Issuu on Google+


THE CEPHEAN Published by the

SENIOR CLASS of

SAINT PETER’S PREPARATORY SCHOOL Jersey C ity, N e w Jersey


FATHER PATRICK M. COLLINS of the Society of Jesus

Page Two


D E D IC A T IO N

M

A Y we, the Class of Nineteen Hundred and Thirty-One. fondly dedicate this memorable chronicle of our youth to the venerable priest who made those years of adoles­

cence profitable for us, to that lovable professor, to that prac­ tical friend-— Father Collins. As these pages become hallowed, mellowed and faded, and our eyes become enfeebled in scanning them, may we ever retain in memory the Spartan character of this noble professor. M ay his earnest, sincere, Christian spirit forever breathe warm upon our hea


5 n

1

cvc/3

During four years we have passed and repassed through the portals of Saint Peter’s. The day has come when for the last time these beloved doors will be closed behind us as students. W e are leaving within these benign portals golden treasures of memory, gracious memories of fruitful endeavor, fond remembrances of sterling in r i

7y1] w f

'I

friends, ennobling recollections of indulgent professors. Do then, these kindly, sturdy, knowing portals of Saint Peter’s exclude us from our former associations? No indeed! For here we have an album in which are pictured the companions of our high school days, a volume in which are chronicled the events of our four happy years at the Prep. The pages of this book lie before you: they will tell a story to our friends; to us they will call back the days o f our youth and once more carry our spirits aloft to the high ideals we came to know a t Saint Peter's.


O R D E R O F IB O O K 'â–  V t/J

1. Faculty 2. Graduates 3. Classes 4. Activities 5. Alumni 6. Athletics


Page Eight


OLD MANRESA HALL

Page Nine


Page Ten


S 1

| I

1 I

I REV. JOSEPH P. O'REILLY, S.J. President

1 X

I m

c jS ^ e ^ S i Page Twelve


Page Fourteen


Page Fifteen


C

REV. W IL LIA M X. QU1LTY, S.J Instructor Fourth Year

e p h e a n

^

REV. MARTIN A. SCHMITT, S.J. 'Xlnstructor Fourth Year

r

REV. JOHN E. McQUADE, S.J. Instructor First Year

i Page Sixteen

JAMES J. HIGGINS, S.J. Instructor Fourth Year


W mm

GEORGE J. GOERING, S.J Instructor Fourth Year

JOSEPH J. ROONEY, S.J. Instructor Third Year

nM1

M d

m DANIEL J. TURBETT, S.J Instructor Second Year

Uj

ANTHONY D. ECKER, S,j. Instructor Fourth Year

nil m I.v -

Page Seventeen

•kii


EDWARD J. HOGAN, S.J Instructor First Year

ANDREW V. GRAVES, S.J. Instructor First Year

ERNEST P. HARTNETT, S J Instructor Second Year

FERDINAND A. ORTHEN, A.M. _ Registrar

~ g r-C

Page'Eighteen

(-


JU G

phean)JE £ ■ ■ — -fi>

%

frni

M B

JOHN B. BRIODY, A M. instructor Third Year

E.' VIN C EN T O’BRIEN, A.M. Instructor Fourth Year

M

JOHN J. MULLEN, A.B. Instructor First Year,

■I OP i l Page Nineteen

'


VIN C EN T P. MclNERNEY, A.B. Instructor Third Year

CLEMENT C. O’SULLIVAN. A.B., LL.B Instructor Second Year

JOHN J, LESTER, A.B., LL.B. Instructor Second Year

Page Twenty

&

»


DANIEL J. COLLINS, A.B Instructor Second Year

JOSEPH W . SINNOTT, A.M. Instructor First Year

wm

GEORGE C. MARTINO, B.S. Instructor Third Year

JOHN J. McGILL,B.S. Instructor Second Year

Page Twenty-One


ALFRED J. KELTY, A.M. Instructor Second Year

EDWARD J. CULLEN, A.E Instructor Fourth Year

Page Twenty-Two

W ILLIA M F. McVANN, A. I Instructor First Year


THOMAS A.'W ALLA CE, A B , LL.B. pMfttru'ctor First Year

JOHN F. LYNCH, A.B. ;Instructor First Year .

JOHN F GRIFFIN, A B. Instructor First Year

THOMAS J. McGEARY, B.S. Instructor Second Year

Page Twenty-Three


THE PREP SONG

It is our pride and our glory, Old in song and in story, And we cherish your name, And we love your fair fame, For the days of long ago; And we, your sons, will be loyal To St. Peter’s so royal. M ay your banner still guide us Where-ever we go. It is a story of gladness, W ith no shadow of sadness, Our years spent with you, St. Peter’s so true; And you hold our heart’s love yet. And through life's years we will treasure, W ith joy beyond measure, The gifts you have given— W e can never forget.


E D W IN FR A N C IS A H ER N “ Ed” Sodality, 1-2; K. B. S., 3-4; Debating, 4 “ Still waters run deep.” C O U R years ago, a shy and bashful youth looked with awe upon the buildings in which he was to pursue his high school studies. But this feeling faded, for Ed discovered that the Prep was riot as hard-featured as it seemed on that first day. Ed applied himself diligently and this, coupled with his natural ability, helped to master the intricacies of the subjects in his course. Hence we find Ed about to leave St. Peter’s, having achieved a great degree of success. He is still shy and modest, and to get a true appreciation of his capabilities we must seek it from others. Ed is a genuine Catholic gentleman. He is well quali­ fied to take his place among the distinguished men in the alumni. Ed has planned to follow a business career. The class extends to him the best wishes for success^

Page Twenty-Six

W A LT ER THO M AS ALEXAN D ER “ Snook”

4

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. . S., 2-3-4; Class Secre­ tary and Treasurer, 2; Basketball, 4; Student Council, 4; Ring Committee, 4 “ The spirit of youth.” K I EVER has the memory of anyone been so tmpressed on our minds as that of Walter Alex­ ander, better known as “ Snook." His ever smil­ ing countenance and inimitable wit have provided many moments of enjoyment to us alt, “ Snook" is also very popular with teachers because of his happy-go-lucky manner and his capability in his studies. W e shall also retain a clear picture of '.'Snook’s" roadster, otherwise known as the “ Beach Diamond," which used to transport some of us to and from school. “ Snook" was prominent in the affairs of the Prep, serving on numerous committees, holding various offices, and giving his hearty cooperation in all school activities. We bre ignorant of his future plans, but if we take his record at the Prep as a criterion, we can rest assured that "Snook” need have no fears for the future. "Snook,” you have our sincere hope for the greatest success. Adios!


JO H N H E N R Y B O Y LE

JO H N ALOV'S I US B R E U N IC y

“ Buzz”

“ Dutch”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Debating, 4; K. B. S., 3-4;

Sodality, 1-2-3; Class Vice-President, 1;

Petrean, 2; Cephean Staff, 4; Class Secretary, 1; Treasurer, 2; Assistant Manager Football, 2 “ A mighty mite of man.” I ONG after we have passed from the portals — of St. Peter’s the cheery smije and witty re­ marks of “ Buzz” linger in our minds. Light­ hearted and gay, with never any worries, never a grudge in his heart, he is a jolly companion and a true friend. On numerous occasions he has mounted the rostrum in debate and has rendered a superb account of himself. His keen mind and lucid manner of expression have made him an excellent debater. As a school reporter for three years “ Buzz” has painted colorful pictures of the Prep athletic contests. He intends to follow journalism as a career. W e say that the periodical which secures his services shall indeed be fortu­ nate in acquiring such a talented writer, "Buzz,” may your strong perseverance continue, as it has done in the past, to surmount the difficulties you may meet with.

~

/

Football, 3-4; Basketball, 3-4 “ His limbs were cast in manly mold For hearty sports and’ contests bold.” I OHN, we all know, is an accomplished athlete,

J indeed, one of those fortunate individuals who are known as 'all-around athletes. But there is something else which perhaps only we classmates understand. John is an all-around good fellow. Now sometimes the term good fellow, or regular fellow, unfortunately creates an impression of a boisterous person almost immoderately forward Lest we leave you with any such idea, let us remind you that "Dutch” is very considerate of the feelings and temperaments of others; he ex­ hibits no'lack of modesty, rather a magnetic re­ servedness. And although the crack of the hickory, the swish of the basket and the savage rushing back were irresistible attractions for him, yet it is satisfying to remember the interest and attention which he rendered in class on all occasions.

Page Twenty-Seven


us m EM

§ im

m Mn\

ir t f l

ib fJI Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Secretary, 3; Library, 3

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 2-3-4; Basketball,

“ Say thou thy say and I will do my deed.”

2-3-4; Class Secretary, 1

A S the years pass by, the impression of our old classmates will grow dimmer, yet some mem­ ory of them will remain firmly rooted in our minds never to be forgotten. In the case of “ Jack” the recollection will be the same for all of us. In our mind's eye we shall see him before us as great in character and in generosity as in stature. And just as his large frame of body and grit of soul have won him a place among our athletes, so too, in later life, his large store of knowledge and sincerity will win success for him, not only in the eyes of the world but also in the eyes of Cod.

“ Everyone excels in something in which

Page Twenty-Eighf

another fails.” A HAPPY, carefree fellow, a good basketball player and a fine scholar, so we introduce "Bud.” He stepped into our lives about four years ago, and began what he little knew was to be a struggle with such master men as Cicero and Virgil. But just as upon the basketball court, so here too, "Bud” fought them "tooth and naila and finally came through triumphant. A gay and assid­ uous worker, he has won his way into our hearts. Conscientious in the performance of duty is "Bud," dependable in a crisis, sincere in purpose and, lastly, and perhaps most important, generous and kind of heart. "Bud" is, indeed, our idea of what a leader of men should be, and we say good-bye to him with sincerest wishes for a successful future.

Imi V .i


R O B ER T E M M E T B U C K L E Y “ Bob” Sodality, 12 3 4;. Student Councils 4; Cephean Staff, 4; Ring Committee, 4; Vice-President, 1; President, 3-4; Football, 4 “ Nothing great is ever achieved without enthusiasm*’,! —p O epitom ize, and to ptape witffm such sm a ll; limits the many sterling qualities thct go to make up this sturdy lad, is indeed a task. His disposition is most meerful; je radiates a per­ sonality that is reallvfwresisffble, and his twink­ ling eye ruthlessly sweeps away all barriers. As to his qualitie^Vf ISfadersfcnp, his ctefe& had suffi­ cient confidente^M him/to e'ect him president. That confidenc^was more than warranted by the efficient rscnnqj; in /which he discharged the office. Althouah he was an energetic part of ail school acitivitifs, it/was on the gridiron that his worth wasiespecially notable. “ Bob” did not score many toualidowns; for you see he was not a sen­ sational player. It was when the team needed a firstdojyn that "Bob" was given the ball, and he c^evwrough almost invariably. It is the same consistent and I determined nature that is going to cairy "Bob” Vo success in life.

iA

ENE FR A N C IS BU R K E “ Gene” Sodality, 1-2-3; Library Staff, 2-3-4; Student Librarian, 3-4; Glass Secretary, 1-2; Petrecr, 4? CejsMsah, 4 “ W ise is he who invests his time in the mart of literature.” /^VF COURSE Gene would not want us to. discriSRinate, and' give him' .more space than anyone else, so it will be impossible to say much here about the facility and corf'der.ce With which Bp rendered Greek, Latin and French into smooth and delectable English. For, obviously, we must -devote1this spcce to an appreciation cf his fine work in the school library. His extensive knowl­ edge gleaned from the bountiful shelves of the library is evidenced by the erudite papers he has written for the Petrean. The title "Librarian" sometimes suggests a pale, emaciated, cheerless person, entirely unprepossessing. Gene, then, is a living refutation of this impression. He can just as well tell you the pennant prospects of the Yanks or Cardinals, as can he recommend to you a good mystery story. Gene is indeed an excellent combination of L’Allegro and It Penseroso.

V Page Twenty-Nine


T H O M A S PALNL B Y R N E “ Buns”

JOSEPH FR A N C IS C ARRO LL

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 3-4; Debating, 3-4; Dramatics, 3; Football, 4; Track, 2-3

Debating, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 3-4; Sodality, 1-2;

“ — Seest thou a man diligent in his business, he shall stand before kings.”

“ A gentleman and a scholar.”

I IAPPY and carefree, but with a sense of seri­ ousness toward the duties of life, "Buns” has worked diligently through the curriculum of- the school. As chairman of the class Communion Breakfast committee, "Buns” distinguished him­ self by the able and efficient manner in which he made the affair a huge success. This gives us an insight into his character. On the surface we see him bubbling over with humor and endowed with a proclivity for joking. But underneath this he conceals his grave, complex and canny fac­ ulty of attaining success in whatever undertaking he is engaged. He never shirked any responsibility, rather he shouldered it willingly and injected en­ thusiasm into his task, regardless of how tedious it might be. His friends are legion since he has that which draws men to him. He'possesses those qualities which make him a true friend and an ideal companion.

Page Thirty

"Jo e ” Cephegn Staff, 4 OE is a perfect, concrete example of that peren­ nial expression of a “ gentleman and a scholar.” He is one of the foremost honor men of the class, and his every action bespeaks itself of a true Catholic gentleman of the highest calibre. He has also distinguished himself in the Debating Society and his forensic ability kept pace with his high scholastic record. Joe however did not allow his seriousness of purpose to rob him of a cheerful disposition and affable nature. Coupled with these eminent qualities is his superlative spirit of coop­ eration. No activity at the Prep ever lacked his support; he was never once found wanting. Rumor has Joe continuing his studies at Villanova; if so it is to be, we most heartily extend our congratulations to Villanova and we are certain that Joe shall bring further credit and acclama­ tion to both himself and St. Peter's in the future. Cood-bye, Joe, and best wishes.

J


JO H N JO SEPH C A SEY “ Red”

V IN C E N T D ePA U L C A SEY , “ V in ”

Sodality, 1-2; K. B. S.; Manager of Basketball, 4;

■Sodality, -T-2-3-4; K. B. S., 2-3-4

Debdting, 3-4; Dramatics, 3; Cephean Staff, 4

“ A Man in a M illion”

“ His w it still abides w ith us.” A ND here we have "Red" Casey, who is just . bubbling over with the well-known pep, vim and vigor. There is-more Irish enthusiasm in "Red” than in a whole congress of Sinn Feiners. Of nimble wit, quick, at repartee, "Red” could always enliven a gathering of Prepsters with his rollicking humor. He is an amiable companion and a valuable friend. His particular pastime was arranging the activities of the "Hoy." For the admirable work he accomplished in this enter­ prise, he certainly deserves a vote of thanks from the brethren. As manager of the Prep basket­ ball team, Red executed his duties in flawless fashion. His pet subject was Chemistry. His knowledge of this science was amazing. Our re­ gret in leaving "Red” is only natural. So-long, best o’ luck.

/IN " is a quiet, kindly lad who achieves more by his silence than by words: at his studies he has won the ultimate reward of hard work, success. He is a chap whose friendship grows more valued with the passing of time. Just as he is faithful in his studies, so also has he been most faithful in his attendance at all school activities. If a prize were offered for the sunniest disposition, it would surely be awarded to this ever-smilling classmate, ‘V in." W e part from him with regret, but it is a regret tempered by the knowledge that he is advancing to a career in which he will be as successful and as much appreciated as he was at St. Peter’s.


JO SEPH JO H N C A SSID Y

H E N R Y M IC H A E L CONLON

“ Joe”

“ Chris”

Sodality, 1-2-3; Class President, 1-3; Class Treasurer, 2

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Cephean, 4 “ Blushing is but the true color of virtue.”

“ Always smiling, never frowning.” NDEED it will be an inestimable loss that St. Peter’s will suffer, when “ Joe” leaves in June, He is one of the very few who have engaged in sport activities and at the same time reclined at the zenith of scholastic achievements. Num­ berless friends have been the result of his manly traits of character. His conscientiousness and earnestness, mingled with a cheerful and amiable disposition, have been too strong an attraction for any of his fellows to resist. Then too, a calm and energetic method of surmounting obstacles on the tedious path to intellectual prominence has been his. This was proven by his remarkable record as a consistent honor student. W e dread to say good-bye to you “ Joe,” it is too sad a prospect; so we bid you instead, “ Au Revoir.”

Page Thirty-Two

I I ERE you see the countenance of one of the most likeable men who ever trod the halls of Saint Peter’s. Quiet and reserved, yet pos­ sessed of a calm humor and an affable, nature, he has the power of charming completely the person with whom he is speaking. Ready, with a broad smile, for any emergency, of few words, and a fine scholar, "Chris” is highly respected and esteemed among his classmates. His qualities as a student are extraordinary. Latin and Creek fall beneath his persistence and he receives testi­ monials with monotonous regularity. He.has also done his bit in helping his class attain its enviable position in the basketball tournament. Wherever “ Chris” may go we are certain that he will; con­ tinue to attain the greatest success.

to

;*ffi

O.

M


JO SEPH A N T H O N Y C O N N ELL

T H O M A S JO SEPH COOKE

“ Gus”

“ Tom”

Sociality 1-2; Debating, 4; Cheerleader, 4

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 2-3-4

“ W ith the sunshine of a contagious smile.”

“ And o’er that fair brow was wrought The intersected lines of thought.”

ARRULOUS GUS" will long be remembered as the Cicero of St. Peter’s. This loquacious chap can rise on the spur of the moment, and deliver an impressive oration on anything from thg~“ Shoestring Situation in Holland" to the “ Price of Eggs in Bolivia.” “ Gus,” however, did not con­ fine his forensic ability to these outbursts of non­ sense. He entered classroom discussions with zest and could be depended on to offer some worth-while suggestion or to formulate some expeditious plan. On innumerable occasions we heard him deliver brilliant talks at the weekly debates. Being endowed with oratorical qualities, naturally “ Gus” i.;s found'on the Prep debating team. As a sideline, he turned to cheerleading, and never did a worthier man elicit a more ar­ dent response than did our own “ Gus.” Along with this, he also managed to rank well in his studies. W e leave him now with deep regret.

I

A SERIOUS yet pleasing disposition and an agreeable spirit of companionship combine to give us a portrait of “ Tom.” From our first meeting we recognized in him all the traits which' make a loyal friend and an earnest student. Dur­ ing his four short years at the Prep he was always on active supporter of the class. The Sodality and the K. B. S., listed him among theif supporters. Caesar, Cicero, Virgil, languages and the sciences have fallen defeated before the relentless onset of his studious mind. As yet he has not made known his plans for the future but he departs with the best wishes of his friends. “ He has borne the burden, he has deserved the honor.”

k

Page Thirty-Three


JO H N JOSEPH C O RBETT

GEORGE JOSEPH COSTA

“ Red”

“ Georgie”

Sodality 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 2-3-4; Class Vice

Sodality, !-2-3-4; K. B. S., 3-4

President, 2; Class Secretary and Treasurer, 3

“ He seeks new worlds to conquer.”

Track, 1-3-4; Football, 4

z'"'AREFREE and easy-going, Georgie has made his stay at the: Prep a pleasant one fgr him­ self and for his associates. He was always ready to lend his support to any School activity. He was persistent and resolute. He attended to his scholastic duties with a Spartanlike faithfulness. He was of generous heart, ever ready to assist some schoolmate in distress. He displayed many fine qualities which won him the admiration of his companions and teachers alike. Georgie has not informed us of his plans for the future but we know that he will choose some line of endeavor for which he is ably fitted. In departing we wish him infinite success.

“ His strength is\as\rte strength of ten.” " D E D " is a gentl^Htin whose name appears I high on the 'Jjw o f leaders at the Prep, In fjis, last .year “ Reqj displayed his remarkable athletic prowes^is q guard bn the football team. His playing waiwharacterized by dogged deter­ mination and slack. His splendid record did not pass unheedeoL'^or it won him a pl.ace on the all­ county teawi rlis physical development is paralled only bsrh\mental ability, for in class he has showiwiiMselj to be a shrewd and an intelligent thinker»Snis pleasing personality has secured a grMt l^any friends for him, for he is a good mixe^vHjs ready smile alone is sufficient to chase away anyone’s “ blues." He has decided to matric­ ulate anSeton Hall and we feel confident of his success. V


a y y JO H N C L A R K COSTELLO “ Cos” \ Sodality/2-3-4; Debating, 2-3-4; Dramatics, 2-3-4; Football Manager, 4 VjThough vanquished he could argue still.” CTROM the beginning of John's career at St. ■.Peter’s, when he entered in second year, his status as a loyal son has been one of ever in­ creasing brilliancy. He will be well remembered for the great managing ability which he displayed while serving in that capacity on last year’s foot­ ball staff. Moreover, he is recognized by all his fellows as an orator worthy of St. Peter’s which is recognized as the criterion and cynosure' for ora­ tory in this section. Aside from 'these talents, and at the same time adding glory to them; John is a student of the first'tank. It is not without regret that we say farewell;

W

g

^

i T

JO H N JO SEPH C R EC A N “ John” Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 2-3-4; Class VicePresident, 2-4; Class Secretary and Treasurer, 1-3 “ Soi>nd in mind, sound in body.” [TOUR years ago; when we all were beginning our studies at the Prep, a smiling,' 'affable youth came among us. That young man was John. .During his four years' stay with us John has made many friends.' His personality is charming, he is good-natured and jolly. By his kindly disposition he has endeared himself to all of us. Thus it is, S w with his earnestness to please, he has made himself a valuable addition to our plass pnd a friend to all, its members. Judging .f/prtv Jiis ,fine character and his ability for.hard wqrk-werj^rj.ow ■that he„ will attain the success hei >«o -highly deserves.

! — X ) Page Thirty-Five


<3 F R A N C IS X A V IE R C RO N AN “ Frank” Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 3-4; Class Vice-Pres., 2-3; Seer, and Treas., 1, 4; Basketball, 3; Football, 4 “ W orth more than all the lips can speak, the silence of the heart” I T HAS been only a few years that we have * known "Frank” but it seems as though he were a lifelong friend. He has ever been the delight of his scholastic instructors. It is evident that his success has been the result of patient toil. W e admire him for his studiousness so characteristic of one of those who, sages mafntain, will' succeed. His sincerity has gained him a wide circle of friends as well as an enviable record as a student. He has ever been prominent in athletics, “ Frank” distinguished himself in all the major branches of sport, especially on the football field and on the basketball court, whereon he brought to St. Peter's the admiration and respect of all. As we understand, "Frank” is planning to continue his studies at Fordham. Far be it from us to doubt that he will cast failure aside, mounting to some unreached pinnacle in the practice of law. For­ tune is thine, “ Frank,” go seek her out.

si

JA M E S G R O W N E Y C U N N IN G H A M

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 2-3-4; Tennis, 3-4 “ Down-hearted never, happy ever” | IM is a true St. Peter's man. He is one of those men who have been most loyal to the school, an upholder of her reputation for graduating real Catholic gentlemen. He is modest and un­ assuming. His nimble mind and ready wit make him a pleasant companion. He was always ready to lend assistance to a friend even if it was neces­ sary to inconvenience himself to do so. W e have not only grown to know Jim, but we have also acquired a warm affection for this lad with a friendly smile and a spirit Of comradeship. We feel a natural regret in taking leave of you, “ Jim,” but we live in the hope that some day we may again be brought into pleasurable contact with you.


W A L T E R W I L L I A M C U R T IS

JO H N JO SEPH DECK

“ W a lt ”

“ John”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 3-4; Student Council;

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K.B.S., 3-4; Class Treas., 1;

Debating, 4; Cheerleader, 4; Cephean Staff, 4

Football, 4

“ A true model of strong perseverance.”

“ Fortune And Victory Sit On Thy Helm”

A LT" early showed signs of intellectual greatness and we retained that impression of him throughout our four years with him. He demonstrated his ability by capturing the class honors in every one of his four years. W e have been so accustomed to “ W a lt’s” habit of pre­ eminence that we have taken it for granted. Not only is “ W a lt” a successful student and a model for every drinker at the fount of knowledge but he also exhibits a marked proficiency in practical affairs. Our Alma Mater may well be proud of this talented youth. He is the ideal St. Peter’s student, and future Prepsters would do well to emulate him in his scholastic endeavors. He has made a brilliant record and he leaves us now, a polished product of Jesuit training. W e hope that his present success will be long continued.

A LL the world loves a fighter, and John is one.

' ' Struggles against difficult tasks are his de­ light, the bigger the task the better. Not only in the class is this spirit shown, for his conquering of Virgil, Cicero and T ri<3- WQS indeed a notable victory, but also on the athletic field; here, de­ spite the tremendous handicap of being a man of small size, John persevered and showed a “ never-say-die" spirit which won for him the ad­ miration of coaches and teammates alike. W e understand, John, that you are going to George­ town to study medicine, it is not necessary to wish you luck, for despite any break of fortune you will come through with colors flying and head held high. “ Adios,” John, and “ Godspeed.”


W A L T E R C H A R LES DEISS

H ER M A N GEORGE DIELLO

“ W a lly ”

“ Tam ”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Library, 2-3; Class Vice-Presi­

Sodality, 172; K. B. S., 3-4 “ Debating, 4';

dent, 1; Ring Committee, 4

Cephean, 4

“ The sages of old live again in us.”

“ His manners were complying and bland.”

“ T H E title of gentleman can truly be ascribed to “ Wally.” His quiet and unassuming attitude has gained for him the deep admiration, not only of his fellow students, but also of his professors. W ally has never been known to neglect his stud­ ies, and he has established an enviable reputation for himself at the Prep. Due to his pleasant dis­ position and smiling countenance, a mutual feel­ ing of lasting friendship has been established be­ tween him and his class-mates. As he takes his leave of us we will ever cherish fond thoughts of him as nonchalant Wally from Ridgefield.

\ W HOEVER coined the phrase "gentleman and ■ scholar” must have had someone tike “ Tam" in mind. A gentleman among .us he Surely was; a model of propriety and sensible sedateness, evei mindful that a gentleman can have a good, yes, the: best of times. 'Skilled in his Latin and Chem , “Tam" had another faculty which amazed his classmates, his knowledge of Spanish and the keen enjoyment he1derived from the study of this language. Like a scholar, he studied well; like'g gentleman, he bided his time By those eminent qualities “ Tam” will surely endear him­ self to others as he has won our lasting friend­ ship. 'Good-bye "Tam,” Qnd good luck. •Moy these few words of encouragement1help you to know that you are going the right way.'


A R T H U R C H A R LE S D IT Z E L 'A r t ” Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Debating, 3-4; Dramatics, 3-4; Cephean, 4 “ A moral, sensible, and well-bred man.” C T . PETER'S has never harbored a more devoted m or more amioble student than “ Art." During his four years of intellectual labor at the Prep he has shown traits.of quiet nature and ability. Apart from this, “ Art” has shown great skill in mastering Caesar, Cicero and Virgil and other authors, i He is noted too, for his diligent perse­ verance in the study of Creek. He has won fame as a debater and dramatist. His friends are nu­ merous and they find him tried and true. W e part from him with a sincere belief that we have been endowed with the fellowship of a true friend and gentleman, and that as our hearts have been with “ Art” in the past, so they will continue to be in the future.

