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Edition of January 10-16, 2013

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LAKE COUNTY FAIRGROUNDS

HEre’s heLP TO KEEP YOUR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONs page 3

Volume 5 Issue 3

JANUARY 18-20, 2013

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Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

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AboutUs

Editor’sNote

Here’s help with your new year’s resolutions Volume 4 No. 51 (USPS 027-080)

The LAKE COUNTY JOURNAL is published weekly on Thursday. It is a member of Shaw Media. Periodical mail postage paid at Grayslake, IL 60030 MAIN OFFICE/EDITORIAL 1100 Washington St., Suite 101 Grayslake, IL 60030 Phone: 847-223-8161 Fax: 847-223-8810 lcjedit@lakecountyjournal.com GENERAL MANAGER Alese Campbell 847-223-8161 acampbell@shawmedia.com MANAGING EDITOR Sheryl DeVore: 847-231-7522 sdevore@shawmedia.com ADVERTISING Sales and Classified: 847-223-8161 POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Lake County Journal, PO Box 250, Crystal Lake, IL 60039-0250 DISTRIBUTION: 815-459-8118 All rights reserved. Copyright 2013.

“Serving our communities to make them better places to live.”

HOW TO SUBMIT STORIES Do you have a news tip or story idea? Call us at 847223-8161 or email lcjedit@ lakecountyjournal.com

If you’re anything like me, making as well as keeping a new year’s resolution can be difficult. I don’t want to make one for fear I won’t keep it, but then I need to make one because it would be good for my health. The Lake County Journal staff decided we all could use some expert advice on keeping new year’s resolutions. With that in mind, we’ve started a three-part series, with this week’s issue focusing on the favorite of all-time resolutions – losing weight. Reporter Yadira Sanchez Olson reveals a secret in her article on page 3: You

Sheryl DeVore

really have to make the commitment first, and after that, take it in small steps, writing down a plan every week. I think I’ll try that. Other folks have resolutions that include spending more time with their family. We’ve got a photo spread on page 14 offering a suggestion on where to go that’s free and

nearby to spend time with your young ones. It’s the Round Lake Neighborhood Museum. Later this month, we’ll feature another column by Little Lake County, who offers you copious ideas on spending time in Lake County with your youngsters. If you’ve been thinking about quitting smoking, you might want to see next week’s issue, when we continue our series on new year’s resolutions. On Jan. 24, Yadira Sanchez Olson will offer tips from experts on reducing stress in your life in 2013.

It can be easy to become a couch potato in January, what with the cold weather, early darkness and lack of sunshine. Hopefully these articles will convince you (and me) to get out, be active and spend time with friends and family while we wait for spring. As always, I appreciate your phone calls and emails about making Lake County Journal the best it can be.

Sheryl DeVore is the managing editor of the Lake County Journal. She can be reached at 847-231-7522 or sdevore@shawmedia.com.

WeekendOutlook FaceTime: Carrie Alani

FRIDAY, JAN. 11

C

arrie Alani is a Wauconda resident and a mom to Jenna, 23, an esthetician; Cara, 20, a junior at Chelsea School of Art in London; and Marisa, a junior at St. Viator in Arlington Heights. She has been married to Laith Alani for four years. Their home is a working horse farm. Alani is the director of the Maryville Academy Children's Healthcare Center in Chicago. She is a longtime pediatric hospice and palliative care nurse with a master's degree in journalism and creative writing, which she admits is an odd mixture. Alani talked with Lake County Journal reporter Yadira Sanchez Olson about a children's book she recently wrote called "Stranger in the Manger." The book is about the manger that held baby Jesus, and how it was built from a cedar tree.

When did you start writing books? This is my first children's book. I have published hundreds of pieces through magazines and TV, nearly all concerning medical and health issues, but this project was much different. Stranger in the Manger began as a poem I wrote and read to my girls, especially Marisa, before bed. We love poems and our night-time reading was full of Dr. Seuss and the like. We would gather all her stuffed animals

Where are the profits from this book going?

Photo provided

Carrie Alani on her bed and have our poem group. I dedicated this book to her and her stuffed friends.

What pieces have you published? I wrote for ABC-TV and NBC-TV in Chicago in the 1980s covering the Tylenol crisis, the first artificial heart recipient and many other fascinating medical and health-related stories that went nationwide. My print work began in the 1990s with Gannett Publishing where I wrote for Nursing Spectrum Magazine for about seven years.

What is your inspiration when you write? I pray before I write anything and just ask God for the right words to capture what is before me.

