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LOCAL ELECTION RESULTS

GarCo commissioner John Martin (R) Sonja Linman (D) Mike Samson (R) Aleks Briedis (D) GarCo open space tax  No Yes State House Dist. 57 Bob Rankin (R) Jo Ann Baxter (D) Dan Enright (L)

the

Sun

Sopris Carbondale’s

weekly, non-profit newspaper

Volume 4, Number 39 | November 8, 2012

Former VCR returning as MSM By Lynn Burton Sopris Sun Staff Writer

D

The eighth annual El Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) celebration filled Thunder River Theatre as part of First Friday on Nov. 2. The event was presented by the Thunder River Theatre Company, Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities and Aspen Santa Fe Ballet’s folklorico program. For more El Dia de los Muertos photographs, please turn to page 7. Photo by Jane Bachrach

EARLY

BLACK FRIDAY

SALE!

evelopers plan to submit an application for a downsized commercial project on the former Village at Crystal River property according to planning consultant Bob Schultz, who Crystal River Marketplace LLC recently hired to shepherd the application through Carbondale’s permit process. What is the difference between the soon-to-be released Main Street Market development application and the VCR proposal that voters shot down 2-1 in January? For starters, Main Street Market would cover only eight or nine acres of the entire 24-acre parcel and front Main Street, Schultz said. The plan will feature a high-quality full-service grocery store (probably City Market) and be simple enough so as not to involve rezoning, variances or other requests such as a PIF “that generated heartburn,” Schultz said.“(We want to) minimize brain damage for all.” Schultz will show a rough site plan of the project to the public and take input at Gordon Cooper Library from 4 to 6 p.m. on Nov. 15. The developers also hired Yancy Nichol (of Sopris Engineering) and Rich Camp (a local landscape architect) to work on the project. Local contractor Briston Peterson is one of the owners of Crystal River Marketplace LLC. The Crystal River Marketplace LLC property runs north on Highway 133 from Main Street to just about the Roaring Fork Valley Co-op; it is comprised of one parcel with two zone districts (PCC to the south and CRW to the north). The developers are targeting the property’s south end for their project. The Main Street Market entrance will be from Main Street; three lots face Main Street. Existing zoning allows residential use above ground floor commercial space. Grocery store parking will be “internalized”Schultz said, rather than extending to Main Street. Schultz referred to the development as “Carbondale-centric” rather than one that would compete with existing shopping centers such as Glenwood Meadows in West Glenwood Springs. “Our process has been to try to develop a Carbondale-style plan for a portion of the property that is in accord with the existing zoning and adopted Comprehensive Plan. No special requests,” Schultz told The Sopris Sun in an e-mail.“We have also considered the draft ideas for SH 133 improvements and draft Comprehensive Plan.” Schultz said the developers will leave the rest of the parcel for future planning.

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Carbondale Commentary The views and opinions expressed on the Commentary page do not necessarily reflect those of The Sopris Sun. The Sopris Sun invites all members of the community to submit letters to the editor or guest columns. For more information, e-mail editor Lynn Burton at news@soprissun.com, or call 510-3003.

CORE collaboration pays off By Amelia Potvin Recently, Bill Grant raised questions about the town of Carbondale’s allocation of $80,000 for energy efficiency. I would like to clarify CORE’s role, and hopefully the value that we provide to the community. CORE’s partnership with the town of Carbondale has produced abundant energy successes, including solar arrays at Colorado Rocky Mountain School, the Third Street Center, the Carbondale Recreation Center and over 105 residences, and adoption of the Energy and Climate Protection Plan. CORE’s programs will result in more than $20 million in lifecycle energy cost savings and the creation of numerous private sector green jobs. Since CORE’s inception in 1994, board member partners — currently Holy Cross Energy, Pitkin County, the city of Aspen, and the towns of Basalt, Carbondale Snowmass Village — have provided direct annual funding to one organization tasked with pursuing energy and economic sustainability on behalf of their constituents and the entire Roaring Fork Valley. In 2008 and 2009, Carbondale contracted with CORE for the town’s energy manager position. Annual funding between $100,000 and $130,000 (nearly 25 percent of CORE’s annual budget) covered board membership dues, staff costs and various energy efficiency initiatives. In 2010, the town discontinued the position, but continued its CORE membership and a limited scope of services for a total of $25,000 per year. Through CORE, Carbondale homeowners, businesses, schools, non-profits and public entities access funding from the Pitkin County Renewable Energy Mitigation Program (REMP). In 2010 and 2011 alone, nearly 250 people in Carbondale received REMP rebates for solar and energy efficiency, totaling over $30,000. Carbondale projects receiving REMP grants since 2009 include: Carbondale Senior Housing – $25,000 Third Street Center – $103,000 Carbondale Community School – $5,000 RFHS Biodome – $13,000 Solar Energy International – $5,000 Carbondale Fire District – $7,500 Crystal River Elementary School – $6,000 RFTA – $5,000 Grass Roots TV – $4,500. Beyond REMP, we believe Carbondale’s board membership has more than paid for itself in added value to the community. For over 12 years, CORE has served Carbondale as a free information resource. Our fully-staffed office in the Third Street Center is a lower-valley launch pad for public sustainability programs. CORE hosts numerous outreach events in Carbondale including the Regional Biomass Summit, 350.org events, and contractor training workshops. We were instrumental in developing disposable bag regulations and partnered with Colorado Mountain College to establish GarCo Sewing Works, giving underemployed women industrial sewing training while offering Carbondale residents locally-sourced bags made from recycled materials. Recently, CORE’s Local Foods Challenge engaged over 300 people and culminated in a well-attended community potluck.The COREmmuter Challenge, initially launched by Aaron Taylor with CORE seed funding, grew to 167 participants. For several years, CORE has sponsored EnergyWise and WaterWise curricula for all Carbondale fifth graders. The 2012 drought inspired a collaborative project between the town’s utility department and CORE to offer 500 water conservation kits in English and Spanish. Now CORE and the Roaring Fork Watershed Collaborative are coordinating a regional water and drought planning effort. Staff presence and regular collaboration with the Carbondale Environmental Board ensured that new building codes were adopted and now remain up to date with the most current green and energy efficiency standards. Progressive codes, combined with workforce training, supported the development of four solar installation companies in Carbondale, a growing sector of energy auditors and contractors now completing efficiency upgrades. CORE assisted the town in a federal licensing process and design phase of the Nettle Creek small hydroelectric power project. Preliminary analysis indicates that the project could cover up to 90 percent of the energy needed to operate the Nettle Creek water treatment plant. The current $80,000 initiative to retrofit 45 homes and 12 businesses in Carbondale by December 2012 stems from community dialogues CORE co-sponsored to update the 2006 Energy and Climate Protection Plan that we developed for the town. Carbondale’s ongoing relationship with CORE has positioned the town as a leader in community sustainability; fostered energy awareness; established a market for building efficiency, renewables, green design and construction; and leveraged economic development in Carbondale through carbon savings and job creation. Of course, the real fuel for CORE’s work is the brilliance of the people of this region. We are here to help you actualize your ideas for energy conservation, efficiency, renewables and sustainability. Call us at 963-1090, stop by the Third Street Center, or go to www.aspencore.org. We couldn’t do it without you, Carbondale! Amelia Potvin is community sustainability coordinator for CORE. 2 • THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 8, 2012

Almost half of the 17 members of Carbondale Girls on the Run took time from their training to read the Sopris Sun. The girls are from Crystal River Elementary, Carbondale Community and Carbondale Middle schools and ran together on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the past two months before a 5K race in Steamboat Springs on Nov. 3. For more on the Western Slope Girls on the Run, visit gotrwesterncolorado.org. Courtesy photo

Letters

The Sopris Sun welcomes your letters, limited to no more than 400 words. Include your name and residence (for publication) and a contact email and phone number. Submit letters via email to letters@soprissun.com or via snail mail to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623. The deadline to submit letters to the editor is 5 p.m. on Tuesday.

