Issuu on Google+

W eekend SV

Saukvalley.com

Your source for news and sports 7 days a week

Serving Lee, Whiteside, Carroll, Ogle and Bureau counties Saturday&Sunday, December 21-22, 2013 $2.00

Newman defeats ’Bago for title

VIVA! LEADER TURNS HIMSELFDIXON, IN TO POLICE A3

SPORTS, B1

WEEKEND ENTERPRISE | SHAKEN BABY CASE

Looking for closure Nearly 5 years later, Rock Falls family waits for outcome in case BY CHRISTI WARREN cwarren@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 521

ROCK FALLS – Today, Alayna Brandt is just like any other 5-year-old girl. She dances hip-hop, ballet, and tap. She loves to ride her horse. She goes to preschool. “She’s very much a girlygirl,” her mother says, laughing. But for a period of time, her future wasn’t quite as secure. The Brandts were introduced to Karyn McCallister and her

unlicensed Sterling daycare business through a friend. They first enrolled their autistic son, Maison, and then their infant daughter, Alayna. On Feb. 24, 2009, about 3:45 p.m., Ann Brandt got a phone call. “I was at work, and Karyn called the salon,” Ann says. “Since it was practically 5 years ago, the exact wording is hard to recall, but I remember her saying Alayna’s eyes were rolling back in her head, and she was afraid she was going

to stop breathing.” When Ann got to Karyn’s, she took Alayna from her arms. “Karyn was holding her head up, and she gave her to me, and I grabbed her around the trunk because she was almost 5 months old, she was holding her head up, but it just completely flopped backwards,” Ann says. “There was no head control.” She left for CGH Medical Center immediately, unsure of what it meant. CLOSURE CONTINUED ON A4

NELSON

Financing finalized for power project Plant could be biggest taxpayer in Lee County

Philip Marruffo/ pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Alayna Brandt, 5, with her parents, Ann and Jacob, at their home near Rock Falls.

WINTER WEATHER

A tough go on the roads

BY PAM EGGEMEIER peggemeier@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 570

NELSON – Financing for construction of the long-planned Nelson natural gas-fired power plant has been finalized. A lending group led by General Electric will provide loans for Chicago-based Invenergy LLC to get the 584-megawatt plant operational. One megawatt of power provides electricity for about 1,000 homes. GE is involved in the project on two levels. In addition to heading up the financing arrangement, the company will provide much of the equipment for the plant under a long-term contract for maintenance and engineering services. Included will be two gas turbines and two steam turbines equipped with software designed to improve efficiency and cut operational costs. POWER CONTINUED ON A5

KSB: OPERATION MOVE TO WIN

Healthier holidays for some Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

The eastbound lanes of Interstate 88 near mile marker 35 were closed for a time Friday morning after a tanker truck hauling hazardous materials overturned. A layer of ice greeted commuters Friday morning, making driving treacherous.

Ice makes travel difficult; winter storm on the way BY CHRISTI WARREN cwarren@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 521

STERLING – Freezing rain made for some tough sledding on the roads Friday. With a winter storm on the way, it might get tougher this weekend. At least one person was injured Friday morning when a Sterling Fire Department fire engine, traveling west on Lynn Boulevard, skidded on a patch of ice and hit at least one oncoming car in the process. The engine, which was en route to an accident on Interstate 88, skidded out of control before striking the curb and rolling into a snow-cov-

Weekend forecast A winter storm warning is in effect from 6 p.m. today until 6 p.m. Sunday. Snow will develop in the early evening tonight, becoming heavy, with accumulations of 5 to 9 inches. Winds will gust up to 30 mph tonight into Sunday. ered cornfield about a quarter-mile west of Avenue E. The driver of the oncoming car, Nancy Surdez, 65, of Christi Warren/cwarren@saukvalley.com Lyndon, was taken to CGH Medical Center for unknown Sterling Fire Department personnel work at the scene where a department fire engine skidded, struck a car, then rolled injuries. over in a cornfield on Lynn Boulevard near Avenue E on FriROADS CONTINUED ON A2 day morning.

BY PAM EGGEMEIER peggemeier@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 570

DIXON – Operation Move to Win has a new group of winners. The KSB Community Wellness corporate weight-loss initiative recently finished its second 12-week session. More than 1,400 pounds were shed by 426 employees of 16 participating companies. The initiative launched in January when the first session drew 514 people from 13 companies who collectively lost about 3,000 pounds. The program is the brainchild of Christine Scheffler, KSB Community Wellness coordinator, and Carrie Grobe, KSB Community Wellness dietitian. After wrapping up the program’s first year, they are using surveys to help determine whether the demand warrants one or two sessions a year. HEALTHIER CONTINUED ON A8

Scattered rain

VOLUME 6 ISSUE 17 44 Pages

Today: 31/27 For the forecast, see Page A9

Skate school

Roller skating brings fun and fitness to Lincoln School students in Dixon. See Page C12

Quick gift choices Still shopping for the perfect present? Check out these ideas. Also inside USA Weekend: Whole-grain gingerbread Massage offers many health benefits

Index Births................ C5 Markets .......... A12 Business........... C1 Nation ............ A10 Classified .......... D1 Obituaries ......... A4 Comics ............. B8 Opinion............. A6 Community ..... C12 Scoreboard ...... B7 Scrapbook ....... C3 Crossword Saturday ........... D6 Sports .............. B1 Support groups .. C5 Crossword Sunday ............. C8 Travel .............. C10 Dear Abby ........ C6 Weather............ A9 Lottery .............. A2 Wheels ............. D8


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

COMMUNITY WATCH Were we in

ERROR? Getting it right 7ECAREABOUTACCU RACY ANDWEWANTTO CORRECTERRORSPROMPTLY 0LEASECALLMISTAKESTO OURATTENTIONAT  OR   EXTOR. Corrections 4HEREARENONETODAY

POLICE & FIRE Dixon Police Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Sterling firefighters clean up their gear after their tanker tuck skidded on the ice, struck a car, and overturned in a cornfield Friday morning on Lynn Boulevard. The driver of the car was injured and taken to CGH Medical Center. The driver and passenger in the fire engine were not hurt.

AFC school bus stuck on hill ROADS

on another bus. That situation, which led to a number of other cars getting stuck on the ice, was one of quite a few that Lee County Sheriff’s deputies responded to Friday. But they weren’t the only agency with a higher-than-usual number of accidents. Sterling Police responded to at least six crashes, including the one involving the fire engine. For Dixon Police, at press time, that number was at 11, with one person being taken to KSB Hospital with unknown injuries. Rock Falls handled at least four crashes Friday. The Illinois State Police total was smaller – two accidents and five cars in ditches. Whiteside County sheriff’s deputies responded to six accidents and more than 10 cars in ditches.

CONTINUED FROM A1

According to police, the driver of the fire engine, Garrett E. Ramos, 30, of Sterling, and a passenger, Cory Bianchi, 40, of Sterling, refused treatment at the scene. Freezing rain overnight Thursday and into Friday morning made for slippery driving conditions in the Sauk Valley. Classes in Polo, Eastland, West Carroll and Chadwick-Milledgeville schools were canceled. Dixon public schools started 1 hour late. And at least one school bus had to call for help. A bus from the AshtonFranklin Center School District got stuck on an icy hill on Reynolds Road in the eastern part of Lee County. Its students, said AFC School District Superintendent John Zick, were placed

Eastbound lanes on Interstate 88 near the U.S. Route 30 exit were closed for a time Friday morning after a tanker truck hauling hazardous materials overturned. Driving in the Sauk Valley might not get any easier this weekend. The region is under a winter storm warning from this evening until 6 p.m. Sunday. Freezing rain and drizzle will give way to snow and wind tonight. The National Weather Service is forecasting 5 to 9 inches of snow in the Sauk Valley, with winds gusting to 30 mph tonight and Sunday. And at least one police department has declared a snow emergency in preparation. Rock Falls Police ask that from 6 p.m. today until 6 p.m. Tuesday, drivers follow snow emergency parking restrictions and ordinances.

Reward offered for lost dog !BLACKLABWENTMISSINGNEAR%LKS#AMPGROUNDON ,OWELL0ARK2OADABOUTAM&RIDAY4HEDOGANSWERSTOTHE NAME3HADOW#ALL2UDYAT 

FALL SPECIAL 50 $

GATOR

David T. McKeown  OF$IXONPM4HURSDAY BLOCKOF.ORTH*EFFERSON !VENUE)LLINOIS$EPARTMENTOF #ORRECTIONSWARRANTTAKENTO ,EE#OUNTY*AIL Paige L. Rockwood  OF $IXONPM4HURSDAY 3OUTH'ALENA!VENUE,EE #OUNTYWARRANTFORFAILURETO APPEAR 7INNEBAGO#OUNTY WARRANTFORFAILURETOAPPEAR TAKENTO,EE#OUNTY*AIL Brian L. Jordan  OF $IXONPM4HURSDAY  BLOCKOF3OUTH(ENNEPIN !VENUEFAILURETOREGISTERAS ASEXOFFENDERTAKENTO,EE #OUNTY*AIL

3TERLINGPM4HURSDAY TH!VENUEAND%AST&OURTH 3TREETDRIVINGWHILELICENSE SUSPENDEDGIVENNOTICETO APPEARINCOURT Jarvis Woods  OF3TER LINGPM4HURSDAYIN 3TERLING7HITESIDE#OUNTY WARRANTFORFAILURETOAPPEAR ONACHARGEOFDOMESTIC BATTERYTAKENTO7HITESIDE #OUNTY*AIL

WARRENTFORCONTEMPTPOSTED  BOND Amber C. Latta  OF 2OCHELLEPM4HURSDAY WARRANTFORCONTEMPTTAKENTO ,EE#OUNTY*AIL Frank D. Edwards  OF #HICAGOAM&RIDAY WARRANTFORFAILURETOAPPEARn PETITIONFORREVOCATIONOFPRO BATIONTAKENTO,EE#OUNTY *AIL

Illinois State Police

Ogle County Sheriff

Lisa A. Meese  OF -OLINEPM7EDNES DAY )NTERSTATEIN7HITESIDE #OUNTYSPEEDING DRIVING WHILELICENSESUSPENDED POSTEDBOND Benjamin K. Thornton  OF$IXONAM4HURS DAY $EER2UNAND,AWRENCE 2OADPOSSESSIONOFCANNABIS nLESSTHANGRAMS POS SESSIONOFDRUGPARAPHERNALIA POSTEDBOND

Chris A. Stanbery  OF 3YCAMOREAM4HURSDAY FROMANINCIDENTINTHE BLOCKOF.ORTH4RANSIT3TREETIN #RESTONAGGRAVATEDDOMESTIC BATTERY DOMESTICBATTERYTAKEN TO/GLE#OUNTY*AIL

Rock Falls Police Jesse Russell  OF 'OODFIELDPM4HURS DAYTHEFTTAKENTO7HITESIDE #OUNTY*AIL

Lee County Sheriff

Bryan E. Burton  OF 3TEWARDAM4HURSDAY DRIVINGUNDERTHEINFLUENCE Sterling Police POSTED BOND Michael C. Hailey  OF Collin S. Miller  OF #HICAGOAM4HURS $IXONAM4HURSDAY DAY)LLINOIS$EPARTMENTOF WARRANTFORDRIVINGWHILE #ORRECTIONSWARRANTFORPAROLE LICENSESUSPENDEDnNOINSUR VIOLATIONTAKENTO7HITESIDE ANCETAKENTO,EE#OUNTY #OUNTY*AIL *AIL Albert Dalipi  OF3TER Christopher R. Stauffer LINGPM4HURSDAY  OF$IXONAM4HURS ,OCUST3TREETAND,E&EVRE DAYWARRENTFORCONTEMPT 2OADFAILURETOREDUCESPEED POSTED BOND TOAVOIDACOLLISIONPOSTED Corbin S. Blean  OF DRIVERSLICENSE &ULTONPM4HURSDAY Vandorzel Sledge  OF

Pick Three-Midday:   &IREBALL.ONE Pick Three-Evening:   &IREBALL.ONE Pick Four-Midday:    &IREBALL Pick Four-Evening:    &IREBALL.ONE My 3-Midday:    My 3-Evening:    Lucky Day Lotto – Midday:      Lucky Day Lotto – Evening:      Estimated Lotto

Mattress &

TAKE A BITE OUT OF HIGH PRICES IN HEATING & COOLING THE SAUK VALLEY!

Mattress Sets

815-631-6232

Huge Savings!

Kelly Wallingford - Owner r .KEGPUGF r $QPFGF r +PUWTGF

Open Wednesdays til 6:00 and Sundays 11-4

 7 TH 3T $IXONs   

jackpot: MILLION Estimated Mega Millions jackpot: MILLION Estimated Powerball jackpot: MILLION

BIRTHDAYS (APPYBIRTHDAYTO3COTT,ITTLE 2OGENE2UTER -ARY2OWLAND -ICHAEL(ELM 2UTH-ILLARD -ADISON3LOTHOWER AND*ES SICA*UDD ALLON3ATURDAY (APPYBIRTHDAYTO$AVID 'IULIANI $ELORES"UCK $ONALD 2'RAY "RAD,INTON AND*EN #ISSNA ALLON3UNDAY

463 s !PPLIANCES s -ATTRESSES

3610 % ,).#/,.7!9 s 34%2,).' ),

815-626-2996

Q U E S TI ON ?

T R I V I A

1) In Sweden, a common Christmas decoration is the Julbukk, a small figurine of a goat. Of what material is it usually made? 2) In Tchaikovsky’s ballet “The Nutcracker�, who is the nutcracker’s main enemy? Answer located in today’s classified section

Before you make a move call‌

SHIPPERTS Moving & Storage

404 N. Lincoln Ave., Dixon, IL 288-3133 www.alliedvan.com

STOCK #ND227

US DOT 76235

SVWeekend

Subscription

Production Director

STOCK #ND220

     Mega Ball:  Megaplier: 2

MOVING?

Ernest Appleyard

NEW 2013 NISSAN SENTRA S

MEGA MILLIONS

Get FREE truck rental rate quotes at Prescott Inc.

ILL CC 10540

NEW 2013 NISSAN ALTIMA 3.5 S

Wayne P. Schroeder  OF-ORRISONAM 3UNDAY STATE2OUTEAND &RENCH#REEK2OADIMPROPER LANEUSAGE DRIVINGUNDERTHE INFLUENCEOFALCOHOLGIVEN NOTICETOAPPEARINCOURT Male  OF-ORRISON$EC TRUANCYORDINANCEVIOLA TION Cheryl A. Geiger  OF -ORRISON$ECPARKING ORDINANCEVIOLATION Cindy K. Truitt  OF -ORRISON-ONDAYFAILURETO REDUCESPEEDTOAVOIDAN ACCIDENT

LOTTERY NUMBERS

Dixon Furniture Mart

FURNACE CLEAN AND CHECK

Morrison Police

Jennifer Baratta

Advertising Director

Kris Boggs

Human Resources

Randy Jacobs

Subscribers should receive their paper by 7:00 a.m. weekdays, and by 8:00 a.m. Saturdays. Subscribers receiving the paper by carrier should call their your carrier, Daily Gazette subscribers should call 815-625-3600, and Telegraph subscribers should call 815-284-2222. Redelivery will be made in Sterling, Dixon, and Rock Falls. All other areas will receive are 6:00 a.m. to noon on Saturday.

Press Foreman

NEW BODY STYLE, 6 CYLINDER

MSRP-$27,160, -2,444 Discount, -$1,500 Rebate, -$500 NMAC Cash, -$500 Holiday Cash

31 MPG HIGHWAY

FINAL PRICE 22,216 $

MSRP-$17,730, -$500 NMAC CASH, -1,000 DISCOUNT, AND .9% FINANCING!

*

NEW 2014 NISSAN MAXIMA SV

39 MPG HIGHWAY

$

275 X 60/mo

**

NEW 2013 NISSAN MURANO SL AWD

STOCK #ND087

Ed Bushman

General

Telegraph General Manager

Joanne Doherty Finance Director

Sheryl Gulbranson

Circulation Director

Larry Lough Executive Editor

Trevis Mayfield Publisher

Jeff Rogers Managing Editor

STOCK #NE061

HEATED SEATS, BOSE, SUNROOF! WITH SPORT PACKAGE

LEATHER, HEATED SEATS, BOSE AUDIO!

MSRP-$37,535, -$2,500 Rebate, -$2,500 discount, -$2,000 One To One MSRP-$40,805, -$3,214 Discount, -$2,000 rebate, -$2,000 One to One Rewards, -$1,500 Bonus Cash, -$500 NMAC Cash = $9,000 OFF! Rewards, -$1,000 Bonus Cash, -$500 NMAC Cash= 8,714 OFF!

FINAL PRICE $28,535* NISSAN

FINAL PRICE $32,091*

928 N. GALENA, DIXON, IL

SV Weekend uses recycled paper and is recyclable.

815-288-4455

WWW.KENNELSONAUTO.COM

*Plus tax, title, license, & doc fee. All rebates & incentives applied. Not all buyers will qualify. See dealer for details. ** With approved credit thru NMAC. Tax, title license & doc fee down. Ask for complete details.

815-625-3600

815-284-2224

www.saukvalley.com


3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

DIXON | STATE TREASURER VISITS

367EEKENDs!

DIXON

VIVA! leader turns himself in Charged with failing to report sexual abuse allegations by student STAFF REPORT news@saukvalley.com    EXT

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

State Treasurer Dan Rutherford, a candidate for the Republican nomination for governor in 2014, speaks to a group Friday afternoon at Galena Steak House in Dixon.

Rutherford: Tight budgets require state facilities plan Republican critical of state hospital, prison closures BY LARRY LOUGH llough@saukvalley.com    EXT

DIXON – Illinois needs a “well thought-out� strategic plan for its prisons and other state facilities so intelligent decisions can be made when tight budgets require closures, State Treasurer Dan Rutherford said Friday during a news conference. Such decisions are not the responsibility of the state treasurer, but Rutherford was in Dixon as part of his campaign to become governor. Rutherford, a former state legislator, is among four Republicans seeking their party’s nomination for governor in a hotly contested campaign. About a dozen people met with him Friday at Galena Steak House to talk briefly about state issues. He is promoting a plan to evaluate “every major state facility� – including Dixon Correctional Center – to avoid the kind of “arbitrary� decisions made by Democratic Govs. Blagojevich and Quinn to close state hospitals and prisons to save money. “I understand budgets; money is tight,� Ruth-

erford said. “We should put together a long-range strategic plan for all our state facilities. ... Are they being deployed in the most efficient way possible for the state?� Understanding prisons is especially important, he said, because the facilities are “dramatically overcrowded.� Asked whether it was a mistake to sell the never-opened maximum security prison at Thomson to the federal government, he acknowledged the sale probably would have happened “eventually.� “Let’s just say if I was governor, we would have

worked to help to get it open,� he said. “I would have opened it because we needed the bed space.� The Republican said that after the 2014 election, Democrats will probably maintain majorities in the state House and Senate, but that he would expect them to be “receptive� to his “methodical� approach to budget matters. Rutherford said he believes Bruce Rauner will get the endorsement from the Cook County Republican Party when its central committee meets today, because

1850s Christmas Open House

Sun., Dec. 22 1-4 pm

ˆ˜VÂœÂ?˜‡>˜>Â…>˜ œ“i U ĂˆĂ¤Ă‡ ĂŽĂ€` -ĂŒÂ°] -ĂŒiĂ€Â?ˆ˜}

Floor Liners & Mud Flaps

Heated Seats Remote Starters Gift Certificates

Auto Accessories & Car Audio

405 Elm Avenue, Sterling

815-625-3169 bruph@comcast.net

BE READY WITH A WWWTOROCOM Frank’s Small Engine Repair

4UNE 5PS s 0ARTS s "LADES s !CCESSORIES s - &   3AT  .OON

 !SH !VENUE 3TERLING s   

Get up to a $300 Tax Credit on New Wood Insert

Wood Burning Insert Act Now For Tax Credit Savings! Features

U 1ÂŤ ĂŒÂœ Çä]äää /1Â˝Ăƒ U i>ĂŒĂƒ Ă•ÂŤ ĂŒÂœ Ă“]äää ĂƒÂľÂ° vĂŒÂ° U ˜VÂ?Ă•`iĂƒ ĂŒĂœÂœ 7-* , +1 / Â…i>ĂŒ VÂˆĂ€VĂ•Â?>ĂŒÂˆÂ˜} LÂ?ÂœĂœiĂ€Ăƒ U Ó°Óx VÕ° vĂŒÂ° wĂ€iLÂœĂ? V>ÂŤ>VÂˆĂŒĂž >˜` ÂŁnÂť “>Ă?ÂˆÂ“Ă•Â“ Â?Âœ} ĂƒÂˆĂ˘i U ™ Â…ÂœĂ•Ă€ LĂ•Ă€Â˜ ĂŒÂˆÂ“i U ÂœÂ“ÂŤÂ?iĂŒi ĂœÂˆĂŒÂ… ĂƒĂŒ>˜`>Ă€` y>ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂ˜}Ă‰ĂƒĂ•Ă€Ă€ÂœĂ•Â˜`i` >˜` ĂŒĂ€ÂˆÂ“ ĂŒÂœ VÂœĂ›iĂ€ wĂ€iÂŤÂ?>Vi ÂœÂŤi˜ˆ˜} Ă•ÂŤ ĂŒÂœ Îӝ… Ă? {{ÂťĂœ U >ĂŒV…ˆ˜} ĂƒÂŤĂ€ÂˆÂ˜} Â…>˜`Â?i >VVÂœÂ“ÂŤ>˜ˆiĂƒ `ÂœÂœĂ€ U "ÂŤĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜>Â? >Ă€VÂ…i` >˜` ĂœiLLi` >Ă€VÂ…i` `ÂœÂœĂ€ ÂŽÂˆĂŒĂƒ >Ă›>ˆÂ?>LÂ?i ˆ˜ ÂŤ>ÂˆÂ˜ĂŒi` LÂ?>VÂŽ] Ă“{ ÂŽ>Ă€>ĂŒ }ÂœÂ?` >˜` Ăƒ>ĂŒÂˆÂ˜ VÂ…Ă€ÂœÂ“i ÂŤÂ?>ĂŒi` wÂ˜ÂˆĂƒÂ…iĂƒ

101 E. 2nd 5VTGGV r 5VGTNKPI +.

815-625-0937

YYY RNCKPYGNNDTCUUEQO

“He’s given a lot of donations.� But he dismissed the importance of an endorsement by “20 people.� Rutherford this week picked up the support of former state Rep. Jim Sacia, R-Pecatonica, as the endorsement wars began to heat up with less than 90 days until the primary election. Rutherford and Rauner will be on the March 18 primary ballot with two other Republicans seeking the nomination for governor: Bill Brady and Kirk Dillard, both state senators.

DIXON – The president of a performing arts school in Dixon turned himself in to police Friday, more than 4 weeks after an arrest warrant was issued for failing to report sexual abuse allegations. Curt Schmitt, 70, of Chicago, reported to Dixon Police at 3 p.m. Friday, posted bond, and was released. Schmitt is charged with failure to report abuse or neglect. Dixon Police Chief Danny Langloss said police have statements from more than one person indicating that Schmitt knew about abuse allegations made by a former student against VIVA! vocal instruc-

tor Robert Campbell. Tim Boles, the school’s director of drama, also is charged Curt with failSchmitt ing to report the sex abuse allegations. Boles and Schmitt have the same local address, police said. During the summer of 2012, police say, Campbell abused a then-16year-old boy. The abuse reportedly occurred at VIVA! On Nov. 3, the student sent an email about the abuse to Dixon schools Superintendent Michael Juenger and other district administrators, authorities said. Langloss said Juenger immediately contacted him, and the investigation began. Campbell was arrested just after 5 p.m. the next day; he bonded out of jail on Nov. 5.

STERLING

Police say truck struck by train had stalled on tracks STAFF REPORT news@saukvalley.com    EXT

STERLING – A semitrailer that was hit by a train early Thursday in west Sterling had an equipment malfunction that immobilized it on the tracks, Sterling Police said in a news release. No one was hurt when a westbound Union Pacific train struck a semitrailer at 3103 W. Lincolnway. Sterling

Police arrived at the scene about 7:09 a.m. Thursday, according to the news release. The crossing is near Casey’s General Store. The driver saw the train coming and got out in time, sheriff’s detective John Booker said. There was substantial damage to the semitrailer. The tracks were closed for a time. The name of the driver wasn’t available.


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

OBITUARIES Linus E. Stephenson COLLINSVILLE – Linus E. Stephenson, 82, of 409 N. Morrison, Collinsville, died Tuesday, Dec. 17, 2013, at Anderson Hospital in Maryville. He had worked for Moto Mart. He was born March 6, 1931, in Rock Falls, the son of Frank M. and Lelia Jackson Stephenson. He was a Marine Corps veteran, serving in the Korean War. He married Jeanne A. Aper on Feb. 15, 1952. Survivors include his wife

and two grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his daughter, Margo Royer; and his parents. Visitation will be from noon to 2 p.m. Sunday and the funeral at 2 p.m. Sunday at Herr Funeral Home in Collinsville, with the Rev. John Lottes officiating. Private burial will be at Oak Knoll Memorial Park in Sterling. Memorials may be made to a charity of the donor’s choice. Visit www.herrfuneral. com to send condolences.

Joyce Barber LaMOILLE – Joyce Barber, 93, of LaMoille, died Thursday, Dec. 19, 2013, at Mendota Community Hospital. She was a cook and waitress at several LaMoille restaurants for more than 30 years. She was born July 19, 1920, in LaMoille, the daughter of R. Everett and Zora E. Preston Shirley. She married Floyd Barber on Jan. 29, 1944, in LaMoille. He preceded her in death on July 6, 1986. She was a member of Van Orin Gospel Church. She is survived by two daughters, Diane Simkins of Van Orin and Kaye Razo of Sterling; eight grand-

children; 15 great-grandchildren; three greatgreat-grandchildren; and one sister, Mary Ethel Shankel of Sterling. She also was preceded in death by two brothers, one in infancy, and Floyd Shirley. Visitation will be from 10 to 11 a.m. Monday and a memorial service at 11 a.m. Monday at Van Orin Gospel Church, with the Rev. Jeffery Patrick officiating. Cremation rites will be accorded. Interment of ashes will be at a later date at Greenfield Cemetery in LaMoille. Merritt Funeral Home in Mendota is handling arrangements.

Gregory J. McIntyre DIXON – Gregory J. McIntyre, 66, of Dixon, died Thursday, Dec. 19, 2013, at his home. He retired from the Dixon Post Office. He was born on Dec. 22, 1946, in Dixon, the son of Frank and Thelma (Herron) McIntyre. He served in the Army during the Vietnam War. He is survived by a daughter, Shannon; a son, Jarod; and one grandson.

Brian J. Strite MOUNT MORRIS – Brian J. Strite, 41, of Mount Morris, passed away Friday, Dec. 20, 2013, at the family farm. Brian was born Oct. 2, 1972, in Sterling, the son of James E. and Rogene M. Gann Strite. Brian graduated from Mount Morris High School, Class of 1991. He graduated from Blackhawk East College in Kewanee, with an associates degree in agriculture. Brian worked for Hog Slat in Rochelle, as the store manager. He enjoyed fishing, deer hunting, playing cards, and collecting miniature farm toys. He loved working with the children during the Ogle County Fair. His real love was his time with his daughter and his nephews, and his time working with his father on the family farm. Brian is survived by his

daughter, Whitney Strite of Springfield; parents, Jim and Rogene Strite of Mount Morris; brother, Brad (Kim) Strite of Oregon; grandpa, Darrell Strite of Mount Morris; nephews, Austin and Kyle Strite, both of Oregon; and several aunts and uncles and nieces and nephews. Brian was preceded in death by his grandma, Dorothy Strite; grandparents, Clarence and Katie Gann; and uncles, Wayne and Frank. Visitation will be from 10 a.m. to noon Monday and the funeral at noon Monday at Finch Funeral Home, 405 E. Hitt St., Mount Morris, with the Rev. Virginia Haney officiating. A private family burial will be at Silver Creek Cemetery in Mount Morris. Memorials will be established.

Melvin J. Schneider OHIO – Melvin J. Schneider, 89, of Ohio, died Thursday, Dec. 19, 2013, at St. Margaret Hospital in Spring Valley. He had worked for Conco in Mendota for 26 years before retiring, and was a lifelong farmer in the Maytown area. Melvin was born Feb. 12, 1924, in Pierre, S.D., the son of Peter and Mary (Haub) Schneider. He married Mildred Stike on Feb. 8, 1947, in LaSalle. He was a member of St. Patrick Catholic Church in Maytown. Survivors include his wife; children, Melvin (Nancy) Schneider of Van Orin, Kathleen Highbarger and Wayne (Barb) Schneider, both of Amboy, Larry

Schneider of Ohio, and Lisa (Tim Dixon) Becker of LaSalle; 11 grandchildren; and 12 great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents; two grandchildren, both in infancy; and a brother, Marvin. Visitation will be from 6 to 8 p.m., with the rosary recited at 7:30 p.m., Monday at Mihm-Jones Funeral Home in Amboy. The Mass of Christian Burial will be at 10 a.m. Tuesday at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Maytown, with the Rev. Joel Lopez officiating. Burial will be at St. Patrick Cemetery in Maytown. A memorial has been established. Visit www.thejonesfh. com to send condolences.

He was preceded in death by his parents; and a brother, Brian McIntyre. A graveside service will be at a later date at Chapel Hill Memorial Gardens in Dixon. Cremation rites have been accorded. Chapel Hill Funeral Home John J. Flynn in Dixon is handling arrangements. HANOVER – John J. Flynn, 58, of Hanover, died Visit www.chapelhill- Wednesday, Dec. 18, 2013, at his home. dixon.com to send condo- Law-Jones Funeral Home in Hanover is handling lences. arrangements.

FUNERAL SERVICES FOR THE WEEK Today’s visitations: Callie L. LeeOF3TERLING TOAMAT3CHILLING &UNERAL(OMEIN3TERLING Ida Mae BalkOF-ORRISON TOPMAT"OSMA 2ENKES&UNERAL(OMEIN &ULTON Today’s funerals: Callie Louise Lee OF 3TERLING AMAT3CHILLING &UNERAL(OMEIN3TERLING Harper M. WagnerOF-IS AWA *APAN PMMEMORIAL BALLOONRELEASEANDWALKAT -ETRO#ENTER 3HOEMAKE(ALL IN0RINCETON Ida Mae BalkOF-ORRISON PMAT"OSMA 2ENKES &UNERAL(OMEIN&ULTON Sunday visitations: Linus E. StephensonOF #OLLINSVILLE NOONTOPM AT(ERR&UNERAL(OMEIN#OL LINSVILLE Terry OlsonOF0OLO   PMAT0OLO#OMMUNITY(IGH 3CHOOL Laverne L. KeppenOF &REEPORT  PM WITHTHE ROSARYRECITEDATPM AT 3T*OSEPH#ATHOLIC#HURCHIN &REEPORT Sunday funerals: Linus E. StephensonOF #OLLINSVILLE PMAT(ERR &UNERAL(OMEIN#OLLINSVILLE Monday visitations: Joyce BarberOF,A-OILLE

 AMAT6AN/RIN'OS PEL#HURCH Thelma EilersOF3TERLING  AM'OOD3HEPHERD ,UTHERAN#HURCHIN2OCK &ALLS Brian J. StriteOF-OUNT -ORRIS AMTONOONAT &INCH&UNERAL(OMEIN-OUNT -ORRIS Melvin J. SchneiderOF /HIO TOPM WITHTHE 2OSARYRECITEDATPM AT-IHM *ONES&UNERAL(OME IN!MBOY Monday funerals: Terry OlsonOF0OLO  AM-ASSAT3T-ARY#ATHO LIC#HURCHIN0OLO Laverne L. KeppenOF &REEPORT AMAT3T *OSEPH#ATHOLIC#HURCHIN &REEPORT Joyce BarberOF,A-OILLE AMAT6AN/RIN'OSPEL #HURCH Thelma EilersOF3TERLING AMAT'OOD3HEPHERD ,UTHERAN#HURCHIN2OCK &ALLS Brian J. StriteOF-OUNT -ORRIS NOONAT&INCH&UNERAL (OMEIN-OUNT-ORRIS Tuesday funerals: Melvin J. Schneider OF/HIO AM-ASS OF#HRISTIAN"URIALAT3T 0ATRICK#ATHOLIC#HURCHIN -AYTOWN

Thelma Eilers STERLING – Thelma Eilers, 89, of Sterling, died Friday, Dec. 20, 2013, at Coventry Living Center in Sterling. Visitation will be from 10 to 11 a.m. Monday and the funeral at 11 a.m.

Monday at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Rock Falls, with the Rev. Daniel Behmlander officiating. Burial will be at Hopkins Cemetery in rural Sterling.

Donald L. Pauley THOMSON – Donald L. Pauley, 68, of Thomson, died Friday, Dec. 20, 2013, at Genesis Medical Center West in Davenport, Iowa. Law-Jones Funeral Home in Thomson is handling arrangements.

Delvin D. Rajnowski CADIZ, Ky. – Delvin D. Rajnowski, 72, of Cadiz, Ky., formerly of Rock Falls, died Thursday, Dec. 19, 2013, at the Veterans Affairs Hospital in Nashville, Tenn. McDonald Funeral Home in Rock Falls is handling arrangements.

Eileen M. Moroney FITCHBURG, Wis. – Eileen M. Moroney, 66, of Fitchburg, formerly of Sterling, died Thursday, Dec. 19, 2013, at Agrace Hospice in Fitchburg. McDonald Funeral Home & Crematory in Sterling is handling arrangements.

Subdural hematomas found when infant examined CLOSURE

CONTINUED FROM A1

Their 3-year-old son, Maison, she decided, would remain in Karyn’s care until his grandmother could pick him up 10 minutes later. In the car, Alayna’s crying was like nothing Ann had ever heard. “I was just in shock,� she says. That was a Tuesday. The Friday before, the last time Alayna had been in Karyn’s care, Ann remembered her being strapped into her car seat, and that there was vomit all over her. For the rest of the weekend, Alayna was tired, anti-social, and would let only Ann or her husband, Jake, carry her. “Very much unlike herself,� Ann says And then Tuesday rolled around, and her condition had, apparently, improved. When Ann dropped her off at Karyn’s, she even remarked about the improvement to her. She had, at the time, attributed the bout of illness to something she might’ve gotten from her brother, who had just recently been sick. When Ann arrived at CGH on that Tuesday, suspecting something neurological, the doctors had Alayna transferred to OSF St. Francis Medical Center in Peoria. The doctors there discovered that Alayna had three

Submitted

Alayna Brandt gave a half smile in a family photo from Feb. 28, 2009, as her recovery headed in the right direction. subdural hematomas. One was fresh, the other two were older. Over the course of the next 6 days, the Brandts waited while Alayna went through surgeries, MRIs, and CT scans. The freshest bleed, prosecutors say, and Karyn McCallister allegedly confessed to, was caused when McCallister shook Alayna on the 24th. “Looking back knowing, because there were three different bleeds, that was probably the second one,� Ann says, referring to the vomiting incident from the Friday before. “I don’t know that because they can’t pinpoint it, but with the vomiting and the fact that she was very, very tired, it would make sense.� But at the time, the doctors weren’t telling them anything. Not until, Ann says, Karyn confessed while Alayna was in sur-

Ask about our FREE Upgrade Special MILLEDGEVILLE DO-IT-BEST HOME CENTER

'SFF &TUJNBUFT t 'SFF .FBTVSJOH t 'SFF %FMJWFSZ

Bring the Beauty of StarMark into Your Home. 3BJMSPBE BOE $PDISBO 4USFFUT .JMMFEHFWJMMF *   UPMM GSFF

 

     &' ()' ' &        !"#  $%

Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Ann and Jacob Brandt pose with their three children, Maison, 8, Alayna, 5, and Gweneth, 2, at their home outside of Rock Falls.

In Loving Memory

Ted R. Powell August 14, 1939 to December 21, 2007

Gone yet not forgotten,

FREE KITCHEN DESIGNS BY Jocelyn Lilly, Kitchen Design: 815-266-1354

gery on Thursday. “They thought that we did it,� she says. “They thought it was us.� “We were under investigation, basically,� Jake says. “There were lots of doctors who came in and asked us questions, police. ...� But even then, the Brandts didn’t suspect Karyn. “I just figured it was some kind of protocol because she was an infant,� Jake says. And then that Friday morning, Ann says, the police showed up to tell them that Karyn had confessed. In December 2009, McCallister was arrested and charged with aggravated battery of a child and reckless conduct. The case has dragged through the court system for more than 4 years, and at this point, the Brandts are just looking for closure. Karyn is next scheduled to appear in Whiteside County court on Monday. Both Ann and Jake will be there. Long promised the matter would go to jury trial, Ann and Jake worry that, come Monday, that no longer will be an option.

although we are apart, your spirit lives within me forever in my heart.

Love,

Your Wife

Wishing Tom & Sue Hodgson a Happy 50th Anniversary! Love, Your Family


Saturday, December 21, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

THE PEOPLE’S VOICE

In word or heard? I recommend both H

i! I’m Christopher Heimerman. You may remember me from such SVM sports series as The Hidden Injury and The Naturals. That awful Troy McClure impression aside (it really doesn’t work in print), those series were vehicles for me to write about some less-than-sporty subjects. Or at least subjects that many sports fans would rather not think about: concussions and nutrition, respectively. As I ventured into those series, it occurred to me that there might be a place for me beyond the arena of sports. Lo and behold, if you’ve been wondering why my smiling mug has been missing from the B Sec-

tion the past few weeks, it’s because I’ve moved on up to the A side. I accepted the night news editor position for a number of reasons, almost all of which have a common thread: family. More specifically, my family, which doubled in size 4 months ago. My wife and I welcomed two beautiful baby girls, Anna Elisabeth and Elise Rae, into the world, and nothing has been the same since. Suddenly, I felt the need to have my thumb more firmly pressed on the pulse of the community in which my girls will grow up. I also wanted to work more dad-friendly hours. And, on the whole, I wanted to grow as a journalist and as a person. I’ll miss many things

christopher HEIMERMAN Christopher Heimerman is night news editor. He can be reached at cheimerman@ saukvalley com or    EXT 

about working on SVM’s powerhouse sports staff. My swan song, covering Newman’s smothering of Mercer County in the Class 2A football semifinals, was emblematic of many of those things. Obviously, I’m a sports nut. But most of all, I knew I’d miss the people, whether it be the young minds, those molding them from along the side-

line and in the classroom, or those cheering them on from the stands or the living room, thanks to the power of Twitter. About the time it hit me that I’d miss meeting people and fostering relationships, I was negotiating (a very loose term, mind you) terms of my new position with SVM Managing Editor Jeff Rogers. And this is where we get back to that being-intouch-with-the-community thing. Jeff proposed that I write a regular column. On people. With all the hairs on my arms standing at attention, I said something to the tune of, “That would be awesome.� Editor’s note: I’m trying my best to remove words

like “awesome� and “sweet� from my daily lexicon. It’s all part of faking it till I make it. So this little ditty is the intro to “The People’s Voice,� a series of columns in which I’ll profile folks from every walk of life in the Sauk Valley. The same way that my Troy McClure impression fell flat in print, I often feel like, no matter how well a journalist writes, print articles don’t do a great interview justice. Sometimes, no adjective or adverb can describe a story subject’s expression, or their intonation. So coinciding with each column will be a podcast that you’ll be able to download at saukvalley. com. All I need now is your help. Is there a public

figure whose brain you’d like me to pick? Know someone who has overcome incredible odds or just flat-out inspires you? Maybe your cousin, Jim Bob, has the biggest taxidermy collection this side of the Mississippi. I’m all ears. Or eyes, depending on how you get in touch with me. Send your recommendations to cheimerman@ saukvalley.com or tweet them to @CHeimerman_SVM on Twitter. Wait, I said ears, didn’t I? Feel free to call me at 815-625-3600, ext. 523. If you’d like a hint as to the star of the first installment, he’s someone you’ve likely run into a few times over the past couple of weeks. But after Wednesday, good luck finding him.

Thompson: Timetable is for production in early 2015 POWER

CONTINUED FROM A1

The project site, an abandoned power plant at 1311 Nelson Road, south of Rock Island Road, has seen two owners begin work since 2001. NRG Energy bought the 165-acre lot to build a gas-fired electrical power plant. NRG, however, filed for bankruptcy protection in 2003 before completing the project. Further complicating matters was that the construction contractor for NRG was NEPCO, a subsidiary of Enron. Although NEPCO didn’t file for bankruptcy when its parent company collapsed in late 2001, Enron had taken much of the subsidiary’s cash before its filing, leaving NEPCO’s assets frozen by the courts. Invenergy bought the property in 2006, with plans to use ethanol and natural gas to generate electrical power. At that time, the company said the plant would create 70 jobs. When plans for the ethanol portion of the project were scrapped,

that number was reduced to an estimated 20 to 25 jobs. Lee County Industrial Development Association President and CEO John Thompson said the financing announcement is consistent with the overall timeline of the project. “They wanted financing in place before the end of 2013, construction completed in 2014, and production to begin in early 2015,� he said. Thompson said that by the time the Nelson Energy Center is fully assessed, possibly by the end of 2016, it could become the biggest taxpayer in Lee County. Taxes wouldn’t be paid until 2017, in that scenario. The Lee Energy Facility, operated by Duke Energy in Nachusa,

is now the county’s largest taxpayer. Although Thompson said it’s too early to estimate numbers for the Nelson plant, the tax value on the Nachusa operation is $31 million, which has the company paying about $300,000 a year to the county. Given that the Nelson plant straddles Whiteside County, some Rock Falls entities also would be beneficiaries. “About 85 percent of that would go to school districts,� Thompson said. “It’s the same group of taxing districts as for the old National Manufacturing building.� Those districts would be Rock Falls High School, East ColomaNelson Elementary, Sauk Valley Community College, County of Lee, Nel-

626-GUNS

difficult situation. “Ten years ago, they said they’d buy this property and hang on to it until it makes economic sense,� Thompson said. “They were willing to pick up the pieces from the bankruptcy situation, put

the financing in place, and stick to their promise.� The plant will sell power into the PJM wholesale market. PJM operates the power grid serving Illinois and 12 other states.

GAME DAY

SPECIAL Support all your favorite teams! Start your game day off right with Mama Cimino’s!

FREE APPETIZER with your order A $5 Value! Minimum $20 order. Dine In, Carry Out or Delivery

Mama Cimino’s — 104 S. Peoria Ave. Dixon

Mama Cimino’s Cimino’s %JOF *O t $BSSZ 0VU t %FMJWFSZ

“SEASONS EATINGS� FROM FOLSOM’S BAKERY TO YOUR TABLE! SEE US FOR PIES, CAKES, ROLLS, COOKIES, & MORE

COOKIES TRAYS AVAILABLE OPEN SATURDAYS 10AM-5PM SUNDAY NOON-4PM

son Township, Nelson Highway Department, Rock Falls Fire Protection, and multiple Nelson and Harmon township entities. Thompson said he is impressed by the way Invenergy has handled a

319 1st Ave., Rock Falls 815-622-7870

847 N. Galena, Dixon 815-677-9385

 t 815-288-4449 104 S. Peoria Ave., Dixon www.mamaciminosdixon.com

Mama Cimino’s Gift Certificate

Holiday Special!

Buy $100, Get $20 Free Buy $50, Get $10 Free Buy $20, Get $5 Free

YOU HAVE A NEED. WE HAVE A LOAN.