I'm thrilled to be able to donate 100 percent of my profit from the book to Joey's House, a nonprofit organization that will provide respite and transitional care for medically fragile and technology-dependent children in the Lake County area. I formed Joey's House four years ago as an answer to the lack of services for families struggling to care for their special needs children. Respite care is best described as a short-term break for families who need to rest, take a vacation or have medical care for themselves. Transitional care is a bit different, but is a homelike setting for children who are medically fragile, stable enough to come home, but whose home may not be ready for them. Often, these families are awaiting home modifications or approval of home nursing care, which can take months. Rather than languish in a pediatric hospital, transitional care gives the child and family a warm, cozy setting to learn how to care for their child and the complex equipment he or she may be going home with. Joey’s House is in fund raising mode, with site selection to take place soon. To learn more about Stranger in the Manger, visit http://www.tatepublishing.com/bookstore/

HIGH: 49 LOW: 40 SATURDAY, JAN. 12 HIGH: 50 LOW: 24 SUNDAY, Jan. 13 HIGH: 31 LOW: 18

Source: www.accuweather.com

Updates at LakeCountyJournal.com

What’sInside Lead story..........................3 On the record with...........4 Community view..............9 Opinion.............................12 Sports................................ 13 Photos...............................14 Critic’s choice.................. 15


By YADIRA SANCHEZ OLSON yolson@shawmedia.com Happy New Year! That phrase screams of fresh beginnings. Among Americans making resolutions, 16 percent want to lose weight in the new year, 13 percent plan to stop smoking and 10 percent want to be a better person, according to the Marist Poll. Spending less money and getting more exercise were other top resolutions.

The steps to planning and carrying through with a resolution can be tricky and may often leave those making them with a sense of pressure and then failure. For some help, the Lake County Journal talked with experts who share tips to making resolutions stick. The Journal features a three-part series to inspire readers through three resolutions. This week, the Journal focuses on weight loss. Next week, we offer advice on quitting smoking. On Jan. 24, readers can learn ways to reduce stress.

Expert offers ways to reduce weight and keep it off Theresa Albert nutritionist

A

ccording to Gold’s Gym in Gurnee, workout gyms get more traffic during the first one to two months of the year because people are motivated by their New Year’s resolutions to get more exercise, be healthier and lose weight. But keeping the goal to lose weight throughout the year is tricky, said Theresa Albert, a nutritionist, health consultant and author of three healthy-eating books. Albert said what really helps keep those resolutions over time is making them only when you’re truly ready to change your lifestyle. “If you’re not ready to make a change, you’re simply going to trip,” Albert said. If you are ready, though, one of the first moves is to

create a plan of action that includes choosing a support system. “Find a buddy or someone to hold you accountable,” Albert said. That way, when your resolution starts to fade from your priority list, there’s always someone who can remind you of it. Albert said the second move is to recognize the real reason why you want lose weight – to fit into that wedding dress, to be able to play with your kids and not feel out of breath, to feel better about your body. “Pick one change you want to tackle every week and write it down,” Albert said. Focusing on one particular aspect will make it easier. Adler gives the example of eating a healthy breakfast. It’s one of the most important changes to make, she said, because “If you skip breakfast your sugar level spikes and then crashes.” That’s when you

get hungry and tired and you’ll eat anything, she said. Albert added that life stressors can affect eating habits, so consider those when trying to lose weight. For Eva Glenn of Grayslake, the stressors that get her into trouble are the times she picks up her two young kids after school and then runs errands. “The kids are hungry, I’m hungry and then I just end up going to some drivethrough,” Glenn said. Her New Year’s resolution is to eat out less and work out more. She started working out three times a week, but then went on vacation. She said she doesn’t want to get out of the habit so as soon as she got back she began to work out again. “It’s not always easy to get to the gym, but you gotta do it to be healthy,” Glenn said. To be healthy and keep her resolution she plans to

prepare food earlier so that when everyone gets hungry, the food is already made and there’s no excuse to eat junk. Adler said that’s a good idea because by preparing food ahead of time, you can plan out exactly what you want and should eat. Going through a drivethrough also takes time, she said. “In the time you’re sitting at the drive-through line, you could have made something healthy,” Adler said. Adler has recipes on her website at www.myfriendinfood.com for easy-to-make foods for the week. For Patricia Dixon of Grayslake, who is diabetic and was ill most of last year, making the right food choices is a serious matter. Dixon resolves to be healthy and be more involved with the American Diabetes Association in 2013.

