Page 1

ENGELSKA 5

Simon Phillips

Tove Phillips

Läromedlet består av både tryckta och digitala komponenter: Elevbok 40-68142-3

Tryckt elevbok med texter, övningar och tips-sidor

Lärar-cd 40-68554-4

Cd-skivor med ljudfiler till elevbokens texter och hörövningar

Interaktiv elevbok 40-68507-0 Digital elevbok med ljud, interaktiva övningar, filmer och länkar Interaktiv lärarbok 40-68509-4

Digital lärarbok med facit, hörförståelsemanus och andra lärarresurser

Simon Phillips är skribent, översättare, ekonom och engelsman som levt många år i Sverige. Simons främsta intressen är samhällsfrågor, fotboll och fiske. Tove Phillips är skribent och gymnasielärare i engelska och barn- och fritidsämnen. När hon inte står i klassrummet på Marks gymnasieskola blir hon gärna lite jordig under naglarna hemma i trädgården.

PICK & MIX

PICK & MIX är ett unikt och nytänkande basläromedel för Engelska steg 5 på gymnasiet och komvux. Materialet erbjuder ett flexibelt arbetssätt som ger läraren möjlighet att skräddarsy undervisningen enligt sina behov.

Simon Phillips Tove Phillips

x i m & k c pi

x i m & k pic ENGELSKA 5

Simon Phillips

Tove Phillips


Welcome to Pick & Mix Pick & Mix is a new, innovative and user-friendly course material for gymnasieskolan’s course Engelska 5, developed in line with Gy 2011 requirements. The texts cover a wide range of interesting subjects and each chapter gives the student plenty of opportunities to practise the four major skills: reading, listening, speaking and writing. Each chapter also contains a grammar section which covers the main areas that students need to know. Pick & Mix works just as well for lesson-based learning as for individual studies, and gives you everything you need to achieve your aims at Engelska 5. There are two possible approaches to using the material:

•

A traditional themes approach, in which you work through the chapters and sections in the order they appear in the book. This will give you plenty of opportunity to practise all the skills that are required to pass Engelska 5.

•

A selective skills approach, where you pick and mix the skills and themes you feel the need to study, whether it be reading, listening, speaking, writing or grammar. This way you can focus on the specific skills that you need to improve.

We hope that you, teachers and students, will find Pick & Mix an inspiring and useful tool for teaching and learning English! Simon Phillips and Tove Phillips Kinna 2013


contents (by theme) 1. Culture Shock..................................................................................7 WARM-UP Dinner at his parents’ 8 READING Dos and don’ts in different countries 10 LISTENING Shoes off, please! 16 SPEAKING Been there? 18 WRITING Stranger in a strange land 20 GRAMMAR Nouns: Plural 22 BONUS Which country? 26

2. Weird Hobbies..............................................................................27 WARM-UP Alternate reality 28 READING Happy with a hobby 30 LISTENING Modern explorers 36 SPEAKING Good or bad? 38 WRITING Free time and bee time 40 GRAMMAR Possessive form 42 BONUS Collecting 46

3. Fabulous Food...............................................................................47 WARM-UP Not for me, thanks... 48 READING The growing population 50 LISTENING Death by chocolate 56 SPEAKING Help yourself! 58 WRITING Tickle your tastebuds 60 GRAMMAR Indefinite and definite form 62 BONUS What does it mean? 66

4. Animal Rights.................................................................................67 WARM-UP Man’s best friend? 68 READING Mice and men 70 LISTENING Meat is murder 76 SPEAKING Furry friends 78 WRITING Breeding and feeding 80 GRAMMAR Pronouns 82 BONUS Which animal are you? 86

5. Behind the Scenes.........................................................................87 WARM-UP Popular piracy 88 READING The glamorous life of a film extra 90 LISTENING On the red carpet 96 SPEAKING On stage 98 WRITING Starstruck 100 GRAMMAR Verb tenses 102 BONUS Which film? 106

6. Conspiracy Theories..................................................................107 WARM-UP What’s your poison? 108 READING From outer space 110 LISTENING Top secret 116 SPEAKING True or false? 118 WRITING Believe it or not 120 GRAMMAR Auxiliary verbs 122 BONUS Who is always telling the truth? 126