OUR NAME IS OUR NUMBER 1114 1st Ave., Rock Falls, IL. (Between Grummert’s and Auto Zone)

I am looking for better mpg.

Let us be the solution to your New Years Resolution!

It's time for a little more horsepower.

I need room for the kids and their stuff.

Angie & Al Delhotal Owners

We guarantee you will love your new floor! 2528 E. Lincolnway Sterling,IL    s WWWANAmOORINGCOM

AUTO LOANS AS LOW AS

2.49% & 90 APR

DAYS NO PAYMENTS

Equal Housing Lender. Member FDIC. The first three payments are deferred and will extend the maturity of the loan by three months. Until the loan is paid in full, interest will continue to accrue on the outstanding principal, including the principal being deferred. Financing and deferred payments are for well-qualified borrowers. Not all borrowers will qualify. Interest will accrue from the date of the loan disbursal. Program available for individuals “consumers� only. Offer subject to change at any time and without notice. $95 loan costs can be financed or paid at the time of loan closing, whichever you prefer. APR is the annual percentage rate. 2.49% APR requires an automatic debit of your loan payment during the life of the loan, 2013/2014 vehicle, 740 FICO score and a 36 to 60 month loan term. APR: 36 months at $28.97; 48 months at $22.00; 60 months at $17.81, per $1000 financed. Title, tax and license are extra. Rates vary based on length of term, age of vehicle, loan to value and your credit history. Rates and terms subject to change without notice. Rates as of 11/12/2013.

1-855-MY-MIDLAND

midlandsb.com


Opinion !s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

EDITORIAL

‘Fiscal responsibility’ and the Ogle sheriff A

s a candidate for the Republican nomination for Ogle County sheriff, Michael Harn wrote these words in a column to Sauk Valley Media in January 2010: “Fiscal responsibility is a necessity today for everyone. The sheriff should not be exempt from being held to the same standards.� We agree with those words of Mr. Harn, who went on to defeat incumbent Sheriff Greg Beitel and take office in December 2010. Thus, we are troubled by certain spending decisions made by Harn since he became sheriff. Credit card receipts and other Ogle County financial documents, which were obtained by Sauk Valley Media through a Freedom of Information Act request, show a pattern of spending that certainly seems out of step

with the fiscal responsibility promised by Harn. The creation by the Ogle County Board in October 2011 of a new revenue source – a $350 fee charged to drivers whose vehicles must be towed, with the money designated to an off-budget Administrative Tow Fund – and spending decisions made by Harn regarding that money also seem out of step with Harn’s pledge of fiscal responsibility.

What we think Michael Harn promised “fiscal responsibility� while campaigning for Ogle County sheriff in 2010. Some of his spending decisions since taking office seem out of step with that pledge. The Ogle County Board must exert more stringent oversight.

time training sessions. Then there were clothing purchases made by Harn, charged to the county, for Lucky Brand jeans, Under Armour polo shirts, HarleyCREDIT CARDS issued Davidson clothing and to the sheriff’s departgear, plus Men’s Wearment were used to pay house suits, shirts, ties, for more than $7,500 pants and shoes for Harn in restaurant meals in and a detective. Added 2011, 2012, and the first together, it’s an addi5 months of 2013. Of that tional $3,452 charged to amount, about $5,300 taxpayers. was spent at BreakHarn spent money for ers Saloon and Eatery, OnStar ($347) and Sirius a block from the Ogle XM Radio ($414) and County Jail. Harn defends charged it to the county. the Breakers spending, And while he was in saying it involved lunch- Springfield for a confer-

ence in March 2012, he charged a $66.19 Hooters restaurant bill to the county. Ten months after Harn become sheriff, the Ogle County Board approved creation of the aforementioned Administrative Tow Fund, with the money to be used “at the discretion of the sheriff.� This fund, by the way, is not reported on the county’s annual budget. Harn decided to spend $22,947 of that money on a 2013 Dodge Ram 1500 pickup truck. He spent $5,437 for 1,500 “foldable Frisbees,� 1,500 plastic

bags and 1,000 coloring books to hand out at the fair and other events. He paid $4,000 to Bob Coine to run the department’s Facebook page. He spent $170 for flowers for Secretaries Day. Harn’s credit card spending had not been questioned until earlier this year. Two new County Board members, John O’Brien and Dick Petrizzo, became curious about the lunch spending and started asking questions about it. HARN’S CREDIT CARD spending slowed significantly after a spring meeting with County Board Chairman Kim Gouker, which coincided with revelations in Dixon of questionable credit card spending by thenCity Engineer Shawn Ortgiesen, who resigned and repaid thousands of dollars in personal expendi-

tures charged to the city. We applaud newcomers O’Brien and Petrizzo for asking the questions that other County Board members should have asked a long time ago. We encourage Gouker to continue with his quest to place off-budget county funds, such as the Administrative Tow Fund, on the budget to ensure greater scrutiny. The Ogle County Board must exert greater oversight on all county spending, as well as advise Sheriff Harn, who makes $87,000 a year, whether it is appropriate to charge the county for jeans, polo shirts, and a meal at Hooters. At $3.5 million, the Sheriff’s Department’s annual budget is the county’s largest. Harn promised fiscal responsibility. The County Board must hold him to that pledge.

THE READER’S VOICE

Government’s promise dashed by ‘reform’ law

on pensions, only affecting those who make more than $109,000 a year. Current employees will keep an additional 1 percent of their paycheck now, as their required contribution has been lowered. The bill also strengthens the requirement that ensures that the state makes its pension payment every year. With changes made only to future payments, supplemental state payments, improved guarantees, and a reduced employee contribution, I believe this bill is constitutional and reasonable. We didn’t get into this problem overnight, and it won’t be solved with a single bill. Even when we disagree, I’ll always explain my vote as clearly and openly as I can. Note to readers: Tom Demmer, a Republican, represents the 90th District in the Illinois House of Representatives.

HAROLD HUNT Dixon

A new pension law was passed that affects only state employees and retirees. Newspapers and politicians, including our governor, have been trying to persuade the public it was essential to pass this “reform� of the pension system. It was approved by only one Senate vote. Dozens of senators and representatives voted against it on the grounds of constitutionality. If that many of our assemblymen found serious fault with it, this should be signal enough for the public to observe the results with doubting minds. Several who voted for it have been busy trying to explain away why they voted for this discriminatory law. There is, and never was, anything wrong with the pension system that needed reform. The only thing wrong is the Legislature for several years decided not to fund it. The pension system has been canonized into law, into the Illinois Constitution. The Legislature has found in some prior actions it has acted in violation of our constitution, and I predict the same result will occur with this pension law. Employees have invested their lives – 20, 25, 35, 40 years or more – paying regularly into the pension system, with full faith the state will honor its promise to its employees. It’s a sad day when your own government decides to break its promise to its own employees. Thousands of government employees don’t qualify for Social Security. They depend entirely on their state pension to survive. Some older retirees draw as little as $350 a month. Hundreds depend on food banks and food stamps on a daily basis.

Joe Heller, Heller Syndicate

Those are among the most vulnerable of Illinois citizens – those who’ve taught your children; those who’ve kept the communities safe; those who’ve provided assistance to the needy. There are dozens of ways to correct the financial disaster the state finds itself in. Taking money from the elderly is not the right way.

Christmas, the biggest holiday of all NINA WAGNER Milledgeville

Have you noticed that there are small, medium, and large holidays? A small one is St. Patrick’s Day. You can buy and share cards and small gifts, and there’s the corned beef and cabbage angle. Shops and stores don’t close down. A medium-sized holiday, Easter, in a secular state we’re told only to buy colored candy. We gather as a family and always

remember to mention the Easter Bunny. Stores and banks are closed, and we may even get an extra day off at work. Then comes the biggest holiday of all, Christmas. Stores and shops start weeks ahead of time putting out Christmas cards, bows and wrapping. Then comes traditional Christmas tunes coming forth from every store. When we get close to Dec. 25, store hours get longer and longer. We’re invited to appear at their stores at 5 a.m. and meet long lines of greedy people who are willing to push and shove to get items first. At this time, we get Frosty the Snowman and other Christmas jingles on the TV. In the last days, we wrap the Christmas presents and get all of our cards ready to send. We go around and say “Merry Christmas� or “Season’s Greetings.� Then there are kooky groups warning us not to say “Christmas� or have a decorated tree because it’s so controversial this

EDITORIAL BOARD

4(%&)234!-%.$-%.4

Jennifer Baratta Jim Dunn Sheryl Gulbranson Larry Lough Trevis Mayfield Jeff Rogers

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

Christmas. In our haste, we ignore those people because we’re so busy with personal stuff. When Christmas Day comes, we meet it head on and follow our plans. Christmas celebrations become just one big crazy encounter, unless we remember the simple journey of Joseph and Mary to Bethlehem for the birth of the savior, Jesus Christ. Happy birthday, Jesus. We will keep you in our hearts forever and remember why you came. God bless you all.

Representative explains vote on pension bill State Rep. TOM DEMMER Dixon

Recently, the General Assembly met in special session to address legislation regarding the state pension systems. On Dec. 10, the unfunded pension liability in Illinois exceeded $100 billion. From last year to this year, our required pension payment

increased by $936 million. We now spend more than 20 percent of general revenue – more than $6 billion a year, or nearly as much as we spend on all K-12 education across the state – on the pension payment. School funding was reduced to 89 percent of the formula level. State prisons, mental health hospitals, and developmental disability centers were closed. The Medicaid system was targeted for $2.7 billion in reforms. More than $6 billion in unpaid bills have piled up. If you’re currently receiving a pension check, the bill won’t reduce it by one penny. You’ll still get an increase every year. We simply put a cap on the amount of an increase you get in a single year. The bill offers the most protection to those with modest pensions and those with the most years of service. Pensions up to $30,000 may see no change at all – and that cap will increase every year along with inflation. The bill also puts a salary cap

“The press’s ability to pursue the truth and publish what we feel is appropriate will always be called into question by those who would prefer to operate in a less open society.� Arthur O. Sulzberger Jr., publisher, The New York Times, 2001

1UOTESBROUGHTTOYOUCOURTESYOF

Traffic stops not simple, can be risky BARB SPATARO Amboy

This is in response to the Dec. 14 letter by David Sigel titled “Too many cops at traffic stop; not enough for distress call.� Unless you have driven solo in a police car with a backup miles away, you could not understand how a simple traffic stop can go bad very quickly. When “warrant� goes over the air, backup officers do not know how many are in the car; is he going to fight; is he going to run. My guess is those officers were near and waited a few minutes to make sure the traffic stop was secure. The agencies in our area have the best officers out there, and they work hard to protect. Be thankful, sir, that your letter was not an apology to a family he may have hit head-on while texting. Note to readers: Barb Spataro is a former police officer.

3HAREYOUROPINIONS Mail: The Reader’s Voice Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway, P.O. Box 498 Sterling, IL 61081 Email: letters@saukvalley.com Fax: 815-625-9390 Website: Visit www.saukvalley.com Policy: Letters are to be no more than 300 words and must include the writer’s name, town and daytime telephone number, which we call to verify authorship. Individuals may write up to 12 letters a year.

OPINIONS EXPRESSED IN LETTERS AND COLUMNS ARE THOSE OF THE WRITERS AND DO NOT REPRESENT THE VIEWS OF SAUK VALLEY MEDIA.


Saturday, December 21, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

SECOND OPINION

For the record, we’ll do what we have to A

s you might imagine, newspaper reporters and editors ask lots of questions. But that isn’t always enough to get the answers we need. Sometimes, we have to get our hands on public records to supplement information from human sources. And no matter how nicely we ask, government employees are not always willing to hand over public documents. So we turn to the Illinois Freedom of Information Act – FOIA. And we file a formal request. PUBLIC RECORDS have some advantages over human sources. People sometimes have bad memories, but public

records never forget. Official documents don’t lie or stonewall. Can’t say the same for people. And if we end up reporting false information that damages someone, sourcing from a public record gives a newspaper some legal cover that a human interview does not. Public records are our friends. YOU OFTEN READ in this newspaper about requests for records that we file under the state’s FOIA. Seems as though we’re seeking public records – through the formal method – several times each month. The law is clear that public agencies may

larryLOUGH Larry Lough is executive editor of Sauk Valley Media. Contact him via email at llough@ saukvalley. com.

grant an oral request for their documents, but sometimes they like to have it in writing. That’s fine. It’s only a little more trouble than asking, and we’re accustomed to filing formal requests. Officials have different reasons for wanting a written request. A county clerk once required it before she would release the voter

registration card of a friend. We had asked for that record because the friend was a political candidate who would not tell us her age, a detail we always report in candidate profiles. Voting records have that information. Such written requests also require public agencies to put their denials in writing, with specific references to the part of the law that justifies their denials. So we’re happy to put it in writing if that’s what it takes. READERS MIGHT have noticed several recent stories that involved our seeking public records. The mysterious death along Interstate 88 and the state police “search”

after a couple of motorists alerted them to a man in distress – 12 hours before his body was discovered. The numerous credit card expenditures of the Ogle County sheriff, who spent thousands of dollars at local restaurants for “training.” The mathematically challenged financial reports of the Coloma Township office. The reporting for those stories involved talking to a number of people. But public records often tell a more revealing story. THOSE STORIES ARE far from over. The sheriff will seek reelection next year, and during the campaign his opponents might happen

to mention the meals, the clothes, and other expenses that voters could object to paying for. We still have a lot of questions about the death and whether it could have been prevented had the man received timely medical attention. And Coloma Township taxpayers have to be concerned about paying fines for the failure of their elected officials to file accurate reports on time. Each story involves the performance of people who work for the public. We all have a right to know whether their actions on behalf of taxpayers are proper and appropriate. Public records will help us to find the answers that will tell those stories.

THE READER’S VOICE

Mr. President, make eagle safety a priority BOB WOLF Rock Falls

I am responding to the Dec. 14 letter titled “Bald eagle endangered by wind energy.” The eagle is a great American symbol. Mr. President, you are not a true American to let people kill our national symbol. The eagle, at one time in 1967, was on the endangered species list. There was an act named for it. The reason being is people overdid the DDT spray. Spray goes anywhere in the air. It got on the eggs, and the shell could not fully develop. In others, it lacked the calcium it needed to fully form an eaglet. The adult eagle was unable to lay healthy eggs. In 1995, the law had changed to “threaten.” In

other words, there were more eagles being born because of the lack of DDT spray. In 2007, eagles were off the endangered and threatened list. Now, in 2013, the president says it’s OK to kill maimed or hurt eagles if they hit a wind turbine. So this is saying in the future, the eagle will be an endangered species. It seems man in politics can make any rules he or she pleases. It is, sorry to say, what this country is coming to – there are 150 rehabs in the U.S. for caring for the eagles if they were hurt. Man has got to stop killing animals that are not hurting the population in America. To sum this story up, it has given the power of the president to kill eagles for 30 years. Mr. President, you do not have a heart or a mind that is sane to pass a bill to allow this to happen. Eagles are beautiful.

Social changes may bring on America’s end THOMAS V. SLOTHOWER Sterling

Are we witnessing the death throes of America? Religious instruction with its moral values was eliminated from the schools in the 1960s, which started a moral decline grown worse during the years of my life. Many Americans believe “everything is OK as long as it feels good.” Everything is not OK. I believe America’s demise today could be caused by aberrant lifestyles, abortion, same-sex marriage, and cohabitation. These arrangements will not produce children. How can a nation survive when deaths exceed new births? “For a nation to maintain its population, it needs a total fertility rate of 2.1 babies per woman.” (Time magazine)

Dave Granlund, GateHouse News Service

Add to the mix gambling with its social destruction. I’ve yet to see a casino advertisement highlighting consequences of uncontrolled gambling. Illinois has legalized marijuana – a drug, according to experts, that can lead to the use of cocaine and/or other

destructive drugs. Gov. Quinn’s gleeful countenance, while he signs legislation harmful to Illinoisans, reminds me of the Roman Emperor Nero who watched as Rome burned, as written in Gibbons’ famous book. I wonder whether America is next.

Sixty years ago, I would have written an article urging Americans to vote for candidates of proven integrity, honesty, and character. Alas, I fear it is too late, as abortion, same-sex marriage, cohabitation, and aberrant lifestyles proliferate. I hope I’m wrong.

Remember your loved ones, family, and yourself at Christmas! Give the Gift Everyone will Appreciate...

Timber Creek Memberships Member & Gift Certificates! Golf, Swimming, Tennis, and Social Memberships available, as well as Gift Certificates in any denomination!

Ring in 2014 at Timber Creek

Celebrate New Year’s Eve with delicious appetizers, hand-served dinner, dessert, champagne toast, cash bar, games, and more!

ChoiceofDinnerEntree:

SurfandTurf, AtlanticSalmon,orPrimeRib

Limited Seating Still Available! Call Today for Details and Reservations!

(815) 288-5110 (Ext. 5)

729 Timber Creek Rd., Dixon 815-288-5110


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

Program survey shows many benefits to employers HEALTHIER

CONTINUED FROM A1

Chris Ekquist, 47, of Sterling, said she had tried every diet imaginable, but the results were what she called the “yoyo effect.� Her weight fluctuated wildly before hitting an all-time high. Because she works in the dietary department at KSB, she was familiar with Operation Move to Win, and she knew she had to take a different approach. “I had to make a total change and be able to stick with it,� Ekquist said. “You can’t just do a grapefruit diet for a week.� Her resolve made Ekquist the second session’s Most Dynamic Lifestyle Improvement award winner. She lost just under 40 pounds during the 3 months. Ekquist said the biggest initial change she made was to cut out sugary beverages like pop and iced tea. “Carrie told me to switch to water, and I lost 5 pounds immediately,� she said. She then worked to cut back on sweets and processed foods. Grobe turned her on to a phone app called My Fitness Pal, which made it easy for her to count calories. She made most of her food and ate lots of fruits and vegetables. “It was hard at first, but it’s really easy after you get used to it,� Ekquist said. When her friends ask her how she dropped the weight, she says it’s important to change not just your diet but your mindset. “You have to think of food as energy instead of a means of satisfaction,� she said. “Then when you want cookies, it’s easier to turn to fruit.� Wally Garza, 44, of

Dixon, dropped more weight than any other competitor in the latter session. A geotechnical crew supervisor for IDOT, Garza does a fair amount of physical labor, and says he knew he needed to drop a few pounds. A few became 45, and he now weighs in at 187 pounds. He admits that guilt was a compelling motivator for him. “My wife is a Zumba instructor and is always exercising, so I decided to sign up for the program,� he said. “Her lifestyle and support has made it easier.� Garza says he started eating right, which included cutting out all red meat during the contest. He also got rid of the sugary beverages and ate lots of salads and chicken. He made the 2-mile commute to work on his bicycle, and when the weather intervened, he started going to the YMCA twice a week. He rode the stationary bike and worked out on the elliptical machine for about an hour each visit. “That was the most I had exercised in a long time,� Garza said. “I just went in with my wife while she taught her classes there.� Garza said he had tried to lose weight before but had always failed. He said the competitive aspect of the program gave him added incentive to succeed. “I know the other people involved here [IDOT] and they motivated me to do it,� he said. “I didn’t want to go into weighins without losing any weight.� Program organizers also provided a great deal of support, Garza said. “They were good at motivating you,� he said. “They stayed involved and sent emails, tips, recipes, and it was really nice that they came to us.�

Weight-loss winners

Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Chris Ekquist, 47, of Sterling, changed her lifestyle by walking every night with her husband near their Sterling home. Her resolve won her the distinction of being the Most Dynamic Lifestyle Improvement award winner in the second session of KSB Hospital’s Operation Move to Win. She lost just under 40 pounds during the 3-month challenge. Initial weigh-ins for the next session will begin Jan. 6. Participants must be signed up by Jan. 3. Projections for the third session are 700 employees from 25 companies. The program involves an element of competition. Prize money goes to the individual winners, and the companies go head to head. The money comes from an entry fee of $20 a person. The companies have a stake in the program, but they pay nothing. Program survey results show several employer benefits. Healthier employees are found to have higher energy levels, be more productive, and use fewer sick days. They also can save their businesses money through reduced insurance claims. “Research shows that if employees are healthier, they tend to be better employees,� Scheffler said. “This program is designed to assist companies in making workers happier and healthier.� Businesses also like that the program comes to them. Scheffler and Grobe go to the work-

places every month for weigh-ins, motivational and educational sessions, and one-on-one counseling. Body fat percentages are taken the first and last month of a session. “It might be 40 minutes, or for the entire day, but we always go to them,� Grobe said. “We find that when we’re able to go to the individual, especially at the workplace, they are just so receptive.� The program has gained traction at Raynor Garage Doors in Dixon, a business that makes health and fitness an important part of its corporate culture. “We have a wellness program at Raynor, and this has become an extension of our efforts,� said Lindsay Drew, human resources coordinator. “Many of our people in management are into exercise and fitness – they do the Reagan Run and triathlons – and it kind of trickles down.� Drew said Raynor offers prizes and even options for premium reimbursements for employees who meet certain wellness criteria. She said the KSB

program is a good teambuilding opportunity. It also helps that the program is brought to the workplace. “It’s not time-consuming for the company, and it’s so nice to see the people who stick with it and look forward to the weigh-ins,� Drew said. UPM Raflatac employees dropped the most weight – 151.3 pounds – during the second session. The winning company also receives a cash award, but donates it to a charity of its choice. Toys for Tots received $319.50 from the company. Grobe finds that the participants must clear many of the same hurdles along their path to better nutrition and fitness. One obstacle is poor food choices. “People are so busy, they aren’t taking the time to cook – many have never cooked,� Grobe said. Grobe encourages program participants to plan for meals and eat at home more often instead of eating fast food. Ekquist says she still has a long way to go, but

Most Dynamic Lifestyle Improvement Award #HRIS%KQUIST +3" (OSPITAL 7EIGHTLOSS  POUNDSPERCENT !WARD  Individual Male First place 7ALLY'ARZA )$/4 7EIGHTLOSS  POUNDSPERCENT !WARD   Second place #HAD(AMMER 2AYNOR'ARAGE$OORS 7EIGHTLOSS  POUNDSPERCENT !WARD  Third place *ACK3KROGSTAD 4EAM,EE#OUNTY 7EIGHTLOSS  POUNDS !WARD  Individual Female First place *ANICE"ORUM !NCHOR #OUPLING 7EIGHTLOSS  POUNDSPERCENT !WARD   Second place ,EITH(AMMOND +3" (OSPITAL 7EIGHTLOSS  POUNDSPERCENT !WARD  Third place ,ISA4ALBOTT 50- 2AFLATAC 7EIGHTLOSS  POUNDSPERCENT !WARD  Company with Greatest Percentage of Weight Loss 50-2AFLATAC  POUNDSPERCENT !WARD  DONATEDTO4OYSFOR4OTS feels she is finally on her way. She is signed up for the January session. Her family serves as constant motivation. “I have two sons,� she said, “and I want to be an example for them of how important a healthy lifestyle is.�

Dreaming are you

of a new

Kitchen or Bath?

We’ll help re-design your kitchen to your unique style & needs and keep your costs down.

FREE DESIGNS BY Ask about our

Nonstop flights Mondays and Fridays to the Ft. Myers area! Access to Ft. Myers, Sanibel, Naples, and more!

FREE Upgrade Specials

Jocelyn Lilly, Kitchen Design:

815-266-1354

MILLEDGEVILLE DO-IT-BEST HOME CENTER 'SFF&TUJNBUFTt'SFF.FBTVSJOHt'SFF%FMJWFSZ

Bring the Beauty of StarMark into Your Home. Call your travel agent or visit allegiant.com for airfares and packages. Easy drive on I-88. See live updates, flight times, and more at qcairport.com

3BJMSPBEBOE$PDISBO4USFFUT .JMMFEHFWJMMF *-  UPMMGSFF


Saturday, December 21, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

HOLIDAY TRAVEL

AP

Passengers walk through Terminal 3 at O’Hare International Airport in Chicago on Friday. A local forecast predicts a chance of rain and sleet this morning, turning to snow and sleet this afternoon.

Foul weather plays Scrooge Snow, freezing rain mar plans ST. LOUIS (AP) – Holiday travelers in the Midwest and parts East and South were keeping a leery eye Friday on a band of foul weather stretching across the nation’s midsection that was threatening to mar the opening weekend of one of the year’s busiest travel periods. Forecasters were predicting a stew of foul weekend weather, from freezing rain and snow

IN BRIEF Storms create uncertainty #()#!'/!0 n4HE BUSYHOLIDAYTRAVELWEEK ENDUNDERWAYIN)LLINOIS COMESWITHPREDICTIONSFOR NASTYWEATHERANDHAZARD OUSDRIVINGCONDITIONS !MAJORSTORMSYSTEM AIMEDATTHESTATEHAS FORECASTERSTALKINGOF

HEAVYRAIN FREEZINGRAINOR SNOW DEPENDINGONTHE REGION )TADDSUPTOUNCERTAINTY FORTRAVELERSHEADINGOFFON HOLIDAYTRIPS 4HE.ATIONAL7EATHER 3ERVICESAYS3ATURDAY COULDBRINGUPTOINCHES

Merlin’s Greenhouse & “The Other Side�

Family Spaghetti includes garlic bread & salad

$

OFSNOWTONORTHWESTERN )LLINOIS4HE#HICAGOAREA COULDGETFREEZINGRAIN sleet and snow. East CENTRAL)LLINOISANDCENTRAL )LLINOISMAYSEEHEAVYRAIN ANDFLOODING 3ATURDAYCOULDBRING HEAVYWINDSANDTHUN

1899

+tax Dine-in only. Saturdays or Sundays. Expires 12/31/13.

Mama Cimino’s Dine-In ~ Carry-Out ~ Delivery

104 S. Peoria Dixon 288-4448 or 288-4449

See website for gift certificate specials www.MamaCiminosDixon.com

25% OFF Purchase

DERSTORMSTOFARSOUTHERN )LLINOIS

in the north to torrential rain in the Ohio Valley and Appalachia and possibly even tornadoes in the South. The worst of the storm wasn’t expected to hit Midwest population centers until Saturday, and although few flights had been canceled as of midday Friday, the weather was already taking a toll on air travel: FlightStats.com reported more than 1,900 U.S. delays, with the most at Chicago’s O’Hare, Denver International, and the three big New Yorkarea airports.

Celebration at the Brandywine  ), 2T  $IXON s   

GAMING

STOREWIDE!

FULL MENU starts at 4PM M-SAT Coffee is always HOT and always FREE. We are open at 9 am!

Monday Dec. 16 - Sat. Dec. 21 Check out our unadvertised specials, too!

Bar and Gaming open: M-THURS 9AM-11PM, FRI & SAT 9AM- Midnight, SUN 11AM-9PM Kitchen open: M-TH 4PM-9PM, FRI & SAT 4 PM-10PM; Closed Sunday

Join our “text club� Dial 36000 & enter Merlins Join us on facebook www.facebook.com/MerlinsOregon

 -IX 3TREET s /REGON    -ERLINS &LOWERS - &   s 3AT   s CLOSED SUNDAYS

FREE APPETIZER with purchase of an entreĂŠ

Limit one coupon per group. Expires 1/12/14.

Celebration

Extended care ‌ What’s your strategy? You may think you’ll never need extended care. And you may be right. But what would happen to your family if you were wrong? Extended care can affect your family members: 8 Emotionally, as they juggle time between you and their families. 8 Physically, especially if they are your caregivers. 8 Financially, by depleting your savings and their inheritance. A strategy for your care could be the best gift you’ve ever given your family. Contact me today to learn more. Insurance products issued or offered by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, Appleton, WI. Not all products are available in all states. Thrivent Financial representatives are licensed insurance agents/producers of Thrivent Financial. A Thrivent Financial representative may contact you. For additional important disclosure information, please visit Thrivent.com/disclosures.

Larry A Cooper CLTCÂŽ, FIC Financial Associate 2000 N Locust St Sterling, IL 61081 815-625-2200

merry

&bright

1203 West 4th Street Sterling, IL 61081 !PPLETON 7ISCONSIN s -INNEAPOLIS -INNESOTA s 4HRIVENTCOM s  4(2)6%.4    27769 N4-13

655632

815-626-1313

$3.00 OFF ANY DQ CAKE Exp. Jan. 1, 2014

Rock Falls residents now qualify for the complete system rebate of up to $1000!


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

WHITE HOUSE PRESS CONFERENCE

A rosy spin on a rough presidential year President says economy better WASHINGTON (AP) – Putting a rosy spin on a difficult year, President Barack Obama acknowledged frustrating “ups and downs� on Friday but exulted that the improving economy is creating new jobs and claimed crucial progress for his troubled health care overhaul. He predicted 2014 would be “a breakthrough year for America.� In his annual year-end news conference, Obama refused to dwell on his tumbling approval ratings, the disastrous rollout of his signature health care law or the pile of unfinished domestic priorities he leaves behind as he heads for a Christmas holiday in Hawaii.

Asked whether this had been the worst year of his presidency so far, he laughed and said, “That’s not how I think about it.� Yet not all was sunny. He did suggest that, given widespread criticism, he may alter the power of the National Security Agency to collect information on Americans. And when it came to the start of his health care law, Obama conceded that “we screwed it up,� and said, “I’m going to be making appropriate adjustments once we get through this year.� It was unclear if he meant to signal high-level personnel changes. Obama does have some reason to be optimistic. He spoke hours after the government announced the economy grew at a solid 4.1 percent annual rate from July through

AP

President Barack Obama speaks during his end-ofthe-year news conference in the Brady Press Room at the White House in Washington Friday. Up next: Obama’s annual Christmas vacation trip to his home state of Hawaii. September, the fastest pace since late 2011 and significantly higher than previously believed. And he heralded a modest

Obama: A million signed up Health care website faces busy weekend WASHINGTON (AP) – His health care plan facing a dicey transition, President Barack Obama said Friday that insurance sign-ups are surging now that the government’s website is working better for consumers. But it was too soon to say the rollout has turned the corner. More than 1 million people have enrolled since Oct. 1, Obama said at his end-of-the-year press conference. That’s more than

Old Fashioned English Toffee

two-and-a-half times the number on Nov. 30, when major fixes to the website were completed. At that point, only 365,000 had signed up through new federal and state markets offering subsidized private insurance. “That is a big deal,� Obama said of getting coverage for uninsured people. “That’s why I ran for this office.� Separately, officials said 3.9 million people have qualified for government health care through the law’s Medicaid expansion. Even so, things aren’t

exactly humming along. HealthCare.gov was down for part of the day Friday, as technicians attempted to fix an error that occurred Thursday night when the site was undergoing routine maintenance, officials explained. The administration cannot afford for the balky website to crash this weekend. Because of Monday’s deadline to sign up so coverage can take effect Jan. 1, unusually heavy traffic is expected on the federal site and those run by states.

"2%!4(% #,%!.%2 !)2

$20 OFF AIRwithDUCT CLEANING this ad

A Delicious Gift Idea

s !IR $UCT #LEANING  3ANITIZING s #ARPET  &URNITURE #LEANING s &IRE  7ATER 2ESTORATION

available at: Dixon: Dixon Food Center, Cobblestone, and Books on First Amboy: Begg’s Grocery Sublette: Bonnells, CV Meats

815-288-1644 Dixon, Illinois

LOCALLY HOMEMADE BY Z BEST ENTERPRISES IN AMBOY * A TRADITION FOR OVER 75 YEARS

Exp. 12/31/13

www.supremecleanersinc.com

Congratulations Jon on your promotion to Commercial Relationship Manager Jon Byar Commercial Relationship Manager 302 – 1st Avenue, Sterling jbyar@midlandsb.com 815-622-1325

We invite you to stop in and visit with Jon to discover how he can assist you in achieving your business vision. 1-855-MY-MIDLAND midlandsb.com Equal Housing Lender. Member FDIC.

All-Safe Storage Center’s

Outdoor Parking Area Providing safety and security at an affordable price!

s 0ERFECT FOR WINTER STORAGE FOR YOUR BOAT TRAILER CAMPER OR OTHER VEHICLES s 3TORAGE AREAS FULLY ENCLOSED BY A  FOOT SECURITY FENCE s  HOUR A DAY SECURITY CAMERA MONITORINGRECORDING SYSTEM Call Today s !CCESS THROUGH MAIN GATE BY SECURITY CODE ONLY s !LL NIGHT SECURITY LIGHTING to Reserve

Your Space!

All-Safe Storage Center www.allsafecenter.com

  ;PTILY *YLLR 9K VMM VM 3V^LSS 7HYR 9K +P_VU ‹  )\ZPULZZ 6MĂ„JL 6WLU 4- ! [V  HUK :H[ ! [V UVVU

bipartisan budget deal that cleared Congress this week, saying that while it’s too soon to declare a new era of bipartisanship,

Washington is “not condemned to endless gridlock.� Obama heads to his annual home-state Hawaiian vacation armed with dozens of recommendations from a presidential task force on ways to limit the NSA programs. The recommendations were released just days after a federal judge declared the NSA’s bulk collection of Americans’ phone records unconstitutional, ratcheting up pressure on him to make changes. The president insisted that the NSA has not inappropriately used the massive amounts of data in its possession, though he added, “We may have to refine this further to give people more confidence.� After lying dormant for years, the government

surveillance issues shot into the spotlight after former NSA contractor Edward Snowden leaked a trove of secret documents. Snowden is a fugitive from the U.S. and living in Russia, where he received temporary asylum. Some of his supporters have pressed Obama to grant him amnesty, though the president declined to comment on those calls. “I will leave it up to the courts and the attorney general to weigh in in public on Mr. Snowden’s case,� he said. Other disputes lie ahead. Obama renewed his longstanding statement that he will not negotiate concessions with Republicans in exchange for legislation that will be needed in late winter or early spring to raise the nation’s debt limit.

Dear Santa,

All I Want Want for Christmas... IS TO BECOME A CNA!

CNA Classes Starting Again in January +MZII8LIQ +MZ 8LIQEE+MJX'IV +MJX 'IVXM½GEXI XM½GEXI Do You You Know Know a Caregiver Caregiver Yo You u Want Want To Remember at at Christmas? 7GVYFW 7GVYFW  7GVYFW 7XIXLSWGSTIW

7XIXLSWGSTIW 7LSIW 7LSIWˆˆˆ'2%'PEW 7LSIW '2% 'PEWWIW WIW www.loveyourscrubs-cherokee.com www.lifetimeofcaringcna.com

Love Your Scrubs 6 East 4th Street, Sterling



0) ‡ DPSP 6$7 ‡ DPSP


3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs!

CHRISTMAS SHOPPING

Marathon underway Stores vie for final shoppers NEW YORK (AP) – Some stores are ending the holiday shopping season the same way they began it – with round-the-clock, marathon shopping hours. Kohl’s for the first time is staying open for essentially 5 days straight, from 6 a.m. on Friday through 6 p.m. on Christmas Eve. Macy’s and Kmart are opening some of their stores for more than 100 hours in a row from Friday through Christmas Eve. And Toys R Us is staying open for 87 hours straight starting on Saturday, which is typically the second biggest shopping day of the year. The expanded hours in the final days before Christmas are reminiscent of how some retailers typically begin the season on the day after

AP Photo/The Telegraph, John Badman

Little Ana Custer, 2, of Godfrey, Ill., was tired of shopping when her father, Chad, carried her into Alton Square shopping mall Friday in Alton. Some stores plan marathon shopping hours until Christmas. Thanksgiving known as Black Friday. The strategy comes as stores try to recoup lost sales during a season that’s been hobbled by a number of factors. Despite a recovering economy, many Americans have been strug-

gling with stagnant wages and other issues. On top of that, the time period between the official holiday shopping kickoff on Black Friday and the end of the season is 6 days shorter than a year ago. That has given Americans less time to shop.

Detached dads? Not anymore CHICAGO (AP) – The detached dad, turning up his nose at diapering and too busy to bathe, dress, and play with his kids, is mostly a myth, a big government survey suggests. Most American

fathers say they are heavily involved in hands-on parenting, the researchers found. The nationally representative survey shows fathers’ involvement has increased slightly since the government first asked in 2002, coinciding with research since then that bolsters the benefits of hands-on fathering.

The results are encouraging and important “because others have found the more involved dads are, the better the outcomes for their children,� said researcher Jo Jones of the National Center for Health Statistics, part of the Centers for Disease Control Prevention. She co-authored the report released Friday.

ISAMONGEIGHTPEOPLE WHOSEDRUGSENTENCES HAVEBEENCOMMUTEDBY 0RESIDENT"ARACK/BAMA 2EYNOLDS7INTERSMITH *R OF2OCKFORD )LL WAS

ATEENAGERWHENHEWAS SENTENCEDINTOLIFE INPRISONFORSELLINGCRACK COCAINE/BAMACOMMUTED7INTERSMITHSSENTENCE 4HURSDAY

IN BRIEF Obama lightens drug sentence "/34/.!0 n!FIRST COUSINOF-ASSACHUSETTS'OV$EVAL0ATRICK

FIESTA SE

STK#F3569

PETE’S PRICE>

14,548

FORD FOCUS STK#F4142

PETE’S PRICE>

16,286

2013 FORD TRANSIT CONNECT XL

AM 1240 WSDR MORNINGS WEEKDAYS BEGINNING DECEMBER 9 - 24 BETWEEN 6AM - NOON

TO WIN UNIQUE AND WONDERFUL GIFTS OUR SPONSORS

Ä? 9/ / -- U Ä?1, "½- Ä? -"* U Ä? 9 "1/+1 U ,Ä?7", , Ä?/9 U  -" "/",-*",/- U Ä?," ½1, /1, U "1- ½- /,1  Ä? Ä?1/" U  *, - "//½- Ä?, +1 -"* U Ä? *"7 , U Ä?,/ ½- -/ Ä? Ä? -*,/U 7Ä? /,Ä? Ä?/"  - "" U *Ä?,7Ä?9 / , U ,Ä?- Ä?, Ä? , U -Ä?1 6Ä? 9 Ä?  U - ½U -/ ,   Ä?,  Ä? / , U -1*,   Ä? ,-

permonthG

STK#F4056

NEW

PETE’S PRICE>

294

$

19,998

*

$

permonthF

STK#F4106

PETE’S PRICE>

LISTEN TO THE

244

$

*

$

2014 FORD FUSION S

GIVEAWAY CONTEST

permonthF

SE

NEW

12 Days of Christmas

283

$

*

$

NEW 2014

U.S. SURVEY

Most fathers active parents

NEW 2013 FORD

283

$

19,104

*

$

2014 FORD ESCAPE S

permonthG

STK#F9106

NEW

PETE’S PRICE>

329

$

20,686

*

$

permonthF

2013 FORD F150 XLT 4x4

STK#F3603

NEW

Super Cab

PETE’S PRICE>

499

$

29,734

*

$

permonthF

Better Quality‌ Better Service‌ Better Prices

Mike Batten

General Manager Pete Harkness Ford

Wayne Squire

Business Manager Pete Harkness Ford

Chris Lansford Sales Professional Pete Harkness Ford

Ray Campos

Sales Professional Pete Harkness Ford

WWW.PETEHARKNESS.COM

.DWKOHHQ 0D[Ă€HOG Sales Professional Pete Harkness Ford

Jack Hibbard

Sales Professional Pete Harkness Ford

Dan Berkeley

Sales Professional Pete Harkness Ford

Brent Hamblen Sales Professional Pete Harkness Ford

Ford R Lincoln

815-625-6300 Rt. 40 N, Sterling

*Does not include tax, title, license & doc fees. F) With approved credit. $2,000 down, 5.9% x 72 months. G) With approved credit. 3.99% x 84 months. Photos for illustration only. Dealer not liable for errors.


!s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

ECONOMY

'

Consumers aid GDP expansion WASHINGTON (AP) – The U.S. economy grew at a solid 4.1 percent annual rate from July through September, the fastest pace since late 2011 and significantly higher than previously thought. Much of the upward revision came from stronger consumer spending. The Commerce Department’s final look at growth in the summer

The following stock quotations, as of 5 p.m., are provided as a community service by Chad Weigle of Edward Jones, Dixon and Raymond James and Associates, Sterling. Abbott ......................... 37.84 Alcoa ............................. 9.94 AltriaCorp ................... 38.58 Autonation ................. 49.85 American Express ...... 87.66 Arris-Group ................ 23.52 Apple......................... 548.70 ADM............................ 43.39 AT&T ........................... 34.34 Bank of America......... 15.62 Boeing....................... 136.84 BorgWarner ................ 55.01 BP ................................ 46.86 Casey’s ........................ 71.13 Caterpillar .................. 88.94 CenturyLink ............... 31.04 Chevron .................... 122.77 Cisco ........................... 21.12 Citigroup .................... 52.26 CNW ........................... 39.58 CocaCola .................... 40.04 ConAgra...................... 33.54 Dean ........................... 16.97 Deere & Co ................. 90.04 Disney ......................... 72.49 Donaldson.................. 43.14 DuPont ....................... 62.58 Exxon .......................... 98.81 Ford ............................ 15.41 Exelon ......................... 27.26 GE ............................... 27.43 FifthThird ................... 20.81 HawaiianElectric ....... 25.93 Hewlett Packard ........ 27.80

NO BETTER DEALS AROUND!

was up from a previous estimate of 3.6 percent. Four-fifths of the revision in the report released Friday came from stronger consumer spending, mainly in the area of health care. The 4.1 percent annual growth rate in the third quarter, as measured by the gross domestic product, came after the economy had expanded at a 2.5 percent rate in the second quarter. Much of the acceleration reflected a buildup in business stockpiles.

MONEY & MARKETS HomeDepot ............... 80.14 Intel Corp. .................. 24.06 IBM ........................... 180.65 IntlPaper..................... 48.36 JCPenney ...................... 8.32 JohnsonControls........ 50.32 Johnson&Johnson ..... 92.15 JPMorgan Chase ........ 57.76 Kraft ............................ 54.00 Kroger ......................... 39.70 Leggett&Platt ............. 30.56 Manpower .................. 85.11 McDonald’s ................ 96.47 Merck&Co .................. 49.34 Microsoft .................... 36.77 3M ............................. 137.06 Monsanto ................. 113.80 Newell ......................... 31.65 AGL ............................. 47.08 Nike............................. 77.27 Parker-Han............... 126.09 Pfizer ........................... 30.34 Pepsico ....................... 81.92 Procter&Gamble ........ 82.00 RaymondJames.......... 51.47 Republic ..................... 33.30 Sears Hldg .................. 46.94 SensientTech ............. 48.16 Sprint ............................ 9.85 Staples ........................ 15.73 TheTravelers .............. 89.24 UnitedContinental .... 37.39 UnitedTech .............. 110.66 USBancorp ................. 40.09 USSteel ....................... 27.96 Verizon ....................... 48.24 Walgreen .................... 59.08 WalMartStores ........... 77.51 WalMartMexico ......... 26.30 WasteMgt ................... 44.39 Wendy’s ........................ 8.69

2 RECLINERS FOR 1 LOW PRICE!

#1 Name in Furniture! RECLINERS FOR LOW PRICE!

Feb. 133.85; April 134.50 Oats: March 3.48ž; July 3.24ž Feeder cattle: Jan. 166.67; May 168.05 Lean hogs: Dec. 86.25; Feb. 91.17; June 100.50 Sugar: March 16.45 Cotton: March 83.15 T-Bonds: March 13004⠄32 Silver: March 19.38 Gold: Feb. 12.01 Copper: March 3.3075 Crude: Feb. 99.13 Dollar Index: March 80.74

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$ $ $ $ $ Top $ $ Dollar $ $ Paid! $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ 1707 East 4th St., Sterling $ $ (815) 625-9600 $$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

WE BUY CARS!

RECLINERS FOR LOW PRICE!