W IL L IA M

TH O M AS DONAHUE “ Jiggs” Sodality, 1-2; K. B. S., 3-4 "H e who speaks, sows; but he who is silent reaps.” H ICCS” is a living proof of the maxim, "Silence is golden.” Golden indeed, is the harvest “ Jiggs” has reaped from his Prep school days. He is quiet and unassuming. He was never heard to utter, a harsh remark about anyone and was never known to lose his, patience. Every gathering of students was enlivened by his presence and by that sunny smile which played continually about his lips. “ Jiggs” is small of stature, but if his body were as big as his heart he would be a Behemoth. And so, possessing these admirable virtues,: natur­ ally “ Hggs" is the absolute essence of a pierfec1' gentleman. He is o "pius Aeneas” and a “ fidus Achates” rolled into one. A silent man must be admired more than his verbose brother for, with­ out verbal persuasiveness, he wins our hearts through his worth. “ Jiggs" has indeed endeared himself to the hearts of us all. His departure, leaves a void that shall be hard to fill. Whereever you go, "Jiggs,” you have the sincere wish of the class for the greatest success and happi-

J


^5

a m

II

<|pi ■Rj]

y

ii]

s K ip m fe

r&a

KM

||g ||l

iw P j h ^ C L W IL L IA M

i i U W A LTER

. D O N O VAN

FR A N C IS M IC H A E L DORIS

“ Bill”

“ Frank”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 2-3-4; Class Pres., 1;

Sodality, 1-2-3; Debating, 2

Cephean, 4; Ring Comm., 4; Dramatics, 1

“ Brevity is the soul of w it.”

‘‘A noble man and scholarly”

K >1AN’S courage and other soul qualities are not to be calculated by his corporal dimen­ sions but, as David of old proved, lie unmeasured in the deep recesses of his heart. Frank is small of stature, but he possesses the courage of that David; a courage which we think will last as the shadow of age falls across the plains of life Also he has, as one of his chief sources of energy, an invigorating humor, a humor which lies hidden, only to unfold itself and shower its abundance of good-feeling in time of gloom. Again, whenever Frank chooses to accomplish something, no matter what difficulties may present themselves, he will succeed. If we were to place all of this young man's virtues in a mythical melting pot, three would endure the heat of opposition— Humor, Constancy and Pluck. With such distinctive gems as these he is well equipped to fight the battle against the obstacles of life.

E W H O had the good fortune of meeting WI E 3ill some four years ago, recognized at once his value and dependability. In him we found a magnetic personality a keen sense of humor, together with his charming, irresistible smile which compelled friendliness. Never was there a time when "Bill’ was found unprepared. He was always ready with a flowing translation or with the solution to a weighty mathematical problem. His quiet manner recalls to our mind that famous line of Washington Irving’s Sketch Book— "The arrogant little and the unassuming great " Such a man was "Bill.” And so it has been our pleasant lot to be cast in with this man of high character whose sterling qualities have won for him lasting friendships.

Page Forty

1M


k ■ M

H H g n iK lA

MBHBgra

i

• r y 'B flll

™ !f

fu jir

JO H N M A R K D O W D

G ER A LD T H O M A S D U G AN

Sodality; 1-2-3; K. B. S.,'2-3-4; Football,.2-3-4;

“ Jerry”

., 4; Baseball, 2; Track, 3-4; Class Seer. & Treas., 3; Class Pres., 4; Debating,3-2; Student Council, 4; Ring Com., 4; Cephean, 4 "A n d he a prince and ruler of the land” O HN’S stay at the Prep has been a long record of notable achievements. His gridiron perform­ ances will go down in the annals of St. Peter's football history. As a tribute to his ability and leadership he was elected Captain of the 1930 eleven. His popularity has won for him the office of Class President for two successive years. W ith his usual determination John sets out along the broad highway of life. It is our firm conviction that no small part of whatever success the Class of 4-C has attained, has been due largely to his fine leadership. And so he departs with the friendship of all.

J

Sodality, 1-2; Debating, 4; Dramatics, 3; Track, 3-4 “ Fleet of foot, sharp of w it.” CTROM the first moment that "Jerry” dashed into our midst we could feel the warmth of his smile and the cheerfulness of his nature. Full of mischief, "Jerry” was the leader in many pranks of the Hoy. When came the balmy days of spring, "Jerry” donned his spiked shoes and distinguished himself on the Prep relay team. He has demonstrated many sterling qualities which should facilitate any task he may set out to do. “ Jerry” was always a friend in need which is the best type of friend. He could always see some humorous angle, regardless of how serious a sit­ uation might be. He injected ease into many trying moments with his subtle wit and humor. With sadness it is that we speed so gallant a knight. It is our earnest hope that success awaits him wherever he goes.


*

v

K EN N ET H JA M E S D W Y E R

FR A N C IS X A V IE R F IT Z P A T R IC K

“ Ken”

“ Fitz”

Sodality,3f-2-3-4; Class Treasurer, 4

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Vice-President Sodality, 4;

“ Good sense and good nature go together.” I N order to appreciate the predominant qualities by which “ Ken" will be remembered in the hearts of his classmates, it. is necessary to delye beneath the modest demeanor which is the exter­ nal mark of his character. Genial, patient, and ever willing to help another, he is q favorite with all. who know him. But cheeriness, outshining all his other fine qualities, distinguishes "Ken” from his comrades. Even under the most adverse circumstances, always ready with a smile, he dis­ cerns only the rosy side of life. Although he has not actively participated in sports, there are few questions on that subject that he cannot answer. His modest manner, his diligence in study, and his unfeigned good-nature, a combination unfor­ tunately rare, all help to make him one of the most esteemed members of his Class, That “ Ken" will continue not only to exercise his cheering in­ fluence but also to attain success in life, is the sincere wish of all his companions..

Page Forty-Two •

Debating,

1-2-3-4; Class Secretary,

1-3-4;

Class Vice-President, 2; Dramatics, 1; Petrean, 4; Cephean, 4 “ W h a t an assortment thou dost possess.” A PAIR of smiling blue Irish eyes set beneath an intelligent brow; above that noble brow an enviable shock of wavy blond hair; a perpetual smile and an overflowing loyal heart: thus stands our “ Fitz.” But catch a glimpse quicKiy. for “ Fitz" does not stand for long. No, indeed, there is too much red vitality in that husky little fellow, lie must keep moving and scattering cheer as he goes. But do not for a moment imagine that "Fitz" is a frivolous or careless fellow; just a glance at the responsible positions, he has capa­ bly filled must give you the correct impression of him. Yes, indeed, he is ah act've spirited student and an honor student, tea; And though Conv mencement presently takes him away from us, he can never take himself from our hearts which his personality has so effectively captivated.


A

K. B.

W A L T E R AL5VS(US FREN C H

GEORGE G ER A LD FLOOD “ Floody”

“ Frenchy”

S., 2-3-4; Debating, 2; Track,

Sedality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 2-3-4; Cephecr, 4;

1-2-3;

Xlass, .Treas., 2,-3; Dramatics, 2-3 “ W h a t men dare, I dare” I TAILING from the thriving city of Bayonne, * there once came.ximongst us a small fellow named "Floody.” ^His geniality soon won him a place in the hearts of his,,clpssmates. Often has he given..His time to others, Coaching them, before or, after class, in some difficult passage from Virgil or Cicera,Oftentimes, too., he has lightened a tense moment, and lifted heavy hearts with a burst of spontaneous, gooql.. humor. He combines the ability of an, earnest student with the quali­ ties of good cheer. He has a generous heart, a likeable disposition, and is a true pal. Many times he has addgd. his voice to the clamor of the crowd, for “ Floody" is an ardent rooter, having been elected captain of the cheer-leaders. W e do not know where he intends to matricu­ late, but with him go our sincerest wishes for success and it is with regret we bid “ Floody,” our true pa!, “ Au Revoir.”

Track, 2-3 “ Success shall be his, may he enjoy it fully” I I ERE we have a great lad possessed of a re* ’ markable smile which has won for him many friends at the Prep. His jovial disposition and his charming manner have made him a favorite with his classmates. “ Frenchy” never troubles any­ one; he leaves the limelight of publicity to those who are more self-asserting. But whenever there is a point to be discussed in class, "Frenchy” is the man to beware of. His glib, persuasive tongue can lash his opponents unmercifully. He presents his arguments convincingly and seldom fails to emerge the victor. “ Frenchy” has all qualifications for success and there, is no doubt in our minds that he will achieve it. W e are sure that his winning personality will secure for him the great­ est prestige in the law profession. May you enjoy, old fellow,. the same popularity and success at John Marshall as you did at our beloved Pep.


JO SEPH ED W A R D G A N N O N

T H O M A S EDGAR G ILK IN SO N

“ Joe”

“ Tom”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Treasurer, 1-2

Sodality, 2-3-4

“ Here is a true and industrious friend.”

“ Young in years but wise w ithal.”

TOURING the past four years Joe has endeared himself to us by his cheerful smile and kind consideration, together with a good sense of humor. Coupled with these go his fine assortment of jokes which tend to cheer everyone. However, the main trait to be noted in Joe is moderation. He never carries a joke so far as to cause pain to another, and herein lies the gentlemanliness of Joe Gannon. W ith Joe, there is a time for play and a time for study: to each he gives due considera­ tion. Knowing this, we, his fellow classmates, hope to hear soon of his mounting success in life.

A LTHOUGH Tom did not come to the Prep until second year, we feel that we have known him aeons. His terse, laconic, humorous remarks have added to his popularity, as has his natural cleverness. However, if is as a sportsman that we remember him, indeed we cannot forget him. Tom could tell you not only the standing of any club in the National, American or International Leagues, but he could accurately tell you their prospects, or the records of their separate moundsmen. Besides admiring this evidence of a well arranged mind, we also wish to express our appreciation of Tom’s happy faculty of emitting humorous remarks during the dullest moments Adios, Tom!

Page Forty-Four


JO H N B E N E D IC T G R A D Y “ Ja c k ”

H A R R Y JO SEPH G R EEN E “ H arry”

Sodality, 1-2; K. B. S., 3; Debating, 3-4; Dramatics, 4

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Class Secretary, 1; Class Presi­

“ A merry youth and one to care unknown.”

dent, 2; Treasurer, 3; Vice-President, 4;

I ACK GRADY is the Greenville-commuter who J turned over a new leaf and changed his “ modus vivendi” upon entering the portals of St. Peter’s Prep. He is an ambitious student and has always kept on a high plane in his studies. Particularly did he excel in Latin and Chemistry. He is well known for his witty and humorous re­ marks, which frequently had the class in an up­ roar. As he is a member of good standing in the Hoy, he was well entitled to that privilege. “ Jack" was always ready to lend a hand to any Prep activity and could always be found in the rooting section cheering on the Maroon and White. "Jack” has not as yet informed us of his future plans, but we feel certain that he will succeed in whatever course he may choose to follow. He is well able to take care of himself and manages to derive a great deal of fun out of whatever he is doing. W e wish him the greatest success and joy.

■ s4i

Ring Committee, 4 “ Speech is silver, silence is golden; Speech is human, silence is divine.” O ET IC EN T , courteous, gentlemanly always and under all conditions, Harry has won the ad­ miration and respect of both teachers and fellowstudents. No matter how large the assignment was, no matter how great the favor asked, no matter how much was expected of him, Harry ever retained his calm, unruffled demeanor.. Gen­ erous to a fault, modest even to meekness, his companionship was naturally much sought after and always appreciated. W e feel sure that the great resoluteness with which he overcame Cicero and Virgil is an indication that all his future en­ deavors will be crowned with the success that comes of determination. Good-bye, Harry, it has been a pleasure to know you.

f ji

fell d W 'i Page Forty-Five


C f, p m ; JO H N JOSEPH H A L P IN

T H O M A S JOSEPH H A YES

“ Spec”

“ Tom”

K. B. S., 3-4; Sodality, 1-2; Cheerleader, 4 “ A calm, unruffled gentleman.” is a quiet, modest and unobtrusive SPECS" youth, yet he is liked by all with whom he comes in contact. His unassuming nature has gained and retained many friends. "Specs’ ” eag­ erness to assist in any athletic activity stamps him as a staunch and true son of St. Peter's Whatever good fortune may have been his in the past, we hope that in the dubious years unparal­ leled success may continue to be his lot. Now as he passes through the portals of St. Peter’s for the last time we are sad because we are losing such a valued friend. W e trust he will be appreciated as much by his future associates as he is by us.

Knowledge itself is power' “ P O M typifies St. Peter’s best. In the affairs of ' the school, he has always taken a prominent part, thrusting himself whole-heartedly and un­ selfishly into activities. Tom has mastered Virgil in an enviable manner, rejoices in Trig, and turns to Science for recreation. Never has it been known that Tom failed to answer any dif­ ficulty in Latin. Besides Tom’s intellectual abili­ ties, he possesses a pleasing disposition and his friends are legion. His good-naturedness, kind­ ness and gentlemanly conduct will carry him far on the road to fame. When summer has given way to autumn and the best of friends are united once more in the union of class-fellowship, Tom will be found within the walls of Fordham where, we are confident, success will crown his every effort.


T H O M A S P A U L H IL L

GEORGE BE R N A R D HOCH

"T o m ”

“ George”

Sodality, 1.-2 3-4; Debating, 3-4; Orchestra, 1-2

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Class President, 2;

"Laurels rest lightly on the truly noble brow.’’

"A n d bears hrs blushing honors thick upon

A fine scholar and a likeable gentleman—this is ‘Tom." Possessing a determined, invincible will to succeed, he has exalted himself to the pedestal of honor man. Moreover, an unusual ability as a rrrisician, his skill and ease as a de­ bater, lend further splendor to his academic achievements. But though we may forget perhaps the scholar, we shall always remember the gen­ tleman, cheerful and unassuming. During his four years at the Prep, he has endeared himself to the hearts of all of us. Indeed, we face the day of parting not only with a feeling of regret that he is leaving but also with a feeling of pride at having known him, and we say good-bye with heartfelt wishes for the success that must be his in the future.

agcggaaBg t

o

Debating, 2-3-4

him.” C R O M the very beginning of high school daylv four memorable years ago, those qualifiers which made George the guiding star of his admir­ ing comrades shone brightly forth. Ortjtorical prowess, scholarliness, gentlemanliness, these mark the man. His cheerful and manly attributes, together with his modesty and conscientious spirit, have not only marked him as a gentleman in, the true sense of the word, but have made him re­ spected and honored among his classmates. Let it be said to his credit, that during his entire four years at St. Peter’s, he has never been known to utter an unkind word to anyone. For a man pos­ sessing such a combination of gentlemanly and scholarly characteristics we can predict, with the utmost confidence, nothing but the highest success.

m

Page Forty-Seven


T H O M A S L A W R E N C E JO RD A N “ Tom” Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Class Secretary, 1; Class Vice-iPresident, 2 “ W h a t is yours is mine, and all mine 7X L 's /y®Vrs” IT eigh'HnapDy semesters ago that those * deep e^res Qjj Tom’s first activated us, and ever since we have bsera.firnw neld under their spell. But do not/fmnkror^/floment that we resisted his magfietism, indeed/wla'ide ourselves on better judgment than that, we horlestly sought his company. The self-confident individual who urges his companionship upon his fellows, truly has friends. But the calm, quiet, patient men, like Tom, never need to placard their virtues; their companionship is sought after and their friends are numbered by the wintry snowflakes. Even higher than all these qualities, there is something else; Tom is the prototype of a "good sport.” To win in glory is not distinctive, but to accept dif­ ficulties, .rebuffs and ill-fortune cheerfully, with­ out ppmplaint, and with a philosophical remark, is the highly distinctive trait of this sportsman, gentleman and friend, Tom Jordan.

Page Forty-Eight

"R ed ” Sodality, 4-2-3-4; K. B. S., 2-3-4; Dramatics, 3 “ To be honest, as this world goes, is to be a man picked out of ten thousand” P jU R IN C his four years’ stay with us in the halls of St. Peter’s, “ Red” has shown two outstanding characteristics, his modest nature and his good fellowship. He is an ideal lad, overflow­ ing with enthusiasm for all that he undertakes; accordingly, he overcomes the hardest of difficul­ ties. Thus, throughout his four years at the Prep, he has always been successful in his scholastic endeavors. “ Red” has the character of a gentle­ man, a fact which is recognized, both by the students and by the teachers. W e are sure that a man of this type needs little encouragement on the road to success. So as "Red" leaves us he carries not only a diploma but the best wishes of a host of friends.


ER IC T H A D D EU S K U K IE L S K I

FR A N C IS X A V IE R LIN D ER

“ Kukkie”

“ Frank”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K: B. S., 2-3-4

Sodality 1-2-3-4; Class Secretary, 3;

“ Shy men oft have hearts of steel”

K. B. S., 2-3-4

and conservative are best descriptive Q UIET of Erie. By his hard and consistent study Eric has won the goal of success which he so richly deserves. A man of silence, Eric, like all quiet men, seems destined to greatness. W e have always admired his straightforwardness and at­ tractive manner in accomplishing things and this has in no little way aided him in obtaining the enviable prestige he enjoys among his many friends. He is an ardent supporter of all teams and can be seen at each and every game calling encouragement to the team. As to Eric's next destination we are not informed, but we ore sure that the greatest success will pursue him. Good-bye to you, Eric.

“ M y w ay is to begin at the beginning” I T IS incredible how such a quiet nature could be contained in such a big man as Frank. One has to see him to know that he is present, for Frank remains serenely silent, never talking un­ less he has something to say. His words, like all precious things, are few and far between. But when some difficulty arose and Frank, with a few well-chosen words, would elucidate the matter, we marvelled at him. He is a strict follower of the old proverb, "Make haste slowly." Before at­ tempting to do anything, he examines the facts; if he believes he is right, he proceeds. Frank has been persistent in his pursuit of knowledge. His excellent standing at the Prep is the sweet fruit of hard labor. Whatever is to be your chosen field, Frank, we trust you will manifest the same quali­ ties you have shown here; for if you do, the ulti­ mate result must be success.


Mo ICm i I

R O W L A N D V IN C E N T LU C ID “ Lux” Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Class Vice-'President, 2; Debating, 2; Ring Com., 4; Class Treas., 4; Stud. Council, 4; Cephean, 4 “ Men of a few words are the best men.”

B m l

IR S

\ \ u

Ml! bn m

U / IT H O U T removing any credit from the highscoring individual stars, allow us to say a few words for those players who specialize in team-work. There is no more thrilling and in­ spiring contest than one in 'which team-work is the dominating force. In any form of endeavoi an intelligent obsSver on the sidelines can dis­ cern and appreciate the earnest efforts and assid­ uous application of those unsung heroes who do not do things in a sensational manner or “ play to the grandstand," as the saying has it. Well, just this sort of a fellow has Rowland been, modest and restrained, and entirely locking in presump­ tion, nevertheless thoroughly attractive and popu­ lar. And just as the team-worker is best appre­ ciated by his teammates, so Rowland is especially admired by all his classmates as a gentleman, a scholar, and a true friend, in every sense of the word.

Page Fifty

A L B E R T JO H N LY N C H “ A l” Sodality, 1-2-3-4 “ Deep run the thoughts of a quiet man” H O UR years ago a lanky youth stepped timidly ' through the portals of St. Peter’s Prep, pre­ ceded and followed by an equally timid throng of ambitious young men about to begin their first year of high school life. "A l” has struggled successfully with the problems of Greek and Latin and has mastered to a proficient degree the in­ tricacies of mathematics. His compositions have afforded pleasure to the teachers who have read them. However, he is renowned not only for his scholastic proficiency but as well for his skill in basketball and baseball. He reigned for three years as captain of his Class basketball team. In baseball his splendid fielding and his hitting power is a well-established fact. Not a talkative man, yet the few words he speaks contain a world of meaning. May fortune's Smile beam upon this promising youth and the gracious God keep him true.

Lr II rM IM 3 D il


M Y L E S ALO YSJjUS L Y O N S

O W E N FR A N C IS M cC ARRO N

“ Buddy”

“ M a c”

Sodality, 1-2-3; K. B. S., 2-3; Class Vice-Pres., 1'

Sodality, I -2-3 4; K. B. S., 2-3-4; Football, 3-4

“ W i t and wisdom are traits of a man”

“ Faithful friends are hard to find”

\ W H EN EV ER we hear the name of “ Buddy * * Lyons’’ we shall always picture in our minds that light-haired youth with the irresistible smile and hearty laugh which has often aided in dis­ pelling gloom from a dull class session. W e will also remember his clever impersonations of radio and screen celebrities which ever held the class’ interest. Always carefree, Buddy is one of the most popular and well-liked students in the class. His scholastic achievements speak well for his effective diligence, and it is with no fear of awaiting him beyond the portals of St. Peter’s, refutation that we predict great accomplishments Reluctantly we bid you farewell, "Buddy” , and we feel sure that you will captivate Columbia as you have captivated us.

C O MUCH could be said about this lad that it ^ is difficult to limit ourselves to a meager de­ scription. He is a jovial youth and his pleasing manner has made him welcome in any gathering of Prepsters. He is not only a student of the first order, but he is also an athlete who has, time and again, proved hjs ability and his dogged deter­ mination. He has manifested those sterling quali­ ties which make for success. W e do not doubt in the least but that “ Mac” will attain eminence in whatever profession he follows. In future years', when we scan the list of famous St. Peter’s men, we shall find "Moc’s" name high in the ranking.. So, regretfully, "Mac,” but with best wishes, we bid you "Adieu!"

Page Fifty-One


JA M E S ED W A R D M cC O RM A C K “ Jim ” Sodality,

1-2-3-4; Sod.

Prefect, 4;

Debating,

1-2-3-4; Pres. Deb. 2; Class President, 4; Ring Com., 4; Student Council,

4;

Petrean,

2-3;

Editor-in-Chief, Cephean Staff, 4 “ All things turned gold at his Midas touch, All hearts were held by his silver words.” IN Jim we have come to know a born leader of * men. At the beginning of fourth year he was chosen Class President. Time proved him to be a capable and efficient representative of the Class. Other positions he filled and again, capably. During his time at the Prep his scholarly talents have borne a heavy harvest of testimonials. W e have watched with respect and admiration the unfolding of generosity, thoughtfulness and up­ rightness in Jim. Well indeed are the elements mixed in him: the fine qualities of a scholar, the traits of manly character, the spiritual fibres of a strong soul, these make up the formula. And some have said that alchemy is a myth! Indeed, Mac, to have known you is to have become, our­ selves, better men.

Q U EN T IN PA U L McGREGOR “ Scotty" Sodality, 3-4; K. B. S., 3-4; Debating, 3-4; Tennis, 3; (Capt.), 4 “ And a jolly good soul was he.” A LWAYS ready to see and appreciate a good joke, even one on himself, “Scotty.” !could be counted upon to conduct himself as one of the boys. Fun-loving, with a penchant for getting in and out of scrapes , his sojourn, at the Prep proved an energetic one both for "Scotty” and those who counted him amongst their friends. However, his ability did not stop with the pun. "Scotty” has been wont to come to the aid of some discour­ aged teacher by a sparkling rendition of twenty or so lines of the Aeneid or, if the occasion de­ manded it, he could be counted upon to unravel the intricacies of a difficult math problem. In athletics too, "Scotty" made his presence felt as a scintilating basketball player, though not a member of the Prep squad. As a tennis luminary, “ Scotty" did much to revive interest in that sport at St. Peter’s 'and was rewarded for his efforts by being elected captain in his fourth year. It is indeed with a deep pang of regret that his fellow classmates observe "Scotty" passing from their midst.


T H O M A S JO SEPH M c L A U C H L IN “ M a c’’ Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Debating, 2; Library, 2 “ Labor Omnia V in cit.” ^'"'RADUATION presents to us the mingled ^ feelings of joy at having attained a long awaited goal, and regret at the parting with friends. This fact is well illustrated in the case of Joe. From the day of entry Joe has proved him­ self a brilliant young man, a pride to any teacher who had the pleasure of instructing him, and above all, a man in the eyes of his fellow-classmates. His ability in mathematics was startling. Many times did we watch with keen interest Joe's slender hand darting over the blackboard in the solution of some difficult problem. Likewise many times did we sit spellbound through the readings of his essays or his scholarly translations. So joe leaves the Prep having attained that schol­ arly gentlemanliness so desired by all.

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Class Treasurer, 4 “ W ith a keen mind and quick smile he stormed our hearts.” [ZROM the first time that we saw “ Mac,” we could do nothing but admire him for his good nature and scholastic ability. He is rarely seen without a twinkle in his eye and a merrylook on his face. However, he is not a boisterous youth but he possesses a very becoming bashfulness. The celerity with which "M ac” acquires friends is a virtue in itself. To his cheery good-fellowship "M ac” adds a real intellectual ability. This ability which carried “ Mac” to success in St. Peter's will undoubtedly carry him to success when he goes out to make himself famous. "M ac” is continuing his studies at Fordham and we want him to know that ’31-M is rooting for him with all its heart.

Y\I L t 1 ly i I'S y

Page Fifty-Three


JX>

fju l M l

Ekl ME1 ru

L ffl GTaS

ir j

IV J

ft! ra'/M' Erf

P A U L A N T H O N Y M A LLO N

LO U IS A U G U STU S M A N Z A

“ Paul”

“ Louis”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Library, 2; Petrean, 4; Cephean Staff, 4 “ He hath sincerity in his look”

rn ■ v IIm iI

O I[

H A U L is a sincere, pious chap. By this we do not * mean that he walks in a holy trance. Not so; his cheerful nature, probably an inheritance from his Irish ancestors, occasionally thrusts aside his seriousness and turns him into a smiling, lively son of Erin. In class he is always a model student, attentive, quiet and orderly. Paul is gifted With great perseverance which enabled him to con­ quer all obstacles encountered during his four years amongst us. He has also a good sense of humor. Now with these admirable traits and a very generous heart, Paul is easily seen to have been an asset to St. Peter’s. That he will meet with great success in life, we feel sure,

71

M l

Page Fifty-Four

'Tis well to be merry and wise” AC C O RD IN G

to the great French general,

‘ ‘Napoleon, a man who knows two languages is, worth two men. Well, if this be true, the blond, curly-haired young gentleman from Union City must be worth a quartet of men. For he has thwarted the numerous hostile advances of the armies of Homer, the phalanxes of Xenophon, the ships of Virgil, the raids of the King of the Mountains, and the forces of Macbeth, all of which attempt to ambush the student on his march to knowledge. Louis, in addition to his seri­ ousness as a student, is also very jocular and possesses an inexhaustible supply of facetious comments. Our parting wish to him is that all success and true haoDiness mav attend him.


G ER A LD JO SEPH M A R A N O

T H O M A S JO SEPH M E N Z E L

"Je rry ”

“ Tom ”

Sodality, 1-2; Debating, 4; Orchestra, 2-3

Sodality, 1-2-3-4

"H ere is a true and industrious friend.”

“ Accuracy is the soul of scholarship.”

| HIS fair-haired youth came into our midst four years ago arid by his simplicity he has endeared himself to all his friends. He is happy and carefree yet realizes that life is real and earnest. “ Jerry” must bear some relationship to the gods of music. W e concluded this the first time we heard him running his nimble fingers over the keyboard. Never did Jerry fail when called on to entertain the boys with magic music. Jerry intends to continue his studies at John Mar­ shall Law School. W e hope that some day our old classmate will be one of the leading barristers of the state.

r\URING his'course at St. Peter’s, “ Tom” has displayed all the qualities of q true scholar. Distinguished by his conscientious and diligent application to the matter at hand, he has earned his success by faithful study. Indeed his earnest, sincere manner of speech, of composition, and of execution have been most plepsant and gratifying to all his classmates. His attractiveness is of that lofty kind born of modesty. He is an unas­ suming chap and the possessor of a manly Strength of character. Having won many friends' during his brief stay with us, he shall continue to hold the affections of men by virtue of his con­ sistency. Truly he has the qualities required to make a successful man, and in bidding him fare-, well, we feel assured that his efforts will be crowned with the same success as that which he has attained at St. Peter’s.