Pumpkin thanks Dear Editor: I want to recognize and thank the Pumpkin Gremlin(s) in Missouri Heights. What a wonderful sight it is to see the Jack-oLanterns in all the fun places. It is heartening to see creative energy to do fun stuff is still with us. As a Halloween baby, the Jack-oLanterns have an extra special meaning to me. Thank you so much. Davis Farrar Missouri Heights

Halloween thanks Dear Editor: The Roaring Fork Family Resource Centers want to thank everyone who made our Halloween Happening another huge success. This was a community event with Roaring Fork, Bridges and Glenwood Springs high school students and local volunteers assisting. Special thanks to: Hayden Hassell and the GSHS Key Club, Pat and Velma Henry, Ronnda Kuhr, Barbara Herrera, Cecily Viall, Penny Ridley, Cinderfella Lindsay, Betsy McMichael, Camy Britt, Beth Mulry, Lilli Smalls, William Luckett, Bridget McIntyre, Ann Jeffrey, Pam and Craig Willis, Debbie and Renee Bruell, Ellen Haas, Kerry and Marcella Ach, David Warner, Cindy Caminite and all our cupcake and cookie bakers! Big thanks go to our title sponsor: Pediatric Partners. More thanks to business partners and Silent Auction donors: Alpine Bank, Ace Hardware,All Kids Dental,Aspen Glen Club, Aspen Meadows Resort, Aspen Skiing Company, Avalon Salon, Betsy’s Barefoot Books, Big O Tires, Bonfire Coffee, Bristlecone Sports, Carbondale Recreation Center, CCAH, Casual Culture, Chilis, City Market, Dancing Colours, Dos Gringos, Domino’s Pizza, El Pollo Rico, Factory Surplus, Glenwood Hot Springs Pool, Glenwood Canyon Brewpub, Glenwood Caverns Adventure Park, Grana Bread, Goat Deli, Heidi’s Deli, Hotel Colorado, Hotel Jerome, K. Ehlers Salon, La Provence Spa, MacXperts, McDonald’s, Moms for Moms Communities, Meadows Dental, Peppino’s Pizza, RFTA, River Valley Ranch, Roaring Fork Anglers, Roaring Fork Club, Roaring Fork Liquors, Russets, Salon Sublime, Seventh Street Salon, Skin to Soul Holistic Massage, Sunburst Car Care, Sunlight Mountain Resort, Sunlight Ski

and Bike Shop, Two Leaves, Treadz, Valley View Hospital, The Village Smithy, Vitamin Cottage and White House Pizza. Please support the businesses that support us! Muchas gracias to our storytellers: Merrilee Hindman, Justice Bouchet and Nancy Ball. All the proceeds from this event will go toward supporting The Roaring Fork Family Resource Centers in our mission of connecting families, schools and communities to improve student health, well-being and academic achievement. Thanks to all of you who braved the cold to show off your costumes and to help us support the children and families of the Roaring Fork School District! Katie Marshall Roaring Fork Family Resource Centers Carbondale

To inform, inspire and build community Donations accepted online or by mail. For information call 510-3003 Editor/Reporter: Lynn Burton • 970-510-3003 news@soprissun.com Advertising: Bob Albright • 970-927-2175 bob@soprissun.com Linda Fleming • 970-379-5223 linda@soprissun.com Photographer: Jane Bachrach Ad/Page Production: Terri Ritchie Webmaster: Will Grandbois Sopris Sun, LLC Managing Board of Directors: Debbie Bruell • Peggy DeVilbiss David L. Johnson • Colin Laird Laura McCormick • Trina Ortega Jean Perry • Elizabeth Phillips • Frank Zlogar

Sopris Sun, LLC • P.O. Box 399 520 S. Third Street #35 Carbondale, CO 81623

970-510-3003 www.soprissun.com Visit us on facebook.com Send us your comments: feedback@soprissun.com The Sopris Sun is an LLC organized under the 501c3 non-profit structure of the Roaring Fork Community Development Corporation.


Rams head for state after smashing win at Regionals By Celeste Comings Sopris Sun Correspondent The gym inside Roaring Fork High School on Nov. 3 was heated with enthusiasm and fueled by anticipation of the state playoffs. The Rams, seeded #1 in the Regional playoffs, got home court advantage. The terms were simple: three teams, each team would play twice, and the winner would be the only team to advance. Roaring Fork came out of the gates with gusto in the first match against Frontier Academy, handily beating them 3-0. In the first game, the girls got out to an early 12-4 lead by slowly picking apart Frontier’s defense and finding open holes on the court. The Rams were pumped; even the attempts of the other team to slow the game through timeouts proved futile. Megan Gianinetti jumped at the net four times, tipping and blocking, before she finally got a set to kill the ball making it 13-6. Controlled passing made it easy for the Rams to set up plays and the Wolverines needed another huddle at 18-7. The Rams would only allow four more points before putting it away 25-11. As Frontier Academy tried to regroup at the break, the crowd came alive. Cheers came across the gym and back to the other side, fueling an already hot fire. In the second game, the Gianinetti twins (Megan and Hattie) took control. A huge middle block by Hattie brought a 5-2 lead. Megan went up for a perfectly set quick ball, and a point. Her sister showed off her versatility with a back row kill. The crowd was on its feet, and Megan would keep a five-point streak alive with another power-packed smash. Taylor Adams decided she wanted in on

The Roaring Fork Rams head for the Class 3A state volleyball tournament in Denver for the second year in a row after winning last weekend’s Regional tournament on their home court. The Rams travel to the Denver Coliseum with lots of senior talent, including Taylor Adams (#10) and Hattie Gianinetti (#24). Photo by Sue Rollyson the action and smacked one down, forcing a timeout at 14-4. Hattie would prove to be a weapon from the back row with another kill and 18-7 lead. At 22-9, the Rams looked to their bench to finish it off 25-11. Game three was all smiles and the Rams were in full stride.They played at a high level, calling out plays, penetrating the net for blocks, constantly communicating, and rewarding each other with high fives after every great play. At 13-0 the Gianinetti twins would watch from the bench.At 16-0 it would bring all the starters off the floor. Josie Horn went on a huge serving streak before the Wolverines got their first point at 181. Georgia Ackerman tipped over the fingertips

of the middle blocker making it 19-5. Diana Flores had a kill from the outside to bring it to game point at 24-10. The Rams won and advanced to a chance at the state tournament. In an interview after the game, Megan Gianinetti said,“It was fun to see everybody get to play.�

Second match In the second match of the day, the Rams would welcome the Lamar Panthers from 350 miles away. This match proved equally dominating for the Rams, who were playing their own game effectively and found another 3-0 win. The first game featured regular big hits from the twins, plus strong blocking, roll shots

at hard angles, and tips to an open center for a 25-17 win. Game two was the closest of the day. Lamar tied it up at six. Both teams went on runs until the Gianinetti twins had kills to get possession back at 16-12. A ball hit the floor and an unhappy coach Carrie Shultz called a timeout with a one-point lead,18-17. Whatever she said worked. The Rams started pulling away and eruptions from the crowd at every point; Roaring Fork ultimately got the win, 25-21. With one game away from the state tournament, you could feel the excitement in the air. Several aces by Madison Handy and strong backside hits from Caitlin Kinney put them up 14-8.A strong-side block from the Twin TowVOLLEYBALL page 9

Library looks to Muse for Carbondale public art installation Sopris Sun Staff Report The Garfield County Library District has chosen Carbondale glass-and-mosaic artist Shannon Muse to create a permanent public art installation at the new Carbondale Branch Library. Muse’s installation, “Pillars of Light,� is a multi-part sculptural piece slated for the seven columns forming the front porch of the new library, which will open next year. Her proposal combines aspects of library, learning, enlightenment and community in a composition with the building’s architectural design, according to a press release.

NEW!

Muse was one of five artists interviewed for the project. The selection committee included representatives from the town of Carbondale, the Carbondale Public Arts Commission, the Carbondale Clay Center, and Carbondale Council for Arts and Humanities, Willis Pember Architects, and Garfield County Libraries. “It was a challenging selection that truly highlighted the depth of local talent available in the Carbondale community,� said one selection committee member. In her proposal, Muse said“This piece will feature the combination of letters, symbols

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and words, coalesced with the architecture for a harmonious and literary installation. The piece will offer engagement for library patrons for generations to come.� The installation is part of the Carbondale Branch Library’s Art and Artisan program, for which the library design team has dedicated art and artisan items throughout the new facility. “Pillars of Light�will also offer community engagement during the creation and installation process and will result in an accessible piece of public art in a civic location. Future community input opportunities in the “Pillars of Light� process� include: fused

glass instruction, donation of recycled tempered glass for use in the piece, submission of text and literary quotes in English and Spanish for the piece, and intern opportunities. Additional information on community participation opportunities will follow at www.gcpld.org. The Garfield County Library District is still seeking public and private donations to support this community art project. For details, call Amelia Shelley at 625-4270. Open calls for artists to submit ideas for other artisan items in the new facility are available online at the art submission website www.callforentry.org.