2 1

$

399

2 1

499

$

2 FOR FOR ONE ONE LOW LOW PRICE PRICE

$

2 FOR ONE LOW PRICE

599

2F FOR OR ON ONE E LOW PRICE

Rambler Cafe 35� Fabric Zero Wall Recliner

Rutledge Mocha 35� Fabric Rocker Recliner

Dylan DURABLENDŽ Espresso 41� Swivel Rocker Recliner

2S EHHMXMSREP HMWGSYRX ETTPMIW

2S EHHMXMSREP HMWGSYRX ETTPMIW

2S EHHMXMSREP HMWGSYRX ETTPMIW

14 Piece Room Packages

   





STARTING AT ONLY

$

999!

+%# %-  # #/#'! ((& +(.)

'%., ,(  %(/,- ($-#% -%  ' -%, +.! -"+(0 %'$-  %&), ' )# ,,(+1 ,-

TVs AT AMAZON PRICES!

WE CHECK AMAZON EVERY DAY TO GET YOUR LOW PRICE!!! 55� CLASS 4K ULTRA ULTRA HD TV FOUR TIMES CLEARER THAN HD

70� 240Hz 240Hz LED SMART SMART TV TV

36 MONTHS QUALIFIES FOR

24 MONTHS QUALIFIES FOR

NO INTEREST!*

Commodities The following quotations are provided as a community service by Sterling Futures: Corn: March 4.33Ÿ; July 4.44½; Dec. 4.60ž Soybeans: Jan. 13.39; May 13.16; July 13.01 Soybean oil: March 39.74; July 40.50 Soybean meal: March 433.60; July 415.50 Wheat: March 6.13½; July 6.24ž Live cattle: Dec. 132.45;

Holiday Sale!

NO INTEREST!*

240

ULTRA HD TV

Hz AquoMotion 480

XBR-55X850A

Â&#x2C6; / 9PXVE ,MKL (IJMRMXMSR Â&#x2C6; 9TWGEPI )ZIV]XLMRK =SY ;EXGL XS / 9PXVE ,( Â&#x2C6; 86-091-237 (MWTPE] 8IGLRSPSK] 'VIEXIW -RGVIHMFP] 8VYI 2EXYVEP 7LEHIW SJ 'SPSVW .YWX 8LI ;E] =SY ;ERX 8LIQ Â&#x2C6; (]REQMG )HKI 0)( &EGOPMKLXMRK [MXL 0SGEP (MQQMRK Â&#x2C6; 1SXMSRžS[81 <6  8IGLRSPSK]

Â&#x2C6; 7XVIEQ &IEYXMJYP :MHIS JVSQ *EZSVMXI 7MXIW PMOI 2IXJPM\Â&#x2039; =SY8YFI81 ERH ,YPY4PYW81 [MXL &YMPX-R ;M*MÂ&#x2039; Â&#x2C6; ;MVIPIWWP] 1MVVSV ;LEX´W 3R =SYV 'SQTEXMFPI %RHVSMH81 7QEVXTLSRI Â&#x2C6; 'SRXVSP XLI 8: SV &VS[WI XLI 'LERRIP +YMHI [MXL =SYV 7QEVXTLSRI <TIVME81 8EFPIX (IZMGI %RHVSMH SV M37

LC-70C7500U

Â&#x2C6; 59%88632 'SPSV

Â&#x2C6; %5937 9:% (-740%=

8IGLRSPSK]

Â&#x2C6; 70-1 ()7-+2 9PXVE 7PMQ

Â&#x2C6; 71%68 8:[MXL (YEP'SVI 4VSGIWWSV ERH FYMPXMR ;M*M Â&#x2C6; ,^ 6)*6)7, 6%8) %UYSQSXMSR 

%PYQMRYQ *VEQI Â&#x2C6; 8,92()6397 ; %9(-3 &YMPXMR WYF[SSJIV

GUARANTEED LOWEST PRICES ON APPLIANCES! BRAVOS Xâ&#x201E;˘ TOP LOAD WASHER WITH POWERWASHÂŽ CYCLE

22.0 CU. FT. BOTTOM-FREEZER FRENCH-DOOR REFRIGERATOR

$

Â&#x2C6; 'VS[R HSSVW [MXL LMHHIR LMRKIW

$

Â&#x2C6; %HNYWXEFPI WTMPPTVSSJ KPEWW WLIPZIW Â&#x2C6; *EGXSV]MRWXEPPIH MGIQEOIV Â&#x2C6; 8[SPIZIP JVII^IV FEWOIXW MVWX600XW

Â&#x2C6; %HNYWXEFPI KEPPSR HSSV FMRW

799

Stock Only

Â&#x2C6; Â&#x2C6; Â&#x2C6; Â&#x2C6;

 'Y *X 'ETEGMX] )GS'SRWIVZIÂ&#x2039; %HZERGIH:MFVEXMSR 'SRXVSP (IIT 'PIER 3TXMSR

499

$

SAVE

300 6É&#x2C6; 4:97

Â&#x2C6; 2IZIV 'PIER GSRHIRWIV

30" SMOOTH TOP SELF CLEANING ELECTRIC RANGE

Â&#x2C6; 9TJVSRX XIQTIVEXYVI GSRXVSPW

Â&#x2C6;  'Y *X 'ETEGMX] Â&#x2C6; %HNYWXEFPI 7IPJ'PIERMRK 3ZIR Â&#x2C6; +PEWW'IVEQMG 7TMPP7EZIV 9TW[ITX 'SSOXST

Â&#x2C6; -RXIVMSV PMKLXMRK

$ GFSF2HCYWW

Stock Only

1099

SELF-CLEANING OVEN AER5830VAW

449

$

STERLING

3614 E. Lincolnway

815-626-5631

MON.-THURS. 9-6, Fri. 9-8, SAT. 9-5, SUN. 11-4

LYNN BL VD.

Third quarter rises 4.1 percent

S

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

Â&#x2C6; )\XVE0EVKI 3ZIR ;MRHS[ Â&#x2C6; (IPE] &EOI 3ZIR 'SRXVSP

$

SAVE

150 6É&#x2C6; 4:97

McCORMICK'S

MENARDS

IL. T. R 2 / E. LINCOLNW AY ALDI'S

POLO  : +P]PZPVU :[ ŕ Ž   MON.-FRI. 8:30-5:00, SAT. 8:30-3:00

(Right next to Ashley Furniture HomeStore)

WE ACCEPT

~ FFurniture urniture & M Mattresses attresses In Sterling Only ~

We Service Everything We Sell!!

Check Us Out Online at www.ShopKnies.com *Approved credit required. Certain restrictions apply. See Knieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s for details.


FOLLOW SATURDAY’S LOCAL SPORTS ACTION ONLINE. GET CONNECTED.

Sports

KIDS WEEK

v weekend

Section B

Latest CatMatt contest, B9.

e-mail: sports@saukvalley.com

Still up in the air Bears linebacker Lance Briggs officially listed as a game-time decision Sunday against the Eagles after being cleared by doctors Friday. Coach Marc Trestman is “fully optimistic” about Briggs’ return.

89

Saturday, December 21, 2013

Numbers game Members of the NHL’s 400-goal club, after the Capitals’ Alex Ovechkin scored his 400th Friday night in Washington’s 4-2 win over the Hurricanes.

‘Like’ us! Sauk Valley Sports

Sports for the Sauk Valley fan! tomMUSICK Northwest Herald sports reporter. Reach him at tmusick@ shawmedia. com

Don’t overthink this, Bears

L

AKE FOREST – After an agonizing, palmto-forehead type of loss against the Minnesota Vikings 3 weeks ago, the Bears could have gone into hibernation. First-year coach Marc Trestman could have let an overtime blunder spoil his season. The atmosphere in the locker room could have turned sour. None of this happened. Give Trestman credit for calmly providing stability. “That’s just the type of coach he is,” running back Matt Forte said Thursday in a jubilant locker room at Halas Hall, where rap music blared and players sang along. “At this level of football, you don’t really see too many coaches who are screaming in guys’ faces or anything like that. They really do treat you like a grown man, and you respond to that better than somebody screaming in your face.” It’s important to note Trestman’s coaching strengths, because he clearly has many. It also is important to scrutinize Trestman’s decisions as the playoffs approach. On Sunday night, the Bears (8-6) will visit the Philadelphia Eagles (8-6) in a game that could mean very much or very little, depending on the day’s events. Everything is hypothetical at this point, but it doesn’t mean we cannot consider the possibilities. MUSICK CONTINUED ON B4

BOYS BASKETBALL | FORRESTON TOURNAMENT FINAL

BOYS HOOPS

Revenge complete

Frightful start sinks Comets beat ’Bago, claim tourney crown Rockets BY PATRICK PETROSKY ppetrosky@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 553

FORRESTON – Newman completed its sweep of revenge games, defeating Winnebago 86-80 Friday night in the Forreston Holiday Tournament championship game. The Comets (9-0) have now avenged all three losses to teams last season that are on their schedule this season. They say that free throws win games, and Newman proved that statement to be true. The Comets went 26-for-37 from the line overall, and were 18-for-21 in the final quarter. “I thought we were very composed down the stretch,” Newman coach Ray Sharp said. “We took care of the ball. We knew the situation and the score, and we did a nice job of getting to the free-throw line and knocking those down.” Senior point guard A.J. Sharp led the Comets in both free throw attempts and makes. He went 13-for-18 overall, and 9-for-11 in the last quarter en route to a 33-point performance. Not only did he make big shots from the line in crunch time, Sharp also drove the Comet offense in the first half. Sharp answered Winnebago 3-pointers multiple times with four 3s of his own in the first half, when he scored 17 points. Fellow senior John Payan chipped in a pair of 3s for Newman, which trailed the Indians 40-37 heading into the half. “It was a lot of Noah [McCarty] and the other guys pushing the ball up,” A.J. Sharp said. “This forced [Winnebago] to drop back a lot, and the shots from the 3-point arc were a lot easier, because of the effort they put into it.” The Comets ran into foul trouble, as key defenders McCarty and Nate Terveer both had to miss playing time because of fouls. Their replacements, juniors Trevor Bolin and Jacob Barnes, accepted this challenge and made the most of it. “I like to play physical. It’s the way I’m used to playing,” Terveer said. “They have been

Grey Ghosts start strong, hang on BY LARRY BRENNAN lbrennan@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 550

ROCK FALLS – An early hole was too much for Rock Falls to dig out of. The Rockets missed their first eight shots and fell behind by 13 points in the first quarter. They whittled a 15-point deficit to five before IVC quickly regained control on the way to a 57-45 nonconference win Friday night at Tabor Gym. Rock Falls (3-5) could not solve the Grey Ghosts’ threequarter-court press into a 1-2-2 half-court zone. FRIGHTFUL CONTINUED ON B10

IVC 57, Rock Falls 45 Star of the game: Reilly Owens, IVC, 20 points, 8 rebounds, 4 steals Up next: State Farm Classic, first round, Rock Falls vs. Fieldcrest, at Normal West H.S., 7:30 p.m. Thursday

Michael Krabbenhoeft/mkrabbenhoeft@saukvalley.com

Newman’s Nolan McGinn shoots a basket over Winnebago’s Zach Thoren during the championship game of the Forreston Holiday Tournament on Friday night. The Comets took home the title, beating the Indians 86-80. calling it closer this year, so it’s hard for me to stay out of foul trouble. “But I usually guard their best player, and we work as a team to stop them.” While Barnes pulled down crucial rebounds, Bolin helped the Comet defense not miss a beat. However, Bolin’s play of the night came on the offensive end. COMPLETE CONTINUED ON B7

Newman 86, Winnebago 80 Star of the game: A.J. Sharp, Newman, 33 points, 6 assists Key performers: John Payan, Newman, 17 points; Nate Terveer, Newman, 10 points, 9 in 4th quarter; Dalton Menke, Winnebago, 20 points Up next: Newman tournament, first round, Newman vs. Durand, 7:30 p.m. Thursday

Philip Marruffo/ pmarruffo@saukvalley.com

Rock Falls’ Cory McCallister shoots over the IVC defense Friday night at Tabor Gym.

BOWLING | COMMERCIAL 16 LEAGUE | PLUM HOLLOW LANES, DIXON

Trio strikes gold in Dixon Three bowlers pull off rare feat at Plum Hollow “I don’t know how it happened; I wish I knew, because I’d do it again,” said Van Quathem, a 43-year-old from Lost Nation. “It’s hard to explain; the only way to describe it is a fluke, something that will probably never happen again.” “It’s really odd, something I’ve never seen before,” added Goodson, a 45-year-old Mount Morris resident who’s been bowling his whole life. “It’s a little bit unusual, but when you think of all the good bowlers in these leagues, you wonder why

it doesn’t happen more often.” While each bowler was wrapped up in their own goings on, all three said they were definitely aware of what the other guys were doing. For White, he actually had a better handle on what Goodson was doing one lane away than his own masterful performance. A “190-something bowler,” White was paying more attention to Goodson’s run at 300 than he was at adding up his own score.

NHL

LOCAL SPORTS

Blackhawks blow 2-0 lead in loss, B3.

Polo 3rd in Forreston, B7.

Suggestion box Comment or story tip? Contact Sports Editor Dan Woessner at dwoessner@saukvalley.com or 800-798-4085, ext. 555

BY TY REYNOLDS treynolds@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 554

Something must have been floating in the ether at Plum Hollow Lanes in Dixon on Dec. 5, for that Thursday night was a rare one indeed. During the Commercial 16 League, Jeff Van Quathem rolled his third 300 game. At the same time, down in lanes 1 Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com and 2, Tim Goodson came up Jeff Van Quathem (left), Jeff White (middle) and Tim Goodson three pins short of his fourth all contributed to a rare night Dec. 5 at Plum Hollow Lanes. 300 game, while Jeff White was Van Quathem rolled a 300 game, Goodson just missed a 300 surpassing even his own expecgame, and White bowled an 812 series – all in the same league. tations with an 812 series.

Sports inside

GOLD CONTINUED ON B5


TOP OF 2

No go Aaron Rodgers 0ACKERS1"OFFICIALLYRULED OUTFOR3UNDAYSGAME AGAINST3TEELERS THESEVENTH STRAIGHTGAMEMISSEDWITH FRACTUREDCOLLARBONE

SVM staff, wire services RUNNING

Track meet set for Dec. 28 4HESECONDANNUAL#HRISTMAS#LASSICTRACKMEET WILLBEHELDAT7ESTWOOD 3PORTS#OPMPLEXIN3TERLING ON3ATURDAY $EC 4HEMEETISOPENTOALL AGES&ORMOREINFORTMATION VISITWWWMUSICINMOTIONKORGORCONTACTBarb LauffAT  OR LAUFFLINE COMCASTNET COLLEGE FOOTBALL

RB Gordon returns to Badgers 2UNNINGBACKMelvin GordonWILLRETURNTO7ISCONSINFORHISJUNIORSEASON IN 4HE  YARDRUSHER SAIDINASTATEMENTRELEASED BYTHETEAM&RIDAYTHATHE HADROOMFORGROWTH AND THATHEHOPEDTOGETTHE TH RANKED"ADGERSBACK TOTHE"IG4ENTITLEGAME (EALSOCITEDADESIRETO COMPLETEHISDEGREE 4HIRD YEARSOPHOMORE 'ORDONISHALFOF7ISCONSINSPOTENTONE TWO BACKFIELDPUNCHWITHSENIOR James White'ORDONS YARDSPERRUSHCAREER AVERAGELEADSACTIVEMAJOR COLLEGEPLAYERS #OACHGary Andersen LASTWEEKSAIDHEGAVE 'ORDONHIS/+TOSEEKAN .&,DRAFTEVALUATION BUT ENCOURAGEDHIMTORETURN TOSCHOOL MLB

Beltran introduced by Yankees #LOSERTOTHEENDOFHIS LONGCAREERTHANTHESTART Carlos BeltranFINALLYGOT TOPUTONTHEUNIFORMOFHIS FAVORITECHILDHOODTEAM 4HEEIGHT TIME!LL 3TAR WASINTRODUCEDATA9ANKEE3TADIUMNEWSCONFERENCE&RIDAYAFTERSIGNING A YEARDEALWORTH MILLIONTHATWASAGREEDTO WEEKSAGOBUTMADE OFFICIALON4HURSDAY 3PORTINGHISNUMBER JERSEYANDJOINEDBYHIS TWODAUGHTERSANDHISWIFE "ELTRANTALKEDABOUTHOW MUCHHEADMIREDTHE9ANKEESWHILEGROWINGUPIN 0UERTO2ICO ANDHOWCLOSE HECAMETOJOININGTHEMIN "UTBOTHSIDESTHAT YEAR INCLUDINGFORMEROWNER George Steinbrenner JUST COULDNTCOMETOTERMS LEAVING"ELTRANNOOTHER CHOICEBUTTOINKA YEAR DEALWITHTHE-ETS NFL

Eagles QB fined for illegal block 0HILADELPHIA%AGLESQUARTERBACKNick Foles was FINED BYTHE.&, ON&RIDAYFORANILLEGALPEEL BACKBLOCKON-INNESOTAS Erin HendersonDURINGTHE %AGLESLOSS3UNDAY &OLESWENTDOWNLOWAT (ENDERSONSKNEES DRAWINGAPENALTYANDNEGATINGDeSean JacksonS  YARDTOUCHDOWNINTHE SECONDQUARTER !LSO&RIDAY !RIZONAS Marcus BenardWASFINED  FORROUGHINGTHE PASSERONAHITON4ENNESSEESRyan Fitzpatrick.

Theismann weighs in on Redskins &ORMER7ASHINGTON 2EDSKINSQUARTERBACKJoe TheismannSAYSTHATWHEN HEWORETHEUNIFORMASA PLAYER HEDIDITTOHONOR !MERICAN)NDIANS "UT4HEISMANNSAID&RIDAYIN!LBUQUERQUE .- THATHEUNDERSTANDSWHY SOME.ATIVE!MERICANS WANTTHENAMECHANGED 4HEISMANNMADEHIS COMMENTSBEFOREHIS KEYNOTEADDRESSATALUNCHEONFOR#OLORADO3TATE AND7ASHINGTON3TATE 4HETEAMSARESCHEDULED TOFACEOFF3ATURDAYINTHE .EW-EXICO"OWL

Adrian Peterson 6IKINGS2"RETURNSTO PRACTICE&RIDAY EXPECTED TOPLAY3UNDAYAGAINST "ENGALSHESOFFICIALLY LISTEDASQUESTIONABLE

Your guide to whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on in sports

"s367EEKEND

sportShorts

Good to go?

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

MY 2 CENTS

Finally, we talkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; hoopin! I

think I blinked and missed a month there. It seems like we were in the middle of the football playoffs, and then I closed my eyes for a second. When I opened them up, we were already in the middle of holiday basketball tournaments. While I am exaggerating, the blur of state football, postseason volleyball and football sections, and the preparation for basketball season just made it hard for me to have time to sit down and type out some thoughts. It didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t help that we are now navigating these seas with one less person, with Mr. Heimerman now manning a desk on the news side. But, now I have a second, and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to give some thoughts on area hoops. So here we goâ&#x20AC;¦ There are a pack of teams that have started the season hot. On the boys side, Dixon, Newman, Milledgeville, Polo, Eastland and Fulton have all had very nice starts. The Dukes are undefeated as I write this, and theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll stay that way through Christmas, what with the West Carroll tournament calling off its remaining games due to the weather. With the Dukes on the road for most of this first month, we havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had much chance to see them. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve played a host of smaller schools so far, but should get tested a little more at the Plano tournament next week. Newman won the Oregon tournament without much help from some key starters who were still playing football. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve kept rolling all the way to the championship game at the Forreston tournament. That game against Winnebago should give us an idea of how far the Comets have come since last winter.

DANWOESSNER 3PORTS%DITOR2EACH HIMAT DWOESSNER SAUKVALLEY COMCOM OR   EXT 

On the calendar Local events Saturday Boys basketball 10:30 a.m.

s$E+ALBTOURNAMENT 3TERLINGVS4HORNRIDGE 3 p.m.

s$E+ALBTOURNAMENT 3TERLINGVS(ARLEM Milledgeville has been a feel-good story, with only one loss. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a group of kids that havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t had a whole lot of winning in their high school careers. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be great to see them string together a good season. The bad news is that Milledgeville, Polo, Eastland, Aquin and Forreston have all been grouped into one regional. Something smells in Denmark, if those five very good teams are getting sent to the same place. There could be at least three sectional championship-quality Photos by Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com teams there. Junior Matt Coffey (above) and the Dixon Dukes On the girls side, are off to a great start this season, as are senior Prophetstown hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Brian Cavanaugh (below) and the Polo Marcos. missed a beat despite key losses to graduation. The Prophets knocked off a good Oregon team on Thursday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; for the second time this season â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and play Byron for the Polo tourney title on Saturday. This year, the Prophets will be placed in 2A, and they could see the Hawks and Tigers again in the sectional round. Sterling started off hot, but has cooled off the last week or two. They are playing in the ultratough Sterling Shootout right now. Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll take their lumps, but most Julie Schroedercoached teams use those lessons for big things later in the year. Eastland is strong again, and thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no reason to believe the Cougars wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make some noise in 1A. Wow, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just scratching the surface. Thank goodness, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve still got a couple months more to talk about hoops.

TBA

s"UREAU6ALLEYAT #OLMONE#LASSIC

Girls basketball 9 a.m.

s3TERLINGSHOOTOUT 3TERLINGVS(ONONEGAH Noon

s0OLOTOURNAMENT 0OLO VS-ILLEDGEVILLE 1:15 p.m.

s0OLOTOURNAMENT 7EST #ARROLLVS&ORRESTON 2:30 p.m.

s7INNEBAGOAT2OCK&ALLS s0OLOTOURNAMENT -ORRISONVS/REGON 3:15 p.m.

s3TERLINGSHOOTOUT 3TERLINGVS2ICHWOODS 3:45 p.m.

s0OLOTOURNAMENT 0ROPHETSTOWNVS"YRON

Boys bowling 10:15 a.m.

s/REGONAT&REEPORT3PORT 3HOT 1:30 p.m.

s$IXONAT2OCKFORD%AST )NVITE

Girls bowling 8:15 a.m.

s$IXON 3TERLINGAT$E+ALB )NVITE

Boys swimming 10 a.m.

s3TERLINGAT2OCKFORD%AST 2ELAYS s-ORRISONAT#LINTON)NVITE

Wrestling 9 a.m.

s2OCK&ALLS 0OLO -ORRISON &ULTONAT%RIE 0ROPHETSTOWN)NVITE s!MBOY /REGONAT 3TILLMAN6ALLEYTOURNAMENT

On this date December 21 1941 s4HE#HICAGO"EARSWIN THE.&,CHAMPIONSHIPWITH A ROUTOFTHE.EW 9ORK'IANTS 1981 sDoug SchloernerS  FOOTJUMPSHOTWITH SECONDLEFTINTHESEVENTH OVERTIMEGIVES#INCINNATIA  VICTORYOVER"RADLEY 4HESEVENOVERTIMESSETAN .#!!RECORD 1998 s'REEN"AYSBrett Favre BECOMESTHEFIRST.&, PLAYERTOTHROWFORMORE THANTOUCHDOWNSINFIVE DIFFERENTSEASONS&AVRE CONNECTSTHREETIMESWITH Antonio FreemanINTHE FIRSTHALFOFA WIN OVER4ENNESSEETOBREAKA TIEWITHDan Marino.

Let us hear it s'AMERESULTS STORY TIPS ATHLETEOFTHEWEEK NOMINATIONS TEAMAND INDIVIDUALSTATSCANBE FAXEDTO   CALLEDINTO   EXTORE MAILEDTO SPORTS SAUKVALLEYCOM

Contact us at 800-798-4085 Sports Editor Dan Woessner EXT DWOESSNER SAUKVALLEYCOM Sports Reporters Larry Brennan EXT LBRENNAN SAUKVALLEYCOM Ty Reynolds EXT TREYNOLDS SAUKVALLEYCOM Brian Weidman EXT BWEIDMAN SAUKVALLEYCOM


3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs"

NHL | CANUCKS 3, BLACKHAWKS 2

Predators cool off Blackhawks Chicago blows 2-0 lead, loses in shootout to bitter rival BY CHRIS KUC #HICAGO4RIBUNE

On the tube TV listings Saturday

College volleyball

College football

8:30 p.m.

11 a.m.

s$IVISION))CHAMPIONSHIP ,ENOIR 2HYNEVS.7 -ISSOURI3T %30. 1 p.m.

s.EW-EXICO"OWL 7ASHINGTON3TVS #OLORADO3T %30. s&#3PLAYOFFS SEMIFINAL 4OWSONAT%7ASHINGTON %30.5 2:30 p.m.

s,AS6EGAS"OWL &RESNO 3TVS53# !"#

s.#!!4OURNAMENT CHAMPIONSHIP 7ISCONSIN VS0ENN3T AT3EATTLE %30.

College wrestling 6 p.m.

s0ENN3TAT)OWA "4.

NBA 7 p.m.

s#AVALIERSAT"ULLS 7'.

NHL 6 p.m.

s$EVILSAT#APITALS #3. 9 p.m.

4:30 p.m.

s&AMOUS)DAHO0OTATO "OWL "UFFALOVS3AN$IEGO 3T %30. 8 p.m.

s.EW/RLEANS"OWL ,OUISIANA ,AFAYETTEAT 4ULANE %30.

s"LUESAT/ILERS &3.

Sunday Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball 11 a.m.

s+ENNESAW3TAT)NDIANA "4.

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball 11 a.m.

Noon

s0URDUEAT76IRGINIA %30.5

s'EORGETOWNAT+ANSAS 1 p.m. %30. s-OUNT3T-ARYSAT0ENN s"ELMONTAT+ENTUCKY 3T "4. %30.5 2:30 p.m. s%#AROLINAAT.#3TATE &3. s5#ONNAT7ASHINGTON 1 p.m. %30.5 3:30 p.m. s7#AROLINAAT'EORGIA #3. s$E0AULAT)LLINOIS3T #3. s-AINEAT0ROVIDENCE &3. 4 p.m. s9OUNGSTOWN3TAT3T s3OUTHERNAT"AYLOR &3. *OHNS &OX3PORTS s%7ASHINGTONAT3ETON 2 p.m. (ALL &OX3PORTS 4:30 p.m. s(AMPTONVS*AMES -ADISON AT2ICHMOND 6A s'EORGE-ASONVS)OWA ."#30 3T AT(ONOLULU %30.5 2:30 p.m.

6 p.m.

s'ONZAGAVS+ANSAS3T AT7ICHITA +AN %30.

s#ALAT#REIGHTON &OX3PORTS 6:30 p.m.

3 p.m.

s-ICHIGAN3TAT4EXAS #"3 s2IDERAT6ILLANOVA &OX3PORTS s.#AROLINA!4AT3T ,OUIS &3. 3:30 p.m.

s(OUSTONAT2ICE #3. 4 p.m.

s$AVIDSONAT.#AROLINA %30.5 4:30 p.m.

s)LLINOISVS-ISSOURI AT3T ,OUIS %30. s6IRGINIA4ECHVS6#5 AT 2ICHMOND 6A ."#30

s!KRONVS/REGON3T AT (ONOLULU %30.5 4:30 p.m.

s3#AROLINAVS3T-ARYS AT(ONOLULU %30.5

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s basketball 10 a.m.

s3T*OHNSVS4EXAS !- AT.EW9ORK %30.5 12:30 p.m.

s#ALVS5#ONN AT.EW 9ORK %30.

NFL Noon

s#OLTSAT#HIEFS #"3 3 p.m.

5 p.m.

s'EORGIA4ECHAT 6ANDERBILT &3. s,OUISVILLEAT&LORIDA )NTERNATIONAL &OX3PORTS 6 p.m.

s/KLAHOMAVS4EXAS !- AT(OUSTON %30.5

s'IANTSAT,IONS &OX 3:25 p.m.

s3TEELERSAT0ACKERS #"3 7 p.m.

s%AGLESAT"EARS ."#

6:30 p.m.

s/HIO3TVS .OTRE$AME AT.EW9ORK %30. 7:30 p.m.

s-ICHIGANVS3TANFORD AT "ROOKLYN .9 &OX3PORTS 8 p.m.

s.EW-EXICOAT -ARQUETTE %30.5 10:30 p.m.

s#OLORADOVS/KLAHOMA 3T AT,AS6EGAS %30.

Need a local sports fix? Visit saukvalleysports.com

B & D HOME SERVICES

5HVLGHQWLDO Â&#x2021; &RPPHUFLDO

3OXPELQJ Â&#x2021; +HDWLQJ &RROLQJ Â&#x2021; (OHFWULFDO

201 W. 14th, Rock Falls

815-626-0897 Lic # 058-157413

LindaSanders.com 815-499-9461 Sauk Valley

(815) 625-3722 110 E. Lynn Blvd., Sterling, IL 61081

CHICAGO â&#x20AC;&#x201C; They donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t meet very often in the new era of NHL realignment, but there is something about the Chicago Blackhawks and Vancouver Canucks that brings out the nasty in both teams. The rivals met for the second of three times â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and the Canucksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; only appearance in Chicago â&#x20AC;&#x201C; during the regular season when they took the ice Friday night at the United Center. The rivalry has been heated in recent seasons after three consecutive postseason battles. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every time you play them you still get pumped up for the games and the history that is behind the two teams, especially the past few years,â&#x20AC;? Hawks winger Patrick Kane said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a fun rivalry to be a part of. You kind of expect something to happen every game that you play against them. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Star of the game: 2YAN+ESLER 0REDATORS '7INSHOOTOUT Up next:$EVILSAT "LACKHAWKS PM Monday TV/Radio:#3. !always a fun matchup.â&#x20AC;? Ryan Kesler scored the winner in the eighth round of the shootout as the Canucks rallied for a 3-2 victory over the Hawks at the United Center. The loss snapped the Hawksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; two-game winning streak and dropped their record to 25-7-6. Daniel Sedin and Zack Kassian had goals in regulation to make a winner of rookie goaltender Eddie Lack as the Canucks concluded a three-game road trip with the second of backto-back contests. Kane continued his torrid scoring pace with a goal and an assist, and Kris Versteeg also found the back of the net, but

AP

Canucks center Ryan Kesler scores past Blackhawks goalie Antti Raanta during the shootout on Friday in Chicago. Vancouver won 3-2. goalie Antti Raanta and the Hawks coughed up a two-goal lead in the first of three consecutive home games. Raanta set the tone early for the goalies when he stoned Chris Higgins on a breakaway on the Canucksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; second shot of the game. Not long after, the Hawks found the scoreboard when Ver-

steeg redirected a Kane shot. Lack got a piece of it, but the puck trickled into the net, marking the 23rd time this season the Hawks had struck first in a game. With the assist, Kane extended his points streak to 11 contests, and is now one game shy of matching his career high set earlier this season.


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

NFL | PACKERS

Against all odds, Packers in playoff hunt No Rodgers means Flynn will start Steelers game Sunday â&#x20AC;&#x153;A lot of it is resolve, and creating a mindset that GREEN BAY, Wis. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to finish, and Packers are finishing youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to focus in a When:3UNDAY strong at just the right little bit more in that part Where:,AMBEAU&IELD time of year. of the game,â&#x20AC;? secondary TV:#"3 Two straight rousing, coach Darren Perry said Line:0ACKERSBY come-from-behind wins Friday. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think that focus has Green Bay buzzing is heightened a little bit, done in the early part of about playoff possibiliand then weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve just been ties again. Two more vic- the game,â&#x20AC;? McCarthy said opportunistic. Guys doing this week. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have tories, starting Sunday their jobs and not having an answer for you there.â&#x20AC;? the critical breakdowns in against the Pittsburgh The goal every week is to the end.â&#x20AC;? Steelers, would ensure play four good quarters. another NFC North This is happening withBut at the least, McCarcrown in Titletown. out franchise quarterback thy is getting the desired The second halves of Aaron Rodgers, out since games had been trouble- result, even if heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first fracturing his left colsome at times this season. had to endure a couple larbone during the first stomach-churning first But then Green Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s series of a 27-20 loss to halves. defense shut out Atlanta the Bears on Nov. 4. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll Against the Cowboys, in the second half of a miss the Steelers game backup quarterback Matt after officially being ruled 22-21 win two weekends Flynn led Green Bay to ago. Then the Packers out Friday, leaving Flynn touchdowns on the first (7-6-1) went on a 34-10 to start again. five possessions of the binge after halftime to Things would be easier take advantage of Dallasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; second half. Cornerbacks with Rodgers back, though Sam Shields and Tramon Green Bayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s confidence meltdown in a 37-36 vicWilliams came up with tory last week. crucial interceptions in Even coach Mike the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s waning minMcCarthy seems pleasantly puzzled by the turn- utes to help finish off a memorable rally from a around. 23-point halftime deficit. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If I knew that, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d get it BY GENARO C. ARMAS !03PORTS7RITER

Steelers at Packers

is growing having to play without him. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re very confident, especially after what we did in the second half in Dallas, scoring that many points in a half,â&#x20AC;? receiver Jordy Nelson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know Matt can make plays ... If we do our part, the defense is going to be fine.â&#x20AC;? Goal No. 1 is to beat the Steelers. A victory ensures a winner-take-all showdown for the division with the Bears the following week. Late in the year, with the playoffs within sight, the Packers want to finish strong. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just about us going out there and executing AP on Sunday,â&#x20AC;? safety M.D. Packers quarterback Matt Flynn (10) passes during Jennings said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Taking advantage of things when Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s game against the Cowboys in Arlington, we have the opportunity.â&#x20AC;? Texas. Flynn will start this week against the Steelers.

Hurry in to

AP

Bears head coach Marc Trestman and his players are focused on nothing but winning their last two games.

Bears control own destiny with wins MUSICK

CONTINUED FROM B1 Long story short, part I:

If the Detroit Lions lose to the New York Giants and the Green Bay Packers beat the Pittsburgh Steelers on Sunday afternoon, then the Bearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; game in Philadelphia will not affect the NFC North race. In this scenario, the winner of the regular-season finale between the Bears and Packers on Dec. 29 at Soldier Field would win the division. Long story short, part II:

If both the Lions and Packers lose their games, then the Bears can clinch the NFC North with a win. Long story short, part III:

No matter what, the Bears cannot be eliminated from playoff contention based on Sundayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games. Clear as mud? Amid so much uncertainty, Trestman would have been best served to offer clarity. Instead, he opened the door to speculation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a hypothetical to answer that weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re 8-6 and we need to continue to progress and win,â&#x20AC;? Trestman said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s No. 1. No. 2 is winning does take us to a different place in terms of potential seed, which is critically important. So just leaving it at that is enough to reason out how we would want to play the game. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now, could that change? Certainly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But right now, weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re focused on winning a game. And I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s really anything else to discuss at this time. And at 7 oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock eastern time Sunday night, if the situation needs to be reevaluated again, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s open for discussion.â&#x20AC;? No discussion. Play your starters. Beat the Eagles. Period. Trestmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s intentions are good, and by no

means was he carelessly looking forward or disrespecting the Eagles. He was offering an honest answer to a timely question, one that may or may not prove to be prophetic as darkness falls Sunday. Intelligence is a gift, but it also can be a curse. Because smart people can overthink certain situations. They can be too geeky for their own good. At times, Trestman has fit this profile. See: field goal attempt on second down. If recent NFL history has shown anything, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that teams do not help themselves by playing it safe late in the season. Remember the 2009 Indianapolis Colts? They won their first 14 games and decided to take their foot off of the gas to stay healthy for the playoffs. Remember that season? The champion New Orleans Saints sure do. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a high-profile example, but not the only one. As Trestman said, the Bearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; potential playoff seeding could be at stake Sunday. A win could clear the path to a No. 3 playoff seed, which as of now would mean a home game against the San Francisco 49ers. A loss could push the Bears toward a No. 4 seed, which as of now would mean a home game against the Carolina Panthers. Will those scenarios change? Probably. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what makes the NFL great. So forget the math, coach. Just listen to your quarterback. â&#x20AC;&#x153;However it turns out, I think you want to get on a run going into the playoffs,â&#x20AC;? Jay Cutler said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You want to be playing your best football. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to lose, lose, get in the playoffs. You want to be on a winning streak when you get into the playoffs, and kind of roll from there.â&#x20AC;? Preach on.

     

Get $100 off all tablets, plus get up to $150 or more when you trade in your old tablet. All tablets require new 2-yr. activation. Trade in for a Verizon Wireless gift card. Old tablet must be in good working condition.

 



 OFFER VALID 12/19 - 12/31   

,+2%+)%+064 /)5%$ ,+0(%', 0!"6%0

NEW! Verizon Ellipsisâ&#x201E;˘ 7 Requires new 2-yr. activation.

%3 -(,+% %2%.4 4%!. 







61/ &,. ! 6)*)0%$ 0)*% '%0 &.%% !#0)2!0),+  4,1. /0 -!4*%+0 ,+ 1/  For 24 mos. 0% APR. 1st pmt due at sale. On Verizon Edge. ,.

%3 -(,+% %2%.4 4%!./  



Requires new 2-yr. activation.

)0(  %+ &,. %!/4 ,-%.!0),+ Samsung Galaxy NoteÂŽ 3







  

WAS $39.99

%!.!"6% 0%#(

Samsung Galaxy Gearâ&#x201E;˘

3%!0 !+$ 3!0%..%/)/0!+0 /,1+$

 

YurbudsÂŽ Inspire Talk Earbuds

Requires same-time purchase of a Samsung Galaxy SÂŽ 4 or Samsung Galaxy Note 3 with a new 2-yr. activation.**

CALL: 1.800.256.4646

|

CLICK: vzw.com/holiday

Also available in black.

|

VISIT: vzw.com/storelocator

* Up to $35 activation fee and 1st monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Edge payment appears as a bill credit, may take up to 2 billing cycles, and doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t apply to taxes/other fees. Waived activation fee ends 3/31/14 and free month ends 1/15/14. ** Offer requires Samsung Galaxy Gearâ&#x201E;˘ and Samsung Galaxy SÂŽ 4 and/or Samsung Galaxy NoteÂŽ 3 on same receipt. Galaxy Gear is a companion device to select Samsung Galaxy smartphones, sold separately. Screen images simulated. Appearance may vary. Offer ends 12/25/13. Activation/upgrade fee/line: Up to $35. IMPORTANT CONSUMER INFORMATION:SubjecttoCust. Agmt,CallingPlan& creditapproval. Upto$350early terminationfee/line.Restockingfeemayapply.Offers& coverage, varying by svc, not available everywhere; see vzw.com. Verizon Edge: Subject to Customer and Edge Agreements & credit approval. Edge Up available after 6 months and 50% of original device paid. 4G LTE is available in 500 markets in the U.S. Limited-time offers. While supplies last. Š 2013 Samsung Telecommunications America, LLC (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Samsungâ&#x20AC;?). Samsung, Galaxy, Galaxy Note and Galaxy Gear are all trademarks of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd. and/or its related entities. Š 2013 Verizon Wireless. H0519


Saturday, December 21, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

NFL | VIKINGS

Move over, Metrodome Modern marvel to set replace Vikingsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; longtime home BY DAVE CAMPBELL AP Pro Football Writer

MINNEAPOLIS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; For close to half of the Metrodomeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 32-year life, the Minnesota Vikings pushed for a new place to play. In 2016, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll break in a new, sleek stadium on the same downtown site. Perhaps theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll enjoy the same edge they often had at the dated, cramped dome. When itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s torn down next month, though, the Vikings will leave a whole lot of homefield advantage in the rubble. They play their final game at the Metrodome on Dec. 29 against the Detroit Lions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a building that the Vikings and their fans probably donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t look forward to going to, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll guarantee you the visitor hates it even more,â&#x20AC;? former center Matt Birk said. The rival Green Bay Packers are at the top of that list. Brett Favre needed six tries to win his first game there, and finished 6-10 as the opposing quarterback, losing there in 1996 with the eventual Super Bowl champions. Former Chicago Bears coach Mike Ditka loathed the Metrodome so much he declared it fit for no better than a roller skating rink. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The volume in that stadium, when the fans get rocking, you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t even have a conversation on the sidelines. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just the snap count and the communication on the field. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s trying to communicate on the sideline to fix something, and you just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t do it,â&#x20AC;? said retired kicker Ryan Longwell, who, like Favre, played for both the Packers and Vikings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d walk out of here with a great team â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and a loss. It obviously got into our heads a little bit.â&#x20AC;? Then-Packers coach Mike Holmgren accused the Vikings of enhancing the crowd noise by playing recordings through the speaker system, but the inflated Teflon cover was going to trap and amplify the cheering, shouting and chanting

AP

In this Dec. 12, 2010 file photo, snow falls into the field from a hole in the collapsed roof of the Metrodome in Minneapolis. One of the quirkiest stadiums in pro sports, the Metrodome in Minnesota has reached the end. and Favre â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they had some of the leagueâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best offenses without having to worry about Opened: April 1982 limiting late-season weather. Capacity: 64,121 When Cris Carter and Randy FYI: Home of the Vikings Moss were the wide receiv(1982-2013), Twins ers, the precision, speed and (1982-2009) & Timberwolves confidence of the passing (1989-90). ... Hosted two game was almost impossible Final Fours (1991, 2001). to stop. ... Stadium roof collapsed â&#x20AC;&#x153;We always won the same before Vikings game in 2010. way,â&#x20AC;? former strong safety Robert Griffith said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got a regardless of manipulation. lead, you knew it was a track The circulated air was dry, and meet in there, and guys had to unaccustomed opponents keep up with us.â&#x20AC;? could quickly dehydrate. Moss, Cunningham, Carter, The Vikings, too, frequently Randle and Griffith were the had rosters built to thrive on key cogs of the 1998 team the artificial turf in the conthat went 15-1, set the latertrolled climate. broken NFL record for singleFrom Chris Doleman to John season scoring, and cruised Randle to Jared Allen, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve to the NFC championship had some of the most domigame. They lost to the Atlanta nant pass-rushers in the NFL. Falcons in overtime, the only For the offensive tackles who opportunity the Vikings had to play for a Super Bowl spot strained to hear the cadence in their domed home. and left his stance a halfThey also lost three other second late, thwarting a sack NFC championship games on became a greater challenge. the road during the MetroWhen the Vikings had dome era, which will be a quarterback who could marked as much by talented consistently complete deep passes â&#x20AC;&#x201C; like Tommy Kramer, teams that fell short as by the success they had there from Warren Moon, Randall Cun1982-2013. ningham, Daunte Culpepper

Metrodome facts

367EEKENDs"

All eyes on guys with chances at 300 games GOLD

CONTINUED FROM B1

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was watching and cheering Tim the whole time, and I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really thinking mathematically about what my series could be,â&#x20AC;? said White, a 44-yearold Dixon resident who was shocked when he heard his final score. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I went into the last game thinking, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;OK, this has been a good night, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just finish with another good game.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t keeping track of how close or far away I was from 800, or how feasible that would be. I was just having a good time bowling, trying to keep good form and hit my mark. I guess it worked out.â&#x20AC;? White called the career night â&#x20AC;&#x153;an outlier for me, statistically speaking,â&#x20AC;? adding that the next week, he rolled a 603 series and was â&#x20AC;&#x153;plenty happy with that, not the least bit disappointedâ&#x20AC;? because he made his average. Several lanes away, Van Quathem also wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t expecting his good fortune. Bowling just 1 night a week, he credited his third 300 game as â&#x20AC;&#x153;more luck than skill.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Probably about the ninth frame, I realized that I had thrown all strikes,â&#x20AC;? Van Quathem said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just tried to stay calm, throw the ball the way I had been, hoping I wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t leave a 10-pin or something.â&#x20AC;? As is usually the case when someone approaches 300, all the noise and activity around Van Quathem ceased. It wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t like a no-hitter in baseball, but the 35-year bowling veteran was definitely on an island all his own. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It was strange; all of a sudden, everybody stepped back and it got very quiet,â&#x20AC;? Van Quathem said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t giving me the silent treatment or anything, but they were definitely respecting my run.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The lanes around you just stop; nobody wants to distract a guy whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s that close to perfection,â&#x20AC;? Goodson explained. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s focused on you, watching your last few balls, and you just have to stop for a minute and get that out of your head and just focus.â&#x20AC;?

