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Volume 2, Number 43 | December 16, 2010

A holly jolly Santa (Russ Criswell) shared some Christmas cheer with (clockwise from upper left) Gavin Brooke, Jeff Ellis, Andi Korber and Andrea Chacos at the new Airstream Village at SAW over the weekend. For more on the Airstream Village, see page 8. Photo by Cari Theron

’Tis the season to shop C’dale Local stores offer some surprises By Lynn Burton Sopris Sun Staff Writer

D

id you know there’s at least one “department” store in Carbondale? You can also still buy books in town. At least two locally grown products are far superior to their mass produced counterparts. And get this – there’s no need to get in your car, guzzle gas, pollute the planet and drive to Wal-Mart for gift-wrapping materials and many other non-electronic items. Nope. There are dozens of places to shop in town, where your sales taxes help support Carbondale’s recreation department instead

of Glenwood’s (as Mayor Stacey Bernot pointed out a couple of town council meetings ago). Dollars spent at this time of year also help retail businesses stay afloat six months from now, at which time you just might need a store for that unexpected birthday, wedding, graduation or other giftrequiring event. Folks who think they know what Carbondale has to offer might think twice before plunking themselves down in front of their computer screen like a shopping zombie and lifelessly click away on the Internet.

Instead, they might ask themselves, “What do you mean Carbondale has a department store? Are you a crazy idiot or what?” Crazy idiot possibly, but not completely wrong. One of Carbondale’s department stores is the Roaring Fork Valley Co-op because it has several departments. Same goes for Ace Hardware. Get it? Department stores. The Roaring Fork Valley Co-Op has several departments, including an outdoor clothing department featuring Carhart, Wrangler and other brands, RUBBER CHICKENS page 9

RFCC wraps up 2nd season

Trustee petitions trustees

Green a no go at the Village?

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Carbondale Commentary Letters

The Sopris Sun welcomes your letters, limited to no more than 400 words. Letters exceeding that length may be edited or returned for revisions. Include your name and residence (for publication) and a contact email and phone number. Submit letters via email to letters@soprissun.com or via snail mail to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623.

So much to be thankful for Dear Editor: I have so much to be thankful for! For my 88th birthday and party on Nov. 3 at the Pour House; for the friends who attended and for those who could not; for the privilege of living in Carbondale at Crystal Meadows Senior Housing; and for my wonderful son and daughter-in-law, Bobby and Melissa Reynolds, who brought me here seven years ago. I am truly blessed. Sue Bacon Carbondale

Mountain bikers: ‘Thanks for 2E’ Dear Editor: On behalf of local mountain bikers and trail users, Roaring Fork Mountain Bike Association (RFMBA) would like to thank Town of Snowmass Village voters for passing Referendum 2E in support of the purchase of 742 acres from the Droste family. Most importantly, we recognize that Snowmass residents have voted in favor of trails and recognize the potential economic and recreation value of land protection that specifically includes creation and management of multi-use trails. In addition to other projects and advocacy on behalf of the local mountain bike community, RFMBA is in the final stages of the first draft of the first Mountain Bike Master Plan for the Roaring Fork Valley. The plan, partially funded by a grant from

the Environment Foundation funded by the employees of the Aspen Skiing Company, will incorporate the mapping and identification of current and future mountain bike trails and areas. We are excited to be able to add the Droste parcel as an area of potential trails. Special thanks to the Droste family, Dale Will and Gary Tannebaum of Pitkin County Open Space and Trails, the Pitkin County Board of Commissioners, Snowmass Village Town Council, the City of Aspen and private donors for their vision and action regarding this project. We look forward to working with each of these entities to help create an optimal trail network. For more information about RFMBA visit rfmba.org. RFMBA Board of Directors Al Beyer Charlie Eckart Mike Pritchard Kirk Hindenberger Len Zanni

Students support the DREAM Act Editor’s Note: This letter was written by students in Diana Alcantara’s 7th/8th grade English Language Learner class at Carbondale Middle School. The kids have been studying the Civil Right Movement and the DREAM Act. Dear Editor: We have a dream – a dream that all children will be able to go to college one day. Just like Martin Luther King Jr. supported,

2 • THE SOPRIS SUN • DECEMBER 16, 2010

“Mustang” Molly Irwin and Josh Fogg were seen reading The Sopris Sun while riding the Golden Pig at Seattle’s famous Pike’s Place Market recently. Courtesy photo

we too want justicia! We would like to be treated as equally as citizens of the United States. Sometimes we feel like we live in a segregated world, like in the South before the Civil Rights Movement. Why can’t immigrants do the same thing? We are all humans; we are all people. How are we different in the world? Please don’t treat us differently. In the next few weeks, Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid will introduce The DREAM Act for Congress to vote on. The DREAM Act will allow children who are undocumented to become citizens. Vote for us to have the freedom to go to college. We are not aliens; we are people like you and everybody else. Cesar Chavez said, “!Si Se Puede!” President Obama says, “Yes We Can!” So please support us and the DREAM Act by calling our Representative, John Salazar, to support this legislation. Bryan Nevarez, Jessica Amaral, Liz Salazar, Anakaren Hernandez, Edgar Reyna, Arturo Torres, Beymar Silva, Alex Salvidrez, Ricardo Huerta, Jenny Garcia, Raul Leyva, Daniel Mendez, Jacqueline Jacquez

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Support youth radio Dear Editor: For the past 11 years, the Andy Zanca Youth Empowerment Program has been teaching youth radio broadcasting. We partner with our community radio station, KDNK, and have trained over 700 local youth to be volunteer announcers. Please make an end-of-the-year contribution. Your donation will help us continue teaching youth radio and providing opportunities for young people to make a positive contribution to our community. For the past three years, we have been teaching a high school radio broadcasting class to students from Aspen, Basalt, Roaring Fork, Bridges, CRMS, Glenwood and Yampah high schools. Students learn marketable skills in communication, teamwork and technology. Each month, students broadcast a youth public affairs program. This year, some of the topics covered have been homelessness, education, politics and parenting. Please listen to our broadcasting projects online at kdnk.org, click on Youth Radio. Email me for more information at youthradio@kdnk.org. You can send your tax-deductible gift to the Andy Zanca Youth Empowerment Program, P.O. Box 1945, Carbondale, CO 81623. Thank you. Stacy Stein Executive Director Andy Zanca Youth Empowerment Program

Yule Fest thanks Dear Editor: To the Roaring Fork and Basalt Community, Basalt High School Student Council would like to thank you for your support of Yule Fest. This one-day event was a great success this year and we hope to put it on for many years to come. We would like to thank the community for coming and supporting us by getting into the Christmas cheer. We would especially like to thank the wonderful artists that came to sell their LETTERS page 13

$10,000

START Illustration by Eric Auer

To inform, inspire and build community Donations accepted online or by mail. For information call 510-3003 Co-editors: Lynn Burton and Terray Sylvester 510-3003 • news@soprissun.com Advertising: David Johnson • 970-309-3623 david@soprissun.com Photographer/Writer: Jane Bachrach Ad/Page Production: Terri Ritchie Paper Boy: Cameron Wiggin Webmaster: Will Grandbois Student Correspondent: Kayla Henley Sopris Sun, LLC Managing Board of Directors: Peggy DeVilbiss Allyn Harvey • Colin Laird Laura McCormick • Jean Perry Elizabeth Phillips • Frank Zlogar

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970-510-3003 www.soprissun.com Visit us on facebook.com Send us your comments: feedback@soprissun.com The Sopris Sun is an LLC organized under the 501c3 non-profit structure of the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation.