“Being around to spend time with my family is my incentive,” Dixon said. She and her husband have two teenage sons and she said she wants to be able to see her grandchildren some day. For her, working at Curves on Barron Boulevard in Grayslake is just what she needs to stay honest with her resolution of better health. For people like Glenn and Dixon and anyone who’s resolved to lose weight this year, Adler suggests starting with a big change — the food they need to eat to be healthy. Then once the bad nutritional habits have turned into good, that success can propel you to start exercising. “Eighty percent of losing weight is the food and 20 percent of it is the exercise,” Adler said. “Start with the food, then you’ll be inspired to move more.”

COVER PHOTO: Scott Stewart, of Gurnee plays with his daughter, Claire, 2, in the Children’s Neighborhood Museum at the Robert W. Rolek Community Center in Round Lake. Claire’s twin, Jonah, was also playing in the museum. (Candace H. Johnson – lcjedit@lakecountyjournal.com) See more photos on page 14.

• Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

“In the time you’re sitting at the drive-through line, you could have made something healthy,”

LEAD STORY | Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com

Healthy resolutions

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Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

| COMMUNITY NEWS

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OnTheRecordWith: Kevin Furlan

Round Lake police officer educates citizens By YADIRA SANCHEZ OLSON yolson@shawmedia.com

K

evin Furlan, 38, has been a police officer with the Round Lake Police Department for the past three and a half years. The best thing about his job, he said, is helping people. That’s why last year he volunteered to conduct the first Round Lake Police Department’s Citizen Police Academy. This year he’s hoping even more citizens will sign up to learn what he and his fellow officers do to protect and serve, and about how both the citizens and the police department can work together to keep the village crime free. Furlan said he makes the classes fun by answering all questions asked, showing films and going on field trips, such as the one he took his class on last year to CenCom or the dispatching center and holding facility in Round Lake Beach. He also brings in guest speakers for demonstrations. “Watching somebody who’s passionate about what they do tell you about what they do is always fun and interesting,” Furlan said.

Why is having this program important for both the police department and the community?

We have these classes to foster a good working relationship between the community and the police department. People learn about

all the services the police department provides. For example, some people don’t know that they can call us up for a house watch if they’re going out of town. Our greatest resource, as far as police work goes, is always the community. We solve more crimes because of community involvement than we ever solve through evidence or things of that nature.

What was your experience with the first program?

I considered it to be very successful even though it was a small class. The students seemed to get a lot out of it. They were very engaged; they enjoyed the subject matter. They wanted to talk, they wanted to learn. It is truly an open forum. You can ask any questions that you like and we’ll give you the answer.

Were all the people taking the class interested in becoming a cop?

No. The youngest was about 20 years old and our oldest was about 75. So, it ran the gamut. We had a single mom, a mother and daughter and a married couple. It made the class very interesting and intriguing. They asked a lot of good questions and hopefully we gave a lot of good answers.

What happens when the program is over?

Photo provided

Kevin Furlan conducts the Round Lake Police Department’s Citizen Police Academy. People get a framed certificate and a patch. Last time I bought a cake. We had a little shindig and we took pictures.

What are some of the points the program covers?

We start with an introductory class where we explain what will happen. We’ll also have an entire class dedicated to law so that people have a better understanding. That covers searches and seizures, traffic stops, what you are required to give to a police officer in a certain situation and what you’re not required to give.

Other topics covered are defensive tactics and investigations. The only class people didn’t like last time was the one covering report writing and paperwork, so we’re not going to do that this time, even though that is a big part of our job. There’s also a weapons class where people get to view the weapons that we use.

What are you hoping people get out of the program?

The reason why we’re doing this is so people have a better understanding of what

police do. That’s important because you have what you see on TV and in the movies and that can either be very positive or very negative but nine times out of 10 it’s not true. You don’t have police officers like Dirty Harry — one man taking the law into his own hands. That doesn’t happen. We work together as a team. We’re trying to give people the reality of what we do. Another aspect of it is that we’re trying to give people safety ideas so they are aware of what’s going on around them. We feel fantastic when we are lucky enough to be able to help somebody before something bad ever happens, when they see all the warning signs and they do everything right and they are able to call us up before anything happens. That’s how they can help us help them. That’s the idea behind community policing.

The citizen police academy is a 12-week course. It starts Jan. 14 through April 1 and registration is now open to Round Lake residents 18 years old and older. There is a minimum of five people needed for the program to run and a maximum of 30. Class is every Monday from 7 to 9 p.m. at the Round Lake Police Station, 741 W. Townline Road, Round Lake. To register, fill out the online application at www. eroundlake.com. For more information, call 847-546-8112 ext. 1031.