7. A World of Sports......................................................................127 WARM-UP Money matters 128 READING In the lion’s den 130 LISTENING A game of two halves 136 SPEAKING On the rebound 138 WRITING Extra time 140 GRAMMAR How do you do “do”? 142 BONUS Sports in English-speaking countries 146

8. Plastic Surgery..............................................................................147 WARM-UP Under the knife 148 READING The history of plastic surgery 150 LISTENING Confessions over coffee 156 SPEAKING A new nose? 158 WRITING Cut, snip and tuck 160 GRAMMAR Adjectives and adverbs 162 BONUS How vain are you? 166

9. Crime and Punishment..............................................................167 WARM-UP Stretching the law 168 READING Ludicrous laws 170 LISTENING In court 176 SPEAKING Thick as thieves 178 WRITING Sentenced... 180 GRAMMAR Prepositions 182 BONUS Who’s the killer? 186

10. Working Life................................................................................187 WARM-UP Calling in sick 188 READING Right person for the job? 190 LISTENING First impressions 196 SPEAKING Work wonders 198 WRITING Hire me! 200 GRAMMAR Word order 202 BONUS Which profession? 206

Extra material.....................................................................................207 How to conduct an interview How to discuss and debate How to make a good advert How to make a presentation How to write a CV How to write a letter How to write a letter of application How to write a recipe How to write/perform a sketch How to write a summary How to write an argumentative text How to write an article How to write an essay List of irregular verbs


Contents (BY SKILL) WARM-UP

Dinner at his parents’ 8 Alternate reality 28 Not for me, thanks... 48 Man’s best friend? 68 Popular piracy 88

READING

Dos and don’ts in different countries 10 Happy with a hobby 30 The growing population 50 Mice and men 70 The glamorous life of a film extra 90

LISTENING

Shoes off, please! 16 Modern explorers 36 Death by chocolate 56 Meat is murder 76 On the red carpet 96

SPEAKING

Been there? 18 Good or bad? 38 Help yourself! 58 Furry friends 78 On stage 98

WRITING

Stranger in a strange land 20 Free time and bee time 40 Tickle your tastebuds 60 Breeding and feeding 80 Starstruck 100

GRAMMAR

Nouns: Plural 22 Possessive form 42 Indefinite and definite form 62 Pronouns 82 Verb tenses 102

BONUS

Which country? 26 Collecting 46 What does it mean? 66 Which animal are you? 86 Which film? 106

What’s your poison? 108 Money matters 128 Under the knife 148 Stretching the law 168 Calling in sick 188 From outer space 110 In the lion’s den 130 The history of plastic surgery 150 Ludicrous laws 170 Right person for the job? 190 Top secret 116 A game of two halves 136 Confessions over coffee 156 In court 176 First impressions 196 True or false? 118 On the rebound 138 A new nose? 158 Thick as thieves 178 Work wonders 198 Believe it or not 120 Extra time 140 Cut, snip and tuck 160 Sentenced... 180 Hire me! 200 Auxiliary verbs 122 How do you do “do”? 142 Adjectives and adverbs 162 Prepositions 182 Word order 202 Who is always telling the truth? 126 Sports in English-speaking countries 146 How vain are you? 166 Who’s the killer? 186 Which profession? 206


really weird? Ever eaten anything r? ly strange behaviou al re e m so en se r Eve

k c o h s e r u cult

7


ck:

e sho cultur

t a r e dinn ’ s t n e r a p s hi

Jane and Jeremy come from two very different backgrounds. They have been dating for a few weeks when they are invited to dinner with Jeremy’s parents. Jeremy’s parents’ house is massive and Jane thinks they are both really posh. The others are dressed much more smartly than her. She doesn’t really like the strange food which looks like mussels or snails or something, and isn’t sure which of the many pieces of cutlery to use for each course. Jeremy

warm-up

and his parents talk a lot about art, books, politics and their experiences in other countries. Jane has never been abroad and she hasn’t read a book since she was a kid. When she gets back to her flat, Jane wonders if she should stop seeing Jeremy.