Page Fifty-Five


R O BER T P A U L M IS K E L L “ Bob” Sodality, 1-2; K. B. S., 3-4; Glass President, 3; Class Vice-Pres., 4; Student Council, 4; Ring Committee, 4; Cephean Staff, 4; Debating, 3-4; Dramatics,, 3 “ In whom the elements are so mixed that nature might rise and say to all the world, ‘There is a man’.” ,t , A STAUNCH character, a serious mind, a strong determination, and a sparkling per­ sonality, ajl stand back of “ Bob's” well-earned reputation. He is a good sport and a true pal. His friends at the Prep are legion. His generous heart has ever prompted him to aid someone in distress. His outbursts of irrepressible wit. and humor were rays of sunshine which could brighten the darkest moments. Bob was a prominent mem­ ber of the Hoi Club and was ever in the midst of any fun, or any bit of nonsense in which this band indulged. Bob also gained rendwn as a debater and orator. His versatility enabled him to give an eloquent oration on anything from the ridicu­ lous to the sublime. However, along with his funloving nature, he has a realizcftion of the serious things in life and a strong appreciation of the finer things.

H E N R Y PETER M O LTEN ! “ M olti” Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 3-4; Class VicePresident, 2; Basketball, 4 “ Thy modesty’s a candle to thy merit” A QUIET and sincere lad is Henry. We* hear

‘ * little about him now, but it is of men of this type that we hear great things in later life. Henry always gave his best to the Prep. In his last year, he earned, by dint of constant practice, the position of guard on the Prep basketball team. In studies, as well as in athletics, he has found persistence to be the keynote of success, for he is one of those sturdy youths who believe in a mixture of work and play. If he continues this moderation in the development of his mental and bodily powers, we are certain that “ Molti” will be a credit to the profession of his choice, dentistry. W e bid him “ Godspeed.”


JO H N T H O M A S M O O N EY “ John” .. Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K.B.S., 3-4; Dramatics, 4; Debating, 1; Library, 2 “ Fresh blown roses washed in dew”

JA M E S E D W A R D M O R R IS / / “ Moe” \Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Football, 3-4; Baseball, 3; * Basketball, 3-4; Track, 2-3-4, ■(Capt. 4 ); Dramatics, 4; Class President, 4; Student Council, 4 “ A silver lining in a scholastic cloud.”

\ \ /HEN good looks, good nature and good sense are assembled in one individual, surely that individual, has a portion of the gifts of nature. And so, it is almost with a note of jealousy that we aver that the goddess of nature has been espe­ cially generous toward John. Even we, his fellows, usually unappreciative of such matters, could not fail to notice that John is a perfectly appointed gentleman, sartorially correct, neat in his habits, and cheerful in his mien. Whenever we seek a refutation of the Opinion that fair features and sound mind do' not go together, we shall remem­ ber our classmate whose talents have graced the records of St. Peter's for four unforgettable years.

“ T O write a biography of “ Moe” would be a pleasure, but when one is restricted to an epitome, there is a difficulty confronted in choosing the most salient features.- For every­ thing about "Moe" seems to stand out. No men­ tion need be made here of his athletic prowess; since the newspapers have well taken care of that. To say he is popular with the student body is putting it rather mildly. His classmates have shown their confidence in him by the various offices and committees to which they have elected him. He is a veritable gloom chaser. His funloving nature and buoyant spirits never deserted him even in the darkest moments. He dispelled much of the dreariness of class by his frequent outbursts of pent-up frolicsomeness. "Moe" was also one of the leaders of the Hoi Polloi. ’Nuff said on that.

Fifty-Seven


JO H N JO SEPH M U R P H Y

A N D R E W A L Q Y S IU S NOONE

“ Murph”

VAndy”

Sodality, I -2-3-4; Debating, 2; Class Secretary, 1

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Debating, 1-2

“ A Trojan, a warrior, a noble man.”

" W i t and good nature he possessed

OHN smiles at the involved passages of Virgil' and Homer; he really enjoys mathematics; turning a French passage into polished English or the complementary procedure of translating Eng­ lish into French, are both performed by this hap­ pily endowed lad in a seemingly effortless man­ ner. Of course, it is unnecessary to mention that he is an honor student; we do regret that John has no intentions of furthering his classical edu­ cation; his mind is already shaped along practical lines, and John purposes to enter the business world. However, it is quite easy to fancy John as a prosperous, kindly, rotund business man, who would at the same time be successful and uphold Christian principles. For do we not already know him as a vigorous, genial, resolute person of a chubbiness that predicts rotundity? Good luck, John!

r i G H T semesters have passed since we had the ineffable pleasure of meeting Andrew. As now in our course the eighth and final buoy looms be­ fore us, behold, there is that jolly young pilot, ‘Andy” himself, settled in his little bark comfort­ ably and confidently, just as he started four years ago. Exhibiting marvelous pluck and dependability, he has weathered the more or less stormy sea of study with a finesse that merits especial com­ mendation. For "Andy” has not only managed to keep his own head high, but by his enthusiasm and high-spirited jovial disposition he has brought the sunshine through the clouds on countless oc­ casions to encourage his faltering fellows. His spontaneous humor always seemed to break through just when the going was hardest. With this happy faculty so evident we can only predict success. For how can he fail who smiles in the countenance of difficulty?

J

to astonishing degree.”


W I L L I A M R A LP H O ’B R IE N

JE R E M IA H BE N E D IC T O ’C O N N O R

“ W illie ”

“ Jerry”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Debating, 1-2;

Sodality, 1-2; K. B. S., 3-4

Class Vice-President, 4

“ Perseverance is his keynote.”

“ His head is the palace of thought.” ITHOUT hesitation, we rank Willie among the leaders of the class. Though the youngest of the graduates, he finds no difficulty in main­ taining himself in a plane well above the aver­ age. Aside from his intellectual ability, he is fur­ ther distinguished by his retirifig and modest na­ ture. There is glamor or heraldry in Willie's quiet, industrious and successful work. But. above pi I, he possesses that rarest of rare gifts— a true sense of humor; he knows when to laugh and when to sympathize. He is as magnanimous as he is modest; modest as he is intelligent. Although we know that his graduation js the first step to a sure success, we sadly bid farewell to a man such as we may hope seldom to meet again.

" I ERRY'S" high-mindedness and integrity were J always a source of admiration to his class­ mates. He is a plodder of the hardworking type with an earnest desire for success. He never ta'ked unless he had something to say. “ Jerry” hails from the Bronx and this alone has raised our estimation of that place. Many were the morn­ ings that “ Jerry" came dashing into the room panting from the four-story ascent just a few seconds before the bell. W e must stand and give him a little hand, for anyone who makes this trip from the Bronx may certainly be described as possessing perseverance. His pleasing personality and good-fellowship made him an ideal classmate. “ Jerry" has our best wishes.


In

(TT r f ) >7— 7]--------

C O R N ELIU S JOSEPH O ’D O N N ELL

C H A RLES JOSEPH O ’KEEFE

“ Connie”

“ Cooper”

Sodality, 1-2-3; Dramatics, 1-2:; Debating,, 1-2-3

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Debating, 2; Class Secretary, 4

"Tears, idle tears, I know not what they

“ The cheerful live longest in life and after it in our regard”

ClOUR years ago our company was enriched by a small;'*indeed, almost tiny individual, who, in spite of his diminutive proportions, soon made his presence felt in much the same manner as did that other , famous personage of small stature, Napoleon Bonaparte. Yes, for "Connie” soon be­ came a leader among his fellows. His sparkling personality soon showed itself in everything he did. In sports he proved himself to be worthy of obtaining a position on the class basketball team. However, this was to be expected because “ Con­ nie” has been naturally gifted with abundant cleverness and a keen perceptiveness. But, what is more to the point, "Connie” has endeavored to develop these natural talents as he progressed and matured into a fourth year student. So it is without any qualms for the future that we bid him "Adieu.”

\ \ /HEN Charles sat fidgety behind a desk as a v v first year lad at St. Peter’s, there began a period of ceaseless joy for his fellow-students and teachers alike. For, his pensive countenance and academic bearing only served to accentuate the flavor of the sparkling nectar which overflowed from the well of happiness within his heart. His presence has truly been like a silvery lining in the sometimes ominous black cloud of learning. Besides his great-heartedness and beaming per­ sonality, Charles is quite an athlete and sports­ man. His class spirit manifested itself continually and favorably, and his executive ability was con­ clusively established by the manner in which he served as Secretary in fourth year. He has not yet informed us where he intends to pursue his edu­ cation, but we know that whatever institution he selects, he will be welcomed with open arms and open heart.


w

. ■ ■ ■.1

, V'~ Iltlliliil'il iJ

B ffl

*_»_;•

'

* SSI

*\»i

T H O M A S E D W IN O ’N E IL L

R IC H A R D JO SEPH O ’R E IL L Y

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Football, 3-4; Debating, 4

"D ic k ”

“ A mighty man in a mighty frame.” ""T “ OM” boasts of Bayonne as his place of resi­ dence and ■ none the worse for it, “ Tom” is the biggest man in the class but requires an Ein­ stein to explain how so much humor and good cheer could be contained in one man. Ever since we have known “ Tom” ..he has been bubbling oyer with witticisms, the supply of which never seiems to diminish. His good cheer and generosity were a joy to his classmates. But underneath this genial nature "Tom” also has a serious side. He worked very hard in his scholastic endeavors and his efforts were well rewarded, as . is evi­ denced by his record. “Tom" found time for other activities, too:, making himself well-known both in the debating hall and on the gridiron. Now we come to the parting of ways, so we bid “ Tom” good-bye and wish him well.

Sodality, 1-2; K. B. S., 3-4;: Debating, 4 ‘‘Good sense and good nature go ever together.” \ A / E are quite confident that “ Dick” will go through life heralded as a man without an enemy. He is above quarrels; his heart, brimful of kindness, cannot cherish resentment. “ Dick” was a faithful student, a gracious acquaintance and a true friend. His deeds are neither blatant nor gaudy but it would be a great mistake to say that he is not outstanding. All the concepts of genuine Catholic gentlemanly behaviour are em­ bodied in his make-up. His spirit of fun prompted him to join enthusiastically in the escapades of the Hoy. He never forced himself into the lime­ light but when it was focused on him he acquitted himself favorably. In parting, “ Dick," may success and happiness be yours.

IIV J litin

Mi

■*4


T H O M A S JOSEPH O’SH A U C N ESSY

JO H N STEPH EN P A FC H IK

‘"Tom”

“ Pap”

"L e t us then be up and doing’’

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Debating, 3

C IN C E the time when Tom first entered the —' Prep, he has always displayed many sterling qualities which mark him out above the ordinary run of men. Perhaps the finest trait he has mani­ fested is that of perseverance. Tom has. never wavered in his duty. He has applied himself to his studies with a determination and singleness of purpose that immediately made themselves ap­ parent in the testimonials of merit which he reg­ ularly received. As Secretary of the Sodality of the Blessed Virgin, Tom has been regular in his attendance and loyal to his duty. Possessed of these splendid qualities coupled with many others, he will go serenely through life straight along the path of charity and kindness. As he departs from our midst, we can see nothing but good fortune and success for Tom in all his endeavors.

None but himself can be his parallel.”

Poge Sixty-Two

HETHER in the classroom or .in the corridors, or in the schoolyard, yes, even in "jug," no gbom cloud, no matter how dark, could shroud the beaming smile and wholesome humor which this lad’s presence instilled in the hearts of his comrades. "Pap” is one of those fellows who spread happiness and joy wherever they may ramble. Yet deep within the secret chambers of his heart is a quality which Cod and men deem praiseworthy, the treasure so many seek but can­ not find, true meekness. How many times have we praised him for some good deed, to hear him say in his innocent fashion, “ Just luck, fellows.” Trying to be seers for the moment, we see a future that is very bright, a future that will make of this young man a modest, competent leader in some profession.


{J W w O JO H N FR A N C IS PET R O C C IO N E “ Pep” Sodality,

1-2-3-4; K.

!. S., 2-3-4; Track,

“ Stretch” Sodality, 1-2; K. B. S., 3-4; Debating, 4;

Class Pres., 3; Treas. 1

Basketball, 3

“ The most manifest sign of wisdom is

“ His ready speech flowed fair and free,

continued cheerfulness” A MAN of ideas, a man to carry on, such "Pep.” His steady effort has gained him a coveted position in the class standing. Examina­ tions hold no fear for him for he works faithfully and the fruits of his labor are sweet. His beaming countenance has often dispelled gathering clouds of difficulty, for when the going is hard, “ Pep” just smiles and we know all is well. May you receive the laurel wreath of success, “ Pep,” and wear it justly, for you shall have earned what­ ever you attain. And so, with a cheery smile we wish you Good Luck and Good-Bye.

r \

R O BER T H U M P H R E Y PR IC E

In phrase of gentlest courtesy.” “ C T R ET C H 'S” quiet demeanor and his calm un^ ruffled manner acted as a sedative to ths more riotous conduct of his classmates. He was ever a gentleman in our midst. Though perhaps the most serious-minded fellow in the class, “Stretch" certainly had a broad sense of humor and nobody could enjoy himself more thoroughly than he, when occasion offered. His warm smile and his pleasant nature won him a host of friends. His beaming face, soft, earnest-voice and his hearty congeniality made him a very enjoyable companion. W e consider ourselves fortunate, in­ deed, in having known him for these few years. “ Stretch" has our sincere wish for a happy future.

Page Sixty-Three


JO HN JOSEPH RINDOS

M A U R IC E FR A N C IS PRO U T

“ Chubby”

“ M aury”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 2-3-4; Orchestra, 2-3-4 “ Napoleon was not the only leader

“ A friend is better than gold” “ T H E popularity which this energetic youth quickly won among his classmates, and the admiration which he gained through his attractive personality have been retained by him through­ out his years at the IPrep. His countenance is always cheerful, a permanent smile lurks in his face. "Maury” has acquired the rare gift of building friendships by his quiet demeanor and sunny disposition. "Maury” may you always up­ hold at Fordham as here at the Prep, the old traditions of a true Petrean— gentlemanliness and scholarliness. W e all know well that you will moke good at whatever work you are assigned to in life, and we wish you all possible goodfortune.

Page Sixty-Fouf

small of stature” A SERIOUS yet pleasant disposition and an

'

agreeable spirit of comradeship combine to give us a portrait of "Chubby.” With that true St. Peter’s spirit "Chubby" gallantly jousted with the classics and finally conquered them by his earnest application. "Chubby" is endowed with the gift of music ond expects to take up orches­ tra work, professionally. In fact, it would not astonish us, after a few years to find "Chubby’s name linked with that of Whiteman or Lopez. Be assured, "Chubby," your memory will for­ ever remain in our hearts. Good luck, and keep smiling.


JO H N JO SEPH S IN N O T T "Jo h n ” Sodality, 1-2-3-4

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 3-4

"T h e goal of yesterday will be the

"W isd om pins faith and trust to w hat

starting point of tomorrow”

he does”

A SM ILIN G lad is the one upon whose counte' ' nance we now gaze. He is quiet and ever cheerful, light-hearted and gay, with never a worry on his mind, he is a faithful companion, a friend to be proud of. From this you can form a fair idea of "joe.” He is always full of fun and readily laughs even when the joke is on himself. Many a class period has been brightened by his cheerful laugh. W ith your sunny disposition, your spontaneous smile and your high ideals, "Joe,” we are sure you will attain a high ploce in whatever course you choose to follow May you enjoy the success you cannot fail to gain.

POURING his sojourn. at St. Peter’s, "Johnny’’ has displayed qualities which constitute a successful man. He is one of those who realize that the secret of scholarship is perseverance. He is a steady, conscientious student, a real gentleman. His calm and poise have acted as a counterbalance to the outbursts of his compan­ ions. Needless to say, "Johnny” ranks high in the esteem of the Class. His likeable personality has won for him countless friends. Having completed his course of study at the Prep, “ Johnny” intends to matriculate at Villanova. As you leave us, John, we, your classmates, want to wish you the most complete happiness for the future.

Page Sixty-Five


JO H N ED W A R D S M IT H

ROBERT JA M E S S O U T H W E L L

“ Sm itty"

“ Bob”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 3-4; Debating, 4

Sodality, {-2-3-4; K. B. S., 3-4; Debating, 1-2;

“ Steadfast stands his w ill.” " C M IT T Y " is young and he possesses all the splendid qualities of youth. He is quiet and reserved, yet most straightforward and pleasant when he chooses to talk. What always surprised the class was the deep, resonant voice which ema­ nated from the throat of this chap. ''Smitty" often amused the class with his droll humor which was enhanced by his ultra-masculine tone. He la­ bored assiduously over his text-books and his ef­ forts were well rewarded. W e feel certain that he will find success in whatever field he seeks. His quiet earnest manner, blended with capability and perseverance, should stand him in good stead. W e wish him well in whatever undertaking he assumes

Page Sixty-Six

Library, 2 “ He shall go forth and conquer a crown” D O B will be remembered by his classmates as a merry, though unassuming gentleman. He has all the traits of a scholar, both in and Outside of class. With real Prep spirit he met the Onslaughts of Cicero and Virgil, and he emerged victorious. Bob is a true Prepster in more ways than on'e. Besides proving himself a careful student, he has been a faithful member of the Sodality. W e cer­ tainly predict great things for Bob because of his good-will, his personality and his scholastic at­ tainments. W e bid him a fond farewell and we hope that contentment and success will follow him throughout his entire journey of life.


%!LEPHEANJ

la

i A M E R IC U S C H R IS T O PH E R S T A B IL E

JO H N JO SEPH T A M A S IK

“ Bib”

“ Tim m y”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 3-4; Football, 4;

Sodality, 1-2-3-4

Dramatics, 3; Orchestra, 2-3-4

“ An unassuming youth, a lad with

"H a rd he labored long and w ell”

a quiet smile”

H O U R years ago we had the pleasure of meet" D I B has been a real representative of fourth ' ing “ Timmy.” Since then his sunny counte­ year during these last two terms at the nance and cheerful manner have won for him the Prep. W hat with football qad orchestra taking up hearts of all. An ardent participant in class his spare time! But it Jsr not in these activities sports, “ Timmy” has many times proven himself alone that “ Bib" for he may be counted an able athlete. Moreover, in the classroom he on to do his. share of the work in class. Not has displayed a remarkable spirit of perseverance given tojbragging, still, "Bib” has gained a promand industry. It may be sincerely said that during ineacajthat cqn come only to one who shrinks from ‘nothing. Alw&ys-Feady-to-piteh-in-and- he+pr- -Ws"entire course he has shown the qualities of a true gentleman, having never knowingly offended ne regarded nothing as too hard or too much. anyone. W e leave “ Timmy,” wishing him the •'Carry on, “ Bib,” you take with you our good best of luck, and being confident that he will; in wishes and best regards. If you continue in life the future, attain the success he deserves. as you have at the Prep, your success is assured.

Page Sixty-Seven


RM| IMSlI

.

.

..

ED W A R D JO SEPH TO O HEY

..

'

C A S IM IR FR A N C IS U R B A N O W IC Z

“ Ed”

“ Urbie”

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Debating, 4; Class Secretary, 3

Sodality,3-2-3; Petrean, 4; Cephefln, 4

“ Straight and sure did he make his way, and quiet was he the while.” C A C H year sends to the Prep a representative from Newark. In “ Ed” we have a good booster, always upholding the honor of his home city. "Ed” is a sincere, persevering' young student known for his quiet demeanor and determination. W e have always esteemed him as a kind and helpful lad, one who is gifted with all the charac­ teristic virtues of a zealous student. Our friend is that type of young man who achieves success by combining his physical and mental powers to bring forward gifts of sincerity, resolution and hope. We, his classmates, regard him as a con­ summate scholar. To continue enumerating his manly traits would require volumes. His kind words and deeds will remain buried deeply in our hearts. A blessing on you, "Ed,” and Cod be with you to help you attain that success He has planned for you.

Page Sixty-Eight

“ Merit is worthier than fame.” \ X/HEN we first met “ Urbie" four years ago, he impressed us as a little fellow, quite frightened. That impression, however, was soon proved an illusion, for he showed that he was a giant, and a fearless one, in his mental capacities. He prefers to be seen rather than heard, but his modesty cannot veil his good nature. Not at all outspoken, his opinion when voiced is yet forcefui and convincing. In fourth year he was captain of his class basketball team and on the court dem­ onstrated directing ability and sportsmanship that excited alike the admiration and respect of both his teammates and opponents. As a member of the staff of the Petrean “ Urbie" has displayed marked promise as a poet. W e feel sure that he will early reach the success he so richly deserves So long, "Urbie,” we Ye better men for having known you.


I S

R O BERT E D W A R D V IN C E N T

G ER A R D T H O M A S W A L K E R

"B o b ”

“ Jerry”

Sodality, 1-2; Petrean Staff, 2; Assistant Mana­

Sodality, 1-2-3-4; Debating, ^ 2 ; K. B. S., 2-3-4; Basketball, 3-4; Ring Committee, 4

ger Basketball, 2; Assistant Manager Football, 3; Ring Committee " A friend that may well be reckoned as a masterpiece of nature.” A S we glance back upon our early years at the Prep, we recall a tousled, serious youth plod­ ding through the fundamentals expounded in our text-books. Today we find him a thoroughly pol­ ished gentleman. A gay, debonair, smiling chap, imbued with the old traditions of St. Peter’s. During his sojourn here, he has acquired a host of friends and retained them by his congenial man­ ners and willingness to be a friend in need. Bob is quite an authority on all the well known or­ chestras and vaudeville headliners, coming in fre­ quent contact with them through the responsible deals in which he represents his fraternal connec­ tions. He has demonstrated a keen business acu­ men in these deals. W e do not know his future plans but we have unlimited confidence in his ability.

“ But when there comes a test, these silent men oft are best.” I ERRY is a quiet chap, who achieves success

) more by his silence than others by their blus­ ter. At his studies he has won the ultimate re­ ward of hard work, success. His ability as a bas­ ketball player was fully recognized and he wore the Maroon and White of his alma mater on the court during his third and fourth years. Always on the alert to do a good turn, he has won the well-merited esteem of his classmates and hosts of friends who extol him as a true St. Peter’s gentleman and a comrade. His sincerity has been more than once evident to his companions and he is one whose friendship grows more valuable with the passing of time. And now that "Jerry” has mastered Homer, Virgil, Cicero and the remain­ ing classics, he sets forth to take up new fields of learning. He may rest assured that the good wishes of his classmates shall follow him.

<8sp'/!g£R\ Page Sixty-Nine


M 7 S ,'

s

ED W A R D JOSEPH W A R D

9 1

ROBERT M A T T H E W W A Y

"E d ”

“ Bob”

Sodality, 1-2; Debating,, 4; K, B. S., 3-4;

Class President, 1; Sodality, 1-4; Vice-President,

Ring Committee, 4

2-3; K. B. S., 3-#

"Look ye here at this genial lad.”

“ A heart to resolve, a head to contrive,

" p D " is a typical Prepster, jovial, friendly, gen­ erous, and imbued with superlative concepts of school loyalty.. From the beginning of his ca­ reer at theLPrep, “ Ed” has been esteemed by hi.s classmates. W e never found lacking, in him ,the attributes of a gentleman and a regular fellow. Not infrequently did we marvel at his Stella*' recital of a Ciceronian speech or of the wandering qf Aeneas over the c'assic deep. W e admired him as, a student, but we sought his-companion­ ship because of himself. No gathering of the “ Hoy" was complete without “ Ed.” He was oyr cheerleader which speaks well for h s cr.gina'ity and buoyant spirit. Viewing the numerous quali­ ties which have been his durjng his stay .at the Prep, we are certain that when opportunity knocks, "Ed” will be fully prepared. W e are not cognizant of his future plans but whatever they are, "Ed" has our hope for infinite success.

Page Seventy

and a hand to execute’' " D O B ” embodie^ traits of a friendly, jovial, and cheerful disposition.!,.No class activity has ever locked his whole-hearted support and co­ operation. Always.shall we envision him as he cheered on to victory the teams >a{ -both class and school. Not only an: enthusiastic spectator but also an active player is "Bob,” as was evidenced when he dodged about in.the thick of the, fray of inter­ class basketball games. .^•'..However, we must not overlook his uncanny ability to untangle the most knotty passages of Cicero. Whenever a faultless translation was needed, "Bob” was ever ready to uphold the class. His success was not confined to Latin, but was extended to every subject. In bidding- you good­ bye, "Bob,” we wish you the greatest success pos­ sible, and may you enjoy the same popularity in the world that you enjoyed at the Prep.


T H A D D E U S A L O Y S IU S Z A JA C “ Ted” "Sm all men cast great shadows.” Sodality, 1-2-3-4; K. B. S., 4 A yourg men, small/in stature, but a Samson in ' character is our "Ted” . Quiet, of few words, he is a diligent, resolute lad whose remarkable ability has been demonstrated by his frequent re­ ception of honors throughout the four years'he has been with us. .His athletic inclinations, alfteugh hampered in some measure by reason of his small size, have made him a valuable addition to many of his; Glass teams. Cheerful, a scholarly gentleman, "Ted” will always be remembered as an outstanding member of his Class. W e are con­ fident thct a man of this type, will cover himself with glory ana prove himse'f a true son of St. Peter’s.

'

A LM A MATER FAIR Though years may lead our steps afar, A far our paths may stray, W ith you, Maroon, our guiding star, Our hearts fore’er will stay. W e ’ll drink deep pleasure of the past Your memories sweet we’ll share, W ith bonded friendship, firm and fast, W e ’ll breathe to you this prayer. C H O RU S Alma Mater, fair: far and long swell out your loyal .throng Your story told to hearts of gold will go through life along. Alma M ater fair, far and long swell out your loyal throng, As years pass by w e’ll linger nigh and sing St. Peter’s song. As years pass by we’ll linger nigh and sing St. Peter’s song.

Page Seventy-One


CLASS HISTORY— FEBRUARY CLASS

T

H E history of the February Class shall be recorded only from last September. This is due to the fact that but a scant number in the class had been together previous to this date. Our class might have been called the Mecca of the Prep, because its

members had gathered from all points on the St. Peter’s globe.

But if we had been

together during our entire career no greater intimacy could have born, no finer spirit of co-operation aroused and no smoother harmony enjoyed. On glancing through the personal writeups of each man in our class, one notes the qualities which made our stay together so pleasant. The classroom was never dull, wits just thrived there. All in the class possessed a broad sense of humor, a love of fun and a propensity to partake of the lighter things of life. W e worked through our class matter with an air of resignation to the cruel tricks of fate. If, during a Spanish translation, a brother was asked the reason for some construction he didn’t know, he would sweetly answer, “ It’s an old Spanish cus­ tom” . Likewise if in Virgil he was asked the same question, he might nonchalantly answer, “ W hy, that’s Poetic License” . “ Tempus fugit, noncumbakibus” someone has said. The days sped into weeks and months and then Christmas was upon us. W e certainly had a wonderful time the day before the beginning of the holidays. A Christmas party was held. Carols were sung and poems were recited, the highlight of which was “ The Night before Christmas” . Time flew faster than ever and once more we found ourselves back in school start­ ing a new year and on the home stretch of our Prep days. O f course everybody made strong resolutions and then promptly forgot about them. Repetitions were begun in earnest (by the teachers). W e were hearing the dreaded word E X A M IN A T IO N S men­ tioned all too frequently for our peace of mind. The Hoy decided to make its last month at the Prep one to be long-remembered. And we were highly successful in this en­ deavor. During those few speeding weeks we had most glorious gatherings after classes Yes, the Hoy was indeed something more than a name. W e could continue this survey of our final term ad infinitum, but here we shall deviate from this comparatively inconsequential review of our own affairs and go into a worthier field. This digression can serve a twofold purpose. First, it will bring this chronicle into conformity with the theme of'this book as sounded in the foreword; sec­ ondly, it affords us an opportunity to express, our few inadequate words of tribute to the man to whom this book is dedicated. In October, our beloved Father Collins, S.J., was compelled to foresake teaching fon an indefinite period because of ill health. This was a severe blow to all concerned. To give up teaching and to be separated from the boys he loved, “ my boys" he called them, was an extreme hardship for him to endure.