Lake County Haven seeks donations for Adopt-A-Night program BY LAKE COUNTY JOURNAL lcjedit@lakecountyjournal.com Due to decreased funding, the Haven is reaching out to individuals, clubs, churches and businesses in the community, and asking them to do just one thing: Adopt one night at the shelter. “If we can get just 365 peo-

ple or clubs or businesses to step up and adopt a night for $239, we can ensure the operation of our shelter for the entire year. We believe and hope that the good people of Lake County will rise to this challenge,” said Donna Barnett, board of directors vicepresident. The Haven’s residents be-

come homeless due to a variety of reasons including job loss, eviction, foreclosure, illness and domestic violence. The Haven has seen a sharp increase in the number of people homeless due to purely economic reasons, said Laura Sabino, executive director. The Haven was hit hard by the recession and was forced

to temporarily reduce expenses, but did so without sacrificing a single bed for homeless women or children, said Barnett. The Haven re-structured, worked hard to strengthen its financial foundation, and has held steady. Part of the reason that the Haven has survived is the success of its annual gala, A Havenly Night, each spring.

But other sources of income have decreased dramatically, she said. Often, Haven residents said if they had not gotten into the Haven’s shelter, they would be sleeping on park benches, in a car, on the steps of their church or in the forest preserves. For more information, call 847-680-1703.


By LAKE COUNTY JOURNAL

Photo provided

LEFT: An Allendale Association student visits with a pet from Lake County Animal Care and Control.

lcjedit@lakecountyjournal.com

arriving at Allendale. So for the past five years, Wright has been using the commonality between unwanted animals and the

youths to provide therapy for the troubled youths. “Animals tend to break down walls. I’ve seen changes in children from the start of a

program to the end of program,” she said. Wright conducts education programs throughout Lake County on behalf of the Lake County Health Department’s Animal Care and Control program, but Allendale is her favorite spot because the programs are not only educational, but also therapeutic for the youths. During the once-a week visits over six weeks, Wright talks about animal cruelty, and the youths learn they can survive being mistreated just like the animals who visit are surviving, she said. She also talked about being cautious around mothers of baby animals. “Never underestimate what a mom will do for her babies,” she said, after which one youth turned to her friend and softly said, “Not my mom.”

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• Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

Have you wrestled an alligator? Do you get rabbits? Have you picked up horses? The questions Lake County Animal Care and Control Warden Renee Wright fields from a group of teenage girls are not unusual, but they just touch the surface of what the visits are about at Allendale Association. The 100-plus acre Allendale Association campus near Lake Villa is home to boys and girls, ages 7 through 21, who have experienced emotional trauma – so much trauma that they can easily understand the feeling of being unwanted like the animals taken to the Animal Care and Control program near Mundelein. On average, the youths placed in the program by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services have lived in 12 different homes before

There are over 1,200 youth and their families served by Allendale’s programs with about 105 children living on campus in Lake Villa and attending school there, plus about 60 more youths attending day treatment school and counseling in Lake Villa. Youths must earn the right to attend sessions with the animals and Wright said that inevitably there is one youth in each group with a passion for caring for animals. “It’s hard to see why people don’t care for their animals,” said 14-year-old Shirley, who wants to be a veterinarian. “When I see a dog, I want to adopt it right away.” Wright told the group how Animal Care and Control is usually called when someone has dumped a pet and hopes that someone will find the pet and take it in. “With the economy being the way it is, people don’t know what to do with their pets when they cannot afford to care for them. They drop them somewhere out of fear of being judged.”

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COMMUNITY NEWS | Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com

Working with unwanted animals provides therapy for youth


Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

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First-graders keeping local dogs fed through project BY ELIZABETH VASSOLO

Photo provided

LEFT: A first-grader shapes dog biscuits to help canines in need.

lcjedit@lakecountyjournal.com Carla Moser and her first-grade glass at Emmons Elementary school in Antioch, want to make sure local dogs don’t go hungry. That’s why she and her students created feedSpot, a dog food drive and donation program that has her class collecting dog food and distributing it to the Open Arms Food Pantry. “Everyone knows I am kind of a dog girl,” Moser said. “And with the economy being how it is and seeing how many people are in the food pantry parking lot every time it opens, I thought the dogs needed to be fed, too.” Helping others is nothing new for Moser. At the beginning of each year she picks a cause her students can believe in and teaches them by experience, what a little time and energy can accomplish. “I want the kids to know even though they are little people, they have the ability to positively impact their community and give back,” she said. The students are involved in every aspect of the project. They stay busy collecting dog food and monetary donations from individuals and businesses. They hold regular fund raisers selling homemade dog biscuits and note cards. They also mix the dog food, bag it, create fliers, decorate the donation boxes and deliver it to the food pantry. “They see how to start something, identify a problem, get in there, do the planning, do the legwork and get it done,” Moser said. So far the students have distributed more than 2,000 pounds of dog food and have raised enough money to buy