8


Discuss Discuss in pairs. 1. What would you have done if you were Jane? Why? 2. What would you have done if you were Jeremy? Why? 3. Have you ever been in a similar situation to Jane and Jeremy’s? 4. What could Jeremy’s parents have done to make the evening easier for Jane? 5. Should Jane have made more effort to find out what the evening would be like? Why/why not? How could she have done this? 6. Is it important that you have the same cultural background as your boyfriend’s or girlfriend’s family? Why/why not?

9


n i s t ’ n o d d s n e a i s r o t d n u o c t n e r diffe ck:

sho e r u t l cu

This forum is open for general discussions on travelling and backpacking. Please respect the views of other people. The moderator reserves the right to remove any posts that could be seen as offensive.

Forum: Travelling: General Dos and Don’ts in Asia

READING

posted by Jenny86 2013-08-22 21:35 Jenny86 2013-08-22 21:35

Hi everyone! I’ve now been working really hard for eight months (!) to save up money to do some travelling. I’m planning to travel mainly around Asia, probably starting off in Israel or Egypt and working my way across through India, Thailand and Japan. I would be grateful for ANY tips, particularly when it comes to the cultural bits. What to wear, what not to wear, what to say, what not to say etc. I really want to avoid offending people!!

Kilroy 2013-08-22 22:04

First thing to check out is the religious stuff. For example, in any Muslim country, you should think about what you wear, especially if you’re a chick. Cover up the interesting bits :-). Some places are stricter than others. In some Arab countries, you shouldn’t look men in the eye if you’re female.

Jenny86 2013-08-22 22:09

What about greeting? Do you shake hands, hug, kiss on the cheek, bow or curtsy?

10


es

Mr Big 2013-08-22 22:15

Elasticman 2013-08-22 22:31

Well, that obviously depends on which country you’re in. In India, you press your hands together, bow and say “namaste”. Bowing is quite common in all Asian countries, I think. In Arab countries many people do the cheekkissing. I was in Oman a few years back, they actually kiss each other on the nose and then they shake hands. And blokes walk around holding hands. Weird!

Ahmad-73 2013-08-22 22:36

In most Arab countries you shake hands if you’re being formal and kiss the cheeks of people you know well.

Kilroy 2013-08-22 22:46

I think bowing is more in eastern Asia. Japanese people are very particular about their bowing. How deep you bow depends on what status you have and how well you know the person.

SeaHorse 2013-08-22 22:59

Yamato86 2013-08-22 23:14

Japanese people are really reserved. They are extremely polite, never say what they think and always expect you to know what they’re thinking. It’s a pain in the ass if you’re American and expect to say whatever you think. I’ve made a fool of myself loads of times in Japan. Well, it all depends from which angle you look at it. To an American, Japanese people seem reserved. To some of us Japanese, Americans may seem a bit... over the top...

Gemini 2013-08-22 23:54

Swedes are even worse than the Japanese. They never talk to strangers and you can never just turn up at someone’s house. You always have to ring first. And they have really boring lives. No wonder they’re so suicidal...

Linnea 2013-08-23 00:12

That’s not true about Swedes. You’re just prejudiced. Or jealous because we’re so good looking :-)

11

bloke

informellt kille

boring

tråkig

bow

buga

check out undersöka cheek

informellt

kind

chick

informellt tjej

common

vanlig

cover up curtsy

täcka över niga

depend on expect fool

förvänta

idiot

formal

formell

greeting hug

bero på

hälsning

kramas

jealous

avundsjuk

know

känna

loads of

informellt många

offend

förolämpa

over the top

överdriven

pain in the ass particular polite

slang jobbig

noggrann, kräsen

artig

prejudiced press

fördomsfull

trycka

reserved

tillbakadragen

stranger

främling

strict stuff turn up weird

sträng informellt saker informellt dyka upp konstig. kuslig


READING culture shock

Gemini 2013-08-23 00:19

Yeah right! And Brits are pale and eat really bad food. Scots are stingy. The French whinge about everything. Greeks are lazy. Germans are sadistic and Italians are womanizers.

Bomber 2013-08-23 01:31

Can the moderator please remove this thick idiot from the forum?

Jenny86 2013-08-23 08:33

Thanks for all the tips – really useful! Please keep posting!

Hotspur 2013-08-23 10.14

Then of course there’s all the food stuff. No pork or alcohol in Muslim countries. No beef in India (the Hindus think that cows are holy animals). You can’t even get a beef burger in McDonald’s!!!!!