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It’s time to learn about Expeditionary Learning By Debbie Bruell ANALYSIS The Roaring Fork School District is soliciting input from the community regarding the proposed Glenwood Springs charter school (Three Rivers Expeditionary School) and the possibility of adopting the Expeditionary Learning (EL) model in one or more of the existing schools in the district. This article explores some key questions about the EL model and the EL Network, the umbrella organization for all EL schools.

What is EL? One defining feature of EL schools is that students learn by engaging in long-term projects that are connected to the community in which they live. The projects typically culminate in a creation that is relevant to both students and a broader audience. In contrast to a more traditional approach to learning, EL students spend more time working in teams with other students, learning outside the classroom and learning from community “experts” in various fields. The following are some examples of “learning expeditions” from EL schools across the country: Third grade students in Rochester, New York met with experts in meteorology, botany, cartography and various industries to create a guide to the city of Rochester. Middle school students in Portland, Maine interviewed citizens, and then worked on their writing and history skills to create a collection of biographies highlighting citizens’

contributions to the civil rights movement. High school students in Queens, New York spent two years visiting a wildlife refuge, studying and documenting wildlife, taking photographs and creating a professionally printed field guide geared toward educating both students and the general public about native and invasive plants in the nearby Jamaica Bay Wildlife Refuge.

A range of students Project-based learning and hands-on experiential learning are typically seen as opportunities available to more affluent students populations. EL boasts of bringing these kinds of educational experiences to a broad range of students. EL was designed in 1991 as a model to help students from typically disadvantaged backgrounds. EL schools nationwide serve a diverse mix of students: 53 percent of students in EL schools are students of color and 51 percent qualify for free or reduced lunch. About 14 percent of EL students are special education students and 10 percent are English language learners. There are about 165 EL schools nationwide. EL schools are located in urban, rural and suburban areas in 30 states and Washington, D.C. There are 24 EL schools in Colorado, including one in Eagle/Vail, and two schools about to open in Garfield County School District #16 in Parachute. About a third of all EL schools are charter schools and two thirds are regular district schools.

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The cost The cost to become and sustain an EL school varies depending on the size, needs and goals of each school. According to EL Mountain Region Director Jon Mann, the first three years could cost $40,000$100,000 per year. The cost then decreases substantially in subsequent years. These funds are paid to the EL Network, a nonprofit organization that partners with schools, districts and charter boards to open new EL schools and transform existing schools into EL schools. The money paid to the EL Network primarily pays for what EL refers to as “transformational professional development.”Each school is assigned a “school designer” who spends 20-60 days in that school building working with the teachers and principals.The designer provides on-site development, coaching and support that is tailored to that school. EL also provides off-site professional development“institutes”led by their most experienced school designers and master teachers. In comparison, the Roaring Fork School District currently spends about $200,000 each year on professional development for the district as a whole. Money paid to the EL Network also covers other resources for teachers including site visits other EL schools, instructional plans, sample curriculum and access to grants for teachers' own “learning expeditions.” Mann emphasized that the school designer and other EL resources are aimed at EXPEDITIONARY LEARNING page 9

SOPRIS LIQUOR & WINE Be Responsible!

Cop Shop The following events are drawn from incident reports of the C’dale Police Dept. SUNDAY Oct. 28 At 8:46 a.m. police received multiple reports that several unlocked vehicles on Linden Circle were entered and items were taken the previous night. mONDAY Oct. 29 At 3:30 p.m. police recovered a vehicle on Colorado Avenue that had been stolen a week or two before. TUESDAY Oct. 30 At 2:55 p.m. police received a call about a suspicious man in a Main Street restaurant.When police arrived and started talking to the 57-year-old man he was “irrational and often random” but “was oriented to the current date, time and events.” He had several personal items spread out on his table. When asked to remove his items from the establishment he said “Yea, I was just getting ready to head out” and he did. TUESDAY Oct. 31 At 10:41 a.m. police assisted a Garfield County sheriff’s deputy with an eviction at 900 Garfield Ave. TUESDAY Oct. 31 At 8:33 p.m. police chased a medium-sized bear away from Greystone and toward the Crystal River.

Wild and Scenic Rivers Educational Forum for the Crystal River NOTICE

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Ad reservations due Fri., Nov. 16 by noon

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PUBLICIZE YOUR BLACK FRIDAY SALES! Contact bob Albright 970-927-2175 bob@soprissun.com or Linda Fleming 970-379-5223 linda@soprissun.com

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Wednesday, November 14 6:30pm Redstone Inn, Redstone

Thursday, November 15 6:30pm Third Street Center, Carbondale

Community educational forum to evaluate the effectiveness and appropriateness of a Wild and Scenic designation for the Crystal River www.roaringfork .org/crystalriver

The Board of Directors of the Carbondale & Rural Fire Protection District will be discussing the proposed 2013 budget at their regular monthly meeting, to be held at 5:30 p.m. on November 14, 2012 at the Carbondale Fire Station located at 300 Meadowood Dr. in Carbondale, Colorado.

4 • THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 8, 2012


Pastor Doug Self retiring after 36 years of local ministry By Melissa Miller Special to The Sopris Sun Pastor Doug Self recently announced his retirement from The Orchard after 36 years of local ministry. A celebration of Doug and Rebecca Self’s ministry will take place at the Orchard (110 Snowmass Dr.) at 4 p.m. on Nov. 17. The community is invited. The Selfs began their ministry in the Roaring Fork Valley in 1976 when Doug and a very pregnant Rebecca moved to Carbondale so that Doug could be an associate pastor with Mid Valley Baptist church. Shortly after their arrival, several families approached the Selfs about starting a church in Redstone. So, on the second Sunday of December in 1977, Church at Redstone began; this year it will be celebrating its 35th anniversary. Doug was inspired by a vision to do church differently. “We wanted to create a place where all people were welcomed as they are, so we ditched the suits and ties, common among many pastors, and opted for jeans and flannel shirts,” Doug said. In addition his sermons were and continue to be based around practical, life-application-style messages. By the spring of 1990, people from Aspen to Rifle were coming to Church at Redstone’s Sunday service. There was nowhere for the church to grow and it was faced with the decision of holding a second service or starting a new church.

Carbondale In May 1990, part of the congregation came from Redstone to begin the Church at Carbondale. At that time, Doug preached at Redstone and then the family would drive down to host a service in Carbondale. The church space could only hold 80 people, so within three months the Church at Carbondale relocated to Roaring Fork High School (now Carbondale Middle School). For the next 14 years, Church at Carbondale was a “church in a box.” Everything was stored in a truck and

is turning 40!

was set-up and taken-down every Sunday. It took dozens of volunteers to make it happen each week. In the Church at Carbondale’s heyday, there were upwards of 800 people from up and down the valley every Sunday. In 1994, Church at Carbondale purchased land to build its own building and broke ground in 2003. In the fall of 2004 Church at Carbondale settled in to its permanent home at 110 Snowmass Drive. On a typical morning in the spring of 2009, Doug was standing in the Orchard’s Gathering Center, marveling at all the blessings of the last 30-some years. He was reminded by God of an unfulfilled promise to become a church that would be a “tipping point” within the community. Doug was approaching retirement and it would have been easy to say that a church whose focus was “A fun place to get serious with God” for people who had given up on church but not on God was enough. Doug approached the church leadership team with the reminder of this vision. They were inspired and spent months praying and working through what this might mean. Through those meetings, a new vision statement emerged, “Brought to Life to Bring Life” and a new mission: “Rooted in Christ, Growing Together and Fruit for the Valley.” And with that, a culture shift from a church focused internally on its members to a church focused on the community-at-large was launched. With this new vision and mission a new name emerged and The Orchard was born out of Church at Carbondale and revealed to the community on April 13, 2011. Doug said he will remain on staff, part-time, providing pastoral care and counseling to those in need. He will also develop The Orchard’s “inner circle relationship” strategy, helping people to develop relationships where one or two other people develop a transformed life and a deeper relationship with each other and Jesus. Of course, lots of camping is on the Self’s agenda and Doug is looking forward to some longer trips to places he

Doug and Rebecca Self. Courtesy photo hasn’t explored like, Yosemite, Yellowstone and the Ozarks. Doug said he is also excited about his volunteer ministry in which he will encourage and grow The Orchard’s presence and influence in helping other churches and pastors fulfill their visions and missions. (Editor’s note: this story is a condensed version of the one submitted to The Sopris Sun. For the complete version, please visit the Sun website at soprissun.com).

ebrate With l e C e m o Us C Friday, November 9th, 3:00-8:00 p.m.