Cultural Council brings the big issues to Carbondale By Terray Sylvester Sopris Sun Staff Writer To the local residents who find themselves paying just $10 for an evening with a Nobel laureate or a former U.S. ambassador, the Roaring Fork Cultural Council must be offering opportunities that are just too good to pass up. Which is pretty much what Jim Calaway, one of the Cultural Council’s creators, hoped it would do. “We’re bringing into our little black box theatre people that any community in the country would be glad to have come and be a speaker,” said Calaway, a Carbondale resident and local philanthropist. “We’re getting them to come here and speak to us from their heart on issues that I believe are educational, and I believe that it’s a real gift to the community, young and old.” Since it opened its first season with a presentation from Ambassador Henry Catto in January of 2009, the Roaring Fork Cultural Council has hosted roughly a dozen speakers on some of the most pressing international issues of the day. Held at the Thunder River Theatre in downtown Carbondale, the events are intimate, almost informal gatherings that give residents of Carbondale and surrounding areas up-close access to experts in a variety of fields, ranging from public education to the recent global financial meltdown, to the changing face of the media since the advent of the internet. Past speakers have included Mike Feinberg, one of the founders of the national KIPP system of charter schools; former Goldman Sachs chairman Robert Steele; and Walter Isaacson, a former CEO of CNN. On Dec. 21, the Cultural Council will round out its second season with a presentation from former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright. The Cultural Council, which works in partnership with the Thunder River Theatre Company, Colorado Mountain College and

Roaring Fork Cultural Council co-chair Jim Calaway (left) introduced journalist Steven Emerson (right) at recent presentation at the Thunder River Theatre playhouse. The council brings in former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright on Dec. 21. Sun file photo The Fleisher Company, is the brainchild of Calaway and local real estate broker Craig Rathbun, owner of The Fleisher Company. Calaway, who serves as the Chairman of the Board of Lifetime Trustees at the Aspen Institute, said he wanted to imitate the format employed by the institute: a “soft” moderator to stimulate discussion, a speaker who will work through the issues without just giving a speech, and a question and answer session afterward. For his part, Rathbun says he has hoped to create in Carbondale the sort of energetic intellectual ferment that might be found in a university town. Rathbun said that when he and Calaway first started discussing the Cultural Council a little over a half-decade ago, he imagined “a non-profit that would … kind of help put little old Carbondale on the map by bringing in some real recognizable names,

big names, world-class names.” And while the Cultural Council has attracted big-ticket names to Carbondale, it’s been able to survive without asking its audiences to pay big-ticket prices. Most of the events cost $10 per seat, but Rathbun and Calaway say the Cultural Council doesn’t break even at those rates, not even if an event sells out, which almost all of them have done so far. The balance the Cultural Council needs to cover its expenses comes from its “Founders,” a group of about 30 local couples and individuals whom Rathbun says are essential to the organization’s success. Each of them donate $1,000 annually to keep the Cultural Council in the black. Carbondalian Tom Neel and his wife Emily were among the first to become founders. “We supported it in the hope that we would get people like [the Cultural Council’s

speakers so far] to be available downvalley at a reasonable price,” he said. “What it’s all about is the diversity of the events they’ve had. I think that’s the key right there.” And Rathbun and Calaway say they’re committed to preserving such diversity in the future. Although Calaway hasn’t yet hammered out all the kinks in next year’s program, he has confirmed a few of the speakers who will be coming to Carbondale. The 2011 season will kick off on Jan. 29 with a panel discussion on energy featuring Calaway himself, who made his fortune in the oil business, and his twin sons, who started their careers working with their father but have since branched off into renewable energy – wind turbines and lithium batteries for electric cars, to be precise. The upcoming season will also feature former CIA director James Woolsey, an expert on international energy issues; Dr. Michael Brown, who was awarded the Nobel prize for research into cholesterol; and former Colorado Senator Gary Hart. Calaway said he has asked Hart to discuss government transparency – including the controversial Web site Wikileaks – and “the corruption of money” in U.S. politics, particularly as it relates to campaign finance reform and to federal policy toward the oil and gas industry. Rathbun says he has a few dreams for the future of the Cultural Council as well. He would like to start bringing in more artists, actors and musicians in the future, and he hopes the council will eventually be able to host multi-speaker symposiums that will provide an in-depth look into a given subject. In the meantime however, Rathbun and Calaway said the Cultural Council will continue to play the same role as it has so far, serving as, in Calaway’s word, an “absolutely neutral” forum experts on some of the most controversial topics. “If we don’t get into touchy subjects, what the hell are we for?” he asked.

Trustees urged to ignore public during town manager talks By Lynn Burton Sopris Sun Staff Writer A former town trustee urged current trustees Tuesday night to ignore public opinion during ongoing discussions about the town manager’s employment contract. Brad Hendricks’s comments came after a Dec. 14 article in the Post Independent describing a letter of support and petition asking trustees to retain Town Manager Tom Baker. Hendricks said public debate about an issue the trustees have discussed in executive

session is “politicizing” the employment review process. “This is really unfortunate and it’s going down a really unfortunate path,” Hendricks told the trustees. “The whole point of personnel decisions being at the board level is that there are a lot of positions in this town that aren’t politicized, and they shouldn’t be.” As noted on their agendas, trustees have held several closed-door, executive sessions in recent weeks to discuss Baker’s contract, which expires at the end of the year.

The public has not been privy to the talks but that didn’t prevent Baker supporters from circulating the letter of support and petition. The petition is addressed to the mayor and trustees, and states,“We the undersigned support Tom Baker, Carbondale Town Manager. People feel comfortable around Tom, they can talk to him; he has demonstrated the ability to bring people together. Tom is a good manager and facilitator. The current strong financial condition of Carbondale speaks well of the Board of Trustee’s (sic) and

Tom’s fiscal competence. “We the people of Carbondale ask you to renew Tom Baker’s Contract.” Trustee Frosty Merriott signed the petition, which prompted trustee John Foulkrod to remark on Wednesday morning, “I think Frosty stepped over the line (signing the petition) but he might not have known where the line is.” Merriott told The Sopris Sun he not only signed the petition, he also got others to BAKER page 5

Green requirements are a “non-starter,” says Village developer By Terray Sylvester Sopris Sun Staff Writer “It’s a non-starter,” said Richard Schierburg of the Denver-based Peregrine Group Development, the firm behind the Village at Crystal River. “I cannot finance and build a project that loses money.” Schierburg was responding to a set of seven sustainability requirements proposed for his project, a planned unit development that would place 164 residential units and 125,000 square feet of commercial space, including a new 58,000-square foot City Mar-

ket, on 24 acres west of Highway 133. The requirements were drawn up by town engineers at the request of the town trustees and discussed at the trustees’ meeting on Tuesday night. Schierburg stated they would generally place too many restrictions on his project and make it impossible for him to finance it. “I look at sustainability, as a developer, in the same way I look at anything else,” he stated. “As a line item.” In response to a requirement that the buildings in the development earn Energy Star ratings, Schierburg said, “There are

At the meeting Schierburg stressed, however, that he would build as sustainably as is financially feasible. He has articulated a similar commitment in the application materials for the development. But town staff and trustees said they were leery of relying on such a“mission statement” instead of a binding agreement. The meeting room at Town Hall was packed during the hearing, and members of the public voiced a similar distrust. “I have to say that the take-home message VILLAGE page 5 THE SOPRIS SUN • DECEMBER 16, 2010 • 3

things we can do with Energy Star. … We’ll do what we can that would be cost-justified.” To a requirement that at least 75 percent of residential units include south-facing windows of a certain size, he replied that although he “is generally in favor of passive solar” heating, the requirement would force him to give up too much density. He also said the project would not “fly” if the trustees require it to draw 10 percent of its energy from on-site renewable sources. A complete list of the proposed sustainability measures is on the town Web site.


News Briefs The Weekly News Brief The Sopris Sun and the KDNK news departments team up to discuss recent news from the Roaring Fork Valley and beyond. Catch the Brief on KDNK between 7:30 and 8 a.m. and between 5:30 and 6 p.m. on Thursdays.

Trustees approve 2011 budget The Carbondale town trustees unanimously voted to approve the town’s 2011 budget during their meeting on Tuesday night. Next year’s total budget will be about $5.5 million, up from last year’s budget of roughly $5.07 million. The budget isn’t a balanced one – the trustees decided to dip into reserves to the tune of about $400,000, which will be set aside as contingency funds – but with a surplus from 2010 of approximately $4.6 million the town still has a significant buffer in place.