AngelaF 2013-08-23 15:45

If you go to Korea, don’t be surprised if you find dog on the menu. And I’m not talking hot dogs, but proper dogs. It’s considered a delicacy. Tastes horrible - yuk!

Queenie 2013-08-23 15:59

Did you know they eat dogs in some parts of Switzerland?

JFK 2013-08-23 16:04

Queenie: I know – I’ve tasted it! It’s illegal, though.

Malcolm 2013-08-23 21:53

Something really funny (or not) happened to me when I was in Egypt for work last summer. I was invited to my boss’s house for dinner. I brought some flowers and wine, as I’ve heard you’re meant to bring something. Had a really nice meal. He had some really nice looking stuff in his house and I made some comment about this ornament... a bronze cat sort of thing. I said I really liked it and you know what the guy did? He gave it to me! Just like that! I was really grateful and everything, but I must have done something wrong, because the boss seemed really annoyed with me after that evening.

Farao 2013-08-23 22:37

No wonder your boss was annoyed: Firstly – flowers are only given at weddings and funerals. Secondly – never give wine to a muslim. Thirdly – if you admire something in an Egyptian’s home, he feels he has to give it to you... but then he also expects you to give him something back. So there...

12


annoyed

irriterad

beef

nötkött

boss

chef

bronze

brons

delicacy

delikatess

funeral

begravning

grateful

tacksam

guy

informellt kille

holy

helig

horrible

fruktansvärd

hot dog bröd)

varm korv (med

illegal

olaglig

lazy

lat

pale

blek

pork

fläskkött

stingy

informellt snål

surprised thick

förvånad

informellt dum

wedding whinge

bröllop informellt gnälla

womanizer

General understandInG Find the answers in the text. 1. In one sentence, what would you say that the text is about? 2. What does the text teach us about our similarities and differences? 3. Give three examples of behaviour that differs between different countries and cultures.

13

kvinnojägare


Multiple choice

READING culture shock

Choose the correct answer: a, b, c or d. 1. Which of these countries was Jenny86 NOT planning to visit? a) India b) Thailand c) Switzerland d) Egypt

6. A stereotype of Scottish people is that they are a) Lazy b) Mean c) Reserved d) Religious

2. Why should females dress modestly in certain countries, according to Kilroy? a) Risk of sunburn b) Religious considerations c) In order not to look like a tourist d) Risk of crime

7. What was the reaction to Gemini’s postings on the forum? a) Someone wanted him/her banned b) He/she was thanked for good tips c) He/she was ignored d) He/she was called a troll

3. What way of greeting, considered unusual by westerners, is common in Oman? a) Rubbing noses b) Kissing noses c) Handshake using the left hand d) Rubbing heads

8. What is said to be special about India? a) Hot dogs contain real dogs b) Indians are reserved c) Indians often kiss each other d) McDonald’s don’t sell beef burgers

4. How low you bow in Japan can be influenced by your a) Height b) Weight c) Religion d) Relationship to the person you are greeting

9. In which European country is dog meat eaten by some people? a) Korea b) Scotland c) Switzerland d) Sweden

5. According to SeaHorse, what are Japanese people like? a) Boring b) Outgoing c) Shy d) Loud

10. According to Farao, what can happen if you say you like an object in an Egyptian’s house? a) You will be expected to buy it b) The host will be offended c) The host will expect flowers d) The host will give it to you

14


vocabulary check Fill in the gap with the correct form of the word in brackets. 1. In India, cows are ___ (helig) than pigs. 2. The woman had never ___ (krama) her brother-in-law. 3. The film was ___ (olaglig) downloaded. 4. He is ___ (lat) than me. 5. He always ___ (dyka upp) too late. 6. Have you met these ___ (kille)? 7. Everything went ___ (fruktansvärd) wrong. 8. Stop ___ (gnälla)! 9. They ___ (förolämpa) me yesterday. 10. It ___ (bero på) the weather.

Between the lines Discuss with a partner. Give reasons for your answers! 1. Why do you think there are different attitudes to being “on time” in different countries? 2. Why do you think eye contact is considered polite in some countries and rude in others? 3. Why do you think it is uncommon in Sweden to give opinions about politics or religion to people you don’t know well? 4. Why is it good to have some knowledge about cultural differences?