Crystal Glass Studio is well known for quality architectural stained, leaded, etched and fused glass; in our same location for 20 years.

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Join us for free consultations and mini-treatments from 3:00-5:00pm, then an open house from 5:00-8:00pm.

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The White Dog Gallery will feature select fine artists from around the country including Mary Matchael of Crystal Glass Studio.

Come help founders David Teitler and Pixie Byrne welcome new practitioners Jessica Jacobson, Asian Bodywork Therapist and Jaclyn Rose Wolf, massage therapist.

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50 Weant Blvd., just off Main in downtown Carbondale THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 8, 2012 • 5


A more energy efficient business is a more profitable one

Peppino’s owner Carol Bruno installed energy efficient fluorescent lighting throughout her restaurant that use 30–40 percent less electricity. These other Carbondale businesses have also signed up for the Garfield Clean Energy Challenge and made upgrades over the last year. 311 Main Street Aspen Valley Land Trust and others at 320 Main Condo Association Carbondale Center Carbondale Food Coop Crystal Glass Studio Dos Gringos

Miser’s Mercantile Peppino’s Pizza Red Rock Diner Sopris Liquor & Wine The Pour House Thunder River Theatre Company Village Road HOA

N EW PA RT I C I PA N TS!

Scuttlebutt

Send your scuttlebutt to news@SoprisSun.com.

Crystal Glass Studio celebrates its 40th Crystal Glass Studio celebrates its 40th anniversary at 50 Weant Blvd. from 3 to 8 p.m. on Nov. 9. Joining in the celebration will be Dream Weaver Designs and White Dog Gallery, which have opened at that location. Mary Matchael established Crystal Glass Studio in 1972 when she moved from her hometown of San Francisco to the Rocky Mountains. She was originally located upstairs in the historic Dinkel Building and then downstairs in the current location of Steve’s Guitars. In 1993, Crystal Glass Studio moved into its own 3,400 square-foot studio and gallery across from Sopris Park. Over the years, the studio grew from a one-person operation to an enterprise that employs several artisans, including Mary’s husband John. Their art glass has been commissioned by many celebrities and shipped throughout the U.S. and worldwide. Locally, Matchael’s work can be seen at the Church at Redstone. Recent commissions include a six-foot in diameter “Kaleidoscope Table” that was written up in local newspapers, and two five-foot in diameter chandeliers for a home theatre. The studio is currently working on a 30-foot glass and steel handrail. According to a press release, Crystal Glass Studio no longer has its own showroom but does have samples of chandeliers, sconces and panels available for sale in the back of its building on Weant. Dream Weaver Designs and the White Dog Gallery are opening in the front part of the Crystal Glass Studio building; Crystal Glass Studio will be a featured artist.

were chosen from a field of 3,500 entries. The writers were tasked with creating a piece of fiction in exactly 79 words. The finalists will gather in New York City to participate in a writing workshop taught by Colum McCann, the bestselling author of “Let the Great World Spin,” and attend "Fiction Night at the Esquire," a celebratory party for the finalists. At the party, the finalists will read their work in front of a live audience of “authors, celebrities and publishing industry gurus” and the grandprize winner receives a scholarship for an advanced fiction workshop an AWF’s Aspen Summer Words. Hansen’s short short story is not available for publication at this time, although its title is “I Do.”

Go get some Big B’s fresh cider is now available at the Carbondale Community Food Co-op on Main Street. Word has it the drink is a season fave.

bonfire shows Cull’s photographs Bonfire Coffee in the Dinkel Building is showing the photographs of Matthew Cull. The show focuses on his bicycle journeys through 63 countries during the past 26 years. For more, go to matthewjkcull.com

Seen and overheard at 7/Eleven Some Carbondalians don’t spend a lot of time at the 7/Eleven on Highway 133 but the store adds its own flavor to the town stew. Tuesday’s election was a topic of conversation at the coffee pots on Wednesday. One coffee fiend told a friend, “At least we legalized pot.” His friend laughed and said “Now we just have to legalize it in the work place.”

Ivy Hansen is a “short short” finalist

They say it’s your birthday

Roaring Fork High School alum Ivy Hansen (class of ’97) is one of 10 finalists in the Aspen Writers’ Foundation/Esquire magazine “Short Short Fiction” contest, according to the current Aspen Writers’ Foundation newsletter. Hansen and the other nine finalists (from across the U.S.)

Birthday greetings go out to: Rick Carlson (Nov. 8), Kelsey Freeman and Estefania Montoya (Nov. 12), Maria Flores and Riley Skinner (Nov. 13), and Sue Rollyson and Morgan Williams (Nov. 14). A belated birthday greeting goes out to Kay Schaefer in Wisconsin (Oct. 27).

Carbondale Beer Works, Mi Casita, Big Mama’s Home Cookin’, Mt. Sopris Montessori School

Limited-time rebates are available for energy upgrades.

Yours is waiting for you... but it won’t wait for long! Good for Carbondale. Great for your bottom line. Call today and talk to an expert energy coach (se habla español). 970-704-9200 or ActNow@garfieldcleanenergy.org This is a town-focused program of the Garfield Clean Energy Challenge. Brought to you by: Town of Carbondale, Garfield Clean Energy, CORE and CLEER.

6 • THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 8, 2012

Dr. Phil Tedeschi brought his dog, Rain, up on stage during his presentation on the relationship between animals and humans at Thunder River Theatre on Nov. 3. The talk was part of the Roaring Fork Cultural Council lecture series. Photo by Jane Bachrach


El Dia de los Muertos Thunder River Theatre was probably one of the Roaring Fork Valley’s more colorful venues on Nov. 2. The Day of the Dead program included an invitation to the spirits by Richard Lyon, readings by Valerie Haugen and Carlos Herrera (lower left and upper right respectively), three dances by the Aspen Santa Fe Ballet folklorico program (shown here) and more. After the presentation, the performers and audience staged a procession from the theatre to the Third Street Center. Photos by Jane Bachrach

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Community Calendar

To list your event, email information to news@soprissun.com. Deadline is 5 p.m. Saturday. Events take place in Carbondale unless noted. For up-to-the-minute valley-wide event listings, check out the Community Calendar online at soprissun.com. View and submit events online at soprissun.com/calendar.

THURSDAY Nov. 8

SATURDAY Nov. 10

WEDNESDAY Nov. 14

vETERANS DAY • Carbondale Middle School will host a Veteran’s Day program at the school at 12:45 p.m. The Roaring Fork High School Choir, will perform “Dona Nobis Pacem,” “The Star Spangled Banner” and “Let Freedom Ring, a Patriotic Celebration.” The Carbondale Middle School Band will perform “America the Beautiful,” “The Battle Hymn of the Republic,” and “My Country, tis of Thee.” All veteran’s and family members are welcome.

ROTARY • The Rotary Club of Carbondale presents Markey Butler (of Hospice of the

SIERRA CLUb FILm FEST • The Roaring Fork Sierra Club’s Fall Film Festival presents “Spoil” and “The Next Revolution” from 7 to 9 p.m. in the Third Street Center. Info: 947-9613.

SPORTS SALE • The Mount Sopris Nordic Council holds its 27th annual Mountain Sports Sale from 9 a.m. to noon at Colorado Rocky Mountain School (one mile west of the Highway 133 traffic light). Equipment check in is 4:30 to 7 p.m. on Nov. 9. Info: springgulch.org. ELK DINNER • St. Mary of the Crown Catholic Church’s wildly popular elk dinner is served up at the church from 4 to 7:30 p.m. It’s the 35th annual dinner. LIvE mUSIC • PAC3 in the Third Street Center presents local rocker Bobby Mason at 8 p.m. Tickets are $15. Info: pac3carbondale.com.

ROTARY • Mt. Sopris Rotary meets at Mi Casita every Thursday at noon.

SUNDAY Nov. 11

FRIDAY Nov. 9

vETERANS DAY • American Legion Post 100, located at 97 N. Third St., offers a free lunch for veterans at noon; $8 for non-veterans.

mOvIES • The Crystal Theatre presents “Searching for Sugar Man” (PG-13) at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 9-15; “Samsara” (PG-13) at 5:15 p.m. Nov. 10 and“Arbitrage”(R) at 5:15 p.m. Nov. 11. DEAD REvIEW • PAC3 in the Third Street Center presents the Rocky Mountain Grateful Dead Review at 8 p.m. Tickets are $12 in advance; $15 at the door. LIvE mUSIC • Steve’s Guitars in the Dinkel Building presents live music every Friday. OPEN HOUSE • The Carbondale Acupuncture Center (54 Weant Blvd.) holds an open house to celebrate health and wellness from 3 to 8 p.m. There’ll be complimentary consultations from 3 to 5 p.m. Info: 704-1310.