Page Seventy-Two


To us, the departure of Father Collins had left a void which could not be filled. To the school in general, it meant the passing of a man who had become a tradition a t St. Peter’s. The class decided that the most fitting way to honor Father Collins would be with a Communion Breakfast. So, on January 17, we gathered in the Domestic Chapel. Father Collins himself celebrated Mass;, we received Communion from his hands, for his intention. Then we retired to the Science Hall, where breakfast was served. Father Collins was presented with a Spiritual Bouquet composed by the class. There followed a few short speeches, laudatory of Father Collins, by the Faculty members, who were present. The student speaker, voicing the sentiments of the Class, informed Father Collins that this small gesture was a manifestation of the immeasur­ able love of his boys for him, a testimony of their deep admiration, their tribute to: his greatness and an expression of their infinite gratitude. Father Collins was beaming with joy. He told us that it was one of the happiest days of his life. He said that it' was gratifying for him to know that his boys had not forgotten him. His boys were happy, too, because they had made him happy. It was ail over in a few short hours, and Father Collins had left us again. But we can never forget that day. It has left an indelible print on our minds. I t is one of the memory treasures of our youth. Father Collins is separated (only temporarily, we trust) from’ St. Peter's but his name remains.

He is one of the traditions which will be handed to the future St.

Peter’s men. They may never, have him as a professor, but they shall know him and love him just from hearing of him. No superlative adjectives or sugar-coated phrases shall-be needed to preserve his fame; just simple words describing his deeds will be enough, for actions speak much louder than words. After graduation, we shall be linked together in spirit by our thoughts of him. Perhaps we shall soon forget much of our Latin and Chemistry, but no space of time can obliterate those pleasant memories of our association with Father Collins. Then at last our exit day arrived. Exams were over, and we had done exceptionally1 well. The thrill of that day is indescribable. The Hoy staged a monster celebration. W e paraded in a body through the buildings, heard speeches from the various brethren, then went to the Science Hall to hold our last meeting. Father Stanley gave us the freedom' of the hall. It was indeed a fitting climax to the activities of the Hoy. After a few hours of celebrating, we called on Father Stanley to bid him good-bye. He re­ sponded with an impressive talk. Then a sad note entered this happy day. W e filed out silently. Farewells were said. W e parted. Now the Hoy was once more but a name. Thus our final chapter had been written. The book is closed, only to be opened through the medium of retrospect. Our Prep days are over, they are now but sweet recollections of our happy youth. W ould that we could turn back the universe and start those joyous days again.

Page Seventy-Three


CLASS HISTORY—4-A As we look back now upon the years we have joyfully spent at the Prep, we cannot help but feel that if the power of turning back the years were given us we would w ill­ ingly live again those happv four years. Although at many places the way was hard and the storms of studies difficult to weather, these rigors were mare than offset by the happy times we had spent under the banner of St. Peter’s. The outings, the foot­ ball and basketball games, arid the triumphs of thespian art we have attended, are things that can never be forgotten in the years to'come, since they are vitally connected with the happy life we led while at the Prep. W e can all still remember that twelfth day in September, nineteen hundred and twenty-seven, when first we entered these portals vaguely wondering what fate lay in store for us either in studies or in the amusement of the upper classmen for green students. .W e were soon set at ease however. The exalted fourth-year students, the haughty third-year lads, and the gleeful second-year boys took no notice of us what­ ever, while under the able teaching of our professors we soon made marked progress in the studies we had contemplated so uneasily. Once in the thick of the combat, we took courage from our own efforts, and forged steadily ahead, garnering many testi­ monials on the way. In the spring of our first year, we turned our eyes to sports, and under the coach­ ing of Mr. Sinnott, obtained a respectable percentage on the diamond. Then came the annual outing to Indian Point before the terrors of the final exams. But judging from the beaming faces all about, exams did not seem very imminent. Not so with summer. It was soon upon us and we left the school to enjoy delights of vacation. In September we again assembled. But we were not all together. Some were separated from the class, having chosen the Science course. But we had determined to do battle with Creek, put its scalp under our belts, and renew our struggles with Alge­ bra. Nor were we unsuccessful. But soon the mid-year exams were drawing near, it was the time for hard study. W e safely passed through these and came up smiling and more confident than ever in our prowess. In fact we actually looked ahead to the Province exams to show the other classes what we could do. The majority of us came through with flying colors, and so gained ourselves the right of entering the lofty domains of the third year.


But when we started the third year we saw what we were up against. Under the guiding hand of Mr. Coering, S.J., we were to weather the difficulties of Ciceronian Latin and of French; the unknown paths of geometry under Mr. Hogan, S.J., and Eng­ lish under Mr. O ’Brien. But what was one more conquest when already we had two to our credit? So we tackled these studies as hard as any football player might his man on the gridiron and scholastic success was our reward. A t the beginning of the second semester Mr. Hogan, S.J., and Mr. O ’Brien left our midst, and Mr. Guterl and Mr. Mclnerney took their places.' W e can still remember the interminable but highly fruit­ ful writing Mr. Mclnerney put us to, in preparation for the province exams, and that now famous, slogan of Mr. Cuterl, “ You can’t beat the system” . But it seems that we did just this, and so entered our final year under the Maroon and W h ite banner. Presently, we were fourth year men, and were constantly reminded by our in­ structors to bear ourselves as such.

Not that we needed reminding, for instead of'

looking up to the exalted pedestal of fourth year, we might now look back upon the lesser lights of the three lower classes. During the first semester Mr. Mullen guided our steps through the mazes of trigonometry; though laboring under the burden, we were duly thankful that it would last only the first term. Father Schmitt, S.J.r.explained to us the far-famed exploits cf Argive Achilles and Trojan Aeneas and, the difficulties of translating them from the Creek and the Latin. W hen football talk again resounded in the,air, Bob Buckley and John Brocdhurst caught the fever, answered the call, and proved their worth on the field.

In the class

tournament, after having striven for four years, our basketball team, captained by "A l Lynch", captured the palm. And now we have done with the final exams, the last barrier to, be crossed; before we receive our.,coveted diplomas. Some of us are at the end of our scholastic journey, but doubtless many will continue the pursuit of. the classics for four more happy years at St. Peter’s College. And so, we are soon to take sorrowful leave of these halls we know so well, som,e to go out into the world with a determination to conquer, some to go to higher seats of learning. But to whatever college we determine to go, we know that in future when we shall look back, the memory of our days at the Prep will take as high a place, if not a higher, than the memory of any days we may possibly spend at college.


CLASS HISTORY—4-B

N

O W that finis is about to be written to our scholastic careers at St. Peter’s, it is

with a poignant pang of regret that we call to mind the vivid recollections of our early Prep training. The happenings have been fraught with incidents at the same time joyous and anxious.

On September 12, 1927, we gathered with-trepidation in the school yard. Upon being assigned our respective classrooms, we were at last convinced that we were on our way to the achievement of becoming good sons of St. Peter’s. Friendships rapidly sprang up and we devoted ourselves whole-heartedly to the task of becoming real Prepsters. Under the able tutelage of the various teachers assigned to our divisions we progressed in our initiation into the mysteries of Latin and Mathematics, D’Ooge and Wentworth were responsible for many a headache and for not infrequent despair­ ing moments. A number of enterprising students allied themselves to the various school activities. "Fran k” Fitzpatrick and Charlie Milton performed ably in the school theatrical pre­ sentation of that year. Richard Beards was the representative on the baseball team. Then, remember “ The Spirit of l-A-4” , our class newspaper. Myles Lyons, the budding journalist, edited that energetic publication. Having disposed of that superabundance of vivacity with which all first year students are endowed, we assumed the somewhat sober dignity of second year men. W e regretted the separation of the former first year classes but when we were aware of the fact that we were to be taught by such able instructors as Mr. Duffy and Fr. Campp, S.J., we soon dispelled all thoughts of regret. W e achieved many praiseworthy projects during that year. Our class was well represented in the Debating Society and as the first semester progressed we formed a second year football team under the ex­ perienced eye of a former Fordham luminary, Mr. Duffy. W e weathered the storm of Mid-Year Exams and proceeded to our goal of June promotion. W e formed, during the second semester, a baseball team which did us much credit. Daylight saving time came and with it Spring and repetitions. Before we knew it, June exams were upon us and we found ourselves put to the test once again and once again we passed, leaving in June for our vacation. t to .-'inb nuo 1 VDfT 5W» aVD1 jf t / .v

Page Seventy-Six

^SSt,

V .X O

_

■■

■ ■:

I•

-• I -


Third year men we were now, with a bursting of vest buttons and general expan­ sion of everyone’s “ ego” . Two milestones, First and Second years, had become dim waystations of the past.

It was in that memorable third year that we met a real friend,

Mr. George Goering, S.J. Under his careful guidance in and out of class, our character was carefully molded until we might readily be recognized as true Petrean gentlemen. It was in that year, too, that we reorganized our old football team. Once more “ Bob” Buckley, "Tom ” Jordan and "Jo e ” Cassidy were performing in their usual inimitable manner. Our baseball team also was setting an enviable record. In thespian ability, “ Charlie” O ’Brien, John Costello and “ A rtie ” Ditzel excelled in the presentation of King Henry IV. During that year the two Greek divisions were united, to the great satisfaction of all. Do y6u remember that barnyard gathering resulting from the welding of classes? Vacation once more at an end, we reluctantly retraced our steps for the final stretch that was to end on Commencement.Night, W oefully we were made aware of the split in our old class. W e were now to become two distinct units. However the disappointment of the separation from our old friends was somewhat alleviated by the appearance of two new faces in our ranks.

“ Jim ” McCormack and “ Johnny”

Breunig had joined us. Many a happy memory accompanied our recollection of this pair.

“ Jim ” soon established his outstanding'worth in intellectual' endeavor while

“ Dutch” displayed his expert athletic ability. He was unparalleled as an end on the Prep football team and also held a position on the basketball team. Two notable a c ­ complishments in truth. "Jo e” Cassidy, incidentally an honor student of the highest calibre, also played on the Prep grid team. John Costello showed managerial ability of the highest degree when he ably con­ ducted the business of the football team. Frank Fitzpatrick in addition to being a member of the Cephean staff held the responsible position of historian of the Beaudevin Debating Society. "Jim ” McCormack received two of the most important positions of fourth year, the presidency of the class of 4-B and Editorship of the Cephean. Assisting him in the publication of the Year Book were Rowland Lucid, “ Gene” Burke and Frank Fitzpatrick. "G ene” Burke held the position of Student Librarian for two years. Now, in closing, may we not say that this is truly a creditable record of our stay at St. Peter’s. The members of our class have almost to a man interested themselves in some scholastic activity. Brilliant have been these past few years and as we stand on the threshold, about to leave St. Peter’s as finished students, we earnestly hope that the ideals inculcated while we were within its walls, will ever be the guiding light of our lives and keep us firm of foot in the path of justice and truth.

Page Seventy-Seven


CLASS HISTORY—4-C

W

H EN the red and brown leaves of that memorable September of four years ago came tumbling down to earth, we, the class of ’31, first entered the walks of St. Peter’s, which since then have become so well known and so well loved by

us. How strange were the surroundings, how ill at ease we felt. Like visitors to some far-away land we wandered about, gazing open-mouthed with awe at some athletic hero, feeling insignificant and overshadowed by those veterans who go about greeting each other and renewing old acquaintances with an ease and security which comes to only those who have already experienced and conquered the little trials of high school life. It was not long before we became acclimated however, and before a month had passed we were going about with the jaunty air and superior bearing which can come only to first year lads. Under the careful surveillance of our instructors, we delved into the deep mysteries which Latin, Math, and Ancient History present to newly-fledged high school students. Here also were instilled in us the first true principles of real Catholic gentlemanliness, principles upon which the Jesuit educational system is founded. W ith what fresh vigor we plunged into all things bearing the stamp of the Prep! How we cheered on our heroes, how we applauded the victor, regardless of his line of endeavor, were it debating, athletics or studies. Our first gathering, at which we met the entire student body, was at the Annual Retreat. From then on we made friendships and by the time of the outing in spring we were indeed true members of the Prep. After a summer vacation, during which we grew weeks older and wiser, we again returned to the Prep. One of our most delightful occupations was greeting those whose acquaintances we had made during the first year. Another happy experience was to watch the new first year students who were assembled in the yard, much as we had been the previous year. A t the first roll call we found, much to our dismay, we were to be separated. Those choosing Creek were assigned to the Senior Building and those following the Science course, to the Science Hall. W e who took Science gained our first knowledge of Biology, and here we first became acquainted with that character so well known to all Science students, “ Charley Gumbash” .

Page Seventy-Eight


Now we began to lose that complex which we had developed in the preceding year and here, too, we began to lose our awe of those who wore the Maroon and W h ite of athletic prowess, for were not members of our class also members of the teams. But we did not lose our respect for those who, month after month, went up the stage to receive testimonials of their faithful hours of diligent study. Second year passed quickly and once again the annual outing came around. This was a brief respite in the storm which had enveloped us, namely the Province Exams. A fte r a battle which brought into play all our skill, we emerged once more victorious. Alas, in the third year we were again broken up, this time because of modern language classes. French students and Spanish students were divided into two different classes. This was one of our greatest years, for we stepped forward and defeated all that came our way. Latin and Physics fell beneath the blows we rained upon them, like wheat before the scythe. During this year we were to come in contact with two new Prefects, in study and discipline. Although we were sorry to lose those who had been our guiding lights for two years, the sorrow of parting was lessened by the calibre of the men who were now to lead us. The days and weeks sped by quickly and it was not long before the approach of spring heralded the coming of another vacation and another year’s close. This time we did not cherish the thoughts of parting, for we had become so well acquainted with our classmates that the thought of separation weighed us down. But, as in all well regulated systems, the goal is reached and we must leave. The summer passed quickly and in September we came back to the familiar halls and classes of. our Alm a Mater. W e now had come to that final stretch down which we would endeavor to stride without any obstacle hindering us. The days of late fall and early winter passed and suddenly we were confronted with a vision of examinations. Finally these passed, and today we stand on the threshold looking forth into that world of which we know so little. It will be with a real pang of sorrow that we will grip the hands of our fellow-students and then bid a fond farewell and "Cod be with you” . So, as we look back, we feel sure that our time has not been wasted, that we have gained a true knowledge not only of the letters which have been drilled into us, but a spirit of true gentlemanliness with which every Prep man is marked. Therefore, it is with a feeling of a work well done that we part from your halls and so, St. Peter’s, we,


P R O P H EC Y

A PACE TORN FROM A 1951 DIARY May 8th, 1951 Attended reunion banquet of Class of ’31 at formal dedication of new Dowd Gymnasium which my old classmate donated to St. Peter’s after he achieved his great engineering success. Surely was a representative gathering. Robert Buckley, coach at Seton Hall, spoke, as well as Ambassador Miskell and Mayor Jordan of Harrison. A telegram of greetings was read from Fathers McGurr and O ’Shaughnessv who are teaching at Holy Cross. Speeches were broadcast over Sinnott-Casey network handled by announcers Costello and W alker. Ditzel and Flood, the famous caterers, put up quite a banquet, at least it satisfied Joe Cassidy, the advertising manager of judge, and he’s still as much of an epicure as ever. Talked for a while with Johnny •Murphy; he has a position chalking up the blackboard in the New York Stock Exchange. W ish my Van Dyke would come along as Pafchik’s has. Tommy H ill’s orchestra was really good. From the way he used to annoy his neighbors with that clarinet, I never thought any good would come of it, but who ever expected that Tom Cilkinson would become manager of the Jersey City "Skeeters” ? Petrean tradition surely is well supported; there were at least fifteen lawyers present including Donohue, Carroll, Curtis and George Hoch,— George was recently awarded an honorary Doctor’s degree at Georgetown. The medical profession was well represented by Doctors Hayes, Price, W a y and Mooney, as well as two dentists, W illie O ’Brien and Chris Conlin— Chris has gone in for surgical work and X-ray as well. Bud Brown and Charlie O ’Keefe brought along a chorus of entertainers from their dancing school, and Jim Morris and Tom Flanagan alternated as masters of ceremony.

N O T E: Must remember Harry Green invited me to come down to the shore and visit him at his home there. Also— must go over and examine Frank Fitzpatrick; he’s laid up with tonsilitis. Good Night Diary— 6-8-51— (11:45 P.M.)

JA M ES E. M cCO RM ACK.

Page Eighty


^

V ke

L E P im

CLASS W IL L svsys

W e , the members of the Class of nineteen hundred thirty-one, cf Saint Peter’s Preparatory School, of sound mind and body, in full possession of our faculties-- we hope— do hereby, out of the unbounded kindness of our hearts, give, bequeath and; incidentally disown these sundry properties and attributes: Buckley’s jokes to an antique collector. Boyle’s spats to Marty. Stabile’s stature to a cooperage. Noone’s absent-mindedness to-same professor. McLaughlin’s nonchalance to Charlie Dolan. Lucid’s bow-ties to McNer'ney. Greene’s neatness to W illie Reilly. Alexander’s tie-knats to anyone courageous enough to wear them. McGregor’s “ Poetic License” to all future students of Virgil and Homer. Cassidy’s blue comet to the junk pile. Prout’s tuxedo to W illie Bauer. Casey’s line to Tumulty. Pafchik’s labial down to the jersey C ity Barber’s School. Connell’s crooning to some peanut vender. Conlin’s blissfulness to Kelly. Dugan’s ability to beat jug to McCeady. The aroma of Colgate’s to the future Prepsters. The class treasury to the next treasurer; with it he can purchase a two-cent stamp (if he has two cents of his own). The name and fame of the Hoi Polloi to any following group capable of upholding their standards. Saturday jug to Pluto and Proserpina. Our sincere good will to everybody.


W & he

EPHEAN

LIAR CHIMES

FRO M T H E RO STRU M 'For the absence of brains, I’ve never seen the like of this aggregation” "N o w when you get to college, when, as and if ” “ You know a lot of Creek but it’s all wrong” "You talk a lot but never say anything”

&

“ W h o was the father of Aeneas?” “ W h a t a crowd of boilermakers” “ Feet off the furniture” " A little paper, gentlemen’ “ Jug!”

I

SV£/3

i

FROM T H E RA N K S ‘Cosh, Cicero himself couldn’t have passed that-Latin exam ” "Gee, Mister, I can’t go to jug this afternoon, I have an appointment with the dentist.” “ Er— what line, M ister^ wasn’t paying attention.” "Mister, don’t you think Cicero was a soft soap orator?” “ But, Father, it says in the notes.” “ The father of Aeneas was Mr. Aeneas.” “ Cot any theme paper?” “ I don’t1think I know that part.” “ Ho Kay, Father.” “ Winged Words.”

I

M D li


FEB R U A R Y C LA SS President..............................................................JA M ES E. M O RRIS Vice-President................................................ RO BERT P. M IS K E L L Secretary..............................................T H O M A S J. M c L A U C H L IN Beadle................................................................. RO BERT H. PRIC E IN STRU C TO RS FA T H ER C O LL IN S, S. J. MR. ECKER, S. J. FA T H ER S C H M IT T , S. J. MR. C U T ER L MR. H IG G IN S , S. J. MR. K ELT Y | N FEB R U A R Y our sojourn at the Prep reached its terminus. W e walked forth from | the traditional portals as ex-Petreans. The last bonds which had bound us as students were severed. W e recall clearly the two conflicting emotions which surged through us: the one of the supreme happiness which is enjoyed by a man who has attained a desired object; the other, that of a profound regret perceived by one who must tear himself away from a place endeared to his heart. W hen we consider the significance of a diploma from St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s we realize that it is a very worthy cause for our high elation. W e have completed the rigid course of studies prescribed in the curriculum. W e have had inculcated the lofty principles of gentlemanly conduct. The diploma is the stamp of approval of the Jesuit Fathers. Our regret on leaving the scenes of happy recollection is a most natural one. The moments of laughter and fun which were generous constituents of daily life here, This is a very propitious time for expressing our sincere appreciation to our teachers for their assiduous efforts in our behalf and their interest in our welfare.

Page Eighty-Four


C LA SS 4-A President ............................. ................. RO BERT E. B U C K L E Y Vice-President. >............ ,...... .............................H A R R Y G R EE N E Secretary..................... C H A R L E S O ’K EEFE Treasurer.......................................:.....................K E N N E T H D W Y E R IN ST R U C T O R S FA T H ER S C H M IT T , S. J. MR. M U L L E N

S

MR. O ’B R IEN MR. K E L T Y

U M M E R and its pleasant memories had passed, and early autumn once again found us under the sheltering roof of St; Peter’s. A few old friends were missing,

but most of our former mates returned. After the first joyous round of greetings, we prepared ourselves for a long siege of Latin and Greek. But as the months rolled on, there was a certain sadness evident, for in a little while we would part from class­ mates. However, the class may justly view its accomplishments with pride. "Bob” Buckley and John Broadhurst were our athletes and George Hoch upheld our reputa­ tion in debating. In dramatic presentation Arthur Ditzel was our representative, and many can testify to his prowess. So now, St. Peters, with a glorious record behind us, we go forth to emblazon your name in every pursuit with the same zeal and energy which marked the days we spent with you.

Page Eighty-Five


v v v

President....... Vice-President Secretary'....... Treasurer......

C LA SS 4-B ......................JA M ES E. M cC O R M A C K W IL L IA M R. O ’BRIEN ................ FR A N C IS X. F IT Z P A T R IC K ...........................R O W L A N D V: LU C ID IN ST RU C TO R S

MR. C O ER IN C , S.J. MR. O ’BR IEN

MR. C U L L EN MR. K ELT Y

L L too shortly we achieved the coveted title of senior and presently we must relinquish it for the still more lofty title of alumnus. But evert though the flight of time has been rapid, we have accomplished much and.are proud of our achieve­ ments. One member of our class managed the Prep football team ; another student was Librarian; still another was Editor-in-Chief of the Cephean, while both prefect and assistant prefect of the Senior Sodality were classmates of ours. W e were also repre­ sented in the Debating Society, in football, and in basketball, on the monthly staff, and in that select group of "honor students.”

A

The past year has been most enjoyable and we are anxious to indicate here our gratitude to the teachers who have endured our delinquencies and. have toiled so unselfishly to make us representative St. Peter’s men.

Page Eighty-Six


C LA SS 4-C President........................................... ...... Vice-President.. .............................. Secretary and Treasurer......................... Beadle......................................................

JO H N D O W D ...JOHN C R EC A N FRAN K CRO N AN JO H N S IN N O T T

IN S T R U C T O R S FA T H ER O U IL T Y , S. J. M R , ECKER, S.

S

MR. C U L L E N M R, KELTY

U C C ESS is ours. W e wear the laurel wreath proudly, and justly. Crises have come and have passed. Behind us is yearning and honest effort; at hand is Graduation, the goal at which we have been striving ever since we entered the Prep. O f scholars, we can boast of Bill Donovan, Tom Hayes, Frank Linder and John

Petroccione. On the athletic field we can point out with pride that, among the athletes who made the football team, were Captain Dowd, "Red ” Corbett and '"Fearless” Cronan. W e can also claim as our own 4-C men, two of the outstanding basketball players, "Buddy” Brown and "Sm ile” Molten!, The Class wishes to extend its sincere gratitude to Father QuiSty, S. J., not only for his patience in guiding the Class through the mysteries of Virgil, but also for his many helpful talks; to Mr. Ecker, S. J., too, for his splendid course in chemistry; to Mr. Cullen and to Mr. Kelty, our instructors in modern languages.

jE K i J| j| Page Eighty-Seven


C LA SS 4-M Class President................................................JA M E S P. T U M U L T Y Vice-President........................................................... JO H N J. H IL L Secretary....................................................... ED W A R D A. N ELSO N Treasurer.......................................................JO SEPH V. M cC EA D Y IN ST RU C TO R S MR. H IG G IN S , S.J. FA T H ER S C H M IT T , S.J. MR. G U T ER L MR. M U L L E N MR. ECKER, S.J. MR. K ELT Y N E chilly February morning in 1928 the portals of St. Peter’s Prep were opened to allow a band of future graduates to enter. The happy group entered the venerable building and have since been jousting with the classics and the Sciences. They have been tried by the fires of Algebra, Creek, and Science. They were nourished on the adversities of Geometry and Latin Our banner floats high on the breeze. For Charlie Dolan carries it into the field of eloquence; "Jo e” McGeady, "Dynamite” Domozych and Victor Spaldo display the brawn that is ours. John Hill and “ Skippy” Kelleher proved valuable on the court, while the class "en masse” defended its banner on the floors of the Senior Debating Society. Since our motto is: " W e learn, not for school, but for life” — we shall carry on. improving as we go. To the teachers, wherever they may be, who have tried to inculcate the true principles of Christian gentlemanliness and have endeavored to prepare us for our place in the world, we pay a vote of deepest gratitude.

O

Page Eighty-Eight


C LA SS 3-A President .......................................................JO SEPH A. M c D E V IT T Vice-President.................................. W IL L IA M J. B U E N Z L E Secretory W IL L IA M A. BA R BER Treasurer,............................................................JO H N J. B O N N E L L IN ST R U C T O R S MR. H IG G IN S , S.J. MR. M c lN E R N E Y MR. RO O N EY, S.J. MR. D U FFY MR. O ’S U L L IV A N

T

HE applause sounded throughout the hall as the curtain opened on A ct ||l of our own “ Comedy of Errors.” Scene I . brought out Cicero, and once more he swayed

the audience with his Catilinian Orations. Xenophon also appeared in this scene with his senior officers. L ittle Pierre completed his task, while Joan or Arc and Portia played the parts of leading ladies. And the first scene ended with a success seldom equalled. Not one actor had failed. As the second scene begins, we see the spotlight flash across our own luminaries Now the class representatives on the gridiron appear. They are M cDevitt and Buenzle. W h a t ’s this? The basketball players, Bonnell, Barber, and McNerney, helping the second team. The lights flash across the debaters, Reilly and McCarthy. Almost the whole class appears in the Sodality scene. And now the third angle of the act, the class teams. Our football team makes its claim to glory by having conquered 3-B. The class basketball team does the honors for all third-year representatives. As the curtain comes down, a promising ball team is being formed. And now, in the closing act, our president appears on the stage. His message is one of sincere thanks to all the teachers on behalf of Class 3-A.