900 more pounds in the coming weeks. The class hopes to collect at least 5,000 pounds of dog food, and so far their efforts have helped 265 dogs. For students like 7-year old James Sheehan, whose best friend is his golden retriever Wrigley, helping other dogs is just the right thing to do. “My favorite part is bagging the dog food,” he said. “I like to bag it because it makes me feel good to see all that food.” The parents also love the lessons their kids are learning and the positive response from the project. “James has always been gung-ho for it,” said James’ mother, Kelly Sheehan. “At the beginning of the school year, it was his birthday, so he

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took some of his birthday money to donate. And I never hear any complaining. I have two

other kids, and they always want to go and help, too.” Karen Pyburn’s daughter

Addison also in Ms. Moser’s class, agrees. “We are very lucky to have Ms. Moser as a teacher,” Pyburn said. “Kids always have good ideas and I think adults are too busy to help them follow through. This has really opened their eyes to give them a realistic view that some people can’t afford to keep their pets.” The project will run through the end of the school year. Moser plans to publish a book sharing her student’s feedSpot journey. As for next year, Moser will refer to her long list of idea projects, pick a new one and plan to help more people. “Ms. Moser is constantly trying got figure out a way to save the world one 6- or 7-yearold at a time and making it a better place to live in,” said Kelly Sheehan. To make a donation, go to http://startsomegood.com/ Venture/feedspot_pet_food_ pantry.

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No case is typical. You should not expect to experience these results. ©2012 RisingTide


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• Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

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| Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com

A healing environment that will nurture your mind, body and soul


Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

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Photo provided

Auction stirs interest in Batmobile trivia By LAKE COUNTY JOURNAL lcjedit@lakecountyjournal.com With only 15 days to complete the feat and a $15,000 budget, George Barris took a 1955 Lincoln Futura concept car out of storage and created arguably the most famous entertainment industry auto ever — the Batmobile. The legendary car customizer crafted the iconic car late in 1965 for the live-action TV series “Batman,” as well as the movie adaptation, featuring Adam West. With the singular, steelbodied original soon headed for a Barrett-Jackson auction in Scottsdale, Ariz., the phone calls have been fast and furious at Volo Auto Museum, where the No. 7 Batmobile long has been a chief attraction. “The one going up for auction is the first one built,” said Brian Grams, director at the museum at 27582 Volo Village Road, Volo. After crafting the original, Barris made a mold and created several fiberglass duplicates “for exhibition use and for backup cars in case [the first] one broke down on the set,” Grams said. “Ours is car No. 7.” Only a handful, including Volo’s, are DC Comicsapproved, actual Batmobiles, bearing the trademarked redorange “bat” logo and permitted to be displayed under the title of “Batmobile.” Barris himself appears regularly at Volo Auto Museum, which also has his personal seal of approval to claim true “Batmobile” status for its car. “It’s not the original,” Grams said. “But it’s an original … visually speaking, they look identical.” Which perhaps is why the morning news team from WGN TV requested the car’s use for

its Dec. 11 newscast, in which a spoof of the Barrett-Jackson auction is planned, Grams said. No doubt the upcoming auction is no laughing matter for Barris, who owns the No. 1 Batmobile and will sell it Jan. 19. Holy masterful tailfins, Batman. We wonder how high bids will go. “[Barris] says it’s the most important movie car ever built, which you can’t argue,” Grams said. “I can’t think of a car more famous than that one. He’s thinking $3 million.” Meanwhile, should you wish to view one of the original’s closest, most bona fide cousins, stop by the Volo Auto Museum, which features hundreds of classic, muscle and Hollywood cars. The museum is open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. Admission is $11.95 per adult, $6.95 for children ages 5 to 12, and $9.95 for veterans and military personnel with ID. Admission is free for military personnel in uniform and children younger than 5. For other information, visit www.volocars.com or call 815385-3644.

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PetofTheWeek

Resale Shop & Adoption Center

Whiskers and Wags is our upscale resale shop where 100% of the proďŹ ts from the sale of the items donated to our resale shop will fund the life saving efforts and medical help needed to maintain our animal rescue organization. It is also the place to meet animals for adoption!