Medical pot moratorium enacted In a unanimous vote on Tuesday night the trustees decided to bar new commercial medical marijuana operations from opening in town. The yearlong emergency moratorium will remain in effect through the end of 2011 and applies to dispensaries, commercial grow operations and infused product manufacturers. Trustees enacted the moratorium to put a hold on the industry while they draw up town regulations for it. A similar moratorium is currently in effect on the state level while the Colorado Department of Revenue formulates its own rules. However, the state ban is set to expire in July 2011. Many local medical marijuana entrepre-

neurs attended Tuesday’s meeting, and some of them objected to the town’s moratorium. Spencer Schiffer, a lawyer who specializes in the industry, said that with the state’s moratorium in place for another six months, the town could not justify passing an “emergency” measure. “You don’t need an act now to prevent what might happen seven months from now,” he told the trustees. Town Attorney Sherry Caloia responded that a local moratorium would be easier for the town to enforce. She also said she was not sure the state moratorium would completely bar new medical marijuana businesses from opening in town, and that the state ban might expire before July if Colorado completes its rules ahead of schedule.

KDNK, KAJX air water series KDNK and Aspen Public Radio are teaming up to bring listeners an in-depth look at threats to the region’s water. The stations will examine the impacts of population growth, climate change, the loss of agricultural land, development and the energy industry on Colorado’s limited resource. The series began Monday, Dec. 13. To listen, tune in to National Public Radio’s Morning Edition and All Things Considered, or visit aspenpublicradio.org or kdnk.org.

Aspen man jailed after armed stand-off in C’dale Staff Report

been in a relationship, allegedly holding the gun to her head at A 42-year old man is being one point and threatening again held in Garfield County Jail to kill her. on felony burglary and tresAccording to the police, Hagepassing charges after he broke land had been arrested about a into a house in Carbondale on year ago for a domestic violence Sunday and threatened the ocincident involving the woman. cupants with a gun before He had subsequently been arbarricading himself inside Hageland rested a second time for violating throughout the night. Carbondale Police Chief Gene Schilling a restraining order. said James Patrick Hageland of Aspen was After the woman managed to escape arrested early Monday morning. He faces from the house, Hageland allegedly shut felony burglary, trespassing and menacing himself in upstairs before eventually surcharges as well as misdemeanor counts rendering to police around 5:30 a.m. Monday morning. and is being held on a $500,000 bond. Carbondale police received assistance Schilling said Carbondale police responded to a disturbance at a residence on from the Glenwood Springs Police DeCleveland Place at 10:10 p.m. Sunday partment, a negotiator from Garfield night. Hageland had allegedly entered a County, the Garfield County All Hazards house and threatened the people inside Response Team and a response team from with a handgun, saying he was going to Eagle County. Schilling said it had been about 15 kill them. According to Schilling, Hageland eventually allowed most of the people in years since the Carbondale Police Dethe house to leave unharmed, but detained partment had faced a similar armed bara woman with whom he had previously ricade situation.

Sewer cleanup continues The Carbondale utilities department will continue its annual cleaning and maintenance of the sewer system through Dec. 30. High-pressure water is used to perform the

maintenance, which may inconvenience customers with short-service lines, states a press release. If you experience any problems, call the town at 963-2733.

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4 • THE SOPRIS SUN • DECEMBER 16, 2010

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Carbondale gets $105,000 for tennis courts, skatepark Sopris Sun Staff Report

If all goes according to plan, local tennis enthusiasts and skateboarders will have new places to play by the end of next summer. Carbondale has been awarded $105,000 from the Great Outdoors Colorado (GOCO) grant program. The grant will help pay for three new public tennis courts as well as a new beginner section at the town’s skateboard facility at North Face Park. The tennis courts and skatepark projects are scheduled to be built next summer and ready for action by September 2011.

Baker cont. om page 3 sign it, and defended his actions. “We (the trustees) are pretty free to do what we want in this (kind) of situation.â€? Mayor Stacey Bernot indicated she does not agree with Merriott’s decision to sign the petition, but pointed out the action isn’t the same as signing a petition opposing or supporting a land-use application. “That (a land use application) is a quasijudicial proceeding. We act as judges,â€? Bernot said. If a trustee signed a petition concerning a land-use application under review, it could be grounds for recusal.“I’m not going to ask him to recuse himself.â€? She continued: “It’s important to understand what the process is ‌ It’s an employee/ employer issue.â€? As such, the town needs all seven trustees to weigh in on Baker’s contract, she said. Even before the petition and letter of sup-

The overall cost for the project is estimated at $185,400. The town will contribute $41,00 out of its recreation sales tax fund, and the Roaring Fork School District will contribute $35,000. The remaining expenses will be covered through a $3,000 donation from the Roaring Fork Tennis Club and $1,400 in private donations. The three new tennis courts will be installed at North Face Park on an existing concrete slab, which was originally built for roller hockey but is rarely used, according to a town press release. The existing slab is port were circulated, in recent weeks at trustee meetings Baker supporters have urged the trustees to renew his contract. Supporters apparently organized themselves when they attended Bernot’s weekly coffee/chat session at the Village Smithy on Dec. 7. She said nine or 10 people wanted to talk to her about Baker and “they all had very similar points.â€? When asked how people learned enough about issues related to Baker to comment, Bernot said,“Your guess is as good as mine.â€? Merriott said he doesn’t know, how word apparently leaked from the trustees executive sessions but, “We have some astute people in town (who know how things work). It’s not rocket science.It’s been posted on our agendas.â€? Merriott said a lot of people support Baker but they may not understand the process. “Tom’s done a pretty good job. ‌ So people are perplexed.â€? As for Foulkrod,“This is a personnel issue ‌ not a public issue.â€?

wide enough to accommodate three courts, but the town will have to pour an additional 28 feet of concrete to make it long enough. The slab will be painted, sealed and enclosed with fences, in addition to other retrofits. Kids and novice skateboarders will find a place to play in the new terrain planned for the skatepark. The steep bowl walls and transitions at the existing facility are difficult and can be intimidating to beginners, so the town plans to install 3,600 square feet of new terrain, including a bowl and streetscape features geared

Village cont. om page 3 I got from [Schierburg’s] presentation was, ‘Trust me. We can work out the details later,’� said River Valley Ranch resident Stephen Hessl during the public comment session.“I hope the trustees don’t accept that proposition because I think it’s a very dangerous path to go down.� Seventh Street resident Melanie Finan urged Schierburg to convince Carbondale he is committed to a creative development in tune with the town’s eco-friendly values. “Right now I don’t know of anyone who is supporting your plan,�she told him.“This is how it’s done in Carbondale. This isn’t Denver; this isn’t Boulder, and the expertise you bring is from those communities.� But not everyone spoke against the development. Joe Enzer, who said he lives near Catherine Store but considers Carbondale his hometown, reminded the trustees to con-

toward beginners. There are currently only two tennis courts in Carbondale for public use and school district play. With the three additional courts, the town hopes to provide sufficient playing space for local citizens as well as the high school girls’ tennis team. The GOCO grant was one of 17 awarded statewide totaling approximately $2.92 million. GOCO, which is funded through proceeds from Colorado’s lottery, received 33 applications requesting a total of roughly $5.6 million. sider the added sales tax revenue the town may accrue from a new City Market. Trustee John Hoffmann stated that although Schierburg didn’t agree to the full scope of the town’s proposals, he nonetheless felt the town and the developer were close and could come to an agreement. Mayor Stacey Bernot wondered aloud what kind of compromises could bridge the gap between the developer’s stated bottom line and the values of the community. “I don’t get the feeling that we’ve given [town staff] really any direction on sustainability and where we go from here,�she said Tuesday as the discussion concluded. Although Carbondale has adopted green building standards for residential construction, a similar code for commercial construction is still in the works. The trustees will discuss the project again on Jan. 11. It has been the subject of nearly 30 public hearings so far.