Page Eighty-Nine


S

C LA SS 3-B President....................................... •:............ EU G EN E C H A P O U T O ® Vice-President..:................................................... FR A N C IS B EIR N E Secretary....................................................................JO H N FO LEY Treasurer........................................................A L E X A N D E R BOOTH • IN ST RU C TO R S MR. RO ONEY, S.J. MR. M c lN E R N E Y MR. G U T ER L ' MR. C O L L IN S H O R T LY after the summer vacation we were summoned to Class 3-B where we renewed old acquaintances and made new ones. Under the capable tutelage of

our teachers we dipped into the mysteries of Cicero, Ovid, Geometry, English and Spanish. Besides being a studious class we were active in sports. In November it wab decided to have a class football team. So, astrongteam under the management of “ Albie” Booth took its position onthe gridiron. During February a class basketball team was organized and “ Sheik” Beirne was elected captain. On the Prep football and basketball team Gene Chapoutot scintillated. “ W illie ” Bauer was the class representative on the Petrean Staff. He also was the class debater and dramatist. W e take this place to express our sincere gratitude to our instructors for their excellent work on our behalf. W e wonder what would happen if: Flash Foley did not seek the aid of his mythical “ Scotty” to aid his geometry. Sheik Beirne lost his job.

Page Ninety


C LA SS 3-C President..................................................................W I L L I A M F IN N Vice-President...................................................... JA M E S F IN N E R T Y Secretary ..................................... M A T T H E W B O Y LA N T re a s u re r.............................................................V IN C E N T N O LA N IN ST R U C T O R S MR. D U FFY MR. C O L L IN S MR. G O ER IN G , S.J. MR. M A R T IN O MR. RO O N EY, S.J. MR. M c lN E R N E Y

O

N a sunny September morn we gathered in the school hall. The roll was called and some of our classmates were missing, some had gone to earn their daily

bread, some had gone to other schools. The class of 3-C has successfully sailed the turbulent seas of High School for three years and now we must look forward to the ringing down of the curtain upon our careers as Prepsters. Now, as our third term quickly draws to an end, a little retro­ spection at this time is not amiss. W e have spent a happy year. Our class activities have dispelled all shadows of monotony so likely to creep in. Above all we consider our scholastic standing to be of the highest degree, inferior to none. The realization of our purposes, however, we attribute to the earnest efforts of our professors and to their interest in us. To them we tender our sincere thanks. In concluding our humble notes, we, the class of â&#x20AC;&#x2122;30, express sincere hopes for the glorious success of the graduating class of 1931. M ay success be the lot of all its members in whatever path they may walk.


C LA SS 3-M-l President .................... ...W IL L IA M J. B R EU N IC Vice-President........................ FR A N C IS X. G REEN E Secretary........................... .... .......... ............ L A W R E N C E P. K IN G Treasurer.......................... .......................... GEORGE T. DUNDON IN ST RU C TO R S MR. B R IO D Y MR. G O ERIN G , S.|. M R .G U T E R L MR. M A R T IN O MR. C O L L IN S MR. M U L L EN PO N the reopening of school in September we found several of our classmates missing. The majority, however, returned with renewed vigor from three months

U

of vacation, resolved to complete second year creditably. Time and tide wait for no man. So we found ourselves confronted by the examinations. Our resolution was realized and February found us in 3-M-l. Third Year. Change of subjects. Change of teachers. Encouraged and stimulated in our work by Mr. Briody and by our other teachers, we are confident of passing the June examinations with success. W e are proud to say that several members of our class have distinguished them足 selves on the gridiron as well as on the basketball court. But not to sports alone has 3-M-l contributed. Our zeal extends to the realms of oratory wherein we have likewise given commendable proof of our efficiency. The realization of all our endeavors, however, we attribute to the untiring efforts of our professors and to their sincere interest in us. W e extend to them our profound appreciation and gratitude.

Page Ninety-Two


W

C LA SS 3-M-2 President....................................................... F R A N C IS G A L L A G H E R ............................. ........VIN C EN T B R E N N A N Vice-President....: S ecre ta ry ..................... JO SE PH O ’K EEFE T reasu rer.......................................................C H EST E R S M IG IE L S K I IN ST R U C T O R S MR. BR IO D Y MR. M A R T IN O MR. M c lN E R N E Y MR. C O E R IN G , S.J. MR. C O L L IN S MR. C U L L E N E have passed the halfway mark in our course at St. Peter’s and it is enjoyable to look back and see w hat a treasure of pleasant memories we have amassed.

The climb thus far, even though it brought us only over the foothills, has been rather rough and unsteady. Several have fallen by the wayside, some from former groups scaling this same mountain of education, have slipped back to join our party. But now all are thoroughly organized and determined to ascend the further heights with steady footsteps and with the determination to leave along the path many suc­ cesses by which future climbers will know us. As now we face a three-month respite from our tedious journey, we cannot help but notice the pink rays creeping over a crag slightly above us and presaging the dawn of another new term, in September. W e close our books now, figuratively laying aside our pike, and in September we will be prepared to carry on in the same happy and profitable manner as has brought us along to this point.

Page Ninety-Three


EPHEAN^

C LA SS 2-A President ................................................... P A T R IC K M cCRATH Vice-President ...................... ............................. JO H N S H U L T Z ■■Treasurer................... JA M ES M cC U IR E Secretary....................................................O C T A V IA N K U K IEL SK I IN ST RU C TO R S MR. C O L L IN S MR. H A R T N ET T , S.J.

A

MR. LESTER MR. O B R IE N

S the completion of our second year of classical education at St. Peter’s draws

near we may say with a true sense of self-justification that we have indeed accomplished much during the past year. W e began the year with a display of good sense and judgment by electing most capable class officers. In due time we succeeded in becoming thoroughly acquainted with Caesar’s "G allic W a r ” under the supervision of a worthy Latin teacher. The intricacies of Creek, Civics, and Algebra were all solved in equally erudite manner by a most effi­ cient staff of teachers and we are grateful to the Prefect of Studies for placing us under their guidance. The class was well represented in the library by Messrs. Heavey, Kukielski, Meaney and Shultz, who were members of the Library Staff. A substantial portion of the class has been members of theSodality and of the Debating Society, and it is withoutany hesitation we affirm that it has been a very successful year for 2-A.

M 2


C LA SS I r B Prssidjrrf LAW REN CE B. .H IL L Vice-Pres:dent ............................... L ER O Y C O O N E Y Secretary,..........................................................JO SEPH P. O 'T O O LE T reasu rer....................................................... G ERA RD H U G H E S IN S T R U C T O R S MR. D U FFY MR. LEST ER MR. T U R B ET T , S.J. MR. O â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S U L L IV A N I f was back in early fall of last year that the members of the class 2-B again came | in contact with each other, ijh e r e were greetings, handshakes, arid every type of happy smile and laughter on that memorable day. Now let us. have a brief summary of the class. It will be very appropriate to consider the immediate cause for our suc­ cesses. First of all, we have a very competent and capable staff of professors who have unselfishly labored every moment of their time,for our benefit; secondly, through the discretion of every class member we have elected a board of officials who have guided us very successfully and capably in all our activities; finally, each and every member has exerted every ounce of energy and has worked enthusiastically to make 2-B. a leader among classes. W e have been a very dominant factor in debating, dramatics, music, and in all games; in short, we have been Well represented in every branch of study and sport. The day-js not far off when again we will be in the midst of an annual farewell scene. Perhaps it will be a little sadder than the opening day of school. W e part with the best of wishes to. each other and to all for a happy summer and a happier reunion next September.


m -EAj

C LA SS 2-C President.................................... W IL L IA M W A L S H Vice-President..................................................G ERA LD A. H A R TY Secretary............................................................. JA M E S G. O ’BRIEN IN ST RU C TO R S MR. H A R T N ET T , S. J. ' MR. C O L L IN S MR. C U T ER L MR. LESTER MR. M c G IL L

j

E T U R N IN G to St. Peter’s some ten months ago we were assigned to class 2-C. Immediately we delved into the mysteries of our studies and after successfully weathering months of hard work and the mid-year examinations we are now pre­ paring to enter Third Year. W e were represented on both Prep basketball and Prep football squads and had a class team that almost won the tournament. A t the thresh­ old of Third Year we take this opportunity to thank our teachers for their untiring work, and to congratulate the Class of 1931. For a time we thought that Jim Buckley would become head coach at Notre Dame. It is quite evident that Degnan will soon become an author. W e have concluded a year sprinkled with laughs due to that incredulous ques­ tioner, Irwin, and to the class imps, Jones, Brede, and Wishbcw. W e wonder what would happen if: ■Coyle passed unnoticed in class. Snyder made any noise. Morris didn’t use those very long words. O ’Brien wasn’t always studying Catechism.

R

Page Ninety-Six •

I


C LA SS 2-D ............................................. JO H N F L A N N E R Y Class President Vice-President.......................................... ED W ARD KEN N ED Y S e c re ta ry ............. W I L L I A M O ’N E IL tre a s u re r ..................................... JO SEPH M cC O V ER N IN ST R U C T O R S MR. T U R B ET T , S. J. ' Mr. M c C IL L MR. LEST ER MR. D U FFY MR. B R IO D Y

W

E are ending our second year within the portals of St. Peter’s. As vacation

draws near we again face examinations which mark the end of another golden year. W h en we entered Class 2-D last September we all planned to become future scientists. W e have not regretted our choice. W e tried to assume what we considered the proper dignity befitting second year students. Gradually, as the year wore on, most of us succeeded in our aspirations, although, unfortunately, some fell by the w ay­ side. Now we hope that in a few years we shall be proud graduates of St. Peter’s. W e wish to thank the teachers whose task it was to instruct us in the wiles and pitfalls of Latin, English and Algebra. The class team has been very successful during this season of competition in the Junior Basketball League, having won the championship. Several of the members of the class are striving valiantly to make a name for themselves on the gridiron and from reports received we dare say they are successful A ll’s well that ends well.

Page Ninety-Seven


W

C LA SS 2-M-l President..............................................................JO SEPH M cA LEER Vice-President................................ JO H N B U C K LEY Secretary.................. RO BERT K EA R IN S JA M ES DOLAN Treasurer................. IN ST RU C TO R S MR. K E L T Y MR. C U LLE N MR. O ’B R IEN MR. H A R TN ETT , S.J. E gathered in the classic halls of old St. Peter’s early in September, 1930, to renew friendships and to extend congratulations to those who had successfully

passed the first milestone. W e were promptly introduced to our new teachers who, each in turn, described the several subjects which were to constitute the curriculum for 2-M-l. Their words encouraged us to meet with confidence the difficulties, before us. They assured us that our cooperation spelled success. Our lives were quite serene until Mr. Trouble himself appeared in the form of Exams. Most of us could say, “ W e have met the enemy, and they are ours.” Some, however, faltered and failed. But we are moving onward and upward to the ideal toward which Jesuit education points the way. 2-M-l has left its impress on the sports history in St. Peter’s. Joe McAleer held high our banner in many a gridiron battle. John Buckley scaled the heights in the struggle for honors on the basketball court. W ith genuine pride in our year’s record, we give the credit to our teachers, to their constant and earnest labor in our behalf. Our congratulations to the Class of 1931!


C LA SS 2-M-2 President..................................... .JA M ES A. M c C E A D Y . Vice-President................................................ H U G H A. M c C U IR E Secretary......................................................... E D W A R D R. SA V A G E Treasurer........................................................... H ER BER T R. BEA C H IN ST R U C T O R S MR. O ’S U L L IV A N MR. T U R B ET T , S.J. FA T H ER S T A N L E Y , S.J. MR. R O O N EY MR. M c G IL L MR. C U L L E N

W

H EN school opened in September we found ourselves in Class l-M-2 with Mr.

W a lla c e and Mr. Rooney as teachers. Under their expert guidance our entire class passed all the examinations with but some few conditions which were soon removed. After the mid-year exams the classes were promoted and 1-M-2 became 2-M-2. The class received a few new numbers from 1- M - l.Then, as proud Second Year stu­ dents we strutted about before the members of First Year. ■The class had one member on the basketball team, Jerry Cassidy, and one out for spring practice, Jim McGeady. It certainly would be a universal day in 2-M-2 if: Farrara didn’t say "ig out a way.” McGuire argued with the teacher. Coyle didn’t look innocent. Savage got up and shouted.

Page Ninety-Nine


C LA SS I-A GEO RGE W . S M IT H JA M ES P. EVERS JA M ES B. REUTER

President....... Vice-President T reasurer IN ST RU C TO R S MR. M c V A N N MR. HO GAN , S .J

MR. L Y N C H MR. CRAVES, S. J.

N D ER such examples as these I-A has risen in the eyes of student and teacher until it now occupies an enviable position among First Year classes.

U

Our football and basketball teams, captained by Red Smith, although they fought heroically for the class, met with only moderate success. Our warriors of the gridiron won two and lost one joust; on the court the dribblers of 1-A set a fast pace and almost won the championship. Incidentally, our contributions to the “ Petreari” , supplied mostly by Jimmy Reuter, have exceeded those of any other First Year Class. W e regret that Father McQuade, our former Latin teacher, was forced to with­ draw awhile from active service because of ill health. Our former English teacher, Mr. Mclnerney, was also taken from us in the first semester. The class earnestly thanks the present teachers for their splendid work. Congratulations, "Class of ’31,” and we hope that you, upholding the name of St. Peter’s, will meet with great success.

Page One Hundred


C LA SS 1-B President....................................................W IL L IA M M O N A G H A N Vice-President .........................................................T H O M A S K E N T T re a su re r............................................................ JA M E S R EY N O LD S IN ST R U C T O R S MR. H O G A N , S .J. MR. G R IF F IN

T

MR. L Y N C H MR. M c V A N N

HE initial year of the “ Rumblers” is now history. If perchance you do not know it,

we are proud to inform you that our class is the spirited congregation that printed a class paper, “ The Rumble,” during the past year. W e are already well in step in the pursuit of the scholastic and athletic traditions of St. Peter’s. W e are represented on Coach Myers’ football squad and also on the list of literary contributors to the “ Petrean." The editor-in-chief of our class paper was Christian Mueller, and his associates were: Thomas Kent, Edward Jesso, Richard Guinan and Andrew Brunhofer. Another outstanding achievement of 1-B was winning the first year championship in the basket­ b a ll tournament T he regulars were Richard Guinan, Captain; James Boylan, Francis Fahy, Bernard r 'jrierty and James Reynolds; Thomas Kent was Manager. W e welcome this opportunity of thanking the teachers who have so effectively fanned in our hearts the flames of St. Peter’s spirit.


&^A <tfS8M ggcjjggK

‘S h e

**& -

CEPHEANJ)

g s g ^ S to K ftg g e g :

C LA SS B C

t

President..:...... Vice-President. T reasurer.........

T H O M A S LEE G ERA LD F IT Z P A T R IC K ■£PH A LEN GOLDEN

Secretary......... IN ST RU C TO R S MR. GRAVES, S.j. MR. L Y N C H

MR. M U L L EN MR. Me V A N N

T seems but yesterday that we cast anchor from our sturdy bark “Ambition,” in our

111

[■1 W j!

voyage to Success, and stopped outside St. Peter’s. W ith hearts beating furiously and holding our heads high we entered the old .portals of the Prep. And as now we lift anchors for a short vacation cruise, many pleasant recollections enrich our “ log." “ Nec tempus ullum nec laborem ullum trivimus" is our class motto and the results of all our examinations have proven this to be well chosen, The afternoon tea-parties of Mr. McVann have not been most pleasant and therefore do we study our Algebra more assiduously than ever. W e are proud of our several honor students and here wish to express our gratitude to our generous teachers M ay we also congratulate the graduates of 1931, whose prowess is our goal.

M l

Page One Hundred Two


C LA SS B B President..................................................... M A T T H E W J. W A L S H ' Vice-President...;....................................... F R A N C IS W . C A S S ID Y Secretary & Treasurer ................JO SEPH T. B U R C H A R D T IN ST R U C T O R S MR. C RA V ES, S. J. MR. S IN N O T T

*

MR. R O O N EY MR. L Y N C H

T was a memorable occasion when in September, 1930, we, the boys who were to comprise the class of 1-D, were introduced to our school and to our classimates. Gathered into a large classroom we were instantly set at our ease by the smiling countenance of Mr. Graves, S. J., our Latin teacher. Immediately, we were almost over­ come by an avalanche of studies assigned to us by our capable and efficient teachers. The class was well represented in Athletics during the entire year. A fter a fair season of football we were determined to make up for occasional football defeats by starring in basketball. Led by our captain-, M atty W alsh, we succeeded in placing 1-D near the top in the basketball league. Needless to say, we had plenty of rooters on the sidelines. Now at the end of our First Year, it is only with pleasant memories that we look back and determine to again raise aloft in September the standards which we have thus maintained. W e wish here to express our thanks to our instructors who have skillfully guided us through our first year of study at St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.

Page One Hundred Three


C LA SS 1-E President............................................................ M IC H A E L SA LISK I RO BERT W O O D Vice-President............. Treasurer....................................................... W IL L IA M GRACE IN ST RU C TO R S MR. S IN N O T T MR. O 'S U L L IV A N

W

MR. LESTER ' FA T H ER DOLAN, S.J.

H EN St. Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s opened its doors in September, thirty-five of us were assigned to 1-E. Under the able guidance of Mr. Sinnott, our Latin teacher, we solved

the difficulties of that ancient language .and eagerly awaited the Province exams. W e were very sorry to lose Mr. Hogan, S.J., our Algebra teacher, and Father McQuade, S.J., our Evidences teacher, but our loss was recompensed by having Mr. Lester and Father Dolan assigned to us. . W ith the greatest regret we saw Vincent Irvine, our contribution to the Dramatic Society, and a shining star of the Mulry Debating Society, leave us. The Class was not to be outdone in athletics, being represented on the football squad by Ignatius Capellupo, a player of no little ability. Our Class basketball team, although it was not the best in the school, did as well as could be expected. W e hope to do better next year. The Class of 1-E extends to the graduating Classes its heartiest congratulations and the best wishes for success in the future. * â&#x20AC;˘

-I Tf|i "\ 3a

Page One Hundred Four


C LA SS 1-M-l President ...................................................... E D W A R D A N S B R O A N D R E W M cD ER M O T T Vice-President ................ S e c re ta ry .................. C H EST ER C A M P B E L L IN ST R U C T O R S MR. EC KER, S. J.

MR. G R IF F IN MR. M c V A N N

T

HE beginning of the mid-year term in February found a number of boys grouped

together in a classroom, all strangers to one another. However, this condition did not last long, for we soon held our first class meeting and elected officers to organize and guide our activities. The athletic, spirit of the class showed itself by our having several, members, on the Spring football squad. The class basketball team, although not a consistent winner, proved hard to beat. A baseball team is being formed and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re hoping it will prove a real success. W e are striving for success with the aid of our teachers and we hope to have made our first term a success, mentally, physically, and morally. It is proper here to express our appreciation to our class officers and to the Faculty, also, our best wishes'to the graduates.

p d

fry

ffl

AS Page One Hundred Five


i

IS

mm r v i

\ ' /

f-

®

‘ • 'F -

C LA SS l-M-2 ' President....................................................... D AVID E. V A N O R D EN Secretary................................................................... JO SEPH RECAN Treasurer............................................... FR A N K JARSA B IN ST RU C TO R S MR. W A L L A C E

MR. RO ONEY FA T H ER DOLAN, S. J.

HE first half of our First Year is over, and thus far we have succeeded fairly well in our studies under the leadership of Mr. W allace and Mr. Rooney. In February, when we assembled for class we were introduced to our teachers. Mr. W allace was to teach us the difficult study of Latin. Mr. Rooney was assigned to us as our History teacher, Father McQuade, S.J., our Evidence teacher, because of serious illness, was forced to give up teaching for a time. He was replaced by Father Dolan, S. J., who has carried us successfully through the latter part of the year. The Class was well represented in athletics during the term, but although the teams fought with the right spirit, they were not very successful in their accomplish­

T

ments. Now as the term is nearing its end, and as the Class looks back over the preceding months, the consensus of opinion is that we fully appreciate the efforts of our teachers in coaching us in studies.

Page One Hundced Six

I I

| I

jlg JI m

Pi

t


SODALITY

P

upon Our Blessed Mother for assistance, is becomingly impressed upon the Jesuit student.

M k

ER H A PS the most characteristic item in the Jesuit System of schools is the encour­ agement of Socialities. The decidedly Catholic custom of praying to and relying

I

The visible manifestation of this solid Christian training at St. Peter’s is found in the active and vigorous membership in the three divisions of Our Lady’s Sodality. The Senior Sodality is composed of members of Fourth Year, classes. The student Counsellor, Father W . X. Quilty, S.J., although superior general of the entire spiritual

W

Im i l

army at the Prep, took to himself especially the moderatorship of the Senior group. Meetings were held every Thursday morning in the Students’ Chapel, where the prefect led the organization in reciting the age-old and beautiful prayers of the office of Our Blessed Mother. Occasionally the Moderator altered the procedure to deliver an appreciative sermon on M ary’s Love for us A delegation of members represented St. Peter’s at the meeting in St. Michael’s, Jersey City, in March, when Father Daniel

f ill

A. Lord, S.J., National Director of the Sodalities, addressed the gathering. Officers for the year were:

w

JA M E S E. M cC O R M A C K , ’31

T H O M A S O ’SH A U C H N ESSY , ’31

F R A N C IS X. F IT Z P A T R IC K , 31

W IL L IA M L. R EILLY , ’32

IT I if.M

L in

Em

Ti

r ”

fT in i Page One Hundred Eight

IrTw


The Intermediate Sodality, with Mr. Rooney, Monday

afternoons.

S.J., tis Moderator, assembled on

In addition toreading theregular

office, members of thisgroup

were very fortunate in having several of the Jesuit Fathers address their meetings. Officers for the year, and governing board of this, the second year group:' O C T A V IA N K U K IE L S K I

W IL L IA M LYN C H

W IL L IA M W A L S H

F R A N C IS M c C A N N EU G EN E KRO N KE

The Junior Sodality, composed of first year students' has had as Moderator, Mr. Higgins1 , S J.

It was impressed upon this group that if they wish to become worthy and

acceptable members in the upper class organizations they must remain, in action and in thought, pure and holy, and must indicate their love of M ary by following her lofty precepts of conduct. A t the regular meetings held on Tuesday afternoons, the following officers presided: Prefect..................................................

..JO SEPH

M cCARTH Y

Assistant Prefects .............................................M A U R IC E W A L S H F R A N C IS F A L V Y

E D W A R D JESSU P

KNIGHTS OF THE BLESSED SACRAMENT

D

U R IN G this past year the Knights of the Blessed Sacram ent have been more vlbrhnt and alive, than ever before at St. Peter’s. Spurred on by the vigor and enthusiasm of their Spiritual Counsellor, the students have received Holy Com­

munion tit the 8:15 o’clock Mass on Fridays in numbers that certainly must have been gratifying to the heart of our EufehariStic King. Besides this healthy showing, which so delighted the heart of Father Quilty,' the Knights have fervidly supported every undertaking. Our delegation was conspicuous at the Catholic Students’ Mission Crusade ?when that association held its rally in Newark last fall. Our contributions to the Missions have been quite generous. : W hen his Excellency, the Right Reverend Bishop Roche, S.J., the first and at present the only native Bishop in India, visited us, Father Rector promised, in the name of the student body, five hundred dollars to erect a chapel in India. How readily that amount and even a hundred dollars more was raised, is a matter of history.

But

assuredly, it is a consoling thought to reflect that somewhere in that vast and bewitch­ ing panorama that is India— probably no one of us will ever see it— there is a modest little house of God, where the ignorant natives whom God so loves, and the brave, stout-hearted missioners, whom God so cherishes, are storming the gates of heaven with prayer. Yes, praying for the students of St. Peter’s who built their chapel.

Page One Hundred Nine


BEAUDEVIN DEBATING SOCIETY

W

E were fortunate this year in having our Beaudevin Debating Society continue its fine work under the capable and enthusiastic guidance of Mr. Edward J. Hogan, S.J., our veteran Moderator, of last year.

A t the first meeting of the year, held on Wednesday, September 17, 1930, Charles F. X. O ’Brien was unanimously chosen President. The following week, the remaining officers were elected: Vice-President, Joseph F. Carroll; Secretary, George E. M c­ Carthy; Historian, Francis X. Fitzpatrick.

On-'Tuesday evening, December 16, four members of the Beaudevin Debating Society debated before the members of the Holy Name Society of St. Michael’s Church, Jersey City, on the subject: “ Resolved: That Capitalism is More Dangerous to the United States than Communism.” The affirmative speakers were Charles F. Dolan and W illiam j. Bauer, and on the negative were Joseph F. Carroll and George B. Hoch. Charles F. X. O ’Brien, president of the Beaudevin, acted as chairman. Later on in the year, debates on the subject: “ Resolved: That a Government Fund for Public W orks is the best solution for recurring periods of Unemployment” were held before Holy Name meetings at the churches of St. Paul of the Cross and St. Patrick.

Page One Hundred Ten


On the Affirm ative were Robert P. Kelley and Charles F. X. O ’Brien. W illiam L. Reilly and Charles F. X. Dolan upheld the Negative. The Chairman on both occasions was George E. McCarthy. Defending the negative of the question: “ Resolved: T h at Interscholastic athletics, as at present conducted, are detrimental,” the debating team of the Beaudevin Debat­ ing Society was defeated by the debating team of Regis/High School in the Regis auditorium, on Sunday evening, December 21. An audience of several hundred, com­ posed chiefly of Regis students and their friends, attended the affair. On the platform of St. Peter’s were: W illia m L. Reilly, George B. Hoch and Joseph A. Connell. The alternate was W illiam J. Bauer.

The contest was judged by James A. Beha, Esq., Mr. John R. Dooley and Dean Ignatius M. Wilkinson of the Fordham Law School, who announced the decision. It might have been difficult to choose between the two teams in a general survey of the arguments. However, the Regis speakers showed more judgment in picking out the weak points of the opponents’ case and hammering away at these. The St. Peter’s team, too, failed to follow up sufficiently the advantage that was theirs in several o f the arguments.

Page One Hundred Eleven


George B. Hoch was unofficially declared the best speaker of the debate. No arrangement has been made for the public announcement of the best individual speaker, but George Hoch was afterwards called in by the judges who enthusiastically compli­ mented him and later announced their unanimous opinion that he was the best speaker of the evening. The exceptional quiet that prevailed throughout his entire speech was a noteworthy tribute to his ability. The first meeting of the new term was held on February 10. A t this meeting election of officers was held. Francis X. Greene filled the office of Vice-President left vacant by the graduation of Joseph F. Carroll. W illiam L. Reilly was elected Historian in the place of Francis X. Fitzpatrick who resigned. For the first few meetings of the Beaudevin Debating Society in the second term it was decided to have open discussions on timely topics. A t the meeting of February 17 the question discussed was: “ Are Interscholastic Athletics Detrimental?” Those who took part in the ex tempore speaking included W illiam Reilly, Edward Toohey, Charles Dolan, Charles O ’Brien, George Dundon, Robert Kelley, Francis Guterl, and Francis Greene. A t this meeting Mr. Hogan, S.J., spoke to the Society upon the benefits of ex tempore speaking.

L

A T E in April a Beaudevin Debating team traveled to Philadelphia to clash with the St. Joseph’s team on the question: Resolved, “ That the development of the Chain Store System has been detrimental to the American people.’’

Page One Hundred Twelve


The representatives of St. Peter’s, consisting of W illiam L. Reilly, Charles F. X. Dolan, and James J. Finnerty, took the negative stand. W illiam J. Bauer was alternate. St. Joseph’s defended the affirmative side of the question. The decision on the debate was awarded to St. Joseph’s by a 2-1 vote of the judges. This forensic defeat was soon forgotten in the face of the St. Joseph’s hospitality. Over the week-end the Prep de­ baters made a trip to Valley Forge, Independence Hall and to the new St. Joseph’s.