Terrific trio sTim Goodson, 45, Mount Morris: Just missed his fourth 300 game, rolling a 297; he also has two 299 games. sJeff Van Quathem, 43, Lost Nation: Rang up his third career 300 game â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with all of them coming at Plum Hollow. sJeff White, 44, Dixon: 2OLLEDGAMESOF AND 287 on his way to a careerhigh 812 series, shattering his OLDPERSONALBESTOF Goodson was experiencing the same thing back across the alley. As he rolled his second strike of the 10th frame, every eye nearby was turned on him, hoping theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d see the second 300 of the night. But his fourth 300 just wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t meant to be. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The last ball was a little wide to the outside, and it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t quite make it back to the pocket,â&#x20AC;? Goodson said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;That was the most disappointing thing about it; I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t give it a good chance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve also bowled two 299s, but in those situations, I threw good balls, it just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t work out. This time was more of a letdown.â&#x20AC;? In addition to the 300 and the 297, Whiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s series included games of 290 and 287, with a 235 in between. The 290 featured 11 strikes after an opening-frame spare, and the 287 followed the same formula, except with a 7 on the final throw instead of a strike. In an interesting twist, Whiteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 14-year-old son Jarod had set his own personal best earlier in the day. A member of the Dixon Dukes bowling team, Jarod White rolled a 222 game at practice the afternoon before his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fantastic performance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It mustâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been something in the water, or the planets were aligned just right and the moon was in the perfect phase,â&#x20AC;? White said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maybe the oil pattern helped, or the guys with us were all rolling it just right that night. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It takes a little luck, a break here or there, getting your head in the game the right way â&#x20AC;Ś a lot of things have to go right even before you let go of the ball. Whatever it was, it just worked out well for us that night.â&#x20AC;?

BOOK BOOK CLEARANCE CLEARANCE

We over-ordered over-ordered and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to to close out tthese hese book books! s!

T OU

Ronald Reagan The The Dixon Dixon Illinois Connection

D L SO

A1 128 28 page page hard hard co cover ver book filled wit with h pho photos tos of Ronald Ronald Reagan Reag R eagan during during his childhood childhood along with with his visits to to Dix Dixon on as an adult. Originally sold for $24.95 Originally NOW NO W CLEARAN CLEARANCE CE PRICED AT AT

$5.00

Tax Included

Vintage Barns Of Northwestern Illinois

A 144 page hard cover book showcasing the unique architecture of barns throughout the Sauk Valley and beyond. Originally sold for $24.95 NOW CLEARANCE PRICED AT

$10.00 Limited Supply Remaining!

Tax Included

Get your copy now before they are gone forever. Available at...

TELEGRAPH 3600 E. Lincolnway, Sterling 815-625-3600

113 S. Peoria Ave., Dixon 815-284-2224

They make great Christmas gifts!


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

Finding the right person for the job can feel like a never-ending task. Through our partnership with Monster, VDXNYDOOH\FRPPRQVWHU FDQ KHOS \RX GR PRUH WKDQ ¿QG FDQGLGDWHV :H FDQ KHOS \RX ¿QG WKH ULJKW FDQGLGDWHV LQ OHVV WLPH ,W¶V MXVW RQH SLHFH RI WKH FRPSUHKHQVLYH UHFUXLWLQJ VROXWLRQ \RX¶OO ¿QG ZLWK VDXNYDOOH\FRP DQG 0RQVWHU %HFDXVH LI \RX ZDQW WR KDYH D OLWWOH WLPH IRU \RX \RX KDYH WR ¿QG D OLWWOH KHOS

saukvalley.com )LQG WKH ULJKW ¿W IRU \RXU QH[W MRE DW VDXNYDOOH\FRPPRQVWHU


Saturday, December 21, 2013

LOCAL SPORTS

MONDAYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S SCOREBOARD Boys basketball Winter tournament schedules Forreston tournament Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results sTHPLACE -ORRISON /RANGEVILLE sTHPLACE &ORRESTON ,ENA 7INSLOW sTHPLACE $AKOTA 0EARL#ITY sTHPLACE 2IVER2IDGE /REGON s'AME 7INNEBAGO 0OLO s'AME .EWMAN !QUIN Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results s 'AME  #ONSOLATION CHAMPIONSHIP -ILLEDGEVILLE #HRISTIAN,IFE s'AME THPLACE "YRON 0ECATONICA  s'AME RDPLACE 0OLO !QUIN s 'AME  #HAMPIONSHIP .EWMAN  7INNEBAGO Colmone Classic Red Pool: (ALL   &IELDCREST   1UEST!CADEMY  3TARK#OUNTY  White Pool: 3T"EDE  "UREAU6ALLEY   -ENDOTA  (ALL*6  Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results s3TARK#OUNTY 1UEST!CADEMY s"UREAU6ALLEY (ALL*6 s(ALL &IELDCREST/4 Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games sTHPLACE 1UEST!CADEMYVS(ALL*6  sTHPLACE "UREAU6ALLEYVS3TARK#OUNTY  sRDPLACE 3T"EDEVS&IELDCREST s#HAMPIONSHIP -ENDOTAVS(ALL  Chuck Dayton tournament in DeKalb Pool A: $E+ALB 3CHURZ "ELVIDERE.ORTH -ARMION Pool B:(ARLEM 7EST#HICAGO 3TERLING 4HORNRIDGE Pool C:"ELVIDERE 7INNEBAGO $U3ABLE 2OCHELLE Pool D:(INSDALE3OUTH (AMPSHIRE 'EN ESEO -OLINE Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s(ARLEMVS7EST#HICAGO AM s(INSDALE3OUTHVS-OLINE AM s4HORNRIDGEVS3TERLING AMMAIN GYM s$U3ABLEVS"ELVIDERE NOON s"ELVIDERE.ORTHVS-ARMION NOON s7INNEBAGOVS2OCHELLE  s3CHURZVS$E+ALB  s3TERLINGVS(ARLEM &IELDHOUSE s(AMPSHIREVS(INSDALE3OUTH  s7EST#HICAGOVS4HORNRIDGE  s2OCHELLEVS$U3ABLE  s-ARMIONVS3CHURZ  s"ELVIDEREVS7INNEBAGO  s'ENESEOVS(AMPSHIRE  s$E+ALBVS"ELVIDERE.ORTH  Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s7INNEBAGOVS$U3ABLE AM s3CHURZVS"ELVIDERE.ORTH AM s-OLINEVS'ENESEO AM s'ENESEOVS(INSDALE3OUTH  s(AMPSHIREVS-OLINE  s7EST#HICAGOVS3TERLING  s"ELVIDEREVS2OCHELLE  s$E+ALBVS-ARMION  Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box scores at Tabor Gym, Rock Falls

IVC 57, ROCK FALLS 45 IVC (6-2) 2ASHID      /WENS      9OUNGMAN   3CHAUB   ,AYNE   "EARD   -C)NTYRE      +EFFELER      Totals: 21-43 15-24 57. ROCK FALLS (3-5) #ONNOR #AIN      !USTIN $ONOHO      *AMES -C&ADDEN      *ACOB-AMMOSSER   $AEGAN 7HARFF   #ORY-C#ALLISTER     4ANNER -ORTONSON      +ASEY !NGER      !ARON &RANK      $AIVON !LLEN      Totals: 18-46 6-11 45. )6#     n  2OCK&ALLS     n  3s n )6#   +EFFELER   /WENS   3CHAUB   2&   -C#ALLISTER   $ONOHO  !NGER  -AMMOSSER  &RANK  -C&ADDEN  Reboundsn )6# /WENS 2&$ONOHO 7HARFF  Assists n 2& $ONOHO  -C#ALLISTER   Steals n )6# /WENS  2& $ONOHO   Foulsn)6# 2& at Forreston Tournament Championship game

NEWMAN 86, WINNEBAGO 80 NEWMAN (9-0) .ATE 4ERVEER      !* 3HARP      -ICAH 4RANCOSO      4REVOR"OLIN   .OAH-C#ARTY    *OHN0AYAN   .OLAN -C'INN   *ACOB"ARNES   Totals: 25-46 27-37 86. WINNEBAGO (8-1) 3UGGS  9ANNI  4HOREN   -ENKE  -ACK  $IXON   3WIGART  -OORE  Totals: 28 14-25 80. .EWMAN     Â&#x2C6;  7INNEBAGO     Â&#x2C6;  3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C;.EWMAN3HARP 0AYAN "OLIN 7INNEBAGO-ENKE 9ANNI 3WIGART  3UGGS 4HOREN $IXON  Third-place game

POLO 77, AQUIN 59 POLO (9-1) "AILEY3HIPMAN  "RAD#AVANAUGH   "RIAN#AVANAUGH  :ACH 1UACO  )VAN'RGAN  -AX 3IMMONS  7YATT0ATTERSON   !* $OLLMEYER     Totals: 31 13-27 77. AQUIN (8-2) -ARTIN     #HANG     4OWNSEND  3OPCIC  9EA GER  #OFFEE  3TOVALL   $IEMER Totals: 22 11-17 59. 0OLO     Â&#x2C6;  !QUIN     Â&#x2C6;  3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C;0OLO"RIAN#AVANAUGH !QUIN -ARTIN 4OWNSEND 3OPCIC #OFFEE  Consolation Championship

MILLEDGEVILLE 72, CHRISTIAN LIFE 61 MILLEDGEVILLE (11-1) "LAKE+PPES  +AMERON$AW4YNE     *ORDAN (ARRIS     $ANIEL 7ALKER     *OSEPH 'ENNARO     ,UCAS%BERSOLE  :ACH(ERIN   #ALEB3KOOG Totals: 26 15-21 72.

CHRISTIAN LIFE %3ANCHEZ  )SAIAH*ONES  ,UKE'OODRICH  #AMERON#ASSARO   0OND  .3ANCHEZ   0ETERSON Totals: 24 8-10 61. -ILLEDGEVILLE     Â&#x2C6;  #HRISTIAN,IFE     Â&#x2C6;  3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C; -ILLEDGEVILLE  3KOOG  %BERSOLE  #HRISTIAN ,IFE  3ANCHEZ  0OND  .3ANCHEZ  All-Tournament, First Team s .OAH -C#ARTY .EWMAN !* 3HARP .EWMAN $E,UNDRE$IXON7INNEBAGO 2YAN3WIGART7INNEBAGO $ALTON-ENKE 7INNEBAGO Second Team s!*$OLLMEYER0OLO "RETT"ENNING$AKO TA $ANIEL,OWE"YRON "RENDEN$AUPHIN 2IVER2IDGE !NDREW-ARTIN!QUIN !IDEN #HANG!QUIN at Colmone Classic, Spring Valley

BUREAU VALLEY 73, HALL JV 52 BUREAU VALLEY (6-4) !LEX *OHNSON     4OMMY *OHNSTON     "RYAN !RTEBERRY     3EAN 3HEPARD  0ARKER.EUHALFEN   %VAN&RANK  "LAKE"ALENSIEFEN   2YAN9OUNG  *OSH-EAD   ,ENNARD7INRICH  $YLAN -ARTIN  $AVID-ILLER  #HRIS 3HYNK     3ETH #AMBRON     Totals: 23 21-27 73. HALL JV (AMMONDS  0ULLAM  +RO LAK  "ERNABEI  "ERNADONI   -ERKEL  %INHAUS  0UENTE  "ALLERINI Totals: 19 9-15 52. "UREAU6ALLEY     Â&#x2C6;  (ALL*6     Â&#x2C6;  3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C;"UREAU6ALLEY.EUHALFEN *OHN SON *OHNSTON 9OUNG -ILLER (ALL#AM POS 0ULLAM -ERKEL "ALLERINI 

Girls basketball Winter tournament schedules Sterling shootout Saturday, Dec. 14 results at Sauk Valley C.C. s-OLINE 3TERLING s2ICHWOODS &ENWICK s-ONTINI (ONONEGAH s2ICHWOODS -OLINE s&ENWICK (ONONEGAH s-ONTINI 3TERLING Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games s3TERLINGVS(ONONEGAH AM s-OLINEVS&ENWICK AM s-ONTINIVS2ICHWOODS NOON s(ONONEGAHVS-OLINE  s2ICHWOODSVS3TERLING  s&ENWICKVS-ONTINI  Pearl City Tournament Pool 1:!QUIN  %ASTLAND  ,ENA 7INSLOW  7ARREN  Pool 2: &ULTON   /RANGEVILLE   0EARL#ITY  223-  Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results s 4HIRD PLACE CONSOLATION 7ARREN  /RANGEVILLE s #ONSOLATION CHAMPIONSHIP ,ENA 7IN SLOW &ULTON Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results s4HIRDPLACE !QUINVS0EARL#ITY  s#HAMPIONSHIP 223-VS%ASTLAND  Polo tournament Pool A:"YRON  0OLO  -ORRISON   &ORRESTON  Pool B: 7EST #ARROLL   -ILLEDGEVILLE   /REGON  0ROPHETSTOWN  Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results s7EST#ARROLL -ILLEDGEVILLE s"YRON -ORRISON s0ROPHETSTOWN /REGON Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s games sTHPLACE 0OLOVS-ILLEDGEVILLE NOON sTHPLACE &ORRESTONVS7EST#ARROLL  sRDPLACE -ORRISONVS/REGON  s#HAMPIONSHIP "YRONVS0ROPHETSTOWN  Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s box scores at Port Byron

RIVERDALE 55, ROCK FALLS 49 ROCK FALLS (5-6) #HELSI"LAIR   "AILEY,ESEMAN    3YDNIE.AILOR   $ALLAS #LEVENGER   "AILIE3MITH    +ARA.EHRKORN   "AILEY3CHRAD ER   4ERRISA7ILLETT   %MILY 3AUER   $ANICA&ORTUNE   Totals: 19-54 9-17 49. RIVERDALE (7-5) 'ROVES      -AYDEW      *OHNSON      "ALDWIN      #LAUS   -ERICLE   -AY  Totals: 19-52 10-16 55. 2OCK&ALLS     Â&#x2C6;  2IVERDALE     Â&#x2C6;  3s â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2OCK &ALLS  "LAIR  2IVERDALE  #LAUS -ERICLE 

Wrestling Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s results at Erie

ERIE-PROPHETSTOWN 56, ALLEMAN 18 113 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;+ERRICK#AMERON%0 PIN7ILD 126 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;*OSH"OWLING%0 PIN$ODD 138 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;*OSH7HEELER%0 PIN!%VANS 145 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; *ARED #OLE %0 PIN -OWER  152 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;$YLAN"INION%0 PIN4%VANS 160 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;3ETH-ONTGOMERY%0 MAJORDEC 3EBBEN   170 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; .ICK 7ILLIAMS %0 MAJORDEC$ORSEY 195 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;.OAH%ADS %0 PIN "ULLER  285 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 9ODTS ! PIN 3TOCK Alleman rec. forfeits: 132, 220 E-P rec. forfeits:  Double forfeit: 120 at Ashton

ILLINI BLUFFS 36, AFC 18 132 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;!NTHONY(AND)" PIN$EMETRI,AH MAN138 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;0AYTON(ILLIKER!&# PIN *AMES+ANOS145 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;:ACH/#ONNOR )" PIN2ILEY3TEPHENS152 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;*AKE #HAPMAN !&# PIN (AYDEN 4ILLHOF  160 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;!LEX,OOK)" PIN"RENDYN7ILLIAMS  182 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; +YLE 'ERARD )" PIN "RYAN $EWEY285 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;(UNTER,EACH)" PIN #OOPER3TAHL Illini Bluffs rec. forfeit: AFC rec. forfeit: Double forfeits:    

367EEKENDs"

PREP ROUNDUP

Missiles, Marcos finish in style Local squads wrap up Forreston tourney with victories 36-30/24334!&&

Caleb Skoog stuffed the stat sheet with 18 points, 11 rebounds, five assists and three steals as Milledgeville topped Christian Life 72-61 on Friday night to win the consolation championship at the Forreston Holiday Tournament. Also for the Missiles (10-1), Jordan Harris had 14 points, four assists and three steals, while Blake Kappes, Kameron DawTyne, and Lucas Ebersole each had 10 points. Polo 77, Aquin 59: AJ Dollmeyer poured in 26 points to lead the Marcos past the Bulldogs in the third-place game at Forreston. Also for Polo (9-1), Brian Cavanaugh had 14 points, and Brad Cavanaugh added 10. Andrew Martin had 17 points for Aquin, and Aiden Chang added 10.

Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s stars AJ Dollmeyer 0OLO POINTS Caleb Skoog -ILLEDGEVILLE  POINTS REBOUNDS ASSISTS STEALS Parker Neuhalfen "6  POINTS Chelsi Blair 2OCK&ALLS  POINTS

Colmone Classic

Bureau Valley 73, Hall JV 52:

Parker Neuhalfen scored 17 points as the Storm won their first game at the Colmone Classic in Spring Valley. Josh Mead finished with 16 points, and Tommy Johnston added 14 for Bureau Valley (6-4), which went 1-2 in pool play and will take on Stark County for fifth place in the tourney.

Girls basketball

Riverdale 55, Rock Falls 49:

Chelsi Blair scored 15 points, while Emily Sauer added 12 for the Rockets (5-6) in a loss to the Rams in Port Byron. Lauren Claus tossed in 29 points for Riverdale (7-5), and Sydney Mericle added 11. Wrestling

Erie-Prophetstown 56, Alleman 18: Kerrick Cameron (113 pounds),

Josh Bowling (126), Josh Wheeler (138), Jared Cole (145), Dylan Binion (152), and Noah Eads (195) all won by pin as the Panthers beat the Pioneers in Erie. Seth Montgomery (160) and Nick Williams (170) won major decisions. Illini Bluffs 36, AFC 18: Payton Hilliker (138) and Jake Chapman (152) won by pin for the Raiders in a home loss to the Tigers.

Comets come up clutch in crunch time COMPLETE

CONTINUED FROM B1

With time winding down in the third quarter, senior Micah Trancoso shot a deep 3 that ricocheted hard to the left off the rim. As the ball bounced into the out-ofbounds abyss, Bolin leaped from 10 feet out, grabbed the ball in mid-air, and got a shot off from behind the backboard. The buzzer sounded as the ball began its descent, where it found the bottom of the net, giving Newman a 61-60 lead going into the fourth. More importantly, it gave the Comets all the momentum. Both teams were in the bonus to start the final quarter, which proved to be crucial. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We got a lot of good minutes out of a lot of people tonight,â&#x20AC;? said Ray Sharp. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jake Barnes did great coming out of football. He hasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t played that much. Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finally getting more time, and had really good minutes for us tonight.â&#x20AC;? It was then Terveerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s turn to be a difference-maker. After a putback from Barnes gave Newman a 65-62 lead with 7 minutes left, the offense transitioned into a stall-type offense to waste time off the clock. Barnes received a pass in the short corner. Terveer recognized that his defender had fallen asleep and made a backdoor cut, where Barnes found him for the wideopen layup to extend the lead to 67-62 with 5:56 remaining. Winnebago responded with a three from Dalton Menke. A free throw by Terveer got one point back, but he missed the second. A pair of baskets by Winnebago sophomore Brandon Suggs tied things at 68 with 3:30 remaining. After an exchange of free throws and baskets by both teams, the score was knotted at 71 with 1:40 remaining, with the ball in Newmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possession. Terveer got the ball at the top of the key and dribbled to the right side. As his defender cut him off, Terveer spun to finish with the left hand in the middle of the lane, giving the Comets a lead they never gave up at 73-71. As the Indians continued to foul, the Comets went a perfect 14-for14 from the free-throw line for the remainder of the game. A.J. Sharp had four trips to the line, while

Michael Krabbenhoeft/mkrabbenhoeft@saukvalley.com

Newmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s A.J. Sharp shoots a basket under pressure from Winnebagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Brandon Suggs during the championship game of the Forreston Holiday Tournament on Friday night. Sharp scored 33 in the Cometsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 86-80 victory. Terveer, Barnes, and Payan all had one trip apiece in the final 1:15. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was really nervous,â&#x20AC;? said Payan, â&#x20AC;&#x153;but we needed those free

throws. Coach Sharp always tells us to make nine or 10 in a row in practice to build up the muscle memory.â&#x20AC;?

CARS815.com


"s367EEKEND Dilbert by Scott Adams

www.saukvalley.com

Saturday, December 21, 2013

Zits® by Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman

Arlo & Janis by Jimmy Johnson Garfield by Jim Davis

Freshly Squeezed by Ed Stein Get Fuzzy by Darby Conley

Blondie by Dean Young & John Marshall

Wizard of Id by Brant Parker and Johnny Hart

Pearls Before Swine by Stephan Pastis Rose is Rose by Pat Brady and Don Wimmer

Pickles by Brian Crane Big Nate by Lincoln Peirce

Born Loser by Art and Chip Sansom

Baby Blues by Jerry Scott & Rick Kirkman

Soup To Nutz by Rick Stromoski

Family Circus by Bil Keane

The Argyle Sweater by Scott Hilburn

Alley Oop by Dave Graue and Jack Bender

Bridge Frank & Ernest by Bob Thaves

Players must pick how high to reach

Grizzwells by Bill Schorr

Niccolo Machiavelli, an Italian who is famous for writing “The Prince,” said, “Ambition is so powerful a passion in the human breast that however high we reach, we are never satisfied.” At the bridge table, we must decide how high we wish to reach. In this deal, North opens one diamond, South responds one spade, and North raises to three spades (yes, he might bid four spades). Now South normally has three choices. He can pass with no interest in game. He can raise to four spades. Any other suit bid shows interest in a slam. Here, four diamonds is a control-bid (cue-bid), usually

indicating the ace. However, since it is partner’s firstbid suit, South might have only the diamond king when he does not have the club ace. (Do not make your first

control-bid with a shortage – void or singleton – in partner’s second suit.) North then control-bid four hearts. (If North-South had been using Roman KeyCard Blackwood, North would have bid four notrump.) This allowed South to use Blackwood twice before jumping to seven spades. (Yes, South might have bid seven no-trump.) West leads the club queen. After winning trick one with his king, South cashes the spade ace, getting the bad news. Now he crosses to dummy’s club ace and plays the spade nine, capturing East’s 10 with his king. Back to the board with a heart, another spade through East picks up his trumps and allows declarer to claim. © 2013 UFS


Saturday, December 21, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs"

OUTDOOR ADVENTURES

           26 NEW & USED CHEVY IMPALAS IN STOCK!!

#U750

12 NEW & USED FORD EDGES IN STOCK!!

#H2749

$ $

199

2012 Chevrolet impala ls

Per MonthD

M

mattJONES Fishing guide from Prophetstown. He can be reached at catmatt@catfish academy.com

ounces. Second place went to Zach Springman, who sent one of the very first guesses of the week at 21 pounds, 2 ounces. Last but not least, this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s winner, Bill Burrall, takes the top prize with a guess of 20 pounds, 3 ounces â&#x20AC;&#x201C; just a single ounce from perfection. Congrats to him, as well as the whole lot of you, and thanks to all of you for participating. Heck, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s do it again, shall we? Now, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m all about kids, and especially trying to influence them into the outdoor way of life. So this week, I thought it would be neat if we let the kids have a crack at something pretty neat. This week, let the young â&#x20AC;&#x2122;uns guess and see how they do. If they happen to be the closest, then what we will do is set something up with their class, and I will come to school and teach â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em some great fishing stuff. Some knot tying, some tips and

techniques, and maybe we can even watch a CatMatt television show while Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m there. Then, to top it all off, that youngster is going to go fish a local tournament with me this spring. So, if you want to expose your child to some fishing done right, get them in on this deal here. So, if your young one is in grade 3 through 12, letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s get â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;em excited about fishing here in one of the greatest rivers in the country. Now, if a real young â&#x20AC;&#x2122;un is to win, then mom, dad or another family member is welcome to accompany us in the tournament. So help the kids out this week and get some emails rolling in. Again, send guesses to flatheadmechanic40@gmail.com. Though we have lots to talk about in the upcoming weeks â&#x20AC;&#x201C; including whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on with the deer herd â&#x20AC;Ś or lack thereof, late winter channel cat fishing, ice fishing and more deer hunting â&#x20AC;&#x201C; this week is all about Christmas. I wish you all a very merry Christmas, and a tremendous New Year. Please, everyone be safe this week in your travels â&#x20AC;Ś and next week, we will start to gear up for a great 2014 in the out of doors. Until then, Merry Christmas everyone, and â&#x20AC;Ś Go Catfish!

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $13,737*

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $21,645*

ESCAPES IN STOCK!!

TAURUS IN STOCK!!

6 NEW & USED FORD

$

221

$

2010 FORD ESCAPE Limited

Per MonthB

LEATHER & HEATED SEATS! Innovative high-tech & carries a peppy perframance. Ford Sync Voice Activated System, Sirius Radio, & MyKey (set electronic limits for speed & volume.)

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $16,215*

1 OWNER & STILL UNDER FACTORY WARRANTY!! #U790

247

Per Month

8 NEW & USED FORD

#F3544B

#F4125A

$

20 2012 12 FO FORD RD EDGE SE

VERY Low miles! Still covered under FACTORY WARRANTY! Offers a smooth ride with compsed handling. It has quiet & comfortable cabin with abundant features.

This week, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; turn to guess the weight of this catfish caught in the Rock River. The winner gets a school visit from CatMatt.

erry (slightly early) Christmas, everyone! Man, things are getting good around here. We got winter weather moving in, we are giving lots of stuff away, and yes, I am planning a fishing trip with my buddies. Yes, I know itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cold, but Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m planning on going south, yâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;all. Now, if you remember last weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s photo, you know it was of a serious channel cat. In fact, it is the most serious channel cat Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever pulled from the Rock Riverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fertile waters. Actually, the young lady pulled it out, I just assisted. That big old dude tipped the scale at 20 pounds, 2 ounces. That fish is still the only 20-pound channel cat I have ever seen â&#x20AC;Ś but I hold out hope for another one sometime soon. Anyway, more importantly, which one of you out there was the closest to guessing this monsterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s weight? This week, the guesses ran very heavy. However, some of you were really, really close. Like this weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourth-place winner, Samantha Helfrich. Her guess of 22 pounds, 5 ounces put her ahead of all but three of you. In third place this week, we had Gazette reader Mr. Tim Ruppert, with a guess of 18 pounds, 5

Per MonthB

30 HWY MPG. Comfortable six-passenger seating, large trunk for storage front ZKHHO GULYH ZLWK D VWURQJ IXHO HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW 3.6-liter V6 engine.

Submitted photo

This time, let the young â&#x20AC;&#x2122;uns guess

295

237

2012 FORD Per MonthB TAURUS SEL LOW Miles, still covered under FACTORY WARRANTY! 27 HWY MPG! Cutting-edge options, unique design, & offers plenty of room. 18â&#x20AC;? wheels, heated mirrors, keyless entry, & Sync Voice Activated System.

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $17,395*

3RDROW SEATING!!

#R695A

$

2013 VW BEETLE

D

SHARP! 31 HWY MPG! Low miles! Still covered under FACTORY WARRANTY! 8QLTXH VW\OLQJ IXHO HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW SRZHUIXO turbo engine, lots of features, and more interior space than itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s competitors! All-Season 17â&#x20AC;? Alloy Wheels & Bluetooth!

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $16,998*

257

2009 VW Per MonthC ROUTAN SEL HEATED FRONT & 2nd ROW SEATS! Heated mirrors, power sliding door & lift gate, & keyless entry. 2nd & 3rd row window shades. V6 4.0 engine, power seat, removable 2nd row seating, Bluetooth, DVD player, & towing preperation with load-leveling rear suspension.

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $13,997*

13 NEW & USED CHEVY 43 NEW & USED JEEPS CRUZES IN STOCK!!

#P3116

$

254

Per MonthI

#U762

2013 CHEVY CRUZE 1LT

38 HWY MPG! STILL UNDER FACTORY WARRANTY! One of the PRVW )XHO(IĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW ,FRQLF $PHULFDQ Brand sedan, & an affordable Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price! Bluetooth, rearview camera, 7â&#x20AC;&#x2122; touchscreen display, & Chevrolet MyLink!

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $16,997*

9 NEW & USED DODGE JOURNEYS IN STOCK!!

2013 JEEP $ 289D PATRIOT Per Month SPORT

FOUR WHEEL DRIVE that secures 30mpg on the open road! Stability control to stay sure-footed in any road condition. 2.0L 4-cylinder churning out 158 horsepower with a tethered qucik shifting automatic transmission.

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $19,888*

26

NEW & USED LINCOLNS IN STOCK!! #H2736

#F4091A

$

IN STOCK!!

$

264

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;11 JOURNEY Per MonthB MAINSTREET 25 HWY MPG. Powerful 283 horsepower 3.6L Pentastar V6, 8.4â&#x20AC;? touchscreen, & Sirius. Larger & roomier than other makes in itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s class, Honda CR-V, Kia Sorento, & Toyota RAV4. 17â&#x20AC;? Alloy ZKHHOV Ă&#x20AC;UP VXVSHQVLRQ WXQLQJ WUDFWLRQ control.

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $11,817*

339

Per MonthK

2011 LINCOLN MKZ Luxury! Leather heated & cooled seats, sunroof, & SYNC. 6yr/100,000 mile comp. warranty coverage, 200-pt inspection by factory trained techs, history report, 24/7 Roadside Assistance & 3mos of SiriusXM.

Peteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Price $24,888*

WWW.PETEHARKNESS.COM   Happy Holidays!

"$      (!%)(  (!%)("'"'$

 *  *   FordRLincoln

Rt. 40 N, Sterling

(!%&"%&#

Chevrolet

Ĺ&#x201D;Ĺ&#x17E;ĹĽĹ&#x2DC;Ĺ&#x;Ĺ&#x2018;Ĺ&#x17E;RĹĄĹ&#x2022;Ĺ?Ĺ&#x2014; Ĺ&#x203A;Ĺ?Ĺ&#x201C;Ĺ&#x2018;R Ĺ&#x2018;Ĺ&#x2018;Ĺ&#x153;RĹ?Ĺ&#x2122;

(!%''""!'!

(!%&"%"")

Rt. 30 E, Morrison

Rt. 40 N, Sterling

* Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. B) 3.9% for 84 months with approved credit. Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. C) 3.9% for 60 months with approved credit. Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. D) 3.9% for 78 months with approved credit. Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. I) 3.9% for 75 months with approved credit. Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. K) 4% for 48 months with approved credit. Plus tax, title, license and doc fees. Photos for illustration only. Dealer not liable for errors.


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

Early deficit too much for Rocketsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rally to overcome FRIGHTFUL

CONTINUED FROM B1

IVC (6-2) took advantage, bolting to a 15-2 advantage in the opening 7 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;As poorly as we played early, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to come back,â&#x20AC;? Rock Falls coach Brad Bickett said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You have to expend so much energy. We knew exactly what they were going to do. We just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t execute. We looked passive. We looked like deer in the headlights. This is not enjoyable right now.â&#x20AC;? The Rocketsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lone firstquarter field goal â&#x20AC;&#x201C; they were 1-for-9 in the period â&#x20AC;&#x201C; was a 3-pointer by Cory McCallister, who was fouled and completed a four-point play to make it 15-6 with 30 seconds left in the quarter. McCallister came off the bench to lead Rock Falls with 15 points, with seven coming in the second quarter. Daegan Wharff added 14 points, scoring eight in the fourth quarter. Austin Donoho

Key performers: #ORY-C#ALLISTER 2& POINTS ASSISTS OFFTHEBENCH!USTIN $ONOHO 2& POINTS REBOUNDS ASSISTS STEALS contributed 11 points and team highs of seven rebounds, four assists and three steals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coming off the bench, I have to bring some momentum to the team to help keep everything going,â&#x20AC;? McCallister said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been that guy all year long,â&#x20AC;? Bickett said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our sixth man, and heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been our energy guy. You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t question his passion. He brings it.â&#x20AC;? McCallister helped the Rockets fight back from a 23-8 deficit with his big second quarter. He and Wharff hit buckets to finish the half, shaving the margin to 29-22. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I wish the second quarter would have never ended,â&#x20AC;? Wharff said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We had the momentum going into halftime.â&#x20AC;? The momentum briefly spilled over into the

second half, as McCallister hit a bucket but was unable to convert a threepoint-play opportunity, making it 31-26 with 4:52 left in the third quarter. IVC, which was led by Reilly Owensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 20-point performance, responded to the threat. The Ghosts went on a 10-0 tear over the next 2½ minutes to make it 41-26 with 2:18 left in the quarter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In practice, we overcame their 1-2-2,â&#x20AC;? McCallister said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t execute from practice over to the game. We couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t break their press, and had to play against their set-up defense, which didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go our way.â&#x20AC;? The Ghosts went up by 16 three times in the final moments of the third quarter and early moments of the fourth quarter. It was their largest lead of the night. Rock Falls got within 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 51-41 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; when Connor Philip Marruffo/pmarruffo@saukvalley.com Cain drove for a bucket with 4:21 to play. The Rock Fallsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Austin Donoho fires a cross-court pass during the Rocketsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; game Rockets would get no against IVC on Friday night at Tabor Gym. Rock Falls lost the nonconference game to the Grey Ghosts 57-45. closer.

Rejoice in His Love! THESE AREA CHURCHES INVITE YOU TO ATTEND THEIR SPECIAL CHRISTMAS SERVICES:

GYYA _ID[ID^A Rb`ID^:W @Ib^@I `}y RÂ&#x2122;Â&#x2022;}yÂ?tÂ&#x2030; @}Â&#x2122;Â?v}Ă&#x2021;TÂ&#x2019;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2122;Â? _Â&#x;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2039;w  0DUWLQ 5RDG 5RFN )DOOV Â&#x2021;   Â?Â?Â?Ă?|Â&#x2019;Â&#x192;vÂ?{Ă?Â&#x2039;Â?| ^yÂ&#x153;Ă? AtÂ&#x2030;yÂ&#x192; TĂ? <y}Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;tÂ&#x2030;wyÂ?Ĺ&#x201E; [tÂ&#x2019;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2039;Â?

@}Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;tÂ&#x2019; DÂ&#x153;y @tÂ&#x2030;wÂ&#x192;yÂ&#x192;|}Â&#x2022; _yÂ?Â&#x153;vy 'HFHPEHU   SP

@}Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;tÂ&#x2019; AtÂ&#x; _yÂ?Â&#x153;vy 'HFHPEHU   DP

Tuesday, December 24th

Christmas Eve Services 6:30pm & 11:00pm

Candles, Carols, & Holy Communion

Immanuel Lutheran Church  )UDQNOLQ *URYH 5G Â&#x2021; 'L[RQ Â&#x2021;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nurturing the inside to show Christ on the Outsideâ&#x20AC;?

              

                        

FIRST IRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH                  Pastor Rick Morris

Christmas Sunday Service

Christmas Eve - Candlelight Service

Immanuel Lutheran Church of Rock Falls, ELCA

(815) 625-3575

501 8th Ave., Rock Falls, IL

Services Open to All! You will be welcomed!

 TH !VE 2OCK &ALLS ), s   fccrockfalls@gmail.com

!       

CELEBRATE CHRISTMAS

New Life

    !    Christmas Eve

  

Christmas Eve

Candlelight Services 7:00pm and 11:00pm Come join us as we celebrate the birth of Christ

St. Paul Lutheran Church  3 0EORIA s $IXON s   

  $%(!  +     $%!!     "&%!!  +     ""%(! 

Lutheran Churh

Christmas Day

CHRISTMAS EVE SERVICES

Mary, Mother of God Feast Day

 7 ,YNN "LVD 3TERLING ), s   

! 

  -%!! 

December, 24th

4UESDAY $ECEMBER th  PM   PM

â&#x20AC;&#x153;For unto you is born a Savior!â&#x20AC;?

 *  "

   )%!! *  *  ("   #%",   "&%!,  ,%(!       

 PM #ANDLELIGHT 3ERVICE 4HE h2EJOICE "ANDv AND 3PECIAL -USIC  PM #ANDLELIGHT 3ERVICE 7ITH 3ENIOR #HOIR  (ANDBELL #HOIR

>|Â&#x17D;~Â?Â&#x201D;Â&#x2026;mÂ? \yÂ&#x17D;Â&#x203A;~tyÂ?

Silent Night, Holy Night!

The Catholic communities of

]Â&#x2013;yÂ?wm Ă&#x201E; ?ytyÂ&#x2026;ryÂ&#x17D; Â&#x201C;ĂłÂ&#x201D;|

Sat. Dec. 21st 5:05 5:0 5 PM

ĂśYÂ&#x2030;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2039;DÂ&#x2026;D  >|Â&#x17D;~Â?Â&#x201D;Â&#x2026;mÂ? @Â&#x203A;y NmÂ?Â? ZytyÂ&#x2039;Â&#x201D;~Â&#x160;Â&#x2C6; Â?~Â&#x192;Â&#x192; CÂ&#x160;Â&#x192;Â&#x192;Â&#x160;Â?

The Long Longest est Night: A Service of Silence

dywÂ&#x2C6;yÂ?wm Ă&#x201E; ?ytyÂ&#x2026;ryÂ&#x17D; Â&#x201C;ĂşÂ&#x201D;|

Christmas Sunday

Ă&#x2039;YÂ&#x2030;Â&#x2030;mDÂ&#x2026;D  >|Â&#x17D;~Â?Â&#x201D;Â&#x2026;mÂ? ?m  NmÂ?Â?

EÂ&#x17D;mty @Â&#x2039;~Â?tÂ&#x160;Â&#x2039;mÂ&#x192; >|Â&#x2013;Â&#x17D;t|

Sun. Dec. 22nds  AM

invite you to Celebrate with us

Tues. Tu es. Dec. 24thsPMs sPMsPM

Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Perfect Gift.

Christmas Ev Evee Candlelight Service

ĂśÂ&#x2030;Ăś C~Â&#x17D;Â?Â&#x201D; :Â&#x203A;yDĂ&#x201E; \Â&#x201D;yÂ&#x17D;Â&#x192;~Â&#x2C6;{   Â&#x2021; JUDFHFKXUFKVWJRUJ

First Christian Church

Celebrate the Birth of Christ at Grace UMC

3400 6th Ave. Sterling, IL 61081 www.firstchristianchurchofsterling.org

Grace United Methodist Church 921 E. Chamberlin, Dixon, IL, 815-288-1505

CHRISTMAS PROGRAM

St. Patrick, Amboy St. Mary, Walton and St. Flannen, Harmon

(Disciples of Christ)

Rev. Courtney Montgomery Chandler - Pastor Director ector Timothy Fischbach - Music Dir

â&#x20AC;&#x153;WHILE ANGELS WATCHEDâ&#x20AC;?

December 24th - Christmas Eve

St. Patrick - 4:30 pm & 10:00 pm St. Mary - 6:30 pm, St. Flannen - 8:00 pm

December 25th - Christmas Day St. Patrick - 7:30 am & 10:00 am

December 31st - Vigil Mass

St. Patrick - 4:30 pm, St. Mary - 6:00 pm

January 1st Feast of the Blessed Virgin Mary St. Patrick - 9:00 am

Sunday, December 22nd at 9:30 AM

Christmas Eve Worship

including singing of â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silent Nightâ&#x20AC;? by candlelight

Tuesday, December 24th at 6:00pm

Christmas Eve Message: Hope Has Arrived!

Grace UMC is Handicap Accessible

For unto you is bor n this day in the city of David a Saviour, which is Christ the Lord. - Luke 2:11

St. Patrick, Patrick, Amboy Amboy 815-857-2315 815-857-2315 St. Flannen, Harmon and St. Mary, Mary, Walton 815-857-2670 www.stpatrickamboy.org


3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs"

COLLEGE BASKETBALL | ILLINOIS VS. MISSOURI, AT ST. LOUIS, 4:30 P.M. SATURDAY (ESPN2)

Something worth bragginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; about Illini out to snap 4-game losing streak against Tigers BY R.B. FALLSTROM AP Sports Writer

Last 5

ST. LOUIS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Missouri is unbeaten, but far from cocky, entering the annual Bragginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Rights game against Illinois. The 23rd-ranked Tigers realize their 10-0 start, and their four-game winning streak in the series, will mean little at tip-off of the 33rd renewal of the neutral-site matchup known for its boisterous sellout crowds â&#x20AC;&#x201C; half rooting for each team. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When they score, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be real loud,â&#x20AC;? Missouri guard Jabari Brown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When we score, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going to be real loud. â&#x20AC;&#x153;So, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve just got keep your emotions even.â&#x20AC;? Illinois is 9-2 and facing its second straight ranked AP opponent after losing at lllinois guard Rayvonte Rice (24) drives to the basket Oregon a week ago. Coach past Oregonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Mike Moser during last Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s John Groce said the key game in Portland, Ore. The Illini return to action will be containing Missouriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s perimeter game, Saturday against Missouri in St. Louis.

2012:-IZZOU )LLINI 2011: Mizzou 78, Illini 74 2010: Mizzou 75, Illini 64 2009:-IZZOU )LLINI 2008: Illini 75, Mizzou 59

and not getting caught up in the hoopla. The Fighting Illini are unranked for the Missouri game for the first time in 4 years. Over the last four seasons, the schools have been a combined 72-7 entering the contest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s one of those games thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s easy to get up for,â&#x20AC;? Groce said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our guys are always talking about it, even during the offseason â&#x20AC;&#x201C; how much they enjoy being a part of one of the gameâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best rivalries.â&#x20AC;? Only three Missouri players â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Brown, Earnest Ross and Tony Criswell â&#x20AC;&#x201C; have experience in the series. Brown, an Oregon transfer, made his first start for the Tigers in last

yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 82-73 victory, and led the way with 18 points and seven rebounds. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I just didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to expect until I got out there,â&#x20AC;? Brown said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;But I enjoyed it.â&#x20AC;? Illinois freshman forward Malcolm Hill played at Belleville (Ill.) East High and was the St. Louis PostDispatch player of the year last season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve talked about it being a heavyweight boxing match,â&#x20AC;? Groce said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s what it is. He knows that.â&#x20AC;? Missouri, with one returning starter, and Kansas, with none, are the only schools in the nation in the top 25 with one or fewer starters back from last season. The Tigers have never won five in a row in the series, and the current streak follows a run of nine straight wins by Illinois. The Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; top producers are newcomers, with

junior college transfer Jordan Clarkson leading in scoring and assists, and freshman Johnathan Williams III the leading rebounder with eight per game. Clarkson is averaging 19.4 points, just ahead of Brown at 19.0, and had a run of five straight games with 20 or more points before getting held to 12 points in a victory over Western Michigan on Sunday. Missouri has a 25-game winning streak at home, best in the nation. Illinois also has a strong perimeter, with the three top scorers all guards. Rayvonte Rice, who averages 17.7 points and 5.5 rebounds, was coached for two seasons at Drake by Mark Phelps, now a Missouri assistant. Tracy Abrams averages 11.5 points, four rebounds and three assists, and Joseph Bertrand averages 10.7 points and 5.3 rebounds.