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STEPHEN CHASE, DDS, BASALT

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“Four years ago we moved to the valley to fulfill upon a long time dream. A year later Donna was diagnosed with Colon Cancer. We began the process of making phone calls back-and-forth across the country, to figure out where would be the very best place for Donna to be treated, only to find out that she was in the right place. The care she needed could be and was delivered in a fabulously expert manner and the follow-up has been nothing greater than beyond expectation.�

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ACCEPTING FALL AND WINTER CONSIGNMENTS

303 Main St. • Carbondale • 963-3940 • OPEN 7 DAYS

THE SOPRIS SUN • DECEMBER 16, 2010 • 5


Scuttlebutt

Send your scuttlebutt to Scuttlebutt@SoprisSun.com.

Castle tours continue

Dog park update

If you’re looking for someplace warm and inviting to take your out-of-town guests during the holidays, you might consider schlepping them up Highway 133 to the Redstone Castle. Regular tours are Saturdays and Sundays at 1:30 p.m., with tickets available at Tiffany of Redstone and Redstone General Store. Special holiday tours are slated for Dec. 24-26: $15 for adults; $10 for seniors/children; free for kids under 5 years old. For more info, go to redstonecastle.us.

Winter turding conditions now exist at the Delaney dog park, according to the Sun’s dog park observer. “This means turders should be especially careful when picking up their dog’s droppings, because turd viscosity can vary, depending on the temperature, and turd-bag rips can be a problem.� The observer said hardcore turders have been known to bring a crow bar to dislodge frozen turds from the ground,“but not around here.� On a related note, a man was seen smoking a big, fat cigar at the park last week while walking his dog.

Boylands publish book Linda and Bob Boyland recently published a book titled “Everyday Cherished Moments: Seeing the ordinary, experiencing the extraordinary.â€? Pastor Mark Bintliff, of the New Creation Church in Glenwood Springs, says about the book, “ ‌ a fantastic addition to anyone’s library of devotionals. The photographs are stunning and the stories witty and inspiring.â€? The book is available through the Boylands Web site at life-beats.com.

Martina on the mend Tennis legend Martina Navratilova was discharged from a Nairobi hospital after recovering from high-altitude pulmonary edema, which forced her to give up climbing Mount Kilimanjaro three days ago, organizers of the fundraising event said on Dec. 13. “I am feeling much

WinterFest needs sponsors

Tom’s Door seasonal greetings cards are on sale at numerous locations up and down the Roaring Fork Valley, including Dancing Colours in Carbondale, Basalt Printing, and Carl’s Pharmacy in Aspen. Proceeds go to providing emergency assistance for those in need. Shown here is “Snow Birds� by Carol Craven. better and really pleased to be going home,� she said on the Web site of Laureus, the climb’s sponsor. Navratilova, 54, was helped down Africa’s highest peak by porters after feeling unwell on the fourth day of the charity climb. Medical tests showed she was suf-

fering from an accumulation of uid in the lungs. The nine-time Wimbledon champion had been leading a team of 27 climbers to raise money for the Laureus Sport for Good Foundation. She is a former parttime Aspen resident who is often spotted around Carbondale.

The Redstone Community Association is looking for sponsors for its WinterFest weekend, slated for Feb. 18-20. If you want your business logo or name included in WinterFest advertising, you must make your pledge by Dec. 17. Sponsorship levels range from $50 to $500. For details, contact Cathy Montgomery at cathymontg@gmail.com or visit the Web site redstonecolorado.com.

Birthday greetings Birthday greetings go out to: Kathy Ezra (Dec. 18), Frances Lewis and Shirley Bowen (Dec. 19), Don ButterďŹ eld (Dec. 20), Paula Fothergill and Jeremy Simon (Dec. 21), and Carolyn, Jackson and Jessica Hardin (Dec. 22). And a belated happy birthday to Steve Keohane, who turned 60 on Dec. 14.

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Skinks, single-wides and Wyoming goes Gothic COLORADO

brings sad news for lovers of low-cost, unconThanks to Colorado Outdoors, the mag- ventional housing: Their days are numbered. azine of the state’s Department of Natural The local icon known as the trailer park, one Resources, we have a new of the few affordable choices favorite wild animal — the left in Clark County — or color-shifting skink. It reanywhere else in the West, for sembles a stocky snake that matter — is disappearing. with lizard-like legs. And County Commissioner Tom like many lizards, it has Collins says he knows trailer the wonderful ability to parks well since he grew up in discard and then regenerseveral of them, yet he conate its tail any time a predcludes, “When we talk about ator pounces on it: “When high-rises and condos and caught, the skink’s tail things of that nature, mobilebreaks off and twitches, home parks don’t fit in.They’ll surprising the enemy.� be gone. They’re a thing of the Even more surprising is past.�And Southern California that the tail of a newborn seems to be cracking down on skink is bright blue — all the cheapest housing of all — the better, perhaps, to atvehicles serving as bedrooms tract a predator to a overnight, reports the New nonessential part of the York Times. Even the Venice By Betsy Marston body. When the tail grows section of Los Angeles, once High Country News back, it either comes in known as the “Slum by the “pinkish� or has the same color as the rest of Sea,� has had it with people who live in their the skink’s black or brown-striped body. cars, and some 250 near-homeless residents Three species of skink live in Colorado; all may be forced to decamp. Where they will go, of them dine on insects. no one knows. As Mario Manti-Gualtiero, an out-of-work audio engineer said, “We can’t just evaporate.� NEVADA Freelancer Matthew O’Brien embraces the underbelly of Las Vegas again in a new book WYOMING Rancher Dave Grabbert had a problem. with a long title,“My Week at the Blue Angel and Other Stories from the Storm Drains, Strip He wanted to sell his 1,500-acre property Clubs and Trailer Parks of Las Vegas.� He which lies about 20 miles from Meeteetse,

Heard around the west

Wyo., to 18 “hermit� monks, who plan to build a Gothic-style monastery, a coffeeroasting barn to process their brand (called “Mystic Monk�) and a church large enough to (on special occasions) accommodate 150 people, topped by a 150-foot spire.“Granted, it would be an odd-looking addition to the area,� editorialized the Casper Star-Tribune. But “what could possibly be less threatening to anyone’s quality of life?�Well, some neighboring ranchers did feel threatened; as their attorney put it,“You see this huge edifice and a paved road leading to it as an invitation.� The paper’s editorial board dryly noted, how-

ever, that the locals never bellyached when oil and gas and timber trucks rumbled by, and added,“We doubt the monastery would need to add a drive-through window any time soon.�Tolerance, advised the paper, is the best approach to the newcomers, all of whom wear long robes as monks of the order of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Mount Carmel. And tolerance, or at least the spirit of compromise, has saved the day. The monks agreed to revamp their planned septic system and make other recommended changes, and, in early October, the Park County commissioners unanimously approved the monastery.

Besty Marston’s blog appears on the High Country News Web site at hcn.org. Diego Hernandez (left) and Max Schlumberger were honored as students of the month this week by the town trustees. Photo by Terray Sylvester

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Airstream Village brought out the town’s best By Andrea Chacos Special to The Sopris Sun I’ve lived in Carbondale long enough to hear the iconic stories. Softball tourneys with kids running around the perimeter of the park, late night cooking sessions getting ready for a restaurant’s grand opening, and the all-nighter security patrol parties for Mountain Fair. Now, Land+Shelter, Inc. and S.A.W. (Studio for Arts+Works) have their own story. The weekend of Dec. 11-12 they hosted the inaugural Airstream Village Holiday Market on the parcel of land owned by Modern Dwell, LLC at the intersection of Highway 133 and Sopris Ave. Over the past six weeks they risked themselves fiscally along with their reputation just to throw a party for the Roaring Fork Valley. Land+Shelter and S.A.W.’s idea was to utilize their vacant lot, promote the artists at S.A.W. and somehow showcase their fetish for Airstreams. Gavin Brooke (one of the Land+Shelter owners) described early in the planning phase the desire for a “fun, quirky and eclectic event.” Hence, the Airstream Village was born. I am proud and humbled to call myself one of the organizers for this event, along with the talented Andi Korber at Land+Shelter. When I pitched the Airstream Village idea to Darren Broome and Nic DeGross at Aloha Mountain Cyclery, Darren hopped around like a jumping bean saying that this is part of why they’re in business. He quickly wrote a sponsorship check and said,“I’m in. Take the money. Let’s have some fun with this!”