T

H E Annual Prize Debate of the Beaudevin Debating Society, was held on Friday evening, M ay 1, at St. Peter’s Hall. The question Was: Resolved, “ That the several

states should enact legislation providing for Compulsory Unemployment Insurance to which the employer shall contribute.” Robert P. Kelley, James J. Finnerty, and Charles F. X. Dolan upheld the affirmative, and Charles F. X. O ’Brien, W illiam L. Reilly, and W illiam J. Bauer presented their argu­ ments for the negative. After a very interesting debate the judges, consisting of Very Rev. W illiam A. Griffin, LL.D., Mr. Stephen J. Meany, S .J., and Hon. Charles F. X. 0 ’Brien; A.M ., LL.B., decided that W illiam Reilly and Charles F. X. O ’Brien had won ex aequo. The decision on the debate itself was awarded to the negative. James E. McCormack, president of 4-B, was chairman of the Debate.

Page One Hundred Thirteen


jg g

S jA y g tfa !

L Jhe J eph eaj

MULRY DEBATING SOCIETY

O

.N Thursday, September 18, 1930, the Mulry Debating Society held its first meet­ ing of the year. Nominations for president were in order. The following Week, on

Monday, September 22, election of officers was held. The results d'f’tjifeHsiections were as follows: President, Anthony D. Botti; Vice-President, J. J. Lynch reta'ry, Robert P. Kelley; Sergeant-at-Arms*, Lawrence B. Hill. Mr, Craves, S.J., the Moderator of our Debating Society, stimulated interest early in the year by. announcing that debates would be held with other Debating Societies. Also, plans were laid for a mock trial to be held later in the year. One of the questions debated early in.October read: “ Resolved: That the Suez Canal contributes more to commerce than does the Panama Canal.’’ Messrs. Knight and Lync_h upheld the affirmative. Messrs. trvine and W allace defended the negative side, of the question. The decision was awarded to the negative speakers by the judges. The long-awaited mock trial was*held on December 19, in the debating room. A l­ most the entire society was present and those who did not have principal parts were the jurors of the case. The trial was directed by Mr. Cuterl of the Prep Faculty, in the manner of an actual case, with Mr. Lynch, also of the Faculty, the prosecutor, opening to the jury. The prosecutor then brought on his witnesses— Messrs. McGrath, Hill, Valenti, and Kane, who took the parts of General Emory, Senator Walsh, Mr. Hall, and Mr. Brown. They tried to implicate President Johnson in the matter of giving illegal advice, making loud and insulting speeches, and taking care' of presidential duties while under the influence of liquor. After Mr. Botti, the counsel for the defense, crossexamined these witnesses, the prosecutor rested his case. Mr. Botti then opened to the jury and sought to destroy the Article of Impeach­ ment by bringing on as witnesses, Messrs. Thomas Meany, Edward Murphy, Robert Kelly and Richard Guinan, who acted as General Sherman, General Emory, General Thomas, and Mr. Browning, respectively. J h e case ended in the same manner as had the real trial, President Johnson being acquitted by one vote. On February 5, the Society convened for the first meeting of the new term. Regu­ lar elections were held and the result was that Mr. Botti and Mr. Lynch were re-elected to the presidency and vice-presidency, respectively. Mr. Hill received thg office of secretary, and Mr. Valenti was chosen sergeant-at-arms.

E

A R L Y in M ay the Mulry Debating Society sent a team of chosen orators across the

Hudson to debate with St. Francis Xavier High School of New York City. This team consisted of Anthony Botti, Joseph McCarthy and William Lynch. The question debated was: Resolved, “ That the jury System be Abolished.” The Mulry team, after a spirited defense of their side of the question, scored another of its forensic triumphs. Xavier received the debaters with open arms and we hope that we may return this hos­ pitality at some future date.


STUDENT CO UN CIL

Robert P. MiskelI W a lte r T. Alexander

Francis X. Fitzpatrick

Robert E. Buckley

Rowland V. Lucid

John M. Dowd

Paul A. M ai Ion James E. McCormack

Page One Hundred Fifteen


DRAMATICS

T

H IS year the work of the Dramatic Society, under the direction of the Moderator, Mr. Craves, S.]., has been marked by the introduction of a play deviating from the usual Shakespearian drama. This play, “ The Doctor in Spite of Him self', one of

Moliere’s most popular farces, was written by the French dramatist with the idea in mind that it should be a satire on the medical profession. A synopsis of the play follows: Sganarelle, an old fagot-binder, is forced by severe cudgeling to profess himself a doctor. For, his wife Martine, infuriated by a beating he had given her, has informed Valere and Lucas, attendants to Geronte whose daughter is ill, that he is the doctor who possesses the Elixir of Life, and the Panacea. Sganarelle's facetious explanation of the girl’s affliction serves to lead Geronte and all his attendants to believe that he possesses superhuman power. Finally, Lucinde, the daughter of Geronte, who has only feigned this illness breaks forth in a heat of fury, telling her father that she will marry no one except Leandre. Then, while Geronte is discussing this sudden outburst with the doctor, the lovers elope. A t this, Geronte be­ comes infuriated, for he had made other plans for his daughter’s marriage, and demands that Sganarelle be hung.

Page One Hundred Sixteen


But just as his order .is to be carried out, the lovers return telling-of Leandre’s sudden heirship to a fortune; and since Geronte desired nothing else than that his daughter should marry a rich man he permits Leandre to marry his daughter and re­ stores Sganarelle to his doctorship. For the success of the play the Moderator, Mr. Graves, S .j., deserves sincere con­ gratulations, since it was through his interest and coaching that the play was so suc­ cessful. The members of the cast received their just reward in the applause rendered by the audience attending the performance. T H E C A ST S G A N A R ELLE, husband of M a rtin e ............... M A R T IN E , wife of Sganarelle

C H A R L ES F. X. O ’B R IE N ’32

............. BER N A R D L. M c N E IL ’32

SQ U IR E ROBERT, neighbor of Sganarelle............................JA M E S E. M c N E R N E Y ’32 V A LER E, attendant of Geronte ........................................ A R T H U R C. D IT Z E L ’31 LUC AS, husband of Jacqueline and servant of Geronte C H A R L ES F. D O LAN '32 G ERO N T E, father of Lucinde .................................................JO H N E. G REG O R Y ’32 JA C Q U E L IN E , nurse at Geronte’s, and wife of Lucas.................V IL A R F. K E L L E Y ’32 L U C IN D E, daughter of Geronte............................................... JO H N T. M O O N E Y ’31 LEA N D RE, in love with Lucinde.................................................. JA M E S E. M O R R IS ’31 T H IB A U T , father of Perrin , . J JO SE PH F. JO H N S O N ’32 PER R IN , son of Thibaut.................[ easants | W I L L I A M J. B A U ER ’32

Page One Hundred Seventeen


ST. PETERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LIBRARY This year, former promises have materialized in the little W arren Street building devoted to the Library. Under the energetic supervision of our Librarian, Mr. D. J. Turbett, S.J.; the reconstruction of the Library, begun in a small way last year, has progressed rapidly. These conditions have met with a gratifying response from the student body. Over four hundred new volumes, appealing to the taste of every tvpe of reader, are now actually on the shelves. This mode of selection forms part of a system similar to that employed in our public libraries. This appeal is evidenced by the steady patron­ age not only of students but also of members of the Faculty. All have been enticed by a number of carefully chosen volumes placed at their disposal by our discriminating Librarian. The reading room also has been transformed in the matter of available material. More than forty-five current weekly and monthly magazines have been added to the racks. The visible results during periods of recreation have justified the expenditure. The reference room has not been forgotten; a vast amount of material, including the best procurable encyclopediae, dictionaries and histories, are now on its shelves. The office on this third floor of the Library, due to added facilities, has become the center of incessant activity.

Page One Hundred Eighteen


:f

one i f i 'P J J 'p /

A debt of gratitude is owed to the efficient S ta ff members who have made possible the organization which now exists in the library. Due to their generous and untir­ ing efforts, the improvements which had become more and more necessary have become vivid realities. From day to day the staff labored unceasingly without hope of reward, under the gigantic task of classifying and cataloging books. To each of the following, therefore, we extend our sincere appreciation and thanks: Moderator........................................ MR. G EO R G E J. G O ER IN G , S.'J. Librarian.......................................... MR. D A N IE L J. T U R B ET T , S.J. Student Librarian...........................................EU G EN E F. BU RKE, '31 ST A FF W IL L IA M L. R E ILL Y , ’32 RO GER J. M E T Z L E R O C T A V IA N J. K U K IE L S K I JO H N C. S H U L T Z A N T H O N Y D. BO TTI T H O M A S B. M E A N E Y JO H N J. H E A V E Y C O N R A D t IM H O F F

C T i Page One Hundred Nineteen


CEPHEAN STAFF Editor-in-Chief, Assistant Editor-in-Chief Rowland V, Lucid Eugene F. Burke W a lte r W . Curtis Arthur C. Ditzei

.......................

James E McCormack RobertP.Miskell

A SSO C IA T E EDITO RS John J. Casey Paul A. Mai.on Joseph F. Carroll Herman C. Die!lo Owen F. McCarror

Henry M. Con Ioft Louts A. Manza Business Manager John M. Dowd

Assistant Business Managers Francis X. Fitzpatrick , Robert E. Buckley Myles A. Lyons

Advertising Managers . W a lte r A. French

Sports Editor Casimir ffl Urbanowicz

Page One Hundred Twenty

Alumni Editor W illiam W . Donovan


PETREAN STAFF Editor-in-Chief.............................................George E. McCarthy, ’32 A S S O C IA T E ED ITO RS Casimir F. Urbanowicz, ’31

John D. Dwyer, ’32

Joseph A. McDevitt, ’32

John C. O ’Sullivan, ’33

Debating

Chronicle

Anthony D. Botti, ’33

Charles F. Dolan, ’32

Alumni W illiam W . Donovan, '31

Exchange Eugene F. Burke, '31 Athletics

W illiam J. Bauer, ’32

Charles F. X. O ’Brien, '32

Business Managers Francis X. Fitzpatrick, ’31 Raymond F. Beachner, ’33 Harry P. McLaughlin, ’33


PUBLICATIONS A Y we invite you to come and sit with us in spirit, in the sanctum of the Cephean-

M

Petrean office?

Draw up a chair and make yourself comfortable while we

ransack these well-fingered records. Then together we’ll look through and consider the publications of past years at St. Peter’s. The earliest book we have is a plain, almost drab-looking magazine called the Ephebeum. First published by the college students, during the spring semester of 1910, the Ephebeum was continued quarterly’ thereafter until 1914. .In it a section was assigned to the High School and another to the Manresa Hall Grammar School. This was entirely a literary publication, having few if any pictures to lighten the monotony of its row on row of black type. There are, however, some fine student compositions. In 1914, or shortly before, the young cadets'of Manresa Hall gathered sufficient energy to publish their own little book— an interesting affair, somewhat resembling a catalogue. Its pages are replete with proud pictures of uniformed little fellows; pic­ tures which perhaps cause us to smile but which doubtless made them feel quite elated. The year 1914 also saw another innovation. The Ephebeum became the Saint Peter’s College Journal. This journal, a little larger than its predecessor and clothed in a slightly more attractive brown cover, nevertheless followed, quite meticulously, the style of the Ephebeum. But it did not apportion any space to Manresa or to the preparatory school section. During the first two years of its existence the College journal was also a quarterly publication but in 1916, as well as in 1917, apparently only one issue was printed. However, these last two editions we value highly, since in them is preserved for us a beautiful manifestation of Saint Peter's spirit. And next, oh yes, here we have the first exclusively Prep publication. It isn’t very elaborate, is it? No, but it is very interesting; a newsy little pamphlet of about eight pages with three columns on each page and without a cover. In fact, it is much like a newspaper both in style and in text. This, the earliest Petrean, was published in quite regular monthly editions from 1922 to 1924. Would you like to see some annuals? The year book was first undertaken in 1922 and since then has blossomed annually with the exception of one year. Isn’t it inter­ esting to look through and examine the early editions in comparison with the recent ones? W ell, w e’ll tenderly put away these treasured old books and turn proudly to the newest section of the files marked with a bright new index "1930-1931.” Indeed we are justly proud of this newest entry,;in the records, for within the past year has been born a new Petrean Monthly which is at least the parallel of anything of its kind yet attempted. It is a neat, attractive little book containing the best literary efforts of the students, interesting alumni notes, athletic and news sections. W ithin its pages is reflected, clear and unmistakable, the fact that the glorious, intangible something, which we know as St. Peter’s spirit, is not dying but is blooming as vigor­ ously as ever.

Page One Hundred Twenty-Two


MANRESA HALL | T W A S August, 1905. Father John W . Fox, S.J., was Rector of St. Peter’s. Father Patrick M. Collins, S.J., was Vice-President and Prefect of Studies. St. Peter’s Col­ lege was slowly approaching, yet still far from that state which befitted an institu­ tion with a University charter. The Rector of the College, Father Fox, S.J., planning to help the college in its struggles, bethought himself of a new expedient to increase the number of students. The fruit of this deep thinking was the establishment of a new preparatory course, but such a one as would offer a fair guarantee that these hopes would be realized.

A building suitable for just that purpose was found on Summit Avenue near Mont­ gomery Street, about a mile distant from the College. This building had been a dancing academy. Now it was to be devoted to a higher purpose. Father Fox bought this building in August, 1905. It was remodeled and refitted, and then given the name

Page One Hundred Twenty-Three


Manresa Hall, after a grotto in which St. Ignatius Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit Order, spent long hours in prayer and meditation. Manresa Hall was opened in September of the same year with an enrolment of 49 pupils. The school was really one for the sons of the families of the better class, for experience had taught that only such would continue in their education. Furthermore, Manresa was a M ilitary School. Military drill was of obligation and the students were required to wear a uniform. This uniform had to be worn on all school days. The drill was conducted by a competent army officer, and the boys soon came to have a fine knowledge of-the manual of arms and intricate manoeuvres.

This was the daily routine of studies: A t 9 A.M. the boys assembled and after morning prayers went to their classrooms. The day was begun with "Memoryâ&#x20AC;? , that is, a few lines of poetry from standard authors, which the boys were required to memorize at home, were repeated the next morning in class. Fifteen minutes were devoted to this and then Christian Doctrine was taken up for an additional fifteen minutes. Arith-

b t

Page One Hundred Twenty-Four

:


metic was then taught from 9:30 'till 10:45 and after that the boys were allowed fifteen minutes for recess, during which baseball, basketball or football was played. From 11 o'clock â&#x20AC;&#x2122;till: the bell rang for luncheon a t 11 :55, the time Was devoted to English Grammar. A t 1 P. VI. studies were resumed and the first half hour was given to Spelling, oral and written.

History or Geography was: then taken.uo for twenty minutes and the

next fifteen minutes were devoted to Bible History. Twenty-five minutes were then given to Reading and the remaining: half hour was spent at penmanship.

On Saturday afternoon an hour was devoted to Elocution. So we see that the school had all the branches required for a full Grammar School Course, and this ad­ vantage also, that the boys received a good Catholic education.. To make this school still more attractive, Father Brock was given a free hand to build a gymnasium that should serve likewise as an assembly and drill hall: for, the

Page One Hundred Twenty Five


management of the school insisted from the beginning that all the pupils, for the good of their health and for the improvement of their bearing, should be enroled as cadets in the different battalions of the school. The school continued since its very beginning to gain students. That is, until 1919, when Manresa Hall was closed because of the lack of teachers. Two years later in 1921, it was re-opened, this time to be used as an Annex to the High School. .A fter one year the doors of Manresa were again closed, except for the gymnasium which has continued to give service until the present day!

W«p|

And so today, when Manresa Hall with all itsjraditions and memories is about to be razed to the ground, perhaps it is not amiss to chronicle a few words of her history, to give a few pictures of the days of her glory as the soil which nourished St. Peter’s Prep and St. Peter’s College. M ay the spirit of old Manresa continue, even after the frame has been destroyed, and may the spirit of one of her veteran prefects and pro­ fessors, Father Patrick M. Collins, continue to inspire us to work for and to live for a greater St. Peter’s.

Page One Hundred Twenty-Six


ALUM NI ’97 Rev. W illiam j. Carlin is the chaplain of the Paterson Fire Department and the pastor at St. George’s Church. Edward Kavanaugh is a teacher in Fordham University and in Public Schools in New York.

’00 Claudio E. McNenny is a popular physician in Jersey City. George Cutley is a lawyer with offices located opposite the courthouse in Jersey City. ■

jj Mr. Stiller, who had the honor of being valedictorian of his class in the College, Class ’09, now resides in South Orange. He is at present connected with the Greenville Bank. ’08 Judge Thomas F. Meaney hears cases in the Juvenile Court. Another St. Peter’s man who has reached the heights in the legal profession. \SSi fwk Wl

’10 Dr. James F. Norton is on the attending staff of St. Francis Hospital. Hon. Robert Kinkead is a prominent judge in this city, and also a loyal Prep rooter. '11 W illiam J. McGovern is a judge in the Second Criminal Court. ’15 Thomas Stanton, A.B., M.A., LL.D., is a lawyer prominent in this city, and a loyal Prep man. Rev. Francis J. Burke, S.J., was ordained a priest at Woodstock College. Father Burke studied at Lyons, France. Vincent McGuiness, M.A., LL.B., has the task of trying to produce a football winner at W e st New York High. He is also a lawyer. ’16 Edward M. Crotty, S.J., and Kerr J. Keane, S.J., were ordained last June. ’17

1

Joseph Sinnott is a member of St. Peter’s Faculty. W illiam Timney is teaching at the John Marshall Law School of the City. Leo A. Cullum, S.J., and Carl J. Hausmann, S.J., are now engaged in their theo­ logical studies at Woodstock, Maryland. Ferdinand A. Orthen is still connected with the Prep in the capacity of Registrar. Mr. Orthen is also Secretary of the Alumni.

BU I Page One Hundred Twenty-Eight


'20

'* Raymond H. Kennedy, S.J., accompanied by Joseph A. Priestner, S.J., returned to New York last summer, after a three-year stay in the Philippine Islands.

’21 John J. Corcoran, Jr., is successfully practising law with the firm of Eagan and Armstrong. Joseph P. McGowan, S.)., and W a lte r Reilly, S.J., are professors at Georgetown U. and Xavier High School, respectively. W illiam G. W a ll, who for several years was a member of the Prep Faculty, is now practicing law in New York City.

’22 James J. McManus, O.P., was ordained last M ay at Washington, D. C. Anthony V. Keane, S.J., during the past two years has been stationed in the Philippine Islands. Thomas A. W allace, now a member of St. Peter’s Faculty, during the past year suffered a sad loss in the death of his mother. John A. Lester is a member of the Prep Faculty. "Johnnie” Slane, who in his days a t the Prep, at Georgetown and at Villanova, gained renown as a football player, is now coaching at Lincoln High. Leo F. M cM anus was ordained to the priesthood in M ay at Darlington, N. J. ’23 “ Bill” Louis will finish his final year at Seton Hall Seminary in June. Frank Mclnerney, John Mclnerney, Oliver T. Cowan, Clement O ’Sullivan, Thomas J. Hearns, John Gillick, and Eugene Tarrent are all alumni graduates of Fordham Law School. Joseph F. Taylor, S.J., is teaching at the Ateneo, Manila, P. I. Four outstanding members of their class, Gerard W . Guterl, Vincent Mclnerney, E. Vincent O ’Brien and Clement O ’Sullivan are members of the Faculty a t St. Peter’s W illiam G. Lavery was ordained to the priesthood last month.

1HI

’24

, j

Fred W . Engel, S.J., leaves for the Philippine Islands this summer.

I

’25 Daniel A. Curtin, graduate of Manhattan College, ’29, is now studying for the priesthood at Darlington, N. J. Thomas F. Burke, Thomas J. Donnelly, John T. Lawlor and Charles B. Murphy are studying at The Immaculate Conception Seminary, at Darlington, N. J. kr ■Mi

E ji

Si Page One Hundred Twenty-Nine


’26 "Denny” W halen is preparing for the priesthood at Immaculate Conception Semi­ nary, at Darlington, N. J. Thomas Cullum is capable manager of the Cullum Trucking Co. in jersey City. Thomas J. M cCeary was a member of the Faculty of St. Peter’s College Prep, but is now engaged in biological research work. Robert B. Reilly, graduate of Holy Cross, is a novice at St. Andrews.

'21

Peter J. Daly, S.J., former Editor-in-Chief of the Petrean, and John J. McGrail are continuing their classical studies at St. Andrew-on-the-Hudson. Joseph J. Lyons is studying at Isaac Jogues Novitiate, Wernersville, Pa. W a lte r Mclnerney and James Connell are in Senior Year at Holy Cross. ’28 ' John T. McCarthy, S.J., is a Junior at St. Andrews. Robert j. Flaherty, S.J., is in his Junior year at Wernersville, Pa. Thomas J. Finn is in his third year at Fordham. Henry C. Cronin is connected with a New York Banking Firm. Richard A. King continues to shine on both gridiron and diamond. Dick is also gaining fame on the basketball court. He has been elected basketball captain at Georgetown for next year. ’29 Howard Molteni is a sophomore at Holy Cross. “ Skippy” McLaughlin coached the Spencer basketball team and made quite a success of it. Henry J. Brock is studying law at Fordham University. “ W illie ” Hawkes is in his third year a t Notre Dame. John Francis McCarthy and Charles McCaule are Novices at St. Andrews. Malcolm Stewart is at St. Isaac Jogues Novitiate. ’30 W illiam j. Rohrenbeck, John Smith, Frederick Rolzhausen, Eddie Skeuse, Ignatius Blanchard, with other Prep graduates, constitute a great part of the student body of St. Peter’s College. George W enz is enrolled at Notre Dame. Joseph C. Faulkner and Joseph Fitzpatrick are Novices at St. Isaac Jogues Novi­ tiate. . i Matthew A. Rooney is a novice at St. Andrews. "Bob” Hanlon and Joseph Doyle were outstanding members of St. Peter’s College basketball team during the 1930-1931 season. John J. Kelly has just completed freshman year at Yale.

Page One Hundred Thirty


T H O M A S J. M EYERS, LL.B Coach

JO H N M. D O W D Captain Football

Page One Hundred Thirty-Two


FOOTBALL

P

R E P A R A T IO N S for the football season were begun several weeks before the opening of classes. Coach Thomas J. Meyers and the Prep football squad spent two weeks in training at Camp Columbus, Culver Lake, Branchville, N. J. A fter this period

of intensive drilling in the rudiments of football, the men, returned to begin their classes in September. A t the end of the month the schedule of games was opened by the first night game of football between High Schools in the East. St. Peter’s opened its 1930 football campaign in its first night game, with a decisive win over Emerson by a score of 19-6.

The Prep scored early, after rushing the

ball to the four-yard stripe, lost the ball on downs, but a poor kick by Milanesi again brought the Prep men within scoring distance, and this try was made good after Morris heaved a pass to McCeady. But the Blue and W h ite was not to be denied, and after skirting the ends and heaving long forward passes, Emerson carried the ball to the tsn-yard stripe where Berg skirted left end for the only touchdown for Emerson. Some pretty long-distance running by Ceraghty after receiving an Emerson punt, brought the ball to the Blue and W h ite twelve-yard stripe. Three tries at the line netted four yards and then Ceraghty fooled the entire Emerson teiam by a well-exe­ cuted spinner play, and crashed through center for fh e Prep’s second touchdown. In the second half the Prepsters again held the upper hand and scored their final touchdown after some pretty running by Morris and the two Buckleys. Then a short forward brought the ball to the five-yard line, where Morris plunged over. A pass from Morris to Bob Buckley netted the extra point and shortly afterward the game ended with the score: St. Peter’s 19, Emerson 6. Before a large, enthusiastic crowd, and again beneath the glare of the lamps, Tommy M yer’s Prepsters swept to their second straight victory of the 1930 campaign. The Petreans opened fire in the first quarter and the Cadets wilted before the attack led by Bob Buckley. The first score came on a tricky shift-play, when Ceraghty dossed a long forward into the waiting arms of Flanagan. The second touchdown came When Jimmy Morris, the Maroon and W h ite speed-king, raced thirty yards after receiving a punt. St. Peter’s continued its brilliant attack when, in the second quarter, Breunig the diminutive star end of the Prep, recovered a fumble on Xavier’s twenty-five-yard line whence Ceraghty, on the first play, skirted the left end for the third center. Nevertheless, Xavier fought back stubbornly and in the last quarter when W altral, the Xavier fullback, crashed through center and then, with splendid interference mowing down St. Peter’s secondary defense, raced sixty yards for a'.touchdOwn. But things were not quite climaxed yet, for the Prepsters came back when Frank Cronan, the lanky end, intercepted a forward pass and sprinted thirty-five yards across the Cadet goal line, bringing the final score to 24-6.

Page One Hundred Thirty-Three


A ii

r rJi Surprised by the strength of Union Hill, the' Maroon and W h ite found itself in a very even and bitterly fought contest and just managed to eke out a 6-0 triumph by means of a blocked kick behind the goal line by Johnny Corbett, which was recovered by Captain John Dowd for the only score of the game at Fletcher’s Field, Fairview. In the second quarter, Cerken of Union Hill side-stepped his way in and out of the Prep wall and was destined for a touchdown when he was pulled down on his four­ teen-yard stripe. There the Prep held and after a series of kicks it was the Prep’s ball on the forty-yard marker. Then,- by straight football, they brought the ball to the fifteen-yard marker where Union Hill held and St. Peter’s lost the ball. Instead of punting, Union Hill tried two end sweeps that netted them a loss of ten yards. Cerkin dropped back to kick. Johnny Corbett, playing his usual stellar game, broke through and blocked the kick which Captain Dowd recovered. In the fourth quarter Union Hill threatened when it brought the ball to the four­ teen-yard stripe. On a triple lateral pass, Gerken was thrown for a twenty-yard loss by Bob Buckley. The Prep immediately kicked out of danger and shortly afterwards the game ended, marking St. Peter’s third consecutive triumph.

s Jls r Page One Hundred Thirty-Four


Long runs by Jimmy Morris and Benny Ceraghty gave St. Peter’s its fourth con­ secutive victory of the 1930 season (its third experience in the night air) before one thousand dyed-in-the-wool fans, who braved the rain and wind to watch the county rivals, W e s t New York and the Prep, slash about in the mire.

Morris, the cagey

Maroon and W h ite halfback, intercepted a forward pass in the second quarter and ran sixty yards for a touchdown, while Ceraghty, the Prep’s brilliawt quarterback, ran forty-five yards to score, after catching a punt in the third period.

The final score

was 13-0. The game was quite interesting although rain fell continuously and the gridiron was a vast sea of mud. In the fourth quarter the Prep men, led by Bob Buckley, .their most consistent ground gainer, put on their best offensive, and marched to the eightyard line, but the game ended before they could do any scoring.

I

St. Peter’s journeyed to Englewood with an unblemished record to play St. Cecilia’s, but there they met a stronger and better team, which was led by M a tty Love, the quarterback, who gained fame at Rutherford High.

It was not St. C ecilia’s much-

talked-of charging back but it was their brilliant aerial attack that literally swept St. Peter’s off their feet.. Love just threw pass after pass, few of which went for naught.

Love made a great run of 65 yards in the final period for the final score for

St. Cecilia’s, netting a 28-6 victory. St. Peter’s saved itself from a white-washing when Bill Heffron scored in the final two minutes of play after a brilliant Over-head game had put the sphere in scoring territory.

