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Volume 4, Number 40 | November 15, 2012

Carbondale was a snowy place on Saturday morning but most folks did not seem to mind. Meanwhile, up at Spring Gulch southwest of town, Nordic skiers were not yet making any tracks but cows from Bill Fales and Marj Perry’s cattle drive did leave imprints on Thompson Creek road. Photo by Julie Albrecht

Skating rink planned for park at Fourth and Main By Lynn Burton Sopris Sun Staff Writer

C

arbondalians will enjoy one more outdoor diversion this winter as the town plans to install a pondstyle skating rink at the Fourth Street Plaza park on Main Street. “Weather permitting, we will unveil the rink during the ‘Light Up Carbondale’ event on First Friday in December,”said Carbondale Recreation Center Manager Eric Brendlinger. “The rink will be a family-friendly experience for skating only, with no stick sports like hockey or broomball allowed.”

The town will also put in an ice rink at the rodeo grounds east of town as it has for the past several years. Brendlinger said the idea for a new rink came up after the most recent Parks and Recreation Committee meeting. “The idea is to create that ‘New York’ feel of a downtown ice rink — lit up and festive.” He joked, “If this all works it was my idea. If not, I will have to blame it on someone else!” The property at Fourth and Main Street is privately owned and sees lots of summer action with music events and other activities. Brendlinger said the cost will be minimal be-

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cause the town will use part of the old rink liner from the rodeo grounds and the boards and hardware from the former in-line rink at North Face park. The in-town rink is experimental and will be weather dependent. It will measure approximately 45-feet by 70-feet, will have lights and be open from noon until the lights automatically go out at 9 p.m. Brendlinger said 4 to 6 inches of water will be put down as a base for the non-refrigerated rink. The top two inches of ice will be managed on an ongoing basis with a “Manboni” and not a Zamboni.

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The sun is the enemy for any unrefrigerated outdoor rink.The site has good shade in the morning but faces direct sun from about 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. The best skating will probably be in the evening hours after the sun is long gone and the ice has had a chance to re-freeze. “This should be fun if Mother Nature cooperates,” Brendlinger said. “Think cold; think ice. On a related note, registration for the broomball league and introduction to youth hockey lessons for ages 6-9 and 10-14 is underway. The registration deadline is Dec. 30.

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Carbondale Commentary The views and opinions expressed on the Commentary page do not necessarily reflect those of The Sopris Sun. The Sopris Sun invites all members of the community to submit letters to the editor or guest columns. For more information, e-mail editor Lynn Burton at news@soprissun.com, or call 510-3003.

What to know about epilepsy By Megan Noonan A year ago, when our son Sam was 18 months old, he first began to have seizures. We met immediately with a neurologist who was unable to identify the source of Sam’s seizures or to provide us with the right kind and dosage of medication to control them. We then took Sam to an epileptologist at Children’s Hospital in Denver to whom we had been referred and where Sam is currently being treated. He has undergone numerous tests and studies, and we have experimented with many different medications. In the last four months we have not seen a seizure, this after months of multiple seizures per day. We are praying that these seizure-free days will continue. This past year has been filled with many days of fear and anxiety. Now, however, with amazing care from the doctors at Children’s and by constantly educating ourselves about epilepsy, we feel hope that our son will lead a full and happy life and overcome the challenges that come with epilepsy. November is National Epilepsy Awareness Month. Our family and friends wear purple bracelets as a symbol of our support for education about epilepsy, for continued research for treatment options for epilepsy, and for hope that our son will be seizure free and will have a minimum of side effects from his treatments. Epilepsy is the third most common neurological disorder in the United States, affecting nearly three million people. One in 26 people will develop epilepsy in their lifetime. The causes of epilepsy are tied to head injuries, tumors, genetic conditions, problems with brain development before birth, or illness. Epilepsy is a chronic medical condition that, for many people, can be successfully treated as long as medications are taken regularly. Different treatments such as: surgery, vagus nerve stimulation, or a special diet can be used to control different types of seizures. Epilepsy is a neurological condition involving recurrent seizures. A seizure is a change in sensation, awareness, or behavior brought about by a brief electrical disturbance in the brain. While about 10 percent of people will have a seizure at some point in their lives, a person is diagnosed with epilepsy after they have had two or more seizures. There are many types of seizures and not all involve convulsions. For seizures that do not involve convulsions, no immediate first aid is required other than reassurance and emotional support. If you do witness a seizure that involves convulsions, it is important to remain calm, and stay with the person until the seizures stop. If possible, place the person on their side and turn their head downward so that secretions can drain out of the mouth to prevent choking. Move hard objects out of the way so the person cannot hurt themselves. It is also important to use a clock or watch to time the seizure. If a seizure lasts more than five minutes or the seizures happen in a series, it is important to call 911. When someone is having a seizure, do not try to open the mouth or place anything between the teeth, and do not try to restrain them. As someone who loves someone very much who is affected by epilepsy, I strongly encourage everyone to know what to do if you witness a seizure. Our son’s life, or that of someone you know, may depend on it. If you would like to learn more about epilepsy or donate to the on-going research for treating epilepsy go to www.getseizuresmart.org.

Letters

The Sopris Sun welcomes your letters, limited to no more than 400 words. Letters exceeding that length may be edited or returned for revisions. Include your name and residence (for publication) and a contact email and phone number. Submit letters via email to letters@soprissun.com or via snail mail to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623. The deadline to submit letters to the editor is 5 p.m. on Tuesday.

basalt fire thanks Dear Editor: We would like to offer out sincerest appreciation to the majority voters (61 percent) that supported Basalt Fire at the polls this past election day. The board of directors, all of whom are taxpayers in our district, carefully calculated all options prior to requesting an increase in taxes. The board had previously cut spending for five years prior, in an effort to ride out and weather the current economic situation. Unfortunately, requesting this increase was a necessity to continue to provide the current level of services that are needed in our community. We would also like to assure all voters that the minority (39 percent) voters were also heard and it is the district’s intention to

treat this increase with care and diligence. Thank you again for your support of the Basalt & Rural Fire Protection District. Scott Thompson (fire chief) Bob Guion (board) Robert Woods (board) John Young (board) Ed Van Walraven (board) Mark Kittle (board)

Interesting Dear Editor: Have you all noticed that since the horrendous hurricane hit eastern America no major Republican politicians are talking about balancing the budget? I find that very interesting. Patricia Fender Carbondale

2 • THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 15, 2012

Attention bikram students Dear Editor: This letter is to all the students that I had the pleasure in teaching at Bikram Basalt and Carbondale. As I didn’t have the opportunity to express how much admiration I have for your practices, for your growth, I wanted to take a moment to say thank you! Thank you from the bottom of my heart to my eyes of delight for listening to me and applying what I was inviting into your practice. As a teacher I couldn’t ask for more and I find myself missing you. So please keep your eyes peeled for information about classes that I will be teaching in the new year. May your holiday season be filled with joy and a peaceful heart. If you wish to contact me please like my facebook page alya howe or e-mail me at alyahowe@me.com. Alya Howe Carbondale