CCAH two hours before we opened for the weekend. Terry Kirk from Sopris Liquor & Wine donated another tent. Then a call for more gravel was placed to TJ Joiner and Casey Concrete to cover the unexpected mud. I witnessed firsthand the spontaneity of our community when Gale (Annie Thompson’s dad) sold holiday trees one day and then moonlighted as Santa the next. Afterward, Russ Criswell came through as Santa for the closer, allowing Gale to return to his tree sales. Erin Rigney and Roaring Fork Leadership took the idea of a watering hole to an entirely new level. Their fully-functioning bar included non-alcoholic beverages such as cider, tea, chai and cocoa. A keg, bottled beer, wine and whiskey were served up daily. Sunday morning’s treat was a cocktail server walking around selling mimosas to tired but thankful vendors and customers. Kids roasted S’mores, petted live reindeer A fire dancer spins flames at the Airstream Village over the weekend. Photo by Julie Albrecht and shared with Santa their holiday wish lists. They rode bikes, tossed beanbags, played Bocce and watched Jammin’ Jim put The ball started rolling and our confidence restaurant gave financial donations. and conviction grew. We could all contribute Talking with MRI (Mountain Roll-Offs, on a magic show. Live music rounded out our event with All in some way, like Tom Corson did by volun- Inc.) for instance, I felt like local businesses teering to collect wood, build a fence and do- really wanted to help us succeed.As our press The Pretty Horses, Dave Taylor, and ZSquared, nate generators and a trailer from ECOS. picked up in the newspapers, online and on a Roaring Fork High School band made up of Bill Rice and IRMW helped us move con- the radio, MRI kept increasing their dona- Zack Ritchie, Zach Hunt and Travis Provost, crete and dug the fire pit. Rainy Day Designs tions to include complimentary restrooms, a who brought out more high school students than a 7-Eleven brings in on a weekend night! made the Airstream Village Market a real dumpster and recycle bins. Will we do this again? Maybe. brand with our flyer.The town of Carbondale At the 11th hour, I felt the momentum of For now, I know everyone is just happy gave us fencing and a Santa suit. Sustainable this event and the spirit of Carbondale truly Settings gave us the wagon and all their out- explode. Rain (instead of snow) on Friday af- to be part of something that feels like the door tables and chairs. MRI, Sunsense Solar, ternoon prompted a frantic call to Mark Tay- right thing to do in our community this holAlpine Bank, RFTA and the Village Smithy lor. He quickly brought in more tents from iday season.

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970-963-3663 8 • THE SOPRIS SUN • DECEMBER 16, 2010

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Rubber chickens and more om page 1 plus Tony Lama and Justin boots, Bristol hats and rubber chickens. You’ll find the rubber chickens in the pet department, along with those ball projectile devices called Chuckits, and you know what they say about Chuckits: “If you don’t have a Chuckit, you don’t really have a dog.” Highway 133 is rife with other shopping opportunities as well, including two bike shops, an angling shop and a running store. A little further out, Garcia’s defies categorization. Part Mexican restaurant and grocery store, Garcia’s also offers a big selection of kids’ cowboy boots, cosmetics, ceramics, nativity floral displays and sugar cane. The sugar cane comes in five-foot lengths and can be chopped up and added into punch bowls ($2.99 a cane). Real men shop the hardware store each Christmas. A quick walk-through at Ace reveals such items as bird feeders, temperature and weather stations, an already-boxedsuitable-for-wrapping Poulan gas powered chainsaw and, for dog owners everywhere, Skunk Odor Eliminator (“It really works” the bottle says). Across the street from Ace Hardware at Main Street and Highway 133, Casual Culture covers about 3,000 square feet and offers Billabong, Roxy, Reef, Volcom jeans and other snowboard/skateboard and related lines of products and clothing. Down in town on Main Street, the Forest Service’s Mount Sopris Ranger District headquarters, through the Rocky Mountain Nature Association, operates a small

bookstore that offers such titles as “Elk Mountain Odyseey,”“Marble: A town built on dreams, Vol. 2,” “Colorado Mountain Passes: the state’s most accessible high country roadways,” “Back Roads of Colorado” and more. The headquarters also sells topo maps and White River National Forest maps. If you’re looking for a Cuddlekins black bear stuffed animal you’ll find it there. It’s a bit of a stretch, but Carbondale is one of the few towns in the U.S. that can boast of its own locally grown meat and whiskey. Which begs the observation: What better present this year than a box of meat and a bottle of whiskey? The meat comes from Crystal River Meats, located at 55 N. Fourth Street. Crystal River Meats offers locally raised, grass-fed beef, pork and lamb, plus chicken. Buy it by the box or the cut. Gift certificates are available. The spirits are Stranahan’s Colorado Whiskey, priced at about $55 a bottle. Stranahan’s is not actually distilled in Carbondale (at least not as far as the River Valley Ranch homeowners association can tell) but its co-founder (George Stranahan) lives at RVR. If you’re in Denver and can stop by the Stranahan’s distillery in person, they’ll sell you up to six bottles of Triple Wood Snowflake for $85 per if there’s any left from the 140 bottle batch released for sale in September. Le’ Clarann’s Sew Shop at 502 Main St. is offering handmade gifts from 5 to 8 p.m.

on Dec. 17 and 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Dec. 18. What else can we say about shopping in Carbondale? Two words: gift certificates. Just about every store and restaurant offers gift certificates for giftees to use at their leisure. The Carbondale Chamber of Commerce also offers gift certificates that are redeemable at dozens of establishments around town. They are available at the chamber office at 981 Cowen Drive. There are plenty of other places to shop

in Carbondale including the Main Street Gallery, Parkside Gallery, Dancing Colours, Roadside Gallery, Lulubelle, True Nature and Miser’s Mercantile. What else can you buy in Carbondale? Tires. You can play the role of functional Santa by purchasing a set of sweet-smelling snow tires right here in Carbondale and stacking them in a corner behind the tree. Talk about an unforgettable Christmas. And you did it right here in Carbondale.

After being judged by a Roaring Fork High School art class, the chamber of commerce named the Pour House as its holiday window decorating contest winner. Although Santa seems to say it all in this photo, the nighttime scene is much more eye catching. Photo by Lynn Burton

Hope in the Dark Join us to contemplate the struggles and blessings of a joyful season that, curiously, falls during the darkest, shortest days of the year. with UU Minister Gretchen Haley This Sunday, Dec. 19, 10 a.m. Music presented by Annie Flynn

Two Rivers Unitarian Universalist (TRUU) Bridges High School, Carbondale

Youth Religious Exploration/Childcare For schedule, map, program info:

www.tworiversuu.org

Breathe Easy

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Head, Heart and Spirit: Living the Liberal Religious Ethic Two Rivers Unitarian Universalist

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Community Calendar THURS.-SUN. Dec. 16-18 â&#x20AC;&#x153;TEMPESTâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Thunder River Theatre Company concludes its original play â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tempest of the Mindâ&#x20AC;? at its playhouse west of the Dinkel Building off Main Street at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 16-18. The play explores the life of William Shakespeare through the eyes of Mark Twain and others. Info: thunderrivertheatre.com.