Look for us in the Long Meadow Commons at Rte 176 & Midlothian Rd! 1126 W Maple Avenue,Mundelein IL 60060 Have a question or want to get more information? Please contact us at 847-566-6799

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(847) 587-2155

weekly column come from Whiskers & Wags Upscale Resale Shop and Adoption Center, 1126 Maple Ave., in Mundelein. The resale shop supports Reach Rescue, Inc., a volunteer-based nonprofit, no-kill animal rescue group. Volunteers include rescuers, fosters, vets, humane societies, humane investigators and shelters that advocate saving the lives of homeless animals. Whiskers & Wags Resale Shop accepts donations at the adoption center in Mundelein. Call 847-566-7799 for more information. All the profits from the sale of items donated to the shop will fund the life-saving medical efforts needed to help unwanted animals.

Congratulations Tim Biglow, CIC, CLU, owner of Biglow & Company, Inc., in Fox Lake, Illinois, has been presented the Gold Key Award by Pekin Life Insurance Company, which annually honors those individuals who display superiority in the sales of life and health insurance. Contact Tim today for assistance with all your life and health insurance needs.

Pekin Life Insurance Company www.pekininsurance.com

• Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

Lili was found wandering outside by a REACH Rescue volunteer while kids were throwing clumps of mud at her, making her very scared and aggressive. After a couple of weeks Lili blossomed and is now a confident, sweet, affectionate and loving kitty. Her favorite place in the world is sitting on a human lap or next to one while being petted. Lili is great with other cats as well as dogs, and she loves it when humans talk to her. She is completely vetted and ready for a forever home. To find out more about Lili or any other pets, visit wwwreachrescue.org or call 847-637-5661. The pets featured in this

Whiskers & Wags

PET OF THE WEEK | Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com

Lili, an affectionate kitty needs a home, family to love


Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

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For Current Obituaries Visit our Website at www.strangfh.com

Place your ad in our FUNERAL DIRECTORY today! 847-223-8161 • Fax: 847-223-8810

On Thursday, December 13, 2012, the Lake County Journal ran an advertisement on behalf of the Village of Fox Lake and Korpan’s Landing, thanking several individuals and business owners for their contributions to the 56th Annual Holiday Parade and Children’s Christmas Party. This advertisement omitted two very important contributors from the Village of Fox Lake. A special “Thank You” to Dockers Restaurant & Lounge and to King’s Landing for their on-going support of all Village special events and community programs. paid advertisement

Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

Funeral Directory


Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

12

OPINION

THE FIRST AMENDMENT Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.

SketchView

LetterToTheEditor Smoke-Free Illinois celebrates anniversary Dear editor, The Smoke-Free Illinois Act, which protects all Illinoisans from the lifethreatening dangers of secondhand smoke, became effective Jan. 1, 2008. Today, Illinois workers (including those employed by casinos, restaurants and bars) no longer have to sacrifice their health for a paycheck. Families and friends are able to dine out without the risk of exposure to the deadly poisons known to exist in secondhand smoke. In addition, studies show that smoke-free laws not only help protect workers and patrons from being exposed to deadly secondhand smoke, but they also help smokers to quit. Numerous times over the past five years, special interests have tried, without success, to repeal or weaken the Smoke-Free Illinois Act. We should not forget that the U.S. Surgeon General has determined there is no safe level of exposure to secondhand smoke, which is a major cause of lung cancer, heart disease and emphysema. In fact, each

year secondhand smoke is responsible for nearly 50,000 deaths from cancer and heart disease among non-smokers. I urge our Illinois lawmakers to continue to preserve this life-saving law, which protects the health and well-being of all who live and work in this state. Sincerely, Maggie Powell American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network (ACS CAN) Volunteer Waukegan, IL

Letters: We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, home address and day and evening telephone numbers. We limit letters to 300 words and one published letter every 30 days. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity at the sole discretion of the editor. Submit letters by: Email: lcjedit@ lakecountyjournal.com; Fax: 847-223-8810; Mail: Lake County Journal, P.O. Box 258, Grayslake, IL 60030

SeeingItThrough

November election shows women are major force The 2012 election showed that from this day forward, women in America will not be ignored in politics. In fact, their record numbers in Congress will continue to increase. They will be the major force in building the agenda of the future. From my experience in government, I found that women are more independent minded, and that’s a great thing. The Democratic Party can thank the radical agenda of the Republicans for its November victories. The anti-women policies that were forced on Mitt Romney during the primaries proved to be an albatross around his neck in the general election, and choked any chance of victory against President Obama. Of course, other fac tors were at play, too.