Please support ACC Dear Editor: As a volunteer, teacher and parent at the Aspen Community School, I have been learning something new for 25 years. I have been challenged to take risks, learn new skills and keep an open mind to what might be possible. I have been given this incredible opportunity to participate along with my two children, our students, teachers and parents in a community that celebrates curiosity, creativity and discovery. Our students thrive as scientists, actors, artists, musicians, mathematicians and authors because they are supported by a community that believes in them. However, our students are succeeding in a school house that is failing. The Aspen Community School is one of Colorado’s highestperforming public schools operating in one of the state’s lowest-performing facilities. As a public charter school, the Aspen Community School enriches the educational choices for the Aspen School District. Yet, we are not currently providing the educational spaces that allow our students to explore, innovate and create at their highest level. We have not only imagined this potential but are ready to make it happen. After four years of effort, the Community School earned a $4.2 million BEST grant from the state. In order to secure this grant, we must raise $4.9 million by May 1, 2013. It is an ambitious and achievable goal, but we cannot do it without your help. I ask you to join the ACS community and support our campus campaign. To learn more and to make a donation, please visit iBelieveACS.org. Lynn Nichols Basalt

Yogis hook up with Lift-Up Dear Editor: The Roaring Fork Valley yoga community will come together this November for “The Gift of Gratitude,” a chance to give back and try something new. Devised by The Aspen Yoga Society and lululemon athletica Aspen, the Gift of Gratitude (GOG) offers residents a chance to try all the valley’s yoga studios for free from Nov. 1-20. The only catch is that they must donate

non-perishable food to Lift-Up in exchange for the class. This is a win-win as you will get to try new studios/teachers and will also be helping neighbors in need. The yoga community really believes in the essential services that Lift-Up provides. As yogis, we feel it is our responsibility to help one another; yoga means “union” and through the practice we understand we are all connected. The Gift of Gratitude will culminate with a free community yoga class at Aspen High School on Nov. 20 at 10 a.m. in conjunction with the Aspen TREE free Community Meal. Participating studios include: The Aspen Club and Spa, Arjuna Yoga Aspen, O2 Yoga Aspen, King Yoga Aspen Business Center, Le Cercle Studio in Basalt, Bikram’s Yoga College of India in Basalt and Carbondale, and Kula Yoga on Main Street in Carbondale. For these studios to essentially give away classes shows their commitment to community. We are hoping the community will in turn support these studios; lululemon is providing a free outfit to the person who visits the most yoga classes at participating studios within the time frame. To participate in Gift of Gratitude, residents must go to lululemon athletica on Spring Street in Aspen and pick up a card. One card per person and one class per studio per person. You will get a sticker from each studio after class to put on the card. Let the fun begin. More info at lululemon or www.aspen yogasociety.org Gina Guarascio Murdock Aspen

To inform, inspire and build community Donations accepted online or by mail. For information call 510-3003 Editor/Reporter: Lynn Burton • 970-510-3003 news@soprissun.com Advertising: Bob Albright • 970-927-2175 bob@soprissun.com Linda Fleming • 970-379-5223 linda@soprissun.com Photographer: Jane Bachrach Ad/Page Production: Terri Ritchie Webmaster: Will Grandbois Sopris Sun, LLC Managing Board of Directors: Debbie Bruell • Peggy DeVilbiss David L. Johnson • Colin Laird Laura McCormick • Trina Ortega Jean Perry • Elizabeth Phillips • Frank Zlogar

Sopris Sun, LLC • P.O. Box 399 520 S. Third Street #35 Carbondale, CO 81623

970-510-3003 www.soprissun.com Visit us on facebook.com Send us your comments: feedback@soprissun.com The Sopris Sun is an LLC organized under the 501c3 non-profit structure of the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation.


Rams win one at the state tourney then close season Sopris Sun Staff Report The Roaring Fork Rams won their first state volleyball tournament match since 1990 last weekend in Denver before being eliminated in a tie-breaker 25-16. “The win against Eaton was fantastic,” said head coach Carrie Shultz after the tournament. “This win was a true test of character and I loved what I saw. It was a very proud moment for our volleyball program.” The Rams finished the season 23-5 and placed second to the Gunnison Cowboys in the 3A Western Slope league. Platte Valley defeated Gunnison 3-0 in the state finals; the Cowboys beat Roaring Fork in five sets earlier in the season. The 3A state tournament was played at the Denver Coliseum and this marked the second straight year the seasoned Rams

made the trip to the Mile High City. Roaring Fork started the tournament on Nov. 9, losing to Platte Valley in three games: 18-25, 16-25, 20-25. The Rams then defeated defending state champion Eaton in five games: 22-25, 25-22, 22-25, 25-23, 15-13. When Eaton won its match on Saturday it set up a one game tie-breaker against Platte Valley with the winner advancing in the tournament. Platte Valley defeated the Rams 16-25 before falling to eventual runner up Gunnison. The state tournament marked the final high school play for seven Roaring Fork seniors: Georgia Ackerman, Taylor Adams, Mariah Ahumada, Hattie Gianinetti, Megan Gianinetti, Madison Handy and Caitlin Kinney.

Cirque d’Sopris plays PAC3 Nov. 17 Sopris Sun Staff Report

Madison Handy (#20) makes a back row hit in Roaring Fork’s state volleyball tournament action last weekend in Denver. The Rams were eliminated from the tournament in a tie-breaker game. Photo by Sue Rollyson

The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities presents design, daring and dance at the second annual Youth Green Is the New Black Youth Fashion Extravaganza: Cirque d’Sopris at PAC3 on Nov. 17. There are shows at 3:30 p.m. and 6:30 p.m. Directed by Jenna Bradford and Rochelle Norwood, Cirque d’Sopris is co-produced with Second Shift, an after-school program for valley-wide middle school students, according to a press release. The show will feature recycled fashion created by youth, the SOL Theater’s Improv Troupe, circus acts and several styles of dance including a piece by Aspen Santa-Fe Ballet Folklorico. “This show was so popular last year that a second show has been added to accommodate

the crowd,” said Amy Kimberly, CCAH executive director. Proceeds from both shows will support CCAH education programs throughout the year. CCAH provides free after-school art programming to Crystal River Elementary School students throughout the year, as well as programs in the middle and high schools. Around 40 models and 20 dancers from Aspen to Glenwood Springs will take part in this show. “It is truly a collaborative project reflecting the values and talents of our valley’s dedicated and motivated young people,” said Kimberly. Tickets are $15 for adults and $8 for youth and are on sale at www.carbondalearts.com or by stopping by CCAH at the Third Street Center. Volunteers are needed. For more information, visit: www.carbondalearts.com or call 963-1680.

