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THE PETREAN N in e te e n H u n d r e d a n d

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PUBLISHED B Y THE

SENIOR

CLASS

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ST. PETER’S P R E P A R A T O R Y SC H O O L JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY

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FERDINAND A. ORTHEN, A.M. Registrar Instructor, Third Year EB

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A fte r fifteen years of continuous and efficient service, September 1920 to June 193 5, Mr. Orthen is hailed by many a Prepster, past and present, as "the best teacher I ever had.” Mr. Orthen is the Prep’s ideal teacher. He is a Catholic xvithout compromise and a gentle­ man of true courtesy and consideration. Pro­ fessionally he possesses superior equipment through university study after his college grad­ uation. In classroom practice he sets a high standard of discipline and scholastic achieve­ ment. He works with his boys to help them reach it. The boys like this way, co-operate with the teacher and are protid of their achieve­ ment. The Class of 1935 is happy that Mr. Orthen’s fifteenth milestone of service coincides with their gradtiation and in recognition of his eminent ser­ vice to St. Peter’s they dedicate their Yearbook to him.

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MUSEUM OF PETREAN MEMORIES ! SCENES,

THE

CHERISHED

INSTITUTIONS

PETER’S .W E CANNOT TAKE WITH US. TENT

OURSELVES

WITH

THE TENDER OF

ST.

WE MUST CON­

MEMORIES— RECOLLECTIONS

TREASURED SO HIGHLY AS TO MERIT A SANCTUM ALL THEIR OWN. STROLLING THROUGH THE CORRIDORS YOU WILL BE AWED W ITH THE PORTRAITS OF SAGE MASTERS OF LEARNING, OF CLASSMATES TRUE AND LOYAL, OF CHERISHED FRIENDS; YO U WILL FIND THE W ALL HUNG W ITH PANORAM AS OF FELLOW SODALISTS, COLLEAGUES IN DEBATE, TEAMMATES IN SPORT.

WE W A N T YOU TO

ENJOY THIS REPOSITORY OF OUR SCHOLASTIC ENDEAV­ ORS. WE, TOO, IN FUTURE DAYS SHALL ENTER ITS POR­ TALS, AND WE SHALL SEE THERE MORE THAN YOU.

WE

SHALL RELIVE THE HAPPY HOURS, THE TENDER SCENES OF PREP D AYS; WE SHALL REVIVE WITHIN OUR VEINS THE LOYALTY, THE HONOR, THE CAMARADERIE THAT WENT INTO THE MAKING OF OUR D AYS A T ST. PETER’S.

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ORDER OF BOOK Faculty G raduates C lasses Activities Athletics Advertisements

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REVEREND JOSEPH S. DINNEEN, S.J. P resid en t


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REVEREND JOHN F. DWYER, S.J. P rin cip a l


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REV. ALFRED M. RUDTKE, S.J. Prefect of Discipline

REV. ALFRED B. OATES, S.J. Student Counsellor


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REV. M ARTIN A. SCHMITT, S.J. I n s t r u c t o r , F ou rth Y ear

REV. RAYMOND I. PURCELL, S.J.

JOSEPH R. O’M ARA, S.J.

I n s t r u c t o r , F irst Y ear

I n s t r u c t o r , F ou rth Y ear

DANIEL J. CAREY, S.J.

ANTHONY J. QUEVEDO, S.J.

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LAWRENCE R. McHUGH, S.J. I n s tr u c to r , S eco n d Y ear


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JAMES J. BALL, S.J. I n s t r u c t o r , S eco n d Y ear

THOMAS J. DOYLE, S.J. I n s t r u c t o r , F irst Y ear

ALVIN S. MAHLMEISTER, S.v I n s tr u c to r , F irst Y ear

BERNARD V. BOYLE, S.J.

THOMAS J. EGAN

THOMAS J. MYERS, A.B., LL.B.

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GERARD W . GUTERL, A.B., LL.B. I n s tr u c to r , f o u r t h Y ear

CLEMENT C. O’SULLIVAN, A.B., LL.B.

GEORGE C. MARTINO, B.S.

JOHN J. MULLEN, A.B.

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I n s tr u c to r , P h ysics

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JOHN F. V J ^ I V A .X J

VINCENT P. McINERNEY, A.B.

ALFRED J. KELTY, A.M.

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JOSEPH W . SINNOTT, A.B., LL.B. I n s t r u c t o r , F irst Y ear

EDWARD J. CULLEN, A.B.

ARTH U R G. MADDEN, A.B.

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JOHN J. McGILL, B.S. B io lo g y

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WILLIAM F. McVANN, A.B.

MARTIN A. ROONEY, A.B.

JOHN J. LESTER, A.B., LL.B.

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CLASS HISTORY February Graduates four years shrink to four seconds. Each sec­ INondRETROSPECTION, represents one year— a year, spent at "Externat de Sainte Pierre, dirige, par les Peres Jesuites.” Each second likewise represents the in­ terval required to review a mental picture of that year. First Second:— A group of fo rty beknickered Freshmen gathered in the yard— over to hall— stern looking, those Jesuits— assigned to class— school must be ancient, judging from all the initials on the desks— first football season— I’m going out for the team when I get a little heavier— see that broad boy over there— has his letter (P ), must be great— know all the Petrean’s argot now— sent to "jug” today, first time— preparing for exams— cramming, cramming— how many did you flunk— school outing— vacation. Second Second:— Hello, boys— you look great— where’s Dick— flunked— that’s tough— quite a few departed, only thirty-tw o now— pretty square shooter, this new teacher— how do you like the new pre­ fect— Latin’s difficult, wish Caesar would have stayed in Rome instead EB

F ou rteen

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of wandering around Gaul— played basketball w ith the class team— we’re Junior Division Champs— lost to Dickinson, didn’t enjoy Thanksgiving Dinner— tricky exams, I have m y dollar ready for the Latin Lit. condition— school play last night— Mac looked just like a girl— getting warm, Spring fever— baseball season— May devotions— Province Exam in Math.— almost failed— class picnic today— Prep outing tomorrow. Third Second:— Back again— third year but only tw enty-five re­ main— survival of the fittest— thought Caesar was bad, Cicero is worse— and that Physics— you take a zero— some football team— beat Mt. Vernon Saturday— State Prep School Champs— Bill and John made the A ll-State teams— late today, Saturday Jug— what a life— second testimonial this month— Dad gave me five dollars extra— class meeting today— are all your experiments accepted— tonight is the prize debate— Jim was fine, he’s a good speaker— best in the school— exam time again— French was easy— no conditions— ushered at gradua­ tion— vacation. Fourth Second:— naturally everybody wears long pants by now— only seventeen in our class— where did you spend the summer— new teacher— Latin poetry— scan line 99, please— fifth foot is always a dactyl— five boys out for the football team— four on the basketball squad— team’s pretty good, this year— plenty of fight— aren’t the Freshmen aw fully small— just kids— going down to Hades with V er­ gil next week— where are you going to college in the Fall— Colgate’s down the street— wait till I get out of the Prep— exams coming, last time— if I get by that Chemistry— burning the midnight every night — exams are over— no conditions— everybody’s happy— graduation— an alumnus— Finis. Thus, in a dialect exclusively Petrean, four years at St. Peter’s have been reviewed. The individual whose thoughts are expressed does not exist in the corporal form ; that is to say he is not a definite young alumnus— he is any member of the graduating class, or rather he is every member of the class moulded into a mythical entity. In addi­ tion to experiencing the joys and sorrows consequent on four years of study on Grand Street, each student has engaged in a vigorous cam­ paign of extra-curricular activities. Among our classmates are em­ bryonic football, basketball and baseball stars, amateur Thespians, sil­ ver-tongued orators, humorists, golden-voiced tenors, and budding journalists. Each has his chosen path of endeavor. Some in attaining their coveted diploma, draw the curtain on their scholastic education. In the future, their education and enlightenment will be fostered and nurtured by personal experience, the master teacher. Others are to continue their formal studies at various colleges and universities; to wit, Alfred, Fordham, Manhattan, New York University, and our own St. Peter’s. W ill their careers be bright? Undoubtedly. Possessed of a broad cultural background and a thorough religious training by virtue of a course of studies under the famous "ratio studiorum” of F ifteen

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the Jesuits, what barrier to success will present itself which cannot be surmounted? Even if an uncertain future holds many a stormy day in abeyance, thinking of St. Peter’s and reliving our Prep days should elicit a smile. For we are satiated with the atmosphere, the environ­ ment, the contacts, the memories that are reserved solely for loyal Peterites. Such a heritage cannot be marred or scarred by the ravages o f time. In adversity, recall St. Peter’s and you will smile. Now, lest this history end without some indication of the individual members of our class, review with me, if you will, the characteristics and the abilities peculiar to each young graduate. THINGS WE LIKE TO REMEMBER John M iller’s idealistic character. C y Corcoran’s dignified demeanor. Tom Sperber’s hearty laugh. Steve Brown’s unusual essays. Pete Coughlin’s borrowing habit. W illie O ’Keefe’s basketball throw. W illiam Condon’s real Irish brogue. Ray Valenti’s eloquent tongue. Vinney H urley’s bewitching dimples. Johnny Callery’s polite little ways. "Flop” Cummings’ school girl complexion. Neal Callery’s soft dreamy voice. Bob Reilly’s Terpsichorean abilities. John Hoffman’s capable management. John Peter’s humorous prophecies. Dan Mundi’s reveries (dreams) in history. Fred Lenk’s love of fun.

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CLASS HISTORY 4 A T IS most fitting that upon this, our tablet of high school memories, a few lines be devoted to a brief reminiscence of our many happy days at St. Peter’s. For having now attained the summit of that tow ­ ering mount, up whose steep rugged slope we have, for four years, made our toilsome ascent, we can rest from our fatigues and survey with pleasure the lands we have traversed. From this lo fty eminence our eager eyes quickly retrace the tortuous trail o f our high school career, until at last we discern in the dim dis­ tance the very beginning of this highway to knowledge. There, not so long ago, we, as ardent pilgrims, first took step upon the path of learning. W ho can forget the sensations of awe which swept over us? W ho can forget that memorable morning in late September when the trumpets of higher education summoned a motley but ambitious horde of "grammar school children” to the Prep? We felt ourselves to be intruders in a domain of profound scholars. Recall the guides assigned to conduct us to the first milestone of our journey. Mr. Sin-

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nott, to whom we attributed all the Latin knowledge of which mere man is capable; Mr. Ecker, S.J., whose unbounded zeal and winning smile led us safely through the mazes of first year Algebra; and Mr. Sturtzer, S.J., whose kindly interest won him a place in all our hearts. W ho does not remember the fearful struggle which gripped our minds in trying to decide which was the greater terror, the mid-year Exam­ inations or the quick little priest with the police whistle? W e feel a happy sensation too as we recall the numerous brawls we had in the school yard with the "Sophs” who tried to confiscate our handballs. W hat is this harrowing, hideous ghoul that stalks before my mental eye? W hat is this wild nightmare of blue books, examination sheets, innumerable questions, headaches, sorrows, chagrins? It all fades like a withering storm that leaves in its wake only the lucky ones who mourn the loss of many a comrade. Then our shattered remnant is transported in war galleys to the harbor o f second year. Some are conveyed to the gulf of Biology; others are carried to the port of Greek. W e had an inherited fear of Greek, a vague, uncertain reverence and dread. Like the ancient warriors of the Anabasis we needed rich enticements to attempt so perilous a siege and like the Greek Agamemnon we received our prize. For did we not have guides who were familiar with every foot of that treacherous trail? Mr. Turbett, S.J., whose jollity combined with his sincerity led us over the pitfalls of Latin and Greek; Mr. Hartnett, S.J., who became enshrined in the hearts of his pupils; and Mr. Lester, the source o f all Algebraic wisdom, whose presence radiated knowledge on our struggling class and gave us a stout staff to assist us on our jour­ ney. Yes indeed, second year was our happiest. For who can forget: "I regard this as a personal defiance,” "Now, you men,” "Some joke, eh boss,” "Get out” or "To the board, Joe.” But scholastic activities were not the only activities in which the members of our class were engaged. There are innumerable scenes of extra-curricular glory along the wayside; debating halls, football and baseball fields, basketball courts, the stage, and the chapel o f the sodality. Among these scenes did our men distinguish themselves. But when the dust of travel had risen, we were at our half way mark and transferred our baggage to the garrisons o f the Senior building. Into third year, with our ranks somewhat diminished, we passed, after firm resolutions were made to excell in all branches of our studies, But here the trail proved most difficult. For we were enticed time and again into the thickets of frivolity that line the highway and only found our way out after much aimless wandering. To our noble guides we wish to express our heartfelt gratitude for their advice and guidance during this third stage of our journey; for without their help we could never have mounted to the top. To atone for our in­ itial weakness, we covered ourselves with glory in the Province Exams, as the third milestone was reached. Our Junior year too was crowded with vivid, almost lifelike recollections. Who does not beam at recallE ighth

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mg our athletic prowess in capturing the coveted diadem o f school basketball champions? W ho can ever forget Mr. Cantillon’s, S.J., laud­ able poetry, "Don Juan,” "Old Noan,” "A Certain Evening” ? In third year, too, Mr. Madden was first introduced to us. He came to us in mid-year and in a short space of time he was endeared to the heart of every Prepster. Then in last September, we arose from our summer’s rest to press forward upon this, the last stage of our ascent. Could we have had better directors than Father Schmitt, who acquainted us with the heroes o f Homer, led us to the camp of Xenophon and introduced us to wandering Aeneas; than Mr. Mullen who simplified for us the in­ tricacies of Trigonometry; than Mr. Guterl who unfolded the literary glories of the English masters, or Mr. O ’Sullivan whose pleasant humor made the French seem easier than it really was? Alas, this part of our journey has been covered all too quickly. The second term has been reached; we have raced furiously along, seeing our goal just ahead. Faster and faster we surge upward, passing countless unforgettable scenes— basketball games, classroom scenes, the Petrean office, Exams, Undergraduate Night, Retreat, Commencement— and then the sum­ mit is gained. Now, as we take up our staffs to seek other fields of endeavor, a lump rises in our throats. For the golden rays reflect the cherished buildings of St. Peter’s and it leaves in our hearts a memory unforgettable. W e pause for a moment to give our thanks to those men, Jesuits and laymen, who have led us to the end of the trail. They indeed are the perfect Faculty. As we leave this path of our high school career, they remain a living embodiment of the Catholic Train­ ing which is St. Peter’s.

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CLASS HISTORY 4 B VERY year, as a sort of warning to those who are to follow us, it E is necessary that we of the Senior Class compile our experiences of four years into a class history. A sort of "Cavalcade” of St. Peter’s, to tell of the disappointments, triumphs, achievements and failures, through which we have gone so that those who succeed us may be able to anticipate what is to come and know what to avoid. And thus it is that we have used up much time, energy, and several pages of an otherwise excellent book to tell you, dear reader, just what happened to us in four years at St. Peter’s. A ct I, Scene 1— The place, the courtyard— Time, 9:30 on a W ed­ nesday morning in September 1931— Characters, a crowd of supercili­ ous Seniors, jeering Juniors, silly Sophomores and our heroes, the gentle­ men o f 4B, then only lowly Freshmen. Little did we know, as we stared around in unaffected awe at the upperclassmen near us, of the perils and pitfalls which we would en­ counter before we reached their position. As we look back it seems T w en ty

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comical to us how frightened we were at the thought o f entering this huge school among so many strange and perhaps unfriendly faces. But it was too late to turn back now, the damage was done. W e were led, feeling as a lamb must feel when led to the slaughter, up to a classroom. Here it was that we were to receive our baptism o f fire. And it was here that we added a new word to our vocabu­ lary. A word which did more to change our customs and plans during the next four years than any other we had ever met— "Jug.” A ct II, Scene 1— This act will be divided into two scenes because the great Union had not yet come about. Place— 2C Classroom, Room 26, Science Building. W hen we came back in September we felt like veterans return­ ing to the scene of our triumphs. A t first we felt somewhat lost as we saw many of our classmates led away to try to argue with the Greek authors. But any sorrow we felt at their loss was soon dispelled by our interest in the workings of Biology. Scene II— Class 2D, Room 27, Science Building. Sophomores— at last! W e could hardly wait to tear into our studies and activities. Just think, only three more years and we would gradu­ ate! The year flashed by like a kaleidoscope— September, Christmas, Mid-term Exams, Easter, Province Exams, and Bingo,— we were Juniors. A ct III, Scene— Class 3C, Classroom 36, Science Building. As the curtain rises on the act we see an event which was destined to have a terrific effect upon future history— the union of Classes 2C and 2D into one class of 3C. If there is one crime of which 3C cannot be accused it is failure to participate in activities. Men from 3C composed nearly 50% of every school activity, doing everything from football to dramatics. W e won the Indoor Baseball League Championship and kept busy annexing the other prizes which were offered as rewards for accomplishment. While we did not shine in studies as a whole, nevertheless we had several members who made a hobby of collecting testimonials. A ct IV, Scene— W ay up under the roof of the Science Building. A t last— Seniors! The "Summum Bonum” of scholastic achieve­ ment, the pinnacle toward which we had climbed, with slips here and there, for the last three years,— the last word in Students. How we looked down on the lowly ones below us! When we marched into that classroom behind Mr. O’Mara, S.J., we felt like Caesar’s legions coming home from Gaul. "It’s all over now,” we thought, "All we have to do is hang around and get our diplomas.” But then, the grand awaken­ ing!

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W ithin a week we were hanging on the ropes, groggy and battered by the onslaught of Trig., Chem., Latin, Modern Languages and English. It didn’t take long for us to learn that fourth year was no rest course but a grim and determined effort to keep up in the schools. As soon as the initial shock was over though, we rallied and began to battle w ith every faculty at our command to overcome this trap into which we had walked. Mid Year Exams came and, probably worn out by the vicissitudes of a hectic Xmas vacation, we gathered a beautiful crop of out-of-courses, conditions, and a few even fell into the Limbo of 4M. Those who were left, after uttering a few fervent prayers of thanks for their deliver­ ance, settled down to the somewhat quieter life of second half of fourth year. Free from the terrors of Trig we began to see visions of diplomas and rings and even ventured to send for college catalogues. A ll we have to do now is pass the Province Exams which will, of course, be easy for geniuses such as we. But now when the final curtain is about to drop and the grand finale draws near all of us begin to dread it. It is almost as though some one were taking our homes from us. There have been times during the four years when we were not so sure that we wouldn’t like to gradu­ ate but now when the time really comes we don’t want to. But all good things must have an end so as the final curtain falls we take our bows and bid farewell to a school that is too universally esteemed to need commendation.

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Francis Edward Allen Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating Basketball 1, 3, 4.

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O U R years ago I had the pleasure of making the acquaintance of the Prep. Today that pleasure is immeasurably mag­ nified. As the endeared memories of the class begin to fade, little will I forget St. Peter’s, a school which has won lasting esteem. In first year, I was safely guided through the intricacies o f Latin. In second year, I gained some knowledge of Greek and more knowledge of Latin. In third year through the most efficient teacher I ever had, Mr. Orthen, I successfully reached my senior year. Now I am on the eve of grad­ uation and it is with a sad heart that I am forced to bid good-bye to so great a school and faculty as St. Peter’s.

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HE first day I entered the Prep some­ thing thrilled me. It was the Grand Street spirit, the spirit that made the noise of the senior recreation room and the clanging of the cafeteria sweet music to my ears, the spirit that made the complicated Latin and Math, a real pleasure instead of an irksome task. The greatest accomplish­ ment that I gained at the Prep was the art of speaking. I will always remember the day I stood up in the debating hall for my first debate. I was nervous and choking but through the patience of the moderator I soon acquired poise and smoothness. Now that I leave I hope that I may always keep this spirit in my heart.


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G ilbert W illiam Ashe K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4.

S THE strains of "Happy Days Are Here Again” echoed from the loud speaker I sat musing over m y departure from the Prep. For me many happy days are gone. I recollected that first day when the call of knowledge beckoned me to the Prep. I recalled how as a Sophomore I looked down imperiously upon the Fresh^men. I pondered over those joyful days when we marched with Xenophon to the "well inhabited town of Ceramonagora” and as full fledged Seniors we absorbed the eloquent words of the incomparable Cicero. They indeed were happy days, days of intimate companionship with friends who shall never be forgotten.

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Theodore Edmund Beach Sodality 1, 3, 4; Sub. Prefect 1; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3; V arsity Basketball 3, 4 ; Class Secretary 3; Class Treasurer 1.

LTHOUGH four years have already passed, it seems but a few months ago that I first entered St. Peter’s as a Freshman. My first year at the Prep was one of lasting encouragement for it proved to me that although the beginning is always hard, the fruits of hard work are without number. In second year the work became more d if­ ficult and testimonials were less frequent. But times at the Prep were far from dull and it certainly will be hard to forget the many happy days I enjoyed during the course. I played an active part in sports, and it was here that I learned to take defeat as well as victory. But now after four difficult but profitable years at the Prep I have finally come to that day so long awaited, "Graduation.”