Rejoice in His Love! THESE AREA CHURCHES INVITE YOU TO ATTEND THEIR SPECIAL CHRISTMAS SERVICES:

CHRISTMAS EVE CANDLELIGHTING SERVICE 45%3$!9 $%#%-"%2  s  0- Traditional Candlelighting Service

Bethel E.C. Church 131 North Court, Dixon 815-284-3849 Randy Sizemore, Pastor

Christmas Services for

Christ Our Savior Lutheran Church Tuesday, December 24th Christmas Eve 

     

Pastor David Andermann  03 9[  ŕ Ž +P_VU 03  

Dec. 22nd - 10:30am

AÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2030;Â?Â&#x161;Â&#x20AC;Â?Î&#x2018;Â&#x203A; \ Â&#x203A;Â&#x2030;}yÂ? g Â&#x201C;Â&#x20AC;Â&#x161; LÂ&#x2030;Â&#x2020;Â&#x17E; Â&#x2020;Â&#x161;Â&#x2018;Â? OÂ&#x20AC;y¢Â&#x20AC;Â?

_A-e+ /)/@!/T ^^A- ( Eg@ ÂŁnää *Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x2026;iĂ&#x152; ,Â&#x153;>`] ,Â&#x153;VÂ&#x17D; >Â?Â?Ă&#x192;]  Ă&#x2C6;£änÂŁ U ÂŁÂ&#x2021;nÂŁxÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;xÂ&#x2021;{Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x2021;ÂŁ Ä?@Â&#x2030;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;wtÂ&#x2019;~Â&#x2021;{ YwÂ&#x2030;Â&#x2039;Â&#x201A;w Â&#x2019;Â&#x2030; MwÂ?Â&#x2022;Â? @|Â&#x17D;~Â?Â&#x2019; rÂ? Â&#x2122;w frÂ&#x201A; `|Â&#x17D;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2022;{| P~ywšÂ? MÂ&#x2030;Â&#x2022;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;wÂ&#x203A; `Â&#x2030;{wÂ&#x2019;|wÂ&#x17D;

Advent Worship Service

Dec. 24th - 7:00pm

Christmas Eve Candlelight Service with communion

        

   VWHUOLQJĂ&#x20AC;UVWXPFRUJ

â&#x20AC;&#x153;O, come, let us adore Him!â&#x20AC;? Christmas Eve -Tuesday, Dec. 24

4:30 p.m. - Family CrĂŠche and Carol Service 8:00 p.m. - Christmas Carol Sing-Along 8:30 p.m. - Festival Mass

Christmas Day - Wednesday, Dec. 25 10:00 a.m. - Christmas Mass Come Celebrate With Us!

Saint Lukeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Episcopal Church

Rev. Richard Frontjes, Rector ~ 221 W. Third St., Dixon 815-288-2151 www.stlukesdixon.org ~ stlukedixon@comcast.net

Twenty Fifth Annual

Christmas Dinner

2/-!. #!4(/,)# #(52#(%3

         

       

>GZH\]N:\ LH]`ZEg \>G@?`L@\

   &$ #     



6DFUHG +HDUW  30 &KLOGUHQ¡V Â&#x2021;  30 '%'' (( 6W 0DU\  30 Â&#x2021;  30 (1*/,6+

 30 63$1,6+

6W $QGUHZ $0 Â&#x2021;  30 Â&#x2021;  0LGQLJKW :('1(6'$< '(&(0%(5      



  "%'' (( ) ! 6W 0DU\  $0 Â&#x2021;  $0 6W $QGUHZ  $0 Â&#x2021;  $0

(  #  "%'' ((

  '(&(0%(5   1(: <($5¡6 (9( 6DFUHG +HDUW  $0 Â&#x2021; 30 6W 0DU\  30 Â&#x2021; 30 63$1,6+

6W $QGUHZ $0 Â&#x2021;  30

:('1(6'$< -$18$5<   1(: <($5¡6 '$< 

  "%'' ((

(  %*' (( 6W $QGUHZ  $0  $0

(  #  "%'' ((  ! " +++* #" . !.  # " ".  

! $ " -') ! #".   .  #   &.  !

! % " 0'' #" . !.  #  .  ! # ! &.  

! % " ('/ ! ! . .  #   &.  !

Christmas Eve Barn Service         ?{Â&#x152;}Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x192;nÂ? CÂ&#x201D;vĘ  AvqvÂ&#x192;pvÂ&#x152; VĹ&#x160;Â&#x17D; É&#x2026;kĆ&#x201A;Ć&#x201A;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;

  !    

` Â? ­Â&#x161; ¡ Ľ̢Ă&#x20AC;ÂŚ r {u Ă&#x20AC;Âą Č&#x192; {u Â&#x2026;¨ª¿  ª¹¹¢š ÂŞÂż iÂ&#x20AC;ee Ă&#x201A;Âł Ă&#x201A;¨³¿¢ Ă&#x2C6;¨³ Ă&#x2C6;ÂłĂ&#x2026;Ž  Žª­¢ Â&#x161; Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x161;š¯ ¯¢Â&#x161;ÂŽ` Â&#x161;¹  ¿³¯¢³¹¢ Ă&#x201A;Âł Ă&#x201A;Â&#x161;Ž­ Ă&#x201A;ÂłĚ&#x2014; _³¯¢ Â&#x161;¹  ¨¢Ž¾ ÂŻÂ&#x161;­¢ Ă&#x201A;¨ª¿ Â&#x161; ÂŹÂłĂ?ÂłĂ&#x2026;Âż Ă&#x201A;ª¯¢ ¤³š Â&#x161;ÂŽÂŽĚ&#x2014; Â&#x2039;¢ Ă&#x2C6;ÂŞÂŽÂŽ ¾š³Ă&#x2020;ª ¢ Â&#x161; šª ¢ ª¤ Ă?ÂłĂ&#x2026; ÂŽÂŞĂ&#x2020;¢ ÂŞÂą Â&#x201E;Ă&#x201A;¢šŽª¹Œ ³š Â&#x20AC;ÂłÂ&#x;­ iÂ&#x161;ÂŽÂŽÂżĚ&#x2014; r¤ Ă?ÂłĂ&#x2026; Â&#x161;š¢ Â&#x161; Â&#x201E;¨Ă&#x2026;Ă&#x201A;ÂŞÂą` Â&#x161; ¯¢Â&#x161;ÂŽ Ă&#x2C6;ÂŞÂŽÂŽ Â&#x153;¢  ¢ŽªĂ&#x2020;¢š¢  Ă&#x201A;Âł Ă?ÂłĂ&#x2026;Ě&#x2014; _Â&#x161;ÂŽÂŽ Ă&#x201A;¨¢ Â&#x;¨Ă&#x2026;šÂ&#x;¨ ³š Â&#x;³¹Ă&#x201A;Â&#x161;Â&#x;Ă&#x201A; Â&#x2026;³¯ v¢Ă&#x2C6;ÂŞÂżĚ&#x2014;

r¤ Ă?ÂłĂ&#x2026; Â&#x;Â&#x161;Âą ¨¢Ž¾ ³š Ă&#x2C6;Â&#x161;ÂąĂ&#x201A; Ă&#x201A;Âł ÂŚÂŞĂ&#x2020;¢ Â&#x161;  ³¹Â&#x161;Ă&#x201A;ª³¹ ¾Ž¢Â&#x161;¿¢ Â&#x;³¹Ă&#x201A;Â&#x161;Â&#x;Ă&#x201A; 6QO .GYKU   QT VJG EJWTEJ  

FIR FIRST ST CHU CHURCH RCH OF THE TH E NAZARENE NAZA REN E H.C. Hatton Center 411 13 41 11 3th Avenue, Sterling

Pastor Senior P astor Bob Hasselbring

    Christmas Eve Services

_³¯¢ ³ª¹ Ă&#x2026;Âż Â&#x161;Âż Ă&#x2C6;¢ Ă&#x201A;šÂ&#x161;Ă&#x2020;¢Ž Â&#x153;Â&#x161;Â&#x;­ Ă&#x201A;Âł ]¢Ă&#x201A;¨Ž¢¨¢¯ _³¯¢Ă&#x161;³ª¹Ă&#x161;Ă&#x2026;ÂżĂ&#x161;Â&#x161;ÂżĂ&#x161;Ă&#x2C6;¢Ă&#x161;Ă&#x201A;šÂ&#x161;Ă&#x2020;¢ŽĂ&#x161;Â&#x153;Â&#x161;Â&#x;­Ă&#x161;Ă&#x201A;ÂłĂ&#x161;]¢Ă&#x201A;¨Ž¢¨¢¯Ă&#x161; Â&#x161;¹  Â&#x;¢Ž¢Â&#x153;šÂ&#x161;Ă&#x201A;¢ Ă&#x201A;¨¢ Â&#x153;ªšĂ&#x201A;¨ ³¤ s¢¿Ă&#x2026;Âż ÂŞÂą Ă&#x201A;¨¢ Â&#x153;Â&#x161;š¹ ³¤ oÂłĂ&#x2C6;Â&#x161;š  Â&#x161;¹  uÂ&#x161;Ă? sÂ&#x161;¹¿¿¢¹ Â&#x;³¯¾Ž¢Ă&#x201A;¢ Ă&#x2C6;ÂŞĂ&#x201A;¨ ÂŽÂŞĂ&#x2020;¢ ÂąÂ&#x161;Ă&#x201A;ÂŞĂ&#x2020;ÂŞĂ&#x201A;Ă?` ¿¨¢¢¾` Â&#x;Â&#x161;Ă&#x201A;Ă&#x201A;Ž¢` Â&#x161;¹  Â&#x153;Â&#x161;Ž¢¿ ³¤ ÂżĂ&#x201A;šÂ&#x161;Ă&#x2C6;Ě&#x2014;

ÚÚÇ?ɏɸ ?Â&#x2020;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2122; T}Â&#x201E;v [Â&#x2020;nsÂ&#x17D; [Â&#x2020;qÂ&#x20AC; HnÂ&#x201A;Â&#x201A;Â? ^Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x201E;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x152;vs pÂ&#x2122; ^Â&#x2018;ÉŠ RÂ&#x2020;{Â&#x201E;ËąÂ? TÂ&#x201C;Â&#x2018;{vÂ&#x152;nÂ&#x201E; ?{Â&#x201C;Â&#x152;q{Â&#x17D; ^Â&#x2018;vÂ&#x152;Â&#x201A;}Â&#x201E;x

Xtt X~c Â&#x2030;ct]yucĂ&#x2DC; {tcXÂ&#x201A;c `~cÂ&#x201A;Â&#x201A; Â&#x2030;X~utÂ?Ă&#x2DC;

             !! ""         !! ""

Christmas Day

               !! ""


"s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

FRIDAY’S SCOREBOARD NFL AMERICAN CONFERENCE

East L T         South W L T Y )NDIANAPOLIS    4ENNESSEE    *ACKSONVILLE    (OUSTON    North W L T #INCINNATI    "ALTIMORE    0ITTSBURGH    #LEVELAND    West W L T X $ENVER    X +ANSAS#ITY    3AN$IEGO    /AKLAND    W .EW%NGLAND  -IAMI  .9*ETS  "UFFALO 

Pct    

PF    

PA    

Pct    

PF    

PA    

Pct    

PF    

PA    

Pct    

PF    

PA    

NATIONAL CONFERENCE

East L T Pct PF PA                     South W L T Pct PF PA .EW/RLEANS       #AROLINA       4AMPA"AY       !TLANTA       North W L T Pct PF PA #HICAGO       'REEN"AY       $ETROIT       -INNESOTA       West W L T Pct PF PA X 3EATTLE       3AN&RANCISCO       !RIZONA       3T,OUIS       x-clinched playoff spot; y-clinched division Sunday’s games 4AMPA"AYAT3T,OUIS NOON )NDIANAPOLISAT+ANSAS#ITY NOON $ENVERAT(OUSTON NOON -IAMIAT"UFFALO NOON .EW/RLEANSAT#AROLINA NOON $ALLASAT7ASHINGTON NOON #LEVELANDAT.9*ETS NOON -INNESOTAAT#INCINNATI NOON 4ENNESSEEAT*ACKSONVILLE NOON !RIZONAAT3EATTLE PM .9'IANTSAT$ETROIT PM /AKLANDAT3AN$IEGO PM 0ITTSBURGHAT'REEN"AY PM .EW%NGLANDAT"ALTIMORE PM #HICAGOAT0HILADELPHIA PM Monday’s game !TLANTAAT3AN&RANCISCO PM 0HILADELPHIA $ALLAS .9'IANTS 7ASHINGTON

W    

College football Bowl glance Saturday’s games New Mexico Bowl At Albuquerque 7ASHINGTON3TATE  VS#OLORADO3TATE   PM%30. Las Vegas Bowl &RESNO3TATE  VS3OUTHERN#AL  PM!"# Famous Idaho Potato Bowl At Boise, Idaho "UFFALO   VS 3AN $IEGO 3TATE   PM%30. New Orleans Bowl 4ULANE  VS,OUISIANA ,AFAYETTE  PM%30. Monday’s game Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Bowl At St. Petersburg, Fla. /HIO   VS %AST#AROLINA    PM %30. Tuesday’s game Hawaii Bowl At Honolulu /REGON 3TATE   VS "OISE 3TATE   PM%30. Thursday, Dec. 26 Little Caesars Pizza Bowl At Detroit "OWLING'REEN  VS0ITTSBURGH  PM%30. Poinsettia Bowl At San Diego .ORTHERN)LLINOIS  VS5TAH3TATE  PM%30. Friday, Dec. 27 Military Bowl At Annapolis, Md. -ARSHALL  VS-ARYLAND  PM %30. Texas Bowl At Houston -INNESOTA  VS3YRACUSE  PM %30. Fight Hunger Bowl At San Francisco "95  VS7ASHINGTON  PM %30. Saturday, Dec. 28 Pinstripe Bowl At New York .OTRE$AME  VS2UTGERS  AM %30. Belk Bowl At Charlotte, N.C. #INCINNATI   VS .ORTH #AROLINA   PM%30. Russell Athletic Bowl At Orlando, Fla. -IAMI  VS,OUISVILLE  PM %30. Buffalo Wild Wings Bowl At Tempe, Ariz. +ANSAS 3TATE   VS -ICHIGAN   PM%30.

NHL EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L OT Pts GF "OSTON      4AMPA"AY      -ONTREAL      $ETROIT      4ORONTO      /TTAWA      &LORIDA      "UFFALO      Metropolitan Division W L OT Pts GF 0ITTSBURGH      7ASHINGTON      0HILADELPHIA      #AROLINA      .EW*ERSEY      .92ANGERS      #OLUMBUS      .9)SLANDERS     

GA         GA        

WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L OT Pts GF GA                                           Pacific Division W L OT Pts GF GA !NAHEIM       ,OS!NGELES       3AN*OSE       6ANCOUVER       0HOENIX       #ALGARY       %DMONTON       NOTE:4WOPOINTSFORAWIN ONEPOINTFOR OVERTIMELOSS #HICAGO 3T,OUIS #OLORADO -INNESOTA $ALLAS 7INNIPEG .ASHVILLE

Friday’s results 6ANCOUVER #HICAGO 3/ !NAHEIM .EW*ERSEY /4 .9)SLANDERS .92ANGERS 7ASHINGTON #AROLINA 7INNIPEG &LORIDA

Saturday’s games #ALGARYAT0ITTSBURGH NOON 0HOENIXAT/TTAWA PM #OLORADOAT,OS!NGELES PM .EW*ERSEYAT7ASHINGTON PM 0HILADELPHIAAT#OLUMBUS PM -ONTREALAT.ASHVILLE PM "UFFALOAT"OSTON PM $ETROITAT4ORONTO PM #AROLINAAT4AMPA"AY PM !NAHEIMAT.9)SLANDERS PM 3T,OUISAT%DMONTON PM $ALLASAT3AN*OSE PM Sunday’s games -INNESOTAAT.92ANGERS PM 7INNIPEGAT6ANCOUVER PM

RELAX WE USE CARFAX

NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct "OSTON    4ORONTO    "ROOKLYN    .EW9ORK    0HILADELPHIA    Southeast Division W L Pct -IAMI    !TLANTA    #HARLOTTE    7ASHINGTON    /RLANDO    Central Division W L Pct )NDIANA    $ETROIT    #LEVELAND    #HICAGO    -ILWAUKEE   

GB ˆ ž ž  

1701 East 4th St., Sterling

Hours: Mon.-Thur. 9-7, Friday 9-6, Sat. 8:30-4

RATES ARE AT ALL TIME LOWS! FROM 1.74% X 60/MO** WE BUY CARS!!! 2007 FORD FOCUS SE

ONLY 33,000 MILES! $ 9,999 OR 167/MO** $

2011 FORD FUSION

2012 MERCEDES C300 4MATIC

LOW MILES!

ONLY 16,000 MILES!

JUST IN!

SPORT PACKAGE

SUNROOF

*

2001 PONTIAC MONTANA VAN 2004 BUICK LESABRE LIMITED

GB ˆ ž ž   GB ˆ  ž ž 

We’ve slashed prices on every vehicle in stock!

815-625-9600 5-9600 Call 815-62

Friday’s box score

CANUCKS 3, BLACKHAWKS 2 6ANCOUVER    ˆ #HICAGO    ˆ 6ANCOUVERWONSHOOTOUT  First Period– #HICAGO 6ERSTEEG  +ANE (ANDZUS  Second Period– #HICAGO +ANE  2OZSIVAL /DUYA  6ANCOUVER +AS SIAN'ARRISON  Third Period– 6ANCOUVER $3EDIN "IEKSA (3EDIN  Overtime–.ONE Shootout–6ANCOUVER  3ANTORELLI ' $3EDIN .' (3EDIN .' +ASSIAN .' 7EBER .' "OOTH .' $ALPE .' +ESLER ' #HICAGO+ANE.' 4OEWS.' 3HARP ' (OSSA .' 3AAD .' 3MITH .' 6ER STEEG.' (ANDZUS.'  Shots on Goal–6ANCOUVER   n #HICAGO   n Goalies–6ANCOUVER ,ACK #HICAGO 2AANTA A–    T–

We want to earn your business... and we will do whatever it takes!

LIKE NEW!

NO RUST! CLEAN AS A WHISTLE! 3800 V-6

5,999*

HURRY! $7,999*

LOW MILES!

ONLY 40,000 MILES!

$

2010 MAZDA 3 HATCHBACK

LIKE NEW!

NAVIGATION

1-OWNER, 100,000 MILES WARRANTY @ NO CHARGE

2011 CHEVY TRAVERSE LT

2006 ACURA TSX

26,999*

$

ONLY 29,000 MILES! ONLY 60,000 MILES!

NEW TIRES!

LEATHER

2011 BUICK ENCLAVE CXL

AWD, LEATHER, SUNROOF

LOADED!

ONLY $239/MO

21,999*

$

2009 ACURA TSX

**

2010 BUICK LACROSSE CXL

2007 INFINITI G35X

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct 3AN!NTONIO    (OUSTON    $ALLAS    .EW/RLEANS    -EMPHIS    Northwest Division W L Pct /KLAHOMA#ITY    0ORTLAND    $ENVER    -INNESOTA    5TAH    Pacific Division W L Pct ,!#LIPPERS    0HOENIX    'OLDEN3TATE    ,!,AKERS    3ACRAMENTO   

GB ˆ ž   ž GB ˆ ˆ  ž 

14,999* OR

$

**

2009 CHEVY HHR LT

GB ˆ    

Friday’s results 0HILADELPHIA "ROOKLYN /4 #LEVELAND -ILWAUKEE /4 -IAMI 3ACRAMENTO !TLANTA 5TAH #HARLOTTE $ETROIT )NDIANA (OUSTON 4ORONTO $ALLAS /4 0HOENIX $ENVER -INNESOTAAT,!,AKERS LATE Saturday’s games -EMPHISAT.EW9ORK AM 7ASHINGTONAT"OSTON NOON 3ACRAMENTOAT/RLANDO PM (OUSTONAT$ETROIT PM 5TAHAT#HARLOTTE PM #LEVELANDAT#HICAGO PM 0HILADELPHIAAT-ILWAUKEE PM /KLAHOMA#ITYAT3AN!NTONIO PM $ALLASAT0HOENIX PM .EW/RLEANSAT0ORTLAND PM ,!,AKERSAT'OLDEN3TATE PM $ENVERAT,!#LIPPERS PM Sunday’s games "OSTONAT)NDIANA PM 4ORONTOAT/KLAHOMA#ITY PM -INNESOTAAT,!#LIPPERS PM

219/MO

$

Big Ten

State schedule Friday’s results 7)LLINOIS 4ROY 0ORTLAND "RADLEY 5#2IVERSIDE )LL #HICAGO Saturday’s games %)LLINOISAT)0&7 PM "ALL3TAT3)LLINOIS PM 7)LLINOISVS5#3ANTA"ARBARA AT,OGAN 5TAH PM "RADLEYVS0ACIFIC AT,AS6EGAS PM Sunday’s games .)LLINOISAT5#2IVERSIDE PM $E0AULAT)LLINOIS3T PM

Top 25 schedule Friday’s result .O3YRACUSE (IGH0OINT Saturday’s games .O/HIO3TATEVS.OTRE$AME AT.EW 9ORK PM .O-ICHIGAN3TATEAT4EXAS PM .O,OUISVILLEAT&LORIDA)NTERNATIONAL PM .O/KLAHOMA3TATEVS.O#OLORADO ,AS6EGAS PM .O6ILLANOVAVS2IDER PM .O/REGONVS"95 PM .O.ORTH#AROLINAVS$AVIDSON PM .O  -EMPHIS VS 3OUTHEAST -ISSOURI 3TATE PM .O&LORIDAVS&RESNO3TATE AT3UNRISE &LA PM .O+ANSASVS'EORGETOWN AM .O+ENTUCKYVS"ELMONT AM .O'ONZAGAAT+ANSAS3TATE PM .O5-ASSVS&LORIDA3TATE AT3UNRISE &LA PM .O  -ISSOURI VS )LLINOIS AT 3T ,OUIS PM .O  3AN $IEGO 3TATE VS -C.EESE 3TATE PM Sunday’s games .O5#ONNAT7ASHINGTON PM .O  7ICHITA 3TATE VS .ORTH #AROLINA #ENTRAL PM .O"AYLORVS3OUTHERN5 PM .O  )OWA 3TATE VS 'EORGE -ASON AT (ONOLULU PM .O)OWAVS!RKANSAS 0INE"LUFF PM

ONLY $269/MO

**

LOW MILES! 10,999* OR

$

198/MO

$

**

2012 LINCOLN MKS

LOW MILES!

NAVIGATION, LOADED!

ONLY $269/MO

*

2011 NISSAN ALTIMA

2012 FORD EXPLORER XLT

LEATHER, SUNROOF

ONLY 23,000 MILES!

16,999* OR

$

247/MO

$

27,999*

$

**

LOW MILES!

DIAMOND WHITE! LEATHER!

19,999* OR

$

299/MO

$

**

2009 SATURN OUTLOOK

LOW MILES!

BALANCE OF 100,000 MILE WARRANTY!

14,999* OR

$

237MO

$

**

2011 FORD EXPLORER XLT

2011 BUICK REGAL

2013 DODGE CHARGER

1-OWNER, 3.5 V-6, CHROME WHEELS

25,999

$

ZERO DOWN!

ALL WHEEL DRIVE! PERFORMANCE & LUXURY!

ONLY 1,000 MILES! ONLY 17,000 MILES! ONLY 34,000 MILES! SUNROOF, TURBO, 30+ MPG!

SALE 23,999 ONLY 319/MO

*

$

*

$

BLACK GRANITE METALLIC!

LOW MILES!

PANORAMIC, SUNROOF, NAVIGATION

1-OWNER, AWD, HUGE SAVINGS OFF NEW!

2012 NISSAN ROGUE AWD

2012 FORD ESCAPE 4X4

GORGEOUS! ONLY 22,999 $

*

2007 SATURN AURA XR

2012 BUICK LACROSSE CXL 2009 MERCEDES C300 4MATIC

Men’s basketball Conference Overall W-L Pct. W-L Pct. 7ISCONSIN       /HIO3T       -ICHIGAN3T       )OWA       -INNESOTA       )LLINOIS       )NDIANA       0URDUE       .EBRASKA       0ENN3T       -ICHIGAN       .ORTHWESTERN       Friday’s results )NDIANA .ICHOLLS3T -INNESOTA .EBRASKA /MAHA Saturday’s games -ICHIGAN3TAT4EXAS PM )LLINOISVS-ISSOURI AT3T,OUIS PM /HIO 3T VS .OTRE $AME AT .EW 9ORK PM -ICHIGAN VS 3TANFORD AT "ROOKLYN .9 PM 4HE#ITADELAT.EBRASKA PM Sunday’s games +ENNESAW3TAT)NDIANA AM 0URDUEAT76IRGINIA NOON !RKANSAS 0INE"LUFFAT)OWA PM "ROWNAT.ORTHWESTERN PM -OUNT3AINT-ARYSAT0ENN3T PM

LOADED! ZERO DOWN!

$

3.6L

LIKE NEW! 2012 LINCOLN MKZ

ONLY 34,000 MILES! WOW! LOADED!

8,999

*

4X4, 3RD SEAT

ONLY $19,999*

*

2013 NISSAN MAXIMA

2013 NISSAN ALTIMA 3.5 SL

ONLY 13,000 MILES! ONLY 13,000 MILES!

17,999*

$

2012 NISSAN SENTRA SR

ONLY 4,000 MILES! ONLY $239/MO** 2013 NISSAN PATHFINDER

ONLY $19,999*

2004 BUICK LESABRE LIMITED

SAVE THOUSANDS OFF NEW!

22,999* OR

$

7,999

$

*

2013 MAZDA 3

13,999

$

*

329/MO

$

**

2012 FORD FOCUS SEL

LOADED

SAVE THOUSANDS OFF NEW! 2013 FORD ESCAPE TITANIUM

ONLY 10,000 MILES!

LOADED & LIKE NEW!

LOW MILES!

4X4, DIAMOND WHITE, LIKE NEW!

SUNROOF, 1-OWNER, LIKE NEW!

14,999* OR

$

229/MO

$

ECO BOOST, 4X4, LIKE NEW!

SAVE $$$

**

2010 NISSAN MURANO SL

2012 LINCOLN MKX

ONLY 34,000 1-OWNER MILES!

ONLY 24,000 MILES!

LEATHER, PANORAMIC SUNROOF, BACK-UP CAMERA

LOADED!

1-OWNER, DIAMOND WHITE

32,999*

$

2013 CHEVY IMPALA LTZ..........................................................LOADED!!!...........................$18,999* OR $269/MO** ZERO DOWN! 2012 CHEVY MALIBU LT ...........................................................30+ MPG! NICELY EQUIPPED....$15,999* OR $239/MO** ZERO DOWN! 2012 CHEVY CRUZE ECO......................................................... 40+ MPG! LOW MILES!..................................................................SOLD 2012 CHEVY CAPTIVA LTZ.......................................................4X4,LOADED! SUNROOF,LOW MILES ................................................SOLD 2012 CHEVY EQUINOX LT......................................................... ONLY 18,000 MILES!....................................... $21,999* OR $309/MO** 2013 CHEVYTRAVERSEAWD.................................................AWD,DUAL SUNROOFS,ONLY 13,000 MILES!............................$35,999* 2013 CHEVY CRUZE 2 LT.......................................................... LEATHER,SUNROOF,LOW MILES!.....................................................SOLD 2013 CHEVY CRUZE LTZ........................................................... BACK-UP CAMERA,17”WHEELS,REMOTE START!..$19,999* OR $299/MO** *

Plus tax, title, license, & doc fee. **$0 Down, 60 months @ 1.74% With approved credit, plus tax, title, license + doc fee. Photos for illustration use only.

SHOP 24/7 ONLINE www.majeskimotors.com


Business

www.saukvalley.com

Section C

SV Weekend

Saturday, December 21, 2013

BUSINESS NOTEBOOK

Dog grooming salon to open in January BY PAM EGGEMEIER peggemeier@saukvalley.com 800-798-4085, ext. 570

T

uff Dog Bakery in Sterling once again will be home to dog grooming services. Puppy Love Grooming Salon is moving into the lower level of the bakery at 7 E. Third St. in Sterling. Julia

Decker of Morrison will run the salon. She has been a dog groomer for 17 years, the past 5 in Morrison, and prior to that at the former North Locust Animal Hospital in Sterling. Grooming hours are 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday, and 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Thursday.

Appointments can be scheduled beginning Jan. 6 by calling 815-718-5706.

Natural medicine practiced at Alpine OREGON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Alpine Chiropractic and Natural Medicine lays claim to being the only practitioners of natural medicine in the area.

Chiropractors Seth and Carri Anderson opened their office in June at 101 N. Fourth St. in Oregon. The married couple are both originally from the area, Seth from Rock Falls and Carri from Polo. Carri practices natural medicine and does food allergy testing at the office. Two mas-

BUSINESS CONTINUED ON C8

daveRAMSEY

HOLIDAY SHOPPING

Running out of time? Consumers try to make up for short holiday season

Financial straight talk. For more advice, plus special readers offers, visit davesays. org or call 888-22PEACE.

Christmas must be part of budget

BY LORRAINE MIRABELLA MCT News Service

With a shortened holiday season, holiday shoppers are feeling the pressure. There are six fewer days this year between Thanksgiving and Christmas than last year. And bad weather in parts of the country has distracted some shoppers from buying. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in denial,â&#x20AC;? said Ann DiAddezio, a York, Pa., restaurateur who was loaded down with shopping bags Saturday morning as she walked briskly past stores at Towson (Md.) Town Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been one year where time just got away from me. I realized I needed to get to the stores.â&#x20AC;? With Christmas drawing ever nearer, shoppers hit the stores in recent days. Some, like DiAddezio, were making up for lost time. Others said the tighter shopping window instead motivated them to start earlier than usual, and they were working to wrap up gift buying on the early side. This year, it felt like Thanksgiving came and went and suddenly just more than a week remains before Christmas, said Karen Carter, who was shopping Saturday with her sister and nephew at Towson Town Center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Usually by this time, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d be further along with shopping,â&#x20AC;? said Carter, who works for a health insurer. By midday, sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d found a sweater at Nordstrom for her daughter, who is away at college, but was far from done. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have to get something for my husband,â&#x20AC;? she said. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still unclear how holiday retail sales will end up being affected by the calendar shift. Some of the biggest shopping days of the year are likely still to come, with the second-biggest day after Black Friday expected to be the Saturday before Christmas, according to ShopperTrak, which reports retail sales and traffic. The firm has not adjusted its forecast of a

sage therapists also are on staff. For massages, there is a 20 percent discount for firsttimers and a special through the end of the year for a free massage when you buy three. Office hours are 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. and 2 to 6 p.m. Monday through Thursday.

Dear Dave, My wife and I have $15,000 in debt left to pay off. We bring home around $32,000 a year, and we usually spend $250 to $300 on Christmas. I started talking to her about your plan earlier this year, and she finally agreed and got on board a couple of months ago. How should we handle Christmas budgeting in the middle of working our debt snowball? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Scott

MCT News Service

Amy Pletz carries packages as she walks with her daughters Mimi, 4, and Ayla, 6, (standing in the background wearing a hooded coat) Dec. 14 at The Avenue at White Marsh, Md. 2.4 percent increase in holiday retail sales. But so far, the season is falling short of expectations, said Bill Martin, ShopperTrakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s founder. Sales rose just 2.1 percent in November. And in the first week of December, sales fell 2.9 percent, ShopperTrak reported. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The snowstorms couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have come at a worse time, right at the time when (retailers) expected shoppers to get back in to the stores,â&#x20AC;? Martin said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a little short of expectations, leaving catch up work in December.â&#x20AC;?

The scenario could play out in a couple of ways, he said. Pent-up demand could propel shoppers out closer to Christmas and push sales up. Or shoppers could be tapped out after shopping over the Black Friday kickoff weekend, when many retailers opened their doors earlier than ever on Thanksgiving and more than 141 million people shopped over the weekend, according to the National Retail Federation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d expect to see some stronger salesâ&#x20AC;? and a pickup in traffic, Martin said.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Consumers are probably in pretty good shape. Unemployment is down and incomes are stable, so thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s good economic news around that.â&#x20AC;? Amy Pletz, an office manager from Essex, Md., went out Saturday to The Avenue in White Marsh, Md., to buy hostess gifts for a holiday party, then planned to head to Costco for gifts for relatives. Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d already done the bulk of her shopping, buying toys for her daughters, ages 4 and 6, on Black Friday. TIME CONTINUED ON C8

Dear Scott, The first thing Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d suggest is to not mention my name for a while. If sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s agreed to start working the plan and help you guys get control of your money, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s enough for now. We donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to cause a rift during the holidays. Just sit down together and ask her what she thinks is a reasonable amount to spend for Christmas while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re trying to get out of debt. If itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a reasonable figure, smile and tell her you agree. You might even ask if sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK with your old Christmas budget. If she is, then pencil it in and move on to other things. The big thing is to make sure you listen to her opinion and work on this together. On the off chance that she gives some crazy dollar amount, just nod and ask how she came to that figure. Then, talk things out. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t bring up my name or go crazy about things. It sounds like you two are on the right track. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dave

Switch to Roth TSP? Dear Dave, Do you think I should consider switching from my traditional TSP (Thrift Savings Plan) to a Roth TSP? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Jeremy RAMSEY CONTINUED ON C8

Heritage Square

Spread the Christmas Joy â&#x20AC;&#x153;Celebrate the magic of the holidaysâ&#x20AC;?  +HULWDJH 6TXDUH %RDUG RI 'LUHFWRUV 5HVLGHQWV DQG 6WDÍž

620 N. Ottawa, Dixon

(815)288-2251 www.heritagesquaredixon.com


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

AFC Student of the Month GED, ESL, classes free Lea Koning, 17, a senior at Ashton-Franklin Center High School in Ashton, is the September Student of the Month. She is the daughter of Matt and Sue Koning, and the sister of Cassidy, 15, and Lane, 9.

Darts: Messy places; I need to clean them. What kind of music makes your skin crawl? Rap that I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t understand

DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sauk Valley Community College will offer free, adult education classes during the spring semester, starting Jan. 13. General Education Diploma Preparation will be from 9:45 to 11:45 a.m. Monday through Thursday at Sauk, 173 state Route 2. Also on Tuesdays through Thursdays are additional GED classes from 4 to 6 p.m. at Sauk; 9 to 11 a.m. at the Illinois Department of Employment Security, 2323 E. Lincolnway, Sterling; and 5 to 7 p.m. at Rock Falls Middle School, 1701 12th Ave. GED classes will be from 6 to 8:45 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday at Morrison High School, 643 Genesee Ave. Computer-based GED

Survival guide: Always do your best, even for Favorite class: Any ag the small things. class Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a tip you would Top teacher: Mr. Petitt give freshmen for makand Mr. Jackson ing high school life easier? Be responsible, Extracurriculars: NHS, respectful, and have Student Council, volley- self-motivation to make ball, basketball, softball, high school a great 4 and FFA years. After graduation: Useless knowledge: Attend the University of The end of your shoeWisconsin â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Platteville lace is called an aglet. to major in ag business. Paycheck: MSK Enter- Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m in the dictionary prises in Amboy; I also next to: Organized have my own T-shirt Secret twin: Anne business Hathaway BFF: Cassidy, my sister Personal trivia: I show Favorite musical group: cattle and sew dresses. Anything country Dream job: My dream Favorite actor: Chan- job is to be an ag sales rep. I have a passion for ning Tatum agriculture. Favorite movie: â&#x20AC;&#x153;FootTrading places: Carlooseâ&#x20AC;? (the original) rie Underwood; she has F a v o r i t e T V s h o w : great legs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sweet Home Alabamaâ&#x20AC;? Trading spaces: MiranFavorite food: Steak da Lambert and mashed potatoes Read this: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Game Favorite place to shop: Changerâ&#x20AC;? The Buckle Favorite website: PinBiggest fear: Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m afraid terest.com of mice. Favorite trend: Sperry Least favorite class: Topsiders; I wear them Spanish every day.

preparation programs are available for adult education students at no cost. English as a Second Language will be from 9 to 11:45 a.m. Tuesdays through Thursdays at St. Mary Catholic Church, 600 Ave. B, Sterling; 5 to 7 p.m. at Washington School, 815 W. LeFevre Road, Sterling; and 5 to 7 p.m. at Rock Falls Middle School. Citizenship Study Sessions will be from 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays at Washington School in Sterling. Students can register on the first day of class. Saukâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Learning Lab also will be open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Tuesday through Thursday. For more information, call 815-835-6310.

Bowlers excel in state competition Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

The AFC September Student of the Month is Lea Konig, who loves steak and mashed potatoes. She plans to attend the University of Wisconsin and major in ag business. What would you do Open campus if you had $100,000? I would pay for college Shout out to: My parand start my life. ents are always there for me, and all of my teachWhat do you wish your ers have taught me outhigh school offered? standing life.

Dixon High Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Illinois State Scholars are (front row, from left) Annalise Ankney, Rachel Gascoigne, Whitney Wildman, Joan Bratt, Samantha Riggen, and Simon Thorpe; and (back row) Paige Himes, Haylee Altenburg, Nathaniel Tipton, Tom Whitcombe, Brandon Helfrich, Christopher Kooy, and Maribeth Johnson. Not pictured are Nancy Hummel and Caitlyn Rozek. Photo submitted by Amy Ebert.

PEORIA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; More than 200 Special Olympics athletes competed in the State Bowling Tournament Dec. 7 at Landmark Lanes. They bowled in singles, ramp, doubles, and team competition. Bowling singles winners included: from Kreider Services in Dixon, Betty Jo Hanson of Dixon, fifth place; from Rolling Hills in Lanark, Jennifer N. Pitts, first, and Stephen â&#x20AC;&#x153;Steveâ&#x20AC;? Suchocki, fourth, both of Lanark; from Twin Cities Schools in Sterling, Rhen Huizenga of Prophetstown and Erica

Mapes of Morrison, both second; and from Village of Progress in Oregon, John L. Roe of Rochelle, first. Bowling doubles winners included James Johnson of Dixon, first, from Gateway Services of Princeton. The event is one of eight Special Olympics state tournaments each year. Bowling athletes advanced from local and sectional competitions. For more information, to make a donation or to volunteer, go to www.soill.org or call 800-394-0562.

Samantha Beightol

Lucas Bonnette

Bentley Grell

Rachel Holden

Addison Huizenga

Micah Miller

Hayden Villa

Elizabeth Williamson

Dixon High introduces its state scholars WACC names its DIXON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fifteen Dixon High School students have been recognized as 201415 Illinois State Scholars, according to Principal Michael Grady. The 15 recipients are: Haylee Altenburg, Annalise Ankney, Joan Bratt, Rachel Gascoigne, Brandon Helfrich, Paige Himes, Nancy Hummel, Maribeth John-

son, Christopher Kooy, Samantha Riggen, Caitlin Rozek, Simon Thorpe, Nathaniel Tipton, Thomas Whitcombe, and Whitney Wildman. The award, given annually by the Illinois Student Assistance Commission, recognizes high school students from across the state as state scholars.

Illinois State Scholar winners rank in the top 10 percent of high school seniors from 773 different high schools. Selection is based on SAT, ACT and/ or Prarie State Achievement Exam scores, and/ or class rank at the end of the junior year. High school counselors work in conjunction with ISAC to

determine the winners. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Illinois State Scholars represent the best in educational excellence in Illinois,â&#x20AC;? said John Sinsheimer, ISAC interim executive director. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The commission applauds their success and salutes their families and the teachers at Dixon High School on this achievement.â&#x20AC;?

NEW TUBA FROM ALUMNI

Students of Month

STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Students of the Month at Whiteside Area Career Center have been announced. They are being honored for outstanding effort and performance. The students are Elizabeth Williamson of Rock Falls High School, allied health, parents Charlie and Tessa Williamson; Addison Huizenga of Dixon High School, health occupations, mother Tammi Morthland; Hayden Villa of Sterling High School, early childhood educa-

tion, parent Tim Villa and Tammy Larson. Lucas Bonnette of Dixon, auto service, parents Matt and Tracy Bonnette; Bentley Grell of Sterling, auto service, parents Kraig and Julie Grell; Micah Miller of Sterling, welding, mother Laura Miller. Rachel Holden of AFC High School in Ashton, computer tech, parents Philip and Nancy Holden; and Samantha Beightol of Polo, commercial food service, parents Russel Beightol and Kathleen Seyler.

HOLIDAY HOURS

The Rock Falls Marching Rockets Alumni Band presents a new tuba to the Rock Falls High School band Dec. 5 at the annual Christmas concert. Alumni band fundraisers made the gift possible. Showing the instrument are (from left) Kahla Davis and Brian Duffy, alumni band members; Rowland Gillett and Jesus Villa, high school band members; Elizabeth Judd, RFHS band director; and Jodi Perez, alumni band member. The RFHS marching band also will receive a new podium from Arthur Kennard of Virginia, a 1983 RFHS graduate and former band member. The alumni band is open to any former member of the Marching Rockets, even those who cannot march. Photo submitted by Jodi Perez.

Ogle County Extension

Walnut Public Library

OREGON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; University of Illinois Extension Ogle County will be closed from Monday through Jan. 1. The office, at 421 W. Pines Road, will reopen Jan. 2 with regular hours, 8 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday. Visit web.extension.illinois.edu/bdo or call 815732-2191 for information.

WALNUT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Walnut Public Library, 101 Heaton St., will be closed Tuesday through Thursday. The library also will be closed Dec. 31 and Jan. 1 and 2. It will reopen at noon Jan. 3 and continue with its regular hours. Call the library at 815-3792159 for information.


Saturday, December 21, 2013

Scrapbook www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

CHRISTMAS CACTUS

This Christmas cactus, owned by Sandra Sujka of Sterling, bloomed well in advance of its big day. Photo submitted by Sujka.

VISITORS FROM THE NORTH POLE

Santa and Mrs. Claus get a lift from the Dixon City Fire Department during the Dixon Christmas Walk Dec. 6. Photos submitted by Ed Higby.

Jessie Arjes, firefighter, and Mark Callison, deputy chief, of the Dixon City Fire Department visit with Santa and Mrs. Claus

PAINTING THE SKY

GRACEFUL SWIMMERS

The sun makes a pillar of light over the treetops recently east of Hazelhurst. Photo submitted by Ann Millhouse of Polo.

A herd of seven swans took a late fall swim Dec. 2 south of Amboy along Rockyford Road. Photo submitted by Pat Burke of Amboy.

WE’LL BE MOO’VING ALONG NOW

SHOWING PATRIOTISM

Cows belonging to Oscar Koenig stood out against the background of the first snowfall of the season Oct. 22. The cattle watched the Christmas decorating going on in Joan Johnson’s yard in Tampico. Photo submitted by Johnson.

The Caring Center in Sterling displays flags in its windows to honor the nation’s heroes on Veterans Day. Photo submitted by Irene Nusbaum.

Wanted: Photos from you A scrapbook is a book with blank pages, and that’s what our Scrapbook page is without your pictures. We want to fill the page with images that capture lives in the Sauk Valley. They can be submitted by email to photos@saukvalley.com or can be taken to the Sterling and Dixon offices.


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

CONFIRMATION AT ST. PATRICK IN AMBOY

Confirmands from six parishes in the Sauk Valley received the sacrament of confirmation Oct. 7 at St. Patrick Catholic Church in Amboy. Participating were the Most Rev. David J. Malloy, bishop of Rockford; the Rev. Joel Lopez, pastor of St. Patrick Church in Maytown, Our Lady of Perpetual Help in Sublette, and St. Mary in West Brooklyn; Monsignor Thomas Bales, pastor of St. Patrick in Amboy, St. Flannen in Harmon, and St. Mary in Walton; and deacons, Kevin Prunty and Terry Wagner. Photo submitted by Maureen Fischbach.