Chamber recognizes Aloha and CCAH Sopris Sun Staff Report The Carbondale Chamber of Commerce has named Aloha Mountain Cyclery as its for-profit Business of the Year for 2012, and the Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities its non-profit Business of the Year. Aloha Mountain Cyclery was founded by Nic DeGross and Darren Broome in January of 2010, according to a press release. Having worked as managers at Ute City Cycles in La Fontana Plaza, the two often discussed what characteristics were most important to them in a local business if they were to ever own a shop. They noticed that their values were on par with one another. So when the opportunity to purchase Ute City Cycles came along, they jumped at the chance and wrote a new business plan that centered around a heavy dose of community involvement. One of the first things that was done was to join the Chamber of Commerce to show support for the town and business community. Focusing on the service and educational side of retail (as compared to solely the sales side) has allowed Aloha to build relationships with customers. For example, the Bonedale Bike Project

Community Bike Program has been a great success, thanks to employee Aaron Taylor. Taylor takes donated bikes and uses volunteer support to get them into sellable condition in order to provide economical transportation for the community. The proceeds from these sales are then donated to a bicycle-friendly charitable organization to provide humanitarian aid on a global scale. Retaining an experienced and certified mechanical staff has also allowed the business to keep up with an industry that is continually increasing technologically. Combining all of these aspects into a business has been not only challenging and fun, but would not have been possible without the help of the Chamber of Commerce. The membership allowed access to organizations like the Roaring Fork Valley Small Business Resource Center, which provided invaluable information and help in the startup process. Nic, Darren and the rest of the Aloha staff said they look forward to serving Carbondale’s cycling community for many years to come. For more information, visit www.alohamountaincyclery.com or call 963-2500 to learn more. •••

Darren Broome (left) and Nic DeGross (right) own and operate Aloha Mountain Cyclery. Courtesy photo The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities has been building community through art for over 38 years. Education, cross-cultural and youth programs, as well as a gallery featuring local artists are an important part of the Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities. Memberships are available on-line anytime. Among its many achievements, CCAH was instrumental in the recent presentation

of the Governor’s Arts Award to the town of Carbondale. The 41st annual Carbondale Mountain Fair, the monthly R2 Gallery exhibits, the Summer of Music free concerts series, the School of Textile Arts, and the Green Is the New Black Fashion Extravaganza fund-raiser are all successful CCAH projects. For more information, go to www.carbondalearts.com or call 963-1680.

THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 15, 2012 • 3


News Briefs Solar Studs needed now Carol Bruno and Chris Chacos are looking for 14 “Solar Studs” to contribute $40 each so the town can purchase LED solar holiday lights for 14 “orphan” trees, located from one end of Main Street to the other. “These 14 trees have never been lit because there is no electrical power source for them,” said Bruno and Chacos in an e-mail to The Sopris Sun. Each sponsor of a solar unit will be recognized with a “thank you” plaque on the adopted tree. “Hopefully, your donation will last for at least three years. Such a deal! Thank you for your generosity and community spirit,” the e-mail continued. “We can only accept the first 14 who sign up NOW. You don’t have to do anything but donate money for the purchase of the lights.” Each tree will be equipped with 200 LED lights and solar collector stands, which town employees will install. Donations can be sent to the Town of Carbondale, Attention Nancy Barnett, c/o “Solar Stud Volunteer,” 511 Colorado Ave., Carbondale, CO 81623. Please include your check number, name, address and phone number; you will receive a receipt for your records.

GCE offering energy loans Garfield Clean Energy is now offering low-interest energy loans for homeowners, according to a press release. The Garfield Clean Energy Revolving Loan program allows homeowners to take out loans to make energy efficiency improvements that can reduce their energy bills while making their homes more comfortable. Loans are available for a wide range of improvements, including: insulation and air sealing, heating equipment, water heating, solar hot water, and energy-saving windows, doors and insulating blinds. Loans are also available for rooftop solar photovoltaic systems done in conjunction with efficiency upgrades. Financing is individually designed to meet client needs.

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Loans are available for $1,000 to $25,000; interest rates and APR are subject to credit score and terms. A Garfield Clean Energy coach will work with borrowers or their contractor to make sure their project meets loan eligibility criteria. GCE coaches will also help homeowners receive any available rebates that might be available on top of the loan. For more information, go to garfieldcleanenergy.org or call 704-9200. The Garfield Clean Energy Revolving Loan Program is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) through the Department of Energy’s Better Buildings Neighborhood Program.

CRC takes stand on fracking At its annual meeting in Redstone on Nov. 8, the Crystal River Caucus voted for a motion that would call for the ban on transferring fracking fluid in the Crystal River watershed, and support (with caveats) Alternative B in the U.S. Forest Service draft environmental impact statement on drilling in the White River National Forest. The caucus also voted to support the Thompson Divide Coalition’s position that there should be no energy extraction in the Thompson Divide and that the area should be withdrawn from oil and gas leasing, according to caucus member Delia Malone. The Crystal River Caucus is one of several caucuses that advises the Pitkin County commissioners on various issues.

bLm discusses sage grouse The Bureau of Land Management’s Northwest Colorado Resource Advisory Council meets in Grand Junction on Nov. 29 and the agenda includes the White River National Forest RMP amendment, a northwest sage grouse update, America’s Great Outdoors Initiative in the Little Snake Field Office and field manager updates. The meeting takes place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Hampton Inn (205 Main St.)

SOPRIS LIQUOR & WINE Be Responsible!

Cop Shop The following events are drawn from incident reports of the C’dale Police Dept. mONDAY Nov. 5 At 6:03 p.m. officers responded to a burglary on Euclid Avenue in which a suspect brandished a small knife. The suspect left by the time officers arrived. TUESDAY Nov. 6 At 10:30 a.m. an agent from Homeland Security contacted police about a Carbondale resident suspected of possessing illegal firearms. No other information was available. TUESDAY Nov. 6 At 6:58 p.m. a resident on Vito’s Way reported a burglary. TUESDAY Nov. 6 At 9:14 p.m. a resident on Eighth Street reported a purse was stolen from her vehicle. TUESDAY Nov. 6 At 9:38 p.m. a resident on Euclid said someone entered his vehicle, rifled through his belongings but didn’t take anything. WEDNESDAY Nov.7At 7:15 a.m. a resident on Cleveland Place reported her vehicle was stolen. Glenwood Springs police recovered it. WEDNESDAY Nov. 7 At 4:02 p.m. a resident on Lincoln Avenue reported someone entered his vehicle the night before but nothing was taken.

HAVE YOU SEEN ME? Teena Louise Gray/white domestic short hair, 5 – 7 lbs, 2 yrs old. She is playful and friendly. Missing since Nov 2, 2012 Westridge Court, Graceland, Oak Run area, Carbondale. She is micro chipped but not wearing a collar or tags Home Again Microchip #985121004801794

(Home Again1.888.466.3242) We miss her so much. She is our little buddy, our little furry friend. Please call me anytime if you have seen her.