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John A lbert Bedell K.B.S. 1, 2; Class Basketball 1, 2.

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parts unknown. The first year at sea I had rough weather and treacherous w a­ ters, but I sailed safely through with hardly an accident. During the second year I had better cruising and the sails caught and re­ tained all the wind of knowledge that came along. A t the beginning of Junior year I was becalmed by the work but soon I ran into a fresh breeze and cruised along with all sails set. I hit a squall at the beginning of m y final year but I pulled through all right and came to port safe and sound with a rich cargo aboard.

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John W illiam Behnken Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4.

S I sit in the arm chair, before me march in cavalcade the events of the past four years. First, Freshman, then in rapid succession Sophomore, Junior and Senior, four years spent all too quickly building a foundation for the future. Not alone an education for the betterment of the mind and the upbuilding of the body, but growth in spirit, which is so important, have been the aim of the Prep Teachers, a group of pedagogues, persevering and patient. As I watch the cavalcade I fall in line with my friends of these happy years to march proudly into the future.

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Peter Anthony Beronio Sodality X; K.B.S. 1; Debating 1, 2 ; Class Basketball 2, 3; V arsity Basketball 3, 4 ; Class Secretary 3.

R A D U A T IO N ! M y eyes grow misty as many happy memories of m y four years come flooding back. First year— a bewildered Freshman awed, unconsciously throwing out m y chest when I heard the grand old name "St. Peter’s”— first enjoy­ ment of the thrill of a "School Spirit”. Second year— growing into long pants— splicing the ties of friendship more firmly — a continuance of work and play. Third year— fu lly grown up now— sophistication — good ' times and studies— basketball. Fourth year— a Senior, broader views, an eye to the future— final exams storm me. Reluctantly I must write "Finis” to my four unforgettable years at St. Peter’s.

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"PETE”

Thomas Joseph Boyle Sodality 2 ; K.B.S. Basketball 1.

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UMMING the strains of the Prep school song at the family hearth, I cannot help but think of my four years at St. Peter’s. As I sit there dreaming, the walls of home drift away and I am once more a lowly Freshman, meeting for the first time my classmates who in the ensuing years became close friends. Then came Sophomore year and that arch-enemy of students— Greek. I battled fiercely with the language of Hellas, but at the end of the year we were deadlocked. Then in third year Greek added an ally to its forces in the person of Xenophon. A fte r three fruitful years of mental clashes with my arch­ enemy, I finished with a slight edge over my w orthy opponent. Now as I take leave of the Prep I bid my friends a fond adieu, and hope that in the near future we will meet again.

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Stephen Lawrence Brown K.B.S. 1, 4 ; Debating 4 ; Dramatics 1, 4 ; Class Basket­ ball 3, 4; Cheerleader 3, 4.

S THE time for m y graduation ap­ proaches, I find it hard to believe that the end of my Prep school career is at hand. The four years I spent at St. Peter’s will be remembered among the happiest of my life. Aside from scholastic gains, I consider that the most valuable and pleasant benefits won were the friendships I formed here in daily contact with fine classmates and an inspiring faculty. Such contact must re­ sult in the absorption of high ideals. In parting, I want to wish the best of good fortune to the others of my class in w hat­ ever line of endeavor they pursue.

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■STEVE”

Joseph Andrew Bruder Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Orchestra 3.

HILE I rest upon the same old desk after a struggle in the mazes of sines and tangents that compose trigonometry a few incidents of m y life at St. Peter’s flash by. The scrimmages in the morning and the handball games after school are now forgotten glories of days gone by as are long hours spent in the study of Caesar and the Algebra code. Cicero and Xenophon be­ came easier as time went on but why did Homer never read a grammar or a vocab­ ulary in his life? As our class won much and lost but little, the thought of thrilling basketball games in the yard brings back fond memories. It is with many regrets and with much hope that I now leave St. Peter’s and the many happy hours spent there.

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Cornelius Augustine Callery K.B.S. 2, 3; Debating 3; Library 3; Class Basketball 2, 3; P e t r e a n Staff 3, 4.

" W H iM P Y ”

CAME to the Prep from St. Michael’s of Union C ity in my second year. The sud­ den change of atmosphere, the new type of teaching and the new faces left me be­ wildered. However, within a few weeks I became acquainted with these new sur­ roundings and gradually the noted Prep spirit took the place of the former Michaelean enthusiasm. In m y third and fourth years I went out for various Petrean pur­ suits, and even if my efforts were not too successful at least I can say that I tried. Now at the end of my career at the Prep, I leave it filled with a new lease on life, a vast amount of knowledge and a profound sadness that the time has come to leave the portals which I have learned to love so well.

John Michael Callery Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; V arsity Football 3, 4 ; V arsity Basketball 3, 4.

L1

ITTLE did I think the first days at St. Peter’s would ripen for me not only into years of pleasant companionships but into a deeper appreciation of the finer things in life, both spiritual and cultural. Advancing step by step, I have come to my Senior year. It is with a feeling of sadness that I now realize that m y career at St. Peter’s is about to terminate. When I go forth from the campus of the Prep, I shall carry with me pleasant memories of those four years spent within her walls, and a determination to practice the high prin­ ciples instilled in me by m y worthy teachers.

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Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2; Class Basketball 2, 3, 4 ; Ass’t Manager of Baseball 1, 2.

HE attainment of an objective always brings back memories. In first year it was the task of Mr. Sinnott to imbue me with the spirit of the Romans. Second year found Mr. Turbett, S.J., trying to show me the intricacies of Latin and Greek. In third year, thanks to Mr. Orthen’s tireless efforts in Latin, I did not stay by the wayside. Fourth year conferred on me the toga of seniorship. Father Schmitt, S.J., found me still suffering from Grecian dyspepsia. However, as the day approaches when I shall receive my diploma, the recognition of four years of study, I look forward with the confidence of a youth secure with a Jesuit . education.

Louis Sebastian C arque Sodality 2, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 4 ; Debating 1, 2 ; Class Basketball 2, 3, 4 ; Class Vice-President 1.

memorable years, packed with FOUR thrills, excitement and studying. Years that will always remain in the minds of those who have weathered the storm. Memories of the football, basketball and baseball teams fighting their hearts out for the school. Disappointments and good times, hard work and exam fears, a partial eclipse and then a glorious triumph— these are the thoughts that now loom before me, thoughts that make me depart with sadness from the halls that wedded me to noble ideals. May future alumni of St. Peter’s leave behind them the happy memories that a re m in e !

"f r e n c h y ”


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John Donald Clark Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Dramatics 2 ; Class Secretary 2; Debating Secretary 2; P e t r e a n S ta f f 4 .

'DON”

I AM gazing from the window at the driz• zling rain, as I am reliving that eventful September 1, 1931, when I entered St. Peter’s. I recall the thrill and awe which was mine on that great day. Time went sw iftly, during the remaining four years, in a maze of studies and extra-curricular activities. Now I am on the threshold of graduation, and as time draws near to bid "adieu” to St. Peter’s I do so with a feeling of regret at the loss of the companions whose friendship has meant so much to me and whom I will cherish for the remainder of m y life. I feel most grateful for all that has been done for me by the self-sacrificing Jesuit Fathers and scholastics, and the zealous efforts of the lay-teachers.

Thomas Joseph C leary Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3; Dramatics 4 ; Class Basketball 4 ; Tennis 3, 4; Library 1, 2, 3; Class President 4 ; Class Vice-President 3; Class Secretary 1; Class Treasurer 2; P e t r e a n Staff 4.

RAD U ATIO N day brings to a close not only the successful completion ot m y studies but also the intimate connection with m y classmates who have dubbed me "Farmer.” It was but four short years ago that I entered St. Peter’s. Although I did not realize it at that time, I was destined to spend four of the happiest years of my life on Grand Street. In that time I came in contact, by means of the various activi­ ties, with numerous fellows to whom I now say "Good-Bye,” only with a feeling of sad­ ness and reluctance. Although we are all happy because we have finished our task, yet it is going to be hard to lose dear friends and miss the happiness and warmth that ever awaited us at St. Peter’s.

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Sodality 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Secretary 2.

OUR years have passed since I, as a mere callow youngster, entered the portals of St. Peter’s Prep. Years which were filled with boyish pranks, happiness and grim hours of study. Now at last a Senior! W ith what exhilarating emotions of joy do I hail this period, the apex of three years of am­ bition! I find myself in a position that reared itself among the starry dreams of my Freshman days. But when I ponder on remembrances and acquaintances which I am about to leave, perhaps to see no more, a feeling of sadness permeates m y mind. "JAFSIE”

Edward W illiam Connell Sodality 1, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3> 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; V arsity Football 3, 4.

FTER four happy years at St. Peter’s I feel a pang of sorrow because I have to leave her ancient walls. W hile making many friends, I started my career as a Petrean by joining the class baseball and basketball teams, K. B. S. and the Sodality. It seemed as though only a few days had elapsed when one year was over. Second and third years passed in a whirl of foot­ ball and other activities. Then came the time for graduation and before I knew it I had passed the exams and left old ac­ quaintances and memories. In years to come I expect that my appreciation will grow for all at St. Peter’s as I find new situations where her solid principles can be applied.

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HE years that I spent at St. Peter’s will ever remain one of the brightest pages in the book of my life. The knowledge I have gained, the friendships I have formed on Grand Street, and the pleasure I have had in m y study and work under the guid­ ance of m y teachers, will never be forgot­ ten. And now that the time has come to leave these halls and this affectionate 193 5 class, I regret very much to think I may never again come in contact with some of m y fellow students. No matter where we go may success be ours!

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"C Y ”

Peter Joseph Coughlin

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Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4.

O EVERY story there must be a last chapter. The end may be happy or sad, but an end there must be. I cannot say much, for I have a feeling of deep regret in seeing my four happy years at St. Peter’s Prep come to an end. That I have profited much from the teachings of my professors, I have no doubt. They have sown the good seed, and I shall try to reap the harvest with the unfolding of future years. In conclusion I bid a fond farewell to my classmates and wish them all success. Their names will always enkindle a warm glow in my heart.

T hirty-two

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W illiam Blackwood C rotty Sodality 2, 4; K.B.S 1, 2; Debati ng 4; Dramatics 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Cheerleader 2.

Y FOUR years at the Prep seem to come to an end all to soon. The hop­ ing for and looking forward to graduation in June is the one thing that cheered me for three full years but as it approaches my heart beats sadder and sadder. I am en ­ couraged only by the hope of taking with me from these cherished surroundings the sacred memories and traditions I enjoyed with m y classmates. It seems to me to be harder to depart from these walls than to part with a lifelong friend. St. Peter’s I shall never forget you!

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"PANTHER"

Philip Joseph Cum m ings Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Cheerleader 2; V arsity Football 4 ; V arsity Basketball 3, 4.

T SEEMS as if only yesterday I found myself wandering, for the first time, through the corridors and into the class­ rooms of St. Peter’s Prep. Four years have passed— years in which struggles, heartaches and doubts have been mesmerized by the joy of learning, culture and close associa­ tion with student and professor alike. W hat I should say of a Jesuit education, I will leave to those more capable and fluent than I. It is enough to say that, if in the future I am but a fair example of my teachers, I will be forever grateful to that order of in­ comparable men— the Jesuits. Both to the Faculty and to the student body I bid a fond, if somewhat sad, farewell.

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W illiam Patrick Dillon Sodality 4; K.B.S. 4; Class Basketball 4.

C A N say St. Peter’s has done much for me both in a spiritual and scholastic way. When I sit down to reflect, I think of the many struggles which came upon me in certain subjects. I often seemed ready to give up, but was determined to continue on toward my ambition in life. M y only regret now is that I may never see some of m y classmates with whom I had so many good times, as we will all go to different colleges and pick different vocations in life. But in my future life I am sure that at some time or another I will sit down and think of the wonderful times we had together, and of the pranks which were played on each one and enjoyed by all.

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'BILL”

Ludger G e o rg e Ditzel Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K.B.S I, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 2; Sodality Officer 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating Officer 4 ; Dramatics 4.

O W that St. Peter’s is opening wide its portals to send me forth, together with a host of genial companions, I can­ not but pause upon the threshold and re­ flect upon the past four years. W hat an enormous amount of gratitude I owe my professors who have helped me so generously during my all-important period of charac­ ter formation! Therefore, nothing short of poetry can express m y reflections under the training and supervision of the Jesuits, the world’s foremost educators. It was here at St. Peter’s that: Life was real! Life was earnest! And the "jug” was not its goal; "Good thou comest, but better goest” Could be spoken of us all.

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pang of sorrow together with ITa ISsensewithof apride that I recall those joyful moments well spent at the Prep. I can scarcely believe that an end has come to my sojourn at St. Peter’s. It seems only a short time ago that I had been assigned to m y first classes. Friends were quickly made of fel­ low classmates and I began m y career as a loyal Petrean. Suddenly I jumped from the ease o f summer vacation to a whirl and rush of studies; debating, interclass basket­ ball, K. B. S. and sodality. Like a flash, first year was gone, then second, third, fourth in rapid succession, and then— Commence­ ment. "All good things must come to an end,” has again proved a truthful reflection. W illiam Charles Drennan Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4; Debating 1; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; V arsity Basketball 3, 4.

S I look back upon my life at St. Peter’s many clear and vivid pictures flash back to me and carry with them memories of my happiest days. They recall to me my first day at the Prep. I was a small, timid Freshman, who was lost in the new sur­ roundings of high school. I looked with awe at the mighty Seniors. Now that I am in my last year I wonder how four years, filled with such happy times and close friendships, could slip by so quickly. D ur­ ing my stay at St. Peter’s I took an active part in sports and cheered the football team on to an undefeated season. And it is with grateful thanks to St. Peter’s with its traditions, its teachers and friendships, that I say "Goodbye.” A

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(D G e o rg e Joseph Emme K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 3.

URIN G my four years at St. Peter’s I have learned the meaning of study. In the initial stages work was hard because it was new to me. I was grimly determined to succeed and make a name for myself like great Petreans before me. Under the guid­ ance of placid-tempered and patient teach­ ers I have succeeded in gaining a coveted Jesuit diploma. I now feel better equipped to face life’s busy throng. W ith sorrow I bid farewell to m y comrades and teachers and wish them every possible success.

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"SPECS”

James Leo Fallon

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Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4.

HE curtain is coming down on the last act of a four act play. In the first act a class of green Freshmen was introduced to "mensa, mensae.” In act two the charac­ ters progress in wisdom and age and pro­ ceed to accompany Caesar into Gaul. A t the call of act three we stand as Juniors in the Forum and listen to Cicero’s orations. In the last act the class, now ripe Seniors, tussles with Virgil and then, having con­ quered all these formidable enemies to­ gether, the actors part to pursue separate paths thereafter. I, a member of that class, am grieved at the necessity for the sharp curtailment of these friendships but, as a graduate, I look forward to a bright future full of promise.

“JAMES”


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Francis Jerome Farley Sodality 1, 2, 4 ; Debating 1, 2 ; Dramatics 2 ; V arsity Football 3, 4.

OUR years of enjoyable work and play was m y stay at St. Peter’s. In my early years I yearned for the day of gradua­ tion, but now that it is upon me, I am saddened at the thought of departing from my many friends both in faculty and stu­ dent body. I entered some of the many activities of the school and was rewarded in each undertaking with a fair measure of success. The friendships I formed in my Freshman year have been firm ly cemented by the spirit of St. Peter’s, and I feel sure that they will continue in later life. W ith the foundation of all m y future work laid at the Prep, I am confident that I have I, ■ r been well equipped for life.

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"FRAN K”

W illiam Thomas Finnerty Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Treasurer 3.

NERVOUS youth dressed in a neat tuxedo wended his way to his seat. Words of warning began to flow from the lips of the Commencement Day orator. To the youth’s brain, wearied by the hurried preparations of the preceding weeks, these words were but a comforting lullaby. Be­ fore his dozing mind flashed all the happy memories of St. Peter’s. He saw his first awkwardness soon wear off. He became en­ gaged in the various school activities and formed lasting friendships which made life at the Prep one of his happiest periods. But his blissful vision was rudely awakened by the final applause for the speaker. D raw­ ing a long sigh of regret he mounted the stage to receive his diploma and complete his final gesture as a student of St. Peter’s.

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G e o rg e Francis Foley Sodality 1, 2, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4 Dramatics 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Basketball 2, 3; Ass’i Manager of Baseball 2; Track 4 ; Cheerleader 1, 2, 3, 4 Sodality Officer 4 ; Debating Officer 1, 2 ; Class Vice President 1; Class Secretary 2; Class Treasurer 2 Library 1, 2, 3; P e t r e a n Staff 4.

O W sw iftly these four years at St. Peter’s seem to have passed. They were happy years and beneficial years too, through m y close association with my teachers and classes and also m y participa­ tion in and pursuit of the numerous activi­ ties afforded by the school. I have made many close friendships which I am sure will last for many years. I have learned many fine and practical lessons which bear fruit in the moulding of m y character. In closing I wish to voice m y gratitude and apprecia­ tion to the Faculty whose tireless and some­ times apparently futile efforts in my behalf and whose wise counsels have remained in­ delibly imprinted in m y mind.

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'GEORGE”

W illiam Nicholas Ford Sodality 2, 3, Staff

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experiences of m y first day at Saint T HEPeter’s are etched so deeply in my memory that I believe they will never go down the tide of oblivion. During the first day I thought I was without a friend in the world. How wrong I was! In the ensuing months friendships were formed, which I have learned to prize dearly. Instead of regarding a normal class assignment as punishment, I began to recognize the fact that its completion to the best of a person’s ability gives him an indescribable sense of something well done. A ll this is a circum­ locution of the simple statement: "To know Saint Peter’s is to love it.”

“BILL"

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"s h o r t y ”

rES, I graduate in June! Those four years did seem long but now— well it seems as though they were four weeks instead of four years. Though I never achieved honors in studies I can honestly say that I tried m y best to overcome all obstacles. Perhaps I could have profited more from the books. But still there is a brighter side to m y reflections. I see numerous friendships, lasting pleasing friendships, that have been formed. I see myself better fitted to face life’s problems with the noble principles taught me by the good example of all at the Prep.

Thomas Aloysius G e ragh ty Sodality 1, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3; V arsity Football 4 ; Class VicePresident 4 ; Class Secretary 1, 2, 3; P e t r e a n Staff 4.

years! It sounds aw fully long FOUR when you say it, but oh! how quickly it can pass. First year with its jug, its home work, and its worries, slid past before we realized it. Second year with the reali­ zation that there was more to school than studies, came and went equally fast. Third year, a riot of fun, jug, narrow escapes and finally promotion. And now Senior year! Not as terrifying as first year, not as ad­ venturous as second, not as wild as third year, it strikes the happy medium. There ought to be a law against spending four years getting used to a place and just when you do, having to leave it.


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Edward Sylvester G ib n ey Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3; V arsity Basketball 3, 4.

R AD U ATIO N already! Still, I am receiving the congratulations of my friends. W hat! my good luck to be leaving St. Peter’s! On the contrary, I doubt very much if I will meet in any other place in the world, more congenial friends. W ith a heavy heart I bid adieu to my Petrean friends made in classrooms, teachers as well as fellow classmates, friends I have acquired on the basketball courts, and the friends I have met in other school activities. These friendships have helped to round out my Jesuit education. I treasure all of them for they are grounded in true love and loyalty. My only fear now is the pain of separation, for not a few of us will travel widely dif­ ferent paths in life.

G

■•ED”

Cornelius Joseph H a gg e rty Sodality 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Football 4 ; Ass’t Manager of Baseball 1; Class Secretary 3; Class Treasurer 2.

Y FOUR years at St. Peter’s, while M they were at their beginning, seemed long drawn out. But now that the time has come for the parting of the ways I feel a deep regret that they cannot last longer. In first year my greatest joy was in playing with the class basketball team, my greatest burden in trying to gain an inkling of the language of the Latins. New subjects came with the advance of years but, thanks to my wonderful teachers, I have mastered their intricacies. Now I must depart and shall try to set a "blaze of glory” for dear St. Peter’s.

"fe e t ”


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Ed ward Francis Hamill Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 3, 4; Dramatics 4 ; Class Basketball 2, 3, 4 ; Sodality Officer 2; Class Vice-President 2; Class Treasurer 3; P e t r e a n Staff 4.

|Y FOUR years at St. Peter’s are over and will never repeat themselves. But, though the happy years have passed, their remembrance will afford me great joy in years to come. I will recall with pleasure the happy days, the careless hours and the pleasant associations. The recollection of memorable classroom episodes will bring me unbounded delight. And what enjoyment will be more pleasant than to meet in re­ union the close companions of m y school life, ever and always to be my friends!

M

"ED”

Thomas Francis H ayes Sodality 1, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 2, 3; Class Basketball 1, 2 ; V arsity Fcotball 4.