TUESDAY Nov. 13 PREACHING • Bethel/Global Legacy minister Jesse Cupp preaches at the Orchard at 6:30 p.m. Cupp has worked with Paul Manwaring, Steve Backlund, Joaquin Evans (former director of Bethel Healing Rooms), Chad Dedmon and Kim Walker-Smith. Info: 970963-8773 ext. 104. CCAH WORKSHOP • The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities presents Kinder Art Klub with Sacha Hart Logan from 1:30 to 2:45 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays through Dec. 13. Tuition is $75 and scholarships are available. Info: 963-1680.

Further Out FRIDAY Nov. 16

LIvE mUSIC • Straight from Austin, pianist/blues singer Marcia Ball plays PAC3 in the Third Street Center at 8 p.m.

SATURDAY Nov. 17 CCAH • The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humanities presents Cirque d’Sopris at PAC3 at 3:30 and 6:30 p.m. The production, directed by Jenna Bradford and Rochelle Norwood, focuses on fashion design, daring circus skills and dance. SOL Theatre’s Youth Improv Troupe and Aspen

Ongoing

mAYOR’S COFFEE HOUR • Chat with Carbondale Mayor Stacey Bernot on Tuesdays from 7 to 8 a.m. at the Village Smithy on Third Street. bEER RUN • Independence Run & Hike stages a four-mile beer run Thursdays at 6:30 p.m. The running starts at La Fontana and ends at a Carbondale watering hole. Info: 704-0909.

Valley) at the firehouse at 7 a.m. Other speakers through the month are: Amelia Potvin of CORE (Nov. 21) and a speaker from Jaywalker Lodge (Nov. 28).

Santa Fe Ballet’s Folklorico will also perform. Tickets are on sale at the CCAH office in the Third Street Center ($15 for adults; less for kids). Volunteers are also needed. Info: 963-1680. FURRY PHOTO SHOOT • Colorado Animal Rescue (C.A.R.E.) has teamed up with the Glenwood Springs Center for the Arts, Digital Dimensions and Santa to take photos of your family or pets – just in time for holiday cards and gifts. The sessions take place at GSCA (601 East Sixth St., next to the Vapor Caves) from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Info: 947-9173.

tate in Glenwood Springs. STORY TImE • The Gordon Cooper Library presents Storytime with Sue at 6 p.m. every Monday. Info: 963-2889. CCAH CLASSES • The Carbondale Council on Arts and Humaniites offers youth fashion classes and more this fall. Info: 963-1680 or carbondalearts.com.

CCC • The Carbondale Clay Center continues its Holiday Festive Tableware and Small Works Invitational exhibition and sale through Dec. 23. Info: 963-CLAY.

JAm SESSION • Carbondale Beer Works on Main Street hosts an old-time jam session with Dana Wilson from 7 to 9 p.m. every Monday. All abilities are welcome.

ART • Through December, Glenwood Springs Art Guild exhibits include Tara Vetter at the Flower Mart in Glenwood Springs, and Nancy Martin at Bullock Hinkey real es-

JAZZ JAm • A jazz jam with players ranging from middle school students to adults is held at the Ramada Inn in Glenwood Springs on Monday nights.

the Crown Catho f o lic ar y Ch in M t ur n Carbondale i ch a S

35th Annual

ELK/turkey DINNER Country Store Saturday, November 10, 2012 Elk/Turkey Dinner Served from 4:00 to 7:30 p.m.

TIME-OUT AT PLANTED EARTH!!!

WE'LL BE CLOSED NOVEMBER 3RD-25TH, THEN OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK UNTIL NEW YEAR’S EVE!!! Fresh Greenery will be in!

Trees, Wreaths, Garland, Planted Gifts!!!

Earth

Garden Center

Candles, Silks, Pottery, Houseplants, Paperwhites, and Amaryllis Bulbs!!!

CARBONDALE 12744 Highway 82 • 963-1731

8 • THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 8, 2012

Donation: Adults $10 5 to 12 and Seniors $6 395 White Hill Road, Carbondale, Colorado (970) 704-0820


Hold the Presses Trustees talk Highway 133, comprehensive plan The Carbondale Board of Trustees discusses Highway 133 improvements with the Garfield County commissioners, and the town’s draft comprehensive plan, at its 6 p.m. meeting on Nov. 13. The agenda and accompanying packet are available online on Friday at carbondalegov.org.

Fire District holds budget hearing The Carbondale & Rural Fire Protecting District discusses its draft 2013 budget at the Carbondale fire station at 5:30 p.m. on Nov. 14.

Carbondale Acupuncture Center holds open house Carbondale Acupuncture Center gives free consultations and mini-treatments at its open house at 50 Weant Blvd. from 3 to 5 p.m. on Nov. 9.

CbW presents Shea Freedom Carbondale Beer Works on Main Street presents Shea Freedom and Company (Tracy Chapman meets world beat) from 8 to 11 p.m. on Nov. 9. There’s no cover.

International Gift Festival The Glenwood Springs Mennonite Church (2306 Blake Ave.) holds its 26th annual International Gift Festival through Nov. 10. For details, call 945-5245.

Annual Crystal meeting The Crystal River Caucus holds its annual meeting at the Church at Redstone at 7 p.m. on Nov. 8.

Next Steps:

Expeditionary Learning continued om page 4 helping schools develop their own unique program according to each school's specific goals and interests. Mann explained that the EL model is very “place-based,” meaning that every EL school is unique to the community in which it is situated. At the Oct. 25 community meeting regarding Three Rivers Expeditionary School (TRES) and EL, TRES Interim Head of School Debra Winston said there is potential to get grant money for an EL school from foundations and others who support the EL model. Mann told The Sopris Sun, “The individual pieces of our model are not unique. We're borrowing from the best practices from the last 20 years.” So why pay money to be a part of the EL network? Why not just adopt these best practices without being an official EL school? Mann stated that there are many schools trying to do just that. However, he noted that the power of being an EL school stems in part from the extensive staff development and resources that the EL Network provides and in part from the coherence that EL brings to best practices: curriculum, community, assessment, character development, and school culture and climate are all connected under the EL umbrella.

EL results Three recent studies of EL schools undertaken by independent research groups have found significant evidence supporting EL’s claims about the positive impact of EL schools on student achievement.

One study of EL schools New York City and Rochester from 2006-2010 found that these schools were substantially closing the achievement gaps for specific populations of students: students eligible for free or reduced-price lunch, English language learners, and Hispanic and African-American students. In a national study of more than 11,000 students in eight states, researchers compared student growth in EL and non-El schools. Researchers concluded that in four out of the six comparisons, students in “mature” EL schools — those that had implemented the EL model at a high level of fidelity for three or more years — experienced significantly greater test score gains than non-EL students. All EL high schools aim for 100 percent college acceptance of its graduates. Of the approximately 45 EL high schools across the country, 10 have reached that goal of 100 percent college acceptance, including two EL high schools in Denver. The Sopris Sun Sun uncovered no research disputing EL’s claims about having a positive impact on student achievement.

Share your thoughts You can email your comments to Superintendent Diana Sirko (dsirko@rfsd.k12.co.us), Board President Matt Hamilton (mhamilton@aspensnowmass.com) or any of the other board members (addresses are listed on the district website: www.rfsd.k12.co.us). The TRES charter application can be reviewed on the district website (www.rfsd.k12.co.us).

Meeting in Glenwood: The Roaring Fork School Board will discuss EL and TRES at its meeting at Glenwood Springs High School on Wednesday, Nov. 14 at 6:15 p.m. Time will be allotted for public comment on these issues.

Volleyball om page 3 ers brought the crowd to their feet at 15-8. High blocks were continually forcing errors as Lamar tried to adjust over them. Point by point, the Rams executed for a 25-13 win and a ticket to state. After the match, Madison Handy said, “I woke up so excited this morning, I think we all did. Playing at home gave us a lot of confidence, instead of being intimidated walking into someone else’s gym.” Coach Shultz commented, “The girls took full advantage of home court.” The Rams are headed to the Denver Coliseum for the state tournament this weekend.

State playoff schedule

The Roaring Fork Rams play at Denver Coliseum on Nov. 9 (taking on Platte Valley then Eaton). They’ll play the fifth and seventh matches of the day (exact times are not available but coach Carrie Shultz expects the first match to be in the early afternoon). The Rams must win their three-team pool on Nov. 9 to advance to semi-final play against Pool 2 (Bayfield, Gunnison or CSCS).

AS P E N CO M M U N I T Y T H E AT R E P R E S E N T S

PERFORMACES

November 8-18 PERFORMANCES AT

Aspen District Theatre TICKETS AT

Wheeler Box Office or aspenshowtix.com aspencommunitytheatre.com

THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 8, 2012 • 9


Community Briefs Town cleans sewers Nov. 13 The town of Carbondale utilities department starts is annual sewer system cleaning and maintenance Nov. 13. If you have experienced a problem in the past with back pressure or water back-up in your plumbing fixtures, cover those fixtures with a plastic bag or towel between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m. For more information, call town hall at 963-2733.

dale Town Hall at 8:30 a.m. on Nov. 8 and expects to approve its 2013 budget.

Chamber introduces C’dale Card

through Nov. 20. Devised by the Aspen Yoga Society and others, participants will donate non-perishable food to Lift-Up in exchange for a class. Participating yoga studios include: Kula Yoga on Main Street in Carbondale, Le Cercle Studio in Basalt, Bikram’s Yoga College of India in Basalt and Carbondale, the Aspen Club and Spa, Arjuna Yoga Aspen, O2 Yoga Aspen and King Yoga Aspen Business Center.

The Carbondale Board of Trustees holds a public hearing for its proposed comprehensive plan at 6 p.m. on Nov. 13. The draft plan is available at town hall or the town’s web site.

The Carbondale Chamber is now offering its Carbondale Card, which provides discounts and coupons at participating businesses. Cardholders will be able to scan the QR Code on their card. The cards can be purchased by anyone, but only Carbondale Chamber members will be able to offer a special, discount or savings on the card as part of their chamber membership benefits. Cards go on sale during the week of Nov. 26 and cost $25 each. For details, call 963-1890.

RFTA adopts 2013 budget

Yogis help with Lift-Up drive

GCE offers energy efficiency rebates

The Roaring Fork Transportation Authority Board of Directors meets at Carbon-

The Roaring Fork Valley yoga community comes together for a Lift-Up food drive

Garfield Clean Energy recently received funds from the town of Carbondale for rebates

Public hearing for comp plan

Harris celebration of life A celebration of life will be held for Glen Charles Harris at the Carbondale fire station at 1 p.m. on Nov. 10. Harris, 64, passed away at Valley View Hospital on Nov. 5.

to businesses and residents within the city limits of Carbondale. Those funds are now available to the public for energy efficiency upgrades in homes and businesses via the Garfield Clean Energy Challenge, according to a press release. Homeowners can receive up to $500 or 50 percent of project costs for measures such as: insulation and air sealing and energy-efficient equipment (like furnaces, boilers and water heaters), equipment tune-ups and heattape timers. Business and building owners can receive up to $1,500 or 50 percent of project costs for measures such as: lighting upgrades, mechanical upgrades or tune-ups, insulation and air sealing, refrigeration efficiency upgrades, and other efficiency measures or energy saving strategies. This rebate can also be combined with CORE and utility rebates. For details, call CLEER at 704-9200.

Shopping | Dining | Culture | Recreation

VISIT BASALT & EL JEBEL At the confluence of Frying Pan and Roaring Fork Rivers THURSDAY Nov. 8 TImE FOR FOOTbALL • Come to Cuvee and watch Monday and Thursday night Football games on the biggest screen in the valley. SALSA NIGHT • The River Side Grill in Basalt hosts Salsa Night from 8:30 to 11:30 p.m.

FRIDAY Nov. 9 EXHIbITION • BILL GRUENBERG - ART IS EASY The Wyly Community Art center presents “Bill Gruenberg: Art is Easy” through Nov. 12. The hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Info: Wylyarts.org.

SATURDAY Nov. 10 SIGN UP • Registration is under way for Holiday Art Club at Wyly Community Art Center. It’s for kids 6-11 years old and takes place Wednesdays Dec. 5-19 at 5:30 p.m. The cost is $75 with a 10 percent discount for Wyly members. Register at wylyarts.org.

MONDAY Nov. 12 YOUTH FITNESS • The Basalt Recreation Department is co-sponsor of SAQ (speed, agility and quickness) training at Basalt Middle School from 3:30 to 4:30 p.m. on Mondays and Wednesdays from through Dec. 15. This is

perfect for kids playing any sport looking to increase their fitness, coordination and confidence.

TUESDAY Nov. 13 FLY TYING • Frying Pan Anglers offers fly tying classes Tuesdays from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. For details, call 927-3441. bOYS ART CLUb II • Wyly Community Arts Center offers Boys Art Club II on Tuesdays through Nov. 20 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m.

Submittal deadline is December 19, 2012

REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS Parks, Open Space and Trails Master Plan

Visit www.basalt.net or email Brian McNellis at brianm@basalt.net for more information

PRINT mAKING • Registration is underway for a stencil silkscreen print making class with Jennifer Ghormley. The class will take place at Wyly Art Center from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Nov. 17. Tuition is for non-members is $105 and pre-registration is required. Info: wylyarts.org.

Become an eco bag lady Now accepting fall items

WEDNESDAY Nov. 14 bINGO • The Basalt Lions Club holds bingo nights at the Eagle County Building in Crown Mountain Park from 7 to 9 p.m. every Wednesday. More than $400 in cash prizes are given out nightly and Beta Chi Sorority provides yummy food.

970-927-4384 144 Midland Avenue Basalt, Colorado 81621

To list your Basalt or El Jebel event, e-mail it to basaltthrift@ live.com by 5 p.m. on Friday.

RECLAIM~RESTORE~REUSE 180 South Side Dr. Basalt 970.927.6488 Non-Profit Supporting Local Sustainable Food Efforts

10 • THE SOPRIS SUN • NOvEmbER 8, 2012

Calling all Landscape Architects and Land Use Consultants

MID-VALLEY TRADITION CONTINUES Carrying on with the Hyrup legacy.

RJ Paddywacks is now offering Large Animal Feed and Supplies.

Call us today to place your order, discuss your needs or for more information 963-1700

Open seven days a week Next to City Market in El Jebel, 400 E Valley Rd. Ste I/J 963.1700 | Open M-F 10-6:30pm | Sat/Sun 11-5pm


Sharing space with the soon-to-be Carbondale library Most people became aware of the reality ment? I have a roof over my head; in the next of our new library when the ďŹ ght for the de- 10-20 minutes my daughter is going to sneak clining spruce trees began. into bed with me to play Wake Up Time and Sitting in a meeting, I listened to a library there’s an espresso brewing in my future. representative defend removing the trees by While it builds its steam, I have furry creatures describing the new library, swirling at my feet giving us love with it’s stacks and stacks in exchange for kibble. Across of books made of sheets the street, a new library grows! and sheets of paper comEveryday I share space with ing from trees as a new the construction site. Sometimes By Geneviève JoĂŤlle they park in my spot and I get kind of forest. In my mind, Villamizar the library grew in its to check out a new one. Somegreatness. I saw inďŹ nite worlds in the conďŹ nes times they see I need help and they offer it. of a single box. Sometimes a great big handsome man knocks I knew the trees were in decline; I didn’t on my door because they need a favor — and know yet that I’d be moving close by. I did I extend it. appreciate her analogy. I grew up in libraries, Landscaping in my 20’s, I loved construcmusty old ones, with row upon row of books tion sites because it was a huge experiment in that informed who I am today. Who I am teamwork. It was a constant dance with the today determined where I currently live, gutter guys or stucco people. It was having which is a funky old mining shack within a another company to borrow a tool from. Infew yards of what became a noisy construc- teractions with co-workers or strangers ran tion site the week I moved in: our future li- the gamut from icking boogers and snickerbrary! Friends have asked me about the noise; ing over dirty jokes, to sharing family stories for me it’s music: a constant ebb and ow of and extra burritos from last night’s dinner. people, activities and machines that enchant When Juniper and I play in the front yard both my daughter and me. nowadays, we get to hear life unfolding I’ve spent the last 20 years of my life on across the street. construction sites, as a landscaper or in some I also like construction sites because of the capacity within the gardening realm. I love transformation: from nothing to a very real them! I might not “loveâ€? the beeping of the something. As a company, we had our crews crane at 7:32 a.m. but hey, it’s one more op- and each crew had its rhythms. It was effortportunity to breathe and connect with the less: like ants spilling from a disturbed nest, we present moment. And what is my present mo- spread over the job site kickin’ tail and takin’

Getting Grounded

Service Directory

names. Within a matter of weeks, what was once sterile and looming was now an environment ďŹ lled with life. Perky young trees wired between T-posts would some day arch their branches to the horizon, shading and cooling your Volkswagen. Newly planted one-gallon lavenders and day lilies would one day welcome you on your way to the doctor’s ofďŹ ce or ATM. The birds and bees would do their dance in the break area patio as co-workers irted by the fountain, surrounded by swaying miscanthus and fragrant monarda. Something from nothing. When I ďŹ rst fell in love with plants, it was through books. I taught myself how to propagate, growing leaf and stem cuttings under lights. When the plant collection became too big, I started researching perennials and bulbs, and moved the hobby outside. Through books and magazines from our library, I discovered biodynamic farming, gardening history and the arcs of famous designers. Having access to all that info from a library changed my life; it opened up worlds. It’s not fair of me to say the library spruce trees had “had their time.â€? I tend to embrace change (reality is reality, after all) but I’m new to the ’hood and haven’t had to endure their loss. Does the “noise and messâ€? bother me? Not really. I’ve seen the plans; I’m excited to sit in the new gardens that peers of mine designed. I stare at the poster mounted on the construction fence — my neighbor won a contract and gets to do the custom art for

NOTICE OF BUDGET

(Pursuant to 29-1-106, C.R.S.)

NOTICE is hereby given that a proposed budget has been submitted to the Board of Directors for the ensuing year of 2013; a copy of such proposed budget has been filed in the office of the Carbondale & Rural Fire Protection District, where the same is open for public inspection; such proposed budget will be considered at the regular monthly meeting of the Board of Directors to be held at the Carbondale Headquarters/Training Building, 301 Meadowood Drive, Carbondale, Colorado on November 14, 2012 at 5:30 p.m. Any interested elector of such Carbondale & Rural Fire Protection District may inspect the proposed budget and file or register any objections thereto at any time prior to the final adoption of the budget.

CARBONDALE ANIMAL HOSPITAL 234 Main Street

(970) 963-2826 www.carbondaleanimalhospital.com

Dr. Benjamin Mackin Mon., Tues., Thurs., Friday 8 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. Wednesday 10:30 a.m.- 6:30 p.m.

Published in The Sopris Sun on November 1, 2012.

Unclassifieds

Help for families in need.

Mid-Valley Food Pantries Carbondale: Third Street Center, 520 South 3rd Street, #35 Mon, Wed & Fri: 10am-12:30pm • 963-1778 Basalt: Basalt Community United Methodist Church 167 Holland Hills Rd. • Wed & Thur: 11am-1pm • 279-1492

Submit to unclassifieds@soprissun.com by Monday 12 p.m. Rates: $15 for 30 words, $20 for up to 50 words. Payment due before publication.*

FREE LOCALRY DELIVErs e For Ord 50 Over $

Learn more at www.liftup.org and join us on facebook!

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each of the seven columns along the front facade! And I daydream about the moment this library opens and we have this amazing community institution right across the street from us, in addition to the 28 trees theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be planting around the library â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the next generation in our community forest. Inside will be another forest, one of inďŹ nite possibility. Who knows what worlds will open up for my daughter, or even you!

Legal Notice

See Thundercat at

Food is available at LIFT-UPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seven area food pantries, made possible by support from our caring community.

Carbondale Library construction last month. Photo by Lynn Burton.

FOR SALE: 1984 Ford F150 Truck. Black. In good shape and runs well. Great work truck. Call 716-867-6459 for more information. *Credit card payment information should be emailed to unclassifieds@soprissun.com or call 948-6563. Checks may be dropped off at our office at the Third Street Center or mailed to P.O. Box 399, Carbondale, CO 81623. Call 618-9112 for more info.

WINDSHIELD REPAIR AUTO GLASS REPLACEMENT

970-963-3891

Headlight Restoration Auto Glass & Side Mirrors

500 Buggy Circle, Carbondale, CO DAVID ZAMANSKY â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Owner Operated

THE SOPRIS SUN â&#x20AC;˘ NOvEmbER 8, 2012 â&#x20AC;˘ 11


SALE! SAL E!

D OM ESTIC R ED DOMESTIC RED

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SALE! SALE!

P PRICE RICE

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

64.28 64.28 34.04 34 04 27.38 27 38 19 37 19.37 16.65 16 65 13 87 13.87 13.31 13 31 12.50 12 50 11.90 11 90 11.50 11 50 11.30 11 30 9.52 9 52 9.47 9 47 8.63 8 63 8 07 8.07 8 00 8.00 7 97 7.97 7 47 7.47 7.26 7 26

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77.97 77.97 42.47 42 47 33.97 33 97 24 47 24.47 20.97 20 97 17 47 17.47 16.97 16 97 15.97 1 5 97 14.97 1 4 97 14.97 1 4 97 13.97 13 97 11.97 11 97 11.99 11 99 10.97 10 97 11 97 11.97 11 47 11.47 10 97 10.97 8 97 8.97 10.57 10 57

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78.57 7 8 57 23.98 23 98 20.24 20 24 20.07 2 0 07 16 97 16.97 15.31 15 31 1 1 97 11.97 1 0 82 10.82 1 0 00 10.00 9 97 9.97 9 55 9.55 8 97 8.97 8 79 8.79 5.97 5 97

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

95.00 95 00 29.97 2 9 97 25.97 25 97 24.97 24 97 21 47 21.47 20.59 20 59 1 5 97 15.97 1 3 97 13.97 1 3 97 13.97 1 4 99 14.99 1 2 49 12.49 1 1 27 11.27 11 97 11.97 6.79 6 79

$ $ $ $ $ $

4 5 97 45.97 16 07 16.07 10 59 10.59 10 19 10.19 9 25 9.25 8.42 8 42

$ $ $ $ $ $

4 9 97 49.97 1 9 97 19.97 1 1 00 11.00 12 97 12.97 11 97 11.97 10.97 10 97

$ $ $ $ $

41.97 4 1 97 32.57 32 57 23 57 23.57 21 47 21.47 16.97 16 97

$ $ $ $ $

48.97 4 8 97 38.97 3 8 97 31 97 31.97 19 97 19.97 19.97 19 97

IMPORTED MPORT ED WHITE WH T E BOUCHARD MERSAULT BOU CHA RD PERE PERE & FILS F LS M ERSA UL T CHARMES CHA RMES '07 07 CLOUDY CLO U DY BAY BAY SAUVIGNON SAUV G NO N BLANC BLAN C '11 11 DOM BOURGONE D OM BRUNO BR U NO CLAVELIER C LAVEL ER B O UR GO NE '09 09 SANTA SAN TA MARG MARG PINOT P N O T GRIGIO GR G O '10 10 FEVRE CHAMPS CHAMPS ROYAUX ROYAU X CHABLIS CHABL S FEVRE KIM K M CRAWFORD C RAW FOR D SAUVIGNON SAUV G NO N BLANC BLAN C M CODAX CODA X ALBARINO ALBA R NO M C HEL P CA R D V OUV RAY '10 10 MICHEL PICARD VOUVRAY B ARONE F N P NO T G RGO BARONE FINI PINOT GRIGIO O YSTE R B AY S AUV G NO N B LA NC OYSTER BAY SAUVIGNON BLANC S MO NS G C HEN N B LAN C SIMONSIG CHENIN BLANC A NSELM P NO T G RGO ANSELMI PINOT GRIGIO E LSA B AN CH C HAR DO N NAY ELSA BIANCHI CHARDONNAY LA L AV VIELLE ELLE FERME FE RME R ROSE OSE CHAMPAGNE C H AMP AG NE & S SPARKLI PA RKL NG NG WINE W NE V EUVE C L Q UO T VEUVE CLIQUOT M UMM N APA B RUT MUMM NAPA BRUT Z A RDE TTO PROSECCO PROSE C CO ZARDETTO R ON DO P ROSEC CO RIONDO PROSECCO Z A RDE TTO CUVEE C UVEE B RU T ZARDETTO BRUT ANNA A NNA DE DE CDORNIU CD OR N U CAVA CAVA SPIRITS S P R TS CROWN ROYAL 1.75 C R OW N R OYAL 1 75 KETEL ONE K ETEL O NE 1.75 1 75 C AP TA N MORGAN MO RGA N 1.75 1 75 CAPTAIN M LA GR O S LVE R 750 75 0 MILAGRO SILVER JJAGERMEISTER AGER ME S TE R 750 75 0

CAYMUS NAPA CABERNET C AYMUS N APA C ABE RNE T SAUVIGNON SA UVIGN ON ''09 09 HUSCH PINOT NOIR HUS CH ANDERSON A NDE RSO N P INO T N O IR ''09 09 ROBERT MONDAVI ROBER T M ON DAV I NAPA NAPA CAB CAB '09 '0 9 EARTHQUAKE E AR TH QUAKE CABERNET CABE RNE T SAUVIGNON SAUV IG NO N '09 '0 9 CHRONIC CH RO N IC CELLARS CELLA RS DEAD DEA D NUTS NU TS ZIN ZIN '10 '1 0 SIMI SIMI CABERNET CABER NE T SAUVIGNON SAUV IG NO N ALEX ALE X FREAKSHOW FREAKSHOW CABERNET CABE RNE T SAUVIGNON SAUV IG NO N MARK MARK WEST W EST RR R R PINOT PINO T NOIR NO IR LEFT LEF T COAST COAS T PINOT P IN O T NOIR NO IR PETITE PETITE PETIT PETIT MDV M DV BEARBOAT BEARBOA T PINOT PINO T NOIR N O IR '07 ' 07 CHRONIC CH RO N IC CELLARS CELLA RS PURPLE PU RPLE '10 ' 10 SEVEN SEVEN DEADLY DEADLY ZINS ZINS MUIRWOOD MUIRW OO D PINTO PIN TO NOIR NO IR CLINE CL INE ZINFANDEL ZIN FAN DEL TROUBLEMAKER TRO UBLEMAKER RED RED CASTLE CAS TLE ROCK R OCK CABERNET CABE RNE T SAUVIGNON SA UVIGN ON PREDATOR PREDA TO R OLD O LD VINE V NE ZIN ZN ESTANCIA ESTAN C A CABERNET CABER NE T SAUVIGNON SAUV G NO N THE THE PINOT P NO T PROJECT PR OJE C T '09 09 GEYSER GEYSER PEAK PEAK CABERNET CABERNE T SAUVIGNON SAUV G NO N '07 07 DREAMING DREAM NG TREE TREE CABERNET CABERNE T SAUVIGNON SA UV GN ON '09 09 MENAGE MENAGE A TROIS TRO S RED RE D TRACTOR TRAC TOR SHED S HED RED RED APOTHIC APOTH C RED RED '10 10 MARK MARK WEST W EST PINOT P NO T NOIR NO R C SMITH SM TH MERLOT MER LO T VELVET VELVE T DEVIL DEV L COPPOLA COPPO LA VOTRE VO TRE SANTE SAN TE PINOT P N O T NOIR NO R MARK MARK WEST W EST 14 14 HANDS HA NDS RED RED PEIRANO PE RA NO ESTATE ES TA TE CABERNET CABER NE T SAUVIGNON SAUV G NO N '09 09 VIANSA V ANSA RED RE D TABLE TABLE WINE W NE FRIEND'S FR E N D S RED RE D '09 09 HOUSE HO USE WINE W NE MCMANIS MCMAN S CABERNET CABE RNE T SAUVIGNON SAUV G NO N ZEN ZE N OF OF ZIN ZN EYZAGUIRRE EYZAG U R RE CABERNET CABER NE T SAUVIGNON. SAUV G NO N INSATIABLE NSA T ABLE RED RE D 120 1 20 C CABERNET ABER NE T SAUVIGNON SAUV GN ON SANTA SAN TA RITA R TA

EVERYDAY E V ER YDA Y L LOW OW P PRICE RIC E

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

63.20 63.20 22.61 22.61 21.97 2 1.97 21.25 21.25 21.00 21.00 18.39 18.39 16.97 16.97 16.68 16.68 16.00 16.00 15.27 15.27 14.87 14.87 14.27 14.27 13.57 13.57 12.32 12.32 11.97 11.97 11.89 11.89 11.62 11.62 11.52 11 52 11.21 11 21 10.97 10 97 10.67 10 67 10.50 10 50 9.97 9 97 9.84 9 84 9.37 9 37 9.34 9 34 9.25 9 25 9.16 9 16 8.99 8 99 8.97 8 97 8.94 8 94 8.92 8 92 8.87 8 87 8.74 8 74 8.32 8 32 7.64 7 64 7.47 7 47 6.97 6 97 5.07 5 07

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

79.97 79.97 27.97 27.97 24.97 2 4.97 26.97 26.97 25.97 25.97 26.97 26.97 21.97 21.97 20.97 20.97 19.97 19.97 19.27 19.27 21.47 21.47 15.97 15.97 16.97 16.97 15.49 15.49 15.47 15.47 14.97 14.97 13.97 13.97 15.97 15 97 14.97 14 97 12.97 12 97 13.97 13 97 13.97 13 97 11.27 11 27 11.77 11 77 11.27 11 27 11.77 11 77 11.79 11 79 11.97 11 97 11.77 11 77 9.97 9 97 11.47 11 47 11.27 11 27 11.97 11 97 10.47 10 47 10.47 10 47 9.97 9 97 9.97 9 97 8.97 8 97 7.97 7 97

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

50.00 5 0 00 26.00 26 00 23.62 23 62 16.37 16 37 16.16 16 16 13.07 13 07 11.47 11 47 1 1 30 11.30 1 0 57 10.57 9 50 9.50 9 27 9.27 9 27 9.27 9 25 9.25 9 25 9.25 9 04 9.04 8 92 8.92 8 46 8.46 8 32 8.32 8 00 8.00 7 97 7.97 7 97 7.97 5.61 5 61

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

63.47 6 3 47 32.97 32 97 32.99 32 99 20.47 20 47 28.99 28 99 16.47 16 47 1 3 97 13.97 1 3 97 13.97 1 3 47 13.47 1 1 97 11.97 1 1 97 11.97 1 0 97 10.97 1 1 79 11.79 11 79 11.79 11 47 11.47 10 97 10.97 10 97 10.97 10 47 10.47 10 97 10.97 9 97 9.97 8 97 8.97 7.97 7 97

DOMESTIC D OM EST C WHITE WH T E FAR NIENTE VALLEY CHARDONNAY F AR N EN TE NAPA NAPA V ALLEY C HA R DO NNAY LIOCO L OC O RRV RRV CHARDONNAY CHA R DO NNAY '10 10 MIGRATION RIVER M G RA T O N RUSSIAN R USS A N R VER CHARDONNAY C HA RD ON NAY '10 10 LA LA CREMA CREMA CHARDONNAY CHA RD ON NAY MERRYVALE MERRYVALE CARNEROS CAR NER OS CHARDONNAY C HAR DO NNAY SMOKE SMOKE SCREEN SCREEN CHARDONNAY CHA R DO NNAY '10 10 X WINERY W NERY NORTH N OR TH COAST C OAS T WHITE W H TE C AN NO NBALL C HA R DO NNAY CANNONBALL CHARDONNAY C HS TM C HEL LE C HA R DO NNAY '10 10 CH ST MICHELLE CHARDONNAY S LVER P EAK C HAR DO N NAY '08 08 SILVER PEAK CHARDONNAY O KO P NO T G RGO OKO PINOT GRIGIO P EDRO N CELL S AUV G NO N B LAN C PEDRONCELLI SAUVIGNON BLANC CS M TH R ESL N G K U NG F UG RL SMITH RIESLING KUNG FU GIRL CS M TH C HAR DO N NAY E VE SMITH CHARDONNAY EVE LO HR CHARDONNAY CHA R DO NNAY J LOHR M C HAEL SULLBERG S ULLBE RG CHARDONNAY CHA RD ON NAY MICHAEL CL NE VIOGNIER V OG N ER CLINE MCMAN S VIOGNIER V OG N E R MCMANIS HOG UE PINOT P NO T GRIGIO G R G O '10 10 HOGUE BOGLE SAUVIGNON SAUV G NO N BLANC BLAN C BOGLE 14 HANDS HA NDS WHITE W H TE 14 PARDUCCI P ARD UC C S SUSTAINABLE US TA NABLE W WHITE H TE


November 8, 2012