THURSDAY Dec. 16 TRUNK SHOW â&#x20AC;˘ Dancing Colours at 968 Main St. hosts a trunk show from 5 to 8 p.m. with Eco-Fashion founder Beth Delehaunty, jewelry designer Kathy Hansel and artist Cindy Noel presenting their holiday collections. CRES SERENADES â&#x20AC;˘ Fourth grade students at Crystal River Elementary School serenade the community with a free Winter Celebration at Carbondale Middle School at 6:30 p.m. BUSINESS AFTER HOURS â&#x20AC;˘ The Carbondale and Basalt chambers of commerce host a Business After Hours at Styles â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kitchen and Bath Studio, located at 20 Sunset Drive, #8 in Basalt, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. Appetizers provided by Smoke Modern Barbecue and Downvalley Tavern. Music provided by Sue Krehbiel and Frank Martin.

FRI.-WEDS. Dec. 17-22 â&#x20AC;&#x153;WHITE CHRISTMASâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Jayne Gottlieb Productions performs Irving Berlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;White

To list your event, email information to news@soprissun.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Saturday. Events take place in Carbondale unless noted. For up-to-the-minute valley-wide event listings, check out the Community Calendar online at soprissun.com.

Christmasâ&#x20AC;? at the Wheeler Opera House in Aspen at 7 p.m. on Dec. 17, 5 p.m. on Dec. 18-19 and 7 p.m. on Dec. 21-22. Tickets prices range from $16 to $25. Info: 920-5770.

FRIDAY Dec. 17 MOVIES â&#x20AC;˘ The Crystal Theatre presents â&#x20AC;&#x153;Love and Other Drugsâ&#x20AC;? (R) at 7:30 p.m. Dec. 17-23 and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Last Dancerâ&#x20AC;? (PG) at 5 p.m. Dec 19. LIVE MUSIC â&#x20AC;˘ The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities presents Pastor Mustard and the New National Swing Band for an evening of music and dance. The Colorado Swing Dance Club will be on hand to teach the dancing styles of the era from 7 to 8 p.m. Tickets are $12 for one or $20 for partners at the door (CCAH members receive a $2 discount). Info: carbondalearts.com. LIVE MUSIC â&#x20AC;˘ Steveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Guitars, located in the old part of the Dinkel Building, hosts live music every Friday. Info: 963-3304. LIVE MUSIC â&#x20AC;˘ Rivers restaurant in Glenwood Springs presents Dave Taylor (classic

to contemporary rock) from 9 p.m. to midnight). No cover.

SAT.-SUN. Dec. 18-19 â&#x20AC;&#x153;NUTCRACKER BALLETâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;˘ Crystal River Ballet School performs its 10th annual â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nutcracker Balletâ&#x20AC;? Dec. 18 at 7 p.m. and Dec. 19 at 2 p.m. at the Carbondale Middle School auditorium. Tickets are available at the door: $20/adults, $15/students and seniors, $50/family; children 3 and under free. Info: 704-0114.

SUNDAY Dec. 19 BENEFIT RUN â&#x20AC;˘ Independence Run and Hike is sponsoring the Jingle Bell 4-Mile Run and Shoe Drive at 11 a.m. The ďŹ rst 50 people to sign up and donate an old (or new) pair of shoes to the storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soles4Souls collection box will receive a goody bag with a pair of free running socks in it. The race goes right through the heart of Carbondale and up White Hill, before heading back to the store, located in the Cowan Center. Info: 704-1919. ADVENT SERVICE â&#x20AC;˘ St. Barnabas Episcopal Church, located at 546 S. Hyland Park Dr. in Glenwood, presents An Advent Service of Lessons and Carols at 6:30 p.m. This is a non-traditional service

consisting of readings and music, and is free and open to everyone. There will also be congregational singing of Christmas carols, anthems sung by the choir (accompanied by string quartet, ďŹ&#x201A;ute and the Crystal Consort recorder group) with Karen M. Tafejian as music director. BIRD COUNT â&#x20AC;˘ The ďŹ rst Eagle Christmas Bird Count, sponsored by the Forest Service and Roaring Fork Audubon Society, will be held from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Participants will meet at the Eagle Visitorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Center, located at 100 Fair Grounds Rd., in Eagle (off I-70) at 8 a.m. Wear warm clothing, and bring binoculars, bird guides, water and a snack. The cost is $5 for those 18 and older; birding experience is not necessary. ConďŹ rm at (970) 328-5899 by Dec. 17. POETRY â&#x20AC;˘ Live Poetry Nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Winter Celebration takes place at the Hotel Lenado, 200 S. Aspen St. in Aspen, from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be live music with singer/songwriters Pat Fagan and Dave Taylor plus piano player/mandolinist Frank Todaro; and an open mic for poets. Info: 379-2136.

MONDAY Dec. 20 MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S BASKETBALL â&#x20AC;˘ The registration deadline for the Carbondale menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball league is Dec. 20. Play begins at the recreation center on Jan. 9. The league is for ages 18 and older and the fee is $475. Info: 704-4115. Referees are also needed. CALENDAR page 11

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Community Calendar continued from page 10

TUESDAY Dec. 21 SCRABBLE ACTION • Dos Gringos hosts Scrabble Night from 6 to 8 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month. BLOOD DRIVE • Valley View Hospital in Glenwood Springs holds its blood drive from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. the third Tuesday of every month. Info: 384-6657.

December 22 - January 1 FILM • Aspen Film’s annual Academy Screenings take place at Harris Hall with one screening at the Wheeler Opera House. A complete program schedule is available

online at aspenfilm.org. Tickets to the general public go on sale Dec. 13 through Aspen Show Tickets at the Wheeler Opera House and aspenshowtix.com.

TUES.-WEDS. Dec. 21-22 SANTA TOUCHES DOWN • Santa Claus and his reindeer touch down upvalley at Aspen’s Wagner Park on Main Street from 12:30 to 4:30 p.m. Santa’s appearance is part of the Aspen Chamber Resort Association’s “12 Days of Aspen,” which runs Dec. 20-31. Other events include caroling, free ice-skating, story reading and more. Info: aspenchamber.org.

Further Out Dec. 23 LIVE MUSIC • Carnahan’s Tavern presents T Ray Becker (acoustic).

Dec. 24 LIVE MUSIC • Carnahan’s Tavern presents Rising Lyon (reggae). CHRISTMAS CELEBRATIONS • The Church at Carbondale will hold candlelight Christmas Eve celebrations at the church at 5 p.m. and 7 p.m., with a live nativity reenactment held off-site at a nearby barn at

6 p.m. The nativity scene comes to life with live actors and traditional Christmas hymns sung by all. Everyone is welcome. The Gathering Center/Common Grounds at the Church at Carbondale will be serving complimentary hot chocolate, cookies, cakes and lattes from 4:30 to 8 p.m. Patrons are invited to bring a plate of Christmas cookies to share. The Church at Carbondale is located at 110 Snowmass Dr. The nativity re-enactment can be reached by driving south on Highway 133 and following the star. Info: 963-8773.