Burns, De Sapio, Heffron and Breunig played best for Coach Meyer’s men.

Another St. Peter’s-Lincoln gridfest has passed on and, like most of the other contests of bygone years, has resulted in a Prep victory.

Only once in the history of

the two schools has the gallant Maroon and W h ite been downed by Lincoln’s Big Blue. This year the score was 6 to 0. The game was won by Benny Ceraghty’s touchdown in the second quarter that climaxed a 38-yard march for the only score of the .game. The game was played through a slashing rain and the field was a vast sea of mud when Lincoln kicked off to start the contest.

Nothing to cause much excitement

happened in the first quarter and it turned out to be a kicking duel between Morris and Sealand, with Jimmy Morris getting the better distance from the water-logged ball. W hen the second period opened it was St. Peter’s ball on Lincoln’s 38-yard line, after an exceptionally poor punt by Sealand. In the first play, Morris threw a short forward to Jim Buckley, which netted a gain of twenty yards; and on the very next play Ceraghty raced toward the left wing, cut back and shot off tackle, eluding two of the Lincoln secondary defense to cross the final chalkmark for the only score of the contest.

Page One Hundred Thirty-Five

Mi


Shortly after the second half began, Lincoln put on its greatest offensive, which did not terminate until the ball was on St. Peter’s 4-yard mark with four downs to go. But though that line, from end to end, may have been shattered and torn apart from five successive first downs, after the constant pounding of the Blue and W h ite ’s backs, nevertheless, with its back to the wall, the Maroon and W h ite rose to the occasion gloriously and drove the Big Blue back.

Three times did Watson, the Lincoln star,

try to get by that fighting line, only to be thrown back heavily.

As a result of this

stellar exhibition, Lincoln lost the ball on downs and immediately St. Peter’s kicked out of danger. Lincoln then tried many aerial plays, but the. ball usually found its way into the arms of St. Peter’s backs and in a short time the game ended. Before a large and enthusiastic crowd St, Peter’s Prep crushed Dickinson Evening at the Jersey City Baseball Park to the tune of 23 to 6.

The Owls got off a very pretty

boot to the 2-yard stripe where De Sapio caught the ball and started on a splendid 65-yard run aided by some fine interference. On an attempted pass, Dickinson inter­ cepted and immediately dropped back to kick, but Dowd and Corbett blocked the punt and Hughes, Prep center, fell upon the ball over the goal line for a touchdown. Conroy immediately kicked the extra point. Dickinson, however, came back in the second quarter and after a steady march, Fulcinski carried the ball over for a touchdown. Their try for extra point was wide and St. Peter’s led 7 to 6 at the half. The Prep came back strong after the rest period. Two successive forwards from Morris to Bob Buckley brought the ball to the O w l’s 3-yard line from which McAleer plunged over. Conroy’s kick was wide. The final Prep touchdown came in the last period after Morris ran back a punt twenty-five yards and then tossed two accurate passes to Bob Buckley. This brought the ball to the Scarlet 6-yard line from which Jim Buckley plunged over after some fine interference on the part of Joe McCeady, dependable Prep end. Jim Buckley plunged over for the extra point. The last score of the game came as a result of John Conroy’s 48-yard field goal. After the kickoff again, Joe Cassidy and Johnny Breunig broke- through on a kick. Breunig fell on the ball on the O w l’s 18-yard stripe, but before Prep could get a play in motion the game ended. A record crowd of 35,000 saw St. Peter’s go down before Dickinson on Thanks­ giving day, after they had outplayed Dickinson for three and one-half quarters. It was a hard-fought battle all the way, but was cleanly played. The Petrean line outplayed the much stronger Dickinson forward wall throughout the entire game. In the first quarter the Prep tore the Big D line to shreds and marched to the 25yard line, whence Morris took the ball to the 5-yard line'but the Maroon was penalized for off-side and the ball was snapped back to the 30-yard line. Dickinson was stopped dead by the Prep line and hqd to keep kicking to save itself.

Page One Hundred Thirty-Six


fS fT l USa s k iM

In the second quarter the Prep started its third great offensive, after two suc­

i

iji©5

cessive forward passes from Morris to Ceraghty put the ball on the Green 20-yard line. Bob Buckley plunged through center for eight yards. Bob Buckley crashed over for a first down, with the goal to go. On the next play a lateral was attempted. In the third quarter, Dickinson made two first downs and everyone seemed to L r il

think Dickinson was off to victory. But the most ardent Dickinson rooter will agree that he was mistaken in this, for on the next three plays Dickinson was thrown for an 18-yard loss. The Prep backfield, with Jim Buckley at the helm, again began to hammer and tear away at the Big D’s line and once more the ball was brought deep into Dick­ inson’s territory as the quarter ended. The fatal fourth quarter opened,.when the Prep brought the ball to the Dickinson 15-yard line, only to lose the ball on downs. A fte r a series of kicks, it was Dickinson’s

B\ s ir

ball on their own 35-yard stripe. Barabas ripped off tackle for eight yards. Albers skirted the end for six and O ’Reilly smashed through center for four yards bringing the ball to the Maroon 47-yard line. Then came the play and victory for Dickinson. The ball was snapped back to O ’Reilly, who passed it to Barabas, who tossed it to Albers. In the meantime Singer, star end of the Green aggregation, was tearing down the side­ lines, unseen by the Maroon secondary, and he received the long pass from Albers and scampered twelve yards to a 6-0 victory.

m jg j.

IX s P & V

3S35r-»j

Page One Hundred Thirty-Seven


BASKETBALL T. P ET ER ’S opened its basketball season with a triumph over the strong Don Bosco quintet to the tune of 17-15. it was a close guarding game throughout and Marty

S

De Sapio’s field goal in the closing minutes gave the Myersmen their well-earned victory. In the first half the accurate shooting of De Sapio and Bud Brown gave the Maroon and W h ite a slight margin. The second half was nip and tuck the entire dis­ tance until De Sapio’s spectacular goal insured the game for the Prep. The Maroon and W h ite traveled out to Carteret and defeated the St. Joseph’s Catholic Club quintet of that town, in an exciting court contest. It was the second consecutive victory of the season for the county champions. The final score was 26-23. St. Peter’s scored its first county win by trimming Bayonne to the tune of 29-17. The Prep had a little trouble in getting started and as a result the first quarter found it at the short end of the score 4-2. However, in the second quarter the Maroon defense tightened and the shorp-shooting eye of Bennie Geraghty began to click. This enabled the Petreans to take the lead as the half ended. In the last quarter St. Peter’s lead was being threatened as the score stood 21 -17. Immediately Mackin, Prep pivotman, sunk a beautiful over-hand shot. Bennie Geraghty almost defeated Bayonne single-handed, running up the total of sixteen points.

Page One Hundred Thirty-Eight


jfftj St. Peter s Prep continued its winning ways by tagging a defeat on the hitherto unbeaten Dickinson Evening quintet to the tune of 27-21. The “ O wls” presented a much stronger aggregation than was expected and for the first half it was a nip and tuck affair. However in the second half the Prep, led by the brilliant Bennie Geraghty, forged her way ahead and held the supreme hand for the rest of the fray. Minus the services of Bennie Geraghty and "A ndy” Andrus, St. Peter’s was forced into an extra period to defeat a strong Fordham Prep team. Mackin, filling the place of Bennie Geraghty, sewed up the game the extra period with a beautiful' basket quickly followed by a foul shot. The result: 22-19. M arty De Sapio was the high scorer. Riding on a wave of five consecutive victories, the St. Peter’s Prep team traveled to St. M ichael’s only to be defeated by the Green and W h ite Passers. The game was not a one-sided affair. It was not until the last few minutes of play when Johnny Kane, of St. M ichael’s, began his scoring spree, that the Maroon clad quintet acknowledged

fl

jot

defeat in the shape of 28-16. The Prep trimmed the Big Blue by the score of 29-18, after a rough and tumble contest at the Lincoln gym in the first game for the city title. St. Peter’s went into the

Iw i ■ It

front in the first quarter by means of five fouls and Geraghty’s basket, holding Lincoln to a single point. A fter the short intermission the Maroon and W h ite began to click and after some little fight, pushed away from Lincoln, thanks to the fine shooting of Geraghty and De Sapio and some excellent floor work of Andrus and Johnnie Breunig, Morris and Brown. A fighting Petrean quintet traveled to Union Hill to defeat a larger and more ex­ perienced Union Hill squad by a mere 17-16. The Prep was scarcely conceded a chance, for victory and lived up to the name established for St. Peter. The Petreans did not

7J

appear as a winning team in the first half and the score stood 9-5. However, in the last half St. Peter’s unleashed an attack that carried the Union Hill team off its feet, and at the beginning of the last quarter the score stood 14-12, with Union still leading' W ith but two minutes left to play little Johnny Hill proved himself a big hero by sink­ ing a beautiful basket and giving St. Peter’s a well-earned victory. The St. Peter's Prep team won a thrilling encounter from the St. Peter’s College “ Peacocks,” by virtue of a last minute rally. The College representatives displayed an attack that completely surprised the Prep, and as a result the Peacocks were leading by the score of 11 -7. In the third quarter the Prep rallied valiantly but not enough to suppress the onslaught of the College. In the last quarter Hill, a mite of a lad, dropped in two well-timed baskets that put the Prep within a point of the College Five. Here M arty De Sapio scored a basket which was immediately followed by a two-pointer off Bud Brown’s fingertips. The College tried to score from all angles with no avail. Ben Geraghty intercepted a pass and dribbled the length of the floor to score a spectacular basket to win at 22 to 18.

ill Page One Hundred Thirty-Nine

iBLi


The Maroon lost to Union Hill and lost the lead in the Hudson County Champion­ ship League by virtue of Union’s holding the Prep to one point in the second half, while they were garnering for themselves fifteen points. After great work by De Sapio and Andrus in the first half, the Prep came within two points of tying the score. A t the intermission the score read 10-8. However, the second half proved disastrous to the Myersmen. Excellent guarding by Union Hill held the Prep to but one single point while the visitors rolled up 25 points. A fighting Dickinson Evening Quintet avenged its early season defeat by humbling the St. Peter’s team, the final score being 33-28. The Petreans were invincible in the first three quarters and scored at will to be leading 15-7 as the final session opened. The Owls from then on played like an inspired team and flashed a brand of ball that completely baffled the Prep. St. Peter’s Prep defeated Lincoln for the second time this season by tagging a 24-12 loss on the Big Blue. The game was not as one-sided as the score indicates but both teams battled on even terms until the last quarter when the Petreans unleashed an attack that carried Lincoln off her feet. In the first quarter, due to some flash shooting by De Sapio and Bennie, the Prep led 5-3. In the second quarter Lincoln picked up a bit and the Blue fought the Maroon to a 9-8 score at the half. The last quarter opened with the Prep leading 13-12 and then they set down to do some heavy scoring. Bud Brown did most of it in this period, tallying 6, and Bennie Geraghty threw up five points to defeat Lincoln decisively. St. Michael’s continued to hold its jinx over St. Peter’s and as a result defeated the Prep by the score of 25-22. The Petreans fought hard all the way and nearly re­ turned victorious. The Green and W h ite passers were entirely too big for the fighting Prepsters to defeat. St. Peter’s Prep lost another game to a small but fighting Demarest team. The Hoboken team outplayed the Petreans in every period but the third when Prep did some nice playing, only to come out of the short end of a 23-15 score. In an overtime game St. Peter's Prep won a thrilling game from St. Joseph’s by the score of 26-25. The Philadelphia team opened with an attack that startled the Petreans, however the Prep battled on even terms with them for the first quarter, the score being 8-8. In the second period the Quakers played a marvelous game and outscored the Peterites so that the score at the half was 16-12. The St. Joseph’s team continued to run up points till the score stood 21-12. A t this point Bennie and Andy began to give an exhibition of some fancy shooting that brought the score up to 24-22 with fifteen seconds to play. Here Bud Brown hawked a nice basket from midcourt as the game ended. In the extra period Andy Andrus scored a basket and a Quakerman scored a foul to end the battle.


R J! S t

St. Peter’s Prep defeated the highly rated Emerson quintet in a thrilling last quarter. The game was sewed up for the Petreans by the brilliant shooting of Bennie Geraghty. The Prep started off in great fashion and gained an 11-4 lead for the major part of the first half, due to some spectacular playing by De Sapio. However, the "Bluebelles” brought the score up to 11 all at the intermission. The second half was packed with thrills. W ith Bennie Geraghty playing the hero’s role to capacity, the Peterites scored a one point victory over the Emerson team, the Prep tallying ten more points to Emerson’s nine. The St. Peter’s Prep basketkeers scored a one-sided victory over the W e s t New York cagers by the score of 24-16. The Maroon and W h ite team outplayed the Memorial Five in every quarter. In the first half the St. Peter’s team demolished the W e s t New Yorkers and at the half the score was 12-8, thanks to some neat tossing by Geraghty and Brown. During the second half, the Petreans played like an inspired team and held the Memorial quintet to 3 points for each period, while they ran up a total of 24 for the Prep.

JO H N J. C A SE Y Manager Basketball

Page One Hundred Forty-One


I

jEepheaX:

W ith Andy Andrus lost to the Prep the fighting Petrean Five were defeated by a strong Brooklyn aggregation. The score was 24-16. The visitors displayed much marks­ manship and passing ability. A fighting and inspired St. Peter’s Prep team was obliged to acknowledge defeat to a Dickinson Quintet but only in the last fifteen-seconds of play. The Prep, supposed to be patched up, gave an exhibition that startled the fans who attended the tussle. From the opening whistle until the closing one, the Petreans fought and battled as a true St. Peter’s team should. Although Dickinson outscored them in the first half, the fighting spirit of the team was not lacking as the second half opened. Trailing by the score of 7-5, the Peterites set a dizzy pace for the remainder of the fray. W ith Hilltop leading 10-7, M arty De Sapio got real busy and hawked a spectacular basket. Noi content with this M arty pulled another shot frem a more difficult angle. This gave Prep a 12-11 advantage. Singer of Dickinson threw one from midcourt that bounded off the rim and Larsen tapped it in. The Petreans tried in vain to score and while doing so fouled Singer who made it good and wound up the scoring. St. Peter’s Prep defeated a Fordham Prep Quintet, 25-22, but not until after a hard fought battle. The teams showed much ability at long range shooting, with Ford­ ham having a slight edge. However, under the basket the Petreans displayed accuracy. St. Peter’s Prep was again defeated by a small but well-oiled Hoboken team. The Petreans opened the game with a bang and as a result were leading by a score of 3-1, due to a hawker by Chapoutot. After this the Prep was restricted in scoring, while Demarest ran up points to lead at the final whistle by a 23-10 score. A few days after the defeat at the hands of Demarest, the Prep quintet met the Bayonne basketeers and with them-— another defeat, in the odd accents of 17-11. A crippled St. Peter’s Prep Five dropped another game to a larger and more ex­ perienced Emerson team. The Peterites were outplayed in every stage of the game and only their fighting spirit kept them in the game which closed in a one-sided 29-13 fashion. A small and fighting St. Peter’s team, minus Geraghty, Brown, De Sapio and Andrus, staged a big upset when they drubbed a more experienced W e st New York team. The Prepsters got off to a flying start, thanks to some accurate shooting by Johnny Burke. The Prep was threatened in the second period when W e st New York drew up within a point of them 6-5. But here Chapoutot heaved in a neat two-pointer, and Burke again staged the hero role by scoring 3 points,*to give the Prep the advan­ tage at the half 11 -7. In the third quarter the Prepmen again displayed their superiority when they scored 6 points to the New Yorkers’ 2. However, in the last period the W est New York team staged a rally but the Prep was content to stave it off until the final whistle which found the Peterites leading 21-16.

TA Page One Hundred Forty-Two


St. Peter’s Prep miniature basketball team threw quite a scare into a larger and much more experienced Dickinson Quintet, before they bowed to it by the score of 21 -16. Considering the fact that it was the Petreans second time to function together, they played very good ball and held the lead for the major part of the first half, due to some nice playing by Chapoutot, Connelley and Bill Breunig. The score at the intermission was 7-7. A t the beginning of the second half, Larson, Singer and Cajkowski sank baskets in rapid succession to give the Hilltoppers a 13-7 advantage. The Prep rallied valiantly but only managed to score with a basket by Breunig. Again Dickinson went on a spree to bring the count up to 21 -12 as the final whistle sounded.

BASKETBALL SCHEDULE, 1930-31 DATE

SCORE

OPPONENT St. P. IP.

Opp’t.

15 23

Dec.

3

Don Bosco Inst. ........... »........... ..............................

17

Dec.

6

St. Joseph’s (Carteret, N. ] . ) .... ....‘ .......................

26

Dec. 10

Bayonne H. S .............................. .............................. Dickinson Evening H. S ............. ..............................

29

17

27

Fordham Prep .......................... ..............................

22

21 19

St. M ichael’s H. S ....................... ............. ................ Lincoln H. S ................................ .............................. Union Hill H. S .......................... .............................

16

28

29

18

17

16

St. Peter’s College, ’34.............. ..............................

22

18

7

Union Hill S. C .......................... ..............................

9

Jan. 10

Dickinson Evening H. S ............................................. Lincoln H. S ................................ ..............................

28 24

25 t33 12

St. M ichael’s H. S ...................... ..............................

22

....................... ..............................

Dec. 17 Dec. 19 Dec. 23 Dec. 27 Dec. 29 Jan. 3 Jan.

Jan. 14 Jan. 16 Jan. 21 Jan. 24

Demarest H. S.

Jan. 28

St. Joseph’s (Phila., P a .)............ .............................. Emerson H. S ............................... .............................

15 ,26 21

Jan. 31

W e s t New York H. S ................ ..............................

24

Feb.

4

Feb.

7

St. John’s H. S. (Brooklyn)....................................... (1 6 Dickinson H. S. ...................................J r .,.......... 12

Feb. 11 Feb. 13 Feb. 17 Feb. 20 Feb. 25 Feb. 28

25 23 t25 20 16 24 .14

Fordham Prep............................. ............p S l ......... Demarest H. S ...... ..................... .........,:T................. Bayonne H. S ...........................................!................

25 10 11

23

Emerson H. S ................. •............. .............................

13

29

W e s t New York H. S. .-...........................................

21

16 21

22 17

Dickinson H. S ............................ .............................

12 t - ■1 Extra Period $— 2 Extra Period" Faculty Adviser of Athletics.................. ........................Rev. L. E. Stanley, S. J. Mr. Thomas Myers Coach .............................................................. M a n a g e r.......................

John J. Casey

Page One Hundred Forty-Three


if®

TEN NIS TEAM

A

FTER a half-hearted attempt last year, the Prep has once more taken up tennis as a minor sport. A number of courts have been obtained at W est Side Park for the Prep’s use and everything seems to point to a successful season. The team last year consisted of Novak, Brock, Cunningham, Gregory, Fritzy

ml

Wildermann and-W alter Wildermann.

M i^ y I

Gregory and W . Wildermann, ready for a stiff schedule this year, and with Mr. Goering, S.J., as Coach, the Petreans will make things hard for their opponents at the net.

rjgj

W ith three of these players, Cunningham,

The probable schedule is as follows"

I r@

Lincoln .................................. ....Friday,..,.... .........

M ay 22.............. ....... ,.At home

Woodrow W ils o n

M ay 2 6

............. Tuesday..

W e s t New Y o r k ......................

I

m

i i

................ Away

Friday......... ...... .,... May 29 . ......... ........... Away

Brooklyn P re p ........................ ...Friday......... ........

June 5,,,................. ..... Away

(9 1 Dickinson ...................... ....... Tuesday................. .........June 9..........................A t home Games with St. Benedict’s, Fordham Prep and St. Peter’s College have also been planned. An opening match with St. Benedict’s was canceled because of poor weather.

ml $

The Prep team is now well organized and ready for all opponents.

I

S JI

IK flS B S S B S Page One Hundred Forty-Four

y B i


Vhe

LETTER MEN c/Tvs FO O TBALL John Dowd, Captain

Robert Buckley

John Conroy, Captain-Elect

Francis Coughlin

Joseph M cAleer

Joseph McGeady

Thomas O â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill

Francis Cronan

Francis Hughes

M artin Cusick

John Corbett

Owen McCarron

James Buckley

John Hill

John Breunig

W illiam Breunig

James Morris

John Costello, Manager e /T v i

BASKETBALL Eugene Chapoutot, Captain

Anthony Andrus

|ohn Connelly

John Burke

John Delaney

John Hill

Henry Molteni

W illiam Breunig

Joseph Kelleher

John Breunig

John Buckley

John Casey, Manager

Page One Hundred Forty-Five


THE SENIOR CLASS OF 1931 c/qpva A H ER N , E D W IN F .........................................................................266 Arlington Avenue m

A LEX A N D ER , W A L T E R T ................................................................29 Roosevelt Avenue BO YLE, JO H N H .......................................................................... 101 Grand Street B R EU N IG , JO H N A ............................................................................169 Griffith Street BRO ADH URST, JO H N C .......................................103 W e st 41st Street, Bayonne, N. J B R O W N , H O W A R D V ........................................................................ 221 Jewett Avenue BU C K LEY , RO BERT E ............................................................................ 26 Cator Avenue

1 % i

BURKE, EU G EN E F .....................................................89-04 250th Street, Bellerose, L. I BYRN E, T H O M A S P ................................................................................ 225 Clerk Street C A RRO LL, JO SEPH F............................................ 450 Marshall Street, Elizabeth, N. J. CASEY, JO H N J ..................................................... 240 W est 4th Street, New York City C ASEY, V IN C E N T D............................................................... 134 Van Nostrand Avenue

I

n

C A SSID Y , JO SEPH J ........................................................................... 243 Pacific Avenue C O N LO N , H E N R Y M ........................................... 164-6th Street, Hoboken, N.J. C O N N EL L, JO SEPH A ................................................................... 9 Stuyvesant Avenue

H

COOKE, T H O M A S J ............................................................................ 648 Jersey Avenue

sI

C O RBETT, JO H N J .............................................................................. 236 Fulton Avenue COSTA, G EO RGE J ............................................................................ 376 Second Avenue C O STELLO , JO H N C .......................................................................... 514 Jersey Avenue C REG A N , JO H N J ............................................................................22 Reservoir Avenue

I

C R O N A N , FR A N K X ..........................................................................654 Jersey Avenue C U N N IN G H A M , JA M ES G ................................................................ 6 BaysideTerrace C U R TIS, W A L T E R W ................................................................... 83 Col lard Street DECK, JO H N J ................... * .................................. 165 Palisade Avenue, Cliffside, N. J.

fk3

£ i

DEISS, W A L T E R C ................................................503 Sunset Terrace, Ridgefield, N. J. D IELLO , H ER M A N G ............................................... 63 Prospect Street, Paterson, N. J, D IT Z EL, A R T H U R C ................................................ 525 North Avenue, Elizabeth, N. J. DO N AH U E, W IL L IA M T ..........................................................................35 Rock Street DO N O VAN , W IL L IA M W ............................................................ 53 Jefferson Avenue DORIS, FR A N C IS M ..........................................................................365 Bergen Avenue

«

L

11

|

1

i'll

5§§1 Page One Hundred Forty-Six


D O W D , JO H N M ..........................

142 Pearsall Avenue

D U G A N , G E R A L D T .................................................69 W e s t 57th Street, Bayonne, N.J. D W Y E R ,’ K E N N E T H J .............................. ........................................220 Danforth Avenue F IT Z P A T R IC K , F R A N C IS X ................................... FLO O D, G EO R G E G

138 Avenue C, Bayonne, N. J.

................................................. 59 Broadway, Bayonne, N. J.

FR EN C H , W A L T E R A ................................................................... 102 Magnolia Avenue G A N N O N , JO SEPH E ................................................................... 254 Armstrong Avenue G IL K IN S O N , T H O M A S G RA D Y , JO H N

E ...........................................................22 Van Houten Avenue

B ...................................................................................243 Fulton Avenue

G R EE N E, H A R R Y J .................................................................... 271 Van Nostrand Avenue H A L P IN , JO H N J ............................................................................ 197 Armstrong Avenue H A YES, T H O M A S J ............................................................................. '....605 Grove Street H IL L , T H O M A S D..........................................................................51 M anhattan Avenue H O C H , G EO R G E B .................................................................................. 40 Condict Street JO R D A N , T H O M A S L .................................................... 408 Jersey Street, Harrison, N. J. K E E N A N , H A R O LD J ......................................................................... 179 Palisade Avenue K U K IE L S K J, E R IC T .............................................................

233 Barrow Street

LIN D E R , F R A N C IS X ...........................................1200 Bloomfield Street, Hoboken, N. J. L U C ID , R O W L A N D V .............................................................................. 85 W a d e Street L Y N C H , A L B E R T J ...................................................103 Newman Avenue, Bayonne, N.J. LY O N S , M IL E S A ..........................................................................218 Washington Street M cC A R R O N , O W E N F ......................................................... 341 Avenue A, Bayonne, N. J. M c C O R M A C K , JA M E S

E ..............................................................459 Fairmont Avenue

M cG REG O R, Q U E N T IN P .........................................1125-3rd Avenue, W oodcliffe, N. J. M cC U R R , JO SEPH F ................................................ 95 Humphrey Avenue, Bayonne, N. J. M c L A U G H L fN , T H O M A S J ......................................................... 102 Wilkinson Avenue M A L L O N , P A U L A ................................................ 60 Adelina Place, North Bergen, N. J. M A N Z A , L O U IS A ...................................................... 630-13th Street, Union City, N. J. M A R A N O , G E R A LD J ............................................................................248 W a y n e Street M E N Z E L , T H O M A S J ................................................................95 Van Nostrand Avenue M IG L IO R E , JA M E S L ..................................................................................356-1 st Street

.

.

.

^

------ ' --o .

_ = » ■ ■ = ■

-

= = -----

. = ■ ------

11 i

Page One Hundred Forty-Seven


M IS K E L L , RO BERT P ............................................................................ 84.Union Street M O L T EN I, H E N R Y P...................................... 451 Gregory Avenue, Weehawken, N. J. M O O N EY , T H O M A S J ...................................................................74 Bartholdi Avenue M O RRIS, JA M E S E............................................................................. 262 Jewett Avenue M U R PH Y , JO H N J .............................................................................59 Anderson Avenue N O O N E, A N D R E W A ..................................................................... 144 Randolph Avenue O ’BR IEN , W IL L IA M R................................................................... 218 Palisade Avenue O ’C O N N O R, JE R E M IA H B .......................................1023 South Boulevard, Bronx, N. Y. O ’D O N N ELL, C O R N E L IU S J ................................... 94 W e st 47th Street, Bayonne, N . ) O ’KEEFE, C H A R LES J ...........................................................................92 Bentley Avenue O ’N E IL L , T H O M A S E................................................... 30 East 3rd Street, Bayonne, N.J. O ’R E ILLY , R IC H A R D J ............................................................. 11 Bartholdi Avenue O ’S H A U G H N ESSY , T H O M A S J .........................................................69 Rutgers Avenue PA FC H IK , JO H N S....................................................... 413 Court Street, Elizabeth, N. J. PET R O C C IO N E, JO H N F......................................134 W e st 14th Street, Bayonne, N. J. PRIC E, RO BERT H .................................................. PROUT, M A U R IC E F..........................................................