Call Valerie 970-948-5877 4 • THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 15, 2012


Hunters advised to avoid shooting wrong game Sopris Sun Staff Report CPW Press release Colorado is in the midst of its main hunting seasons and hundreds of thousands of hunters are in the field enjoying the vast opportunities the state’s abundant wildlife has to offer. As the seasons progress, Colorado Parks and Wildlife reminds every hunter that good judgment and ethical behavior are critical to ensure a safe and successful hunting experience. The wildlife agency says that over 250,000 hunters enjoy the big game seasons in the state each year, adding billions of dollars annually to the state’s tourism economy. Based on the number of incidents versus the overall number of hunters, it appears that the vast majority are careful in the field. However, officers say that even one incident of carelessness is too many. “We ask for 100 percent compliance,” said Northwest Regional Manager Ron Velarde. “Because of the serious consequences of an accident, avoiding this kind of mistake entirely should be every hunter’s primary goal.” The reminder was prompted by several incidents of hunters shooting the wrong game during the first part of the main hunting seasons this year, including moose that have been mistakenly shot by elk hunters and at least one case of a hunter that shot a mule deer he believed was an elk. “Every hunter should know that if they not 100 percent certain about the target, do not pull that trigger,” continued Velarde.“It is a serious concern that some hunters are either unable to properly identify their target, or are simply too impatient to take a responsible shot.” Wildlife managers say that accidents usually involve a combination of poor judgment, low-light conditions, a long-distance view of the animal and not using a good pair of binoculars or a spotting scope. “A serious hunter understands the importance of good optics,” said Dean Riggs, assistant regional manager in the Northwest Region. “In some of these incidents, it is likely that the use of binoculars or a spotting scope could have helped the hunter identify their target.” Riggs advises that using a rifle scope only to identify a potential target may not give the best view of the animal and its surroundings, and it could create a situation where the hunter points his rifle at someone’s pet, livestock, or in the worst case scenario, another hunter. “A hunter that points his rifle at a person can face serious consequences, even if it is by accident,” said Riggs. “It’s just not safe to point a firearm at anything you don’t intend to shoot.” Wildlife officers stress that before a novice heads into the field, being able to identify the animal they are hunting is an important step. For the experienced hunter, being patient and avoiding making assumptions based on prior experience is critical. For everyone in the field, a good tip is to study the entire animal — from its head to its hindquarters — before taking the shot. The penalties for shooting the wrong game can be serious. Wildlife officers say that if a hunter compounds the accident by abandoning the carcass and failing to report the incident, they could face felony charges, several thousand dollars in fines, the permanent loss of hunting privileges in Colorado and 37 other states that participate in the national Wildlife Violator Compact, and possible imprisonment. Hunters that mistakenly kill the wrong animal are urged to immediately field dress the animal and contact Colorado Parks and Wildlife as soon as possible. Wildlife officers will seize the animal and donate the meat. Officers will take prompt reporting into consideration when assessing penalties. Anyone who sees suspicious activity in the field is asked to contact a local district wildlife manager, or Operation Game Thief at (877-265-6648). Callers contacting the tip line remain anonymous and may be eligible for a reward if the information leads to a poacher. For a video showing the differences between elk and moose, visit: http://vimeo.com/ 16435402.

Obituaries John Charles martin 1944-2012 John Charles Martin — rancher, businessman, mentor and friend to countless people — passed away on Nov. 6, 2012, at St. Mary’s Hospital in Grand Junction. He was 68 years old. John was born Aug. 2, 1944, in Grand Junction to Richard and Wilma (Billie) Martin and spent his younger years in the Grand Valley. In 1952 the family moved to Carbondale, where John remained until his death. John graduated from Carbondale High School in 1962 and developed his mechanical skills at a diesel school in Utah. John married Marilyn Trump in 1972 and they had two children, Sean and Holly. John and Marilyn spent nearly 25 years together before divorcing. John went on to marry Laura King and spent the last 20 years of his life with her. With that union he also welcomed Laura’s children into his life: John, Katie and Zane. John was known to all as a man with diverse interests. He was exceptionally passionate about work and spent many years building his businesses. Through the years John was involved in ranching, sand and gravel production, ready-mix concrete, real estate development, and restau-

Glen Charles Harris 1947-2012 Glen Charles Harris, 64, passed away at his home on Nov. 5, 2012. He was born in Glenwood Springs on Dec. 2, 1947. He was a lifelong Roaring Fork Valley resident and was the third generation of his family to be born in this area. Glen lived life to the fullest, whether he was traveling around the world, was in Lake Powell with his family and friends,

rant ownership, among many other fields. John loved to take on a challenge and was an excellent source of business advice. He thrived on making big deals and was at his best in high-pressure situations. He was also a man who was always ready to listen when a person had a problem, and genuinely wanted everyone he knew to be successful and happy in what they were doing. John’s generosity and compassion were cornerstones of his personality. When he wasn’t working (which was rare), John enjoyed snowmobiling, jeeping and collecting antiques that he found on eBay or in little, out of the way stores. He had a fantastic sense of humor and liked to work “South Park” references into conversation. He loved animals and being outdoors and combined the two whenever he could. John rarely went anywhere without his buddy, Kelpie Grandé. John is survived by his wife, Laura Martin; children Sean and Holly (Robert) Martin; step-children Jon (Erin) Willis, Zane (Charlea) Hubbard, and Katie (Shelly) Willis; siblings Bill (Helga) Martin and Jimmie (Dan) Downer, as well as several grandchildren, nieces and nephews. The burial was private; the family invited all who knew John to attend a celebration of life gathering on Nov. 14, at Tybar Ranch, 100 Angus Lane, outside of Carbondale. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that those who wish to honor John’s memory do so with a contribution to the American Diabetes Association.

or just relaxing at home with a glass of wine. He impacted all who knew him with his easy going manner and kindness. He always seemed to have the answer to nearly any question and was a renaissance man who was skilled in many fields. He designed and built his own house and was a master at fixing problems — whether they were mechanical or emotional. He will be greatly missed. Glen is survived by his parents, Charles and Margaret Harris; wife, Susan Harris; sister, Alvina Stecklein (Bill); sons, Luke (Andrea) Harris, Kaid (Tatjana) Harris; and grandson Louis Oscar Harris. Glen and Susan were married on Aug. 18, 1979 in Fort Collins, Colorado.

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TECHNICIANS & INSTALLERS

THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 15, 2012 • 5


Scuttlebutt

Send your scuttlebutt to news@SoprisSun.com.

Unintended consequences Did anyone see this one coming after Carbondale residents approved the plastic bag ban at City Market by 27 votes earlier this year? Word has it some shoppers are making off with the black shopping baskets located just inside the store’s front door. We’re not talking a few missing baskets; we’re talking hundreds. At one point, the store was down to just a few baskets before management brought in reinforcements. The reasons for this thievery vary. Some shoppers without their own carry-out bags probably load up their baskets in the self-serve checkout line, tote them out to their car then forget to bring them back. Others who do not bring their own reusable bags are no doubt stealing the baskets because they resent being charged 20 cents for paper bags. Now, this part is just rumor so don’t go spreading it around, but some folks claim the pilfered baskets are even turning up at local consignment stores. Anyway, just a reminder to basket thieves: it’s not City Market’s fault the town forced it to charge for paper bags. Folks voted on it fair and square.

gate (titled “Story Trails”) “embody the craft of blacksmithing and fit perfectly in the library setting,”said a library spokeswoman. “Garfield County Libraries is pleased to integrate blacksmithing in its new library as the modern tradition of blacksmithing in Carbondale dates to Francis Whitaker’s forge and has placed Carbondale on the national map within the field.” On a related note, there is currently an open competition for a specialty light and a decorative treatment for the new library’s service desk.The deadline to enter is Dec. 1. For details, go to callforentry.org.