T. PETER’S! Four or five years ago that name awed me. When I began my first year at St. Peter’s I was one of the most timid of the some 150 boys who made up the Freshman Class. The teachers made us feel at home and gradually we began to act like real men. Now instead of awing me, the mention of St. Peter’s grips my heart. As the days roll by, that feeling in my breast grows stronger and my love grows deeper. It is hard to say "Goodbye” when tried and true friends must part from the scenes that brought glowing happiness into my heart.

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"TOM”


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|PON m y arrival at Saint Peter’s Prep in February 1931, I only knew a few of my classmates, but I soon made friends with a good many fellows in the school. And in a few weeks I began to take part in sports and other school activities. Time passed very quickly but during that time many things occurred which I always will remember. I soon found myself in the last half of fourth year before I realized what was happening. And now that my stay at St. Peter’s is coming to a close I always will look back on my high school career and w ill cherish it as a fond recollection.

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■j e r r y ”

John Aloysius How e Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 3, 4; Debating 1; Class Basketball 2, 3, 4; Track 4 ; Class Treasurer 1.

PON entering St. Peter’s I felt like a timid stranger. The process of ac­ climation to the famous Petrean atmosphere was very rapid. Seriousness and jollity blended harmoniously. During the speed­ ing years there has been noticeable intel­ lectual advancement and formation of true friendships which we hope will grow firmer with the passing of years as is the custom of all friendships made at St. Peter’s. Until now we are friends all and strangers none under the Maroon banner. May the suc­ cession of years cement our loyalties and prosper our every move!

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Vincent de Paul Hurley K.B.S. 1; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Secretary 2; Class Treasurer 4.

O W at the end of my course in St. Peter’s I can look back at m y four years of schooling with joy and regret. Joy for the many friends I have made, regret that I must leave the traditional portals I have learned to love so well. The sense of fair play, gained through the medium of the various intramural sports and other school organizations, has inculcated in me the idea of fair dealing with fellow-men. The Jesuit principles, instilled in me during my four years at the Prep, I hope will ac­ company me throughout m y life.

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"HICK”

Robert Clark Irwin K.B.S. 1, a, 3, 4.

ELL, it’s over; four short years have passed and I’m leaving St. Peter’s. In first year when asked whether I intended going to College, I replied: "W hy worry, that’s a long time off.” Even in Junior year the same feeling possessed me. But now, it is tru ly the "finis.” Joy should reign in all our hearts because of the suc­ cessful completion of four years of hard work. However, we are hesitant and fear­ ful. The reason is clear. Graduation has come and that means the parting of the ways and the severing from generous com­ panions who have been unselfish and loyal at every turn.

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'RAYMOND V .”

HE seeming sternness of my Freshman Year teachers left me in a stupor of awe mingled with admiration; but I survived and entered Sophomore year. Then I began to talk of football with a knowing air. A c ­ cordingly I assumed the role of a "Jittery Junior” and a slight swagger crept into my walk. Finally the dream of m y youth was a reality, for I was a "Sophisticated Senior.” Now, as the Petrean portals close behind me and leave me standing on the banks of the "River of Life,” which flows far into the future, I see inside the rapidly closing por­ tals four memorable years studded with friendships that will stand the test of time.

Edmund Francis Kane Debating 1; Sodality 1, 2.

T SEEMS but a short time ago that I entered the Prep. Yet it is four years. Though the time has passed quickly, the pleasant memories of those years will al­ ways remain— new friends, exciting grid­ iron clashes, thrilling court games. So too will the moments spent in the classrooms striving to remember a difficult geometric theorem or to translate the classics of Virgil and Homer. True, we sometimes were sen­ tenced to a term in jug, but we ourselves knew the sentences were just and for our own good. Now, at the completion of my stay at the Prep, I want to express my appreciation to m y teachers to whom I attribute whatever success I may have at­ tained in my studies here. It is to them and my parents credit must go.

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m James Edward Killeen Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2; Class Basketball 1, 4 ; V arsity Baseball 4.

r O U R years ago I entered St. Peter’s Prep. * Today after these happy years I am grateful to the Prep for the character it has tried to make me. I shall never forget the many wonderful friends I have met during my course at St. Peter’s and the glorious moments spent with them. I must not neglect praise for the Faculty of St. Peter’s, for they were eager at all times to instruct the students and help them in their difficulties. In my heart are deep thoughts of gratitude and sundry gushes of affection for all on Grand Street.

Joseph W a lte r Kirsch Sodality 2, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2.

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S I sit and reminisce over the last four years, I can think of no part of my life which has been better spent than that at good old St. Peter’s Prep. When I needed spiritual guidance the Jesuit Fathers were always ready to help me. Where I stumbled or I found a difficulty in my studies, the teachers were always extremely generous in offering their knowledge to lessen m y burden. I hope that in the march of future events I may do as well and even better than I have done at St. Peter’s Prep. My parting word is that life may hold many sweet surprises for my fellow graduates.

"JOE”


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IS our pride and our glory.” These few words can fu lly express my feel­ ings towards St. Peter’s. The past four years, as I look back over them, were clouded in spots. A h! but there were the silver linings which always outshone the dark spots. There were the happy days which, like the joyous sunshine, always broke through the black clouds to scatter bright rays of sunshine and joy. Four years of pleasure, knowledge and new friends. Now to part, that is going to be the hardest of all. To leave these storied walls will be like tearing a heart from a living body.

"ja c k ”

Theodore W a lte r Kramer Sodality 4 ; K.B.S. 2; Debating 3 , 4 ; Dramatics Class Basketball 2, 3 , 4 ; Class Vice-President 3.

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AVE I gained anything from the years in Prep? I think I did, in fact, dis­ regarding the learning and culture one would naturally obtain from such a school, I am sure that I have made friendships that will endure a lifetime. I honestly believe that these friendships are the greatest gifts the school has given. I believe that these friends have changed years that would have been spent in drab study into the pleasantest years I have ever experienced. My days at the Prep have been one long link of happy memories. “TED”

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Y CAREER at St. Peter’s Preparatory School is ended. While at times they appeared to be hard years, upon reflection they were very pleasant indeed. During this period many difficult problems were encountered, but they were overcome though the splendid guidance of the Faculty, from whom I gained invaluable training. I treasure the many sincere friendships of m y fellow students and hope these shall continue for years to come. I wish to express my most sincere apprecia­ tion to all the professors for their untiring interest on m y behalf. Now I can only ex­ press appreciation, but in the years to come I hope to be able to show just what their efforts have meant to me.

M

■'MICKEY”

W a lte r John Little Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. X, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4.

FTER having travelled 26,000 miles on the railroad for m y education, and listened to the clicks of the wheels on the rail joints, each click has become a day, happily spent within the portals of St. Peter’s Prep. There were the dreaded ex­ amination days, the days with slowly pass­ ing periods, the days of triumph with their testimonials. The days melt into years, the first, in 1-E, where I made friends never to be forgotten. The 2-A , 3-A , 4-A , all passed far too quickly. Indeed it seems a shame that the time with such human teachers, such fine fellows as m y co-students were, should flash by, and melt into the past, as a waystation melts behind the fast-stepping Limited.

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T W A S with a feeling of high hope and expectancy that I entered St. Peter’s. To be sure I was not disappointed. A ll my fondest dreams of what a school should be, came true. The heartiness of the students and the kindly interest of the faculty were remarkable. There was scarcely a dull moment in any class room as in any athletic contest. Everyone had a fine sense of humor and a good jest as a diverting incident was always appreciated. To sum up, everyone worked hard but had a fine time doing so— serious yet not grim, humorous yet not frivolous. 'M AC”

Henry Bernard McFarland

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Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 3, 4 ; Class Secretary 3, 4.

HE one lasting impression that a student carries to the end of his Senior year is his emotion when first entering the class­ room. Behind the teacher who has his face wreathed in smiles, the more highly imagin­ ative of the stupefied Freshmen fancy that they see the ghosts of Cicero, Homer and Virgil, mute evidence of their ordeal by fire. This is but an hallucination which has been almost blotted out by the true concep­ tion of the genuine interest displayed in our welfare by our teachers. Now that my four years are over I only hope that my ef­ forts to bring honor to St. Peter’s will be as constant and painstaking as have been those of the Petrean Faculty.

"PACKY”


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Staff 4 ; Class President 2, 3, 4.

S WE reminisce on the old Prep days, we become surprisingly aware o f the great speed with which these years have slipped by. But when we ponder more deeply, the predominance in our thoughts of fleetfooted time gives way to a realiza­ tion of w orthy accomplishments. The fruits that we have garnered from the store of the Jesuits are immeasurable. For over three hundred years these great educators have taken countless boys under their care and sent them away educated Christian gentlemen. And each class as it has marched into the world, each year of those many years, has sung the praises of its teachers. So we just add our voices to that ever in­ creasing chorus and thank God that we can do so.

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"JIM”

Leonard Francis Manning Sodality 2, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Cheerleader 2, 3, 4 ; P e t r e a n Editor 4 ; Class Vice-President 1; Class Treasurer 4 ; Debating Officer 4.

REP days gone! A ll that remains is the pleasant and unforgettable memory of four years at the Prep. Memories of that happy phalanx that fought so valiantly with Caesar in Gaul and so often marched two stations, fifteen parasangs with Xen­ ophon. How they marvelled at the fleetfootedness of Achilles and how they wan­ dered in carefree abandon with Aeneas to Carthage! Happy memories of four years at the Prep. The many friends— those true, loyal, likeable friends, shall always be cherished. The spirit of St. Peter’s shall roam the world imbued within my soul to guide and protect her devoted son.

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John Francis Miller Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; Sodality Officer 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 1; Class Vice-President 4 ; Class Sec­ retary 1, 3; Class Treasurer 2.

T H E first year in the Prep I found myself ■ in a haze. In second and in third year the mist began to clear. Resolute and de­ termined, I studied sincerely, and eagerly took part in all the Interclass league sports. During the four years I became filled with the true Prep spirit and made an earnest ef­ fort in all my undertakings. Now as the curtain falls on m y Prep school days, I reluctantly depart. But I take with me fond memories of many happy days at St. Peter’s. “JOHNNY”

G e o rg e John M o n gon Sodality 2, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2 ; Class Basketball 2, 3, 4.

Y FIRST day at St. Peter’s— my ex­ citement, the coolness of the upper classmen— m y first day in jug— the weekly compositions, hated and often done at the last minute— the studying for the province exams— the first time I received a testi­ monial, the others you receive never have the same effect— the time we were given the choice between writing a poem or a composition over the weekend— I chose the poem and flunked miserably— I was con­ vinced that I could never be a poet— the curious feeling I experienced when my name was not in the mid-year promotions but was left out by mistake— m y first day as a Senior— and the never to be forgotten memory— graduation night.

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SENIOR about to graduate! W h y it hardly seems possible that four years could go so fast! It appears only a few weeks ago that I was a "timid little Fresh­ man looking up to the Seniors as super men.” I can recall the difficulty I had in getting accustomed to the new high school subjects which were all foreign m at­ ter to me. M y entrance to second year, when I selected the subject of Greek for the further development of m y "surplus” brain matter, signaled an irksome struggle with difficulties. Now when it is all over I see that m y many obstacles were but grow­ ing pains to wisdom.

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John Francis Mottley Sodality 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; V arsity Basketball 3, 4.

S I look back on m y four years at the Prep I can say that they were the happiest years of m y life. In first year I was just a Freshie or a tenderfoot. As a Sophomore I followed the brilliant career of Caesar and managed to play some class bas­ ketball. Next I met the very eloquent Cicero and the clever Xenophon and as a diversion played basketball for "Alma Mater.” Now the goal for which I have been striving looms before me. A ll good things must come to an end, so my life at St. Peter’s must have its exit. As I bid goodbye to St. Peter’s there looms a feeling of sadness. I promise that in later life, I will live up to the traditions of St. Peter’s.

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Daniel Joseph Munde Sodality 1, 2 ; K.B.S. 1; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; V arsity Baseball 3, 4 ; Class President 3, 4 ; Class Treas­ urer 1.

"DAN”

EMBARKED on the good ship "Ambi­ tion” which was anchored at St. Peter’s. W e sailed through the rough waters of Latin and Algebra, which later became calm by the thorough drilling of our in­ structors. Time flew by and soon I was entering into the fourth year of my course. During m y four years at St. Peter’s I saw the great Petreans march to victory. A t times they were defeated but even in de­ feat they were admired for their sportsman­ ship. So as the time draws near for my de­ parture I cannot find words to express my deep appreciation for the benefits bestowed on me at St. Peter’s.

W a lte r Francis Murawski Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Sodality Officer 2; Debating 1.

W ONDER at the swiftness with which my four years have faded away. Only yesterday, it seems, I found myself among a group of Freshmen entered upon a new era in life. Together with my classmates I was soon busy constructing a foundation for Latin, Greek, Algebra and other subjects. As time drifted on I had the opportunity of seeing Caesar carry on his campaigns and Cyrus make the famed expedition against his brother. Still living in those ancient times I joined Aeneas in his conflicts for the founding of Rome. During my stay at the Prep I took no active part in sports but joined the majority in rooting the Prep eleven to most successful seasons. Now I can hardly believe that it’s my turn to bid Saint Peter’s Prep a heartfelt farewell.

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K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2; Class 2, 3; V arsity Football 4 ; Manager of Ass’t Manager of Basketball 2 ; Class 1; V arsity Basketball 4.

A IN T PETER’S we are here! This was the cry of several other students be­ sides myself in the fall of ’31. Our recep­ tion was w arm ; so warm, in fact, that our cheeks were often crimson from initiations. Just passing the green stage, I came plung­ ing into the path of Greek and wondering w hy Caesar ever lived. Sooner than I realized I was sitting in 3B. I now had to acquaint myself with Pierre Delsart and his happy adventure, with Xenophon and his great Anabasis, and with Cicero and his "gift of gab.” And now the mysteries of Virgil and Homer are gone, but as long as I live I shall never forget the many friends I have made at St. Peter’s.

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'L A R R Y ”

James Francis Murray Sodality 1, 2; Sodality Officer 2 ; K.B.S. 1; Debating 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating President 2, 4 ; Secretary 3; VicePresident 1; Dramatics 4 ; P e t r e a n Staff 4 ; Class President 3; Class Vice-President 4 ; Class Secretary 1.

ITH deep regret, I realize that my four fleeting years at St. Peter’s have passed. But nothing can efface from my memory the tender recollections that hover among m y thoughts of the Prep. In de­ parting from St. Peter’s we realize that our efforts spent within her halls cannot but reap a harvest of success. W e are firm ly convinced that the paternal counsellings of the Fathers and lay teachers who have labored so earnestly in our behalf, the wis­ dom of whose counsels we cannot perhaps fully appreciate at the present moment, will be the guiding light of our lives and will lead us safely to the haven of our desires. St. Peter’s lives on!

W

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RATER, A ve atque Vale” ! I wonder if Catullus’ thoughts resembled mine as he penned these words! Four years ago I shouted an enthusiastic "Ave.” But now— now, I hear the spirited applause which is the token of another Prep forensic victory. I hear the roar of a loyal student body which marks another Prep gridiron triumph. The dribbling of a ball and the pounding of many feet, the emotional speech of a wouldbe Barrymore, the rambling logic of a fiery debater— these sounds drift to m y ears as if through a magic sound box. I put down my pen— I sigh and make a silent wish. But with the sad knowledge that this desire cannot be fulfilled, I sigh again and whisper a sorrowful "Vale.”

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"EM”

Joseph Thomas Nugent Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1; Class Basketball 1, 2, 4 ; Ass’t Manager of Baseball 1; Class Secretary 2 ; Class Treasurer 1; Cheerleader 1.

S I sit down and think about my four years stay at St. Peter’s, it seems only a few months ago that I stood in the School yard and marched to the hall to be assigned to Class 1-A with the Rev. Fr. McQuade, S.J., as my Latin teacher. Then came sec­ ond year with something that looked like Hebrew to me, Greek. In third year I met two more new subjects, French and Geometry. Then fourth year came and after getting through the Iliad and the Aeneid, graduation arrived. Now it is over, but friendships have been formed and St. Peter’s has reached a deeper place in my affections.

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W illiam Francis O 'K e e fe Sodality 1, 2 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; V arsity Basketball 3, 4 ; Captain 4 ; Class Vice-Presi­ dent 1; Class Secretary 4 ; Class Treasurer 2.

Y FOUR years spent at Saint Peter’s Prep School will go down in the his­ to ry o f m y life, as a short, happy and suc­ cessful period. These years have been a mixture of work and play, enjoying the companionship of classmates and instruc­ tors while developing mind and body with a view to taking m y place as a good citizen. May I profit by the wonderful example of the Jesuit instructors their life of endless patience and work and untiring efforts to assist me! I trust I may live to be a credit to m y school and thus repay them.

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•PEP”

Thomas Joseph O rm sby Sodality 4 ; K.B.S. X, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball I, 2 ; V arsity Football 2, 3, 4 ; Class Treasurer 1.

HE completion of m y high school career brings back to me sacred memories. I started off in timid awe of my shrewd upper classmen who seemed to know all the answers. Second year, with the able as­ sistance of Mr. Turbett, S.J., was easily overcome. In Junior year I found the waters troublesome but with the oil of honest effort the stormy seas were calmed. Fourth year— well! A fte r three years of diligent study I entered the final lap and conquered the remaining obstacles. Look­ ing forward I wonder what the future holds. In retrospect I feel most contented for I have tried my best and feel I have profited from the training afforded me at the Prep.

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"BIG TOM”


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§ Virginio Joseph Perrotta Sodality 1, 2, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 4 ; Debating 1; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4; Varsity Basketball 3, 4.

A S I turn the pages of my memorandum * ^ vivid pictures of my years at the Prep return to me. During my first year I was very timid and green like most Freshmen and always kept on guard for the bully Sophomore. Yet this timidness soon dis­ appeared and I became acquainted with many students. During my second year Greek was infused into m y maturing brain and I began to feel rather cultured. In my third year I played basketball and made many bosom friends. Now as the pages lessen their thickness I bid adieu to the place where I have spent four happy years.

"VIG”

John Francis Peters Sodality 2, 3, 4 ; V arsity Baseball 4.

ITH eyes that are misty and a throat that is dry, I have come to the time when I must bid a last farewell to m y Alma Mater. Here I have known triumphs and struggles. Golden memories— episodes— brief flashes— make parting difficult. The day of my dreams has at last arrived— "Graduation D ay” which I can face w ith­ out fear. Before I leave I wish to thank the members of the Faculty, one and all, for their untiring efforts on my behalf. Fare­ well to thee, dear Alma Mater, with all your cherished memories! May I prove myself a loyal son!

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"PETE"

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HE drowsy Senior awakens from his reverie with a smile. Recollections of bygone days have been returning through his mind— thoughts of the timid Freshman as first he beheld the Prep buildings; the amazement experienced when introduced by the teachers to the mysteries of Latin and the intricacies of Math. Then come more pleasant thoughts of new acquaint­ ances soon to become trusted friends, and the joys of passing into Sophomore, Junior and finally Senior years. But chiefly is the Senior thankful for lessons taught outside of books— to take defeat manfully, to be courageous and truthful, and never cause his beloved Alma Mater to be ashamed of him.

Robert Emmet Reilly Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; V arsity Football 2, 3; Class Vice-President 4.

S YEARS roll on and memories of the class of ’3 5 are fading, my arrival, career and departure from St. Peter’s will always stand out in my mind as fond recol­ lections. The sportsmanship, friendliness, and helpful hand of my classmates and teachers will always be looked upon as the true attitude of all at St. Peter’s. Upon graduating, I wish all the fellows of my class my sincere hope that they all attain their respective ambitions and always re­ main as true and loyal as they have been in St. Peter’s.

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Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2

OUR enjoyable years! A ll the con­ scientious work and glorious times now become one great pleasant dream. From Freshman to Senior is the story of a mental maturing that cannot be gainsaid. Through m y Jesuit teachers I have gained a consider­ able amount of knowledge and an enthusi­ asm to carry me on to success. By my quiet disposition, which is only natural in me, I have gained a host of dependable friends. Since I am to leave all, I am bidding St. Peter’s and its loyal friends a sincere "Au Revoir,” and pray that prosperity may always tread their path in life.

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„TED>>

Dominic Nicholas Scatuorchio Sodality 1, 2, 4 ; Sodality Prefect 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; D r a m a t ic s 1 ; V a r s it y F o o t b a ll 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 ; P e t r e a n S t a f f 4 ; C a p t a in o f F o o tb a ll 4 ; C la s s P r e s id e n t 2 .

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HEN I think of the first day in Prep I wonder how I ever reached fourth year. But an objective attained always brings back fond memories. The first bat­ tered vocabulary, knowing all the varsity men, the old library in the Junior Building and how I tried to master Latin, all crop up. As I advanced in classes I also advanced in wisdom. As a Senior nothing surprises me. M y fondest memories are of third year. Here there were many troubles— Cicero, French and Geometry have stamped a vivid picture in my mind. Yet, these were happy days for they not only taught me the value and necessity of hard work but ushered in the beginnings of many real friendships.