15


! e s a e ff, pl

ck:

e sho cultur

o s e o sh

Hank from Texas has gone to Sweden to attend a business conference. Listen to the story about Hank’s visit to Sweden.

General understanding Find the answers in the text. 1. Why was Hank staying with Bengt? 2. What did Bengt and Hank think of each other? 3. What did Hank think about Sweden?

listening

Fill in the blanks Complete the sentences from the conversation with the missing words. 1. Bengt ___ his fingers would be ___. 2. It would have been ___ to ___ with him, but it was also ___ to say anything at all in reply. 3. He just ___ really ___ about what he said. 4. No wonder the ___ ___ are so tiny! 5. As ___ as I get home, I will send him some ___ Texan ___.

16


Multiple choice

admire beundra

Choose the correct answer: a, b, c or d.

break paus, rast (fika)

boots kängor, stövlar company företag

1. Why was Hank in Sweden? a) To buy a pair of shoes b) To attend a conference c) To catch up on some paperwork d) To eat meatballs

cookie AmE kaka, kex despite trots difficult svår disagree inte hålla med fatten up göda feeling känsla

2. What did Hank think of Bengt? a) He drank too much coffee b) He was very loud c) He worked too hard d) He was rather quiet

genuine äkta hospitality gästfrihet impression intryck notice märka

3. What did Hank tell Marie about the food in Sweden? a) The portions served were very small b) It was too sugary c) It was expensive d) The portions served were very large 4. What present was Hank going to send Bengt? a) A book about politics b) American yoghurt c) A pair of shoes d) A video from the conference

Between the lines Discuss with a partner. Give reasons for your answers! 1. Why do you think Bengt didn’t ask Hank to take his boots off in the house? 2. Why do you think Bengt was quieter than Hank? 3. Do you think Bengt will have more to say if they meet again?

17

office kontor paperwork pappersarbete plate tallrik remove ta av reveal avslöja, visa scenery landskap, natur tiny

mycket liten

trouble besvär


ck:

e sho cultur

THERE BEEN

?

Discuss Discuss in groups. 1. In what ways can cultural differences make it more difficult for people to understand each other? 2. Why do you think many people feel uncomfortable in unfamiliar situations? 3. What culture shocks have you experienced when in a different city or country? 4. Give examples of different cultures in your community. 5. What are the advantages of a multicultural society? What problems can arise?

speaking

Useful words and phrases abroad utomlands

misunderstand missförstå

behaviour beteende

mussel mussla

body language kroppspråk

Please explain Var vänlig och förklara

break up göra slut

posh flott, förnäm

choice val

prejudice fördom

course maträtt

shy blyg

cutlery bestick

smart elegant, flott

flat lägenhet

tension spänd atmosfär

friendly vänlig

unused to ovan vid

habit vana

upbringing uppfostran

have in common ha något gemensamt med

values värderingar

law lag

18


interview Work in pairs. Interview each other about places or countries you have been to and what your experiences were. OR: Each of you chooses a nationality to be. Interview each other about your culture and answer as well as you can. The questions can be about anything from food and clothing to traditions and habits.

sketch Work in groups. Write a 2-minute sketch about a situation involving some sort of culture shock. It can be funny or embarrassing, but avoid making fun of other nationalities. Perform it for the rest of the class.

Tips! How to conduct an interview – page 208 How to write/perform a sketch – page 216

19


ck:

sho e r u t l cu

a n i r e g n a r st d n a l e g n a r st

Translate A. Translate the following sentences from English to Swedish. 1. It is important to find out about the local culture when you are abroad. 2. You can experience culture shocks in your own country. 3. It can be difficult to adapt to a new culture. 4. You should arrive on time for meetings in Sweden.

writing

5. There are many different ways of greeting people.

B. Now translate these sentences from Swedish to English. 1. Undvik ögonkontakt när du besöker Japan. 2. Det är olagligt att slå barn i Sverige. 3. Lägg inte fötterna på bordet i Asien. 4. Den mat du äter är en del av din kultur. 5. Människor är mer lika än de är olika.