198 Arlington Avenue 1:43 Lembeck Avenue

RIN DOS, JO H N J .................................................................... 287 Communipaw Avenue RYA N , JO SEPH J ................................................................................. 119 Ogden Avenue S IN N O T T , JO H N J ............................................................ 86Jewett Avenue S M IT H , JO H N E...................................... ........................................ 60 Baldwin Avenue S O U T H W E L L , RO BERT J .............................................................. 212 Arlington Avenue S T A B IL E, A M E R IC U S C ........................................127 W e st 44th Street, Bayonne, N. J. T A M A S IK , JO H N J ............................................................361 Avenue E, Bayonne, N. J. TO O H EY, ED W A R D J .................................................219 Garside Street, Newark, N. J. U R B A N O W IC Z , C A S IM IR F.....................................................................185 Bay Street V IN C E N T , RO BERT E.....................................................................198 Arlington Avenue W A L K E R , GERARD T .......................................................................... 217 Jewett Avenue W A R D , ED W A R D J .......................................................................... 12 Delaware Avenue W A Y , RO BERT M ........................................................................ 425 Fairmount Avenue Z A JA C , TH A D D EU S A ........................................... 118 Prospect Avenue, Bayonne, N. J.


PATRONS AND PATRONESSES t/ T V J JO H N B. BRIO D Y , A.M . D A N IE L j. C O L L IN S , A.B. MR. JO H N J. C O R C O R A N , JR, E D W A R D J. C U L L E N , A.B. MR. JA M E S J. D O N O V A N JO H N F. D U FFY, A.B. JO H N F. G R IF F IN , A.B. G ER A R D W . G U T ER L, A.B;, LL.B. A L F R E D J. K ELT Y , A.M. JO H N J. LEST ER, A.B., LL.B. MRS. W IL L IA M - J. L U C ID

j

JO H N F. L Y N C H , A.B. G EO R G E C. M A R T IN O , B.S. MR. A N D MRS. T H O M A S H. M IS K E L L D A V ID J. M O L L O Y C O M P A N Y JO H N J. M c C IL L , B.S. V IN C E N T P. M c lN E R N E Y , A.B. W I L L I A M F. M c V A N N , A.B. JO H N J. M U L L E N , A.B. MRS. M IC H A E L M U L Q U IN JO SEPH F. M U R P H Y , D.D.S. E. V IN C E N T O ’B R IEN , A.M .

C L E M E N T C. O ’S U L L IV A N , A .3.. LL.B. M A R T IN A. RO O N EY, A.B. JO SEPH W . S IN N O T T , A.M . , T H O M A S A. W A L L A C E , A ;B., LL.B C/CFV5 The Class of 4-M The Class of 4-A The Class of 4-B The Class of 4-C

Page One Hundred Forty-Nine


APPRECIATION f/ S V 5 The class of nineteen hundred and thirty-one desires here to voice its appreciation and indebtedness to all who have contributed to the success of the Cephean: To Father Collins, for his inspiration ever lighting our path during the many hours spent in preparing this book. To the Moderator, Mr. Hartnett, S.J., and to all the members of the Faculty for their interest and approval, particularly to Mr. Orthen, ’15, and to Mr. E. Vincent O ’Brien, ’23, both of whom have been ever willing to sacrifice their own time in defer­ ence to the Staff. To the S ta ff who have labored under difficulties to create, from the mere idea of a year book, a beautiful reality. To the students and in particular to the First Year classes (captained by Mr. Hogan, S.J.) whose enthusiastic cooperation was most welcome and encouraging. To the patrons and advertisers, without whose loyal and substantial friendship we would have been immeasurably handicapped. To the W h ite Studios for their courteous service. To the Jahn and Oilier Engraving Company for their excellent craftsmanship. To Mr. Alexander Sager for his consideration and care in the printing of the 1931 C EPH EA N .


ST. PETER’S COLLEGE PREPARATORY 130-144 Grand Street, Jersey C ity, N. J. The Reverend Joseph P: O ’Reilly, S.J. President

CLASSICAL COURSE OF STUDIES TOGETHER W IT H

B IO LO G Y , PH YSIC S, C H E M IS T R Y

Boys who have completed a Grammar School Course may then enter to begin their High School Course ,

T U T IO N . . . $120 a Year PAYABLE QUARTERLY

Page One Hundred Fifty-Two


ST. PETER’S COLLEGE (O F A R T S A N D

S C IE N C E S )

Founded 1872 Refounded 1930

“ T H E D O W N T O W N JE S U IT C O L L E G E ”

1931-32 FRESHMAN and SOPHOMORE ONLY

ONE N EW A RK AVEN UE

JE R S E Y C IT Y , N. J.

For a Catalogue W rite to the Registrar

Page One Hundred Fifty-Three


SETON HALL COLLEGE South Orange, N. J. ] ESTABLISHED 1856

j

I

| College of Arts and Sciences, empowered by act of the Legislature of the State of New Jersey to grant

!

Academic Degrees, endowed with all the rights be足 longing to similar corporations by the laws of the State.

Registered in N ew York and New Jersey;

j

Standard College N. C. E. A. Selected Faculty. Com足 plete courses leading to degrees to Bachelor of Arts

j

and Bachelor of Science

j

Special D epartm ent of Education A th letics A d m irab le Location

Excellent Board

For Further Particulars and Catalogue . . . Address

RT. REV. MSGR. T. H. M c L A U C H L IN , S.T.D. President

Page One Hundred Fifty-Four


D A Y A N D E V E N IN G

U N D ER G R A D U A T E C O U RSES BEG IN N IN G SEPTEMBER, 1931

IN S C IE N T IF IC B U S IN E S S T R A IN IN G

TOGETHER W IT H A CULTURAL BACKGROUND

A FO U R -Y EA R D A Y A N D S IX - Y E A R E V E N IN G C O U R SE L E A D IN G T O T H E D EG REE

OF

B A C H E L O R .O F

S C IE N C E IN

B U S IN E S S

A D M IN IS T R A T IO N

Also Courses in Preparation for State Certified Public Accountant s License Examination

W rite for Catalog

FORDHAM UNIVERSITY S C H O O L O F B U S IN E S S W oolworth Building

Page One Hundred Fif.ty-Five


Telephone: COrtlandt 7799

THE EDW ARD O’TOOLE CO., Inc. Ecclesiastical Goods and Pious A rticle s B A R C L A Y and C H U R C H STREETS, N E W Y O R K C IT Y

EGAN SCHOOL OF BUSINESS Superior in Facu lty, Equipment-and Placem en t Facilities j

OPEN ALL YEAR

DAY AND EVENING

Secretarial, Shorthand, Stenotype, Bookkeeping, Accounting and I

Business Administration Courses Call, ’Phone or Write for Circular

2849 B O U L E V A R D at JO U R N A L SQ U A R E

JE R S EY C IT Y , N. J.

Other Eagan Schools: HOBOKEN and UNION CITY

Compliments ... o f . . .

Compliments .

.

1E

i

Telephone: 1598 Montgomery

. .of. .

JOHN J. DOWD

Established 1872

Home'Phone: 4054 Delaware

M. J. BOYLAN Funeral Director Auto Hearses and Limousines Constantly on Hand at All Hours FUNERAL HOME: 2690 BOULEVARD AND HIGHLAND AVENUE

198 Pavonia A venue

Page One Hundred Fifty-Six

Jersey C ity, N. J.


HOLY CROSS COLLEGE E N T R A N C E B Y C E R T IF IC A T E O R B Y E X A M IN A T IO N

A .B ., Ph.B., and B.S. Courses A C O N S E R V A T IV E C O L L E G E . . . W H IC H RETAINS THE BEST OF THE CLASSICAL TRADITIONS.

A PR O G R E S S IV E C O L L E G E . . . W H IC H MEETS THE HIGHEST MODERN EDUCATIONAL REQUIREMENTS.

A C O M PLETE C O LLEG E . . . W H IC H GLORIES IN MOLDING CHARACTER IN HHER STUDENTS.

A FEA R LESS C O L L E G E . . . W H IC H TEACHES THE FUNDAMENTAL TRUTHS PERTAINING TO ETERNAL AS W E L L AS TEMPORAL LIFE. Bulletin of information on admissions will be mailed upon application to the

, Dean of Freshmen, Holy Cross College; Worcester, Mass. i

Compliments

Compliments

]

... o f . . . .

.:. o f. . .

I

i s

1C

JO H N

BECCAN S Director

I

1

3 j

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY

Compliments

Compliments

... o f ... .

. . .of. . .

'

'

!

J s | s

3A

1

C U S D IT T M A R i i I

i *-

— +■ Page One Hundred Fifty-Seven

J


I

FOUNDED IN 1841

FORDHAM UNIVERSITY I Fordham Road and Third Avenue Adjoining Bronx Park

N EW YORK CITY

Conducted by the Jesu it Fathers ST. JO H N ’S C O LL EG E - S C H O O L OF L A W - - -

- - -

C O LL EG E O F P H A R M A C Y

-

- - - -

-

- -

- -

-

- - - - - - - - - -

- -

- -

SC H O O L O F SO C IO LO G Y A N D S O C IA L S ER V IC E G R A D U A T E SC H O O L - - - - - - -

-

-

Fordham Road Woolworth Bldg. also Fordham Rd. Fordham Road

- - - - . - Woolworth Bldg. - - - Woolworth Bldg.

T E A C H E R S ’ C O LLEG E

Woolworth Bldg.

S C H O O L O F B U SIN ESS A D M IN IS T R A T IO N - - - - - S U M M E R SC H O O L - - - - - - - - -

- Woolworth Bldg. Fordham Road

PR EPA R A T O R Y SC H O O L -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

- -

Fordham Road

R E S ID E N T and N O N - R ESID EN T S T U D EN T S Write for Bulletin

Specify Department

CABLE ADDRESS: “ EDHOCAN” N.Y.

Western Union Code Used

EDWARD J. HOGAN Agent for Woolworth Building

Real Estate AG EN T

::

BRO KER

W O O L W O R T H B U IL D IN G

Insurance A PPR A ISER

233 BR O A D W A Y , N. Y.

Telephones: Webster 4-4056— 4057

HUDSON COUNTY COAL CO. 611 Tonnele Avenue, Jersey City Harry V. McNally, Prep ’16

Page One Hundred Fifty-Eight


Complete TRAVEL SERVICE for You If you are considering a trip at home or abroad it will pay you to consult our Travel Department, in charge of George S. Meagher, who will cheer­ fully answer all your questions and offer suggestions for tours or cruises to suit your individual requirements . . . W e are equipped to make your travel arrangements for any trip, to or in any part of the world, to w hat­ ever extent you wish to place those arrangements in our hands . . . Our experienced Travel Department will save you time, money and worry. C O N S U L T US W IT H O U T C H A R G E

The Trust Company of New Jersey JO U R N A L SQ U A R E ELEVEN

C O N VEN IEN T

-

LOCATIONS

JE R S E Y C IT Y IN

HUDSON

C O U N T Y

“ O ve r 50 Y e a rs O ld . . . and s till yo u n g ”

CONSUMERS COAL & ICE CO. Bayonne

Telephone, Bergen 3-0552

-

N e w Jersey

Telephone, Webster 4283

A LPS RESTAU RA N T W orld’s Best Food

A . W . C R O N E & S O N , Inc.

727 Bergen A venue

BUILDERS

Corner Fairmount Avenue

338 P A L IS A D E A V E N U E

Jersey City, N. J.

JERSEY C ITY, N. J.

Page One Hundred Fifty-Nine


LE S S F O R E S IG H T . . A squirrel knows enough to store up a winter T H A N A S Q U IR R E L supply of food, but many people fail to save a part of their income for emergencies. Surely, you have more foresight than a squirrel . . . Save at one of our five convenient offices.

COMMERCIAL TRUST CO. O F N E W JE R S EY Capital, Surplus and Undivided Profits Over $11,000,000 Total Resources Over $70,000,000

Member Federal Reserve System O FFIC ES: MAIN - - -- - 1 5 Exchange Place GROVE - - 338 Grove St., near Newark Ave. 5 CORNERS - - 660 Newark Ave. at 5 Corners BERGEN - - - Bergen and Fairmount Aves. MERCANTILE - 186 Newark Ave. at Jersey Ave.

JE R S EY C IT Y

Compliments ... of....

Compliments . . . of . . .

P A T R IC K A. D W Y E R

Telephone, Bayonne 3-7575 7576

D O L A N â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Shell Service Station

JO H N P. B R O W N E F U N E R A L D IR EC TO R 197-9 Broadway Corner 7th Street

Page One Hundred Sixty

J. F R A N K B U R K E , D.D.S.

BAYONNE, N. J.

Crank Case Service GREASING . . . COMPLETE SERVICE FLATS F IX E D ............ACCESSORIES Special Service to: Fleet Owners

GRAND, GRO VE and B R IG H T STREETS Montgomery 5-9713

JERSEY CITY, N. J.


GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY W ashington, D. C. W . Coleman Nevils. S.I.. President

The and 0 The The

College (Undergraduate School), 37th Streets, N. W . : Dean, R. Rush Rankin, S.J. Registrar, Walter J. O’Connor, Ph.D.

The Graduate School, 37th and 0 Streets, N.

The School of Foreign Service, 431 6th Street, N. W .: The Regent, Edmund A. Walsh, S.J. The Dean, William F. Notz, Ph. D. The Assistant Dean, Thomas H. Healy Ph.D.

W.:

The Dean, R. Rush Rankin, S.J.

The School of Medicine, 3900 Reservoir Road, N. W .: The Regent, John L. CiDprich, S. I. The Registrar, John E. O’Brien, M.S.

The Training School for Nurses, Georgetown University Hospital, 35th and N streets, N. W . : The Directress, Sister Euphrasia, O.S.F. The Astronomical Observatory, Georgetown University, Observatory Heights: The Director, Paul A. McNally. S.J. Assistant Director, Frederick A. Sohon, S.J.

The School of Law, 506 E Street N. W . : The Regent. Thomas B. Chitwood. S.j. The. Dean, Ceorae E. Hamilton. I.U.D., 1L D. The Assistant Dean, Hugh J. Fegan, LL.B., Ph.D. The Registrar, Thomas Hurney, LL.M.

The Seismic Observatory, Georgetown Uni­ versity. Maguire Building: The Director, Frederick A. Sohon, S.J.

The School of Dentistry, 3900 Reservoir Road, N W. ; The Regent. (Ohn L. CipDrich. S I The Dean, William N. Cogan, D D S.. F.A.CD;

The Riggs Library, Georgetown University, Healy Building: The Librarian, John J. O’Connor, S.J.

H E Successful completion of this book is due to the kind and efficient cooperation of the Editors. T h at which we have helped to perpetuate for The Cephsan, O f St. Peter’s Preparatory School, we are only too willing to help perpetuate for others.

T

SAGER

PRESS

- C O R P O R A T I O N -

33 W e s t 6 0 t h N e w Y o r k

Street C i t y

Page One Hundred Sixty-One


|

C O M P L IM E N T S

I

GEORGE E. CUTLEY

I 1 I

Class of 1900

Office Tel., Montgomery 1325

Compliments . . .

of. . .

.

T H O M A S F. A. G R IF F IN Counsel lor-at-Law

76 Montgomery Street

E D W A R D J. O â&#x20AC;&#x2122;M A R A

JERSEY CITY, N. J. Residence:

15 Cautier Avenue

Compliments of. . . . . .

.

JA M E S J. K E A R N E Y Counselor-at-Law

A L E X . H A M IL L IR O N W O R K S

75 M O N T G O M ER Y STREET JERSEY CITY, N. J. Telephone, Montgomery 2625

I

j

Page One Hundred Sixty-Two


+»■ 1 The advantages of labor-saving devices and modern

1

j

machinery operating in a small New England town,

1

removed from the high rents and expenses of the

1

large city are

|

reflected

in w hat we

believe

is:

IMPRESSIVE PRINTING j

.

A

T

M O D ERA T E C O ST

|

| j

1

«

|

THE HEFFERNAN PRESS

!

SP EN C ER , M ASS.

|

S P E C I A L I S T S

IN

S C H O O L

AN D

C O L L E G E

P R I N T I N G

j

I

T H E F IF T H W A R D S A V IN G S B A N K

JO H N J. S U L L I V A N

]

1

Pavonia Avenue and Grove Street

Grove Funeral Parlor

j

!

jersey City, N. j. 514 Grove Street

!

■ s

Interest on Deposits Payable Quarterly

|

Telephone, Delaware 3970

SENIORS... Prepare for Promotion After Graduation

' D R A K E S E C R E T A R IA L C O LLEG E ATTEND

j

D A W S O N ’S

|

Farm and D a iry Products

|

209 M O N T I C E L L O A V E N U E

11-25 Concourse East

Journal Square

JE R S E Y C IT Y , N. J. Jersey City, N. J.

Phone: Journal Square 2-2875

F, G. HOAGLAND, Manager

Page One Hundred Sixty-Three

I | 1


I

C O M P L IM E N T S I

*•* *

1 1

Hon. FRANK HAGUE

j |

Congratulations to

Est. ■

j

THE BOYS OF ST. PETER'S

HARRY A. W YSE

A. Z. Benedict, Pres.

B E R N S T E IN

A N N A M . W YSE

&

CO.

AT JOURNAL SQUARE

Apparel for Men and Boys

Funeral Director and Embalmer Established 1857

Harry F. O’Megliq President

New Store

New Low Prices

COMPLIMENTS OF . . .

SN2W

O ’M E A L IA O U T D O O R ADVERTISING COM PANY

T h e Facial D epilatory

O UTD O O R A D V E R T IS IN G Removes the Hair or Beard without use of razor, electric needle or cream . . .

THE MODERN MARKETING FORCE Labor Bank Building 26 VETERANS SQ. JERSEY CITY, N. J.

JO H N M A R S H A L L C O LLEG E OF L A W Hon. James F. Minturn, Dean

. . . Ask Your Druggist

Compliments ... o f .. .

.

. C O -ED U C A T IO N A L

1A

College and Law Departments Day and Evening Divisions Apply to Registrar for Catalogue 26 JOURNAL SQUARE JERSEY CITY, N. J. ----Page One Hundred Sixty-Four

-

-

-

---------.— .--------.— .—

!


|

Compliments

!

... o f ...

i i

I ! L A W R E N C E C. Q U IN N Funeral Director

i Hon. JO S E P H M I N T O N

i

2 M A D ISO N A V E N U E Tel., Delaware 3-9478

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

1

i I j I 1 | s

1

Establ isned over 23 years

H U D SO N V A L E T (Cares for Clothes)

53 Church Street, N ew York

I I f 1

Compliments

j

. . . of . . .

I

! I I

Dress Suits, Tuxedos and Cutaways Rented Hudson Terminal Bldg. Main Floor, Room 109

j

T H O M A S J. S T A N T O N

j I 1 i

Tel., COrtlandt 7-4659 DRY C LEANING REMODELLING PRESSING Clothes Called For and Delivered

i ! f

Compliments . . . o f. . .

P. H. N U G E N T f

Funeral Director

jO H N F. O ’H A R A & S O N incorporated

1026 Avenue C BAYONNE, N. J.

.

J 1 Compliments . . . of . . .

A FRIEND

Compliments

1

...of...

j I

KRAM ER MOTOR CO M PANY

| 1

I I Page One Hundred Sixty-Five

I I


4» I I I

C O M P L IM E N T S

f

. . . o f. . .

1 I 1

i

L.F. D. i

Bayonne, N. J.

“ THE OLD BEEHIVE BA N K” T he Provident Institution for Savings in Jersey C ity M ain O ffice: 239-241 W A S H IN G T O N ST R EET Bergen Avenue Office:

BERG EN and H A R RISO N A V E N U E S

THE LARGEST AND OLDEST “ MUTUAL SAVINGS BANK” IN HUDSON COUNTY

CHARLES M. EAGAN ANTHONY V. AVALLONE

THOMAS R. ARMSTRONG LOUIS HOBERMAN

I

JOHN J. CORCORAN

L A W O F F IC E S

EGAN & ARMSTRONG Telephones: Montgomery6070-6071-6072

I

15 Exchange Place

Jersey City, N. J.

I •§• . . .

1

■»

1

II

M

Page One Hundred Sixty-Six

1 . --------IB -------------------no

-

p .--------1 . ----------- ------------------------------------------------------- -

I


4m. I

C O M P L IM E N T S ...O F . . .

ST. PETER’S PREP ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION \

Page One Hundred Sixty-Seven


I I

Telephone: MONTGOMERY 5-C47T; 5-2549

i !

,McDONALD BROS. Hugh M. McDonald

W illiam A. McDonald

Funeral Directors

I

|

280 B A L D W IN A V E N U E

JE R S E Y C IT Y , N. J

I

Compliments FR O M . . .

. . . o f. . .

MAC

3-M-l

A. P. C R A N W E L L , D.D.S.

JO H N F. M A R T IN

355 Palisade Avenue

Funeral Director

Union City

1019 EAST JER SEY STREET

Telephone, Union 7-0538

Page One Hundred Sixty-Eight

Elizabeth, N. J.


HARRY C. BRADSHAW C olleg e Je w e le r C LA SS, C O L L E G E A N D F R A T E R N IT Y JE W E L R Y M E D A L S , C U PS, T R O P H IE S Catalogs on Request

N E W A R K , N.

54 C L IN T O N S T R E E T

1851 - 1931 Eighty Years of Continuous Safety to Depositors and Stockholders Now the Oldest and Largest National Bank in Hudson County

Hudson County N a tio n a l B a n k

E R IE B E E F A N D P R O V IS IO N C O M P A N Y Choice M eats and Poultry 5th and ER IE STR EETS

Under the Supervision of the United States Government

Telephone, Harrison 6-8409

M . JO S E P H D U F F Y

T H E SPO RT SH O P 14 JO U R N A L SQ U A R E

F L O R IS T

R A D IO Sport Goods

331 Harrison Avenue Harrison, N. J.

DISCOUNT to STUDENTS

IN* Page One Hundred Sixty-Nine


[

1

Compliments . . .

of

Compliments

1

. . . o f . . .

.. .

j

1

I

I

I I

ROBERSON and ROBERSON

A. J. DOAN & SON

i I

I I i

|

Bayonne, N. J.

| |

H. K. ROBERSON W E S T 8th STREET

j

Telephone, Montgomery 905

Residence, Montgomery 4726

CHARLES IM BR IC LIO ’S Fish and Green M arket RELIABLE FRUIT and VEGETABLE MARKET

Bayonne, N. J.

Fresh Fish Every Friday Orders Delivered Promptly

443-445 B A L D W IN A V E N U E Jersey City, N. J

| !

Compliments ...

C O M P L IM E N T S

o f. . . :

i

I

..O F... 7

|

I

PETER J. GREENE

I

I I I

I

! 1

Mary C. Shannon

i

A F R IE N D . . . O F .. .

BIB STABILE I i

-«— «— «»---- -------------H—II-mm--HU----

Page One Hundred Seventy


j.—

„—

-----------------—

» —

................. ..................................

"

'

— — — ----

----------------- ---------- ---- -----------------

+

I Compliments

R O X Y C LO TH ES

|

of

126 N ew ark Avenue

|

Corner Grove Street

j

.

. .

. . .

! l

I

Stores in

James F. Norton

j

Principal Cities

M .D . Office and Home Telephone MONTGOMERY 5-0581 Day or Night

R. H. D U F F

C olleg e ’ 14

UN D ERTAKER Funeral Service Home 37 ERIE STREET

Compliments .

.

.

of

.

.

JERSEY CITY, N. J.

Compliments

.

.

.

.

of

.

.

.

T

A FRIEND THE

N E W JERSEY TITLE GUARANTEE b TRUST CO. i

Compliments .

1

.

.

of

.

.

.

2B

I

Page One Hundred Seventy-One


1

“ Correct Dress for M en ”

i

Best Wishes! j

I I

T H O M A S J. K IT R IC K I

F I T Z P A T R I C K and S U L L IV A N

Deputy Director of

Revenue and Finance

I

Jersey City, N. J.

! I f

I B A Y O N N E, N. J.

i

Compliments

j

... o f ...

j

I J

BERT D A LY

| I

) I |

P. S. S U M M E R

151 Avenue C

I

|

Bayonne, N. J.

I

| 1 1 j

100 Montgomery Street

Telephone, Montgomery 8900-8901

1

-0"

i |

W A L T E R J. C O L E M A N

[

E L E C T R IC A L E N G IN E E R IN G and C O N T R A C T IN G j 54-56 W A S H B U R N ST R EET

JER SEY C IT Y , N. J.

C O M P L IM E N T S . . . o f. . .

0 0

*

i

C. 1 I 1 i

Page One Hundred Seventy-Two

1

j

j


Telephone, Montgomery 5-5474

Compliments

W a rre n M e a t M a rk e t

. .. of . ..

W IL L IA M OTTO, Prop.

A FRIEND

Choice Beef, V eal, Pork, Lam b and Poultry 244 W A R R E N S T R E E T

Telephone, Montgomery 5-5343

Telephone, Montgomery 5-0788

F 1E S E L E R ’ S

A U G U S T I N ’S

Established 1886

Practical W atchm aker and Jeweler

B A K E R Y and L U N C H RO O M 335 Grove Street Three Doors from Newark Avenue

258 W A R R E N S T R E E T

Jersey City, N. J.

Jersey City, N. J.

C O M P L E T E L IN E O F L A T E S T T U X E D O S . . . T O H IR E A N D FO R S A LE Ready-to-Wear High Grade Clothing— Cutaways and Full Dress Suits

THE HOBOKEN VA LET EMANUEL LEW IS, Owner Established in Hoboken 1902

106 S E V E N T H ST R EET , near B L O O M F IE L D S T R E E T Telephone, Hokoben 3-2579

H O B O K EN , N. J.

JOSEPH JE W K E S & SONS G EN ERAL CO NTRACTO RS 976 M O N T G O M E R Y S T R EET

JE R S E Y C IT Y , N.

I •k

--Page One Hundred Seventy-Three


..— *

| I j

B R IN G Y O U R P R E S C R IP T IO N T O A P R E S C R IP T IO N STORE...

-----

From “ Y O U R D O C T O R ’S D RUG STO RE Our prescription Department is a com­ plete store within a store. The pharma­ cists employed have no other work except to c o m p o u n d prescriptions. Nothing to detract from close attention to their particular work. It ’s a sdfeguard your prescription should have.

For Quick Service . . . Call

M O ntg om ery 5 - 0495-0496 Four Registered Pharm acists to Serve You Prompt Auto Service. W e Call for and Deliver Prescriptions

“ Sickness Does Not Command Cheapness”

I

|

McCLOSKEY DRUG CO., Inc. P H A R M A C IS T S

j

351 MONTGOMERY STREET

j 1 ______

Page One Hundred Seventy-Four

JERSEY CITY, N. J.


ESTABLISHED 1888

A Q U A R T ER C E N T U R Y OF C O LLEG E PH O T O G R A PH Y

220 W E S T 42nd S T R E E T N e w Y o rk C ity

COM PLETELY EQUIPPED TO RENDER

The Highest Q uality Craftsmanship and an Expedited Service on Both Personal Portraiture and Photography for College Annuals

Official Photographer to the

“ 1931 C E P H E A N ”

Page One Hundred Seventy-Five


iM p '1 m m M

)}Jr

m

' ~

m

i

UUe offer you a finesse in art a n d reproductions created through conscientious service, an d in­ spired by a genuine desire to distribute the best Th e J A H N & O L L IE R E N G R A V I N G C O . Photographers, Artists and Makers o f Fine Printing Plates for Black and Colors 817 W . Washington Blvd., Chicago

TH IS A N N U A L E NG RAVED BY JAH N a O LLIE R

Page One Hundred Seventy-Six



1931 Cephean