"SCA T”

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T IS w ith mixed feelings of joy and sad­ ness that I look at m y picture on this page. Joy, because it is the realization of a four-year ambition— sadness, because I must now leave these hallowed portals. W ell do I remember m y first days at the "Prep.” I laugh as I recall m y fears of the new teachers, men who worked to set me right on m y course as a Petrean. Then came Sophomore year with Greek adding a new w orry but also a new field for conquest. In third year I chafed at the bit till I be­ came a Senior. Now that goal is reached and I am sorry I cannot begin all over again. I thank God for m y teachers— without whose efforts I could never have reached this peak of success.

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John Joseph Sharkey Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1, 2, 3; Staff 4 ; Ass’t Manager o f Basketball 3 ; Man­ ager o f Basketball 4 ; Debating Officer 2.

Petrean

ERHAPS the thought that my days at the Prep are at an end will not bring tears to m y eyes, but it is touching enough to make me spend a little time in reviewing the past tw en ty-fifth of a century. I wasn’t much for size, back in September ’31, when I got m y first whiff of Colgate’s "perfume” and I felt lost among so many unfamiliar faces. But most of those faces are now my closest friends. It was their friendship that made the daily hours spent with them a pleasure rather than a task. In the class­ room, on the athletic field, and on the rostrum they treated me regally. Now it is with some regret that I bid goodbye to them and the Jesuit traditions which made me what I am. , tifty -n m e

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Francis Russell Sillery K.B.S. 1, 2, 3; Class Basketball 3, 4.

S THESE four years draw to a close, * \ I can tru th fu lly say that they have been "full of gladness, with no shadow of sadness,” as the old song goes. The four years that I have been at the Prep are years which I will never forget. I have made many lasting friends at Grand Street and these have played a big part in my Jesuit training. - Wherever future years may lead me I shall never forget St. Peter’s Prep and her faculty. They have been a blessing and a joy to me. "R U SS”

Donald Francis Smith K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Cheer­ leader 2, 3, 4 ; Library 2.

URING my four years’ sojourn at the Prep, I have established a firm and lasting friendship with many worthy and sportsmanlike companions. As I look back and recall the careless hours, the joyous associations, the fight and spirit exhibited in football, baseball, and basketball games, I cannot help feeling a touch of remorse when the fact comes home to me that all these pleasant associations must come to an end. However, there is always one thing that no one can ever take away from me and that is "memories.” I feel that I shall never meet again in any future cycle of my life, such happy surroundings and good companions.

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Thomas Joseph Sperber Sodality 4 ; Class Basketball 4 ; Class Secretary 1.

ERE at the threshold of life, I can look back with pride upon my course of study at St. Peter’s. There is a feeling of substantiality that arises in me, knowing that I have acquired through my schooling at St. Peter’s a strong reliable foundation for whatever field of endeavor I may choose to pursue after graduation. I hesitate in almost ethereal silence because of the lack of words to express adequately my gratitude to the teachers whose knowledge, advice and devotion, have guided my class mates and me to the heights of graduation.

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T O M ':

Alvin John Stiehler Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3.

HILE looking out of the window in my room I noticed the dark reddish clouds that were sw iftly hurrying over the distant horizon. This brought to m y mind the past years that I have spent at the Prep and how they too have quickly passed over the horizon of life. On entering the Prep the work was altogether different from what I was accustomed to do. But as time advanced I gradually began to understand it better. During this time I became ac­ quainted with boys who later became my best friends and who, I hope, will still re­ main so after I leave school.

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Chester Joseph Urynowicz Class Basketball 1, 2; V arsity Football 3, 4 ; Varsity Basketball 3, 4.

U RING my first days at the Prep I seemed to be walking around in a daze. But I soon found that I was having a good time. O f m y four years at the Prep the last two were the hardest but also the happiest. A t this time I turned my atten­ tion to sports and I never regretted it for it was in this line of endeavor that I met my staunchest friends. In parting I only hope m y friends of the future will be as loyal as the friends of the past. To my teachers for their golden instructions and m y class mates for their fine spirit, I am most grateful.

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“CHET”

Raymond Francis Valenti Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2 ; Debating 2, 4; Dramatics 2; Class Basketball 1, 2; Orchestra 1, 2, 3; L ibrary Staff 2, 3; P e t r e a n Staff 4 ; Class President 4; Class Secretary 1.

CAME to Saint Peter’s a tremulous little Freshman in knickers. Now I am pre­ pared to leave, a few years older but many, very many, years wiser. In the twinkling of an eye, my imagination reviews four cherished years. Can’t I recall: the inti­ mate nooks and corners of the Science Hall — the facetious remarks of the charming "wits” of the class— the expressive "nick­ names” of the Faculty— the melodious airs emanating from the Senior room? But be­ sides such smiling remembrances as these, of infinitely greater value is our solid educa­ tional and religious foundation. Such bul­ warks will never desert us nor will even the ravages of time itself erase the imprints of a Jesuit training from our characters and intellects.

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"R A Y ”


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Marion Thaddeus W alichowski

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Sodality 1, 2, 3, 4 ; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Class Basketball 1, 2 .

S I sat down to look over an old P e t r e a n , I glanced at a picture com­ posed of a group of Freshmen among whom I happened to be present. I recalled the first day o f the school year. A t the sound of the bell we all assembled in the yard, and I found myself among the largest group. A ll were filled with as much enthusiasm as I. Then came the Sophomore and Junior years, which I found very interesting in the addition of the new languages, Greek and French. Although I am on my last lap as a Senior, I join with m y colleagues to say "vici” ; I have conquered, because I strove and implored the help of God in order to do so and He did not fail me.

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John Nicholas W o o d s Sodality 2, 3, 4; K.B.S. 1, 2, 3, 4 ; Debating 1; Class Basketball 1, 2, 3; V arsity Basketball 3, 4 ; V arsity Baseball 3, 4 ; Class President 2.

EPTEMBER 1931 — Latin — Debating— Gym— Testimonials— Late slips— Study period— 2D, Biology— 2:30 bell— Cafeteria at noon— "Go to Jug”— Repetitions— Let­ ter Night— Vacation — Basketball — June Exams— Physics and Chem. Lab.— Junior Building— Facuity— Grand Street— Cicero — Senior Room— K. B. S.— "Take a Zero” — Christmas Holidays— Prep 7 Dickinson 7 Algebra— School Outing— Baseball — U n­ dergraduate Night — Elocution Class — School Play— French Meetings in Book Store— "W rite it out”— Sodal'ity—Trigo­ nometry— Commencement— This is a hur­ ried glance of four of the happiest years I have spent on this side of eternity. S

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T H O M A S A L O Y S IU S M U R P H Y Born Jan. 7, 1917. Died Dec. 17, 1934. VERHEAD, a dull grey sky. Low hanging clouds seemed to O weep in sympathy with us on the morning we learned of Tom’s death. Courageous and loyal to a fault, he had in­ sisted, even though torn by a hacking cough, on coming to the play rehearsals. He seemed to forget all symptoms of weariness when there was the least chance to help the school he loved. But finally the doctor, summoned by his worried parents, pronounced it pneumonia. Tom didn’t last this time even until the curtain rose. Deep as our sorrow is, we nevertheless feel a certain joy as we think how quickly and safely Tom passed from our sordid surroundings into a much happier home. Few of us are so privileged! Although we were allowed to enjoy our comrade’s presence for only a short time, we all gained enormously from his cheery disposition. He was unmis­ takably impressed with those ideals, without which no one can call him­ self a true Petrean. His actions of themselves speak so loudly that we need only add one thing— "Tom lived and died a Catholic Gentle­ man and a true Saint Peter’s man.” R eq u ies ca t in P ace.

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APPRECIATION THE CLA SS OF

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DEDICATES THIS PAGE TO OUR DEAR

MOTHERS

FATHERS

WHO, BY THEIR UNTIRING .O V E A N D SA C R IF IC E ,

AYE MADE OUR GRADUATION AND THIS YEAR BOOK POSSIBLE

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ALUMNI NEWS FOR 1955 W A L T LITTLE

President of Erie, Pennsylvania, Susquehanna, New York Central, Lehigh Valley Amalgamated Railways, Inc.

GIL ASHE

Shatters world speed record for automobiles in the new "jackrabbit” Hudson.

TOM BOYLE

Publishes new book, "The Secret of Nonchalance.”

JO H N N Y BEHNKEN

Delivers flawless Latin speech to an audience of distin­ guished scholars and students.

BILL FINNERTY

Buys autograph of Freddy Lindstrom for $5000.

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McFa r l a n d

Wins world acclaim by trouncing Ely Culbertson.

EM NORTON

Plays title role o f .that stupendous production, "Kirschencretzman, Son of Frankenstein and King Kong.”

JIM M URRAY

Filibuster in Senate for new record of three weeks.

PETE BERONIO

His bird manufacturing business a failure — he still can’t make those "chippies.”

DONALD CLARK

Time-table expert for President Little— recognized as fore-most collector of aforesaid articles.

JOHN SHARKEY

News announcer for Station XRQL.

VIG PERROTTA

Crooning revives— feminine hearts throb— Vig is on the air.

JIM FALLON

Becomes a night watchman.

R A Y JO RDAN

Recognized authority on derivation of English words from Greek roots.

JA C K HOWE

General of 999th Brigade— the usher’s inspiration.

JIM McKENNA

A n inspiration to the President on business affairs.

DICK SCOTT

Receives appointment to the Congressional Library.

TOM HAYES

Expert furnace cleaner! ! !

LEN MANNING

President of "Anti-Gum Chewing League.”

BILL DRENNAN

Wins Pulitzer Prize with his book "Study.”

JOHN MOTTLEY

Publishes Bill’s book.

BILL FORD

Hit of radio, stage and screen,— impersonator extra­ ordinary.

DUCASSE

Reported Missing.

Sixty-six

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ACE MOORE

Coach and owner of the N. Y. Football Giants, suc­ ceeds the retiring Tommy Myers as Athletic Director at the Prep.

LUDGER DITZEL

Dramatic coach of Elizabeth circles.

GEORGE FOLEY

Publishes book, "Grace and Poise in Cheerleading.”

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W A LLY WALICHOWSKI Succeeds Teddy Rembisz as Mayor of Bayonne. TEDDY REMBISZ

Resigns as Mayor to accept Latin Professorship at Notre Dame.

JOHN REGAN

Secures the Capitol Theatre (Union City, of course) to produce his minstrel shows.

ED KANE

Scores 21 baskets, 26 assists as Jac Srs. win championship of the Greenville Professional Cage Loop.

LARRY MURCHAN

Designs the new stadium for Jersey City.

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McC a r t h y

Covers .the century in 8 % seconds.

JOE BRUDER

Receives honorary degree from Oxford in recognition of his translation of Homer’s Iliad.

W A LT MURAWSKI

Chief of the Bureau of Missing Persons, searching for Joe Kutyla.

ED HAMILL

Having just revised Bennett’s Latin Grammar, gives his yearly predictions to the press. Here is what the universal seer forecasts:

DON SMITH will make barrels of money as an understudy for Stan Laurel— TED KRAMER will become an expert picker of blossoms from century plants— GERAGHTY will attain fame as a singing waiter— CONNELL will write a book of decorum that will astound the world— CLEARY’S quest for a motion slower than an Erie train will never know success— ORMSBY’S concerts in Carnegie Hall will shame Paderewski— KILLEEN will find his vocation in Armour’s as a pork expert— DILLON will be a great man in the horseshoe-pitching game— DONNELLY’S "Ad­ vice To The Lovelorn” will enlighten mankind— KIRSCH and KOERNER must cer­ tainly appear in one of those advertisements entitled "Before and A fte r”— H AG ­ GERTY will miss his calling if he does not take up professional dancing— In about thirty years CROTTY may obtain a driver’s license, and CARQUE will make us for­ get his middle name— CARMODY will do nothing but sell pretzels— If he perseveres, GAR RAH Y may finally reach second base in one throw— GIBNEY and HASSMILLER will play on the same professional basketball team— EMME and BEDELL will put Vanderbilt and Sir Thomas to shame in the 1970 Cup races— If MUNDE doesn’t get rid of that pipe, he’ll never get any place.

Sixty-seven

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CLASS OF 4M Fourth Row—W alsh, Wolf, McHugh, Mildenberger, Coffey, Susek, Heinz. Third Row—Tomaszewski, Egan, W asacz, Cohalan, O’N eill, Doherty. Second Row—Kane, Gallagher, Rebolini, R e illy, Tonne, Garbarino. Seated—Shanley, Leber, Jam in, Mr. Guterl, V alenti, Hughes, McDermott.

CLASS OF 3A Fifth Row—Gauthier, Howley, Jordan, W alsh, Simko, Behnken. Fourth Row—McCarthy, W est, Marchiony, Monaco, Nevin, Conway, Sito. Third Row—Heindel, Buckley, McNeill, Cody, Dragna, Kennedy. Second Row—Hudak, Stanley, Furman, M elillo, M ullen, Sperry, Burke. Seated—McCarthy, Brennan, Dineen, Mr. Madden, Nolan, Mahoney, O’Neill. Seventy-one

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C L A S S O F 3B — ( L e f t to R ig h t ) f jg F o u r t h R o w —M u r p h y , H o ch , L e h m k u h l, F u r e y , O ’N e ill, C a r r o ll, D o n n e lly . T h ir d R o w —C lo s s e y , M c G ra th , A r b r e e , L o o n e y , B u r k e , L o ffre d o , D o u g h e r ty , L y o n s . S e c o n d R o w —B r a d l e y , M a d ig a n , J o n e s , C r o w le y , D e V o u r s n e y , C o d a. S e a t e d —B a r r e t t , M c L a u g h lin , N u t z e l, M r . B o y le , S . J . , S o d e n , F it z p a t r ic k , M u r r a y .

C L A S S O F 3C— ( L e f t to R ig h t) F o u rth R o w — D r is c o ll, K ir k , C o s te llo , O ’ B r ie n , E n g lis h , R o o n e y , H e ro ld , K e a r n e y . T h ir d R o w — L y o n s , K e n n y , J o n e s , D u g a n , V a d in o , T r o y , M a llo n , S w e e n e y . S e c o n d R o w —S o lg a , B r a n d o n , O ’ H a llo r a n , V a n B e m m e l, K r u s e , G o ld en , K r a m e r. S e a t e d —G ren o n , B r o g a n , M a n o r e k , M r . O rth e n , M c B r id e , M i l l e r , C la n c y .


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CLASS OF 3D—(Left to Right) Fourth Row—Sweeney, E. McCarthy, Hancik, Brine, T. McCarthy^ Heitzman, Broadbent, Collins. Third Row—Kreager, W ojtanowski, Smith, Zimmerman, Strohoefer, Turley, Flaherty. Second Row—Di Bianco, Rojeski, M arnell, Murphy, Connolly, Woods. Seated—Hinchen, Metzinger, Ertle, Mr. Carey, S.J., Bosworth, Enright, M igliore.

CLASS OF 3M—(Left to Right) Top Row—Woods, Leahy, Murphy, Brauer, Coughlin. Second Row—Degelmann, O’N eill, Cassidy, Torresson, Corley, W alter Guterl. Seated—Edwards, Glaser, Mr. Duffy, W illiam Guterl, Rinn.


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CLASS OF 2M—(Left to Right) Fourth Row—Casalino, J. OBrien, Facciolo, McEvoy, Coleman, G. O’Brien, McFadden. Third Row—Crowley, B ielicki, P. Pidgeon, Brennan, Conroy, Dougan. Second Row—M arks, Wuensch, M iller, Herrmann, Sexton, J . Pidgeon. Seated—McCartin, McCarthy, Mr. Rooney, O’N eill, Baker.

CLASS OF 2A—(Left to Right) Fourth Row—Schulz, Nugent, Garlinger, K elly, Lohr, McFarland, Traynor. Third Row—Satz, Burke, Schneider, F laherty, Cox, Davis, Browne. Second Row—Phillips, Brunquell, Ruane, John Quinlan, James Quinlan, McCarthy, Wilson. Seated—Foley, Leahy, Stahlin, Mr. McHugh, S .J., Morris, McGrail, Orr. S e v e n ty -fiv e

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CLASS OF 2B—(Left to Right) Fourth Row—Coughlin, Pocus, Carr, Connolly, M artin. Third Row—B rin ski, Hayden, Gillooly, R. B arry, M. Barry. Second Row—O’Brien, Flanagan, Scott, Rodgers, Mahler, Wilson. Seated—Lambert, Dzura, Donovan, Mr. K elty, Botti, Burke, Hamill.

CLASS OF 2C—(Left to Right) Fourth Row—Griffin, Merrick, Sharp, Simpf, Upton, Hamill, Dinan, Downing. Third Row—Busichio, Kennedy, Fleckenstein, Costello, Ford, Hurley, Stoebling, Tully. Second Row—Madden, MacDonald, McHugh, Carroll, Saporito, Hoffmann, Mann, Brady. Seated—Vetter, Dieth, Meehan, Mr. B all, S.J., Nolan, O’Neill, O’Keefe. S ev en ty-six


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CLASS OF 2D—(Left to Right) Fourth Row—Flaherty, Kretzmer, Yendzewski, English, O’Connell, M aguire, Smith. Third Row—B alas, Sachs, Lynch, Corcoran, Larkin, W ard, Caulfield, Crimmins. Second Row—Braun, Harhen, McCarthy, Florio, Murphy, Greene, Newton, Lowther. Seated—Stoll, Dillman, L isa, Mr. M clncrney, Hale, Sullivan, Stanley.

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CLASS OF 1M—(Left to Right) Fifth Row—Glaviano, Dilman, O’N eill, Hendrick, Gorman. Fourth Row—McDermott, Sheehy, Robinson, Costello, Nitto, Adams. Third Row—Grein,, Murphy, Di Meo, Grimley, Parsons, Cullen. Second Row—Donnelly, Casey, W hite, Byrne, McGlynn, W irtis. Seated—O ahill, Scanlon, Jam in, Mr. Cullen, H ealy, W est, Zenorini.

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CLASS OF 1C—(Left to Right) Fifth Row—Costello, K elly, Moran, Hendricks, W alsh, Stoklos, De Polo. Fourth Row—Gorman, McKenna, Veydovec, Norton, Robinson, Boyce, Hughes, McGinn. Third Row—Fitzpatrick, Hamm, Morschauser, Rutledge, Hoffmann, Colford, Harrington. Second Row—Conniff, M ullin, M asterly, O’Neill, McEvoy, Rummell, Dwyer, Kirk. Seated—Stulz, Monahan, Nutzel, Mr. Doyle, S.J., Bums, Egan, Lavin. Eighty


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CLASS OF ID—(Left to Right) Fourth Row—Kiczek, Thompson, Smedley, Guellich, Byrne, Norton, Fellinger, McGee, O’Connor. Third Row—Kane, Keenan, Neale, K elly, D aly, McNamara, Roe, Garner, M ullin. Second Row—Corcoran, McCabe, O’Donnell, Voss, Falcicchio, R ackley, M ulligan, Costello, Corbutt, S ulli van. Seated—Kavanagh, Sandford, Beronio, Mr. M ahlm eister, S.J., Formosa, Leucht, Morley.

CLASS OF IE—(Left to Right) Fifth Row—Bodenmann, Cordo, O’N eill, Guglielmo, Scholle, M arkenstein, W alsh, Lupo. Fourth Row—Kane, Mackin, Dunne, Lavagnino, Murtha, Hawkes, Fleming, Scanlon. Third Row—Kelleher, Grein, Hoffman, McDermont, Curtin, Goldrich, Cahill. Second Row—Halpin, Stone, Donnelly, Brady, Mangine, L isky, Griffin. Seated—K elly, Quinn, Roemke, Mr. Cullum, McTigue, Macaluso, Reddington. Eighty-one

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RF.V. DANIEL E. POWER, S.J.

REV. WILLIAM F. SCHOTT, S.J.

REV. FRANCIS J. GERAGHTY, S..

REV. ANTHONY V. KEANE, S.J.