20


dear diary... Pretend that you have landed on a totally different planet. It is your first day and you have met a lot of strange people and seen a lot of strange behaviour. Write a fictional entry in your diary about your day and the culture shock you have experienced. Start with the phrase: “Dear Diary, Guess what happened today?”

visit our country! Work in groups. Each group chooses a country. Your task is to create an advertising poster that aims to make more tourists come to your country. The focus should be on the fantastic culture of your chosen country. Use text and images in a creative way to make everybody want to spend their holiday there. Make an exhibition of all the posters and vote on which poster is the best.

Tips! How to make a good advert – page 210

Useful words and phrases amazing fantastisk

extended family storfamilj

apologize be om ursäkt

gender genus, kön

argue gräla

generous generös

avoid undvika

give the thumbs up göra ”tummen upp”

awkward obekväm, pinsam

herring sill

climate klimat

hug krama

confusing förvirrande

indecent oanständig

custom sedvänja, tradition

kiss on the cheek pussa på kinden

difference skillnad

leisure fritid

directions riktning, vägbeskrivning

pretend låtsas

discover upptäcka

privacy privatliv, integritet

education utbildning

rude oartig

exciting spännande

scruffy ovårdad

21


ck:

l a r u ns: pl

sho e r u t l cu

nou

Nouns are words that usually name people and animals (John, cat), things (chair, boat), places (beach, Sweden), substances (steel, water), activities and events (football, holiday), characteristics and conditions (intelligence, anger) and abstract ideas (love, justice). Countable nouns can be singular or plural. Some nouns are neither singular nor plural – they are called uncountable nouns.

regular plural Most nouns are made plural by adding the suffix -s: one cat a feeling an ambulance

two cats many feelings three ambulances

Grammar

Sometimes the spelling is changed slightly when forming a regular plural. Nouns ending in -s, -x, -z, -ch and -sh are made plural by adding -es: one bus a box

two buses two boxes

For nouns ending in -y after a consonant, the y is changed into -ies: one country a family

two countries two families

Most nouns ending in -o are made plural by adding the suffix -es: one tomato

two tomatoes

However, abbreviated words ending with -o only get the suffix -s: radios, photos

22

abbreviated words are words that have been shortened: radio = radio-telephony photo = photograph


irregular plural There are also a lot of nouns with irregular plural forms. Some of them follow certain rules, while others are completely irregular. For some words ending in -f or -fe, the -f/-fe is changed into -ves. For example: wife, life, knife, wolf, self, calf, shelf, loaf, leaf, thief, sheaf, half and elf: one wife

two wives

Some nouns have the same form in singular and plural: one fish – two fish, one sheep – two sheep, one deer – two deer, one series – two series, one species – two species Other nouns have a completely irregular plural form: foot – feet, goose – geese, louse – lice, man – men, mouse – mice, tooth – teeth, woman – women, child – children

Practise plural nouns A. Write the plural form of the following words: boy, potato, monkey, kilo, tax, wolf, hero, baby, bush, sheep, thief, crash, hat, way, lorry, video, man, guy, dress, match, worry, fox, eyelash, echo, mouse

B. Now fill the gaps with the words in the box in the correct form: 1. I drank three ___ of water after the hot curry. 2. According to Hindusim, we have many ___ . 3. Paris is one of my favourite ___ . 4. In many countries, ___ have a higher status than ___ . 5. In some cultures, people eat insects such as ___ . 6. The Brazilian had four ___ .

23

life, child, louse, man, city, glass, woman


uncountable nouns Uncountable nouns exist in both English and Swedish. These are nouns that cannot be counted. For example, you cannot say a sugar, one anger, many intelligence or two water. Therefore, many of these words do not have a plural form. Uncountable nouns are usually treated as singular: Sugar is sweet. The water is cold. The weather is bad. Some nouns can be both countable and uncountable, depending on the context: Egg is rich in protein. (uncountable – egg in general) I had two eggs for lunch. (countable – two actual eggs) I don’t like beer. (uncountable – beer in general) He had two beers after dinner. (countable – two glasses of beer)

Grammar culture shock

Certain nouns are treated as plural, but lack the -s: The police are working hard. (use police officer for the singular form) There are many people here. (use person for the singular form) Some nouns that are singular in Swedish are plural in English, for example: stairs (trappa), scissors (sax), pyjamas (pyjamas), knickers (trosa), customs (tull), contents (innehåll), looks (utseende), morals (moral).