Eagle watch gets underway FULTON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The U.S. Army Corps of Engineersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Mississippi River Project, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Clinton Community College, and the Stewards of the Upper Mississippi River Refuge will host the 30th annual Bald Eagle Watch on Jan. 4. Educational programs and environmental exhibits will be at Clinton Community College, 1000 Lincoln Blvd., Clinton, Iowa. Eagle viewing will be at Lock and Dam 13 off state Route 84 in Fulton. The event will be open from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. to view exhibits and education programs.

This yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s schedule at the college is as follows: 9:45 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Welcome to Eagle Watch. 10 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The American Bald Eagle,â&#x20AC;? presented by the National Eagle Center, Wabasha, Minn. 11:15 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Native American Dance, in Honor of the Bald Eagle,â&#x20AC;? by Rudy Vallejo, a member of the Kickapoo Tribe of Kansas. 12:30 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;Listen to the Eagles Message,â&#x20AC;? a DVD. 1 p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The American Bald Eagle,â&#x20AC;? presented by the National Eagle Center. The programs and exhibits will feature a

live bald eagle, conservation groups, artists, drawings for door prizes and refreshments. The National Eagle Center will have a live eagle available for photo opportunities between 11:45 a.m. and 12:45 p.m. A courtesy bus shuttle will be provided between Clinton Community College and Lock and Dam 13 from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. The shuttle will run every half hour until 2. For more information, contact the Thomson Park Rangers at 815-2593628 or the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service at 815273-2732.

COLOR SHOTS 8 WINNERS

Ellen Donaldson Allen of Dixon recently won best of show for â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Plains of La Manchaâ&#x20AC;? in the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Color Shots 8â&#x20AC;? exhibit at The Next Picture Show in Dixon. Photos submitted by Bonnie Kime.

Music, candlelight part of service MOUNT MORRIS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The annual candlelight service of Evangelical Free Church of Mount Morris, 102 S. Seminary Ave., will be at 6 p.m. Sunday. The members of the community are welcome to attend.

In addition to the adult and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choirs, the childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hand-bell choir will perform. A brass ensemble will add its music to the service, and harpist Melissa Anderson will play during Communion.

In addition, the churchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s puppet team will give a mime presentation. A candlelighting ceremony will end the service. A time of coffee fellowship will follow. Visit www.efcmm.org for more information.

KEEPING THE WREATH RED

Justin Davis of Dixon got first place for â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ware of Dog.â&#x20AC;?

GROUP EFFORT Family and friends of Jessica Strader, a Sterling teacher who died Feb. 17 from cancer, created a tree in Tampico honoring her and her Team Jess supporters. Her mother, Sherry Coleman, and sister, Jamie McIntire, both of Tampico, were part of the crew.

Members of A shift, Derrick Newton (from left), Nathan Hartman, and Kyle Sommer, at the Rock Falls Fire Department hang a wreath for the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keep the Wreath Redâ&#x20AC;? campaign. The wreath remains red as long as there are no holiday-related fires. Photo submitted by Dave Northcutt.

TAMPICO ROYALTY

Mr. and Mrs. Santa paid a visit to Tampico and helped crown the new royalty. They are Prince Lucas Meier, Princess Kloey Ferguson, Queen Zoey Ferguson, and King Matthew Hinds. Photo submitted by Joan Johnson.

Photo submitted by Evelyn Croy


Saturday, December 21, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

BIRTH ANNOUNCEMENTS Weston Andrew Leslie

Paternal grandparents Paternal grandparents are Richard and Jeanne are Mary Ortiz of SterAlmasy of Freeport and ling and Juan Ortiz of San Craig and Kristina Leslie the late Udom Almasy. Antonio. are the parents of a son Maternal great-grandborn at 3:19 a.m. Nov. 15, parents are Tom and Bishop Thomas 2013, at Campbell County Anna Feltenberger of Sward Memorial Hospital in GilLamar, Mo., and Charlie lette, Wyo. Laura and Daniel Sward Dyer of Lovington. Weston Andrew Les- of Jacksonville, N.C., Paternal great-grandlie weighed 7 pounds, 11 are the parents of a son parent is Consuelo Ortiz ounces at birth and was born at 3:33 a.m. Nov. 2, of Uretaro, Michoacan, 19 inches in length. 2013, at Camp Lejeune Mexico. Maternal grandparents Naval Hospital in Camp are Bob and Maureen Lejeune, N.C. Cade Richard Dorman of Sterling. Bishop Thomas Sward Muzslay Paternal grandparents weighed 9 pounds, 11 are Bryan and Carol Leslie ounces at birth and was Jeannette Kobbemanof Gillette, Wyo. 22.5 inches in length. Muzslay and Heath Maternal great-grand- He is welcomed by Muzslay of Kalamazoo, mother is Delores Dor- Tatum Anne, 1. Mich., are the parents of man of Oak Lawn. Maternal grandmother a son born at 12:34 a.m. Paternal great-grand- is Beth Hammer of Ster- Nov. 27, 2013, in Kalammothers are Marie Gor- ling. azoo. ishek of LaSalle and Anna P a t e r n a l g r a n d p a r - Cade Richard Muzslay Mae Kearns of Evansville, ents are Kevin and Laura weighed 7 pounds, 12 Ind. Sward of Dixon. ounces at birth and was Maternal great-grand- 20 inches in length. parents are Tom and He is welcomed by Honor Easton Linda Payton of Sterling. Keegan, 6, and Braden, 3. Almasy Paternal great-grand- Maternal grandparents Calli and David Almasy parents are Jim and Treva are Richard and Barbara of Sterling are the parents Fitzgerald of Dixon. Kobbeman of Sterling. of a son born at 7:24 a.m. Paternal grandparents Dec. 7, 2013, at CGH Medare Ollie and Ricci MuzsJanessa Alexis ical Center in Sterling. lay of Ocean City, N.J. Ortiz Honor Easton Almasy Maternal great-grandweighed 6 pounds, 5 Nichole and Julio Ortiz mother is Marian Nicolounces at birth and was of Dixon are the parents Vickrey of Champaign. 20 inches in length. of a daughter born at 3:34 He is welcomed by Isa- p.m. Nov. 15, 2013, at KSB Kempton John iah Almasy, 22, Sarina Hospital in Dixon. Kutz Avila, 16, Isaias Avila, 13, Janessa Alexis Ortiz Cierra Avila, 12, and Gray- weighed 6 pounds, 13 Jennifer and David Kutz son Almasy, 2. ounces at birth and was of Dixon are the parents Maternal grandparents 20 inches in length. of a son born at 2:06 a.m. are Claudia Brock of FreeMaternal grandpar- Nov. 12, 2013, at KSB port and the late George ents are Chuck and Lois Hospital in Dixon. Brock. McBride of Dixon. Kempton John Kutz

THANK GOODNESS weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces at birth and was 20 inches in length. Maternal grandparents are Mary and Rob Bowser of Dixon. Paternal grandparents are David and Janette Kutz of Dixon. Paternal great-grandmother is Sharon Kemp of Dixon. Paternal great-greatgrandmother is Sally Culver of Dixon.

Camden James Glassburn Sierra Skaff and AJ Glassburn of Sterling are the parents of a son born at 5:07 p.m. Dec. 3, 2013, at CGH Medical Center in Sterling. Camden James Glassburn weighed 8 pounds, 6 ounces at birth and was 21 inches in length. He is welcomed by Braedyn Thomas, 6, and Noah Glassburn, 2. Maternal grandparents are Fran and Charley Riney of Rockford and Joe and Paula Skaff of Streator. Paternal grandparents are Ann and David Glassburn of Sterling. Maternal great-grandparents are Jesse Smith of Sterling and Talitha Skaff of Minneapolis. Paternal great-grandparents are Jim and Marilyn Robinson and Jack and Louis Glassburn, all of Sterling.

SUPPORT GROUPS, CLUBS, AND SERVICES CHURCH &IRST!VE &ORreston. Veterans Affairs representative, 9 a.m., Rock 2IVER#ENTER 3TH 3T /REGON    Narcotics Anonymous, 10 a.m., open, 403 13th !VE 3TERLING Dixon Rotary Club, NOON LOWERLEVEL 3T,UKE %PISCOPAL#HURCH 7 Third St., Dixon. Sauk Valley Group Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, SUNSHINE BACKDOOR  &IRST!VE 2OCK&ALLS Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, closed, step; 6 p.m., open, 90-92 S. Hennepin !VE $IXON Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, closed, Big Book; 6 p.m., closed, Spanish; 7 PM OPEN "AZAAR!MERIcana, 609 W. Third St., Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, NOON CLOSED 3T0AUL ,UTHERAN#HURCH 3 Fifth St., Oregon. Reality Check Narcotics Anonymous, noon, PM &IRST#HRISTIAN #HURCH &IFTH!VE 2OCK&ALLS    Downstairs, west door. Crochet-Knitting Club, 12:30 p.m., Whiteside #OUNTY3ENIOR#ENTER 1207 W. Ninth St., Sterling,    The Salvation Army Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Auxiliary, 1 PM !VENUE& 3TERLING    Whiteside County Society for the Blind and Monday, Dec. 23 Visually Impaired, 1:30 Women, Infants and PM #OVENTRY6ILLAGE  Children clinic and Fam- W. 23rd St., Sterling. ily Planning Services, all TOPS, 4 p.m. weigh-in, by appointment only, Suite PMMEETING Sunday, Dec. 22  ,EE#OUNTY(EALTH p.m. weigh-in, 6 p.m. Alcoholics Anonymous, $EPARTMENT 3'ALENA MEETING (UB#ITY3ENIOR 7 a.m., closed; 7 p.m., !VE $IXON   #ENTER #HERRY!VE OPEN 2OCHELLE#OMMUNITY 3371. Rochelle. Hospital, 900 N. Second Abuse Changing Team, TOPS Chapter IL 634 St.    meeting PM  Alcoholics Anonymous, Alcoholics Anonymous, S. Walnut St., Franklin 8 a.m., closed; 11 a.m., 8 a.m., open, Methodist 'ROVE Saturday, Dec. 21 Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., closed, Big Book, 5NITED-ETHODIST#HURCH %#HICAGO!VE $AVIS Junction. Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., open, tradition; 12:30 p.m., closed; 7 p.m., CLOSED "AZAAR!MERIcana, 609 W. Third St., Sterling. Alcoholic Anonymous, 9 a.m., open, womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s; noon, open; 6 p.m., open,  3(ENNEPIN!VE Dixon. Alcoholics Anonymous, 9:30 a.m., former St. !NNES'RADE3CHOOL  .*ONES!VE !MBOY    Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Alcoholics Anonymous, 10:30 a.m., 7 p.m., closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. Mercy Nursing Services free blood pressure clinic, 11 a.m.-noon, Walmart, &IRST!VE 2OCK&ALLS Reality Check Narcotics Anonymous, noon, PM &IRST#HRISTIAN #HURCH &IFTH!VE 2OCK&ALLS    Downstairs, west door. Sauk Valley Group Alcoholics Anonymous, noon, 7 p.m., open, back door, &IRST!VE 2OCK&ALLS Mercy Nursing Services free blood pressure clinic, 1-2:30 p.m., Save! ,OT &IRST!VE 2OCK Falls. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., open, First PresbyTERIAN#HURCH #ALVIN Road, Rochelle. Alcoholics Anonymous, 8 p.m., closed, Village of Progress, 710 S. 13th St., Oregon.

open; 1 p.m., closed, Spanish; 7 p.m., closed, "AZAAR!MERICANA 7 Third St., Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, 9 a.m., closed; noon, open; 6 p.m., closed, step,  3(ENNEPIN!VE Dixon. Alcoholics Anonymous, AM OPEN (ORIZON View Farm barn, 2422 N. River Road, Oregon. Sauk Valley Group Alcoholics Anonymous, 10 a.m., open, Big Book, BACKDOOR &IRST!VE Rock Falls. Alcoholics Anonymous, PM CLOSED #HURCHOF 3T!NNE .#HERRY St., Morrison. Reality Check Narcotics Anonymous, 6 p.m., First #HRISTIAN#HURCH &IFTH !VE 2OCK&ALLS   8214. Downstairs, west door. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, SpanISH 3T0ATRICK#ATHOLIC #HURCH +ELLY$RIVE Rochelle. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, clearance REQUIRED "!!BBLEONFOR ,IFE0RISON'ROUP    Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 p.m., closed, 304 3EVENTH!VE7 ,YNDON Alcoholics Anonymous, PM CLOSED -OUNT -ORRIS3ENIOR#ENTER % Front St.

367EEKENDs#

TOPS PM WEIGH INPM 0OLO#HURCHOF THE"RETHREN 3#ONGRESS!VE    Celebrate Recovery, 6-8 p.m., 201 W. Market St., -ORRISON    Celebrate Recovery, Christ-centered Recovery Group, 6-8 p.m., 2EVIVE#OMMUNITY#HURCH 8 E. Front St., Mount MorRIS    Rock Falls Rotary, 6 p.m., Beelendorfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Deli, 204 W. 10th St., Rock Falls. Overeaters Anonymous, PM 2OOM #'( -EDICAL#ENTER % ,E&EVRE2OAD 3TERLING    Rock Falls Boy Scout Troop 306, 6:30-8 p.m., fellowship hall, Harvest 4IME"IBLE#HURCH  $IXON!VE 2OCK&ALLS Rock Falls Optimist Club PM #ANDLELIGHT)NN &IRST!VE Rock Falls. Al-Anon, 7 p.m., #HURCHOF'OD #LAY 3T -OUNT#ARROLL 284-3444. Lee/Whiteside Chapter of the American Diabetes Association, 7 p.m., 2YBERG!UDITORIUM #'( -EDICAL#ENTER % ,E&EVRE2OAD 3TERLING Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, 808 Freeport Road, Sterling. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7 p.m., closed, step study, New Hope Fellowship #HURCH STATE2OUTE  +INGS Tampico Lions Club, 7 PM 'OOD4IMES . -AIN3T 4AMPICO  438-2789. Alcoholics Anonymous, 7:30 p.m., closed, 3T,UKE%PISCOPAL #HURCH 74HIRD3T Dixon. Alcoholics Anonymous, PM CLOSED &IRST 0RESBYTERIAN#HURCH  Third St., Savanna.

ENTERTAINING AT CHILI SUPPER

Thank you for support of Hospice CAROLYN SPENCER and KAREN VOSS Rock Falls

Twenty-four years ago, a group of community members joined forces to create the first Festival of Trees to benefit Hospice of the Rock River Valley. Now, the Festival of Trees is a tradition that encompassed the entire Sauk Valley. The Festival of Trees would not be possible without the generosity of the communities we serve. Hospice of the Rock River Valley says thank you to all businesses, organizations, volunteers, decorators, chairpersons, sponsors, donors and the general public for the generous amount of time, talent, and financial support given to the Festival of Trees. We realize your resources are limited and precious, and we truly appreciate your expressions of support that help us continue helping others. The proceeds from the Festival of Trees assist Hospice of the Rock River Valley to provide care and support to the terminally ill and their families at no cost. The professional staff and team of volunteers have offered expert and compassionate care for more than 30 years to those during a most vulnerable time. Services include nursing care, social work, pastoral and bereavement services, volunteer support, inpatient and respite care, music therapy, as well as medications, medical supplies and equipment. Although Hospice services are reimbursable, the reimbursement does not totally cover the actual costs of providing our full range of services. This is why Hospice relies heavily on community support to maintain our commitment of not passing on costs to our patients or their families. On behalf of the staff, board of directors and volunteers, please accept our sincere and heartfelt thank you. Please know that through your generosity, you have helped to provide hope and compassionate care to your fellow community members. We wish you and yours happiness throughout this holiday season. Note to readers: Carolyn Spencer is the executive director, and Karen Voss is the marketing director of Hospice of the Rock River Valley.

Gratitude for success of holiday event CORINNE BENDER Morrison

The Morrison Chamber of Commerce would like to express its sincerest gratitude to all businesses, organizations, school groups, churches, and individuals who participated in the 26th

Thank Goodness policy Sauk Valley Media accepts letters to the editor (300 words or LESS FROMNONPROFITAND volunteer groups who want to thank the community for its support. ,ETTERSMAYBE emailed to letters@ saukvalley.com or sent to Sauk Valley Media, %,INCOLNWAY P.O. Box 498, Sterling, ), annual Morrison Christmas Walk celebration. The 2-day celebration included the lighting of the Christmas tree, live nativity scene, lighted parade, Christmas Tree Walk auction, church suppers, entertainment, refreshments, and warm hospitality. Christmas Walk parade winners were best decorated vehicle â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Resthave Nursing and Retirement Home; best community group entry â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Kids for Christ; best business entry â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Morrison Community Hospital; most spirited entry â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Henry C. Adam Memorial Library; and best use of theme â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Morrison Elementary School. Trees recognized in the Christmas Tree Walk auction were best of show â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Vegter Steel Fabrication, Kelly Vegter, decorator; honorable mention â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Morrison Schools Foundation, Heather Bush, decorator; most creative â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Morrison Community Hospital, administration department, decorators; traditional Christmas â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Resthave Nursing and Retirement Home, Tawnya Bottoms and Marcia Blean, decorators; and highest bid on a tree â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Fat Boyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bar and Grill, Heather Bramm, decorator. Winners are to pick up their trees at the chamber office. Proceeds benefit â&#x20AC;&#x153;Banners for Main Street.â&#x20AC;? The Christmas Walk would not have been possible without the assistance of generous sponsors: Morrison Auto Supply Inc., The Dancerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hut, CGH Morrison Health and Vision Center, Wells Fargo Bank, Community State Bank, The National Bank, Farmers National Bank, Sterling Federal Bank, Whiteside News Sentinel/Shawver Press, The Prairie Advocate, Ashford University, and Dunlap Lodge 321. Special thanks to the city of Morrison Public Works Department, Maurits and Jost Insurance Agency, Morrison Police Department, Nelsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Electric, Rickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Auto Body, Brethren in Christ Church, Santa and Mrs. Claus, Santaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s elves, parade judges and line-up volunteers, parade announcer Brian Zschiesche, Mayor Everett Pannier, Eric Phend, Sharon Habben, and Christmas Walk committee members Nance Anderson, Jean Eggemeyer, Jan Roggy, Diane Garcia, Heather Toppert, and Stephanie Vavra. Note to readers: Corinne Bender is the administrator/economic director of the Morrison Chamber of Commerce.

Holiday open house set

The Sterling line dancers performed Dec. 6 during the chili supper at the Big Red Church in Sterling. Dancers are (from left) Fadra Law, Priscilla Olinger, and Lynda Norton, with Lindsay Anderson, instructor. They danced the Boot Scootinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Boogie to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rockinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Around The Christmas Treeâ&#x20AC;? and Stray Cat Strut to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walkinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; in the Winter Wonderland.â&#x20AC;?

STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; An 1850s Christmas open house will be from 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday at the Lincoln Manahan Home, 607 E. Third St.

For more information, call Terry Buckaloo, Sterling-Rock Falls Historical Society museum director and curator, at 815-622-6215.

Note deadline for paper

Photo submitted by Norton

The deadline to submit event information, including photos, for the SV Weekend Community pages is 2 weeks before the event.

Information may be submitted in writing by hand, mail, fax or email at the Dixon or Sterling offices. For information, call 800-798-4085, ext. 575.


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

Sister immersed in virtual world blocks out reality Dear Abby: My younger sister â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lainieâ&#x20AC;? is 14. She has had a smartphone for about a year. While I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t belong to any social media sites, Lainie is a social media junkie. She never goes anywhere without her phone. Sometimes sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll have her phone in one hand and her tablet in the other, taking turns when one or the other begins to bore her. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s almost impossible to interact with her because her face is buried in the virtual world just about every hour of the day and night. I miss the way things used to be before she got that smartphone. I have talked about this with my parents. While they

a lot of time on their phones and computers. But when they become $EAR!BBY withdrawn and secretive, ISWRITTEN BY!BIGAIL it is time for a parental 6AN"UREN intervention. If your folks ALSOKNOWN are equally concerned AS*EANNE about your sisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s behav0HILLIPS4HE COLUMNISPROior, they should step in, VIDEDTHROUGH find out whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s going on 5NIVERSAL and do something about 5CLICK it, if necessary. If they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t already, they could are equally concerned start by scheduling famabout Lainieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s withdrawn, ily dinners during which sometimes secretive cellphones are turned off behavior, they never do or put away. anything about it. What are your thoughts on this Dear Abby: Christmas is topic? nearly here, and Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m conâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gadget Girlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sister in cerned about my brother. New Mexico Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m afraid he blames himself for his 28-year-old Dear Sister: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comdaughterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s suicide, which mon for teens to spend was by no means his

DEARABBY

fault. This will be his first Christmas without her. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what to do for him. Any suggestions? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Challenged in Michigan Dear Michigan: When a close family member commits suicide, it is common for survivors to experience a range of emotions. Anger and guilt are two of them. If possible, encourage your brother to spend Christmas with you or other relatives. You also should suggest he join a survivors support group. The American Association of Suicidology provides referrals to local self-help groups for survivors of suicide. Its website

is www.suicidology.org. If he joins one, it will give him a place to talk about his feelings with people who will understand because they have them, too.

much and just want the chance to be with her. Any advice? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Heartbroken in New York

Dear Heartbroken: Your former girlfriend Dear Abby: A long time has gone on with her life, ago, I was dating and and your relationship is living with a wonderful ancient history. If she woman. I was arrested had been willing to forand went to jail for posgive you, she wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t session of cocaine. She have taken out the then had an order of restraining order. If you protection issued against want to be successful in me for 1 year. moving forward in your That was 10 years ago. life, stop looking backI have been clean from ward. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time to focus drugs ever since. She has on your future. a child with another man now, and I hope everyWrite Dear Abby at thing is great. My probwww.DearAbby.com or lem is, I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t get her out P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeof my mind. I miss her so les, CA 90069.

PASTORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CORNER

Processing garbage in, out A recent Chicago Tribune article spoke about the â&#x20AC;&#x153;James Bond effectâ&#x20AC;? in PG-13 movies. The â&#x20AC;&#x153;James Bond effectâ&#x20AC;? is the on-screen combination of violence and other â&#x20AC;&#x153;risk behaviorsâ&#x20AC;? (e.g., alcohol, drug or tobacco use, and promiscuous sex) in such a way that â&#x20AC;&#x153;violence looks as acceptable as these other behaviors.â&#x20AC;? Even as I write this, the lead article on the front page of one of the morning papers today is about â&#x20AC;&#x153;an increase in the number of children reported to have died of neglect or abuse in the state (of Illinois).â&#x20AC;? The â&#x20AC;&#x153;James Bond effectâ&#x20AC;? is a concern, because of what researchers found in analyzing behavior of characters in 390 of the most popular films in the United States from 1985 to 2010. Gun play in PG-13 movies tripled in fewer than 30 years, and PG-13 movies became more violent than R-rated

coming out as garbage? Do we know the effects of exposure to many hours -ONSIGNOR of violent video games? 4HOMAS $ZIELAKISTHE Do we know the effects of PASTOROF3T exposure to pornography !NDREW#ATHand promiscuous sex? Do OLIC#HURCHIN 2OCK&ALLS we ignore the devastation to individuals and relationships of drug and alcohol abuse? I am not an expert on the reliable research movies. Of more concern about how these things was that in 77 percent of connect to one another, those 390 movies, charbut I am able to observe acters that behaved viowhat I see around me. lently also engaged in at I see more and more least one other behavior accounts of violence in considered dangerous for our communities. children and adolescents. I see the results of When I was growing up, pornography and the good nuns who taught immoral sexual activme in school often would ity on individuals and tell us to pay attention to relationships. I see the what we read, because devastation resulting what you take into your from the abuse of drugs mind remains there. In and alcohol. Is it strange todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s technology the that I would wonder, â&#x20AC;&#x153;is computer culture has a it GIGO?â&#x20AC;? Should we â&#x20AC;&#x201C; term for it â&#x20AC;&#x201C; â&#x20AC;&#x153;GIGOâ&#x20AC;? (Gar- especially parents â&#x20AC;&#x201C; pay bage In, Garbage Out). more attention to what What kind of garbage is offered to their chilmight be going into dren in PG-13 movies? modern minds, and then Just a couple questions.

THOMASDZIELAK

Winners named at holiday fest BYRON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Winners of the Byron Festival of Trees were chosen Dec. 6 during the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Miracle on Second Street. The trees are on display during regular museum hours, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, at Byron Museum of History, 106 N. Union St. The winning trees were picked by peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s choice ballot. Categories and winners were: Traditional: first place, First Baptist Church; second, Byron Forest Pre-

serve; and third, Byron Chamber of Commerce. Handmade: first place, By-Y-Badgers 4-H Club; second, Girl Scout Troop 3162 and 14; and third, Byron Park Districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tiger Den. Nontraditional: first place, Byron Library District, and second, Neighbors Rehabilitation. Other organizations taking part were Byron General Federation of Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Clubs, Byron School District 226 special education classes, Byron Young Women of the Church of

Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, Davis Junction Historical Society, Byron Farmers Market, Girl Scout Troop 3768, Holmstrom & Kennedy, Kiwanis Club of Byron, and RE/ MAX Professional Advantage. The museum also has some new exhibits, including â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winter Memories,â&#x20AC;? featuring antique and vintage cameras. Admission is free. Visit the museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website at www.byronmuseum.org or call 815-234-5031 for more information.

Bill Doering, Nicole Scott, Kylie Scott, Ashton Scott, Rose Scott, Jen Trotter, Santa, and Breanna and Aaliyah Surrena joined Troop 902 and Pack 323 of Rock Falls in preparing packages for Paul A. Scott and his platoon in Afghanistan. Photos submitted by Bill Doering.

Scouts send treat overseas ROCK FALLS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Boy Scouts from Troop 902 and Cub Scouts from Pack 323, both of Rock Falls, packed 30 care packages Dec. 9 for a local soldier and his platoon in Afghanistan. Santa stopped by and helped pack for Paul A. Scott, a Sterling High School graduate. Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s wife, Nicole; daughter, Kylie; son, Ashton; mother, Rose Scott; and family friend, Jen Trotter, also packed. The scouts from Troop 902 who attended were Terrell Walter, Ian Buckingham, A.J. Stanley, Adrian Kibodeaux, Dillion Larson, and Wesley Larson. And Cub Scouts lending a hand were Ethen Benters, Brenden Benters, Jonah Williams, Carson Petersen, Lyden King, Preston Kibodeaux, Dakota Bennett, Login Hicks,

Nicole, Kylie, and Ashton Scott receive lap blankets from Bill Doering. The Scotts joined Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts in preparing packages for Paul A. Scottâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s platoon overseas. Dugan Schauff, Marcus and Aden Buckingham. Surrena, Mathew KlapThe packages were cher, Garrett Funderburg, shipped Dec. 10.

AT SERENITY HOSPICE & HOME ABOVE LEFT: Tita Roach of Dixon, a volunteer at Serenity Hospice & Home in Oregon, recently sang and played guitar for volunteers, staff, patients, and visitors.

GINGERBREAD HOUSE PROJECT REWARDING

Lillith Gray gives $160 to Kate Webster of the First Christian Church in Princeton. The money was raised by the Open Prairieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Christkindlmarkt Gingerbread House Project for Princeton Buddy Bags. The ecumenical program works to address childhood hunger by providing area children with snack packs on days when school is not in session. Photo submitted by Sarah Cooper.

BELOW LEFT: Volunteers from Watt Publishing in Mount Morris decorated Serenity Hospice & Home in Oregon for Christmas Dec. 4 for the United Way Day of Caring program. Gathered in front of one of the nine trees they decorated are (from left) Greg Watt, Pam Ballard, Linda Orsted, and Andrea Gantz. Not pictured are Diane Palmer and Christina Webb. Visiting the hospice facility at Christmas time has become a Watt Publishing tradition. Photos submitted by Lynn Knodle


Saturday, December 21, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

AGRONOMY COMPETITION

On Nov. 12, West Carroll FFA members participated in the Section 1 Agronomy Career Development Event. The team placed fifth overall with a score of 936. West Carroll FFA members placing within the top 10 were Clare Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor, fifth, and Karley Metz, eighth. At the contest, members were required to identify live weed samples and crop seeds. They also judged rings of corn, soybeans, hay, corn silage, oats, and wheat. Within the samples, the members had to find weed seeds, other crop seeds, and had to determine if there were any more problems with the samples. Photos submitted by Christy Ralston.

IN BRIEF Local FFAs earn two, three stars

and Brian Diers, soybean diseases; Aaron Hager, marestail; Adam Davis, palmer amaranth; Ken Olson, conservation tillAGESYSTEMS#ARL"RADLEY fungicides; Gary Schnitkey, machinery and farm size; and Mike Gray, insect sur4-H club hears vey results. from two members A noon lunch and a #(!$7)#+n4HE#HAD- booklet with synopses of wick Achievers met Nov. 6. all presentations will be provided to each regisTalks and demonstratrant. Advance and on-site tions were done by Dylan REGISTRATIONSARE6ISIT !LEXANDER ARCHERYAND www.cropsciconferences. woodworking, tractors, and aerospace; and Becca COMTOREGISTER#ALL  OR  !LEXANDER VETERINARYSCI4424 for more information. ence. OFFICE 3%AST!VE .O #OMPLETEDAPPLICATIONS must be returned to the BUREAUBY&EB#ONTACT the bureau at leecfb@comCASTNETOR   for more information.

SAVANNA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Three FFA chapters in the Sauk Valley earned national star rankings for the National FFA Organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s National #HAPTERAWARD The program recognizes chapters that successfully completed an annual set of required activities designed to encourage members to grow, work as a team, and serve others. Judging was July 28 to !UG7EST#ARROLL&&! in Savanna received a TWO STARRATING WHILE!&# High School in Ashton and Oregon High School each Crop program received three stars. The chapters were recog- planned in January nized during the National URBANA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Registration &&!#ONVENTIONAND%XPO is being accepted now from Oct. 30 to Nov. 2 in for the 2014 University of Louisville, Ky. )LLINOIS#ORNAND3OYBEAN #LASSICS February deadline Regionally, the program will be from 8:30 a.m. to for book sign-up 3:30 p.m. Jan. 13 at Peo!-"/9n,EE#OUNTY ria Par-A Dice Hotel, 21 Farm Bureau Foundation "LACKJACK"LVD%AST0EORIA members are accepting and Jan. 15 at Kishwauapplications for the groupâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s KEE#OLLEGE -ALTA fourth annual Books by the Road, Malta. Bushel program. Sessions will feature nine Any organization in Lee presentations emphasiz#OUNTYCANSIGNUPTO ing crop production, pest receive a bushel basket management, economics, of agricultural books. The and the interactions among program is designed to them. Market updates will help increase agricultural be provided throughout awareness among chilTHEDAY#OMMUNICAdren. Some of the titles tion between speakers are â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Hog Ate My Home- and participants will be work,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Diary of a Worm,â&#x20AC;? encouraged. QuestionANDh#LARABELLEv and-answer sessions are Applications can be scheduled for the sessions. downloaded from the founThe speakers are Jim !NGELONWEATHER%MERdation website at www. leecfb.org or can be picked son Nafziger, soybean yields; Randy Nelson up at the farm bureau

Still time to take part in training $)8/.n!-ASTER'ARdener training course is getting closer. The local training will BEGIN*ANTO!PRILAT 3AUK6ALLEY#OMMUNITY #OLLEGE STATE2OUTE There are two other courses as well: Jan. 15 to April ATTHE"OONE#OUNTY %XTENSIONOFFICE !LEXandra Drive, Belvidere, and Jan. 14 to April 1 at HighLAND#OMMUNITY#OLLEGE 70EARL#ITY2OAD Freeport. Sessions will be from AMTOPM4HE REGISTRATIONCOSTIS and advance registration is required. After training, 60 hours of volunteer work is required over a 2-year period. #ONTACT,ISA6ALLE EXTENsion program coordinator, AT   ORVISIT WEBEXTENSIONILLINOISEDU bdo to register or for more information.

Workshop focuses on pesty bugs URBANA â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The University of Illinois Extension will present an invasive pest awareness workshop in the new year. The first will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Jan. 14 at Illinois Central College, 1 College Drive, East Peoria. Write Rhonda Ferree at ferreer@illinois.edu for details and to register. The workshop will be repeated from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Feb. 27 at Klehm Arboretum, 2715 S. Main St., Rockford. Write Candice Miller at mille116@ illinois.edu for informa-

tion and registration. The focus of the workshops will be on potential oak threats in Illinois, such as the oak splendor beetle, goldspotted oak borer, and sudden oak death. Sessions will cover identification and detection, life cycle/ biology, hosts, sampling, management, and lookalikes. Hands-on activities will allow those attending to examine pests and diseases in more detail. The workshop is targeted for certified arborists, tree care professionals, Master Gardeners, Master Natu-

ralists, forestry and natural resource professionals, conservationists, and others interested in trees. An application has been made for continuing education units in IAA Certified Arborists, continuing forestry education credits, Professional Landcare Network, and Golf Course Superintendentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association of America. There is a $40 nonrefundable fee, covering instruction, an onsite lunch, and training materials. Space is limited.

The West Carroll FFA varsity team members are (from left) Chloe Carson and Clare Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor; and (back row) Christy Ralston, Dylan Williams and Rachel Badtke.

Acreage reporting dates set SPRINGFIELD â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Producers now have until Jan. 15 to report crops that have a Dec. 15, acreage reporting deadline without paying a late-file fee. Crops under this waiver include fall seeded small grains and perennial forage. The Risk Management Agency did not grant a waiver, so producers need to consult their crop insurance agent for deadlines for insured crops. In order to comply with Farm Service Agency program eligibility requirements, all producers are encouraged to visit their local county FSA service center to file an accurate crop certification report by the applicable deadline. Additional 2014 acreage reporting dates applying to Illinois: Jan. 2: honey. Jan. 15: apples, asparagus, blueberries, caneber-

ries, cherries, grapes, nectarines, peaches, pears, plums, and strawberries. July 15: all other crops and cabbage planted March 15 to May 31. Aug. 15: cabbage planted June 1 to July 20. The following exceptions apply to the above acreage reporting dates: If the crop has not been planted by the above acreage report dates. If the crop has not been planted by the above acreage reporting date, then the acreage must be reported no later than 15 calendar days after planting is complete. If a producer acquires additional acreage after the above acreage reporting date, then the acreage must be reported no later than 30 calendar days after purchase or acquiring the lease. Appropriate documenta-

tion must be provided to the county office. If a perennial forage crop has an intended use of â&#x20AC;&#x153;cover only,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;green manure,â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;left standing,â&#x20AC;? or â&#x20AC;&#x153;seed,â&#x20AC;? then the acreage must be reported by July 15. Noninsured Crop Disaster Assistance Program policy holders should note that the acreage reporting date for NAP covered crops is the earlier of the dates listed above or 15 calendar days before grazing or harvesting of the crop begins. Additionally, producers can purchase either RMA coverage (if available) of NAP for 2014 forage crops. Late file fees will be assessed for 2013 crops reported after Sept. 15 and 2014 crops (with a Dec. 15, 2013, acreage reporting dated) reported after Jan. 15.

Volunteers put food on table ASHTON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Monsanto Co. is committed to combating hunger in rural America, so this November, hundreds of Monsanto employees helped raise awareness of food insecurity by participating in the companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s second Rural Hunger Volunteer Month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Food insecurity is a reality for many people in this country, even for families in the farming communities where much of the worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s food supply is raised,â&#x20AC;? said Brenda Cockrell, Monsantoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s global volunteer program manager. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To get food on the tables of those who need it most, collaboration, and willing volunteers are essential. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why

Monsanto is supporting Rural Hunger Volunteer Month.â&#x20AC;? Employees from 80 locations across the U.S., including Ashton,volunteered at local food banks to address the needs of the hungry. The Ashton Monsanto site organized a food drive in November. Volunteers helped to spread the word about the food drive, collected food and donations, and stocked shelves at the Ashton Food Pantry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Ashton Monsanto site chose to participate in Rural Hunger Volunteer Month because it is important to give back to the community, especially as we get close to the holidays,â&#x20AC;? Shane

Ebersohl, operations supervisor, said. In addition to Rural Hunger Volunteer Month, the company is involved in several other efforts to fight hunger. Monsanto pledged $3 million to Invest an Acre, a partnership which helps farmers support their local food banks. Other efforts include annual food drives at industry tradeshows, which have raised more than 100,000 pounds of food over 4 years, as well as donations to rural food banks through the Monsanto Fundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farmers Grow Communities program. Go to www.monsanto. com/fightinghunger for more information.

PANTRYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ELVESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

CLEANING UP

On Nov. 20, the West Carroll FFA participated in Savanna City Wide Clean-up Days. Agriculture classes throughout the day were assigned to different areas of the city and cleaned up during their class hours. Nine agriculture classes consisting of 140 students participated. Photo submitted by Christy Ralston.

The Lanark Clever Clover 4-H Club and the Clover Buds put their heads, hearts, and hands together for a recent community service project. Under the direction of Donna Strauch and Becky Erbsen, this group cut and tied 10 fleece blankets to donate to the Pitter Patter Pantry of Carroll County. Gretchen Wallander, director of the pantry, accepted the donation. The pantry serves those enrolled in the Carroll County Health Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Women, Infants, and Children program for children up to age 5. For more information, call Wallander at 815-493-6076. Photo submitted.


#s367EEKEND

WWWSAUKVALLEYCOM

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

Consumers seek discounts

SHOPPING

TIME

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last year was a mad rush,â&#x20AC;? Walker said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This year, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m almost done.â&#x20AC;? Carolynn Black, however, was feeling the time crunch. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I am not even close to done,â&#x20AC;? said Black, who had come off an early morning shift at Middle River Aircraft Systems before heading to stores in White Marsh on Saturday morning. She had bought gifts for only one of her three teenage children, but was taking it all in stride. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They want what they want, but theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not

CONTINUED FROM C1

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I knew it was a shorter season, so I decided to start immediately the day after Thanksgiving,â&#x20AC;? Pletz said, adding that the early start paid off. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The decorations are done. The presents are wrapped and hidden. I do feel less pressure this year, because I knew I didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have time to spare.â&#x20AC;? Leslie Walker, an accountant from Essex, said sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mostly finished, too.

getting it because I canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t afford it,â&#x20AC;? she said of requests for computers and smartphones. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Christmas is first a holiday, time to be with family.â&#x20AC;? Consumers are far more-price conscious than they were even 5 years ago, and the depth of discounts offered will likely have a bigger impact on the season than the number of shopping days, said Britt Beemer, chairman of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Research Group, a consumer research and marketing firm.

MCT News Service

A red-dyed chinchilla stole, priced at $9,000, is shown here at Neiman Marcus NorthPark in Dallas.

Company aims to define luxury in a casual world Division president says products last longer than others BY MARIA HALKIAS -#4.EWS3ERVICE

Jim Gold has a sweater heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worn a hundred times, and it still looks new. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a classic V-neck with a ribbed hem and cuffs. Most guysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; wardrobes include a couple of these pullovers, usually one in navy or gray. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a piece that gets a lot of wear over the fall and winter. After a year or two, the pillings get bad enough that a wife, mother or close friend replaces it with a new one in a gift-wrapped box at Christmas. Gold, who is stores division president of Dallasbased Neiman Marcus Group, says his sweater is at least 8 years old and doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need replacing. The sweater is cashmere, a Brunello Cucinelli, thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s made in Italy and retails at Neiman Marcus for $645. Plenty of cashmere sweaters can be bought elsewhere for $99 or less, he said, but after you wear one four or five times, it will start to look shabby. Gold is building a case for luxury, a term he says is batted around too loosely these days. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Too many companies and brands claim to be in

the luxury business,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t following the strict definition.â&#x20AC;? At Neiman Marcus, the litmus test is quality, scarcity and longevity â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a product that can stand the test of time, Gold said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s our core business.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;An important part of what we do every day is to educate people about our products. Neiman Marcus merchandise doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost more because we unilaterally decide to charge more,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quantities are in smaller numbers because thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s more craftsmanship and a whole lot of talent behind creating things.â&#x20AC;? The core Neiman Marcus customer already knows that. But a broader base of customers is evolving, and some shoppers are a harder sell, said Pam Danziger, president of Unity Marketing, a Pennsylvania-based research firm that focuses on the affluent shopper. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I would disagree with that value proposition. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think the consumer is buying that story,â&#x20AC;? Danziger said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You can still buy a cashmere V-neck sweater thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just as good at $300, and there are more premium brands out there now, like a J.Crew, that are fine quality and last a long time.â&#x20AC;? Danziger believes thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been a shift in

the makeup of the luxury consumer market. Based on her ongoing tracking study of affluent Americans, households with income levels of $100,000 to $249,999 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; known as the Henrys, for â&#x20AC;&#x153;high earners, not rich yetâ&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201C; arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t playing as big a role in luxury spending as they did before the recession. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They shop everywhere, and they view themselves as middle class. They shop at Nordstrom and Neiman Marcus, but they shop widely, and they are the heavy lifters in the overall economy,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They also shop at J.C. Penney and Costco and Wal-Mart and Macyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and the dollar stores, and on occasion they shop at Neiman Marcus.â&#x20AC;? The Henrys, an acronym coined by Fortune magazine writer Shawn Tully, are a key demographic for luxury retailers because future ultraaffluent customers usually start out as Henrys. The top 2 percent of the ultra-affluent households, with incomes above $250,000, and the top 1 percent, with annual incomes of more than $380,000, donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have huge buying power as a group because there arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t as many of them, she said. There are about 2.9 million in those two categories, and 1.2 million are in the 1 percent.

Research online bank first RAMSEY

CONTINUED FROM C1

Dear Jeremy, If Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got a choice, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m going with the Roth TSP. Now, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re starting out really late with your saving and investing, the math might work out either way. But in most cases, when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got several years ahead of you, a Roth TSP, or even a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k) where your money grows tax free, is a much better choice. Remember, unless youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve waited until youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re in your 60s, the vast majority of the money in the account will be growth. Ten percent or less will be the money you actually put into the account. This tax-free growth is what makes the Roth TSP an excellent choice. In other words, if youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got $1 million in your current investment, and

$900,000 is growth, youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get taxed on that portion. That would amount to around $300,000. If your money is in a Roth, there are no taxes. You just saved $300,000 out of every $1 million. Not a bad deal, is it? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dave

Online bank OK? Dear Dave, What do you think about using an online bank for my emergency fund? â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Raphael Dear Raphael, Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not a bad idea at all, as long as you can easily check out the institutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s reputation and stability. There are lots of financial scams online, so you want to do some research and make sure theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a reputable and trustworthy organization. Due diligence is the key, Raphael. There are reliable household names

that are online banks, but you canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just assume the group youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re dealing with online is made up of honest, stand-up folks any more than you can with a traditional brick-andmortar bank. Make sure you take your time and know exactly what youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re getting into before going into business with them. Remember, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not as simple with an online bank as just walking in the door to get your money back if something goes wrong. â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Dave Dave Ramsey has written four New York Times best-selling books: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Financial Peaceâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;More Than Enoughâ&#x20AC;?, â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Total Money Makeoverâ&#x20AC;? and â&#x20AC;&#x153;EntreLeadershipâ&#x20AC;?. The Dave Ramsey Show is heard by more than 6 million listeners each week on more than 500 radio stations. Follow Dave on Twitter at @DaveRamsey and on the Web at daveramsey.com.

Office seeks help in promoting tourism BUSINESS

CONTINUED FROM C1

Tourism office looking for photos ROCK FALLS â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Rock Falls Tourism office

needs your help. Executive Director Tim Wilson needs photos that can be used throughout the new year to help market local attractions and events. Photos must be high-resolution shots at a minimum of 300 dpi.

The photos can be sent to the Rock Falls Tourism office at info@visitrockfalls.com. For more information, call Wilson at 815-3802300, or stop by the office at 603 W. 10th St., Suite 1 A.

Astrograph

Make thoughtful choices this year. If you choose the right path, you stand WR IXOĂ&#x20AC;OO \RXU GUHDPV 3ODQQLQJ DQG preparation will be your best assets. Your integrity and strong character will guide you in the right direction. Strive for perfection, and youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll gain satisfaction. &$35,&251 'HF -DQ   $ QHHG WR PDNH VZHHSLQJ FKDQJHV PD\ VKRFN WKRVH FORVH WR \RX <RXU heart will lead you in the right di rection. If you are open and honest about your actions, your actions will EH PHW ZLWK XQGHUVWDQGLQJ $48$5,86 -DQ )HE   &KLOGUHQ RU URPDQWLF SDUWQHUV PD\ EH HVSHFLDOO\ QHHG\ 'RQ¡W JLYH LQ WRR UHDGLO\ LI GRLQJ VR ZLOO FRPSUR PLVH RWKHU FRPPLWPHQWV ,W LV LP portant to look after your own needs as well. 3,6&(6 )HE 0DUFK   1XU WXUH \RXU KHDOWK DQG JHQHUDO ZHOO EHLQJ 7DNLQJ VXIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQW WLPH WR UHVW LV LPSRUWDQW (QMR\ WKH FRPIRUWV RI KRPH DQG VSHQGLQJ TXLHW WLPH ZLWK loved ones. $5,(6 0DUFK $SULO   1RZ LV D JRRG WLPH WR EHFRPH EHWWHU DF

Make sweeping changes. Sunday, December 22, 2013 TXDLQWHG ZLWK SRWHQWLDO SDUWQHUV ZKHWKHU IRU EXVLQHVV URPDQFH RU friendship. Be careful not to get caught up in the revelry and over VSHQG RQ HQWHUWDLQPHQW 7$8586 $SULO 0D\   3HU VRQDO Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO VHWEDFNV ZLOO FDXVH \RX VWUHVV 0DNH D FOHDU JDPH SODQ IRU FRSLQJ ZLWK Ă&#x20AC;VFDO XQFHUWDLQW\ You will be low on energy, so be sure to get lots of rest. *(0,1, 0D\ -XQH   <RXU FRQVFLRXV DQG VXEFRQVFLRXV PLQGV PD\ EH LQ FRQĂ LFW 0HGLWDWH YHU\ carefully on which path to take. Solitude will be useful for you at WKLV WLPH &$1&(5 -XQH -XO\   $YRLG DQ\ ODUJH Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDO YHQWXUH IRU WKH WLPH EHLQJ &KLOGUHQ RU IULHQGV PD\ go to great lengths to get your atten tion. Make an effort to understand WKHLU PRWLYDWLRQV 2IIHU WLPH QRW PRQH\ WR RUJDQL]DWLRQV ORRNLQJ IRU a donation.

IRU URPDQFH LV UHFRPPHQGHG 9,5*2 $XJ 6HSW   <RX PD\ EH LUULWDWHG E\ IULHQGV DQG UHOD tives. Ignore what they have to say, DQG IRFXV \RXU DWWHQWLRQ RQ VRPH thing productive. You are capable of great things. /,%5$ 6HSW 2FW   +ROORZ SURPLVHV DUH OLNHO\ 'R QRW TXLW \RXU MRE XQOHVV \RX KDYH D QHZ RQH OLQHG up. Contracts will not turn out to be DV OXFUDWLYH DV SURMHFWHG 6&253,2 2FW 1RY   $YRLG WKH VSRWOLJKW 6RPHRQH PD\ be gossiping about you, trying to GDPDJH \RXU UHSXWDWLRQ &RQVLGHU who your true friends really are. 6HHN RXW WKH LQIRUPDWLRQ WKDW \RX need to advance. 6$*,77$5,86 1RY 'HF 

 ,I D IULHQG RU UHODWLYH LV PHGGOLQJ LQ \RXU DIIDLUV WHOO WKHP WR PLQG WKHLU RZQ EXVLQHVV <RX PXVW UH spect your own needs and not brook interference.

/(2 -XO\ $XJ   'LVUXS tions and delays will throw a wrench in your routine. Be prepared to go ZLWK WKH Ă RZ 9LJRURXV H[HUFLVH ZLOO KHOS DOOHYLDWH \RXU VWUHVV 7LPH

6HH 7RGD\¡V &ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HG 6HFWLRQ IRU &URVVZRUG $QVZHUV


Saturday, December 21, 2013

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

4-H CLUBS SPREAD CHEER

Members of the Fenton Wizards 4-H Club of Erie make Christmas tree and snowman sugar cookies, ornaments, and other items for goodie bags Dec. 7 for Erie shut-ins. Photos submitted by Susan O’Connor.

Members of the Hume Happy Hustlers 4-H Club of Tampico spread Christmas cheer to nursing home residents by singing Christmas carols Dec. 8 in Prophetstown.

Stan Eden (center) of the Ogle County Farm Bureau board, presents Jacob Ebens (left) of Oregon and Jordan Mingus of Byron the Co-op Watch Award during the John Hintzche, Ogle County 4-H Foundation vice chairman, awards Jordan Mingus of Byron the 4-H Foundation Award. Ogle County 4-H achievement program. Photos submitted by Lisa Valle.

Stan Eden, representing the Oregon Rotary Club, hands out the second-place Tom Snodgrass with the Pomona Grange hands out the first-place trophy for trophy for Best Pen Exhibit Award to By-Y-Badgers 4-H Club. Best Pen Exhibit Award to the Carefree 4-H Club.

4-H’ers honored for outstanding achievement OREGON – Ogle County’s top 4-H members and clubs were honored for outstanding achievement at a special program Nov. 17 in the Byron Junior High School Theatre. Top county honors went to 4-H teens Jacob Ebens of Oregon and Jordan Mingus of Byron. Ebens and Mingus were the recipients of the Co-op Watch Awards. Mingus also was the recipient of $50, the Foundation Award. Four youths received the “I Dare You” Leadership Award. The winners are Ryan Reeverts of Byron; Abby Mongan and Kelly Stranberg, both of Ore-

gon; and Carley Ackland of Rochelle. 4-H Fair Animal Exhibit Traveling Trophies went to Carefree 4-H Club of Oregon, first place; and By-Y-Badgers 4-H Club of Byron, second. Other award winners are: Outstanding club presidents: Carley Ackland of Rochelle and Katie Roush of Malta. Outstanding club vice presidents: Katelyn Ackland of Rochelle and Abigail Mongan of Oregon. Outstanding club secretaries: Chelsea Eden and Heather Stranberg, both of Oregon. Outstanding club trea-

surers: Curtis Hollowell of German Valley and Nathan Keys of Rochelle. Outstanding club reporters: Samantha Bowers of Mount Morris and Gracie Mingus of Byron. Outstanding club historians: Mahalia and Chloe Freier of Rochelle and Madalin Russell of Mount Morris. Outstanding club recreation: Kayla Mingus of Byron and Isaac Charbonneau of Leaf River. Bits ’N Reins Traveling Horse Trophy: Amanda Headon of Rochelle. Nine 4-H’ers will be in the state 4-H records competition in January.

They are: Megan Ackland of Rochelle; Jacob Ebens, Chelsea Eden, Michalea Eden, and Heather Stranberg, all of Oregon; Kendal Kuelling of Forreston; Jordan Mingus of Byron; and Dylan Moser of Clinton, Wis. Winners of top educational club programming efforts in various areas of study are: Agriculture: Bits ‘N Reins 4-H Club of Ogle County; environment and natural resources: Mighty Clovers 4-H Club of Monroe Center; personal development: Ogle County Clovers 4-H Club of Rochelle; and mechanics and technology: Hub Hickory Nuts

4-H Club of Rochelle. 4-H Honor Clubs are Bits ’N Reins 4-H Club of Ogle County; Blackhawk Crossing 4-H Club of Mount Morris; By-Y-Badgers 4-H Club of Byron; Carefree 4-H Club of Oregon; Grand Detour Greens 4-H Club; Hub Hickory Nuts 4-H Club and Ogle County Clovers 4-H Club, both of Rochelle; Leaf River Busy Beavers 4-H Club; Mighty Clovers 4-H Club of Monroe Center; Ogle Jolly 4-H Club of Stillman Valley; Pine Creek Valley 4-H Club of Polo; and Summerhill Huskies 4-H Club of Forreston. Club State Award winner: Ogle County Clovers

4-H Club of Rochelle in personal development. Fall Club Promotion Award: Ogle County Clovers 4-H Club of Rochelle. Window Display Promotion Award: Blackhawk Crossing 4-H Club of Mount Morris, first place; Ogle County Clovers 4-H Club of Rochelle, second; and Hub Hickory Nuts 4-H Club of Rochelle, third. Ogle County 4-H Club of the Year: Ogle Jolly 4-H Club, Stillman Valley 4-H Club. Top Leader Team Award: Carefree 4-H Club leaders Annette Martin and Karen Wolber, both of Oregon.

Getting the right name for multiples of animals, birds “Four score and 7 years ago …” It means 87 The English lanyears ago. The Gettysguage contains words burg Address was delivthat denote a specific ered in 1863 – 87 years number in a group of after the beginning of objects. the Revolutionary War For example, in a in 1776. dozen eggs or golf balls Animals are organized or automobiles, there is into groups with unique 1 dozen of these items. names. Almost everyone Likewise, a gross of nails is familiar with herds of or paper cups means horses, prides of lions, that there are 144 – 12 and flocks of geese. dozen – similar objects. Fewer people know that A score is a group of 20 a group of wild turkeys objects. A score of chain is a rafter; a group of contains 20 links. Presi- domestic turkeys is a dent Abraham Lincoln’s flock. Gettysburg Address Some groups of anibegins with the line, mals that have similar BY DOM CASTALDO Special to SV Weekend

appearances also share a common name. For example, a group of clams and a group of oysters are both a bed. In some cases, the group name refers to the appearance of a large group of a species of animal. Large groups of gnats or grasshoppers are clouds. Some names of groups of animals have interesting names. Groups of crows are murders. The name may have originated because flocks of crows kill and eat injured animals. Some of these animals were

large, such as cattle. A group of magpies is also collectively called a murder, possibly for the same reason. A parliament of owls refers to the scholarly and dignified appearance of these birds. Likewise, a pride of lions also suggests the prideful appearance of these animals. Within a group of animals, some sub-groups have collective names that are vastly different from the general group name. Usually, large groups of deer are herds. However, a group of roe deer, however,

is a bevy. A group of hawks is a cast. A kettle of hawks is a large group of hawks flying over the same location. Several hawks flying together in the same spiral pattern is a boil. A gaggle of geese is a group of geese on the ground. However, when they take flight, the collective term for the group is skein. Often, the same name is applied to different groups of different species of animals. A group of monkeys or kangaroos is called a troop. Groups of whales or

seals are pods. The condition or state of a group of animals sometimes dictates the name of the group. A group of wild rabbits is a warren or colony, but a group of domestic rabbits is a herd. A group of ducks swimming on the water is a raft. When that same group of ducks leaves the water and walks on land, it becomes a flock. Castaldo is a biology instructor at Sauk Valley Community College. Write critterdoctor@ hotmail.com to contact him.


367EEKENDs#

Travel www.saukvalley.com

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

At San Diego Zoo Stare down giraffes and have breakfast with pandas BY CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS MCT News Service

Y

ou and I both know where to find an endless supply of watchable animals – felines, canines, reptiles, eating, sleeping, swinging, swatting, spooning. It’s hard to look away. Time flies by. “Yes,” you say with a sigh. “The Internet is ruining us.” Probably. But I’m talking about the San Diego Zoo, an actual physical place that might not be a waste of time. Here, without the benefit of a mouse, monitor or smartphone, you can lock gazes with a viper, smell elephant scat, and coo at an adorable giant panda – until you hear the menacing crunch of that 230-pound bear’s sturdy teeth, snapping and shredding an inch-thick bamboo stalk. That was Bai Yun, a 22-yearold mother of six, tearing into breakfast while I watched and winced one morning last month. Even though most of its residents are captive non-natives, the zoo is an iconic Southern California creation all the same, with more than 3,700 animals from 650 species, surrounded by 70,000 plant species and ogled by 3.5 million visitors last year. If it weren’t for that pesky St. Louis Zoo (3,519,926 visitors last year), San Diego’s would be the most-visited facility of its kind in North America. The zoo’s leaders might prefer to emphasize its role in helping bring back pandas, California condors and other threatened species, but in simple gawkand-snap terms, this territory has been a 100-acre photo op since before Kodachrome was born. In the 1930s, the zoo veterinarian used to roam the grounds between chores with a Graflex camera, then sell the prints at the front gate. (That vet, Charles Schroeder, went on to run the place from the 1950s into the 1970s.) San Diego is my default zoo. Just as my daughter counts on seeing Reggie the alligator on her way into the L.A. Zoo (1,100 animals; about 1.5 million visitors yearly), I grew up with the Skyfari buckets dangling above and pink flamingos squabbling at the entrance. In the Children’s Zoo, I rode the Galapagos tortoises, and a goat once peed on me. There were no goats on this trip, but in the several days that L.A. Times photographer Mark Boster and I spent roaming the grounds, there was plenty of sensory stimulation: One after-

noon, passing the California condors, I glimpsed a tuft of unexpected fur on the rocks – a fresh spread of dead rabbits and rats, laid out by the keepers, for the scavengers’ brunch. At the Backstage Pass program, I got slimed by rhino spittle, howled in harmony with an arctic wolf whose fur was as white as snow, and fed flamingos using one of those red plastic cups you used to misplace at frat parties. I highly recommend the flamingo feeding. You sit on a bench with cup in hand, and the long-necked, sharp-beaked birds come at you like a squadron of pink Concordes. As they snap up the snack pellets, you feel their beaks rattling in your cup. The next morning in the Conrad Prebys Australian Outback area – a major updating of the zoo’s Australian collections that opened in May – we looked on while keeper Kate Tooker gave the female koalas their eucalyptus fixes, then paused to cuddle a wallaby. In the next enclosure, keeper Lindsay King whispered sweet nothings to a male koala while it paced a few feet on a branch, climbed a few steps up a trunk, then settled in to munch leaves. For a koala, which sleeps about 16 hours of every 24, this was whirlwind activity. And in this new setup, they’re easier to see – closer to visitors, less cloaked by foliage. Of course, most zoo visitors also will want to pay visits to the lions, tigers, elephants and giraffes, and so did we. (One of the giraffes stared me down for so long I thought it might demand to see my ID.) But I set aside more time for my old friends the tortoises, which have been part of the zoo since arriving from the Galapagos in 1928. This looked like a mistake at first: Beyond the boulders upfront, I saw no sign of life in their enclosure. Then a boulder budged and a scaly, dark-eyed, primordial face emerged. Then another. While I looked over those faces, keeper Jonny Carlson brought me up to date. In 1972, keepers stopped letting kids climb aboard. Nine of the zoo’s original tortoises are still here, plus one that arrived in the ’30s. They bask in the sun to warm their cold blood, snap up greens from their keepers and – as I witnessed – occasionally bloody each other’s noses in lumbering battles for dominance. In other words, they’re no better than Congress.

MCT News Service

The youngest giraffe at the San Diego Zoo, Penelope, gets a nudge and a little love from one of the other inhabitants in their Urban Jungle exhibit Sept. 23.

Some history and fun facts

1953: Schroeder, a forceful advocate for moats instead of cages, becomes zoo director.

1987: Fifteen years after the arrival of Chinese giant pandas at the National Zoo in Washington, D.C., the San Diego Zoo

receives pandas Basi and Yuan Yuan on short-term loan from China. 1996: Giant pandas Bai Yun and Shi Shi arrive from China on long-term loan. 1999: Bai Yun gives birth to Hua Mei. 2005: The first YouTube video, “Me at the Zoo,” is shot in the elephant area and uploaded by YouTube co-creator Jawed Karim. 2012: On July 29, Bai Yun gives birth to her sixth cub, Xiao Li Wu. Combined zoo and Safari Park attendance reaches 5 million. SeaWorld: 4.4 million. Sources: “Mister Zoo: The Life and Legacy of Dr. Charles Schroeder,” by Douglas G. Myers with Lynda Rutledge Stephenson; Assn. of Zoos and Aquariums; www. sandiegozoo.org; library. sandiegozoo.org/history.htm; www.prsasdic.org/content. asp?itemidequals92;www. aecom.com/themeindex

And as in Congress, their tenure is closely tracked – in this case by the numbers painted on their shells. That’s how we know No. 5, nicknamed “Speed,” weighs close to 600 pounds. He arrived in 1933. He was estimated to be in his 60s then, so he’s near 140 now, the

oldest animal in the zoo. There’s a good chance that Speed’s mother and father were lumbering around on one of the Galapagos islands in 1835 when a man with a notebook showed up and started tapping on tortoise shells. The man even sat on a few, find-

ing it “very difficult to keep my balance.” Then he went home to England with his notebooks and wrote “The Origin of Species.” That’s right: By the tortoise calendar, you and I are just one generation removed from Charles Darwin.

1916: Worried about what would become of the animals in the 1915 Panama-California Exposition in Balboa Park, Harry M. Wegeforth founds the San Diego Zoological Society. 1923: Grand opening in Balboa Park. Adult admission is 10 cents. 1925: First koalas, kangaroos, emus, wombats and dingoes arrive from Australia. 1928: First Galapagos tortoises arrive. 1931: First gorillas arrive from Africa: Mbongo and N’gagi, later to be celebrated by bronze busts near the entrance. 1930s: Caught in a Depression-era tax dispute, the property and animals are put up for auction but attract no bidders. Zoo veterinarian Charles Schroeder stretches the budget by feeding carnivores horse meat.

1964: SeaWorld, a for-profit venture, opens on San Diego’s Mission Bay, kicking off longstanding competition with the zoo. 1970: Joan Embery, a 21-year-old Children’s Zoo attendant, is chosen as Miss Zoofari, a goodwill ambassador who makes appearances with animals. 1971: Embery, joined by Carol the painting elephant, appears Nov. 4 as a guest of Johnny Carson on “The Tonight Show.” During the next 38 years, through the Carson and Leno eras, Embery is invited more than 40 times. 1972: The Zoological Society opens the Wild Animal Park, a 1,800-acre sibling of the zoo, in northern San Diego County. It’s now known as the San Diego Zoo Safari Park.

Do’s and don’ts when you’re visiting While at San Diego Zoo, consider these activities. Casual or gourmet food options. Surprising places to spend the night. And a way to get closer to the animals. To do the San Diego Zoo (2920 Zoo Drive, San Diego; 619-231-1515, www.sandiegozoo.org ), set aside a day. Admission costs $44 for adults, $34 for children ages 3-11. (Kids are admitted free in October.) Fall hours are from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Dec. 13 through Jan. 5, hours are from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m., except Dec. 24, which is a 9-to5 day. For an insider’s view of the animals, do spend $99 for admission that includes a Backstage Pass (619-718-3000, http:// bit.ly/dvVHCJ). For that, you step behind the scenes for 90 minutes for close encounters (aka photo ops) with several zoo animals – a chance to feed flamingos and a rhino, for instance, meet a cheetah or see an arctic wolf from just a few feet away. Don’t bring your dog – or any pet – into the zoo. Rules forbid it. Service dogs, however, are permitted in most areas.

Do treat yourself to lunch at Albert’s Restaurant (619-6853200, www.sandiegozoo.org/ zoo/alberts), which is not a snack shack but a genuine restaurant in the middle of the zoo with “world cuisine” and a pleasant dining room and patio overlooking a waterfall. Named for a beloved gorilla, now departed. Lunch main dishes $13-$23. Do try the Prado at Balboa Park (1549 El Prado, Balboa Park; 619-557-9441, www. cohnrestaurants.com). The park’s flagship restaurant is a few steps from the zoo’s main walkway. It has an eclectic interior design and a big, shaded patio. Lunch and dinner. Dinner main dishes $21.95-$34.95. Don’t sell short the rest of Balboa Park (Visitors Center, 1549 El Prado; 619-239-0512, www. balboapark.org). Besides the zoo, its 1,200 acres include 15 museums, the Old Globe and other theaters, gardens, studios, galleries, groves, trails, lawns, lawn bowling, golf, disc golf and perhaps the most scenic lily pond in California. If you have a day to spend, the best deal might be the Passport to Balboa Park, a Passport/Zoo combo, or

a Stay-for-the-Day Pass. Each allows admission to multiple attractions at a discount. Info: www.balboapark.org/parkpass

If you’re up for playful retro lodgings, check out the LaFayette Hotel, Swim Club & Bungalows (2223 El Cajon Blvd.; 619-296-2101, www.lafayetteDo consider the Balboa Park hotelsd.com), which dates to Inn (3402 Park Blvd.; 619-2981946. Beyond its facade of red 0823, www.balboaparkinn. bricks and white pillars, there’s com) if you want to walk to the a lobby full of vintage details zoo or you want a kitchen or you’re determined to avoid chain and a big swimming pool. Also low prices. Units range motels. The inn has 26 rooms from modest hotel rooms to (10 with kitchens) in four buildthree-bedroom suites that are ings. The exterior is suburban essentially vacation rentals. Spanish colonial; the interiors are homespun, eclectic, a differ- Non-suite rooms typically are $99-$169. ent theme for every room. Free breakfast and Wi-Fi. Units rent Do eat at American Voodoo for $99 to $249 a night. Draw(4655 Park Blvd.; 619-255back: Reservation policies are 8504, http://on.fb.me/19SP4Ly). strict; it requires more money This snug (capacity: 37) New upfront than many other hotels. Orleans-style spot opened in September along restaurant Do try a slice from Pizzeria Luigi (2121 El Cajon Blvd.; 619- row in University Heights. Dinner entrées about $15-$26. 294-9417, www.pizzerialuigi. com ). There’s nothing fancy Do consider Flavors of East about the dining room – in fact, Africa (2322 El Cajon Blvd.; there’s a bit of a tattoo parlor 619-955-8778, www.flavorvibe – but the pies (including sofeastafrica.com). Maybe several vegetarian options) are you didn’t come to San Diego tasty. Luigi has an older location for Kenyan cuisine, but these (same atmosphere) at 1137 25th dishes are good. Many vegan St. in the Golden Hill neighboroptions. Great value: Sambusas hood, also handy to Balboa (meat and other ingredients in a Park. Most pizzas $15-$22; triangular dough pocket) for as most slices, $2.75. little as 99 cents each. Lunch

and dinner. Dinner main dishes: $12-$19. For a French feel in the East Village, do stop at Cafe Chloe (721 Ninth Ave.; 619-232-3242, www.cafechloe.com), a small, stylish spot with a curving bar and mostly two-top tables. Breakfast, lunch and dinner. Dinner main dishes $19.50-$28. If you’re traveling without kids, do consider Keating House (2331 Second Ave.; 619-2398585, www.keatinghouse.com). This quiet Victorian B&B in the Bankers Hill neighborhood has a limit of two guests per room, but it has great prices. A pleasantly lived-in feel. Rates $119-$169. Not to be confused with the very contemporary Keating Hotel (www.thekeating.com) downtown. If the night is mild, do get dinner on the patio at Buona Forchetta (3001 Beech St.; 619381-4844, www.buonaforchettasd.com). This young South Park neighborhood restaurant’s menu is pizzas, pastas and salads, but do not be fooled: The sophisticated preparation and setting make it special. Opened in early 2013. Dinner main dishes $10-$15.


3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs#

AT VAESSEN BROTHERS CHEVROLET

ROCK FALLS ROTARY

Vaessen Brothers Chevrolet in Sublette had a Help a Hero test drive event Oct. 11-12 at the dealership. For every test drive taken, $20 was donated to the Sublette Fire Protection District. Chief Doug Erbes receives $3,040 from Kourtney Vaessen, Internet manager. This is the result of 152 test drives. Photos submitted by Vaessen.

Brenda Fiorini, Rock Falls High School instructor and childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s book author, recently presented a program to Rock Falls Rotary about her efforts to bring her book, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rescue Pup,â&#x20AC;? to every first-grade student in Lee, Ogle and Whiteside counties. The book became a reality with support from Granny Rose Animal Shelter in Dixon, Coloma Township, and regional superintendents of schools. Every first-grade teacher in the counties also received a copy of the book, a CD, and supporting materials to share the book in classroom instruction. A second book is expected to be released in early 2014 concerning a rescue kitty. Photos submitted by Betty Clementz.

Nick Vaessen (right), sales manager at Vaessen Brothers Chevrolet in Sublette, presents Wayne Hoy, president of the Amboy Youth Soccer Organization, $500 for the organization.

Keith Zoeller (right), Rock Falls Rotarian, presents Corey Law a thank-you for his presentation to the members of the Rock Falls Rotary Club and his assistance in navigating the Affordable Care Act. Law is a counselor at the Whiteside County Health Department in Rock Falls, where he helps with health care enrollment.

THANKSGIVING MEALS DONATED

Nick Vaessen (left), sales manager at Vaessen Brothers Chevrolet in Sublette, presents Jeremy Schultz of Dixon an entertainment package he won through the Chevy Youth Baseball program. The ticket was purchased through the Amboy Summer Baseball League.

SAUK VALLEY BANK GIVES TO FOOD BANK

Dirk Meminger, Sauk Valley Bank president and CEO, presents Carol Siefken, Sauk Valley Food Bank executive director, with a check to help those in need. Photo submitted by Jaimie Maxwell.

The New Bedford Royal Neighbors of America donated eight turkeys and all the trimmings to make a Thanksgiving dinner to the Western Bureau County Food Pantry for area families. At the presentation were (from left) Helen Hardesty, Patsy Swanson, and Mary Lanham, the pantryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s coordinator. Food pantry volunteers also were present. Photo submitted by Lanham.

IN BRIEF Sears, customers to aid firefighters STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Sears Hometown Store of Sterling is partnering with the National Volunteer Fire #OUNCILTORAISEMONEYFOR the Sterling Fire Department. This is part of Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores Inc.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Salute to Local Heroes charity campaign. The objective is to provide money to improve resources for training, equipment, and financial support where local heroes need it most. 4HROUGH$EC CUStomers and company employees will have the opportunity to donate toward the National VolUNTEER&IRE#OUNCIL WHILE making a purchase. All money will go directly to the local fire station for that storeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s community. In addiTION FROMEACH#RAFTS-

MAN"OTTLE#AP7RENCH purchase will go to the local department. After the holiday launch, the company hopes to continue the partnership THROUGHOUT0LANSWILL be released at a later date.

Hospital, OSF enter arrangement 2/#(%,,%n2OCHELLE #OMMUNITY(OSPITALAND OSF Healthcare System recently entered into a network affiliation agreement. This new collaboration will establish a more clinically-integrated health care delivery system for patients. Both have worked together with shared services for many years. OSF physicians specializing in cardiology and hematology/oncology have been seeing patients weekly at 2#(S-ULTI 3PECIALTY#ENTERFORMORETHANYEARS

2#( AT.3ECOND St., will retain independence as a locally-governed community hospital with sole responsibility for hospital administration. Through this agreement, both parties anticipate an opportunity for sharing resources resulting in more cost-effective delivery of health care services. For more information, call 2#(AT  

Store helps Red Cross with funds -),7!5+%%n"ON Ton Stores, Inc., raised  THROUGHCUStomer donations Nov.  FORTHE!MERICAN 2ED#ROSS #USTOMERSWEREGIVEN the opportunity to donate INEXCHANGEFORA"ON 4ONOFFCOUPON The money went toward 2ED#ROSS-IDWESTTORNA-

dos and storms relief. Bergnerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Sterling is a Bon-Ton Store.

2. "3. #2.) #'( Home Nursing and Infusion director. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know that home care is critically important, as patients usuCGH celebrates ally have better outcomes home care month and quicker recoveries when they get an opporSTERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; In honor tunity to heal in their own of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s home care homes.â&#x20AC;? professionals and volunShe said the goal of the TEERS #'((OME.URSING celebration was to let peoand Home Infusion celeple know about the supBRATED.ATIONAL(OME#ARE portive and compassionate -ONTHIN.OVEMBER The celebration pays trib- services home health is ute to the dedicated home able to provide. care professionals who enable elderly, disabled, Program helps and chronically ill individubusiness, workers als to live their lives in their STERLING â&#x20AC;&#x201C; BEST, Inc./ own homes. .#)7ORKSAND)LLINOIS6ALâ&#x20AC;&#x153;This celebration, sponLEY#OMMUNITY#OLLEGEARE sored by the National seeking participants for the Association for Home Accelerated Training for #ARE HONORSALLHOME )LLINOIS-ANUFACTURINGPROhealth workers who provide high quality and com- gram. The program is for indipassionate health care services to patients in their viduals looking for careers in home,â&#x20AC;? said Judy Hentges, manufacturing and employ-

ers wanting job candidates with nationally-recognized safety credentials from the -ANUFACTURING3KILLS3TANDARDS#OUNCIL !4)-TRAININGISTAILOREDTO specific needs of regional employers. Tuition and other financial assistance are available to eligible individuals for training in machining, mechatronics (equipment service and repair), welding, and logistics/inventory. Ways are being tested to provide accelerated services, training, and placement of qualifying people into available skilled manufacturing jobs. The employer involvement helps to ensure the training responds to the regional demand to fill vacancies. Those interested in the Sterling area should contact #ARRIE&OLKENATCARRIE? folken@best-inc.org or Sally 0FLIBSENATSALLY?PFLIBSEN BEST INCORGORCALL  


Community 367EEKENDs#

www.saukvalley.com

New photos every day www.saukvalley.com

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

SKATING FOR FUN AND FITNESS AT DIXON’S LINCOLN SCHOOL

SKATE SCHOOL

Photos by Alex T. Paschal/apaschal@saukvalley.com

Dixon’s Lincoln Elementary School third-graders wait their turn to take a spin during P.E. class Tuesday. Physical education teachers Jeff Masters and Brian Scheidegger have been teaching the students how to roller-skate for the past 4 weeks. The skates were rented from Skate Time in Morrison.

ABOVE-LEFT: Third-grader Nayeli Miranda keeps her balance while flying around the gymnasium. ABOVE-MIDDLE: Joy Feofanov, 8, waits to stand up on the skates to begin the class. Teaching the students about balance and standing up safely was one of the goals of the class. ABOVE-RIGHT: Third-grader Johnny Baker gets a little help from teachers aide Bryce Lumzy. LEFT: Maya Moss practices stopping by using the T-stop method. After skating one way for a while, the students stopped safely and changed direction. This helped them learn about balance and turning while on the skates. ABOVE: Kaitlyn Knipple (left) is offered a hand from Kaelynn Burgess as they practice. BELOW-LEFT: While one class skates, the other sits waiting with excitement for their chance. During the lesson, Christmas music plays for the students’ enjoyment.


place ads online www.saukvalley.com

CLASSIFIED SAUK VALLEY

Section D

Saturday, December 21, 2013

Dixon

LOST

110

IS YOUR PET MISSING? Read our found section in todays paper. Just in case it is not there, call one of your area animal shelters listed below: Lee County Animal Control (815)284-3833 Granny Rose Animal Shelter (815)288-7387 Whiteside County Animal Control (815)625-3507 Happy Tails Humane Society (815)626-2994 A public service of Sauk Valley Media Lost 2 weeks ago black and white miniature Collie/ Sheltie. 17 lbs. Franklin Grove area. REWARD. 815-703-4120 or 815-739-6051

VOLUNTEERS

126

CASA 15th Judicial Circuit (Lee/ Carroll/Ogle Counties) is seeking volunteers to advocate for children in the court system involved in abuse and neglect cases. Your involvement can impact a child’s future. Contact Vanessa White, Director of Advocate Services (815) 288-1901 www.casalee carroll.com Kreider Services is looking for volunteers in several programs. 1) Early Intervention (children under 3 yrs old)- entails preparation for play group sessions and assisting with outings. M & W 8am – noon 2) Recreation program looking for people to help with outings or Special Olympics 3) Arts and Crafts helpers. If interested, please call Becky at 288-6691 ext 280 or stop into Kreider front desk for an application. Kreider mission: People reaching their fullest potential. LOVELAND MUSEUM... Are you interested in Dixon and local history, Civil War, Blackhawk War? Are you a people person? We are looking for people like you to help host our Museum one or more days a month. The Museum is open Thurs. & Fri. 9-2, Sat. 103. Interested? Please stop at the main office at the Loveland Community House between 8-4 Mon. thru Fri. to pick up an application and learn more. 513 W. Second St. 815-284 2741 lovelandcommunity house.org.

Any Where Any Time

REAL ESTATE 202 SERVICES PUBLISHER'S NOTICE All real estate advertising in this newspaper subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference , limitation or discrimination based on race, color,religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-279275.

FOR SALE BY OWNER

209

STERLING 3BR ranch on the river. Remodeled. 1¾ BA, full finished basement w/ wetbar. garage. $169,500 or only Rent w/ option to buy. Call Tom to set up appt.815441-5706 Web ID #483125 Sterling Home for Sale! 3416 sq. ft. home on 3.07 acres in Northland Acres Subd, $429,900 #121529. www.30915 TannerDrive.com Call John Rosengren at RE/MAX Sauk Valley, 815284-4663 or visit www.SaukValleyHomes.net

INVESTMENT PROPERTY

220

4 Unit Brick townhouse complex w/ attached garages. Nice area near hospital in Sterling. $237,000 815-6524517

CEMETERY LOTS

226

Two lots for sale in Garden of Hymms, section M, Chapel Hill Memorial Park, Dixon IL. Reasonably priced. Call 815-973-9673

MOBILE HOMES 230

MOBILE HOMES

230

Advertise your mobile homes for sale here!!

DIXON

CHATEAU ESTATES Homes for sale and rent call our VMÄJL MVY KL[HPSZ

815-284-2000 3 bed 2 bath $24,900 2 bed 2 bath $17,900

FARMS / ACREAGE

235

FARMS FOR SALE 57 acres approximately 53 tillable with river frontage

11.5 acres, river frontage, road to river with cement dock

Matt Hermes, Broker

815-288-4648

206 Acres M/L, 202.4 Tillable acres, 108.4 PI, Wyoming Township, Lee County call Kyle: 641-919-5953 240 Acres M/L 216.4 tillable acres, 109.4 PI, Pine Creek Township, Ogle County call Kyle: 641-919-5953

APARTMENTSFURNISHED 305 APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED 306 HAVING TROUBLE wording your ad? Call our Classified Department today. We'll be glad to help you. 626-SOLD or 284-SOLD

AMBOY 200 S. Boyd Ave. 2BR, good cond. $425/mo. Available immediately. Call Ed Reagan 312337-7384 2BR $450 avail. Jan 1st., very clean, all applncs. No pets. Ref. & dep. Req. 815-849-5334 or 815-994-1202

ASHTON ★★ 1&2 BR., Ashton/ F.G. 815-7512712/562-5075.★

DIXON

1BR upper, attached garage. Southside. Stove, refrig., A/C, garbage furn. No pets. Refs. & lease. $425/mo. $425/ dep. 815-652-2042

STERLING

STERLING

STERLING

STERLING

1st Month Free! 2BR, appl. incl. Pet friendly. $475/mo. 815-562-7368

Completely remodeled 2 BR, located 1 ½ mi. outside RF, on 3 acre lot w/ use of a 35 acre lake. $900mo. All utilities inc. No pets. Call 815-626-2145

Sterling Rentals

4BR Duplex, $675/ mo. Call 815-9736768.

Apts. No pets. Call 815-716-0367.

Remodeled 1BR, $350mo. + dep. 815-590-9511

PROPHETSTOWN 2 Bed Apt. for Rent: Unit #3 at 109 E. Second Street, Prophetstown. $525/month Includes 1 garage space, storage in the lower level, and coin laundry located in the lower level as well. Call Ken Kophamer (815) 631-6115 Prophet Manor Apartments 1 bedrooms and efficiencies available. Age 55+ or 18+ with the need for accessible unit. Income maximum $20,200 for 1 person, $23,050 for two people. Come see our home and make it your home. We currently are offering a moving incentive. Let us help with your moving expense, up to $1,000 with paid moving receipts, now through January 31, 2014. 415 W 2nd St, Prophetstown. 815-537-5705. EHO

Lg. 1BR. + appl. No pets. $425 + dep. 815-625-4701

STERLING

RIVER RIDGE APARTMENTS

2 Bedroom Great Location Garages Available

$

495 1st Month’s Rent

$

PER MONTH

1.00

*

Newer 2 Bedroom $599.00 & Up Applcs., Fireplaces 2002 3rd Ave. 1836 First Ave. 606 W. Lefevre 2 BR $535.00 1 BR $465.00 1 Studio $390.00 Partial Heat, Water, Sewer, Refuse Removal, Laundry Facilities, Satellite

(815)626-1431 1 BR, gas, heat & water furnished, $450/mo. + dep., No Pets. 815-6310896. 1 or 2BR apts. $420. Call 815562-7368 Rochelle Realty.

*with 1 year lease

Next to

ALDI in Sterling

1-815-414-2288

NORTHLAND PARK APARTMENTS

ROCK FALLS 1 & 2BR, Hampton Apts. 815-625-7043 2-3BR, on the river, applcs. No pets. $550/mo. + dep. 815-622-4344 Edon Apts. 2BR, $480 mo., $400 dep. Refs. req. No 815-537dogs. 9190, 815-4413999.

ANNOUNCEMENTS

100

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Before you make a move call…

SHIPPERTS Moving & Storage

404 N. Lincoln Ave., Dixon, IL 288-3133 www.alliedvan.com ILL CC 10540

US DOT 76235

Sauk Valley Media is looking for

Motor Route Drivers

Studio, 1 & 2 Bedroom Washer & Dryer Units Fitness Center Balconies / Patios Open House Daily

Call Me 2-Rent (815)632-7368 (Located Behind Nor Northland thland Mall)

Motor Routes Available

Classifieds Work!

Terry of Rock Falls sold his 2002 Pontiac Grand Am for $4200 using

C CLASSIFIEDS LASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY

LASSIFIEDS

dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

TELEGRAPH

815-284-2224 815-625-3600

815-284-2000

saukvalley .com

3 BR, 2 bath, new deck, new A/C & plumbing, applcs., storage shed, $19,500. 815-9735601

Nice 1BR Ranch style apt. w/bsmt. Appliances, water, garbage furnished. 722 Assembly Pl. $395/mo + lease & dep. 815-440-3663 Sleeping Rooms for rent in Dixon. All utilities & cable free. $400 /mo. 815-677-1146.

100

2) The King of the Mice, usually represented with seven heads, leads his troops against the nutcracker’s toy soldiers. He loses the battle when Clara, the heroine, stuns him with a shoe.

Inquire in person at:

Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL 61081

Telegraph 113 S. Peoria Dixon, IL 61021

or call: 625-3600 or 284-2222, ext. 301

Custom Built Websites by Shaw Shaw Media Media Digital Digital

Condo Style, 2BR apt. w/private entrance and deck. Appliances included plus W/D. Water, sewer, garbage provided. Tenant pays elec. Off road parking. No pets. Lease & dep. req. $650/mo. Call 815378-2151

Online!

ANNOUNCEMENTS

1) Scandinavian Christmas festivities feature a variety of straw decorations in the form of stars, angels, hearts and other shapes, as well as the Julbukk.

2BR upper, Dixon Dells. stove, refrig., air, garage w/ opener, basic cable & garbage p/u furnished, No Pets, Ref, & lease. $500/ mo. + $500 dep.815-652-2042.

DIXON MANOR APTS- 2BR CLEAN QUIET, WALK TO DOWNTOWN, ONSITE LAUNDRY, APPLIANCES INCLUDED, HEAT, WATER INCLUDED. CALL ERICK 815-739-5806

100

TR IV I A AN SW ER

2BR Duplex, NE side. Stove, refrig., A/C. Full bsmt. Carport. $495/mo. + dep. No pets. 815-652-7470.

ROCK RIVER ESTATES

2 bed 1 bath on the river $27,900 2 bed 1 bath $9,900

ROCK FALLS

dailyGAZETTE

1BR duplex Northside. Attached garage, $475/mo. + dep. & lease req. 815-631-7610 or 815-284-8388.

Modern clean, 2BR. Stove, refrig., D/W. No smoking or pets. $500. 815652-3365.

Homes for sale and rent call our VMÄJL MVY KL[HPSZ

HARMON

Call today to get started!

815-625-3600 ext. 630 shawmediadigital.com


A1

SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, December 21, 2013 s PAGE D 2

SERVICE DIRECTORY SAUK VALLEY

Air Cond./Heating

Basement Waterproofing

Eikenberry Sheet Metal 412 E. 3rd, Sterling Service work heating & cooling; gas, electric. Free estimates Accept Visa & MC on all new installations.

Prater Paint & Waterproofing We Dry Up Basements & Crawl Spaces, Remediate Mold & Install E-Z Breatheâ&#x201E;˘ Ventilation Systems 815-626-5165

CALL 815-625-0955

Eikenberry Sheet Metal 412 E. 3rd, Sterling Service work heating & cooling; gas, electric. Free estimates. Accept Visa & MC on all new installations. CALL 815-625-0955

FARLEY'S APPLIANCE Heating & Cooling Sale & Service Free Estimates New & Replacement Units We service all brands! Call Today (815)284-2052

Appliances

TELEVISION IN HOME REPAIR All Types Brands & Models Over 25 yrs. Exp. Call Ron for a free quote at 815-561-0011

Automotive

Complete Automotive Detailing & Accessories

Window Tinting

Hot Rods & Choppers Consignment / Sales 1807 Locust St. Sterling IL

(815) 625-2500

www.HotRodsChoppers.com

Great Garage Sales Call

284-2222

Dumpster Rental for Clean-ups & Construction Small & Large containers avail. Tidy Bug Inc. Dixon, IL tidybuginc.com 815-456-3001

www.praterpaintand waterproofing.com

Carpentry KRISâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; KARPENTRY (815)564-9576 For all your building needs incl. kitchens, baths, basements, siding, replacement windows, additions & trim carpentry. It's time to replace those old windows to save money on heating. Call for a free estimate. No job too large or too small. Kris is a craftsman with 30 yrs. exp. Licensed, Bonded, Insured.

Electricians C.P. ELECTRIC For Your Electrical Needs. New Homes, 100 amp. Service Updates, Rewires 25 Yrs. Experience Â&#x2122;Licensed Â&#x2122;Bonded Â&#x2122;Insured Musky & Bass Fishing Consultant Leave Message 815-626-6219

Cleaning Service

â&#x153;ąCarpet/ Upholstery â&#x153;ąMaid/Janitorial Gift Certificates Available for cleaning 815-632-3822 www.advanced cleaners.biz

Car Audio/Video/Starters LOW PRICE GUARANTEE

Dumpster Rental

M&M Cleaning Service (Matt & Mandy) No job too small Home or Office Bonded & Insured Serving Lee & Ogle, Whiteside & LaSalle Counties 815-440-9121 or 815-677-6266

Genl. Contracting Gilbertson Construction Residential & Commercial. Remodeling, house additions, windows, siding & doors. Also mobile home repairs. Licensed, Bonded, Insured. No Job Too Small. 30 yrs exp. (815)6220087.

Spring Cleaning Services HOLIDAY One Time Deep Clean Service. Great ref. & rates. If it's not shining It's not clean. CALL KIM 815-677-0295 GREAT HOLIDAY GIFT

RAMOS CONSTRUCTION Roofing (Techos) Siding, Windows Drywall, Remodeling, Repairs, Property Maintenance Licensed, Bonded, Insured Roofing Lic. #104016565 815-564-7241

Looking for the perfect home? Read Sauk Valley estate section and Real Estate Weekly on Thursdays.

Handyman HANDYMAN/ GENERAL Contracting, siding, drywall, concrete work, decks, flooring (tile, linoleum, carpet, wood), bathroom and kitchen, complete remodels, additions all types of home repairs. Free Estimates and Insured-Bonded 815-564-7428

Painting

SPECIALIZING IN " erior Pa " od "l you Ho  air Needs  sured d Boed , S k Falls area. Now Accepting Credit & Debit Card Payments Free Estimates

815-739-2089 www.ho reir.or

PAULâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HANDYMAN SERVICE â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything Your Husband Wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Do!â&#x20AC;?  xperience On All Manner of Home Repairs & Maintenance since 1986 (815)625-2607 www.mullerslane farm. com

Haul/Clean Service

Lewis Plumbing 815-288-0028 Serving All of the Sauk Valley Area Lic.#058-173956

Power Washing

Mobil Pressure Wash Service Commercial, esidential emis Yo me we  ant! Call Ben 815-590-2694

â&#x153;śSince 1981â&#x153;ś â&#x2014;&#x2020;Home Improvement â&#x2014;&#x2020;New Construction

Roofing

Randy L. Moore

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Area's #1 Roofing Contractor IL Lic# 104-015191 Licensed, Bonded & Insured $oofing$Siding $# $ ecks $ tions $es & More Residential & Commercial Call now to schedule your FREE Estimate! Will beat any leading competitor price 815-590-2677

815-626-1333

Painting BALAYTI PAINTING

Interior & Exterior Light Carpentry Pressure Washing 35 Years Experience Insured - References Cell #815-440-2202

Roofing/Siding

Snowplowing

Tree Service

â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;

â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤â&#x153;¤

Need to place an ad?

Water Softeners

Call us 625-3600 284-2222

MATT'S SNOWPLOWING Sterling Rock Falls Residential & Commercial Most Driveways $20 LOWEST PRICE GUARANTEED 815-590-1677 â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;â?&#x2039;

Snowplowing

Commercial & Residential Most driveways $20 Serving the entire Sauk Valley area & Rural areas Call James

815-764-0155

Home Improvement

IL State Roofing Licensed 104-002247(1986) Bonded-Insured

Illinois License #104.016127 Bonded/Insured &oofing&Siding &indo$!& oors & tion!& Garages& %$& cks and more Free Estimates 815-213-0556

Plumbing

JOHN'S CLEANUP & REMOVAL Anything goes!! Estate Cleanups PHONE 815-622-0240

Winter is the perfect time to build your garage, addition or remodel bath or kitchen!!

Roofing

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Area's #1 Roofing Contractor IL Lic# 104-015191 Licensed, Bonded & Insured $oofing$Siding $# $ ecks $ tions $es & More Residential & Commercial Call now to schedule your FREE Estimate! Will beat any leading competitor price 815-590-2677

Sewing/Repairs SHOE REPAIR ZIPPER REPAIR Call for appointment or pick up Call Gary Lenox 815-388-8047 or 815-499-4772

Snowplowing

Commercial and Residential Snow & Ice Control serving the Sauk Valley Area. www.porter brothers.net COMMERCIAL SNOW PLOWING 815-857-3281 www.dreamscapes bydennis.com

Storage

The Softener Man Repair on all makes & models Service Call Special $19.95 Over 30 years experience 815-323-1622

Online

â&#x153;°CORNERâ&#x153;° STORAGE

Dixon near Walmart Sterling near Menards Various Sizes

GREAT RATES 815-973-3613

at

www.allsafe center.com High-Security Storage Solutions and Much More! Climate Controlled Storage Low-Cost Moving Truck Rental Confidential Document Shredding We Ship FedEx & UPS! Expert Packaging Services Value Boxes & Packaging Supplies EBAY and EMOTORS Internet Auction Sales Over 15,000 Sales Office Hours: Mon-Fri. â&#x2DC;&#x203A; 8:306, Sat. â&#x2DC;&#x203A; 8:30noon 690 Timber Creek Rd. Dixon, (815)285-2212

Searchable listings

online Over 140 categories to search

saukvalley.com

it really is

Sometimes

as

as simple

Black &

We have advertising solutions to fit your needs!

BRAD'S TREE SERVICE Tree & Limb Removal Stump Removal Storm Clean-up Mulch & Firewood       Ins d 815-857-3674 Amboy, IL

White

Call TELEGRAPH dailyGazette 284-2222 625-3600


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, December 21, 2013 s PAGE D 3

LOANS

STERLING

DIXON

FRANKLIN GROVE

ROCK FALLS

1BR upper Studio, $350/mo. Stove, refrig. furn. Nice 1BR, applcs. $400/ mo. + lease, dep. Bentley Real Estate 815-625-1414. 2BR Townhouse, 1831 N. 2nd Ave. 1½ BA, C/A, lots of storage. 1100 sq. ft. w/garage. $600 mo. + dep., util. refs. 815-652-4517

1BR, Stove & frig. incl. Basement. No Pets. Tenants pay utilities + deposit. $425 month Available now! 815-440-2613

401 S. State St. 3BR, 2BA, finshed bsmt. $800 mo. + 1st & last mo. dep. 815-566-5387

Why Rent? You CAN Own! 3BR 1bath Home. One Week Special $600/mo. 815-8786356.

MILLEDGEVILLE

STERLING

3BR, C/A, applcs., 400 Holcomb. $650 + dep. Call 815-718-5488

2 BR., w/ garage & unfurnished basement. $575 + $350 dep. No pets. Call 815-590-0010 Apartments and Houses for rent in Sterling/Rock Falls. 815-238-2601.

2BR, stove & refrig. furnished, $450 lease and dep. req. H & H rental Properties LLC. 815625-7995 Park Setting, newer 2BR, L/R, garage, NS, 1 floor, near CGH, energy efficient, 1832 2nd Ave., $585/mo. 815-499-0199. Sinnissippi Townhomes First Mo. Free! Spacious 2 BR. 2 story townhomes. Central air, good location. Laundry hookup. (815)6261130.

WOOSUNG 604 Griswold Ave. 2 BR, 1BA, Ground level Unit, Newly Remodeled. $525/ mo. Requires sec. deposit. Call Matt @ 310-750-5663

HOMES FOR RENT

310

FOR RENT HOUSES & APTS. svla.org

DIXON 2BR Ranch Duplex Garage. No pets. Snowplowing-$550 815-973-2831

2BR, garage. $550 815-285-4035 or 815-440-0693 2BR, stove & refrig. ,w/d. Tenants pay utilites. No smoking or pets, $500mo. + deposit. 815-288-3207 3-4BR, 2 Story Near downtown, SW side. Non smoking, no pets. $825/mo. Lease. Call 815-440-0927. 3BR, 1ba. NE side. $695/mo. 815-9736768. 7054 Rock Nation Rd. Newer 2 story home on Rock River. All applcs. incl. 2BR, 1ba., 2 car garage. $900/ mo. 815-994-0777. For Rent Condominium On the River Boat Dock Incl. 2 BR 2BA Upper 1400 sq. ft. 1 Car garage Snow removal Lawn care $925/mo. + util. Lease-opt to buy 815-378-2151

HOUSE FOR SALE OR RENT 3BR full basement, detached garage, applcs furnished, incl w/d, $550/mo. + dep. ($65,000) no smoking, no pets, 815-718-5062 or 815-973-7076

MORRISON 3 BR, 2 BA country home on 16 acres, hunting rights included. $900 per month. Call Kophamer & Blean Realty (815) 7722728.

ROCK FALLS 1 BR house for rent, newly remodeled, stove & refrig, $450/mo. w/out garage, $500/mo. W/ garage. 815499-7060.

Nice 2BR. No Pets. $485 + dep. 815-535-6731.

FRANKLIN GROVE 1 Story, 2BR, C/A attached garage, newer updates, laundry hookups, NO PETS! $575mo. 815-677-2383

2 story (contract /deed) $19,500 needs lots of carpenter work ($1,000 down & $350 mo. until paid) 815-626-3065 2BR, 1 ba. Garage. $625/mo. Call 815973-6768.

LG 2BR, 2 ba. Home. 108 E. 6th St. $690 mo. + security deposit. 815303-0026. Rent to own. 2BR 815-622-9665. Realtor Owned.

COMMERCIAL RENTAL

311

1200 sq. ft. 10 E. Miller Rd. Sterling. 815-625-9638 Great location! Approx. 1,000sq.ft. Call 815-499-7448. Secured 3 acre w/ high bays and office, 3818 River Rd., Sterling. 815-626-8790

MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT

315

GUNS & ARCHERY

402

THE CLASSIFIED Advertising Department of Sauk Valley Media does not have the opportunity to fully investigate the credibility of each advertiser appearing within these columns. If an offer sounds “too good to be true” it probably is. Proceed with caution if you are asked to send money or to give a credit card number. Proceed with caution in calling 900 phone numbers. All phone numbers prefixed by “900” are charged to the CALLER. Charges may be assessed on a “per minute” basis rather than a “per call” basis. Sauk Valley Classified makes every effort to qualify these charges for the reader. If you have a concern about an advertiser, please contact the Better Business Bureau 330 N. Wabash, Chicago, IL 60611. 312-832-0500

H.I.S. Gun Shack Guns & Ammo Christmas Sale!! December 21st 815-284-3232

CLOVER APPLIANCES HILLS

1 Mo. Free rent. Cozy 2BR. $395 + dep. 630-965-1470 or 815-716-3703 Looking for the perfect home? Read Sauk Valley estate section and Real Estate Weekly on Thursdays.

LEASE TO OWN APPLIANCES TV’S MATTRESSES

815.625.8529 Frigidaire Affinity front load washer & gas dryer set on pedestals. One Owner. White. New in '08 from Knie's. $800/set obo. 815590-7021.

CLOTHING

730

Mens black USA Leather Jacket, red/white stripes on sleeves, 2XL, $40, 815-626-2461

WOOD / FUEL

746

Dry, stored, hardwood for sale. $70 You pick up. 815778-3783. Mixed Hardwood $80/pickup load Delivered 779-423-4249

AREA GARAGE SALES 624

FURNITURE

755

2pc. Beautiful wood corner flattop computer desk. Prestige brand, 960TWR. 60wx33dx30h 48wx24dx29h $600 815-632-1521

Dixon Petunia Festival Buttons. Full Set from 1965present. $350 815677-1203 or 815284-8526 I Buy: Antique furniture, fishing tackle, toys, post cards junk. 815-445-6151

710

CLOVER HILLS

ANTIQUES & COLLECTIBLES 705

DIXON

706

Rocker Recliner, dark blue, good cond., $50 815626-2461

FURNITURE

755

Bed/ Mattress Sets New in plastic. Twin $99, Full $129, qu. $159, King $259. W/ Warr. Can deliver. 815-703-3688 Mattress sets: Twin $99, Full $129, Queen $159, King $199. Will deliver! Kern Mattress Outlet 309-4527477.

MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS 765 Wurlitzer Spinnet w/ bench, maple wood, $300 firm, 815-718-2424

PETS & PET SUPPLIES 775 ABC Reg border collie puppies, shots & wormed, 6 wks., bl & wh, & br & wh, $500 Phone 815-631-7391. No texts. Four kittens FREE to good homes. Or see at 601 14th Ave. Sterling Sat. 8-5 & Mon.& Tues. 4-8 pm. 815-713-5894 Free 8week old kittens and mother cat to a good home. 815-6257686

PETS & PET SUPPLIES 775

TICKETS / TRAVEL 787 & EVENTS

Wanted: small adult chihuahua, female, spayed, housebroken, reasonably priced or free. 815-564-9022 after 1 pm.

No person or business, unless properly licensed by the Illinois Secretary of State, may sell ticket(s) for any sporting event or otherwise, for more than the price printed upon the face of the said ticket(s). Only licensed ticket brokers may legally advertise, negotiate and execute the sale of ticket(s) for any amount over what is printed upon the face of ticket.

WARNING ADS FOR FREE PETS Your beloved pet deserves a loving, caring home. The ad for your free pet may draw response from individuals who will sell your animal for research or breeding purposes. Please screen respondents carefully when giving an animal away. Your pet will thank you!

SNOWBLOWERS 782 Ariens 7 HP, 24” cut, pull start snowblower, very little hrs., like new! $475. Call 815973-3223

Kitten, 7 mo., F, blk, spayed, shybut sweet, needs patient person, no small kids, 815535-7061.

Craftsman Snowblower, 22” elec. start, self propel. like new, $265 815-441-7535

Male cat, young, neutered. Free to good INDOOR homes only. 815499-9923.

Toro 21” Power Clear single stage snowblower, like new $400. Yardman 2 stage 9hp 28” snowblower, power steering, heated hand grips, runs good $450 815-441-3499

Precious kittens, clean and full of love. Will hold for Christmas. 815441-9064.

KRINGLE'S KORNER

794

★ Beautiful Drexal Bedroom Set ★ triple dresser w/mirror, lg. armoire, king headboard, 2 nightstands, w/ 2 lamps, like new, 815-537-5372. Electric Mobile Independent Living ★Bruno Deluxe★ ★Model Scooter★ quiet & comfortable operation, Excellent Cond. ★★Must See!★★ 815-537-5372 New In Boxes, Rudolph's Xmas Town Village, by Hawthorne Village. 9 houses & 20 figurines. $350 815535-3963

WANT TO BUY 795 I buy scrap gold, silver & bullion. Top dollar paid. 815-625-0966

Here Today. Gone Tomorrow.

When you let Sauk Valley Classifieds do the work, you won’t get the run around. It’s easy, effective and will get you results. Call 815-625-3600 or 815-284-2222 and get started!

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

815-625-3600

815-284-2222


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, December 21, 2013 s PAGE D 4

all

C

Classified

To sell those extra items! SAUK VALLEY

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITIES 501 NOTICEPURSUANT to the Business Opportunity Sales Law of 1995, every business opportunity must be registered with the Illinois Securities Department. Protect yourself and get the facts before you hand over your hard earned money by contacting the Illinois Secretary of State's Securities Department at 1800-628-7937. This notice provided as a public service by Sauk Valley Classifieds.

CLASSIFIEDS C SAUK VALLEY

LASSIFIEDS TELEGRAPH

dailyGAZETTE dailyGAZETTE

815-625-3600

TELEGRAPH

815-284-2222

CNA Positions NO MANDATED SHIFTS

10 or 12 hr. shifts. No Benefit Package Available

HEALTH / MEDICAL

Franklin Grove Living & Rehabilitation Center 502 N. State St. Franklin Grove, IL 61031

504

â&#x2DC;&#x2026; NEW TODAY â&#x2DC;&#x2026;

CNA's

815-456-2374

EOE

Registered Nurses (RN 1) Jack Mabley Developmental Center has openings for Registered Nurses (RN 1). These positions will be 3:00pm-11:00pm based on a 2 week schedule with every other weekend off. Other days off will be determined at time of offer. Successful candidate will hold an AS or BS in Nursing and a current RN license with the State of Illinois. The State of Illinois offers a competitive salary, as well as vacation, sick, holiday, and personal time.

Evenings & Nights We are looking for experienced and dedicated professionals to assume key full and parttime positions on our nursing team. We offer: Excellent Starting Wage! Vacation Pay! Paid Time Off! Holiday Pay! Medical, Dental, Vision! And Much More! For an immediate and confidential interview, apply in person or call Lynette at (815) 284-3393.

Application process is described and posting can be found at www.work.illinois.gov or by contacting Human Resources at 815-288-8340.

Dixon

Applications (CMS-100) must be submitted directly to: Human Resources Mabley Developmental Center 1120 Washington Ave. Dixon, IL 61021 or faxed to: 815-288-8321 (fax) No applications can be accepted after December 28, 2013, at 4:00pm.

Healthcare & Rehab 800 Division St Dixon, IL 61021

Looking for the perfect home? Read Sauk Valley estate section and Real Estate Weekly on Thursdays.

Local firm has immediate opening for a full time Proposal Writer. Successful candidate should have strong written communication skills and be experienced with Microsoft Word and Excel. Experience with Publisher, PowerPoint, website creation a plus. 8:00 a.m. â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5:00 p.m. Monday thru Friday. Attractive Salary and Benefits. Benefits include Profit Sharing, 401K, Group Health, Disability and Life.

Send resume and salary history to Box # M-66 c/o Sauk Valley Classifieds, P.O. Box 498, Sterling, IL 61081. Equal opportunity employer

ROUTES AVAILABLE! Towns

Streets

Route

Customers

Rock Falls

12th-15th Ave. 245 *** Call for Available Routes in Prophetstown & Rock Falls*** Milledgeville Cochran, Franklin, Main, Madison & Old Mill 313 Milledgeville W. 6th, Cochran, Hager, Holcombe, Main & Meyers 315 Sterling W. 4th - W. 7th, Ave. B-D 19 (Call about sign on bonus for Milledgeville & Morrison Routes) Polo W. Fulton, W. Dixon, W. Mason, N. Division & N. Cherry 3232

Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL 61081

45

37 62 79

60

Telegraph 113 S. Peoria Dixon, IL 61021

815-625-3600 ext. 301

HEALTH / MEDICAL

504

Exceptional Care & Training Center QIDP (Case Manager) to assess need(s), coordinate services and to promote quality of life through training and advocacy. Bachelor's degree in health-related field with at least 1 year experience w/persons w/intellectual disabilities req. Must be a proficient computer user, reliable, detail-oriented, and willing to learn. EOE Resume to: 2601 Woodlawn Road, Sterling, IL 61081 or melissa@ ectc1.com Hiring Medical Assistants for lg. medical practice in Rockford. Exp. preferred but will train good candidates. Paid training & certification. Full benefits package. E-mail resumes: supervision969 @gmail.com.

EMPLOYMENT

505

Diesel Mechanic

Full time. $30/hr. Must have 15 yrs experience. Please No phone calls or walk ins. Mail resume to:

Brechon Farm Services, Inc. 1270 IL. State Route 26 South Dixon, IL. 61021

Welder Fabricator

Full time. $30/hr. Must have 15 yrs experience.Please No phone calls or walk ins. Mail resume to:

Brechon Farm Services, Inc. 1270 IL. State Route 26 South Dixon, IL. 61021

Class A CDL Driver Hauling Grain & Fertilizer $20.00 per Hour plus overtime. Hauling NH3 with a Hazmat endorsement $25.00 per Hour plus overtime. Must have 5 \HDUV YHULĂ&#x20AC;DEOH H[SHrience. Please mail resume to:

Brechon Farm Services, Inc. 1270 IL. State Route 26 South 'L[RQ ,/ 

Accountant or CPA with a 4 year degree. Pay Commensurate with experience.

Please No phone calls or walk-ins.

Earn Holiday CASH!

REVIEW ROUTES AVAILABLE! EARN EXTRA $$$$ BY WORKING ONLY 1 DAY PER WEEK! Pick Up Papers on Tuesday and Deliver by Thursday! Extremely Flexible ~ Between 150-300 Papers

Call for Availability 815-625-3600 ext. 301 Sauk Valley Media 3200 E. Lincolnway Sterling, IL 61081

Telegraph 113 S. Peoria Dixon, IL 61021

Please mail resume to: Brechon Farm Services, Inc. 1270 IL. State Route 26 South Dixon, IL. 61021

Position Openings Pre-K Teacher: Sterling. 40hrs/wk., schoolyear. Minimum of a BA in Early Childhood Education or closely related field. Pre-K Teacher: Assistant: Sterling 30 hrs./wk., school year; Minimum of AAS in Early Childhood Education, Child Development or related degree with a minimum of 18 credit hours in ECE. For information and application contact Tri-County Opportunities Council at 815625-7830 or visit our website at www.tcochelps.com

Equal Opportunity Employer

EMPLOYMENT

505

Legal Assistant Join the best. Our prominent, general practice law firm seeks a selfmotivated Legal Secretary to join our elite team. Duties include project management, client interaction, scheduling and calendaring, document production, filing, and answering phones. Computer skills required; dictation skills preferred. The successful candidate will be diligent, pleasant, able to communicate well, and adept at multitasking. We offer competitive wages and benefits, and the opportunity to learn any skills not yet developed. Prior legal experience required; prior experience in the medical field would be a plus. To apply please send your cover letter and resume to either saukvalleylaw @gmail.com or send replies to Box #:1196 ,c/o Sauk Valley Classifieds, P.O.Box 498, Sterling, IL 61081 River City Fencing Responsible motivated leader, willing to work in all types of weather, must have some knowledge of fencing and have a VALID DRIVERS LICENSE. 815-589-2307 Semi Truck Driver Needed Day travel only, no nights or weekends. Class A CDL required with dump trailer experience preferred. PT/FT, 25-35 hrs. a week. Apply in person or send resumed to bryan@tt metalsinc.com The Ogle County Health Dept. is seeking a fulltime manager for the Health Education and Emergency Preparedness programs. Send resume to Doreen O'Brien, 907 West Pines Road, Oregon, Illinois 61061. TO OUR

READERS:

Sauk Valley Media does not knowingly accept advertising which is in violation of the law. Likewise, we do not knowingly accept advertising which is fraudulent or has malicious intent. While we attempt to screen advertising with potential fraud, it is impossible to screen all potential problems. We strongly encourage our readers to exercise caution and common sense, particularly when dealing with companies with which you are not familiar.

CHILD CARE

A1

512

NO INDIVIDUAL, unless licensed or holding a permit as a childcare facility, may cause to be published any advertisement soliciting a child care service.* A childcare facility that is licensed or operating under a permit issued by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services may publish advertisements of the services for which it is specifically licensed or issued a permit. Sauk Valley Media strongly urges any parent or guardian to verify the validity of the license of any facility before placing a child in it's care. *Family homes that care for no more than three (3) children under the age of twelve or which receive only children from a single household, for less than 24 hours per day, are exempt from licensure as day care homes. The three children to whom this exemption applies includes the family's natural or adopted children and any other persons under the age of 12 whether related or unrelated to the operator of the day care home. (DCFS Rule, Part 377.3 (c))

POSITION WANTED

515

Typist seeking work, 45WPM 815-441-4920

Go BOLD

Get SOLD Bold type draws readers to your ad.

Get your ad noticed!

GO BOLD CALL

815-625-3600 815-284-2222

To place your AD TODAY!

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

BEWARE OF INTERNET PUPPY SCAMS!

Visit the American Kennel Club website (www.akc.org) for tips on how to avoid getting scammed and If you have been the victim of a scam, report it to your local authorities and your local BBB (www.bbb.org)

Got Your Attention didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t it? The First Rule of advertising is catching their eye.

The Second Rule is sustained, repeated advertising.

Advertising doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t cost, it PAYS! Get your moneyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worth, advertise in the Telegraph or Daily Gazette and reach over 46,000 readers!

For information 625-3600 or 284-2222


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, December 21, 2013 s PAGE D 5

FULL COLOR PRINTING BLACK & WHITE PRINTING BUSINESS CARDS LETTERHEAD ENVELOPES POSTCARDS NEWSLETTERS FLYERS INVOICES RECEIPTS CARBONLESS FORMS CONTINUOUS FORMS CHURCH BULLETINS CALENDARS LABELS/STICKERS RAFFLE TICKETS EVENT TICKETS NOTEPADS BOOKLETS MENUS GIFT CERTIFICATES MEETING BOOKS WEDDING INVITATIONS WEDDING PROGRAMS AND MUCH MORE

a division of sauk valley media

saukvall ey

PRINTING With over 40 years of experience, Sauk Valley Printing is your local one-stop source offering professional designs, excellent print quality, fast turn-around times, friendly customer service at affordable pricing.

contact kris sands at 815.625.3600 ext 701 ksands@saukvalley.com 3200 e lincolnway - sterling il 61081 (located inside sauk valley media)


MISCELLANEOUS 796 FOR SALE

MISCELLANEOUS 796 FOR SALE

1/64 Nascar collection, orig. packaging. 250+ cars, 15 semis + 20 misc. $3,000/obo. 815-625-4943. 10 gal. mixed paint & mud for popcorn ceiling $20 815677-0896 2 sets of dumbbells. $100. 815499-6799. 2000 oak kitchen cabinets in stock. Builder Discount 815-626-4561 26” Magnavox tv, $30, 815-631-5810

Oreck X2, 9 bags $35. 815-772-2145

Antique Curio cabinets, graniteware 815-973-4972 Brand New Snap On Beer Keg Fridge. Would be a nice holiday gift! $350 firm. 815973-1976 after 5.

Call 815-625-3600 or 815-284-2222

Published Every Other Tuesday!

C E L E B R A T I O N S

SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, December 21, 2013 s PAGE D 6

Castle Snowmobile Boots sz. 13, $125 815-499-4666 Castle Snowmobile pants 2XL $100 815-499-4666 Child's Wooden Sled with steel runners. $20 815535-3758 Chipper Shredder $200, Sofabed & chair $175, 220 volt elec. welder $100, 7” Heavy duty elec. sander $50. 815-622-9062 Chocolate Fountain in box w/ recipes. $8. 815499-4770 Collector Engine 7 cars track. $200. Call 815-499-9180 Free Mirrored bifold door, 32x80. 815-499-0437 Great Christmas presents! Foosball table, 54”x29” $95. John Deere leaf sweeper, 1yr old $225. Manitowac 650lb. commercial ice machine & ice bin $1200. Call 815-441-5772. Gun Cabinet, wood w/ glass door, holds 6 guns, $50 815-441-8343 Military Extreme Cold Weather “Mickey Mouse” Boots! M-65 Field Jackets, camo clothing, new & used & much more! Princeton Military Surplus 11 E Putnam St. Princeton IL 815-875-1096 Tues.- Sat. 10-5 Oak Desk 56” wide, 26” deep & 30” tall. $50 815499-0437

Pool table, Heavy 8ft. Good condition. You move. $250 obo. 815499-6799 Raynor garage doors, (1) 16x7 & (1) 9x7, w/ openers & all hardware, tracks, & remotes, exc. cond. $750 815-631-9600. See More Online Photos, Commerce, Expanded Text ➛Look for WEB ID ➛Log on to: www.saukvalley. com classifieds ➛Enter the WEB ID in the WEB ID Box ➛View Photos, Expanded Text BUY ONLINE!! saukvalley.com CLASSIFIEDS Twin, full, queen, king beds. Washer, dryer, rec. sofa, twin sofa sleeper, dresser, refrig., full bedroom set, theater dbl. rec. group 815-718-4385

CLASSIC CARS

904

1985 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme, needs motor work, good body, $450 815-716-0475

AUTOMOBILES

905

2000 Saturn SL2, 71k mi., 4 cylender, good gas mi. $2,000 OBO 815973-3455

NEW REAL DEAL

FOR ALL READERS!

A 5 Line REAL DEAL

ad runs for 30 days in Sauk Valley Classifieds, 4 Ogle County Papers, The Review and saukvalley.com all for only $38! Special must be mentioned at time of ad placement. Offer expires 12/31/13 No Commercial Advertising, Pets, Garage Sales, Wood/ Fuel, Tickets/ Travel or Real Estate

2002 Pontaic Grand Am GT, 130K, sunroof, red, rust free! New tires, brakes, brake pads, rotors, tune up. $5,000 OBO 815-440-5591 2005 Dodge Caravan, good running cond., no rust, 150k mi. $2600 815-626-7398

AUTOMOBILES

905

Credit Problems? Bad Credit? No Credit? We might be able to help! If you're looking to buy a vehicle we have many financing options available through qualified lenders. Call Brett Simpson today at 815-2855313. Ken Nelson Auto Plaza. creditautosales dixon.com Always over 100+ vehicles to choose from. HAVING TROUBLE wording your ad? Call our classified department today. We'll be glad to help you. 626SOLD or 284SOLD.

4X4S

912

1999 Red Jeep Wrangler, 180k w/ 500mi. new crate engine. $5600 815-440-2419 2001 Chevy Blazer LS, 4x4, 2dr. 97K mi. Very nice & clean. $4,000. 815535-0423 2003 Chevy S10 ext. cab. Bedliner, 82K mi. Good cond. $7500. 815225-7527.

PARTS & ACC.

925

Antique Running boards for hot rod. $50 815-677-0896 M&S 31x10.50 R15 LT Chev truck tire on rim, like new. $85 815-677-0896

A.T.V.S

936

PHOTOS ONLINE!!

When you see the above logo in a classified ad in the paper you'll find a whole lot more online. Just go to www.saukvalley. com Classifieds, and enter the Web ID included in the ad.

S.U.V.S

909

2000 Bravada, new radiator/timing belt. Good tires. 186K mi. Needs tranny. $850/obo. 815-441-4739. 2001 Ford Explorer XLT, 4x4. Loaded/ sunroof. 182K mi. Exc. cond. $3500. 815-994-8426. 2007 Jeep Wrangler Unlimited 4x4, 4 door, auto, hard & soft tops, black, 106K mi., $15,995 815-441-7500

TRUCKS

910

2000 GMC 3500 HD dually dump. Gas, automatic. 8' plow. 66K mi. Exc. cond. $9500/obo. 815-440-0833. 3 ton utility truck w/ 40 ft. bucket, several additional options, $2500 815-535-5182

VANS

911

1999 Ford Luxury van, great shape, runs great, $3,250 815-716-0475

4X4S

912

1999 Ford F150 4x4 Lariat. $2800. Call 815-973-3376.

2005 Suzuki 4x4 500 cc w/plow, low mi., sharp, $3500 815-716-0475

TRAILERS/RVS

945

1999 Wells Cargo Motorcycle Trailer, holds 2 bikes, new tires, good shape, $3,350 815716-0475

AUTOS WANTED

960

$$$

CLASSIFIEDS C

Locate

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

815-625-3600

815-284-2222

the items

815-441-0246

you want

ABSOLUTELY THE BEST CASH PAID FOR JUNK VEHICLES

to buy or sell! www. saukvalley. com $$$$$$$$$$$$$ 815-499-3543

CASH 4-CARS

We are licensed & insured to buy vehicles. Running or non running, scrap, Ect. 7 days a week. All Calls Answered!

(815)499-3543 $$$$$$$$$$$$$

815-441-0246 ABSOLUTELY

THE BEST CASH PAID FOR JUNK or

Call Classified To sell those extra items! SAUK VALLEY SAUK VALLEY LASSIFIEDS dailyGAZETTE TELEGRAPH

View Classifieds Online!

Looking for the perfect home? Read Sauk Valley estate section and Real Estate Weekly on Thursdays.

$150-$2000 We Pay the BEST! Guaranteed! Fastest Pickup All calls answered 7 days a week. with any other number in the paper.)

815-441-0246

$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$$

Unwanted (running or not)

VEHICLES $150-$2000

We Pay the BEST! Guaranteed! Fastest Pickup All calls answered 7 days a week. Licensed Dealer

815-441-0246

(Don't be lied to this number is not affliated with anyother number in paper} 1:18 MODEL CARS FOR SALE! We Buy Used cars & trucks. Call Dixon ATV 815-288-2146

Great Garage Sales Call

Sud oku! Answer on D7

625-3600

CELEBRITY CIPHER by Luis Campos Celebrity Cipher cryptograms are created from quotations by famous people, past and present. Each letter in the cipher stands for another.

TODAY’S CLUE: L equals M “TNM OBA NART RNNP YNWGBWE ZN B JNMZF EBPNZB GXAZKW XY ... TNM’WK BSRK ZN YNWUKZ FNG SBE XZ GBJ ZFK RBJZ ZXLK.” -- EBA N’SWXKA

Previous Solution: “Everyone has an hour in their day to go and do something for somebody else; I don’t care how busy they are.” -- Gisele Bundchen (c) 2013 by NEA, Inc., dist. by Universal Uclick 12-21

Astrograph Strong work ethic. Saturday, December 21, 2013 A strong work ethic and a lot of determination will be necessary if you are to accomplish your goals. This year is a turning point, and adequate preparation will determine how far you go. Attention to detail will ensure that you stay ahead of the competition. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- Your lust for new adventures will be sated if you travel or seek out mentally stimulating groups. New environments and ideas will likely inspire a shift in your professional focus. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- You may be faced with handling the affairs of older relatives. Your partner may become frustrated if you are unable to fit in quality time together. Finding balance will be your key challenge. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -Tension will cause confrontations with your partner. It is important to openly discuss the root of the problem. Secret endeavors may damage your standing. Be conscious of the consequences of your actions. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -Don’t waste time on one-sided romantic connections. Be careful what you say at this time. It’s

not the day to be controversial. Try to be cognizant of workplace politics. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -Travel in search of adventure and look to expand your horizons. Socializing will lead to new romantic opportunities. This is a great day to make a positive change. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- Stubbornness will be your downfall if you refuse to take advice from friends or relatives. Try to see your circumstances as possibilities rather than limitations. Keep an open mind. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -Friends will feel neglected if you are devoting too much time to a new friend or lover. Find a balance and keep everyone happy. Be cautious about getting involved in any joint ventures. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -Heated debates with people close to you may lead to an unexpected change. Overreacting will have catastrophic results. Try to keep your emotions in check. Be careful about lending money at this time. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- Your emotional reactions will leave you feeling alienated from the

ones you love. Try to take a more practical approach to things, and avoid being melodramatic. Understand and respect your role. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -Bureaucracy will cause delays where institutional matters are concerned. Try to put off meetings with superiors until you are fully prepared. Leave time for entertainment.

ACROSS

50 Sense of taste 1 Lavish party 53 Salad green 5 Cereal bit 55 Battery 10 — Abdulterminals Jabbar 56 Hung on 12 Matched 57 Aboveboard socks 58 Transmission 13 Mountainpart eer’s tool (2 wds.) 14 Dock work DOWN 15 Comparison 1 Fugue word composer 16 “Norma —” 2 Vicinity 18 Wolfed down 3 Connery and 19 Outshine Penn 23 Soft touch 4 Evil eye 26 Pen part 5 LAX 27 Billionth, in regulators combos 6 Jar top 30 Expire 7 Diva’s 32 Desert rendition phenomenon 8 Superman’s 34 Life’s work alias 35 Is of use 9 Margin 36 Des Moines 10 Baby fox state 11 More jolly 37 Riviera 12 Defendant’s summer answer 38 — and 17 PD dispatch Perrins 20 Beat an 39 Catch incumbent off-guard 21 Cry and 42 Pained cries whine 45 Ebenezer’s 22 Name in oath cheesecake 46 Olive —

Answer to Previous Puzzle

23 Muscle for pushups 24 Jai — 25 Poi source 28 Brad 29 Gawk at 31 Hard benches 32 Broderick of films 33 NASA counterpart 37 Historical period 40 Not all are “Honest” 41 A funny Murphy 42 Libra’s stone 43 Opposite of

wax 44 Trudge 47 Beatles’ meter maid 48 Say decidedly 49 Pickup truck part 51 Tooth fillers’ org. 52 Util. bill 54 Remind too often

PUZZLE ENTHUSIASTS: Get more puzzles in “Random House Crossword MegaOmnious” Vols. 1 & 2

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Focus and attention to detail will bring significant improvements to your affairs. Someone close to you may be confused. Your capacity to evaluate situations from multiple angles will help to resolve the problem. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -- Your mental acuity will be exceptional and must be used to advance your cause. Your ability to communicate your ideas articulately will draw interest. Reach for your goals.

©2013 UFS

12-21

© 2013 UFS, Dist. by Universal Uclick for UFS


SAUK VALLEY MEDIA s Saturday, December 21, 2013 s PAGE D 7

Go BOLD

OUTGROWING YOUR HOUSE? CHECK OUT THE GREAT HOUSES LISTED FOR SALE IN SAUK VALLEY MEDIAS’ CLASSIFIED ADS.

Call 815-284-2222 or 815-625-3600 To Place Your Classified Ad

Get SOLD Bold type

You’ll Smile Too... When you see All the bargains Advertised in the Go ahead and clean out that closet, attic or garage and sell those A little extra cash comes in handy these days!

draws C LASSIFIEDS readers to your ad. SAUK VALLEY

Get your ad noticed!

GO BOLD

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

CALL 815-625-3600 815-284-2222 To place your AD TODAY!

dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH

815-625-3600

815-284-2222

GET YOUR GAME ON

With The

Classif ieds 815-625-3600 815-284-2222

CLASSIFIEDS SAUK VALLEY dailyGAZETTE

TELEGRAPH


Wheels

3ATURDAY $ECEMBER 

www.saukvalley.com

367EEKENDs$

2014 RAM ECO-DIESEL Submitted by Ken Nelson Auto Group

make sure you don’t end up with a noisy powertrain.”

A

We had Standring explain why a diesel

dding to its amazement factor

produces so much torque. He attributed

for 2014, the Ram 1500 now offers buyers the choice of

fuel, higher compression ratios, and

a brawler or a bruiser. The brawler,

the turbocharging.” The high compres-

of course, is the available Hemi V-8.

sion ratio is due to the fact that diesel

Raise it off idle, and you know it has

fuel has less combustibility. “It’s less

attitude. To delve hard through its

likely to ignite as you compress it. And

midrange toward the top is to experi-

you’re relying on compression to ignite

ence true bellicosity. Now there’s the

it. The higher compression ratios drive

bruiser: the Ram 1500 EcoDiesel.

the fuel-air mix up to a higher tempera-

This engine is nothing but punches to

ture so it does ignite.” Applying the

the midsection. You know this merely

“Eco” to the “Diesel” meant emulating

by listening to it. While an unstinting

the European luxury sedans, as well as

effort was made to suppress the rumble

heavy-duty Class 8 trucks, and inject-

Ram is introducing this 3.0-liter turbodiesel V-6 to the light-duty pickup class

that’s the bellwether of diesels, we

ing a solution containing urea into the

didn’t mistake the grumbling exhaust

exhaust stream. “It’s an iteration where

note for the tones of a carillon. The clattery percussiveness is censored

lb-ft of torque at 2000 rpm. (When the

remarkably well, but it isn’t silenced.

system. Relying on boosted induction

unachieved distances.

from a variable-geometry turbocharger,

Cummins turbodiesel six was adopted,

In a shrewd move, Ram is introducing this 3.0-liter turbodiesel V-6 to the light-duty pickup class. Ram led off with Cummins turbodiesel sixes in its heavy-duty trucks in 1989, and others to market with a light-duty diesel will have advantages as other manufacturers jump in. Nissan will insert a Cummins V-8 into the Titan, and diesel power is slated for GM’s midsize trucks as well. The Ram’s DOHC engine, which is available in six of nine models. When

performance. It wrings out 240 hp at

we’ve changed the emissions after-

ing the truck’s range to previously

and oxidation cat[alyst] only to SCR:

the V-6 operates with a 16.5:1 com-

Selective Catalytic Reduction, the urea

it produced 400 lb-ft.) The Hemi V-8

From Italy, with Love

far surpasses the turbodiesel V-6 in

The 60-degree, 24-valve DOHC V-6 is

the typical gas engine, and it’s designed

system.” An eight-gallon tank holds a

power, at 395 hp, which would be use-

designed and made by VM Motori in

accordingly, with a block and bedplate

mixture of deionized water with urea in

ful if you were trying for the household

Cento, Italy. Since 1992, VM Motori

of compacted graphite iron. This is just

a 32.5 percent solution. (The EcoDiesel

haulers’ class record at the Bonneville

has supplied diesels for Chrysler’s

one of several strategies to quell NVH.

will keep running at full power when

Salt Flats. But for towing up to 10,000

European products, such as the Jeep

Uniform dispersal of the graphite

the solution runs low.) This liquid is

pounds, plowing heavy snow, or car-

Grand Cherokee and the Chrysler 300.

produces several desirable properties,

pumped into the stream just behind the

rying up to a 1630-pound payload,

This engine is nearly identical to the

Standring said, speaking in the soft

the torque is nice to have. With nearly

one now offered domestically in the

brogue of his native English Midlands.

twice the displacement, the gasoline-

Grand Cherokee; the only differences

“The graphite in the cast iron gives the

fueled V-8 languidly churns out 410

are that the Ram’s all-aluminum oil

material a higher strength,” he said.

scheduled for replenishing at the same

“So you can basically use that strength

10,000-mile interval that oil changes

lb-ft of torque at 3950 rpm. Meanwhile, the diesel should easily surpass the 25

for packaging considerations, accord-

to create a stiffer structure. In terms of

are due. Word on the Web is to take

mpg highway achieved by the gasoline

ing to powertrain engineering chief

diesels and noise, the key is ensuring

care of this yourself and purchase the

3.6-liter V-6 -- the Ram’s other avail-

Jamie Standring. Fuel is delivered

that the higher combustion loads are

solution at a truck stop instead of let-

able engine -- while also offering less

under 29,000 psi of pressure to the six

managed in that structure. You need

ting a dealership charge a small fortune

consumption under load and extend-

cylinders by a common-rail injection

a stiffer bottom end of the engine to

TOP

GREAT

YEAR END

DOLLAR

DEALS!

W 2014 CHRYSLER TOWN & COUNTRY TOURING

E LN

AL

Was KN Discount Rebate Owner Loyalty

STK # CE000

$31,860 $ 2,550 $ 1,500 $ 750

W 2013 RAM 1500 SLT

AL STK # DD118

CREW CAB 4X4

$42,775 Was KN Discount $ 5,049 $ 4,000 Rebate

W

E LN

L ASTK # DD037

33,726*

2013 DODGE DART SE

$19,180 Was KN Discount $ 1,185 $ 2,000 Rebate

Mike Freeman General Mgr.

$

NOW

$

Rich Vogeler Sales Mgr.

L ASTK # DD117

2013 DODGE AVENGER SE

AL

STK # JE030

$23,755 $ 1,760 $ 2,000

AL

$

NOW

2013 CHRYSLER 200 LX

Jamie Curia Sales

$

$19,990 Was KN Discount $ 1,159 $ 2,500 Rebate

18,392

*

2013 DODGE JOURNEY SXT

$27,840 Was KN Discount $ 6,199

Brett Simpson Business Mgr.

W

E LN

W

E LN

ALSTK # DD108

NOW

21,641

*

Steve Acree Sales

ALSTK # DD066

NOW

16,331*

2013 RAM 1500 REG TRADESMAN

$27,140 Was KN Discount $ 3,038 $ 2,500 Rebate

Carl Buehler Sales

$

Chad Conderman Sales

$

Was KN Discount

$29,185 $ 4,190

W

E LN

ALSTK # CD026

NOW

21,602

*

Justin Meyers Sales

2013 DODGE GRAND CARAVAN SXT

W

E LN

STK # CD021

$22,385 Was KN Discount $ 3,993

L ASTK # DD106

15,995 Craig Buchanan Sales Mgr.

W

E LN

W

*

2014 JEEP PATRIOT LATITUDE FWD

W

E LN

NOW $19,995*

E LN

NOW

FOR TRADES

Was KN Discount Rebate

NOW $27,060* E LN

nitrogen are reduced. The storage tank,

Rusty Baker Sales

NOW

24,995*

2013 CHRYSLER 200 TOURING

$23,855 Was KN Discount $ 1,981 $ 4,000 Rebate

Nick Melsness Sales

$

NOW

17,904*

$

Jeff Wilson Sales

Adam Chapman Sales

1000 N. GALENA, DIXON, IL

CHRYSLER *Tax, license, title, $164 doc dee additional. All rebates & incentives applied.

815-288-4455

WWW.KENNELSONAUTO.COM


TEL_12212013