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SODALITY CHAPEL

SENIOR SODALITY U

NDER the capable direction of our new Student Counsellor, Father Oates, the Sodality at St. Peter’s was reorganized at the inception of the September term. The Sodality has ever stamped itself as the most important student organiza­ tion at the Prep. Inspired with love and devotion to the Blessed Virgin Mary, the members have faithfully gathered, each division on its respective morning, to petition and praise Mary for the assistance and love she has consistently showered upon them. The activities of the Sodality have as usual been extensive as well as profitable, not only to the Sodalists but also to the foreign missions. The Sodalists have benefited by the prayers and talks at the meetings as well as by the reading and circulation of Catholic literature. The distribution of pamphlets which was started last year, has met with continued success. The missions have been aided considerably by the work of the Sodality. In the early part of the year, a Sodality raffle netted over $300 for the laborers in foreign fields. Mite boxes were placed in the classrooms during the Lenten season. Congratulations must be extended to the boys for their charity and good will in contributing frequently and generously to these boxes. In gathering stamps for the missions, our Sodalists were most zealous. Although custom tends to blunt initial endeavors and mitigate zeal, the Prep stamp collectors have been as faith­ fu l as Antigone in this latest mission hobby. Another branch of Sodality work is the Knights of the Blessed Sacrament. Each student, enlisting as a Knight, takes upon himself the title of a soldier in God’s vast army. His duties are to attend Mass and receive Holy Communion each Friday E igh ty-six


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SENIOR SODALITY OFFICERS

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morning. The work of this group needs no honeyed commendations for "age cannot wither nor custom stale” K. B. S. enthusiasm at St. Peter’s. Thus we have a filmy sketch of the benefits and activities of the Sodality. It must be remembered that there are also other benefits which in reality mean more to us, not only now in our school work but also in later life. They are the spiritual bene­ fits derived from the constant attendance at meetings, the recitation of the office and the talks given by the Student Counsellor, These benefits will never die. May we as the graduating class of 1935, at this point, exhort those who are to follow us to join in the work of the Sodality. We know of the marvelous benefits, both mental and moral, which may be derived by faithful attendance. A n y boy who has the opportunity of becoming a member of the Sodality and neglects it is shunning one of the most important and beneficial character builders at the Prep. By joining the Sodality a student is enabled to do what is in reality the primary purpose for which we are placed on this earth, namely, to practice and propagate our religion. For in the Sodality all are requested and allowed to do their part, no matter how small or how large, not only financially but spiritually. However good our intentions may be to do something by ourselves, it never has as much effect as when we gather into one large body and act as a whole. A t this point it behooves us to thank as well as congratulate all those who have done their part in making this Sodality year a success, members as well as officers. A special vote of thanks is due the following for their generous sacrifices of time: Dominick Scatuorchio, our Prefect; Gene Ertle, Assistant Prefect; John Behnken, Secretary; John Collins, our faithful organist, and George Foley, our most reliable Sacristan. This summary is intended primarily as a record of the activities of the Sodality • but we must deviate from our purpose for a time, in order to pay some slight tribute to the one person to whom we owe whatever success we have achieved. Father Oates, S.J., in his first year as Spiritual Adviser to the Prep and head of the Sodality, has worked wonders. We give him our sincerest congratulations for this year with the fond hope of many more which will even eclipse his current endeavors.

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SECOND YEAR SODALITY E VERY Wednesday morning a faithful gathering of Sophomores could be found in the chapel manifesting their filial love and devotion to Our Lady. What our group lacked in numbers they surpassed in enthusiasm and zeal. In mite box offerings, mission raffles and spread of Catholic literature, our little group were always in the van. Nothing was too great, nothing too small, for the Sophomore Sodalists! The missions were aided in no little way by the generous stamp collectors in the Sodality. Almost daily some of our group could be seen heavily burdened with stamps finding their way to the Student Counsellor’s office. Nor were our activities limited to this field. Every Sunday, no matter what the weather would bring, Messrs. McGuire, Rodgers, Brauer, Phillips, Larkin and Leahy, journeyed to the parish of Our Lady of Mount Carmel to teach Catechism to God’s neglected souls. Cer­ tainly Our Lady will not allow their generous deeds to go down the tide of oblivion. To our Moderator, Father Oates, S.J., much thanks is due for his encouragement and bright gems of thought. Aided by a loyal band of officers and consultors, much good has been accomplished by our Moderator and an interest as edifying as it is intense has been kindled.

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FIRST YEAR SODALITY T HE First Year Sodality had its initial meeting in September with an attendance of more than one hundred boys. The Moderator outlined the purpose and the privileges of the Sodality and emjphasized the importance of regular attendance. The first term officers elected were: William Hogan, Prefect; Joseph Connors, SubPrefect; Thomas Burns, Secretary; and John Kelly, Sacristan. During the first semes­ ter, weekly talks were given by our Moderator on several phases of Sodality work. Frequent visits were paid by the Moderator and several officers to St. Francis’ hospital to distribute pamphlets, gifts and sacred pictures to the children. This work was made possible by the generosity of the members in several collections. David Smedley’s contribution of boys’ books was outstanding. A week before the Christmas holidays, a collection was taken up for the annual Christmas Basket Fund. From the fifteen dollars collected, gifts and toys were pur­ chased for the men and children in St. Francis’ Hospital. On Christmas Eve, Father Purcell and several officers distributed the gifts. Special mention must be made of several contributors of cash and gifts, namely, Dolan, Rackley, Neale, Kelly, Hughes, Kiely, Keenan and Roemke. The second semester opened with a weekly attendance of about seventy-five mem­ bers. Lively talks were given by the Moderator. Father Dwyer also addressed us upon the topic, "Mary as our Mother.” Another feature of these weekly discussions was the address of Father John Mullen on "Catholic Press Month.” Other interesting sermonettes were given by several members of the Faculty. The past year’s activities have surpassed the Moderator’s fondest hopes. The boys have been given a right start in their High School life and there is every reason to believe that they will continue in their devotion to Mary, Our Mother. E igh ty-n in e

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OFFICERS OF BEAUDEVIN DEBATERS

BEAUDEVIN DEBATING T HE vein of golden success which Mr. Cantillon, S.J., had mined in the Beaudevin

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last year proved a great boon to debating at St. Peter’s. For when we assem­ bled in September we were greatly surprised to find that our ranks had been increased to capacity by the reception of Junior Candidates. Our rostrum this year was entrusted to the capable tutelage of Mr. McHugh, S.J. The first regular meet­ ing of the term saw James F. Murray elected President, Emmet J. Norton, VicePresident and Leonard F. Manning, Secretary-Treasurer. A fte r all preliminary for­ malities were executed we settled down to enjoy many pleasant afternoons listening to true eloquence expounding the merits or the defects of the World Court, the Hauptmann Trial, the Ju ry System, the Thirty Hour Week Bill and Private Control of Munitions. Such were the categories from which our orators drew the subject matter for debate during the first term. From those who distinguished themselves on the floor of our debating chamber Messrs. Thomas A. Geraghty, David A. Valenti and Leonard F. Manning were selected to carry the laurels of St. Peter’s into Brooklyn against our Jesuit rivals, Brooklyn Prep. The question read, "Resolved that a thirty hour week in all basic American industries would be economically and socially beneficial.” The Beaudevin forces, upholding the negative of the debate, presented an air-tight case of argumentation to their adversaries. Their logic was perceptibly powerful and almost irrefutable. How­ ever, the Brooklyn boys influenced the balloting of the fudges with their true Cicero­ nian oratory and the Petreans were forced to lower their standards in a 2 to 1 set­ back. 'N inety

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The Beaudevin then returned to the fair city of Jersey C ity to tangle with Mr. John Lynch’s debaters from Dickinson Evening High School. For this debate we placed our hopes in Raymond F. Valenti, George F. Foley and Leonard F. Manning. The question was, "Resolved that the present Ju ry System should be abolished.” Again the Petreans propounded their negative views with convincing logic while their opponents swayed the emotions of the audience with suasive oratory. A fte r a heated discussion among the judges (which held the audience in suspense for all of tw enty minutes) the verdict was awarded to the Dickinson trio by a 2 to 1 vote. While we were thus engaged in public engagements with rival institutions of learn­ ing, the Beaudevin also was extending its activities along other lines. Two debates between members of the society were held before social organizations in the county. The first of these raged before the First W ard Stalwarts Assoc, of Bayonne. Here Messrs. Jordan, Nutzel, Doherty, Norton, Murray and Manning aired their views on the proposal of a thirty hour week. A short time later another such debate was held before the St. Joseph’s Junior Holy Name Society of Jersey City. In this en­ counter Messrs. Nutzel, Valenti, Geraghty and Jordan displayed their oratorical prow­ ess before a responsive and truly appreciative audience. The Beaudevin then accepted the invitation of St. Joseph’s High School of West New York to battle their champions on the thirty hour week bill. Messrs. Adrian W . Doherty, William G. Nutzel and Raymond V . Jordan bore the Beaudevin banners into the wilds of North Hudson. A close, nip and tuck affair ensued before one of the largest audiences that ever thronged the Knights of Columbus Auditorium. It was only after a torrid session of argument and debate that the judges declared Ninety-one

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LOYOLA DEBATERS

the West New York warriors victorious. The St. Joseph’s debate marked the close of our public activity fo r the first semester. A t the first meeting of the second term new officers were elected to the posts of honor. The balloting of the society made Leonard F. Manning, President; Raymond V. Jordan, Vice President; and Robert L. Sperry, Secretary-Treasurer. A t this meet­ ing it was also made known that Leonard F. Manning, Emmet J. Norton and James F. Murray had earned the glory of representing the Beaudevin against Loyola Prep of Baltimore. A fter many afternoons of long preparation and incessant clashing of opinions on the most minute intricacies of the proposed thirty hour week bill, our efforts brought their fru it when our forensic delegates garnered a bitterly contested victory. However, the elation over victory was somewhat dimmed by the very cordial and courteous reception which Loyola tendered our debaters. During their sojourn in the land of Old Black Joe they visited Washington, Mt. Vernon, George­ town University, Catholic University and last, but by no means the least, Woodstock College. Here the debaters enjoyed an entire day musing on half-forgotten memoirs with the Messrs. Hartnett, Turbett, Sturtzer, Cantillon, Hogan, Swick and Gleason of the Society of Jesus. It was indeed a delightful and most enjoyable trip and the debaters acknowledge the real Southern hospitality of their hosts, especially their generous and amiable moderator, Mr. Powell, S.J. Now our debating career at St. Peter’s is in its Vesper hour. As we review our many accomplishments, a swarm of pleasant and profitable recollections marshall themselves before us. The invaluable training in oratory, poise and self-expression that we have gained week after week gives us unbounded confidence for future pursuits. The many friendships garnered within the Beaudevin walls and even on foreign rostra shall never be broken. The tireless efforts of our Moderator to make each succeeding session more perfect will always be appreciated.

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OFFICERS OF MULRY DEBATERS

MULRY DEBATING SOCIETY E SOPHOMORES entered the familiar debating hall ready for new achieve­ ments and prepared to conquer new fields. We greeted our new Moderator, Mr. Carey, S.J., early in September. He outlined his plans and told us of the advantages of debating. A t our second meeting the balloting for officers was held. John Carr took the President’s chair, Joseph Larkin was elected to the Vice-Presidency while John Ruane was unanimously chosen the Minutes’ Keeper. The first term’s rule was called the "Regime of the Reds,” due to the crimson "combs” possessed by the two presiding officers. A fte r the election of officers and an explanation of the rules the regular weekly meetings were held. Each debate found four Mulry members pitted against one another on topics of current interest. Many exciting verbal wrangles took place on subjects varying from school athletics to governmental duties. In March Messrs. Quinlan, Carr and Hamill represented the Mulry Debaters in a clash with Brooklyn Prep on the question of the World Court. A fter a spirited session the Brooklyn de­ baters were handed the palm of victory by a 2-1 decision. The gavel has now sounded on the last rebuttal. Our Demosthenic efforts for the year are finished. However, the invaluable training we have received and the poise and confidence gained in self-expression have no "finis” for they will ever and always remain with us.

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OFFICERS OF COLLINS DEBATERS

THE COLLINS DEBATING SOCIETY T HIS Society consists of approximately forty Freshmen ambitious of developing their forensic abilities. A t our weekly meetings we gained experience in con足 ducting debates and in discharging the duties and responsibilities of officers and judges. Among other things, we learned how to overcome self-consciousness when addressing audiences and how to gather, assemble and present facts in order that we might be able to debate intelligently and convincingly. During the year our activities consisted in debates on such subjects of general interest as advertising, athletics, capital punishment, chain stores, disarmament, presi足 dential powers and radio. A fter every debate an open forum was conducted. The opportunities thus afforded our membership were always enthusiastically embraced. Occasionally a member of a debating team selected to present the affirmative of a proposition would personally prefer to argue the negative, or vice versa. He was honor-bound, however, temporarily to submerge his opposing individual inclinations and opinions and to battle with might and main for his team. Situations such as those contributed immeasurably to the popularity of our debates. Our officers for the first semester were: John Kelly, President; Raymond Keenan, Vice President; James Dolan, Secretary; and for the second semester: Bernard Kelly, President; Leon Nutzel, Vice President; Thomas Burns, Secretary. We take this oppor足 tunity to express to them our appreciation of all they have done to help us preserve inviolate the best traditions of our Society. N in e ty -fo u r


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DEBATING HALL A t the conclusion of the year our three stalwarts— Conniff, Gillen and Hogan, met the Mulry Debaters on the question: "Resolved that the study of Latin in High Schools is useless.” By a vote of 2-1 our Freshmen trio gained a decisive decision over Messrs. Hamill, Carr and Scott, who argued for the affirmative side. Many times the space allotted for this sketchy resume of our forensic achievements would be necessary to express our deep feeling of gratitude and thanks for the in­ valuable instruction, advice and encouragement we received throughout the year from our very caipable and considerate Moderator, Mr. Mahlmeister, S.J.

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TOM SAWYER N MONDAY evening, December 17, 1934, before a capacity audience in the School Hall, the Dra­ matic Society presented Mark Twain’s popular and delightful "Tom Sawyer.” The actors were twenty boys from the Classes of ’3 5, ’36, ’37, and ’38. How efficiently and painstakingly Mr. O’Mara, S.J., rehearsed them for their several roles was abundantly evidenced by the spontaneous, enthusiastic applause with which the audience greeted their acting. There were in this performance, as there are in all per­ formances, actors who played major roles and actors who played minor roles. Space will not permit of even a brief comment on the splendid acting of each individual actor. The natural tendency, or bad habit, of the commentator to eulogize actors who play major parts and to ignore those who play minor parts must here be sternly repressed, because each of the actors in "Tom Sawyer” acquitted him­ self in a manner that reflects lasting credit upon our Jesuit school and our Director of Dramatics. A chain is as strong as its weakest link and a play is as good as its poorest actor. There were no poor actors in "Tom Sawyer” ! Each played a vitally important part in making the presentation a tremendous success. Therefore, to single out a particular actor for commendation, or even special mention, would be an unpardonable reflection upon the acting of the other nineteen stars. On the eve of the performance, Thomas A. Murphy of the Class of ’3 5, who had been fu lly prepared to play the difficult role of "Dr. Robinson,” died suddenly. May it always be a source of consolation to his relatives and many friends to know that he lived and died true to the best traditions of St. Peter’s and that his last earthly efforts were in the service of his Alma Mater. These general comments cannot be terminated without an expression of deep thanks to and generous praise of the High School Orchestra, and its Director, Mr. Patrick

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Roach, for the excellent musical selections rendered on the evening of the play w ith little practice; nor without an ex­ pression of profound gratitude to Mr. Boyle, S.J., and his efficient business staff and to the m any Patrons and Patronesses of the performance; and to all others who in any w ay contributed to making the presentation of "Tom Sawyer” one of the most memorable occasions in the long eventful history of the social life of St. Peter’s High School. Last but not least, the value and importance of the contributions to the effective presentation of the play which were made by Father Robert Parsons, S.J., the ta l­ ented make-up man, who performed his task in a delight­ fu lly realistic manner, and by the Scene Shifters of Argus Eyes of St. Peter’s College, cannot be overestimated and are deserving of all the panegyrics that have been bestowed by an appreciative audience. THE CAST W idow D o u g la s ^ _____ ___ Robert G. Conway, ’36 Mrs. H arper _________ Edward B. Gillen, ’38 W alter P otter ._____ *________ Joseph L. Rodgers, ’37 Dr . R obinson ___ ____ _____ Thomas A. Murphy, ’3 5 Becky T hatcher _______ W illiam F. Hogan, ’38 Sid Sawyer _____ ___________ Edward T. Madigan, ’36 Georgie M iller __________________ John L. Botti, ’37 J oe H arper __________________Francis J . O’N eill, ’36 Ben R ogers ________ -_____ —__ John P. Ruane, ’37 A lfred T emple __________1_______ John J. Foley, ’37 A my L awrence *________ Thomas A. Burns, ’3 8 R ev. Sprague — James F. M urray, ’3 5 Sheriff J o n e s _______________ Joseph P. Larkin, ’37 J udge T hatcher ____ ________ W illiam J. C rotty, ’3 S M rs. T hatcher ___L-___________ John F. Carr, ’37 A unt P olly ______ ___ Lawrence J . Buckley, ’36 Muff P otter ________ Ludger P. Ditzel, ’35 In ju n J oe ____,_____ ________ Emmet J. Norton, ’3 5 H uckleberry Finn _________ W illiam A. Scott, ’37 T om Sawyer ______________ James F. Donovan, ’37


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LIBRARY BOARD OF DIRECTORS

LIBRARY ITH a few misgivings and much manual labor, our library in the initial days of the past school year moved to its new location in the Senior build­ ing. The older Prepsters, missing their former haunt, scoured the premises and soon business was again progressing at fever heat. Our library offers many tempting advantages. Our rack of magazines is crowded with the pick of the crop. More serious readers find their full in America, Common­ weal, Literary Digest, and their kin. For lighter moments our new quarters pro­ vide Fortune, News Pictorials, Saturday Evening Post, and a host of similar periodicals. For the first time in our history we have obtained Stamp and Coin magazines for the hobbyists. This is a feature which the students enthusiastically received. W ith the money allowed the library in the school budget, helped along by the fines collected from overdue books, the library has been able to secure a wide variety of new volumes. Flashing new covers dot the shelves on all sides. The new collec­ tions embrace sport stories, detective novels and sundry adventure tales. Nor have we in any way neglected the invaluable classics. Strange as it may appear, the classical group is one of the most alluring in the library. The majority prefer the old masters to the more modern authors. Encouraged by the new "Reader’s Club,” the number of readers has grown tremendously and the librarians are kept as busy as the proverbial bee checking their wholesome selections. By careful observation we have noticed the books most of the boys prefer and we have purchased several copies of these volumes. We have also obtained new

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biographical volumes to help the student in his researches for book reviews. As a whole the new books have been received so well that our reserved list is constantly crowded. W e must not neglect to mention our other volumes which cover a wide field. Religion, Science, Travel, Debating, History, Biography and Literature constitute a few of the multiple subjects treated. A ll these books are constantly in use, particu­ larly the Biographies and books of Travel. Our Biographies too are kept up to date. Lives of Father Finn, Father Coughlin, A lfred E. Smith, Knute Rockne and others, provide an interesting collection. The fiction department likewise is ample in extent. Some of the favorites are Finn, Tarkington, Dudley, Stevenson, Chesterton, Wodehouse and Boynton— a variety wide enough to satisfy all tastes. We must not forget our efficient staff. Day in and day out we find these tireless workers busy about their tasks keeping the library moving at a level pace and in­ suring quick courteous service. So let us close with a grateful and sincere handshake to Mr. James Ball, S.J., our Moderator, Richard Scott, Senior Librarian, James Quinlan, Mark Burke and James Conniff.

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THE PETREAN STAFF E d itor -in - C h ie f LEONARD F. MANNING A ssistant E ditors EMMET J. NORTON

EDWARD F. HAMILL A ssociate E ditors

JAMES F. MURRAY RAYMOND F. VALENTI WILLIAM N. FORD THOMAS J. CLEARY THOMAS A. GERAGHTY DOMONIC N. SCATUORCHIO

JOHN J. SHARKEY CORNELIUS A. CALLERY JOHN P. GARRAHY JAMES J. McKENNA DONALD J. CLARK RAYMOND V. JORDAN A rt E ditor

JOHN C. CARROLL T y p is t WILLIAM G. NUTZEL B usiness M anager GEORGE F. FOLEY M od era tor MR. THOMAS J. DOYLE, S.J. O ne h u n d red

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PREP CONQUERS ST. CECILIA’S M urky skies and a muddy gridiron greeted the curtain raising of the new Prep football season. Both elevens were forced to wallow in the mire, but the day was gloomy for the Englewood boys only. Our 193 3 State Champions inaugurated their season w ith a 19-6 win. From the very beginning, the result was apparent.On the third play of the game St.Cecilia’s fumbled within their own tw enty yard line. Jam in, then Garraghy, then Jam in carried the ball with “Charlie” scoring on his second try w ith a beautiful off-tackle play. "Ches” Urynowicz converted. The remainder of the first half passed without excitement, until in the closing moments, the Englewood brigade threatened, bringing the pigskin down to the Prep 18 yard marker. But the whistle was on our side! The second half was a brilliant kicking duel between two of the best punters in the state—Echols, the star St. Cecilia halfback, and our own Charley Jamin. And without partisanship, we must say that Charley was a little the better. The break came when Dom Scatuorchio broke through to block a kick on the enemy 20 yard stripe. Hale scooped up the ball and was away for a touchdown. As the final period opened the Bergen County Saints marched determinedly down the field only to be stopped on the twelve yard line. An exchange of kicks and a fumble gave us the ball deep in our opponents’ territory. Following a 20 yard pass to Jim Lyons, Jam in circled his own end to score from the 8 yard line. Against our second team, St. Cecilia’s finally scored but it was too late. The Petreans were set on winning their tenth straight victory in two years. Captain Scatuorchio and “Ches” Urynowicz were solid blocks of granite on the defense while Jamin and Garraghy scintillated on the offense.

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FOOTBALL SQUAD Fourth Row—Downey, Howley, Van Bemmel, W ard, Mildenberger, Macaluso, Boyle, Connell, Driscoll, E. McCarthy, R. McCarthy, Newman. Third Row—M yers (Coach), Tunney, Murchan, L isa, Sharp, Egan, A. Jam in, F arley, McHugh, Donnelly, Griffin, H aggerty, C allery, Smith, Sullivan , Manorek (M anager), Egan (Graduate M anager). Second Row—Urynowicz, H ale, English, Moore, Scatuorchio (Captain), C. Jam in, Heitzman, Heinz, O’Brien, Rooney, McGrail (A ss’t. M anager). F irst Row—King (A ss’t. Coach), B rin ski, Gallagher, Caulfield, M errick, Lyons, Garrahy, H ayes, Turley, Dillman.

ST. M A R Y ’S HOLDS PREP TO TIE

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W ith St. Cecilia’s scalps dangling on their belts the Petreans next journeyed to St. M ary’s of Rutherford where they battled to a scoreless deadlock in a gruelling, hard-fought engagement. A steady downpour of rain had transformed H iggins Field into a veritable pool mud. Unfortunately, a soggy gridiron and a slim y pigskin are not conducive to hocus-pocus tactics such as the Prep employs. The game was marred by frequent fumbles and through these miscues Tommy Myers’ clan squandered no less than four opportunities to ta lly a touchdown. Likewise did the "Blue Streaks” often let the elusive spheroid slip from their grasp but they were always repaid threefold by the generous Prep gridders. East was the outstanding star of the home team and not seldom did he reel off S or 10 yards through the mire and through the Myer men. "Punchy” Garrahy, the diminutive Prep halfback, by his fine play on both the offense and defense covered himself w ith glory as well as mud. In fact, it was “Little John” who supplied the biggest th rill of the game. In the waning minutes of play "Punchy” took a lateral from Charley Jam in and galloped 40 yards only to be thrown out of bounds on his own 3 5 yard stripe. But, w ith this glorious opportunity to score glaring in the face of the Petreans, the referee tooted his whistle to end the game and bring to St. M ary’s rooters a sweet revenge for last year’s 26-0 setback.

UNION HILL VS. ST. PETER’S

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On Columbus Day the Prep entertained the powerful Union H ill gridders and for the first time since Dickinson triumphed over our warriors in the Thanksgiving Day classic of 1932 the banners of St. Peter’s were lowered in defeat. For the first time since 1927 the Orange and Blue wave of Union H ill surged victoriously over the Prep. It was a bitter dose to swallow. A bitter dose

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indeed! For the Petreans proved themselves the superiors in every phase of the game save for the matter of registering touchdowns. But Dame Fortune evidently had a bone to pick w ith our stal­ warts. Jam in lost the opening kick-off in the blinding sun and Mazzie, Union H ill’s backfield lum inary, pounced upon the oval on our 10 yard stripe. But the fighting, courageous, never-say-die spirit of the Petreans smacked down the towering Goliaths without a gain on four successive attempts. But Lady Luck again frowned. Charley Jam in faded back to punt and again the pigskin eluded his grasp and went rolling crazily into the end zone. This time Roth, Union’s right guard, dove upon the ball for the first score of the game. But misfortune, rather than disheartening the Petreans, served as an added incentive. Tommy Myers’ boys proceeded to flash their reputed repertoire of trick plays. W ith brain instead of brawn they battered away at their heavier rivals. Reverses, triple bucks, laterals— all this befuddled the m ighty behemoths from Union. But not until near the close of the second quarter did a Maroon and W hite jersey scamper across the H iller’s goal line. Two thousand spectators sat enthralled as Garrahy took the ball from Jamin on a reverse, straight­ armed two burly Union men, sliced off tackle and then romped 70 yards through the whole Union H ill secondary without a bit of interference. The sprint bordered on the sensational. It was a beauty from start to finish. Urynowicz failed to convert the extra point and the intermission found the teams deadlocked. O n e h u n d r ed fo u r

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BAYONNE SNAPS In the second half the speed demons from Grand Street continued to outstrip their rivals but when it came to pushing over a score Dame Fortune always met us w ith a frown. Union’s second break came late in the third quarter. Tom Rooney took the ball on a reverse, darted towards the sidelines and then lashed a snap lateral that was never completed. "M uddy” Ruhle, the Hillers center, diagnosing the play, suddenly lurched forward, snared the pigskin and cavorted 30 yards unmolested for the second Union touchdown. The scoreboard flashed 12-6 and 12-6 it was when the shrill blast of the referee’s whistle ended the game. The staunch buccaneers of the Maroon and W hite suffered the stigma of defeat but their courageous, uphill battle, w ith all odds blazing in their faces, is indeed commendable and a fine example of Petrean spirit.

EMERSON BREAKS FIFTEEN YE AR JIN X Minus the services of several regulars, the Prep squad, on the following Saturday afternoon, traveled to Fletcher’s Field to meet Emerson High, only to have the Union C ityites break a jinx that had been overhanging them for fifteen years and defeat the Petreans, 12-6. The "Bluebelles” took advantage of the crippled but the game Prep team to record their fourth successive win and keep their slate unblemished. Two long drives, both in the third quarter, one of sixty, the other of fifty yards resulted in the winning touchdowns. Hanak, having brought the ball around end for tw enty yards to the Petrean thirteen yard marker, plunged through on the next play for the first score. A few min­ utes later he flipped a pass to Monaoo who galloped th irty yards for another six points. In the final quarter, the Prep strove desperately to score and succeeded. A wonderful forty yard pass from Charlie Jam in to Tom English advanced the ball to the ten yard stripe and another pass from Charlie to Gallagher in the end zone resulted in the tally. On the line, Gene M cCarthy, playing his first game in the guard position, performed a herculean task in pushing through and breaking up plays, while among the ball carriers, Charlie Jam in and Tom Boyle played superbly.

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PREP VS. LINCOLN

LINCOLN TRIUMPHS

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Mud again! For the third time during the current season the Prep eleven lined up for the open­ ing kick-off on a muddy field! Loyal rooters for both teams roared their enthusiasm as the sturdy athletes trotted onto the field. The stands were overflowing. Feeling ran high among the supporters of the two rivals. The Prep kicked off to Lincoln’s 30 yard line but the Blue could make no gain. Both teams exchanged kicks; they were w aiting for the breaks. W hat seemed to be the break, came when Jam in’s punt was p artially blocked and recovered by Lincoln in mid-field. However, Charley Jamin nullified this gain a moment later by quick-kicking from our own tw enty yard line to the same stripe in Lincoln territory. And thus the half ended. But Fate was not to be denied. Cochrane kicked off for Lincoln and after two running plays, Jam in punted to the Lincoln 15 yard marker. Lombardi received and almost immediately ''A ce” Moore flung himself at him. Moore’s hands grasped the Lincoln quarterback’s waist but Lombardi squirmed and shivered and w ith the aid of his muddy jersey finally spun out of his opponent's hands. The entire Prep team was strung out behind Moore, and as the eel-like Lombardi slipped out of his tackier’s hands, he found himself on the opposite side of the field with a flock of Lincoln men screening him from potential tacklers. This beautiful run put Lincoln in the van at the half. The Prepsters tried valiantly to even the count in the final half. They rained passes all over the field but just couldn’t clutch one. In the fleeting moments of the last quarter Finnie inter­ cepted one of the many desperately thrown Petrean passes and sprinted for a touchdown. This sealed the verdict and gave Lincoln her first triumph over the Prep since 1926. The Prep line stole the show in this bitterly but clean fought battle. They effectively halted every thrust of the hard driving Slanemen and held the Lincoln backs to two first downs. Bernie Flaherty kept Lincoln out of danger many a time by his splendid kicking. His end over end kicks drove far down into Petrean territory. Bernie surely gave all he had against his former teammates. He and another little fellow, whom we ruefully remember as Lombardi, spelled defeat for the Prepsters. O n e h u n d r ed six

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ANNUAL TURKEY CLASH

PREP ROUTS BROOKLYN Even if St. Peter’s football season ends in ignominy, the Prepsters can boast of being credited w ith the only field goal kicked in the county during the 1934 campaign. It happened during the first quarter of the Brooklyn Prep encounter on Armistice Day, which, incidentally, ended 9-0 in favor of St. Peter’s. The kickoff gave Brooklyn the ball deep in their own territory but, after two fruitless attempts to crack the Petrean line, they were forced to kick. Two completed passes of Charlie Jam in put the ball on the nine yard line where the visitors’ defense checked the forward advance. It was then, on the last down, that Charlie dropped back to the tw enty yard line and place-kicked the ball between the uprights for three points. One hundred seven

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For the next three quarters Coach Myers had his charges experiment w ith the forward pass. It met w ith a certain amount of success in that it netted eight first downs, but it did not result in a score u n til late in the fourth period when “C het” Urynowicz received a ten yard heave from Charlie Jam in and ran sixty yards for a touchdown. The Petreans performed very well defensively in holding the Brooklynites without a single first down and not allowing them to get past their own thirty-seven yard line once during the game. A gain Jam in ’s kicking and passing was featured, but at the same time Plucky Johnny G arrahy’s clever running and effective tackling and Gene M cC arthy’s line plunges did not go unnoticed. On the line Ace Moore and Tom Ormsby were outstanding.

BAYONNE NOSES OUT PETREANS A few hectic moments at the beginning of the third period saw a Prep team that was completely outplaying a courageous Bayonne eleven go down in defeat. First St. Peter’s scored but immediately after Bayonne crossed the goal line. It was the extra point that gave Bayonne a 7-6 victory. During the entire first half and all of the fourth quarter there was no scoring but plenty of hard fought th rillin g football. St. Peter’s advanced almost at w ill but when the boys from Bayonne found themselves w ithin their own ten yard line they were invincible. The second half had hardly got under w ay when Ormsby intercepted W elter’s forward pass on Bayonne’s th irty yard line. Then the Prep tried passing. The first failed. The second failed. But on the third attempt Charley Jam in whipped a pass to Garrahy who caught the ball, tucked it under his arm, and raced tw enty yards for the first touchdown of the game. Now the Prep rooters were settling down in hopes of seeing some more scoring by St. Peter’s but their hopes never materialized. Two line plunges of Bayonne failed. Then W elter shot one of his left handed passes to Hassmiller who received it and zig-zagged the remaining distance for a score. W ith victory or a tie hanging on the next play, King, the Bayonne fullback, tried a line plunge for the extra point. He made it. The Prepsters had plenty of opportunities to score but failed to capitalize at opportune moments. They completely outclassed the “Oil C ity ” gridders in yardage gained and first downs. Several times the Petrean clan were Within the five qard stripe but the magnificent defensive performance of the victors staggered their attack.

DICKINSON W IN S TU RKEY CLASH Thanksgiving Day and the big clash w ith Dickinson! A clear, cold day, milling crowds, excited cheering, great expectations, and a football contest unequalled throughout the State for clean, th rillin g playing. But, alas! Last Thanksgiving dawned, dismal and foreboding. Heavy clouds hung close to the earth and the field was swathed in mud. Both teams had suffered many discouraging set-backs during the season, and each was determined to capture their final fray. The Prep, last year’s State Prep Champions, had begun the season w ith an overwhelming number of last year’s regulars lost through graduation; and in this Thanks­ giving game she felt their need sorely. Dickinson also had experienced a most disheartening campaign, but seemed to have an increase in strength and v itality as the St. Peter’s game approached. From the very first quarter Dickinson’s superiority was apparent. The Hilltop passes were deadly, while its blocking and tackling staggered the Petreans. Slowly the big Hilltop Gridders advanced toward our goal, and on a series of passes threatened to score. Then Panepinto faded almost to midfield and whipped a pass toDeMatto, who nearly stumbled in making the catch, but retained his stride and raced fifteen yards to tally. De Lorenzo’s placement fell short and the score at the end of the first quarter read Dickinson 6, St. Peter’s 0. The Prep fought doggedly and held their larger foes until near the end of the half when, unable to crash the Dickinson line, St. Peter’s took to the air and unleased an unexpected pass attack. Jam in pitched a 20 yard aerial to Van Bemmel. A moment later, on a lateral pass, Gallagher advanced to the 5 yard stripe. Seeing the Hilltoppers completely bewildered, Phil Cummings, on a cleverly executed play, threw the ball across the field to Jam in who scored. Charley then place kicked the extra point to give St. Peter’s a 7-6 advantage at the half. The Grand Streeters fought grim ly and held that narrow lead until the last quarter. Then, on a series of passes Panepinto to Colligan, Dickinson scored again. Once more the placement was wild. O n e h u n d r ed e ig h t

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The Prep held staunchly, but the crushing blow came when DeMatto intercepted a Petrean pass and on two plays the Hilltoppers marched down to the Prep four yard line. De Lorenzo then plunged through center for the final score. The gridiron season is over. Although not as successful as Petreans would like, no one feels down-hearted. No great grid squad could be expected to repeat a perfect performance w ith the exit of no less than eight regulars from a State Championship eleven. Throughout the season our "eleven” played inspired football but lack of experience and weight proved too much of a barrier to a perfect season. Although the pupils of Tomm y Myers lacked experience and w eight, no one can say they were w anting in that most m anly of all qualities— true sportsmanship. Several of the season’s setbacks had a bitter taste to them, but the Prepsters, modeling themselves on the noble example of their great coach, swallowed each defeat like stalw art athletes. They realized that sports were made not only for the glamor and joy of victory but also for the sowing of higher and more lasting ideals. To our gallant gridiron squad we say: " W ell d o n e , v e r y w e ll d o n e.” To our inspiring captain, Don Scatuorchio, who proved his metal to a superlative degree, and those graduating Prepsters who have donned the Petrean regalia for the last time— Ormsby, Moore, Garrahy, Urynowicz, Connell, Cummings, and others— we bid a hearty farewell. We trust that the same self-sacrificing spirit that galvanized you all into sparkling action at the Prep may continue to blossom forth even more conspicuously w ith the rapid succession of years.

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VARSITY SQUAD S ta n d in g :— S h a rk ey (M g r .), C a llery, P erro tta , U ry n o iv icz , U p ton, E rtle, O ’K e e fe , R eb olin i, Ja m in , M cC a rth y ( Asst. M g r .). S ea ted : M yers (C o a ch ), G ib n ey, B eron to, L eber (C a p t.), W oods, B ea ch , E gan (G rad. M gr.).

BASKETBALL HEN the football season had ended and the call for basketball candidates went out, Coach Tommy Myers was forced to hastily round out a team from a group of ambitious Prepsters who were eager to sport the Maroon and White on the ribbed court. But the alert eye of Mr. Myers caught sight of some real talent in this group and for the opening game with Woodrow Wilson High School St. Peter’s took the floor with Pete Beronio and Jackie Woods in the forecourt, Ted Beach at center, and Harry Leber and Willie O’Keefe in the guard positions. A ll five, in addition to Ed Gibney and Phil Cummings who were held in reserve, were veterans of the previous season. Lack of practice, however, made itself evident in the first few encounters and, as a result, the Petreans lost in rapid succession to Woodrow Wilson, Demarest and Emerson. However, when they met Lincoln High the Prepsters showed that they were beginning to benefit by the tutelage of Coach Myers and they overwhelmed their old rival by the score of 36-19. A t the end of the quarter, the Prep seemed to be headed for certain defeat as the powerful Lincoln quintet led, 11-6. However the real power of the Petreans manifested itself in the second and remaining quar­ ters and on the defense, led by Pete Beronio who slashed the cords for fifteen points, they completely subdued the fast attack of their opponents. The next two encoun­ ters resulted in losses for the Maroon and White. The strong Union Hill team, with its eyes on its third consecutive county championship, defeated the Prepsters easily 31-15, and St. Michael’s High was successful in a hectic struggle played at the Grotto Auditorium by the score of 28-27. St. Peter’s won its second contest of the season and with it the City Champion­ ship for the first half when Dickinson High fell before the Prep onslaught, 28-20. That the game was a rough and tumble affair can be evidenced from the fact that the victors made twenty-eight trips to the foul line and Dickinson took twenty free

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shots. Seeking revenge for a former defeat at the hands of Woodrow Wilson the Petreans found it when they handed the Indians a 3 5-30 defeat. For the first time the Prep machine hit its top form. Harry Leber and Upton, who scored thirteen and twelve points respectively, were the big guns in the attack that stopped the Wilson quintet cold. Again the Petreans lapsed into a losing streak and games were dropped to Bay­ onne, West New York and Demarest. But it came to an end when they traveled to Brooklyn and defeated an old rival, Brooklyn Prep, by the decisive score of 33-23. This game marked the first appearance of Ed Gibney in the regular line-up. He re­ placed Willie O’Keefe, the bulwark of the Prep defense, who had completed his course of studies at St. Peter’s. Another victory was chalked up by the Prep quin­ tet when they managed to nose out the St. Peter’s College Jay Vees, thanks to several timely baskets by Pete Beronio and Harry Leber in the closing minutes, 33-28. The game was significant in another manner more than being a victory. It marked the opening of the Collins Memorial Gymnasium, the new athletic plant of St. Peter’s College, a court which was sorely needed before the athletic prowess could reach the heights of which they are capable. Union Hill, who had won its first encounter against the Prep, came to town con­ fident of another win, but they went away from the Collins Gym a very discouraged but much wiser team as the result of a 36-29 defeat handed them by the scrappy Petrean quintet. The game, which was chuck full of excitement, will forever re­ main in the memories of its spectators. During the first few minutes of play, the tussle ran true to previous predictions as the sharp shooting stars of the Union C ity team quickly scored two baskets and a foul to put their own team in front, 5-0. From this point on the Prepsters began to play with a vengeance. They hounded their opponents all over the court, intercepted passes, passed and shot in a O n e h u n d r ed e lev e n

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marvelous manner, and as a result forged ahead of the visitors just before the half ended, 13-12. During the second half the same marvelous manner of play con­ tinued. On the defense Leber and Gibney stopped the high-scoring Union forwards in their tracks and on the offense, Beach, Woods and Beronio took advantage of every opportunity to score, so that Union Hill suffered its worst loss in many years of competition. For the second time during the season the Prep bowed to St. Michael’s in another hectic struggle, 27-26, but a few nights later the Maroon and White avenged a previous loss by defeating Emerson, 34-26. Two games remained for the Prep in the county league, one with Lincoln and the other with Dickinson. But both turned out on the wrong side of the ledger. Lincoln put on a sparkling exhibition to win, 20-17, and in the finale, Dickinson was the victor, 34-24. STATE TOURNAMENT A t the end of the regular schedule, St. Peter’s was the recipient of an invitation to compete in the State Tournament in the Group IV Prep division. The offer having been accepted, the Petreans drew as their first opponents St. Benedict’s Prep of Newark. But the tournament bore no good for the Prep fans for St. Peter’s was eliminated by the Gray Bees at the Dickinson Gym. The Petreans, though renowned for their scrappiness, could not cope with the experience of the adversaries, and especially the accuracy of the Bees’ Captain, Bill Sweeney, whose twenty-two points aided his team no little to win, 38-27. O ne h u n d red tw e lv e

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JESUIT TOURNAMENT

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need, dropped a marvelous shot through the rim. A few seconds later, Jackie Woods intercepted an opponent’s pass in mid-court, dribbled to the basket and dropped the ball in to put the Petreans in the lead, 21-20. Only a few seconds were left to play when Ted Beach made good on a foul shot and thus the game was won and with it went the trophy emblematic of the Jesuit championship. BROOKLYN K. OF C. TOURNAMENT

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A fter conquering the Fordham Rams in a torrid battle for the Jesuit Champion­ ship, Tommy Myers’ shooters jumped across the river to do battle in the sixth annual Brooklyn tournament. The Petreans, wearied by as strenuous a schedule as any quintet in the State, fought their way to the finals in the Casey round-robin. Good Counsel School of Newark was the only obstacle to our second trophy of the season. However, the Essex County five, paced by the speedy Georgie Jordan, wrested the honors from our gallant sharpshooters in the closing minutes of a game that held a capacity audience breathless with excitement. Jackie Woods was sensational for the Prep. He and Jordan staged an individual performance that continually rocked the K. of C. quarters with deafening applause. Although conquered, our Prepsters were glorious in defeat. The game will never be forgotten by the hundreds of rooters who travelled to Brooklyn and cheered lustily for victory under the leadership of Georgie Foley. The hair-raising battle was a fitting climax to the basketball prowess of Jackie Woods, Pete Beronio, Ed Gibney and Ted Beach— a quartet that brought much renown to the Maroon and White.

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BASEBALL THE P e t r e a n goes to press Coach Tommy Myers is diligently priming his large squad for the opening clash with Dickinson. The starting line-up has not yet been determined as Tommy desires to overlook no possible offensive material. The Prepsters lost some tough games last season because of weak hitting, especially in the pinches.