Zebrowitz opens new office Dr. Michele Zebrowitz, DC, has opened a new office — Alpenglow Chiropractic — at 1101 Village Road, Suite UL-4D (across from Gianinetti Park). Dr. Z specializes in Koren Specific Technique and also works with many professional athletes. For details, call 510-0850. Undaunted by the first significant snow of the season, Aaron Taylor pours himself a cup of coffee as he pedals out to Colorado Rocky Mountain School to help at the Mount Sopris Nordic Council’s annual Mountain Sports Sale on Nov. 10. Photo by Julie Albrecht

Hoffmann scores The Garfield County Library District has chosen town trustee John Hoffmann to fab-

ricate and install bike racks and an afterhours gate at the new Carbondale Branch Library. He won the job in an open competition for the commission, according to a

TIME-OUT AT PLANTED EARTH!!!

WE'LL BE CLOSED NOVEMBER 3RD-25TH, THEN OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK UNTIL NEW YEAR’S EVE!!! Fresh Greenery will be in!

Trees, Wreaths, Garland, Planted Gifts!!!

Earth

Garden Center

Candles, Silks, Pottery, Houseplants, Paperwhites, and Amaryllis Bulbs!!!

CARBONDALE 12744 Highway 82 • 963-1731

press release. Hoffmann works out of the Roaring Forge, a collective of smiths. His bike rack proposal (“Dancing Paper Clips”) and his

Folks celebrating their birthday this week include: Joyce Leeman (Nov. 15), Robin Tolan (Nov. 17), Larry Smith (Nov. 18), Heather Lafferty and Kelsey Clapper (Nov. 19), and Rosie Sweeney and Mike Metheny (Nov. 20).

g vin 2 i g ks ov. 2 n a N Th ay, D

Reserve Your Ad Space Now for the

THANKSGIVING DAY ISSUE Contact bob Albright

970-927-2175 bob@soprissun.com or

AD RESERVATIONS, LETTERS AND PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENTS DUE Fri., Nov. 16 by noon

Linda Fleming

970-379-5223

ur o y

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6 • THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 15, 2012

They say it’s your birthday

Friday sales! k c Bla


“Presidential candidates” debate issues at RFHS By Jessica Hardin Special to The Sopris Sun The honors Fundamentals of American Democracy class at Roaring Fork High School hosted a mock presidential debate on Nov. 5. Following on Nov. 6, RFHS students voted along with the rest of the United States on Election Day. This year’s presidential candidates were portrayed by RFHS students Olivia Savard as President Obama and Cameron Doherty as Gov. Romney. These two also had research teams and Fundamentals of American Democracy instructor Matt Wells to guide them in forming their arguments. This reporter participated in aiding them as their moderator during the debate. Both candidates put a considerable amount of time into their research: Savard maxed out at more than six hours. Their research included following both presidential candidates policies and plans for the U.S., along with general knowledge on topics such as health care and the economy. Honors students began buzzing with excitement in October when they first received their roles for the mock debate and election. Unfortunately, most of that energy died down as the final date approached. Even though it was a struggle for both the candidates and their research teams, the candidates pulled through. Going into the debate, both candidates said they did not know very much about modern politics and this year’s presidential candidates’ views. Coming out of the election both students said they feel considerably more aware of this election and processes involved in politics. Doherty said, “I learned that there are many different perspectives in politics and compromise is important to hold this nation together.” On the morning of Nov. 5, students bustled into the school auditeria to hear the candidates answer questions about their plans for the future of the U.S. Beginning

with an opening statement by teacher Wells, the candidates stepped onstage and greeted their cheering peers. There were two questions per topic and discussion sessions after each question. The debate moved along smoothly, and many similar arguments from the debates of this year’s election were portrayed by candidates in this mock debate. Concluding the debate the crowd was permitted to cheer for their favorite candidate, and the applause was similar for each. On Election Day, students flashed identification to election judges and cast their own ballots that included Colorado senators, representatives, three constitutional amendments and of course — the presidential election. Ballots were counted at the end of the school day and the results were released the next morning. In Roaring Fork High School’s election, Obama was re-elected and all Democratic Party representatives received the most votes. Students approved all three amendments by a landslide. Savard and Doherty admit to the stress of preparation and the work it took to take part in the debate. However, both said they believe the experience was worthwhile. Savard said, “This was a great opportunity and it is important for underage high school students to be able to experience voting and to find out what their own views are and where they stand on the issues.” None of this would have been possible without the effort put in by Wells, who is the new Fundamentals of American Democracy teacher and made a great impression on the students. The entire school benefited greatly from this mock debate and election, and even the trials and tribulations made the experience all the more real. (Jessica Hardin is a sophomore at Roaring Fork High School).

Rebates are getting gobbled up! Act now to secure yours!

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Ruby (left) and Hudson (right) Lough wasted no time in putting the season’s first snow to good use over the weekend. In fact, these might be the first confirmed snowmen of the year. Ruby and Hudson are the children of Nic and Autumn Lough and they live in River Valley Ranch. Courtesy photo

This is a town-focused program of the Garfield Clean Energy Challenge. Brought to you by: Town of Carbondale, Garfield Clean Energy, CORE and CLEER.

THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 15, 2012 • 7


Community Calendar THURS.-SUN. Nov. 15-18 THEATRE • Aspen Community Theatre concludes its production of “Crazy for You” at the Aspen District Theatre. This musical is getting rave reviews. Info: aspenshowtix.com.

THURSDAY Nov. 15 WILD AND SCENIC • The Roaring Fork Conservancy, White River National Forest and others present a public forum on possible Wild and Scenic designation for the Crystal River at the Third Street Center at 6:30 p.m. The panelists include: Kay Hopkins (WRNF), Chuck Wanner (former Fort Collins city council member), Mike Moody (the Native Fish Society) and David Moryc (American Rivers). Info: 927-1290. TRIvIA NIGHT • Carbondale Beer Works hosts a Trivia Night. CCC • The Carbondale Clay Center welcomes new resident artists Staci DeBolt, Kendra Sparks, Brandon Whitacre and HP Bloomer at 7 p.m. Each will explain their artwork and influences; refreshments will follow and the public is welcome. Info: 963-CLAY. ROTARY • Mt. Sopris Rotary meets at Mi Casita every Thursday at noon.

FRIDAY Nov. 16 mOvIES • The Crystal Theatre presents “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” (PG-13) at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 16-21 and “Searching for Sugar Man” (PG-13) at 5:30 p.m. Nov. 17. Closed Nov. 22 for Thanksgiving. LIvE mUSIC • Straight from Austin, pianist/blues singer Marcia Ball plays PAC3 in the

To list your event, email information to news@soprissun.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Saturday. Events take place in Carbondale unless noted. For up-to-the-minute valley-wide event listings, check out the Community Calendar online at soprissun.com. View and submit events online at soprissun.com/calendar.

Third Street Center at 8 p.m.Ball earned a 2012 Grammy nomination for her CD“RoadsideAttraction” to go along with four previous nominations. Tickets are $27 in advance and $30 the day of the show. Info: pac3carbondale.com. LIvE mUSIC • Josh and Ananda team up at Carbondale Beer Works at 8:30 p.m. There’s no cover. CBW also hosts an open mic night on Sundays at 7:30 p.m. Info: 704-1216. LIvE mUSIC • Steve’s Guitars in the Dinkel Building presents live music every Friday. LIvE mUSIC • Rivers restaurant in Glenwood Springs presents Powderhounds from 9 p.m. to midnight. There’s no cover.