Carbondale Community Housing Lottery 559 Jacobs Place: $231,552 Application Deadline: December 20, 2010 Lottery: December 23, 2010 Carbondale Town Hall 12 noon

Income Category 4

Ongoing “MADE BY HAND.” The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities presents its annual holiday exhibit “Made by Hand, From the Heart” at the Third Street Center. Info: 963-1680. ART SHOW • Zheng Asian Bistro at 400 E. Valley Road in El Jebel presents the work of local painter Dennis Dodson. The show is called, “Insider Outsider Art: Finding the Sociological Imagination.” Info: 963-8077. MAYOR’S COFFEE HOUR • Chat with Carbondale Mayor Stacey Bernot on Tuesdays from 7 to 8 a.m. at The Village Smithy at 26 S. Third St. ACOUSTIC CARNAHANS • Singer/ songwriter T Ray Becker hosts an acoustic music night with new musicians every week from 7 to 9 p.m. Thursdays at Carnahan’s Tavern. Info: 963-4498. FOOD EDUCATION • Eco-Goddess hosts a food education series at the restaurant every Wednesday from 6 to 7 p.m. Topics include the hidden costs in food and choices you can make. It’s free. Info: 963-7316. SUICIDE SURVIVORS SUPPORT • A support group for those who have lost a loved one to suicide meets the second

Tuesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at the First United Methodist Church in Glenwood Springs, 824 Cooper St. Info: 9451398 or pamsz@sopris.net. GROUP RUN • Independence Run and Hike at 995 Cowen Drive leads group runs, Saturdays at 8:15 a.m. rain or shine. Info: 704-0909. LEGAL SERVICES • Alpine Legal Service offers intake to eligible clients from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays and Fridays at the Garfield County Courthouse in Glenwood Springs, and Tuesdays and Wednesday at the Pitkin County Courthouse in Aspen. Info: 945-8858, 920-2828. ROTARY MEETING • The Mt. Sopris Rotary Club holds its weekly lunch meeting at noon Thursdays at the Aspen Glen Club. Info: 948-0693. SCRABBLE ACTION • Dos Gringos hosts Scrabble Night from 6 to 8 p.m. the third Tuesday of the month. MATINEE BINGO • It’s Matinee BINGO time in the Rominger Room at Crystal Meadows senior housing after lunch every Wednesday. It’s five cents per card, and large print cards are available. Info: 704-1579.

tix on sale now HARRIS CONCERT HALL WHEELER OPERA HOUSE

Maximum Gross Household Income: $108,300* *May add $7,500 per dependent up to three dependents

559 Jacobs Place: $231,552 • Single Family Home • 2 bdrm, 2.5 baths (originally a 3 bedroom; upper level bedrooms converted to one bedroom master suite) • Finished Basement

• 1760 SF heated area (per assessor) • Shed • Pets OK - 2 Pets • HOA - $395 per quarter • 2009 Taxes - $1,001

Requirements: Full-time Employee: minimum local employment of at least one household member of 30 hours per week, 9 months per year. Priority is given to applicants who live and/or work in Carbondale town boundaries. Not Own Other Property: members of the household may not own other improved real estate in the RF Valley, including mobile homes, with the exception of owner-occupied commercial real estate (not less than 50% occupied by the owner). Occupancy: Owner(s) must live in the unit

Applications are available and may be picked up and turned in at Mountain Regional Housing 520 South Third Street, #23, Carbondale, CO Or Carbondale Town Hall 511 Colorado Avenue www.carbondalegov.org or www.colorado.gov/housingcommunity.org Information: 970-704-9801 or janet@housingcommunity.org

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www.aspenfilm.org THE SOPRIS SUN • DECEMBER 16, 2010 • 11


Join me

in supporting the Sun the variety of subjects covered in the Sun. “ I enjoy The Sun engenders a

Community Briefs Peshlakai shows at the Tybar Internationally recognized Navajo artist Mae Peshlakai will show her silverwork and weavings, and work from other artists, at the Danciger Tybar Ranch on Dec. 18 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Peshlakai has conducted seminars on Navajo lifestyles, beliefs, arts and culture at several colleges and universities around the country, including Brown, Wheaton College, Brandeis, Wooster, Beloit and the University of Hawaii. She has also taught at Colorado Rocky Mountain School and will teach there again in 2011, according to Tybar owner Emma Danciger. “Mae and her husband James have worked tirelessly to preserve the arts so vital to Native American culture,” Danciger said. Mae learned to weave from her mother, master weaver Dorothy Walker. The Tybar Ranch is located south of Carbondale at 100 Angus Lane. To get there, go south on Highway 133, turn left onto Prince Creek Road (County Road 111), travel two miles to Angus Lane. For more information, call 963-1344.

sense of community, unlike the corporate media. The Sun accents the positive.

Jack Sebesta Cut out the form below and mail it with your donation to: Sopris Sun, P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623 or bring it by the Sopris Sun offices at the Third Street Center at 520 3rd Street, #35 in Carbondale.

Send in your contribution now Three easy ways to support the Sun

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Chamber recognizes Habitat for Humanity The members of the Carbondale Chamber of Commerce have named Habitat for Humanity of the Roaring Fork Valley as the 2010 Business of the Year. Habitat for Humanity, a nationwide non-profit that builds affordable housing, also operates the ReStore between Glenwood Springs and Carbondale. The store partners with regional resorts, including the Timbers Club, Snowmass Club,The Little Nell, Boomerang Lodge, and other businesses and private donors from Aspen to Rifle to provide used furniture, appliances, building materials and household items to local families at affordable prices, according to a chamber press release. “Offering daily service, the ReStore transportation staff even picks up donated goods for free and provides tax-deductible receipts for all donations made,” said a ReStore spokesman. Through its newly created ReStore Rewards program, volunteers are encouraged to lend a hand in exchange for cumulative savings on ReStore merchandise – savings that can be transferable to anyone in the community who could benefit from Habitat’s “hand up” philosophy. Habitat’s 2010 “A Brush with Kindness” program provides free home improvements for senior citizens. Habitat for Humanity/ReStore employs more than a dozen people and has an administrative office in the Third Street Center.

Lottery application deadline The deadline to enter the Carbondale Community Housing lottery for a 1,760-squarefoot, single family home at 559 Jacobs Pl. is Dec. 20. The house is priced at $231,552 and the lottery is at town hall on Dec. 23. For details, call Mountain Regional Housing at 704-9801.

Yater-Wallace competes at Copper Aspen Valley Ski and Snowboard Club skier Torin Yater-Wallace qualified for the finals in the Visa U.S. Grand Prix at Copper Mountain Dec. 8-11, finishing ninth. Yater-Wallace, a Basalt native, competed against such nationally know freeride X Games skiers as Simon Dumont and Mike Riddle. He was also the youngest competitor in the finals. “Torin has staked his position as a serious competitor in the professional half-pipe scene,” said coach Travis Redd. Redd said Yater-Wallace is now gunning for a spot at ESPN's Winter X Games and a topfive finish at the Aspen Open.

Museum open house DONATIONS ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE The Sopris Sun, LLC is a 501(c)3 nonprofit subsidiary of the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation. Sopris Sun, LLC #26-4219405

12 • THE SOPRIS SUN • DECEMBER 16, 2010

The Frontier Historical Society in Glenwood is hosting a free open house at their museum from 4 to 7 p.m. on Dec. 17. There’ll be hot cider, Starbucks coffee and homemade cookies. The Frontier Historical Museum is located at 1001 Colorado Ave. For details, call 945-4448.


Tips for a midstream winter solstice For many years it has been an on-going mid-river, when an ice floe comes through. tradition of mine to go fly-fishing on the Often a safer and more productive bet for shortest day of the year, winter solstice. And winter fishing is to head up the Frying Pan while I grew up far away from or other tail-water fishery the East Coast, there is somewhere water comes out of a thing particularly “Live Free dam and keeps a fairly conor Die” about winter solstice. sistent 38 degrees. Not only Ten inches of snow in the last do you not have to deal with eight hours and still snowing? the ice shelves and ice floes Sure, why not go fly-fishing. of a freestone river, but you High winds and near whitewill often find more bug life out conditions? Sure, why not. and more fish actively feedTen degrees and the river ing. As the saying goes, usualong with your brain is a ally followed by a sadistic slow moving slushy? I’m in. grin, “A fish in the Frying The night before solstice I’ll be Pan doesn’t care how cold it headed for bed, dreaming the is outside.” dreams that most fly-fishers by Cameron Scott Maybe, like me, solstice or dream in the winter: dreams New Year’s resolutions will of solitude, silence, and stacked up fish. motivate you out onto the water this winter. While winter fly-fishing isn’t for the faint If they do, or if you are searching for soliof heart, neither is it for the fully sane. It tude, silence, and stacked up fish, know that helps to have good circulation in your fin- our local winter fishery is one of the best in gers and toes and an I-don’t-give-a-damn at- the world. titude about how often you have to break ice from your fly rod guides and leader. Often you have to wear enough clothing to look like the Michelin Man. And regardless of how cold, miserable, and insular you might feel, you always have to keep on the Ten below zero, look-out for two things, especially on area stars and the city’s steam, freestone rivers (rivers without dams upbreath escapes and falls like dust. stream) like the Roaring Fork and Colorado: ice shelves breaking beneath your weight Unable to spill over the mountains and ice floes coursing down the river. this giant mass of cold settles Over the years I’ve taken to a stompand-step approach of moving along frozen and by morning the sun has no heat. ice shelves, which usually keeps me warm At the hot springs, heads shine and dry. However, ice floes are another matter. One of the worst things that can – like the flowers of frozen clovers, and often will – happen while winter fishWhen we cross the bridge ing is to have a chunk of ice, usually from the size of a fist to an on-demand satellite a small sliver of water dish, come bobbing down a riffle and flows clear as a pane of glass. whack you in the shin. An ice floe, on the other hand, is a bank-to-bank slough of This cold that keeps seeping in. fists and satellite dishes, sometimes a few To finally drive it out. Imagine. feet thick, rumbling down the river like a – Cameron Scott freight train. Ironically, the last place you want to be is basking in the glory of a warm late-winter afternoon, whacking fish