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Garrahy, Jamin, Woods, Lutz, Munde and Kirk, are the only regu­ lars from 1934. This year’s roster, although youthful and inex­ perienced, have plenty of pep and fight. W e are not predicting a championship nine, nor are we promising to come out on the long end of a majority of our menus to-date, which lists eleven games. However, we are certain that this year’s team will possess plenty of fight and courage. A n y squad, stamped with these traits, usually carve for themselves a niche in the hall of P e t r e a n fame, even though their record is far from impressive. O ne h u n d r ed fift e e n

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INTER-CLASS BASKETBALL ESOLUTION, courage, perseverance— these are only a few of the laudable qualities which we saw displayed on the yard court during our Inter-class Basketball season. Resolution that was determined, courage that fought fiercely but fairly, perseverance that stubbornly, doggedly refused to acknowledge defeat— these are the priceless jewels which we choose from one of our league’s most enthusiastic seasons. "To the victor belongs the spoils.” But in this case, we must also commend the losers. For though 3C undoubtedly displayed the best brand of cooperative team play seen in many a year in their spectacular rise to the Senior championship throne, their several narrow escapes, and the fact that their every game was a torrid tussle, are testimony enough of the timbre of their foes. The losers need no other com­ mendation. The same holds true for the Junior League. For the mighty midgets of 2A emerged victorious only after squeezing through by narrow victories over 2C and 2M in the Sophomore playoffs, and then barely topping the unpolished but stronghearted 1C crew, the class of the Freshmen. Here again, though the players were smaller in stature and less proficient in ability, their hearts were as large, their courage as strong, and their tenacity as firm and indomitable as their older brothers. A laurel wreath to the players of both leagues. It would be impossible to pen, here and now, an account of the most exciting contests played this year; for nearly every game was a threat to a weak-hearted student. And so, we can only recall the most sparkling highlights of the season— the rhythmic twang of the cords as 3C overwhelmed 3B to don the purple robes of the Senior Championship. The brilliance of the 2A mites as they salvaged one victory from the heavier 3C quintet, which eventually vanquished them to become the basketball rulers of the school. That hotly contested battle between 3D and 4A, which ended in a tie at the end of a long overtime period— The second joust between these same two bands of yard league knights, which again went into over­ time, with the 3D noblemen the victors. These fond recollections have no end. We might say that we owe a great deal to the spectators for their interest and appreciation (especially to those who observed the play from the library windows, many of whom fell before the gentle admonitions of Mr. Ball, S.J.) and to the cheering sections for their vociferous encouragement, but we feel that they were well repaid by the calibre of the classic contests which they viewed. To the Faculty and to Mr. Doyle, S.J., the league director, we give a vote of thanks for the co-operation and the fatherly interest which they manifested— and too, we must not forget the referees, who, though in error at times, were always striving to keep the game fair and clean, to make it interesting for the spectators, and to be impartial to both teams. A ll in all, we enjoyed every moment of the Inter-class Basketball League, but our interest was doubly remunerated when we saw so many products of our friendly though spirited games, togged in Varsity and Junior Varsity uniforms. A toast to a successful season and a hope that many more will follow!

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FINAL CLASS STANDINGS Class 3C 3B 3D 3A 4A 4B 3M 4M

S en io r D iv isio n Won Lost 7 0 6 4 3 4 3 3 4 2 5 2 5 0 7

Class 2A 2C 2M 2D 2B

S e c o n d Y ea r G rou p Won Lost 1 5 4 ^111 2 4 1 3 0 4

Pet. .833 .667 ' .667 .250 .000

Class 1C IE IB 1M 1A ID

F resh m en G rou p Won Lost 0 1 4 2 3 2 3 4 0 5

Pet. 1.000 .800 .600 .400 .200 .000

Pet. 1.000 .857 .571 .571 .429 .286 .286 .000

JOE MACKIN WINNER OF FOUL SHOOTING CONTEST

FOUL SHOOTING CONTEST Towards the end of the basketball campaign, the second annual foul shooting con­ test was held under the capable direction of Mr. Doyle, S.J. Almost every student at the Prep participated. A fter weeks of shooting, the following qualified for the finals— Jerry Turley of 3M, Jimmy Cox of 2A, Ernie Miller of 1A and Joe Mackin of IE. This quartet fought for first honors on the night of the Prep-Fordham game at the Collins Memorial Gym. Joe Mackin gained the crown by caging .ten out of fifteen tries from the penalty mark.

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TRACK

FTER a lapse of six years track has again been instituted at St. Peter’s. Track at the Prep has always submitted to the popularity of the other sports, but this year a fine crowd of promising youngsters turned out to show their speed. The Prep has great hopes of showing their class on the boards and cinders this coming season, for the silksters have turned in some fine performances in their early prac­ tices. Co-Captains Mike Simko and George Nevin, whose speed won for them a varsity berth together with Hawkes and Howe, will form the basis of what promises to be a future relay team. Simko, Nevin and Howe, have together scored a total of six points in a meet sponsored by the 71st Regiment Armory in New York City. A fte r the first of January a great shock came to the tracksters when they lost their coach, Bill McGrath. During his absence a rest of four weeks intervened, after which John Behnken, a former track man himself, now in his Senior year, took over the coaching reins. Manager Austin Behnken with the aid of our moder­ ator, Mr. Quevedo, S.J., is arranging an extensive schedule which will include practically every large meet in the Metropolitan District. There is no want of spirit and enthusiasm among the board aspirants. The only obstacle to their speedy advance is lack of training quarters. During the winter the speedsters had to cross the river thrice weekly to taper off. Certainly this is a mark of genuine Petrean loyalty and must signal sure success in the future. To our resurrected track team we wish all possible success!

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PREP "LETTER" MEN FOOTBALL 193 5 Dominic N. Scatuorchio (Capt. ’34)

John J. English (Co-Capt. ’3 5)

Philip J. Cummings

Charles F. Jamin (Co-Capt. ’3 5)

Edward L. Moore

Robert P. Egan

Chester J. Urynowicz

Charles E. Gallagher

Thomas J. Boyle

William L. Heitzman

John P. Garrahy

Robert J. Van Bemmel

Thomas J. Ormsby

Edward W . Connel

James F. Lyons

Thomas F. Hayes

James A. Driscoll

Neil J. Haggerty

Robert W . Cohalan

Thomas F. Rooney

Eugene F. McCarthy

Edward R. Brinski

Robert E. McCarthy

Nicholas M. Manorek (Mgr.) BASKETBALL 193 5

Harry J. Leber (Captain)

William F. O’Keefe

Peter A. Beronio

John N. Woods

Theodore E. Beach

Lawrence A. Murchan

Eugene V. Ertle

Virginio J. Perrotta

Sylvester J. Upton

John J. Sharkey (Mgr.) BASEBALL 1934

Daniel J. Wallace (Captain)

John N. Woods

Charles F. Jamin

John P. Garrahy

Frank A. Lutz

Daniel J. Munde

James J. Kirk

William J. Grace

Patrick J. O’Reilly

John F. Peters

John F. O’Neill

Donald G. McNamara George W . Irving (Mgr.)

One hundred twenty-three

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JAMES JOSEPH MeKENNA P resid en t S en ior "A”

RAYMOND F. VALENTI P resid en t S enior ffM”

THOMAS JOSEPH CLEARY P resid en t S enior ”B”.

DOMINIC N. SCATUORCHIO S enior S od a lity P r e fe c t C aptain o f F ootball Team


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LEONARD F. MANNING E d ito r-in -C h ief o f P etrea n

GEORGE F. FOLEY B usiness M anager o f P etrea n

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ALM A MATER FAIR There’s one old school we all love well, Its storied walls are grand; And speak our hearts what words can’t tell, Or tongue cannot command. Her words of love we’ll not forget; Her love is staunch and strong, And ne’er a voice has faltered yet, In singing her this song. CHORUS Alma Mater fair, far and long swell out your loyal throng Your story told to hearts of gold will go through life along. Alma Mater fair, far and long swell out your loyal throng, As years pass by we’ll linger nigh and sing St. Peter’s song. As years pass by we’ll linger nigh and sing St. Peter’s song. Though years may lead our steps afar, A fa r our paths may stray, W ith you, Maroon, our guiding star, Our hearts fore’er will stay W e’ll drink deep pleasures of the past; Your memories sweet we’ll share, W ith bonded friendship, firm and fast, W e’ll breathe to you this prayer.

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APPRECIATION To those who so generously gave their time and energies to a work that required much self-sacrifice we owe a vote of sincere gratitude. W e wish to extend our appreciation in particular to: The Editor-in-Chief and his staff of competent workers who needed the rein rather than the spur. The Principal and Faculty whose timely advice and criticisms have been most profitable. Brother Maurice Burke, S.J., for his many generous deeds. The Business Manager, George F. Foley, whose energies knew no bounds whose advertising instincts stimulated our ambitions.

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The many students who trudged the pavements soliciting adsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; especially Edward Hamill, Leonard Manning, Mark Burke, Joseph Arbree, Earl Bosworth and Ernest Miller. The Patrons and Advertisers for their generous financial assistance. The Champlain Studios for their peerless photography, in particular MissMosler, Mr. Halsey and Mr. May, whose countless courtesies and practical suggestions eased our task at every turn. The Chemical Engraving Company, especially Mr. Kenneally, whose praises we cannot trumpet enough. The Heffernan Press who never faltered in their excellent service.

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Rt. Rev. Msgr. Edward A. Kelly, LL.D. Rev. Joseph S. Dinneen, S.J.

Rev. A lfred B. Oates, S.J.

Rev. John F. Dwyer, S.J.

Rev. Richard E. Meaney, ’26

Rev. Alfred M. Rudtke, S.J.

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Rev. Joseph F. Stockhammer

Hon. Mayor Frank Hague Hon. Mayor Lucius F. Donahoe Hon. Senator A . Harry Moore Hon. Hugh Clifford Clarke Mr. John W . Behnken Mr. Peter A. Beronio Mr. David Blackham Mr. Leon Bohner Mr. and Mrs. Earl F. Bosworth Mr. and Mrs. Henry Carleton Mr. and Mrs. John A. Carmody Mr. Daniel J. Carver, E.E.

Mr. and Mrs. F. W . Clark Mr. and Mrs. Joseph E. Colford Mr. John N. Connell, Jr. Mrs. Julia Conniff Miss Catherine Crosson Mr. Edward P. Crosson Miss Sue Crosson Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Crosson Mrs. Catherine C. De Lemos Doctor Francis X. De Sevo

Mr. Robert A. Doherty Mr. and Mrs. Robert F. Downing Mr. and Mrs. John J. Doyle Mr. William C. Drennan Mr. Thomas J. Egan, ’26 Mr. Thomas Peter Finnerty Miss Catherine Foley Mr. and Mrs. George E. Foley Mr. John B. Foley Mr. and Mrs. Joseph H. Foley

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ffl Miss Mary Foley Mr. and Mrs. Charles H. Ford Mr. William Ford Friends of the Prep Freshmen Classes "A”, "B”, ”C ” T. A . G., ’20 Mrs. Blanche Gillen Dr. Francis Leo Golden, ’ 18 Mr. Edward F. Hamill Mr. Thomas F. Hayes

Mr. James M. Houghton Mr. John A. Howe Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Killeen Mr. Henry Kusel Mr. Michael Lavanga Mr. and Mrs. Dallas W . Lowther Mr. James J. McKenna Mr. Frank J. McMackin Mr. and Mrs. J. Manning Mr. John Milton

Mr. Edward L. Moore Mr. and Mrs. W alter E. Morris Mr. John F. Mottley Mr. and Mrs. James J. Murray Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Myers Mr. Emmet J. Norton Mr. M. J. Nugent Mr. William G. Nutzel, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Ferdinand Orthen

B

Mr. Virginio J. Perrotta Mr. Lawrence G. Quinn Mr. and Mrs. John J. Regan Mr. Martin F. Scanlon Mr. Charles Schappert Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Scott Mr. John J. Sharkey Mr. Sidney Stobbs Mr. Ross Wilkinson

ffi One hundred twenty-nine

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Allen, Francis Edward 34 Bidwell Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. --------------23 Fulton Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Artusio, Joseph Francis Ashe, Gilbert William ----------- _______612 Bramhall Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Beach, Theodore Edmund------------------------ 679 Tyler Place, West New York, N. J. Bedell, John Albert— ............252 Garfield Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Behnken, John William--------- — __________ 830 Grand Street, Jersey City, N. J. Beronio, Peter Anthony ____________ 515 Park Avenue, Hoboken, N. J. Boyle, Thomas Joseph u a LL 433 G etty Avenue, Paterson, N. J. Brown, Stephen Laurence__________________900 17th Street, Union City, N. J. Bruder, Joseph Andrew------------- --------- ---- 344 Fairmount Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Callery, Cornelius Augustine______ 309 30th Street, Woodcliff, N. J. Callery, John Michael____________ ___ 385 Baldwin Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Carmody, John Aloysius j £ _ 3 6 Union Street, Jersey City, N. J. Carque, Louis Sebastian__________ ________ 1-90 Bower Street, Jersey City, N. J. Clark, John Donald-,-......,.^__________ ____413 Boulevard, Hasbrouck Heights, N. J. Cleary, Thomas Joseph______1____________Bartholdi Avenue, Butler, N. J. Condon, William Michael________________240 2nd Street, Jersey City, N. J. Connell, Edward W illia m _ l_____________ 94 Warner Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Corcoran, Cyril Francis__________ ,__.-..j ,__ 251 4th Street, Jersey City, N. J. Coughlin, Peter Joseph__________________ 43 Arlington Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. C rotty, William Blackwood ^________ .183 Summit Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Cummings, Philip Joseph_____________ 23 Baldwin Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Dillon, William Patrick_____ ___ _ __ ____ 182 Stegman Street, Jersey City, N. J. Ditzel, Ludger George_________ __________ 525 North Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. Donnelly, James Francis ____ _______ 206 Dodd Street, Weehawken, N. J. Drennan, William Charles ____ __ 25 West 47th Street, Bayonne, N. J. Emme, George Joseph__________________ 82 Pearsall Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Fallon, James Leo____________ L___ .319 West 3rd Street, Clifton, N. J. Farley, Francis Jerome__________________ 181 Bayview Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Finnerty, William Thomas__„________ ____ 303 Fourth Street, Union City, N. J. Foley, George Francis__________ 92 Lindberg Blvd., Teaneck, N. J. Ford, William Nicholas_____________ __ ^....19 Armstrong Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Garrahy, John Peter_________ J.__________ 169 Winfield Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Geraghty, Thomas Aloysius ______ ____ 100J/2 Maple Street, Jersey City, N J. Gibney, Edward Sylvester___________ ___ 183 Union Street, Lodi, N. J. Haggerty, Cornelius Joseph _______ 8 83 Broadway, Bayonne, N. J. Hamill, Edward Francis^ ___ ___ _____306 Varick Street, Jersey City, N. J. Hayes, Thomas Francis___ 1 -_____ __17 Delaware Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Hoffman, John William_________________ 191 Clerk Street, Jersey City, N. J. Howe, John Aloysius________ ___...445 Fairmount Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Hurley, Vincent de Paul__________ _______ 86 Malone Avenue, Belleville, N. J. Irwin, Robert Clark_____________ ........ .....541 Page Avenue, Lyndhurst, N. J. Jordan, Raymond Vincent_______________278 Linden Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Kane, Edmund Francis ________________ 204 Hopkins Avenue, Jersey City, N. J.

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.278 Second Street, Jersey City, N. J. .900 Avenue C, Bayonne, N. J. .1 1 7 Van Wagenen Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Kramer, Theodore W alter—. .227 Beechwood Road, Ridgewood, N. J. Lenk, Frederick Rudolph__ .507 Palisade Ave., Jersey City, N. J. ^ Little, W alter John______ .387 Union Avenue, Paterson, N. J. .15 West 43rd St., Bayonne, N. J. McCarthy, Eugene Charles.. .63 Skellman Ave., Jersey City, N. J. McFarland, Henry Bernard .. McKenna, James Joseph__ -3 5 5 York Street, Jersey City, N. J. Manning, Leonard Francis __ ....____274 Griffith Street, Jersey City, N. J. -515 Mercer Street, Jersey City, N. J. Miller, John Francis „___ ____ ____ Mongon, George John 1___ _____ -36 West 37th Street, Bayonne, N. J. -195 Belmont Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Moore, Edward Lester_-|§^ i * ____ Mottley, John Francis_______________ -1035 Lafayette Street, Elizabeth, N. J. .39 Cecelia Avenue, Cliff side, N. J. Munde, Daniel Joseph___________,____ .18 8 Washington Street, Jersey City, N. J. Murawski, W alter Francis________ ___ Murchan, Lawrence Aloysius JL; ___208 Seventh Street, Jersey City, N. J. Murray, James Francis______ *__ _______ __152 Harrison Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Norton, Emmet Josephs___ _c___________ 277 Eighth Street, Jersey City, N. J. Nugent, Joseph Thomas ___ 93 West 13 th Street, Bayonne, N. J. O’Keefe, William Francis_____________ -__ 100 Grand Street, Jersey City, N. J. Ormsby, Thomas Joseph .__ ___________ 72 W . 53rd Street, Bayonne, N. J. Perrotta, Virginio Joseph ____________569 Palisade Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Peters, John Francis •-___ 2 57 Clerk Street, Jersey City, N. J. Regan, John James...^______ ________ ____ 920 Van Buren PL, North Bergen, N. J. Reilly, Robert Emmet .....___ 78 Astor Place, Jersey City, N. J. Rembisz, Thaddeus Gerald _________26 Edwards Court, Bayonne, N. J. Scatuorchio, Dominic Nicholas________— .340 Stegman Parkway, Jersey City, N. J. Scott, Richard Henry |Sj _______77 West 34th St., Bayonne, N. J. Sharkey, John Joseph__________ ________ 127 West 28th St., Bayonne, N. J. Sillery, Francis Russell___________________ 124 Sherman Place, Jersey City, N. J. Smith, Donald Francis______________ M,---- 199 Fairview Avenue, Jersey City, N. J. Sperber, Thomas Joseph________ ,__ 383 5 Boulevard, North Bergen, N. J. Stiehler, Alvin John_____________________ 620 36th Street, Union City, N. J. Urynowicz, Chester J o s e p h ___________415 Henderson Street, Jersey City, N. J. Valenti, Raymond Francis_______ _______ 5 5 Manhattan Ave., Jersey City, N. J. Walichowski, Marion Thaddeus.—------------ 76 East 21st Street, Bayonne, N. J. Woods, John Nicholas___________________ 118 22nd Street, West New York, N. J Killeen, James Edward____ Kirsch, Joseph W alter____ Koerner, John Joseph.

09


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A FRIENDLY TALK W e who have found a genuine source of en­ joyment in the pages of the

193 5 P e t r e a n

are

indebted in no small degree to the business men who generously contributed to our advertising section. These men believe that the spirit o f all St. Peter’s men is such that it will evince itself in the patronage of those who have shown their friendly spirit to St. Peter’s Prep. It is only just that we at the Prep should help those who have helped us. When we have busi­ ness to give, let us favor our real friends, those who have made possible this publication, those who believe in us and in everything linked up with St. Peter’s. In a word, let us— Patronize Our Advertisers

O n e h u n d r ed t h ir t y - fiv e

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9 3

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Practically A ll the Graduates of the Prep. W ho Continue Their Education Go Either to

ST. PETERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COLLEGE fo r

ARTS AND SCIENCES because they know that the standards are high and the school spirit is as high as the standards,

OR TO

HUDSON COLLEGE FOR

COMMERCE AND FINANCE Especially if they have to pay their own way and keep a daytime position. They get their information first hand, so that for them it is unnecessary to write to

THE REGISTRAR

1 NEWARK AYE.

JERSEY CITY


Ne w Jersey’s Jesuit High School

ST. PETER’S PREPARATORY SCHOOL 144 Grand Street, Jersey City, N. J. "The Prep” JESUIT DIRECTION

STATE REGISTRATION

ACCREDITED BY REGIONAL ASSOCIATION

St. Peter’s Prep is easily accessible from all Northern New Jersey cities. W ithin five minutes w alk from Grove Street and Exchange Place Stations of the Hudson and Manhattan Tubes, connecting with Erie, Pennsylvania, and D. L. & W. R.R. Terminals. Ten minutes ride from Journal Square Subur­ ban Bus Terminal. Bus connection with New Jersey Central Terminal. Academic and Scientific Courses TU ITIO N $3 0 .0 0 PER Q U ARTER ( $ 1 2 .0 0 per month fo r the School Year)

For Catalogue, apply to the Principal Telephone Bergen 4-3444


Seton Hall College SOUTH ORANGE, NEW JERSEY Established 1856

WILLIAM C. MARTIN

Accredited: N ational Catholic Educational Association Middle State Assoc, of Colleges and Secondary Schools.

908

Members of American Council on Education

C H E ST N U T ST .

P H IL A D E L P H IA

Assoc, of American Colleges College of A rts and Sciences. Registered in New York and New Jersey. Courses leading to degrees of Bachelor of A rts and Bachelor of Science. Special Department of Education. Athletics. Admirable location. Excellent board; also

MAKER OF

St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Class Rings

SETON H ALL HIGH SCHOOL F or c a ta lo g u e s a d d ress R e v . F r a n k J. M o n a g h a n , S.T.D.