John S. Matijevich

Romney never seemed to know where he stood on issues from one minute to the next. The new-look Congress will have many feminine faces after the January inauguration. One of them will be Senator Elizabeth Warren. A couple of months ago, I called her race against the incumbent U.S. Senator from Massachusetts the most important congressional contest in the country. I wrote that because I thought

that she had the potential to become an outstanding lawmaker to serve the middle class and ordinary citizens. Besides that, the mega-donor ultra- conservative wheeler and dealers and lobbyists listed her as the No. 1 target on their hit list. Her career in fighting for those who are taken advantage of, and especially her work in battling the giants who control the financial agenda was rewarded. Her star will continue to shine brightly in the years ahead, and middle America will be the better for it. Considering that women are a majority in the country, it is probable that their numbers will also grow in state legislatures. When I began as a legislator, women were such a scarcity that they

didn’t even have a women’s restroom as a part of the floor of the House of Representatives in Springfield. I believe that it was in the late 1970s when a cloak room was turned into a women’s restroom. You can imagine the inconvenience when women had to skip roll calls to use a restroom one floor below the House Chamber. I recall when I lost my last election in 1990 after a district remap, I suggested to the Democratic leadership that they could win back that seat if they nominate a qualified woman from the Lake Forest area. Susan Garrett then became the nominee, and that started her great career, culminating in victories in the state senate. You can be sure that in the near future there will be a

woman rise to become President of the United States of America – and also a woman will become governor of Illinois. Haven’t they waited long enough? To that point, you will never guess who said the following in 1969, someone who I rarely agreed with, but I agree with what he iterated then: “Certainly, In the next 50 years we shall see a woman president, perhaps sooner than you think. A woman can and should be able to do any political job that man can do.” That was uttered by the late and former president of the United States, Richard M. Nixon. To meet his timetable, a woman must become president in the 2016 election. Is that on the horizon?


By BILL PEMSTEIN

Photo provided

RIGHT: Shannah Schumacher (center) maneuvers a puck with Logan Harper close behind.

editorial@mygurneelife.com

offense? It’s because he has a potent scorer in sophomore Kristin Chivers. Ballestero, named Illinois coach of the year a season ago, believes Chivers can play this sport in college if she keeps it up. She’s one of those double-roster players who also plays for the Chicago Young Americans. Now in double figures in scoring, Chivers is ranked in the top six in league scoring. From Carmel comes another key sophomore. She’s Logan Harper. She plays hockey for Team Illinois. “She’s another very big scorer on the team,’’ Ballestero said. In goal is Lakes senior Aeriell Pendley. She plays for the Milwaukee Admirals, when not playing for Warren. She’s making saves on a 92 percent basis.

Also on this team are Megan Cavanaugh, Elizabeth Cecchin, Katie Charland, Alex Christensen, Gabrielle Gallo, Jordan Knoll, Kate McCleary, Rachel Sacca,

Rachel Settle and Brittany Thompson. And there is a player named Amanda Ballestero. Yes, the coach’s daughter. “She saw her brother play-

Welcome to Plan!t Weekend January 12 & 13

planitlake.com

Top 3 Picks!

ing so she wanted to give it a try,’’ he said. The team’s next local game is scheduled for 9:10 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 13, at Rinkside in Gurnee.

What is Plan!t? PlanitLake.com organizes everything you need for affordable weekend fun! With our money saving vouchers and extensive events calendar you can always find something to do on Planit!

Planit is where you will find:

1

2

January 12 Winter Fest Centennial Ice Arena, Highland Park

January 12 Trains of Grayslake and Lake County Grayslake Heritage Center, Grayslake

There will be figure skating, speed skating, hockey and free stake with lessons available. Learn about how bees, coyotes, and other wildlife survive the cold winter. An ice sculpture demonstration, cookie decorating, dog sled, and carriage rides also. Event is from 3:30 to 6 p.m.

This presentation features more than 70 images of area railroads taken by Terry Norton. Learn about the fascinating history of the iron horse in the area. There is also an exhibit of the history of the railroad in Grayslake on display, now through February 28. Starts at 2 p.m.

pdhp.org

villageofgrayslake.com

3 January 13 Winterfest! Volo Bog, Ingleside Enjoy this annual event, featuring live music, storytelling and winter-theme crafts indoors while outdoors there will be hikes, and snow permitting , snow sculpting contests and cross-country skiing.. Cookies, hot cocoa and coffee will be for sale. Fun starts at noon. Suggested donation of $5 for adults and $2 for children. friendsofvolobog.org

Please note; we try to be as accurate as possible with our events but things are subject to change without notice. Check the listing and confirm before heading to an event.