Tailgate

Cold Snaps

Letters continued om page 2

amazing work. The Aspen Times, Post Independent, The Sopris Sun, and the Aspen Daily News were all very supportive of getting the word out and helping us with advertising. We want to extend our thanks to Ramona Bruland from Plum TV: Thank you for your piece on our event. KSNO Radio and Tri-color Radio, thank you for your support of our event. To all the businesses around the valley who supported us with banners and posters, thank you, especially Jean’s Printing in Rifle. The City of Basalt and the Basalt Chamber of Commerce deserve a big thanks for your support with hosting such a jam-packed line up of community events. We’d also like to thank the elementary and middle schools for their support, and finally we wish to thank all the parents and students who turned out to

make this event a true community festival. We would also like to give a special thanks to Ralph Smalley, who did an amazing job helping out with this event. We would like to especially give a tremendous thanks to Seann Goodman, for all your hard work you have put in for the last two months for this event. This festival has been a wonderful experience for the school and for our community. We hope to start finding artists for 2011 Yule Fest some time in mid-Spring. Keep your eyes and ears out for more information or feel free to contact us at this high school. We hope to see everyone at next year’s Yule Fest as we continue this Basalt holiday tradition. Basalt High School Student Council THE SOPRIS SUN • DECEMBER 16, 2010 • 13


This Christmas, try a leg of lamb Dealing with Thanksgiving turkey leftovers may have turned into a chore, and the thought of another round so soon may not be very appealing. Beef tenderloin sounds good, but that’s a lot of money to risk, and it may not turn out perfectly if you haven’t had some experience with those big hunks of beef. Christmas goose? – sounds traditional, in the Dickensian sense, but let me warn you away, after a disappointing personal experience. For this year’s Christmas dinner, consider a leg of lamb. This used to be the Easter standard, but now it’s available year-round. It’s easy and almost foolproof to prepare, and astoundingly delicious. At about one-third By Chef George Bohmfalk the cost of beef tenderloin, lamb is an excellent option in these tough economic times. Every time I roast one, we marvel at how great a thing can be for so little effort. Lamb comes in a variety of forms. You can buy a whole long leg of lamb, which includes both the upper part (the thigh) along with the lower shank. More commonly, you’ll see just the thigh. If you don’t want to deal with the shank, get just the thigh part, which comes either bone-in or boneless. With my surgical background, I probably enjoy dissecting out the bone more than most people, and then I have something to simmer for several hours with some onion and carrot

The Fork

that Roared

to make lamb stock for the sauce. But it’s not a complicated procedure if you’re up for it and have a good sharp knife. Trim away most of the fat and gristle, and you’ll be left with several large loosely connected pieces of meat, which is how the boneless leg looks once removed from its package and netting. Rosemary and garlic must have evolved to be used with lamb, as they are the perfect seasonings. Strip the needle-like leaves off of six or eight rosemary sprigs then chop them finely with some parsley and several cloves of garlic. Mix this in a bowl with salt and pepper, a little olive oil and Dijon mustard. Rub this mixture over the inner aspect of the meat, then roll the meat into a football shape, tie it with string, and rub a little olive oil over the surface. You can do this the night before cooking and set it in the fridge if the next morning is going to be occupied with Santa’s largesse. About three hours before dinnertime, while heating the oven to 400 degrees, remove the meat from the refrigerator, lightly coat it with salt and pepper, and set it on a rack in a roasting pan. Put a couple of cups of beef or lamb stock (or water) in the pan, to prevent the drippings from burning. After about 15 minutes at 400 degrees, turn the oven down to 250, so that the outside will brown with the high initial heat, and the inside will cook more evenly at the lower temperature. Let the lamb slow-roast for around three hours while you’re opening and playing with your presents, or enjoying a Christmas morning ski. If you have a meat thermometer, let the internal temperature get up to about 135 degrees. Remove the lamb from the pan and cover it loosely with foil to rest and stay warm. Pour the fat and

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14 • THE SOPRIS SUN • DECEMBER 16, 2010

drippings into a measuring cup or bowl, and deglaze the roasting pan with a cup or so of red wine, stock, or just water. When the drippings have settled, skim off and discard the fat. Strain the deglazing liquid and the defatted drippings and stock into a saucepan. Then simmer this sauce to reduce and thicken it slightly while you get other dinner things ready. My favorite side dish with roast lamb is simple roasted potatoes. Scrub any kind of potatoes and cut them into roughly 1-inch chunks, skin on. Toss these with some olive oil and salt and pepper. Put them in the oven (now set at 250) on a cookie sheet or in a roasting pan about two hours before you want to eat, stirring them around several times. If they don’t have a nice browned crust by the time you remove the lamb, turn the oven up to around 400 until they do. I bet your lamb – and potatoes – will be fabulous, and the leftovers will make for great sandwiches and stew. If you’re tired of turkey, don’t want to pay for beef, and can resist the mystique of goose, roast a leg of lamb this Christmas. You might start a tradition of which Dickens would surely approve!

Recipe Notes:

Ingredients: garlic, rosemary, olive oil, potatoes and a leg of lamb, bone-in or boneless Optional ingredients: red wine, beef or lamb stock, parsley, Dijon mustard


Unclassifieds

Submit to unclassifieds@soprissun.com by Monday 12 p.m. Rates: $15 for 30 words, $20 for up to 50 words. Payment due before publication.*

DOG TRAINING AND CARE SERVICES. Private dog training or Saturday group sessions, dog walking and hiking, Pet CPR AND First Aid classes. Gift Certificates available. More info at www.SueMelus.com or 948-0297. KEEP YOUR HOLIDAY SHOPPING LOCAL AND EASY! “Memoirs of a River...Up the Crystal, Vol. 1” is a great holiday or stocking stuffer gift for anyone you know

who loves this beautiful valley! Available at the Carbondale Ranger Station, Glenwood Springs bookstores, or get a personalized copy at: marbledweller.com for $20, including tax, shipping AND a donation to our local Lift-Up! Call 704-0567 for details. MOAB FOR ONLY $165 PER NIGHT! Book your winter desert getaway now! 3 bdrm/3 bath Moab condo, only $165 per night. Fully furnished and equipped. Mtn bik-

ing, hiking, jeeping. Call Valerie at (970) 948-5877 and ask to book Gecko’s Rest. WANTED: one or more volunteer sports writers to cover Roaring Fork High School’s winter season. Experience not required but knowledge of sports is helpful. For details, call The Sopris Sun at 618-9112. WANTED: volunteer photographer to shoot Roaring Fork High School winter sports. For details, call 618-9112.

*Credit card payment information should be emailed to unclassifieds@soprissun.com or call 948-6563. Checks may be dropped off at our office at the Third Street Center or mailed to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623. Call 618-9112 for more info.

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GO SAINTS! THE SOPRIS SUN • DECEMBER 16, 2010 • 15


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December 15, 2010