P r e sid en t

COMPLIMENTS OF

C H A R L E S M. E G A N


Appropriate Clothes fo r the Clergy Expertly tailored clothes in keeping w ith churchly dignity and cultured smartness. T o t h e c l e r g y , t h e m o d e r a t e p r ic e s a ll t h r o u g h o u r s to r e s a re s u b je c t t o a 1 0 % d is c o u n t , t h e o n ly d is c o u n t w e m ak e.

F ifth A v en u e a t 4 1 s t S tre e t Broadway j Liberty St. 13th St. a t j W arren St. 35th St. N ew York City In Boston: Tremont a t Brom field

e r /

in

r fs

HUDSON C O U N T Y T he T R U S T C O M P A N Y o f NEW JERSEY •

M em b er F ed era l D eposit In su ra n ce C orporation JERSEY CITY

♦WEEHAWKEN

UNION CITY •

HOBOKEN

WEST NEW YORK

*In W eehaw k en, ‘The P ark T ru st Co.


Compliments of

The Censullo Burke Construction Co. BUILDERS OF

Collins Memorial Gym

WM. McCARREN WHOLESALE & RETAIL

FRUITS AND VEGETABLES 163 WEST STREET, Near M urray St., New York

Phones B A rc la y

j

7.2726


R . M. DOYLE

D. A. DOYLE

DOYLE BROS. Est. 1845

OLD RELIABLE MANUFACTURERS OF

TRUNKS, BAGS AND SUIT CASES U m b r e lla s , F in e L e a t h e r G o o d s, P o c k e t B o o k s— T r a v e le r s S u p p lie s a S p e c ia l t y — R e p a ir in g D o n e

40 CORTLANDT STREET Phone Cortlandt 7-2758 H u d s o n T e r m in a l B ld g .

O u r O n ly S to r e

N ew

Y o rk

"The Old Bee Hive Bank.”

THE PROVIDENT INSTITUTION FOR SAVINGS IN JERSEY CITY Main Office 239-241 Washington Street

Bergen Avenue Office Bergen and Harrison Avenues

A MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK Est. 1867

Tel. Bergen 3-0043

Joseph Jewkes and Sons Contractors 19 Tuers Avenue

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

Beekman 3-6921

C o m p lim en ts o f

BEAULIEU VINEYARD RUTHERFORD, CALIFORNIA

SUPERIOR ATLANTIC BRANCH,

WINES

26 BEEKMAN STREET

NEW YORK CITY


COMPLIMENTS OF

St. Peter’s Prep Athletic Association


HUGH M. McDONALD FUNERAL HOME 548 Newark Avenue JERSEY CITY

No Charge for Use of Funeral Home

Phone - Journal Square 2-5222


NELSON and WARD COMPANY Congratulate and extend their sincerest and best wishes to the class o f 193 5 of St. Veter's Preparatory School.

NELSON and WARD COMPANY Insurance Since 1870 23 9 WASHINGTON STREET JERSEY CITY, N. J.

BALDWIN JUNCTION Lumber

Millwork

G rand St. and Garfield Ave.

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

GRAND VIEW AUDITORIUM Ogden Avenue & Franklin Street

JERSEY CITY, N. J. Large and Small Dance Hall and Lodge Rooms at Reduced Rentals. W e Cater to Card Parties, Banquets and Dinners. Book Your Next A ffair Now. V isit o u r M o d e r t i N e w B a r a n d G r ill n o w o p e n t o t h e P u b l i c

COMPLETE LINE OF LATEST

TUXEDOS, CU TAW AYS, FULL DRESS SUITS, SILK HATS AND COMPLETE OUTFITS TO HIRE AND FOR SALE

Ready-to-Wear High Grade Clothing NO

O RD ER TOO

SM A LL— N O

O RDER TOO

LARG E

THE HOBOKEN VALET EM ANUEL

L E W IS ,

Owner

Established in Hoboken 1902 106 Seventh St., near Bloomfield St.

HOBOKEN, N. J.

Phone Hoboken 3-2579


DRAKE JUNIOR COLLEGE Two Years of College W ork DR. BENJAMIN F. STALCUP, DEAN CONCOURSE EAST JOURNAL SQUARE

Compliments of

St. Aloysius Alumnae MISS ANNA A. ATKINSON President

Compliments of

Michael A. Scatuorchio Contracting Company 47 P rior Street

JERSEY CITY

Compliments of

The Meseck Steamboat Corp.


ONGRATULATIONS to the class of 1935 It has been a pleasure to work with them

THE HEFFERNAN PR E S S 150 FREMONT STREET

Worcester, Mass.

P rin ters to t h e P e t r e a n and o t h e r g o o d book s.


Dale - Lehigh Coal Co., Inc. Foot of Henderson Street JERSEY CITY, N. J. Phone Bergen 4 -2 8 7 8

Delaware 3-8800 Union 7-1100

JOHN EGGERS & BROS. JEDDO-HIGHLAND COAL COKE — FUEL OIL F o o t o f C u lv e r A v e n u e JE R S E Y

1175

C IT Y , N . J .

B erg en

NORTH

T u r n p ik e

BERGEN, N . J.

Compliments of

McConnell Coal Company "blue coal” 87 V an H orn Street

JERSEY CITY, N. J. Phone Del. 3-2820

Compliments of

JAMES F. McMULLEN


H ob.

3 -1 4 5 5 -5 6

Day and Night Service

EARL F. BOSWORTH Funeral Director D IS P L A Y R O O M S A N D O F F IC E S

3 11 W illow Avenue, Hoboken, N. J.

COMPLIMENTS OF

CASTLE LAUNDRY CO. First and Harrison Streets

HOBOKEN, N. J.

Compliments of

A FRIEND

Success to St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Graduates

James McConnell Coal Co. 87 Van Horn St. JERSEY CITY, N. J.


HOLY CROSS COLLEGE E n t r a n c e b y C e r t i f i c a t e o r b y E x a m in a tio n A .B . ,

P h . B .,

and

B .S .

C o u rse s

A C O N S E R V A T IV E c o lle g e w h ic h r e t a in s th e b e s t o f c la s s ic a l t r a d it io n s . A P R O G R E S S IV E c o lle g e w h ic h m e e ts th e h ig h e s t m o d e rn e d u c a t io n a l r e q u ir e m e n t s . A C O M P L E T E c o l l e g e w h i c h g l o r i e s i n m o ld ­ in g c h a r a c te r in h e r s tu d e n ts . A F E A R L E S S c o lle g e w h ic h te a c h e s th e f u n ­ d a m e n ta l t r u t h p e r t a in in g to e t e r n a l as w e ll as te m p o ra l life .

B u lletin o f in fo r m a tio n o n a d m ission s w ill b e m a iled u p o n a p p lica tio n t o th e D ean o f F resh m en , H o ly C ross C o lleg e , 'W orcester, Mass.

John Marshall-College of Law HON.

JAMES

F.

M IN TU R N ,

DEAN

40 J O U R N A L S Q ., J E R S E Y C I T Y , N. J . A Co-Educational institution chartered and approved by the State of New Jersey G r a d u a te D e p a r tm e n t A course of study leading to a degree of L.L.M . College D e p a r tm e n t Two years’ lib eral arts course, preparing the student for entrance to the Law Department. L a w D e p a r tm e n t Three years’ standard law school curriculum leading to the degree of Bachclor of Laws (LL.B.) S p e c ia l C o u rs e s D e p a r tm e n t Banking, Public Speaking and Debate. Parliam entary Law, Eng­ lish. No entrance requirements needed and no academic credit given in this Department. NEXT SCHOOL YEAR OPENS OCT. 3rd, 1935 Day and Evening Divisions REGISTRATION NOW OPEN Send for B ulletin of Information SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE

STUDY AT PACE COMPLIMENTS OF

St. Dominic’s Academy

Accountancy- C. P. A. or Business, S ecretarial (Beginning and Ad­ vanced), Shorthand Reporting, Marketing, Advertising and Selling Day and Evening Classes. 134-Page G en eral Bulletin Upon Request.

PACE INSTITUTESWsSK Eagan Schools of Business The Edward O’Toole Co.

C hurch Goods

Superior in Faculty, Equipment and Placements O PEN

ALL

YEAR— DAY

S E C R E T A R IA L ,

65 Barclay Street

NEW YORK

BELLEWOOD DAIRY

E V E N IN G

SH O RTH A N D

A C C O U N T IN G

2849 Boulevard At Journal Square JE R S E Y

AND

C IT Y

AND

C O U R SE S

State-Capitol Building 48th & Bergenline U N IO N

C IT Y

THOS. A. DEMING CO.

Wm. Raleigh, Prop.

Canopies and Crash to Hire fo r Weddings, Receptions and Dances

Pasteurized Milk and Cream

Card Tables and Chairs to Hire A

198

Second S tre e t

JE R S E Y C IT Y

C O M P L E T E L IN E

OF TA BLE S FO R

BANQUETS 1 1 0 M o n tic e llo A v e ., J e r s e y C it y , N . J .

Tel1: Delaware 3-8609

.


TELEPHONE BERGEN 3-0345

JOHN P. BROWNE

William A. Higgins

fu n e r a l D ir e cto r

F u n era l H om e B ro ad w ay,

C o rn er

7 th

S tre e t

LADY ATTENDANT

BAYONNE, N. J. 278 Montgomery St. T e le p h o n e , B A y o n n e

3 -7 5 7 5

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

Martin Carey & Son

HEALTH IS A PRECIOUS POSSESSION

F u n era l D ir e cto r s W e 417

w o rk

w it h

y o u r d o c to r to

p reserv e it !

T h e d r u g s to re y o u r d o c to r re co m m e n d s

G ro v e S tr e e t

F o r p r e s c r ip tio n a n d s ic k ro o m lo w th e c r o w d

Delaware 8-1848 263 3 B o u l e v a r d

s u p p l ie s f o l 足

McCLOSKEY DRUG CO., INC.

Delaware 3-23 96

Main Store and Office

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

351 Montgomery St.

Branch Store 216 Washington St.

L et u s cle a n a n d p ress f o r y o u .

LOUIS DI BIANCO

Sussex Tailoring

Up-to-Date CASSOCK TAILOR

123 Sussex St. 1 4 7 U n io n S t r e e t

JERSEY CITY

JERSEY CITY

H. J. TOFFEY, P resid en t

Telephones Montgomery 5-0118

5-2121

Jersey City Coal Co. D is t r i b u t o r s o f A n t h r a c i t e s i n c e 1875

374 N ewark Avenue JERSEY CITY, N. J.

SPALDING EQUIPM ENT


COMPLIMENTS OF

COMPLIMENTS OF

Mrs. Helena V. Muller

Mr. and Mrs. John Hassett

COMPLIMENTS OF

COMPLIMENTS OF

Vincent P. Butler, M.D.

James F. Norton, M.D.

COMPLIMENTS OF

COMPLIMENTS OF

Thomas F. Meaney

Raymond A. Coleman

COMPLIMENTS OF

COMPLIMENTS OF

A Friend.

Frank Scatuorchio


COMPLIMENTS OF

COMPLIMENTS OF

James A. Hamill

William N. Hill, M.D.

COMPLIMENTS OF

COMPLIMENTS OF

Joseph H. McGuinness, Jr.

Daniel T. O’Regan

Class o f 1913

COMPLIMENTS OF

COMPLIMENTS OF

Patrick A. Dwyer

Dr. James A. Nugent

Tel. Union 1365; Pal. 595

Acme Auto Renting Co. COMPLIMENTS OF

Second W ard Regular Demo­ cratic Club

Packard and Cadillac Cars fo r A ll Occasions DAY AND

N IG H T

S E R V IC E

3 80 Palisade Avenue U N IO N C IT Y


McCarthy and Burke A cco u n tan ts and A u d ito rs

"H arp” Kiernan’s Sport Shop W IN D B R E A K E R S — IC E S K A T E S — SCH O O L SW E A T E R S

(Special Discount to Students of the Prep) C h a m b e r o f C o m m e rc e B u ild in g

9 01 Bergen Avenue JERSEY CITY

Room 3

Frank P. McCarthy C ounsellor a t L aw

Telephone Journal Square 2-2221 2-2222 29, 3 3 , 3 6 , 4 0 P a s s e n g e r B u s e s t o H i r e f o r A l l O c c a s io n s a t R e a s o n a b le P r ic e s

921 Bergen Avenue

JERSEY CITY, N. J. Phones Journal Square 2-0410-0411

The Hudson Bus Transportation Co., Inc. 4 3 7 -4 4 1

T o n n e lle A v e n u e

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

GANNON BROS.

Telephone Bergen 4-2255

Brandt Printing Co.

4 57 Y ork St.

C O M M E R C IA L , L A W

JERSEY CITY, N. J. D e l. 3 - 8 0 9 6

PRINTING 8 7 M o n tg o m e ry S t., J e r s e y C it y , N . J .

F o r O v e r N in e ty Y e a r s th e S ta n d a r d o f E x c e lle n c e

PETTIT & REED, INC. 3 8 -4 0

A N D SO C IE T Y

N o rth

M o o re

S tre e t

NEW YORK CITY Established 1836 B U T T E R , EGGS A N D

SCHROEDER’S Home Made Candy and Ice Cream 344

C e n tra l A ven u e Je rsey

C it y

C H E E SE

P u r v e y o r s to H o te ls - R e s t a u r a n t s - S te a m ­ s h ip L in e s - C i t y a n d C o u n t r y C l u b s I n s t it u t io n s

Telephones W Alker 5-7412 -7413 -7414-7415-7416

1 4 1 M o n tic e llo A v e n u e J e r s e y C it y

Telephone Webster 4-4569

Telephone Delaware 3-6045


B r a n c h : 8 2 3 W e s t S id e A v e .

Phone

P h o n e D e la w a r e 3 - 7 1 8 9

M o n t g o m e r y 5 - 5 8 66

A . Z . B E N E D IC T ,

BERNSTEIN & CO.

D’AQUILA & D’ELIA FLORISTS F lo w e r s

fo r

A ll

O c c a s io n s

9 0 8 - 9 1 0 B e rg e n A v e . T e le g r a p h e d

At

E v eryw h ere C a re ta k e rs

91

o f H o ly

N am e

B r u n s w ic k

JE R S E Y

C e m e te ry

53 P a r k P la c e

College Je w e le r

N ew Y o rk

Schwartz, Kirwin & Fauss JE W E L R Y

Specialty

M E D A L S A N D T R O P H IE S 93

Jew elers

L a f a y e tte S tre e t

NEWARK, N. J.

CO LLEG E

JE W E L R Y ,

Catalogue on Request

R IN G S

AND

P IN S

M ED ALS

Laboratory Apparatus and Chemical Reagents F o r C h e m ic a l a n d M e t a l l u r g i c a l L a b o r a t o r ie s

HENRY MILLER CO. Opticians Since 1 9 0 9

L a r g e s t a n d m o s t c o m p re h e n s iv e s t o c k in A m e r ic a

L E N O X H IL L O P T IC IA N S , I n c .

A d v is e u s o f y o u r re q u ir e m e n ts

1 1 1 1 L e x in g to n A v e .

EIMER & A ME N D E s t. 1 8 5 1

S q u are

College and Prep Students

C IT Y , N . J .

F R A T E R N IT Y

Jo u rn al

O utfitters to St. Peter’s

S tre e t

HARRY C. BRADSHAW SCH O O L A N D

Pres.

B e t. 7 7 t h a n d 7 8 t h S ts .

NEW YO RK

In c. 1897 H E N R Y M IL L E R

H e a d q u a rte rs fo r L a b o ra to ry A p p a ra tu s an d

M . D. PO LEN

R H in e la n d e r 4 - 1 0 2 0

C h e m ic a l R e a g e n ts T h ir d A v e n u e , 1 8 th to 1 9 th S tr e e t,

N ew Y o rk

A C o lle g e G y m a n d C o lle g e B u ild in g is n o t c o m p le te w it h o u t t h e m o s t u p to d a t e a n d s a n it a r y a r r a n g e m e n ts , n e ith e r a r e th e b u ild ­ in g s c o m f o r t a b le a n d h e a l t h y w it h o u t a g o o d h e a tin g a n d v e n t ila t in g s y s te m . S t. P e t e r ’s C o lle g e w i l l b e f u r n is h e d w it h t h e b e s t o f th e s e n e c e s s a r y a d ju n c t s to a m o d e r n c o lle g e b u ild in g e q u ip m e n t, u n d e r t h e d ir e c t io n o f

W arren Plumbers’ Supply Co., Inc. 25 5

A rch itects By

P hone B erg en

THE W. W. FARRIER CO. M o n tg o m e ry

S tre e t,

Je rsey

C it y ,

S tre e t

JERSEY CITY

W illiam Neumann & Sons,

44

W arren

N.

J.

4 -1 9 0 8


Good Results Depend on

GOOD COAL OLD COMPANY’S LEHIGH D IS T R IB U T E D

BY

P h o n e D e la w a r e 3 - 2 2 5 0 - 1 - 2

Mongiello Bros. Coal Corp. 625

C o m m u n ip a w A v e n u e

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

Hudson C ounty Coal Co. 611

F o u n e le

C o al Y ard

A ve.

JE R S E Y C IT Y Phone W eb . 4 -4 0 5 6

T e l. B erg en 4 -4 9 5 1

451

C o m m u n ip a w A v e n u e

JE R S E Y C I T Y , N . J .

BELASCO & SON A ll Kinds o f Sea Food D aily

W arren Meat Market

Oysters and Clams on H alf Shell

W illiam Otto, Prop.

2 9 9 H en d erso n S tre e t JE R S E Y

C IT Y

2 4 4 W a rr e n S tre e t E s t. 25 Y e a r s

T e l. B e rg . 4 - 8 5 7 1

THE ACADEMY

AUGUSTIN’S Bakery and Lunch Room

Choice Delicatessen The Best of Everything Cooked to Eat 129 York Street

2 5 8 W a r r e n S tre e t P h o n e B e rg e n 4 - 8 6 1 4 JE R S E Y

C IT Y , N . J .

COMPLIMENTS OF

The New Jersey Title Guaranty and Trust Co.

COMPLIMENTS OF

DORTMUND’S Bakery and Restaurant


Camp Rotherwood

William Schlemm, Inc.

A Real Camp for Real Boys

F u n eral D irectors

ALFRED, MAINE

Main Office: 43 5 Bergenline Ave. At Twenty-second Street

D ir e c t o r — D a v id J . W a ls h

917 Castle Point

HOBOKEN, N. J.

U N IO N

C IT Y , N . J .

Phone Union 7-1000 Branch Office: 140 Palisade Ave. BOGOTA, N . J.

Information of Joseph Boyce 1G

Phone Hackensack 2-6 568

Oil Heating and Appliance Co. 492 Central Ave.

William A. McDonald

JE R S E Y C IT Y

F u n eral D irecto r

Fuel O il D elivered — Oil B urners Dom estic and In d u stria l Phones W ebster 4-6388

280

B a ld w in

A ve.

JE R S E Y C IT Y

Phone Journal1 Square 2-3221

Hackensack 3-1104

W e d o S t . P e t e r ’s w o r k

Hudson T yp ew riter Exchange M . K o c h a n s k y , P ro p .

Ribbons, Carbon Paper, Stationery Monthly Inspection Service

COMPLIMENTS OF

William J. Hirten Co. B a r c la y S tr e e t N E W Y O R K C IT Y

Bergen 4-8333

99 Montgomery St.

S p e c ia l R e n t a l R a te s t o S t u d e n t s

Visit O ur New and Only Store

JACOBS BROS. C lothiers and Custom Tailors

COMPLIMENTS OF

ALPS RESTAURANT 727 Bergen Ave.

134

N ew ark

A ve.

JERSEY CITY JE R S E Y C IT Y


French Woods, Hancock, N. Y.

A lt. 1800 Feet

One of the Finest Catholic Camps in America Some o f the Many Features— 1. Mass daily. 2. O ver tw en ty modern buildings. 3. E lectricity, plumbing and excellent sanitation. 4. Staff o f high school teachers.

THE IDEAL SPOT FOR YOUR BOY Fee, $200— J u ly 1st to Sept. 1st—Nine Weeks C A M P D IR E C T O R

PAUL J. SULLIVAN, B.S. F o r F u ll D e ta ils A b o u t a R e a l C a m p

Consult—ffModerator of Petrean” or CAMP ST. JOHN’S 143 W inthrop St., Brooklyn, N. Y. Phone: Bucminster 4-2409

COM PLIM ENTS OF

K. F. K.


Printing Plates that Satisfy

Fifteen years experience in the production of Designs and Printing Plates for College and High School Annuals A L L PLA TE W ORK IN T H IS YEAR B O O K E X E C U T E D BY

ClHllMOCRiL FlHVTO 5

T9 1 5 MVIRRHY STR^T YtfRK


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$05 .

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1935 Petrean  

The Petrean yearbook from 1935

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