SATURDAY Nov. 17 CCAH • The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities presents Cirque d’Sopris at PAC3 at 3:30 and 6:30 p.m. The production, directed by Jenna Bradford and Rochelle Norwood, focuses on fashion design, daring circus skills and dance. SOL Theatre’s Youth Improv Troupe and Aspen Santa Fe Ballet’s Folklorico will also perform. Tickets are on sale at the CCAH office in the Third Street Center ($15 for adults; less for kids). Volunteers are also needed. Info: 963-1680. CHRISTmAS bOUTIQUE •The 36th annual Carbondale Christmas Boutique takes place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Carbondale firehouse. Info: 963-2379. FURRY PHOTO SHOOT • Colorado Animal Rescue (C.A.R.E.) has teamed up with the Glenwood Springs Center for the Arts, Digital Dimensions and Santa to take photos of your family or pets – just in time for holiday cards and gifts. The sessions take place at

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Read the Sopris Sun e-edition 8 • THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 15, 2012

GSCA (601 East Sixth St., next to the Vapor Caves) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Info: 947-9173. CELEbRATION FOR DOUG • The Orchard hosts a celebration for Doug and Rebecca Self’s ministry from 4 to 7 p.m. on Nov. 17. Doug is retiring after more than 30 years of local ministry. Appetizers, beverages and dessert will be served and everyone is welcome. Info: 963-8773. AbUNDANCE WORKSHOP • Gwen Garcelon presents an Abundance of Enough workshops at the Third Street Center from 10 a.m. to noon. To register, go to highlifeunlimited.com. LIvE mUSIC • The Black Nugget throws a grand re-opening party with The Roosters (featuring Josh Phillips). The action starts at 9 p.m. and there’s no cover. The Black Nugget is located in the Dinkel Building at Fourth and Main.

SUNDAY Nov. 18 LET’S GO bOWLING • A Spiritual Center celebrates its 14th anniversary at El Jebowl at noon. There’ll be free bowling and pizza for all. Non-bowlers are welcome as well.

MONDAY Nov. 19 HEALING mEETING • Dave Duell of Faith Ministries International presents a healing meeting at 7 p.m. at the Eagle County building in El Jebel. Duell says he has traveled to 76 countries “spreading the good news of God’s grace and mercy.”

TUESDAY Nov. 20 “DEATH ZONE” • Ute Mountaineer in

Aspen presents the vintage climbing film “Death Zone” at 7 p.m. The film is about the 1974 Makalu Himalayan expedition led by Aspenite the late Fritz Stammberger. Seating is limited. Info: 925-2849. EARLY bIRD mEAL • Aspen T.R.E.E. hosts a free community meal at the Aspen High School Commons at 5 p.m. The pre-Thanksgiving Day dinner celebrates the city of Aspen and CORE’s “Waste Not, Want Not” plastic reduction contest (which starts on Nov. 16). Info: 963-1090.

WEDNESDAY Nov. 21 COmEDY • PAC3 in the Third Street Center presents comedian Lori Callahan at 8 p.m. Callahan has toured with Paula Poundstone, Will Durst and Thea Vidal, and has appeared on Showtime’s Comedy Club network and ESPN’s “The Lighter Side of Sports. Tickets are $12 in advance and $15 at the door. Info: pac3carbondale.com. ROTARY • The Rotary Club of Carbondale presents Amelia Potvin of CORE at the fire station at 7 a.m. A representative from Jaywalker Lodge will speak on Nov. 28.

Further Out MONDAY Dec. 3 CCAH WORKSHOP • Today is the registration deadline for “Seasonal Decorative Folk Art” with Jill Sher. The workshop is from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. on Dec. 9. Tuition is $37 for CCAH members/$45 for non-members. It’s for folks 14 and older. Info: 963-1680.

CALENDAR page 9


Community Calendar

continued from page 8

Hold the presses

Save the date

SOv PLAYS TCHAIKOvSKY â&#x20AC;˘ Symphony in the Valley performs Tchaikovskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dances from the Nutcracker Suiteâ&#x20AC;? ballet with conductor Carlos Elias at Glenwoood Springs High School at 7:30 p.m. on Nov. 30, and at RiďŹ&#x201A;e High School at 7:30 p.m. on Dec. 1. Also on the program will be a variety of orchestral Christmas pieces including a couple of festive pieces by Leroy Anderson. The Symphonyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s guest Jack Lanning will lead everyone in â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Dreaming of a White Christmas.â&#x20AC;? Tickets are at the door or sitv.org and are $12 for adults, $10 for seniors, $6 for young people (3-18), $30 for families and music students are free. Info: manager@sitv.org.

Ongoing

mAYORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S COFFEE HOUR â&#x20AC;˘ Chat with Carbondale Mayor Stacey Bernot on Tuesdays from 7 to 8 a.m. at the Village Smithy on Third Street. bEER RUN â&#x20AC;˘ Independence Run & Hike stages a four-mile beer run Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. and a group run Saturdays at 8:15 a.m. Info: 704-0909. CCC â&#x20AC;˘ The Carbondale Clay Center continues its Holiday Festive Tableware and Small Works Invitational exhibition and sale through Dec. 23. More than 30 local and national artists are offering functional pottery and ceramic sculptures. The hours are Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and by appointment. Info: 963-CLAY ZINGERS CONTINUE â&#x20AC;˘ Betsy Schenck leads the Senior Matters Zingers sing-along group in Room 33 of the Third Street Center. Under her direction the tunes take on a whole new meaning and resonance when sung by seniors. Info: 963-2167.

Archaeology society discusses rock art The Roaring Fork Chapter of the Colorado Archaeology Society presents the hour-long video â&#x20AC;&#x153;Marks of the Ancients: Ancient India Rock Art of Arizonaâ&#x20AC;? at the First Presbyterian Church in Glenwood Springs (1016 Cooper Ave.) at 7 p.m. on Nov. 19. The public is invited. For details, call Cynthia at 401-3533.

Terra Lingua looking for host families

ART â&#x20AC;˘ Through December, Glenwood Springs Art Guild exhibits include Tara Vetter at the Flower Mart in Glenwood Springs, and Nancy Martin at Bullock Hinkey real estate in Glenwood Springs.

Terra Lingua USA is looking for host families for foreign exchange high school students who will be coming to the Roaring Fork Valley for second semester. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a great opportunity to learn about another culture, and help international students practice their English and learn about our community,â&#x20AC;? said a spokesperson. Students looking for placement are from Ghana, Germany, Italy, and Mongolia. For details, call Laurie Guevara-Stone at 963-8905.

STORY TImE â&#x20AC;˘ The Gordon Cooper Library presents Storytime with Sue at 6 p.m. every Monday. Info: 963-2889.

Senior matters offers phone classes

CCAH CLASSES â&#x20AC;˘ The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humaniites offers youth fashion classes and more this fall. Info: 963-1680 or carbondalearts.com. JAm SESSION â&#x20AC;˘ Carbondale Beer Works on Main Street hosts an old-time jam session with Dana Wilson from 7 to 9 p.m. every Monday. All abilities are welcome.

JAZZ JAm â&#x20AC;˘ A jazz jam with players ranging from middle school students to adults is held at the Ramada Inn in Glenwood Springs on Monday nights.

oes ar g t o ha

Senior Matters in the Third Street Center will offer basic classes on smart phones (iPhone, Android, apps and â&#x20AC;&#x153;Phabletâ&#x20AC;?) from noon to 12:30 p.m. on Dec. 8. A $5 donation is asked. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s also a class about computers from 10 to 11:30 a.m. Senior Matters is located in Room 33 and the Third Street Center is located at 520 S. Third St. in Carbondale. To reserve a spot, call Bill at 379-6599.

GSHS Key Club serves chili The Glenwood Springs Key Club hosts an all-you-can-eat chili dinner at the school cafeteria from 5 to 8 p.m. on Dec. 7. Tickets are $20 for families of four or more, $7 for adults and $5 for students. Proceeds go to Children of Peace International. For details, call Diana Banks at 309-6825.

Ready for Icy Sidewalks?

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Help Build Communities Advertise in The Sopris Sun Published weekly on Thursdays. Contact Bob Albright

bob@soprissun.com 970-927-2175

Communities

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The Blend on Highway 133 hosts an open mic night from 6 to 9 pm. on Nov. 15. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll also be specials on beer, wine and espresso.

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Adver tise â&#x20AC;&#x201D; S ell â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

ASPEN ART mUSEUm â&#x20AC;˘ The Aspen Art Museum continues â&#x20AC;&#x153;Continental Driftâ&#x20AC;? with seven Colorado-based artists through Nov. 25. Each artist explores the idea of place.

They are: Christina Battle, Scott Johnson, Jeanne Liotta, Sarah McKenzie, Adam Milner, Yumi Janairo Roth and Edie Winograde. Admission is free. Info: 925-8050. The Aspen Art Museum is located at 590 N. Mill St.

Open mic night

of Carbondale www.CarbondaleAce.com

(970) 963-6663

You Know How Good It Feels Novemberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Special

Salt Glow Scrub Private Mineral Bath Back, Neck and Shoulder Massage plus a Day Pass to Our Historic Vapor Caves Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a Day at the Spa $115 -VY 0UMVYTH[PVU 9LZLY]H[PVUZ JHSS   Â&#x2039; `HTWHOZWHJVT :WH 6WLU  :HSVU  Â&#x2039; 4HQVY *YLKP[ *HYKZ Â&#x2039; .PM[ *LY[PĂ&#x201E;JH[LZ (]HPSHISL THE SOPRIS SUN â&#x20AC;˘ NOvEmbER 15, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ 9


Shopping | Dining | Culture | Recreation

VISIT BASALT & EL JEBEL At the confluence of Frying Pan and Roaring Fork Rivers FRI.-SAT Nov. 16-17

MONDAY Nov. 19

ONGOING

EmmA bAZAAR • The 36th annual Emma Schoolhouse Christmas Bazaar takes place on Friday from 4 to 8 p.m. and on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. There’ll be locally made pottery, glass, sewn items, jewelry, unusual beaded items, body products and much more.

YOUTH FITNESS • The Basalt Recreation Department offers youth fitness training at the middle school from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays through Dec. 15.

EXHIbITION • “Bill Gruenberg: Art is Easy” continues at theWyly Community Art Center through Nov. 21. The exhibition includes contemporary sculptures and paintings. Gallery hours are Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. The Wyly Art Center is located in the former Basalt Library building at 99 Midland Spur. Info: wylyarts.org.

SATURDAY Nov. 17 ART FOR ADULTS • The Wyly Community Art Center offers the class “Printmaking: Stencil Silkscreen” with Jennifer Ghormley from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the high school. The tuition is $105 and registration is required. For details, call 927-4123.

Become an eco bag lady Now accepting winter items

TUESDAY Dec. 4 ART FOR KIDS • Registration is in progress for the Wyly Art Center’s “Holiday Art Club” with Nicole Nagel-Gogolak. It’s for kids 6-11 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. on Dec. 4, 11 and 18. Tuition is $75. For details, call 927-4123.

S SMALL L BUS BUSINESS SINESS S

Calling all Landscape Architects and Land Use Consultants

SATURDAY S ATURDAY DAY Y Submittal deadline is December 19, 2012

N 2 NOV 24 4TTHH 970-927-4384 144 Midland Avenue Basalt, Colorado 81621

To list your Basalt or El Jebel event, e-mail it to basaltthrift@ live.com by 5 p.m. on Friday.

SHOP LOCALLY AND SUPPORTSM SMALL BUSINESSES SHO SHOP OP WITH US AN AND ND SUPPORT SMALL MALL BUSINESSE BUSINESSES ES ANDOU OUR LOCAL ECO ECONOMY. OUR ECONOMY. AND UR LOCAL NOMY.

Book Sale

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Parks, Open Space and Trails Master Plan

Visit www.basalt.net or email Brian McNellis at brianm@basalt.net for more information

MID-VALLEY TRADITION CONTINUES Carrying on with the Hyrup legacy.

RJ Paddywacks is now offering Large Animal Feed and wild bird seed.

Call us today to place your order, discuss your needs or for more information 963-1700

Open seven days a week

WHAT:

Friends of the Basalt Regional Library

SEMI-ANNUAL BOOK SALE WHERE: WHEN:

Next to City Market in El Jebel, 400 E Valley Rd. Ste I/J 963.1700 | Open M-F 10-6:30pm | Sat/Sun 11-5pm

Library Community Room Friday and Saturday, November 16 & 17, 10 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Proceeds of this November Book Sale will go to Books and Programming for the Library

For more information or to volunteer to help: Call Linda Crossland Home: 927-3669, Cell: 379-6303 E-mail: lkc44@comcast.net

10 • THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 15, 2012

Non-Profit Supporting Local Sustainable Food Efforts


Community Briefs Zanca program holds bake sale The Andy Zanca Youth Empowerment Program holds a bake sale during their weekly KDNK radio show from 7 to 9 p.m. on Nov. 15. Youth announcers Miles, NC Awesome, Patrick and Ty the Rain Man will play music and tell listeners what they love about connecting with the community through radio. The even is part of AZYEP’s fall campaign to raise $20,000 by Dec. 15. The money goes to help youth elevate their game by learning public speaking, interview skills, script writing, critical thinking and curiosity. KDNK is located at 76 S. Second Street. For details, call Stacy Stein at 963-0139.

main Street market presents plans Developers present their Main Street Market plans to the public from 4 to 6 p.m. on Nov. 15 at Gordon Cooper Library. The proposal calls for a new grocery store and three one-acre building sites on west Main Street across from the City Market shopping center.

medicare specialist speaks at TSC Medicare specialist Kate Neuschaefer explains supplemental and re-certification service in the Senior Matters room (#33) in the Third Street Center from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Nov. 20. For an appointment, call 970-306-2587.

P&Z discusses comp plan, Oates infill The Carbondale Planning and Zoning Commission discusses the draft comprehensive plan, the Oates family infill application on Maroon Drive and the Commercial Green Code starting at 7 p.m. on Nov. 15.

basalt library book sale The Friends of the Basalt Regional Library’s semi-annual book sale takes place from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Nov. 16-17. Proceeds go to books and programming for the library. For details, call 927-4311.

Free dinner at RFHS The Roaring Fork High School Student Council hosts a free community dinner at the school from 6:30 to 8 p.m. on Nov. 16. “The goal is to bring the community and students together over a nice Thanksgiving meal,” said a student council spokesperson.“We also want to help people who may not be able to have their own Thanksgiving meal this year.” The meal will include turkey, cranberries, stuffing and dessert.

Sean Heal (8) examines a bug he and his brothers, Peter and Elijah, captured in the ditch along Hendrick Drive on Friday. There’s more to this story than a bug, however. The three boys spotted some fish trapped in the soon-to-bedried up ditch and decided to rescue them. Aided by Sue Knable, who happened to be passing by, and this photographer, they netted seven fish that were mostly rainbows and returned them to the Crystal River. Most of the fish were tiny but one was a 24-incher. Photo by Julie Albrecht

Unclassifieds Submit Unclassifieds to unclassifieds@soprissun.com by 12 p.m. on Monday. $15 for up to 30 words, $20 for 31-50 words.

FREE PIANO. Needs a $200 tune-up; I’ll pay half. Call 963-1549. GET THE WORD OUT IN UNCLASSIFIEDS! Rates start at $15. Email unclassifieds@soprissun.com. *Credit card payment information should be emailed to unclassifieds@soprissun.com or call 948-6563. Checks may be dropped off at our office at the Third Street Center or mailed to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623. Call 618-9112 for more info.

Service Directory CARBONDALE’’ S NATURAL FOOD STORE

Help for families in need. Food is available at LIFT-UP’s seven area food pantries, made possible by support from our caring community.

Check out our

Local Produce

Mid-Valley Food Pantries

for your

Carbondale: Third Street Center, 520 South 3rd Street, #35 Mon, Wed & Fri: 10am-12:30pm • 963-1778 Basalt: Basalt Community United Methodist Church 167 Holland Hills Rd. • Wed & Thur: 11am-1pm • 279-1492

Thanksgiving OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK M-F 9AM-7PM; Sat. 11AM-6PM; Sun. 12-6PM 559 Main Street • 970-963-1375 • www.carbondalecommunityfoodcoop.org

Learn more at www.liftup.org and join us on facebook!

WINDSHIELD REPAIR AUTO GLASS REPLACEMENT

970-963-3891

Headlight Restoration Auto Glass & Side Mirrors

500 Buggy Circle, Carbondale, CO DAVID ZAMANSKY – Owner Operated

FREE LOCALRY DELIOVrdEers For 0 Over $5

THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 15, 2012 • 11


SALE!

DOMES TIC RED

Your wine super store! SALE!

CHAMPAGNE & SPARKLING WINE VEUVE CLIQUOT MUMM NAPA BRUT ZARDETTO PROSECCO RIONDO PROSECCO ZARDETTO CUVEE BRUT ANNA DE CDORNIU CA VA

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64.28 34.04 27.38 19.37 16.65 13.87 13.31 12.50 11.90 11.50 11.30 9.52 9.47 8.63 8.07 8.00 7.97 7.47 7.26

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IMPORTED RED BOUCHARD PERE & FILS VIGNE DE L'ENFANT '06 RESA LTE CRIANZA '09 BOUCHARD PERE & FILS M ONTHELIE LES DURESSES '08 LA BRACCESA NOBILE M ONTEPULCIAN LAN RIOJA '05 ROA GNA DOLCETTO G5 GA RNA CHA AVE MALBEC CLOS LA COUTA LE CAHORS '10 E. GUIGA L COTES DU RHONE '09 CRIOS MALBEC '10 VEGA REA L RIBERA DEL DUERO '09 MORSE CODE SHIRAZ '08 INTIMO CA B SAUV HUM BERTO CANA LE ELSA BIANCHI CA BERNET SAUVIGNON ELSA BIANCHI MALBEC HERETIQUES RED VDP ORAISON CDR POGGIO CHIANTI IMPORTED WHITE BOUCHARD PERE & FILS M ERSAULT CHA RM ES '07 CLOUDY BA Y SAUVIGNON BLANC '11 DOM BRUNO CLA VELIER BOURGONE '09 SANTA MARG PINOT GRIGIO '10 FEVRE CHAMPS ROYAUX CHABLIS KIM CRAWFORD SAUVIGNON BLANC M CODA X A LBARINO MICHEL PICA RD VOUVRA Y '10 BARONE FINI PINOT GRIGIO OYSTER BA Y SAUVIGNON BLA NC SIMONSIG CHENIN BLA NC ANSELMI PINOT GRIGIO ELSA BIANCHI CHA RDONNA Y LA VIELLE FERM E ROSE SPIRITS CROW N ROYA L 1.75 KETEL ONE 1.75 CAPTAIN M ORGAN 1.75 SVEDKA VODKA 1.75 MILA GRO SILVER 750 JAGERM EISTER 750

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EVER YDAY LOW PRICE

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

63.20 22.61 21.97 21.25 21.00 18.39 16.97 16.68 16.00 15.27 14.87 14.27 13.57 12.32 11.97 11.89 11.62 11.52 11.21 10.97 10.67 10.50 9.97 9.84 9.37 9.25 9.16 8.99 8.97 8.94 8.92 8.87 8.74 8.32 7.64 7.47 6.97 5.07

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

79.97 27.97 24.97 26.97 25.97 26.97 21.97 20.97 19.97 19.27 21.47 15.97 16.97 15.49 15.47 14.97 13.97 15.97 14.97 12.97 13.97 13.97 11.27 11.77 11.27 11.79 11.97 11.77 9.97 11.47 11.27 11.97 10.47 10.47 9.97 9.97 8.97 7.97

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

46.47 26.00 23.62 16.37 16.16 13.07 11.47 11.30 10.57 9.50 9.27 9.27 9.25 9.25 9.04 8.92 8.46 8.32 8.00 7.97 7.97 5.61

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

63.47 32.97 32.99 20.47 20.47 16.47 13.97 13.97 13.47 11.97 11.97 10.97 11.79 11.79 11.47 10.97 10.97 10.47 10.97 9.97 8.97 7.97

DOMES TIC WHIT E FAR NIENTE NAPA VA LLEY CHARDONNA Y LIOCO RRV CHA RDONNA Y '10 MIGRATION RUSSIA N RIVER CHARDONNA Y '10 LA CREMA CHA RDONNA Y STARM ONT CHA RDONNA Y SMOKE SCREEN CHA RDONNA Y '10 X WINERY NORTH COA ST WHITE CANNONBA LL CHARDONNA Y CH ST MICHELLE CHA RDONNA Y '10 SILVER PEA K CHARDONNA Y '08 OKO PINOT GRIGIO PEDRONCELLI SAUVIGNON BLANC C SMITH RIESLING KUNG FU GIRL C SMITH CHARDONNA Y EVE J LOHR CHARDONNA Y MICHA EL SULLBERG CHARDONNA Y CLINE VIOGNIER MCMANIS VIOGNIER HOGUE PINOT GRIGIO '10 BOGLE SAUVIGNON BLA NC 14 HA NDS WHITE PARDUCCI SUSTAINA BLE W HITE


November 15, 2012