The best local deals and coupons for the businesses you visit - save on shopping, dining and entertainment! Our calendar with the best list of family friendly events and activities. All the details for local festivals, concerts and more!

• Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

This growing sport of high school girls hockey still requires a team to get players from other schools to fill out a roster. So, the job of Warren Township High School head hockey coach Manny Ballestero is to put together a team. In addition to Warren girls hockey players, his club has athletes from Carmel in Mundelein, Lakes in Lake Villa, Highland Park and Antioch. This club started the season slowly at 0-5 and they rallied to tie the season mark at 7-7. Now there are some key players from Warren, such as Shannah Schumacher. This senior captain can play anywhere on the ice. “Last year, she was a scoring machine,’’ Ballestero said. “But we’ve dropped her back to defense and she’s really stepped up. She’s accepted her role.” So how can Ballestero take away Schumacher from

13

SPORTS | Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com

Girls hockey club scouts players from neighboring towns


Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

| COMMUNITY PHOTOS

14

In the neighborhood Photos by Candace H. Johnson

FAR ABOVE: Nick Green, 3, of Lake Villa and Jackson Hjorth, 2, of Round Lake have some make-believe tea while they play in the Children’s Neighborhood Museum at the Robert W. Rolek Community Center in Round Lake. IMMEDIATE ABOVE: Evan Huhn, 2, of Volo plays in the Children’s Neighborhood Museum. RIGHT: Evan Huhn, 2, of Volo plays next to his mother, Colleen.


15

Critic’sChoice

BY TOM WITOM lcjedit@lakecountyjournal.com

Tickets, please

What: “The School for Lies” Where: Chicago Shakespeare Theater, 800 E. Grand Ave. When: Through Jan. 20 Tickets: $58-$78 Information: 312- 595-5600

500 Lunch Specials $ 00 2 Domestic Bottles $ 00 1 Domestic Drafts $

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• Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

CHICAGO – Truth be told: deceitfulness is in the air in “The School for Lies,” David Ives’s delightful adaption of Moliere’s 17th century farce, “The Misanthrope.” Making its Midwest premiere at Chicago Shakespeare Theater under the capable direction of Barbara Gaines, this production is a hoot from start to finish. A smart cast in over-the-top period costumes and wigs (by Susan E. Mickey and Melissa Veal, respectively) performs brilliantly with nary a stumble over sight gags and exaggerated rhyming couplets, many of which are riddled with contemporary references. The storyline of this satirical work, which was first performed in 1666, has a contemporary feel that’s very much at home in the 21st cen-

tury thanks to Ives’s inspired script. “School for Lies” opens with Frank (Ben Carlson), a blunt French drama critic who has returned to his native country boasting that he speaks the truth as he sees it – a trait that can get a fellow in trouble in a litigious society where suits for slander and calumny are commonplace. Rounding out the energetic cast is Samuel Taylor, a servant who adds further comic relief dashing about with endless trays of hors d’oeuvres that mostly end up littering the stage.

Monday - Thursday

ENTERTAINMENT | Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com

‘School for Lies’ is a smart take on Moliere


Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

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16

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17

| Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013


Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

|

18

Start finding better today. Visit LakeCountyJournal.com/jobs or call 1-800-589-8237.


Lake County Journal / LakeCountyJournal.com • Edition of January 10-January 16, 2013

|

48

Sale Dates:

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Beef & Pork

Paul’s Italian Beef ...............................................................$2.89lb Precooked Spare Ribs........................................................$1.29lb Breaded Pork Patties 5lb......................................................$7.45

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Spicy Sauced Chicken Wings 4.5lb......................................$12.99 Boneless Wing Zings 5lb.....................................................$18.25 Munch Box Southern Chicken & Cheese Bits 2lb .................$3.99 Munch Box Mac And Cheese Bites 2lb Bag..........................$4.50

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Frozen Vegetables 16oz .......................................................$1.25 Potato Skin 2lb......................................................................$2.50 6/5lb French Fries ............................................................. $11.50!

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We Now Accept The SNAP CARD Hours: Monday - Friday 9-5, Wednesday 9-6, Saturday 8-4, Sunday 9-4 We reserve the right to limit or correct printing errors.


LCJtest11013