7

3

1

8

5

4

2

9

6

2

5

Some nouns that are countable in Swedish are uncountable in English, for example: advice (råd), furniture (möbler), homework (läxor), information (upplysningar), money (pengar), work (arbete), progress (framsteg), evidence (bevis), bread (bröd), soap (tvål), news (nyheter). These nouns cannot be used with numerals or quantity words such as many. Instead, you have to use some or another form of measure word: De har köpt några nya möbler. Jag har fem läxor . Jag har bakat tre bröd. Jag har en god nyhet.

They have bought some new furniture. I have five pieces of homework. I have baked three loaves of bread. I have some good news.

24

9


Practise uncountable nouns A. Choose the correct word: 1. It is difficult to find work/a work in England. 2. Zimbabwe has beautiful/a beautiful nature. 3. The news is/are good! 4. Can I have two bacons/two rashers of bacon, please? 5. My knickers is/are in my hand luggage! 6. The content/contents of the basket was/were fantastic! 7. I need some advice/advices on how to behave in China. 8. I met three nice polices/police officers in Denmark. 9. The Greek people/peoples are so friendly! 10. I bought two soaps/bars of soap in France. 11. I haven’t got the scissor/scissors. 12. Where is/are my pyjamas?

B. Translate the sentences, paying special attention to the nouns: 1. Jag köper alltid ett bröd när jag är i Tyskland.

9

2. Det finns inga bevis för att svenskar är blyga. 3. Indien har gjort många framsteg under senare år. 4. Tullen i USA var väldigt hård. 5. Danska möbler är väldigt populära. 6. Upplysningarna om australienarna är felaktiga. 7. Dina pengar är säkra på hotellet. 8. Var är min pyjamas? 9. Trappan i kyrkan är väldigt gammal. 10. En del människor är väldigt intresserade av sitt utseende.

25


ock:

e sh cultur

h c i h w

? y r t coun Match the foods with the correct English-speaking countries.

1.

Fish and chips

2.

Vegemite on toast

3.

Bacon and cabbage

4.

Curry

5.

Hamburger

6.

Maple syrup

7.

Lolly cake

8.

Jerk chicken

9.

Cou cou and flying fish

10.

Haggis

11.

Bobotie

12.

Tatws Pum Munud

A.

India

B.

USA

C.

Scotland

D.

South Africa

E.

England

F.

Jamaica

G.

Australia

H.

Canada

I.

New Zealand

J.

Barbados

K.

Wales

L.

Ireland

bonus

Now use the Internet to find out more about the foods in the list you have not heard about before.

Key: 1-E, 2-G, 3-L, 4-A, 5-B, 6-H, 7-I, 8-F, 9-J, 10-C, 11-D, 12-K

26


ENGELSKA 5

Simon Phillips

Tove Phillips

Läromedlet består av både tryckta och digitala komponenter: Elevbok 40-68142-3

Tryckt elevbok med texter, övningar och tips-sidor

Lärar-cd 40-68554-4

Cd-skivor med ljudfiler till elevbokens texter och hörövningar

Interaktiv elevbok 40-68507-0 Digital elevbok med ljud, interaktiva övningar, filmer och länkar Interaktiv lärarbok 40-68509-4

Digital lärarbok med facit, hörförståelsemanus och andra lärarresurser

Simon Phillips är skribent, översättare, ekonom och engelsman som levt många år i Sverige. Simons främsta intressen är samhällsfrågor, fotboll och fiske. Tove Phillips är skribent och gymnasielärare i engelska och barn- och fritidsämnen. När hon inte står i klassrummet på Marks gymnasieskola blir hon gärna lite jordig under naglarna hemma i trädgården.

PICK & MIX

PICK & MIX är ett unikt och nytänkande basläromedel för Engelska steg 5 på gymnasiet och komvux. Materialet erbjuder ett flexibelt arbetssätt som ger läraren möjlighet att skräddarsy undervisningen enligt sina behov.

Simon Phillips Tove Phillips

x i m & k c pi

x i m & k pic ENGELSKA 5

Simon Phillips

Tove Phillips

Profile for Smakprov Media AB

9789140681423  

9789140681423  

Profile for smakprov

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded