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Monday, December 16, 2013

COLLEGE FOOTBALL • SPORTS, B1

FACE TIME WITH ... • LOCAL, A2

Lynch finishes third in Heisman voting

DeKalb High School senior plans for career in politics

Evan Guest

Local service hopes to aid more Women, Infants and Children program already helps more than 1,800 in DeKalb County By ANDREA AZZO aazzo@shawmedia.com DeKALB – Kay Chase didn’t know about the Women, Infants and Children program until she started working for it. Chase is the program coordinator for the DeKalb County branch of the federally funded food and nutrition assistance program, commonly referred to as the WIC Program, which serves qualifying low-income families across the nation. WIC Program officials serve about 1,875 clients a month in DeKalb County, Chase said, but they want to serve more. Clients in the program receive $40 to 80 a month in coupons for USDA-approved foods, as well an education on nutrition, including breastfeeding.

“We want to serve people out there that need to be served,” Chase said. “There’s people out there who need food.” Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding and children younger than 5 are eligible for the program depending on their income. A family of four that earns up to $43,568 a year, or $1,816 monthly, is eligible. The WIC Program is funded by the federal government. The amount of money they receive is load-based, said Cindy Graves, director of community health and prevention. This means if the program gets more clients, they should get more money, Graves said. The WIC Program in DeKalb County receives about $318,000 a year, which is distributed by the state.

WIC Program officials have distributed posters in laundromats, libraries and local food pantries to get the word out about their program. They’ve also relied on wordof-mouth resources. That’s how DeKalb resident Megan Jackson heard about the WIC Program. Her former sister-in-law suggested she sign up after she became pregnant. Jackson, a seven-year client who has been in and out of the WIC Program because of age requirements with her three children, said her family has saved a lot of money going grocery shopping. “My kids drink a lot of milk,” Jackson said. “[Coupons for] milk alone has given us huge savings in our household budget.”

See PROGRAM, page A8

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Megan Jackson picks out some groceries Saturday with her 1-year-old son, Cameron Jackson, at Schnuck’s in DeKalb. Jackson is in the Women, Infants and Children program.

DOWNTOWN DeKALB

Hopkins: Little retail space available

Sticker shock for health care insurance? By CARLA K. JOHNSON The Associated Press

through the catering business that he discovered a void in the community – banquet hall space. McMahon received a low-interest loan of about $340,000 from TIF funds to help renovate the building. And he’s hoping that as customers use his banquet hall, they also will take time to explore downtown.

CHICAGO – The next big challenge for the nation’s health care law may be sticker shock, when consumers find they’re still paying high medical bills after buying lowcost insurance for the first time. With a Dec. 23 deadline looming for anyone who wants health insurance by Jan. 1, people may hurry to choose plans with cheap monthly payments on a new insurance marketplace. But they may be surprised, especially if they’ve never had coverage before, to find they’re still on the hook for thousands of dollars in out-of-pocket “deductibles,” a standard part of most insurance policies. Many will find they must pay costs up to $6,350 – on top of their monthly premiums – before their insurance pays anything for actual medical care. If they have a family, they may have to pay nearly $13,000 in an out-of-pocket “deductible” before insurance starts paying. If you don’t know about deductibles, you’re not alone. Only 14 percent of American adults with insurance understand deductibles and other key concepts of insurance plans, according to a study published this year in the Journal of Health Economics. If people with insurance don’t understand it, it’s likely that uninsured Americans’ grasp is even fuzzier. If they make poor decisions when shopping for insurance for the first time, they may be surprised that the law’s promise of affordable care, for them, is still out of reach.

See RETAIL, page A8

See HEALTH CARE, page A8

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Line cook Xan Peldonia slices bread in preparation for a holiday party Saturday at Faranda’s in DeKalb.

New retail establishments, such as Faranda’s, have recently opened By DEBBIE BEHRENDS dbehrends@shawmedia.com DeKALB – Ducky’s Formalwear is looking to move from its current location, but has no plans to leave downtown DeKalb, confirmed manager Diane Hosey. “We’ve run into issues with a building we’ve been looking at, and won’t know anything until the end of

March,” Hosey said. Other downtown business owners, Bill and Joy McMahon of The Lincoln Inn, have invested additional money in the community with the opening of Faranda’s, a banquet hall in the former DeKalb Clinic Annex at 302 Grove St. “DeKalb has been a great community to do business in,” Bill McMahon said. “There’s great grassroots

Voice your opinion What area of DeKalb is most in need of new development? Go to Daily-Chronicle.com to vote. support here. People want to support their downtown.” The Lincoln Inn also provides catering, and McMahon said it was

Inside today’s Daily Chronicle Lottery Local news Obituaries

A2 A2-4 A4

National and world news Opinions Sports

Weather A4 A9 B1-3, 6-7

Advice Comics Classified

B4 B5 B8-10

High:

20

Low:

16

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MORNING READ

Page A2 • Monday, December 16, 2013

8 DAILY PLANNER Today

Big Book Study AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Overeaters Anonymous: 10 a.m. at Senior Services Center, 330 Grove St. in DeKalb; 815-758-4718. Free blood pressure clinic: 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at Kishwaukee Community Hospital, 1 Kish Hospital Drive in DeKalb. www.kishhospital.org/ programs; 815-748-8962. Sycamore Food Pantry: Noon to at Sycamore United Methodist Church, 160 Johnson Ave. 815-895-9113. Winter coats are available October to February. Alzheimer’s/Dementia Support Group for Caregivers: 1 p.m. at DeKalb Adult Day Center, 126 S. Fourth St. Contact: Alzheimer’s Association of Greater Rockford, 815-484-1300. DeKalb Daytime HEA: 1:30 p.m. at a member’s home. Part of the Homemakers Education Association. For meeting location and other information, call Urla at 815-758-1509. Feed My Sheep Food Pantry: 3 to 5 p.m. at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 1915 N. First St. in DeKalb. All are welcome. New Hope Baptist Church Food Pantry: 4:30 to 6:30 p.m. at the church, 1201 Twombly Road in DeKalb. 815-756-7706. Kiwanis Club of DeKalb: 5:30 p.m. at the Dekalb Elks Lodge, 209 S. Annie Glidden Road. Contact Tarryn Thaden, club president, at tthaden@gmail.com; 815-751-4719; dekalbkiwanis.org. Take Off Pounds Sensibly: 5:45 p.m. weigh-in and 6:30 p.m. meetings, St. John’s Lutheran Church, 13N535 French Road in Burlington. 847-8336908. 12 & 12 AA(C): 6 p.m. at Salem Lutheran Church, 1145 DeKalb Ave., Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com. Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group; 815-756-5228; www. safepassagedv.org. DeKalb Chess Club: 6 to 8 p.m. at First Congregational Church, 615 N. First St., DeKalb. Free, open chess game play, all ages and skill levels are welcome. Equipment is provided but attendees are welcome to bring their own. info@dekalbchess.com or visit www.DeKalbChess.com. DeKalb Rotary Club: 6 p.m. at Ellwood House Museum. 815-756-5677. Kishwaukee Valley Heritage Society directors: 6 p.m. at Kishwaukee Valley Heritage Museum, 622 Park Ave. in Genoa. Members and guests are welcome. Directors meeting followed by a general membership meeting at 6:30 p.m. 12 Step & 12 Traditions AA(C): 6:30 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 321 Oak St. in DeKalb; www.firstumc. net. DeKalb Evening Lions Club: 6:30 p.m. at Junction Eating Place, 816 W. Lincoln Highway. New members welcome. Contact: Rick Tonozzi, club president, at 815-756-6550. www. dekalbeveninglions.info/. Back to Basics AA(C): 7 p.m. at Union Congregational, 305 S. Gage St., Somonauk. 800-452-7990; www. dekalbalanoclub.com. DeKalb Festival Chorus: 7 to 9 p.m. rehearsals in Room 171, Northern Illinois University Music Building in DeKalb. dekalbfestivalchorus.org. Adults can schedule an audition; festivalchorus@gmail.com or 630-4538006. Expect A Miracle AA: 8 p.m. open meeting, United Methodist, Third and South streets, Kirkland, 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. We Are Not Saints AA(C): 8 p.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Tuesday Kishwaukee Sunrise Rotary: 7 a.m. at Kishwaukee Community Hospital, 1 Kish Hospital Drive in DeKalb. Contact: Becky Beck Ryan, president, 815-7583800. Weekly Men’s Breakfast: 8 a.m. at Fox Valley Community Center, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich. Cost for these men-only events is $4 for food and conversation, along with bottomless cups of coffee or tea. Easy Does It AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Weight Watchers: 9:30 a.m. weigh-in, 10 a.m., 12:30 p.m., and 5:30 p.m. meetings at Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road (near Aldi), DeKalb. Women with Cancer Network: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. third Tuesday each month at The Cancer Center at Kishwaukee Community Hospital. Women with Cancer Network is an opportunity for women with similar experiences to give and receive support, and share information. Participants can learn from each other, meet new people, have discussions, and listen to presentations. The group is free and no registration required. Visit www.kishhospital.org/ programs or call 815-748-2958.

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

8 WHAT’S HAPPENING AT DAILY-CHRONICLE.COM? Yesterday’s Reader Poll results:

Today’s Reader Poll question:

What type of donations are you most likely to make during the holiday? Cash: 58 percent Food and nonperishables: 19 percent Clothing and coats: 16 percent Toys: 7 percent Total votes: 213

What area of DeKalb is most in need of new development? • Downtown • Area between downtown and NIU • South Fourth Street • Sycamore Road • Other Vote online at Daily-Chronicle.com

8 FACE TIME WITH ...

Vol. 135 No. 300 Main Office 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb 815-756-4841 Toll-free: 877-688-4841 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Customer Service: 800-589-9363 Customer service phone hours: Mon.-Fri. 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat.-Sun. 7 a.m.-10 a.m.

Missed paper? We hope not. But if you did and you live in the immediate area, please call Customer Service at 800-589-9363 before 10 a.m. daily. We will deliver your Daily Chronicle as quickly as possible. If you have questions or suggestions, complaints or praise, please send to: Circulation Dept., 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. To become a carrier, call ext. 2468.

EVAN GUEST

Copyright 2013 Published daily by Shaw Media. SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION Daily: $.75 / issue Sunday: $1.50 / issue Basic weekly rate: $5.25 Basic annual rate: $273 GENERAL MANAGER Karen Pletsch kpletsch@shawmedia.com ADVERTISING Display Advertising: ext. 2217 Fax: 815-756-2079 Classified Advertising: 815-787-7861 Toll free: 877-264-2527 NEWSROOM Eric Olson Editor eolson@shawmedia.com News: ext. 2257 news@daily-chronicle.com Obituaries: ext. 2228 obits@daily-chronicle.com Photo desk: ext. 2265 photo@daily-chronicle.com Sports desk: ext. 2224 sports@daily-chronicle.com Fax: 815-758-5059 REGIONAL PUBLISHER AND GENERAL MANAGER Don T. Bricker dbricker@shawmedia.com Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Evan Guest is a DeKalb High School senior and plans to attend Drake University next year. By DEBBIE BEHRENDS dbehrends@shawmedia.com Evan Guest is not a typical high school student. The DeKalb High School senior has a vision for his future, and he’s on his way to making it happen. Guest, the son of Tom and Laurie Guest of DeKalb, took a few minutes to talk with reporter Debbie Behrends after being recognized as a Leader of Tomorrow by DeKalb County KEYS [Keep Encouraging Youth to Succeed]. Behrends: Tell me what you’re involved in at school. Guest: I’m the president of the National Honor Society, vice president of

the senior class and a student council executive. I’m involved with DCP/ SAFE [DeKalb County Partnership for a Safe, Active and Family Environment], I play trombone in both the marching and pep bands, and I’m on the speech team. My event is extemporaneous speaking. Behrends: What are you involved in outside of school? Guest: Last summer, I earned my Eagle Scout designation. My project was providing smoke detectors to about 50 families. I’m also in YEP [Youth Engaged in Philanthropy] for the second year. Behrends: What are you plans for college?

Guest: I’m planning to go to Drake University [in Des Moines, Iowa] to double major in business and political science. Drake has a good political science program, and just a good curriculum in general. Behrends: What are your career plans? Guest: I would like to get into politics and hope to get elected to Congress. Behrends: What made you choose that career path? Guest: I think it takes a special kind of person to get elected. It takes someone who is organized, influential and just generally a good person. I believe I have those qualities.

8GOVERNMENT MEETINGS Send a schedule of meetings to be included in this weekly column to news@ daily-chronicle.com, with “Government Meetings” in the subject line, or send a fax to 815-758-5059. Please provide committee name, date, time and location with the complete address.

7 p.m. at Rochelle Township High School Library, 1401 Flagg Road. Sandwich Council-As-A-Whole Committee: 7 p.m. at the Sandwich City Hall Annex, 128 E. Railroad St. Somonauk School District 432 Board: 7 p.m. in the Somonauk High School conference room, 501 W. Market St. TODAY Sycamore City Council: 7 p.m. at the DeKalb Citizen’s Community Enhance- Sycamore Center, 308 W. State St. ment Commission: 4 p.m. at the DeKalb Waterman Park Committee: 7 p.m. at Municipal Building, 200 S. Fourth St. Waterman Village Hall, 214 W. Adams St. Kishwaukee College Board of Trustees Finance Committee and Hiawatha TUESDAY School District Board of Education DeKalb County Housing Authority Joint Meeting: 6 p.m. in LRC of Hiawatha Commission: 2:30 at 507 E. Taylor St., Elementary School, Kirkland. DeKalb. DeKalb Park District Hopkins Pool DeKalb Advisory Commission on Consideration Committee: 6:30 p.m. at Disabilities: 5:30 p.m. in the conference Hopkins Park Community Center, Second- room at the DeKalb Municipal Building nd Floor Conference Room, DeKalb. Annex, 223 S. Fourth St. Genoa Park Board: 6:30 p.m. at Genoa DeKalb Airport Advisory Board: 5:30 City Hall, 333 E. First St. p.m. in the DeKalb Taylor Municipal AirHiawatha School District 426 Board: port Maintenance Facility, 2200 Pleasant 6:30 p.m. at the Elementary School LRC. St. DeKalb County Community Mental Sandwich Finance Committee: 5:30 Health Board: 7 p.m. at the Community p.m. at Sandwich City Hall, 144 E. Railroad Outreach Building, 2500 N. Annie Glidden St. Road, DeKalb. DeKalb County Board Forest Preserve Indian Creek School District 425 Committee: 6 p.m. at Administration Board: 7 p.m. in the Indian Creek High Building, conference room east, south School Media Center, 506 S. Shabbona entrance, 110 E. Sycamore St., Sycamore Road. Sycamore Park District Board: 6 p.m. Kingston Village Board: 7 p.m. at the at Maintenance Building, 435 Airport Kingston Village Building, 101 E. Railroad Road, Sycamore. St. Creston-Dement Public Library Board: Kirkland Village Board: 7 p.m. at the 6:15 p.m. at the library, 107 S. Main St., Kirkland Municipal Building, 511 W. Main Creston. St. Any village board committee may Genoa City Council: 6:30 p.m. at Genoa meet at 6:30 p.m. on a regular meeting City Hall Council Chambers, 333 E. First St. date without further notice. Hiawatha School District 426 Board: Rochelle School District 212 Board: 6:30 p.m. in the New Elementary School

CIRCULATION Kara Hansen Group VP of Audience Development khansen@shawmedia.com BUSINESS OFFICE Billing: 815-526-4585 Fax: 815-477-4960

8CORRECTIONS Accuracy is important to the Daily Chronicle, and we want to correct mistakes promptly. Please call errors to our attention by phone, 815-756-4841, ext. 2257; email, news@daily-chronicle.com; or fax, 815-758-5059.

8DID YOU WIN? Illinois Lottery

LRC. DeKalb Liquor Commission: 7 to 9 p.m. in Conference Room 212 at the DeKalb Municipal Building, 200 S. Fourth St. DeKalb School District 428 Board: 7 p.m. at DeKalb High School, 501 W. Dresser Road. Hinckley Fire Protection District: 7 p.m. at 911 S. Sycamore St. Kingston Township Park District: 7 p.m. at 305 E. Railroad St. Malta Fire Department: 7 p.m. at 308 E. Jefferson St. Maple Park Village Committee of the Whole: 7 p.m. at the Maple Park Civic Center, 302 Willow St. Sandwich School District: 7 p.m. in the Sandwich Middle School Library, 600 Wells St. Waterman Planning Commission: 7 p.m. at Waterman Village Hall, 215 W. Adams St.

WEDNESDAY DeKalb Sanitary District: Noon at 303 Hollister Ave. DeKalb Park District Trails & Trees Committee: 1 p.m. at Prairie Park, 401 Clifford Dr., DeKalb. DeKalb County Board Finance Committee: 6 p.m. at the DeKalb County Administration Building, 110 E. Sycamore St., Sycamore. Cortland Community Library Board: 7 p.m. at Cortland Community Library, 63 Somonauk Road. DeKalb Citizen’s Enhancement Commission: 7 p.m. at the DeKalb Municipal Building, 200 S. Fourth St. DeKalb County Board: 7:30 p.m. at the Legislative Center’s Gathertorium, 200 N. Main St., Sycamore.

Sunday Pick 3-Midday: 0-4-4 Pick 3-Evening: 8-3-2 Pick 4-Midday: 6-5-3-9 Pick 4-Evening: 9-5-3-9 Lotto (Sat.): 24-36-39-41-43 45 (17) Lucky Day Lotto (Midday): 6-18-33-34-38 Lucky Day Lotto (Evening): 3-11-14-24-28 Lotto jackpot: $8 million

Mega Millions Mega jackpot: $550 million

Powerball Saturday’s drawing Numbers: 14-25-32-33-41 Powerball: 34 Powerball jackpot: $50 million

8STATE BRIEF Police say bus of federal prisoners crashes on I-64 BELLEVILLE – Authorities say a southern Illinois freeway crash involving a busload of federal prisoners sent all 13 of the vehicle’s occupants to the hospital. Illinois State Police Trooper Calvin Dye Jr. said the westbound bus headed from Kentucky to Jefferson City, Mo., hit a bridge support in Interstate 64’s center median about 5 a.m. Sunday and overturned onto its side. The nine federal inmates and four prison guards on the bus were taken to area hospitals, with none of the injuries considered life-threatening. – Wire report


LOCAL

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Monday, December 16, 2013 • Page A3

Board addresses community park issues By DEBBIE BEHRENDS dbehrends@shawmedia.com DeKALB – Roberts Playground, a neighborhood park near Hillcrest Drive, will be closed by next spring after a vote by the DeKalb Park District board. Lisa Smalls, the park district’s interim director, said the playground once was part of the elementary school grounds. She said the school district sold the property to Northern Illinois University, which moved its school of nursing to the elementary school building. “NIU left the playground and allowed the park district to maintain it for the neighboring children,” Smalls said. “It’s a secluded park, and I think the attraction is that it’s not visible from any nearby street,” nearby resident Kim Launer said. She said her family moved to the area 17 years ago. At that time, her daughter was 4 years old, and she felt safe in allowing her daughter to play there.

“Over the past 10 years, it’s gotten progressively worse,” she said. Launer said there have been numerous incidents of vandalism, alcohol and drug paraphernalia found in the park and neighborhood children being bullied. “These are not the neighborhood kids causing these problems,” Launer said. “For the safety of the residents and our homes, closing the park is a step in the right direction.” “While supportive of the park district’s recreational programming, the academic mission and programming of the university is not presently congruent with the maintenance and play activities of neighborhood programs, and thus the university will seek to remove the playground equipment in cooperation with the park district,” wrote Jeff Daurer, assistant vice president facilities planning and operations for NIU, in an email. Brad Garrison, the park district’s assistant director for planning and development, said equipment removal will

“I think there’s a good chance we’ll have a garden there next summer.” Dan Kenney DeKalb County Community Gardens

Rob Winner – rwinner@shawmedia.com

Roberts Playground is seen Friday in DeKalb. Residents have complained about finding drug paraphernalia here. begin in the spring. A second park in the Eden’s Garden subdivision on the north side of Twombley Road was discussed, as well. Dan Kenney of DeKalb County

Community Gardens requested removing the gazebo from the Garden of Eden Park to make room for a community garden. “I had students at Brooks

Elementary who were interested, and their parents seemed interested, as well,” Kenney said. “It would be up to the residents to determine what form that garden would

take.” Although he’s not opposed to the idea of a community garden, Garrison said there are sites more conducive to that type of activity. He showed the board an aerial depiction of the area and pointed out other areas that might be better suited. “It is the only park in that area, and the playground is heavily used,” Garrison said. The board directed park staff to send a letter to residents of the development seeking their thoughts on park improvements and a community garden. “I think there’s a good chance we’ll have a garden there next summer,” Kenney said.

8LOCAL BRIEFS Fire department urges proper disposal of rags

chief Art Zern at 815-895-4514.

SYCAMORE – The Sycamore Fire Department urges the proper disposal of oil- or stain-soaked rags, which can spontaneously combust, causing fires in the home. Spontaneous combustion occurs when oil- or stain-soaked rags or towels are heated to their ignition temperature by a chemical reaction that creates and releases heat. If this heat can’t dissipate, it will build up in the material until ignition occurs. This process only occurs with animal and vegetable oils found in oil-based paints, certain stains, polishes and finishing oils. Manufacturers are aware of this hazard, and products contain consumer warning labels and instructions for proper disposal. Many manufacturers advocate soaking the rags in water and letting them dry outside, not in a clothes dryer. For information on proper disposal, contact assistant fire

Prizes offered for Winter Challenge SYCAMORE – From Saturday through Jan. 6, the Sycamore Library is hosting the Winter Challenge to Read, Discover and Create to win a Samsung Galaxy 3 tablet, courtesy of the Friends of the Sycamore Library. Participants read for two hours; discover something new by attending a library program, using the library databases or borrowing and playing with snap circuits; and create something fun by writing a book review, making a Peeps diorama, knitting, crocheting or making a photograph. Each time the three parts are completed, fill out the form and enter for a chance to win. Details are available by visiting sycamorelibrary.org/ events, calling 815-895-2500, ext. 31, or emailing spl@sycamorelibrary.org.

– Daily Chronicle

Stephen Haberkorn for Shaw Media

Kate Appleby of Genoa hands materials to Amber Walitzer as Cam Fradkin looks on Saturday during the Pack the Bus food drive.

‘Pack the bus’ with food pantry donations Genoa-Kingston School District 424 helps local organization By STEPHEN HABERKORN news@daily-chronicle.com GENOA – The term “food drive” took on a double meaning during the second annual Pack the Bus event organized by the Genoa-Kingston School District 424 Transportation Department. “The Transportation Department does so much for the students and community of Genoa, so this is our way of supporting them,” said Barb Benzinger, a Genoa resident and kindergarten teacher at Davenport Elementary School, who braved the snowy weather Saturday morning to drop off food items at the school bus parked on downtown Main Street. At three sites across Genoa on Saturday morning, school district drivers collected a busload of nonperishable food and personal hygiene items

“They were looking at out sourcing transportation and the community backed us up, so this was our way of giving back to the community, by collecting food.” Amber Walitzer A bus driver who helped at food drive and several hundred dollars in cash. They will deliver it Wednesday to the Genoa-Kingston food pantry. The food drive was started last year as a show of gratitude by the Genoa-Kingston School District Transportation Department, which includes 17 bus drivers. “They were looking at outsourcing transportation and the community backed us up, so this was our way of giving back to the community by collecting food,” said Amber Walitzer, one of the bus driv-

ers who helped organize the food drive. Leaders with the Genoa-Kingston Food Pantry were very appreciative, emphasizing that the transportation department members took the initiative with the drive. “November and December are our biggest months,” Carol Cleveland said. “We served 116 families last month and about the same this month.” Dan Duval, who has driven a school bus for the district for the past 44 years, helped Saturday at the bus drop-off point

on Main Street. “They couldn’t believe how much we got last year,” Duval said. “They were overwhelmed.” Judy Thompson, one of the directors of the food pantry, wanted to express her gratitude for the community support. “Our community is just wonderful about helping those in need,” she said. For those who missed the food drive Saturday and would like to donate, items still can be dropped off at Faith United Methodist Church on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Or they can call Judy Thompson at 815-784-5989 or the church at 815-784-5143 to schedule a drop-off. There also are collection sites at Piggly Wiggly and Pete’s gas station in Genoa.

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Collectors show in Rochelle features gold, silver DAILY CHRONICLE ROCHELLE – The Gold, Silver, Coins and Currency Collectors Show is set for 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Saturday at the Holiday Inn Express, 1240 N. Dement Road, Rochelle. Collectors can find gold and silver jewelry, silver coins minted before 1964, buffalo

nickels, wheat pennies, mint sets, proof sets, Morgan dollars and Peace dollars. Other items sought by collectors include all toys made before 1965, war memorabilia such as swords, daggers, medals, helmets, etc., silver coins and paper currency, and musical instruments both new and used, especially vintage

guitars. The event also includes an electronics buyback. Anyone with clean, modern, used electronics can bring them to this event and sell them for cash. Offers made are based on market demand, condition, included accessories and original packaging. Original packages and accessories are not

required, but premium prices are paid to those who have the original packaging. The event is free to attend, and there is no limit to the number of items sellers may bring. For information, contact Bob Bell at keephopealive9000@gmail.com or 217679-6987.

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NEWS

Page A4 • Monday, December 16, 2013 *

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

‘A GREAT TREE HAS FALLEN’

College plans recycling program in storm’s wake The ASSOCIATED PRESS

AP photo

Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, (left) Nelson Mandela’s former wife, and Nelson Mandela’s widow, Graca Machel, stand over the former South African president’s casket Sunday during his funeral service in Qunu, South Africa. The woman on the right is unidentified.

Mandela buried Sunday in rolling hills of South Africa By CHRISTOPHER TORCHIA The Associated Press QUNU, South Africa – His flag-draped casket resting on a carpet of animal skins, Nelson Mandela was laid to rest Sunday in the green, rolling hills of the eastern hamlet where he began his extraordinary journey – one that led him from prison to the presidency, a global symbol of endurance and reconciliation in the fight against South Africa’s racist rule. Artillery boomed and military aircraft roared through a cloud-studded sky, as the simple and the celebrated gathered to pay their final respects in Mandela’s native village of Qunu at a state funeral that blended ancient tribal rituals with a display of the might of the new, integrated South Africa. “Yours was truly a long walk to freedom and now you have achieved the ultimate freedom in the bosom of your

maker,” Brig. Gen. Monwabisi Jamangile, chaplain-general of the South African military, said as Mandela’s casket was lowered into the ground at the family gravesite. “Rest in peace.” “I realized that the old man is no more, no more with us,” said Bayanda Nyengule, head of a local museum about Mandela, his voice cracking as he described the burial attended by several hundred mourners after a larger funeral ceremony during which some 4,500 people, including heads of state, royalty and celebrities, paid their last respects. The burial ended a 10-day mourning period that began with Mandela’s death on Dec. 5 at 95, and included a Johannesburg memorial attended by almost 100 world leaders and three days during which tens of thousands of South Africans of all races and backgrounds filed past Mandela’s casket in the capital, Pretoria.

For South Africans, it also was a time for reflection about the racial integration they achieved when Mandela presided over the end of apartheid, and the economic inequality and other challenges that have yet to be overcome and seem certain to test his legacy’s endurance. The burial site marked a return to Mandela’s humble roots, but the funeral trappings were elaborate. South African honor guards from the army, navy and air force, including both black and white officers, marched in formation along a winding dirt road. In contrast to the military pomp, some speakers evoked the traditions of the Xhosa tribe, to which Mandela’s Thembu clan belongs. “A great tree has fallen, he is now going home to rest with his forefathers,” said Chief Ngangomhlaba Matanzima, a representative of Mandela’s family who wore an animal

skin. “We thank them for lending us such an icon.” Another speaker, Zolani Mkiva, served for many years as Mandela’s praise singer, a traditional role in which he shouted out the leader’s attributes to audiences, prefacing Mandela’s many stations in life with the words “very important:” person, prince, patriot, politician, prisoner, philosopher, president, pensioner, patient, papa. “The bones of our ancestors are vibrating. The waves of African oceans are reverberating,” Mkiva said. In keeping with Xhosa traditions, Mandela’s casket was brought to Qunu Saturday draped in a lion skin, an honor bestowed on those of a high rank like Mandela, who is the son of a traditional clan chief. His body lay for the night in his family home before burial, a time when tradition dictates that family elders “talk” to the body to explain to his spirit what is happening.

‘Lawrence of Arabia’ star Peter O’Toole dies at 81 By GREGORY KATZ The Associated Press LONDON – Known on the one hand for his starring role in “Lawrence of Arabia,” leading tribesmen in daring attacks across the desert wastes, and on the other for his headlong charges into drunken debauchery, Peter O’Toole was one of the most magnetic, charismatic and fun figures in British acting. O’Toole, who died Saturday at age 81 at the private Wellington Hospital in London after a long bout of illness, was nominated a record eight times for an Academy Award without taking home a single statue. He was fearsomely handsome, with burning blue eyes and a penchant for hard living which long outlived his decision to give up alcohol. Broadcaster Michael Parkinson told Sky News televi-

AP file photo

Peter O’Toole appears backstage without his Oscar after receiving the Academy Award’s Honorary Award during the 75th annual Academy Awards on March 23, 2003, in Los Angeles. O’Toole, the charismatic actor who achieved instant stardom as Lawrence of Arabia and was nominated eight times for an Academy Award, died Saturday. sion it was hard to be too sad about his passing. “Peter didn’t leave much of life unlived, did he?” he said. O’Toole long suffered from ill health. Always thin, he had grown wraithlike in lat-

er years, his famously handsome face eroded by years of outrageous drinking. But nothing diminished his flamboyant manner and candor. “If you can’t do something willingly and joyfully, then

don’t do it,” he once said. “If you give up drinking, don’t go moaning about it; go back on the bottle. Do. As. Thou. Wilt.” O’Toole began his acting career as one of the most exciting young talents on the British stage. His 1955 “Hamlet,” at the Bristol Old Vic, was critically acclaimed. International stardom came in David Lean’s epic “Lawrence of Arabia.” With only a few minor movie roles behind him, O’Toole was unknown to most moviegoers when they first saw him as T.E. Lawrence, the mythic British World War I soldier and scholar who led an Arab rebellion against the Turks. His sensitive portrayal of Lawrence’s complex character garnered O’Toole his first Oscar nomination, and the spectacularly photographed desert epic remains his best known role.

Joan Fontaine, Oscar-winner for ‘Suspicion,’ dies at 96 The ASSOCIATED PRESS CARMEL, Calif. – Academy Award-winning actress Joan Fontaine, who found stardom playing naive wives in Alfred Hitchcock’s “Suspicion” and “Rebecca” and also was featured in films by Billy Wilder, Fritz Lang and Nicholas Ray, died Sunday. She was 96. Fontaine, the sister of fellow Oscar winner Olivia de Havilland, died in her sleep in her Carmel, Calif., home Sun-

day morning, said longtime friend Noel Beutel. Fontaine had been fading in recent days and died “peacefully,” Beutel said. Joan Fontaine In her later years, Fontaine had lived quietly at her Villa Fontana estate about 5 miles south of Carmel, enjoying its spectacular view of windswept Point Lobos.

View a complete list of Daily Chronicle obituaries by clicking on the calendar dates

Fontaine’s pale, soft features and frightened stare made her ideal for melodrama and she was a major star for much of the 1940s. For Hitchcock, she was a prototype of the uneasy blondes played by Kim Novak in “Vertigo” and Tippi Hedren in “The Birds” and “Marnie.” The director would later say he was most impressed by Fontaine’s restraint. She would credit George Cukor, who directed her in “The Women,” for urg-

ing her to “think and feel and the rest will take care of itself.” Fontaine appeared in more than 30 movies, including early roles in “The Women” and “Gunga Din,” the title part in “Jane Eyre” and in Max Ophuls’ historical drama “Letter from an Unknown Woman.” She was also in films directed by Wilder (“The Emperor Waltz”), Lang (“Beyond a Reasonable Doubt”) and, wised up and dangerous, in Ray’s “Born to be Bad.”

Sign and read the online guet books at www.legacy.com/Daily-Chronicle

EAST PEORIA – An East Peoria college discouraged by tons of debris in the tornado-damaged city of Washington is launching a program meant to recycle much of that waste otherwise bound for landfills. Illinois Central College next month will begin offering a certification program called Deconstruction and Building Materials Salvage and Reuse. The effort is at least partly funding by a $500,000 grant from the Illinois Department of Labor, the Peoria Journal Star reported. Anne Nicklin, an instructor at the college, said central Illinois doesn’t have the infrastructure or certified laborers needed to handle the recycling of material from the Nov. 17 tornado in Washington, where more than 1,000 homes were damaged or destroyed. The twister was one of two dozen that pelted Illinois, killing seven people.

“It’s atrocious what’s h a p p e n i n g i n W a s h i n gton,” Nicklin said. “Driving through and seeing the debris – so much materials are there. We need to ensure – God forbid it happens again – that these materials don’t need to go to the landfill.” Nicklin said 40 to 60 percent of the national waste stream comes from construction and demolition debris, most of which can be recycled. The college’s certification program is open to companies wanting to expand their employees’ diversity and to current students seeking a construction, architecture or demolition career. Registration for the spring semester is open on college’s website. “There’s a high potential for this to be successful with area contractors,” said Diana Fuller, the program’s regional coordinator. “It’s a fairly new concept, but a lot of employers are very interested in the program.”

8POLICE REPORTS Note to readers: Information in Police Reports is obtained from the DeKalb County Sheriff’s Office and city police departments. Individuals listed in Police Reports who have been charged with a crime have not been proven guilty in court.

DeKalb Alex J. Jackson, 23, of the 8700 block of South Emerald Avenue, Chicago, was charged Thursday, Dec. 5, with tresspass to land. Kentral G. Brown, 20, of the 700 block of Regent Drive, DeKalb, was arrested Thursday, Dec. 5, for an in-state warrant. Allonde J. Epps, 20, of the 1000 block of Spiros Court, DeKalb, was arrested Thursday, Dec. 5, for an in-state warrant. Steven B. Huston, 38, of the 15500 block of West 151st Street, Homer Glen, was charged Friday, Dec. 6, with possession of cannabis 30 grams and under and possession of drug paraphernalia. Dimitrius L. Puckett, 19, of the 2300 block of Ruby Lane, DeKalb, was charged was charged Friday, Dec. 6, with possession of cannabis 30 grams and under. Ryan J. Ginczycki, 24, of the 700 block of Concord Lane, Barrington, was charged Saturday, Dec. 7, with domestic battery, possession of cannabis 30 grams and under and possession of drug paraphernalia. Jimmy M. Jackson, 20, of the 900 block of Normal Road, DeKalb, was charged Saturday, Dec. 7, with disorderly house. James E. Mactaggert, 52, of the 800 block of West Taylor Street, DeKalb, was arrested

Saturday, Dec. 7, for an in-state warrant.

DeKalb County Richard L. Thompson, 42, of the 200 block of West Garden Street, DeKalb, was arrested Friday, Dec. 13, for a warrant alleging he failing to appear in court for a DUI. Jacob C. Brummett, 29, of the 15000 block of North Street, Cortland, was charged Friday, Dec. 13, with criminal trespass to residence and theft. Mickeya I. Stewart, 19, of the 1400 block of Stonenge Drive, Sycamore, was charged Friday, Dec. 13, with possession of a stolen motor vehicle and unlawful possession of cannabis. Treshonda B. Cornett, 17, of the 2400 block of Williams Way, DeKalb, was charged Friday, Dec. 13, with possesion of a stolen motor vehicle and no driver’s license. Molly E. Williams, 69, of the 1500 block of Longwood Drive, Sycamore, was charged Saturday, Dec. 14, with failure to yield turning left after a two-vehicle collision at Peace and Barber Greene roads. No injuries were reported. Erik D. Swanson, 44, of the 1100 block of Marquette Street, LaSalle, was arrested Saturday, Dec. 14, on a warrant for aggravated criminal sexual abuse, criminal sexual abuse and battery.

Sandwich Heath A. Dannewitz, 42, of the 300 block of Pearl Street, DeKalb, was charged Sunday, Dec. 8, with domestic battery. A 15-year-old male juvenile was charged Wednesday, Dec. 11, with aggravated battery and domestic battery.

8OBITUARIES RICKY JAMES ROSS Born: April 7, 1974 Died: Dec. 13, 2013, in DeKalb, Ill. Ricky James Ross, 39, of Kirkland, Ill., passed away Friday, Dec. 13, 2013, at Kishwaukee Hospital surrounded by his loved ones. He was born April 7, 1974, to Dennis and Sherel (Mangum) Ross. On June 15, 2010, he married Caroline Suitts. Ricky worked as a truck driver for many years. He loved riding his Harley, fishing and spending time with family and friends. Ricky is survived by his loving wife, Caroline; four children, Ricky J. Ross, David Lancaste, Samantha Flores and Kimberly Flores; his parents; his brothers, Tim Dwyer Send flowers, gifts and charitable contributions

and Casey Ross; and many nieces and nephews. Funeral services will be at 11 a.m. Wednesday, Dec. 18, at Olson Funeral & Cremation Services Ltd., Quiram Kirkland Chapel, 309 S. Fifth St., Kirkland, with the Rev. Jackie Wills officiating. The visitation will be from 5 to 8 p.m. Tuesday, Dec. 17, at the Kirkland chapel. Burial will be in Maple Cemetery in Kirkland. In lieu of flowers, a memorial fund has been established at Alpine Bank in Kirkland. Arrangements by Olson Funeral & Cremation Services Ltd., Quiram Kirkland Chapel. To share a memory or condolence, visit www.olsonfh.com. To sign the online guest book, visit www.legacy.com/daily-chronicle.

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Daily Chronicle • www.daily-chronicle.com • Page A6 • Monday, December 16, 2013

Concert band presents holiday performance The Kishwaukee Concert Band will present “Holiday Sounds” at 7 p.m. Wednesday, in the Boutell Memorial Concert Hall, inside the Music Building on Northern Illinois University’s DeKalb campus. The concert will be conducted by Dave Lehman and Gene VandenBosch, and is sponsored by Millie Sullaver in memory of her sister, Joan. The band is also supported by the DeKalb Coun-

ty Community Foundation and the Mary E. Stevens Concert and Lecture Fund. The newly-formed French horn quartet, Caccia Horns, will make its debut at the concert. They will be featured on the selection “Holiday for Horns” by Jack Jarret. Members of the quartet are Bonnie Anderson, Kristine Mutchler, Mark Robinson and Gail Schumacher. Anderson and Schumacher are also

members of the concert band. Five members of the Westminster Presbyterian Church Joy Ringers Handbell Choir will accompany the band on “In the Bleak Midwinter” and “Auld Lang Syne.” Those ringers are Karl Roseberg, Cindy Dugan, Brenda Lehan, Nancy Whitmore and Elli McLaughlin – McLaughlin also is a member of the band. Denny Vaupel will direct

8BRIEFS

“Christmas Time is Here” from “A Charlie Brown Christmas.” Other music on the program includes the Mannheim Steamroller version of “Deck the Halls;” “Three Moods of Hanukkah,” an arrangement of three wellknown tunes by Lennie Niehaus; “C’est Noel!;” “March of the Cute Little Wood Sprites;” and “A Vaughn Williams Christmas,” featuring “Forest Green,” “Wassail Song” and “Sussex

Carol.” The concert would not be complete without an audience singalong. Selections include “Santa Claus is Comin’ To Town,” “Silver Bells,” “Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer,” and “Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas.” The concert is free and handicapped-accessible. In the event of bad weather, cancelation will be announced on local radio.

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KishHealth System plans blood drives Valley West Hospital hosts a community blood drive from 1 to 5 p.m. Tuesday, in the Valley West Medical Office Building on the Valley West campus, 15 W. Pleasant Ave., Sandwich. Donating blood is completely safe, and organizations like the Heartland Blood Centers rely on volunteers for support. Help save lives by giving a meaningful gift this holiday season. Walk-ins are welcome, but appointments are preferred. Appointments can be made online or by calling Sue Morgan at 815498-9467. A photo ID is required for donation. Please make sure to eat a healthy meal and drink plenty of fluids before you donate. When arriving for your donation, park in the Valley West Medical Office Building parking lot, enter the building through the main entrance and follow the signs to the second floor. A community-wide blood drive also is scheduled from 1:30 to 5:30 p.m. Wednesday at Kishwaukee Hospital in the Garden Level Conference

Room, DeKalb. To schedule a donation, sign up on online at www.heartlandbc.org or call 815-756-1521, ext. 151000. Walk-ins also are welcome. A photo ID is required. Donors will earn points to redeem online gift cards and a variety of premium gifts in the Heartland’s Warm Hearts Club at www.heartlandbc.org.

Deadline today for giving tree donations The Family Service Agency Senior Giving Tree has become an annual community project that benefits seniors who are lonely and in need. Ornaments of needy seniors in DeKalb County are available at the Heartland Bank in Genoa or at Family Service Agency in DeKalb. Items needed are things like hats, gloves, scarves, lotion, gift cards and other small items that will let those who are less fortunate enjoy some holiday happiness. Last year there were 125 requests, more than in previous years. If you would like to help, contact Family Service Agency’s Senior Services department at 815-758-4718. Gifts

need to be dropped off no later than Dec. 16 for distribution on Dec. 18 and 19. Family Service Agency is one of the oldest social service agencies in DeKalb County and devotes its focus to protecting and developing children and older adults through four distinct departments: Big Brothers Big Sisters, Center For Counseling, Children’s Advocacy Center and Senior Services. For information on any department, please call 815-758-8616.

Masons hold pancake breakfast The DeKalb Masonic Lodge 144 is open from 7:30 to 11 a.m. Sundays for and all-youcan-eat pancake breakfast. Located on the southeast corner of east Fairview Street and South Fourth St. (Route 23). The menu features pancakes, pork sausage, eggs (your way), toast, fresh coffee, orange juice, milk, biscuits and gravy (full order costs $4, half order costs $2 extra). Cost is $6 for adults, $4 for children ages 5 to 12 and free for children younger than five.

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AROUND THE COMMUNITY

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com Monday Free blood pressure clinics: no registration required. • 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Mondays in the Kishwaukee Hospital Roberts Conference Center, DeKalb. 815-748-8962 or visit www.kishhospital.org/programs. • 9 to 11 a.m. Wednesdays at Valley West Hospital, 11 E. Pleasant Ave., Sandwich. 815-786-3962 or www.valleywest.org. • 9 to 11 a.m. Wednesdays at KishHealth System Family & Specialty Care in Genoa. • 9 to 11 a.m. Thursdays KishHealth System Family & Specialty Care in Waterman. Mom’s Time Out: 9 a.m. to noon Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at South Prairie School, Sycamore. This recreational program provides children with a safe and structured place to play and socialize with other children. For ages 18 months to 7. Cost for residents is $9, nonresidents cost $11 per day. Call the Sycamore Park District at 815-895-3202. DeKalb Chess Club: 6 to 8 p.m. at First Congregational Church, 615 N. First St., DeKalb. Free, open chess game play, all ages and skill levels are welcome. Equipment is provided but attendees are welcome to bring their own. info@ dekalbchess.com or visit www. DeKalbChess.com. Kishwaukee Valley Heritage Society: 6 p.m. at Kishwaukee Valley Heritage Museum, 622 Park Ave. in Genoa, followed by the general membership meeting at 6:30 p.m. For more information call 815-784-5559. Bedtime Story Time: 6:30 p.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Participants can wear pajamas. Call Youth Services at 815-7569568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl.org. DeKalb Evening Lions Club: 6:30 p.m. at Junction Eating Place, 816 W. Lincoln Highway. Contact: dekalblionsclub@gmail.com or call Erica Kelley at 815-758-6706. For men and women interested in improving their community. Visit us on Facebook.

Fair City Quilters: 7 p.m. at The Federated Church, 403 N. Main St., Sandwich. Guests are welcome; their $3 nonmember fee can be applied to membership. Quilters of all experience levels welcome. Contact: Louise at 815-498-9675. Square Penguin Craft: 7 p.m. today and 4 p.m. Wednesday (bilingual) in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Call 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl.org. Tuesday Kishwaukee Sunrise Rotary: 7 a.m. at Kishwaukee Hospital, 1 Kish Hospital Drive in DeKalb. Contact: Becky Beck Ryan, president, 815758-3800. Tales for Twos: 9:30 a.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Program lasts 20 to 25 minutes. Call 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl.org. Santa Visit: 10 a.m. today, 11 a.m. Wednesday at 2:30 p.m. Saturday, in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Bring your gift wishes and cameras. 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl.org. Tree Ornament Craft: 10 a.m. today, 11 a.m. Wednesday and 10:30 Thursday (bilingual) in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl.org. Teacher in the Library: 4 to 5:15 p.m. today and Wednesday in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Those who register will receive homework assistance. Sign up in advance at dkpl.org, 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or the youth services desk. Barb City Swing Connection Tuesday dances: 7 to 11 p.m. at The House Cafe, 263 E. Lincoln Highway. Meals, beer and wine can be purchased. Admission costs $5 for a lesson followed by social dancing. No partner needed; casual wear and leather-soled shoes recommended. www.BarbCitySwing. com; connect on Facebook for notices and announcements. “Hear, We Come a Caroling”

Waterman and Shabbona Elementary 2013 Winter Music Programs: 7 p.m. Tuesday for Waterman and 7 p.m. Wednesday for Shabbona at Indian Creek High School Gymnasium. Students in grades K-5 will be performing. A variety of songs from traditional to very new will be shared. The public is invited. Kishwaukee Valley Barbershop Chorus rehearsals: 7:30 p.m. at First Congregational United Church of Christ, 615 N. First St. in DeKalb. Contact: 815-895-5955 or 815-7563004. Male singers of all ages are invited to learn to sing in harmony. Wednesday Master Networkers Chapter, Sycamore Business Network International: 8 to 9:30 a.m. at Midwest Museum of Natural History, 425 W. State St., Sycamore. Offers an opportunity to share ideas, contacts and business referrals. New members and visitors are welcome. Contact: Jon Bockman, president, at 815-793-1832. Toddler Time: 10:30 a.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. No sign-up necessary and walk-ins are welcome. Contact Youth Services at 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl.org. Kishwaukee Kiwanis: 11:45 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Hopkins Park Community Room in DeKalb. www.KishKiwanis.org. Contact: Amy Polzin at APolzin87@yahoo.com. E-Book Help! Lab: 5:30 to 9 p.m. in Youth Services at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Download e-books to your e-book readers or mobile devices. No sign-up required. 815-756-9568, ext. 220, or email dkplref@dkpl.org. Chess Game Play: 6 to 8 p.m. at Sycamore Public Library, 103 E. State St., Sycamore. Free, open chess game play, all ages and skill levels are welcome. info@ dekalbchess.com or visit www. DeKalbChess.com. Sycamore Pumpkin Festival Committee: 7 p.m. at Sycamore Center, 308 W. State St. www. sycamorepumpkinfestival.com. All Sycamore Pumpkin Festival planning meetings are open to the

Monday, December 16, 2013 • Page A7

public. Attendees should use the Somonauk Street entrance. Bingo nights: 7:15 p.m. at Sycamore Veterans Club, 121 S. California St. Contact: Robert Fleetwood at 815-895-2679. Open to the public. Thursday Bilingual Story Time: 10 a.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. For children ages 0 to 5. Contact Youth Services at 815-756-9568, ext. 250, or email theresaw@dkpl. org. DeKalb Area Christian Women’s Connection: Noon at Blumen Gardens, 325 Edward St., Sycamore. Special feature is “Getting your house back in order,” with Pamela Augustine. Speaker Karen Hampel will present “From No Boundaries to a Life of Control.” Cost is $10 per person. Call Muriel Horton at 815-762-5513 to RSVP by Tuesday. Complimentary Gift Wrapping: 5 to 8 p.m. today and noon to 2 p.m. Friday near the fireplace at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Stop by to get your small or medium gifts wrapped while you relax and have a cup of coffee. This is free service but donations are gladly welcomed. Tri-County Kiwanis Club: 5:30 p.m. at Fox Valley Older Adult Services Center, 1406 Suydam Road, Sandwich. Membership is open to adults, men and women of all age groups, seeking to improve their community in general and especially for children. Contact Dave Wood at 815-751-8874 or 815-756-1680 or davidwood43@ comcast.net. Scrap Guild of Northern Illinois: 6 to 8:45 p.m. in Sycamore Public Library’s large meeting room for open scrapping time. For more information visit, www.scrapguildillinois.com or send email to scrapguild@yahoo.com. Sycamore Music Boosters: 6 to 7 p.m. in the Sycamore High School Library. www.sycamoremusicboosters.com. Boredom Box Craft, Tween: 6:30 p.m. in the Youth Services Department at DeKalb Public Library,

309 Oak St. Create a Boredom Box for a place to store activity ideas so you’re never bored again. Limit of 12 tweens (ages 10 to 14). Email darcyt@dkpl.org or call 815-7569568, ext. 250. Computer Class – MS Publisher Intro: 6:30 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Sign up online or at the Reference Desk or call 815-7569568, ext. 220. DeKalb County Democratic Party: 6:30 p.m. social time and meeting at 7 p.m. at Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 158 N. Fourth St., DeKalb. For more information, email Mark Pietrowski Jr. at markpietrowski@gmail.com, call 815-762-2054 or visit www. dekalbcountydemocrats.org. Mothers & More Program Night: 7 to 8:30 p.m. in the community room at American National Bank, 1985 DeKalb Ave., Sycamore. For more information or to RSVP, email mothersandmoredekalbcounty@gmail.com or visit www. mothersandmore.org/chapters/ DeKalbCounty. Musical Christmas Celebration: 6:30 p.m. at Somonauk Public Library, 700 E. LaSalle St. All are welcome to attend and enjoy a fun-filled Christmas program. Jeanie B., an award-winning musician will be present a holiday program for children which includes singalongs, indoor snowball fight as well as other Christmas-themed family music. No registration is required. Appropriate for all ages. www.somonauklibrary.org or 815498-2440. Lou Reed Retrospective: 7 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Discuss Reed’s life, history and musical accomplishments. Call 815-7569568, ext. 260, or email edithc@ dkpl.org. Skiers get-together: 7 p.m. at Twin Tavern in DeKalb. Several ski trips are planned by members. For information or an invitation to a DeKalb Ski Club meeting, call Nancy Higdon at 815-895-3247. Friday Game Days: During library hours today and Saturday in the Youth

Services Department at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Board and card games will be available. Email theresaw@dkpl.org, or call 815-756-9568, ext. 250. Peace vigil: 5 to 6 p.m. at Memorial Park at First Street and Lincoln Highway in DeKalb. The DeKalb Interfaith Network for Peace and Justice Peace Circle follows at 6 p.m. 815-758-0796. Elburn Lions Club Bingo: Doors open at 5 p.m. at 500 Filmore St. Early Bird Bingo starts at 6:30 p.m., followed by the first of four progressive raffles. Regular Bingo games start at 7 p.m. and include two split the pot games. Food and drink are available for purchase. Proceeds go toward Elburn Lions Charities for the sight and hearing impaired. 630-365-6315. Troop support rally: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. at First Street and Lincoln Highway in DeKalb, across from Memorial Park. DAWC activities and gallery viewings: 7 to 9 p.m. at DeKalb Area Women’s Center, 1021 State St. in DeKalb. Contact: 815-7581351 or dawc@niu.edu. All are invited to events; an entrance with an accessible lift is near the alley north of the building. Free parking is located at 415 N. 11th St., a half block south of the center. Saturday Saturday Cinema: 2 p.m. in the meeting room at DeKalb Public Library, 309 Oak St. Film will be “The Nightmare Before Christmas,” rated PG. Bring a friend and enjoy the show with some popcorn and light refreshments. No registration to this free event. Sunday Society for Creative Anachronism events: Visit www. carraigban.org or call 815-7395788 or 815-986-5403 for other information. Middle Ages-Renaissance history re-enactors and those interested in “stepping into the past” are welcome. • Armored fighting practice: 4:30 p.m. behind Stevenson North at Northern Illinois University in DeKalb.

8COMMUNITY SERVINGS DeKalb County Salvation Army food pantry: 9 a.m. to noon Monday to Thursday; 5 to 6:45 p.m. Thursday at Ninth and Grove streets in DeKalb. For DeKalb County residents only. Call 815-756-4308 or email gary_billings@usc.salvationarmy.org. Sycamore Food Pantry: Noon to 4 p.m. Monday at Sycamore United Methodist Church, 160 Johnson Ave. 815-895-9113. Feed my Sheep Pantry: 3 to 5 p.m. Monday and 9:30 to 11:30 a.m. Thursday at Bethlehem Lutheran Church, 1915 N. First St. in DeKalb. 815-758-3203. All are welcome. Feed’em Soup Community Project

Free Community Meals: 5 to 8 p.m. Wednesdays at 122 S. First St., DeKalb. These meals are free to anyone in need. People wishing to volunteer can visit www.FeedEmSoup.org and fill out a short contact form to receive updates about volunteer needs. Groups wishing to volunteer or spearhead events, such as food drives, for Feed’em Soup Community Project, can send email to Info@FeedemSoup.org. Free public community meal: 5 to 7 p.m. Wednesday at the Cortland Lions Den at Cortland Community Park, 70 S. Llanos St., hosted by Cortland United Methodist Church. Special games, crafts and activi-

ties will also be provided. For those who would like to stay, participants will close the evening with a short, very informal worship service beginning at 7 p.m. VAC Community Holiday Dinner: 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the Voluntary Action Center lunch site, 330 Grove St., DeKalb. Meal will be roast beef with gravy, mashed potatoes, glazed carrots, fruited gelatin, dinner roll and dessert. The free, public dinners are served by volunteers and new sponsors are always welcome – call Nancy Hicks at 815-7581678 to volunteer; call the main VAC office at 815-758-3932 to sponsor a meal. Transportation available through Trans-

8SUPPORT GROUPS Monday Big Book Study AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Overeaters Anonymous: 10 a.m. at Senior Services Center, 330 Grove St. in DeKalb; 815-758-4718. Job & Career Support Group: 2 to 4 p.m. in the Sycamore Public Library board room, 103 E. State St. Take Off Pounds Sensibly: 5:45 p.m. weigh-in and 6:30 p.m. meetings, St. John’s Lutheran Church, 13N535 French Road in Burlington. 847-833-6908. Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group: 815-7565228; www.safepassagedv.org. 12 & 12 AA(C): 6 p.m. at Sycamore Lutheran Church, 1145 DeKalb Ave., Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Group Hope: 6:30 to 8 p.m. in the private dining room at Rochelle Community Hospital. 815-3989628. 12 Step & 12 Traditions AA(C): 6:30 p.m. at First United Methodist Church, 321 Oak St. in DeKalb; www.firstumc.net. Back to Basics AA(C): 7 p.m. at Union Congregational, 305 S. Gage St., Somonauk. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Expect A Miracle AA: 8 p.m. open meeting at United Methodist, Third and South streets, Kirkland. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. We Are Not Saints AA(C): 8 p.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. com. Tuesday Easy Does It AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Weight Watchers: 9:30 a.m. weigh-in, 10 a.m. meeting at Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road, (near Aldi) DeKalb. Women with Cancer Network: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at KishHealth System Cancer Center. Women with Cancer Network is an opportunity for women with similar experiences to give and receive support, and share information. Participants can learn from each other, meet

new people, have discussions, and listen to presentations. The group is free and no registration required. Visit www.kishhospital.org/programs or call 815-748-2958. Alzheimer’s/Dementia Support Group for Caregivers: 1 p.m. at DeKalb Adult Day Center, 126 S. Fourth St. Contact: Keely at 815758-4286. Safe Passage Sexual Assault adults’ support group: 815-7565228; www.safepassagedv.org. Compassionate Healing Grief Support: 6 to 7:30 p.m. in the auxiliary room at Rochelle Community Hospital. 815-562-2181, ext. 2684. Genoa Taking Off Pounds Sensibly: 6 p.m. weigh-in and 6:30 p.m. meetings at CrossWind Community Church, 13100 Cherry Road. 815784-3480. Hinckley Big Book Study AA(C): 6 p.m. at United Methodist Church, 801 N. Sycamore St. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Women’s “Rule #62 Group”: 6 p.m. at Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Sycamore. For information, call Kathy at 815-756-6655. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Better Off Sober AA(C): 6:30 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Grief Education and Support: 6:30 to 8 p.m. at Homebound Healthcare, 1625 Bethany Road, Sycamore. Meeting will include a dinner and dessert. 815-793-2815 Alcoholics Anonymous Tuesday Night Fellowship Group(C): 7 p.m. at The Church of St. Mary, 244 Waterman St. in Sycamore. 815-739-1950. Good Vibes Al-Anon group: 7 to 8 p.m. at First Lutheran Church, 324 N. Third St., DeKalb. Wheelchair accessible entrance is on North Third Street. Parking available in lot located on northwest corner of Third and Pine streets. Contact Mary Ann at 815-895-8119. Sexaholics Anonymous: 7 p.m. at 512 Normal Road, DeKalb (behind church in brick building). 815-5080280. Smoky Mirror AA(C): 7:30 p.m. at Trinity Lutheran Church. 33930 N. State Road, Genoa, 800-452-

7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Narcotics Anonymous: 8 p.m. at 1201 Twombly Road in DeKalb; www.rragsna.org; 815-964-5959. Program of Recovery AA(C): 8 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Wednesday Men and Caregivers Networking Breakfast: 9 to 10 a.m. at KishHealth System Cancer Center. Oncology patients and caregivers can give and receive support, and share information. The free group is open to all those with cancer for discussion over breakfast; no registration is required. For more information, visit www.kishhospital.org/programs or call 815-7482958. Fresh Beginnings AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. New Beginnings AA(C): 10 a.m. at 120 Main St., Kingston. 800-4527990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. 24-Hour-A-Day Brown Bag AA(C): 12:05 p.m. at Newman Center, 521 Normal Road, DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Caregivers’ Network: Noon to 1:30 p.m. at the Family Service Agency’s Senior Services Center, 330 Grove St. in DeKalb; 815-7584718. This free support group offers help for caregivers of older adult family members or friends. Attendees are invited to share ideas and experiences. Weight Watchers: 5 p.m. weighin, 5:30 p.m. meeting at Weight Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Road, (near Aldi) DeKalb. Safe Passage Domestic Violence support group; 815-7565228; www.safepassagedv.org. Came to Believe AA(C): 6 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. North Avenue Pass It On AA(C): 6:30 p.m. at North Ave. Baptist Church, 301 North Ave., Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Narcotics Anonymous: 7 p.m. at United Church of Christ, 615 N. First

Vac-815-758-6641. Maple Park American Legion Fish and Chicken Fry: 4:30 to 7:30 p.m. Friday 203 Main St., Maple Park. All-you-can-eat cod, perch, shrimp, smelt, baked tilapia and chicken are available. Cost: $12 for adults, $10 for seniors and $8 for children younger than 12. Carry outs cost $12. Knights Of Columbus all-you-can-eat fish fry buffet: 5 to 7:30 p.m. Friday at DeKalb Knights of Columbus Club, 1336 E. Lincoln Highway. Cost is $10 plus tax for adults, $6 plus tax for children. Buffet includes cod, walleye, shrimp, macaroni and cheese, soup, baked potato, French fries, coleslaw and salad bar. Sorry, no

carryouts. NICE pantry: 8:30 to 11 a.m. Saturdays and by appointment other days at 346 S. County Line Road in Lee. Contact: 815-8242228. Knights’ Saturday Burgers and More: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at DeKalb Knights of Columbus Hall, 1336 E. Lincoln Highway. Open to the public. Burger buffet: Noon to 2 p.m. Saturday at Genoa Veterans Home, 311 S. Washington St. Hamburger or cheeseburger with chips are available or sandwich and buffet. The buffet includes potato salad, macaroni salad and beans. Proceeds help fund community projects and scholarships.

For information about Alcoholics Anonymous closed meetings, call 800-452-7990 or visit www.dekalbalanoclub.com. St. in DeKalb; www.rragsna.org; com. There is a Solution AA(C): 8 815-964-5959. Weight Watchers: 6 p.m. weigh- p.m. at Kingston Friendship Center, 120 Main St. 800-452-7990; www. Hopefuls AA(C): 8 p.m. at DeKalb in, 6:30 p.m. meeting at Weight dekalbalanoclub.com. Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., Watchers Store, 2583 Sycamore Day PAA(C): 9 p.m. at DeKalb DeKalb. 800-452-7990; www. Road, (near Aldi) DeKalb. Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., dekalbalanoclub.com. Sandwich Steppers AA(C): 7 p.m. at Fox Valley Community Cen- DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www. Thursday dekalbalanoclub.com. ter, 1406 Suydam Road. 800-452Safe Passage Domestic Vio7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Saturday lence support group: 815-756A Friend Of Bill’s AA(C): 8 p.m. Overeaters Anonymous Walk5228; www.safepassagedv.org. at Trinity Lutheran Church, 33930 Back To Basics AA(C): 9:30 a.m. N. State St., Genoa, 800-452-7990; and-Talk meeting: 8 to 9 a.m. at The Federated Church, 612 W. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. www.dekalbalanoclub.com. State St. in Sycamore. www.oa.org; Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; Any Lengths AA(C): 8 p.m. at www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Contact: Marilyn at 815-751-4822. It Is What It Is AA(C): 9 a.m. at Cancer Support Group: 10 to Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www. St. Catherine’s Church, 340 S. Stott 11:30 a.m. at Kishwaukee Hospital dekalbalanoclub.com. St., Genoa. 800-452-7990; www. Cancer Center, DeKalb. Learn more Closed Discussion AA: 8 p.m. dekalbalanoclub.com. about cancer from fellow patients, at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. As Bill Sees It AA(C): 9:30 a.m. caregivers and trained staff in a Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. safe and encouraging environment www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; at this free, drop-in group. www. Friday www.dekalbalanoclub.com. kishhospital.org/programs; 815Learning to Live Al-Anon group: 748-2958. Sexaholics Anonymous-DeKalb: 9:30 to 10:30 a.m. at Newman Alzheimer’s Support Group: 1 6:30 to 7:30 a.m. at Christ Comto 2 p.m. at Fox Valley Older Adult munity Church, 1600 E. Lincoln High- Catholic Center annex, Normal Road in DeKalb; llc904@hotmail. Services, 1486 Suydam Road, way, DeKalb. This 12-step recovery com. Sandwich. Free adult day service program is for Internet addiction. Narcotics Anonymous: 10 to 11 foryour loved one while you are in Contact: 815-508-0280. SA.org. a.m. at United Church of Christ, 615 the meeting. 815-786-9404. Pass It On AA(C): 9:30 a.m. at N. First St. in DeKalb; www.rragsna. Take Off Pounds Sensibly: 4:30 DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. org; 815-964-5959. to 5:30 p.m. weigh-in and 5:30-6:30 Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; Back to Basics AA: 6:30 p.m. at p.m. meeting at Sycamore United www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Cortland United Methodist Church, Methodist Church, 160 Johnson There is a Solution Too AA: 45 Chestnut Ave., Cortland. 800Ave. Call Lydia Johnson, chapter 12:05 p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano 452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. leader, 815-895-4618. Club, 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800- com. Keep It Simple AA(C): 6 p.m. 452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. AA Speaker Open Meeting: 8 at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. com. p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; B.Y.O.B. Big Book – 12 & 12 Dis312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452www.dekalbalanoclub.com. cussion AA(C): 6 p.m. at DeKalb 7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Courage, Attitude, Resources, Area Alano Club, 312 E. Taylor St., Saturday Night AA(C): 10 p.m. at Encouragement support group: 6 DeKalb, 800-452-7990; www. 312 E. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452to 7:30 p.m. at DeKalb County Hos- dekalbalanoclub.com. 7990; www.dekalbalanoclub.com. pice, 2727 Sycamore Road. People Big Book Discussion AA(C): 7 Sunday facing cancer or another serious p.m. at Newman Catholic Student illness and their loved ones can Center, 521 Normal Road, DeKalb. 24 Hours a Day AA(C): 9:30 a.m. join CARE, a Kishwaukee Hospital 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoat DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. support group. 815-756-1521, ext. club.com. Taylor St., DeKalb. 800-452-7990; 3566. Fox Valley AA(C): 7:30 p.m. at www.dekalbalanoclub.com. La Leche League of DeKalb Salem Lutheran Church, 1022 N. Steps And Traditions AA(C): County: 6 p.m. at the Goodwill Main St., Sandwich. 800-452-7990; 6 p.m. at Masonic Hall, Route 23, Industries store Community Room, www.dekalbalanoclub.com. Genoa. 800-452-7990; www. 1037 S. Annie Glidden Road, DeKalb. County Line Group Big Book dekalbalanoclub.com. All breast-feeding moms can share AA(C): 8 p.m. at St. Mary’s Church, No Longer Hopeless AA(C): 7:30 encouragement and support. Con121 N. Sycamore St., Maple Park. p.m. at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 tact: Dawn, 815-517-1067; www. 800-452-7990; www.dekalbalanoE. Taylor, DeKalb. 800-452-7990; lllusa.org/IL/WebDeKalbIL.html. club.com. www.dekalbalanoclub.com. One Day Café AA(C): 6 p.m. One Day At A Time AA(C): 8 p.m. Any Lengths AA(C): 8 p.m. at at Waterman United Methodist at DeKalb Area Alano Club, 312 E. Federated Church, 612 W. State St., Church, 210 W. Garfield St. 800Taylor St., DeKalb, 800-452-7990; Sycamore. 800-452-7990; www. 452-7990; www.dekalbalanoclub. www.dekalbalanoclub.com. dekalbalanoclub.com.


FROM PAGE 1

Page A8 • Monday, December 16, 2013

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Sozo Market, other businesses open in DeKalb About 1.8 million in • RETAIL Continued from page A1 There is a lot to explore, according to Matt Duffy, executive director of the DeKalb Chamber of Commerce. “There are events every night and all weekend long,” Duffy said, listing theater options, shopping and restaurants. In the past few months, the downtown area has seen new retail establishments opening, including Sozo Market, MCR Framing and Poppy Seed Primitives. With the opening of those businesses, Roger Hopkins, the city’s economic development consultant, said, “There’s not a lot of open retail space available downtown.” “Of course, there aren’t a lot of changes in retail around the holidays,” Duffy said. “The status quo is not a bad thing, even though there’s always the desire for more, new and different.” Hopkins said he has fielded inquiries about Golden Thai Jasmine, 251 E. Lincoln Highway, and has talked with

Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

Faranda’s in DeKalb recently opened this month. The facility can host meetings, receptions and banquets. Subway franchisees about the former Sawyer Imports at 460 E. Lincoln Highway. DeKalb 1st Ward Alderman David Jacobson owns the former DeKalb Clinic on Grove Street, and said he is ready to lease space. “At this point, I’m looking for tenants,” Jacobson said. The total rentable space is about 30,000 square feet, but he said he would be willing to build to suit from 850 square feet or more. “The old immediate care

side [at the corner of Grove and Second streets] is about 4,000 square feet and still suitable for a medical clinic,” Jacobson said. DeKalb Mayor John Rey said TIF funds have been used primarily for stimulating business activity by enhancing infrastructure and making streetscrape improvements. “It’s important to acknowledge the importance of TIF funds, [which] is to put public stimulus into the economy to

foster investment from private development,” Rey said. Although the recently-announced city center project committee has not met yet, Rey is hoping it can assist with future development. In the meantime, Rey said he’s hoping other private development, such as the Mike Mooney property on Fourth Street, can gain some traction. Rey said it will be up to the committee to review and prioritize plans for the proposed DeKalb City Center, initially focusing on the area of Lincoln Highway between the Northern Illinois University’s lagoon and First Street. “One of the projects that I’m sure will come to the table early on is the Pearl Street ShoDeen development on Lincoln Highway,” Rey said. Regardless of future development, McMahon said, “You could come into downtown DeKalb for a reasonable rent, and start up a business. If you have the passion, this is the place to be.”

WIC Program also has walk-in clinic available Thursday, Friday • PROGRAM

Learn more

Continued from page A1 The program also helped diagnose medical issues that Jackson’s 4-year-old son was having as anemia. Children in the WIC Program receive hemoglobin tests, and one check-up found Jackson’s son’s high milk intake was affecting the iron levels in his blood, Jackson said. According to the National Institutes of Health, milk and antacids can interfere with iron absorption.

Those who qualify for the Woman, Infants and Children Program include women who are pregnant, breastfeeding or postpartum women; infants and children younger than 5 years old, including foster children; and families with an income at or below 185 percent of the federal poverty level. To schedule an appointment with the WIC Program, call 815-748-2402. For information, visit www.dekalbcounty.org/Health/women/wic.html.

“I probably wouldn’t have known this without WIC,” she said. “I wouldn’t have thought to have [his hemoglobin] tested.” WIC Program also has a

walk-in clinic open from 8 to 11 a.m. and 1 to 3:30 p.m. every Thursday and Friday for its clients. Officials in Lake County will stop by the DeKalb office in January to

see how the walk-in clinic works. Chase said some confuse their program with services such as Medicaid or Link cards, but the WIC Program is different in that it provides educational tools that teach families what to buy at the grocery store. It also provides much-needed support to its clients, Jackson said. “I am treated very well,” she said. “I feel like the case workers really care about what I have to tell them.”

d r a o B Jo b s e i t i n u t r o p p e nt O m y o l p m E l a c o L

state are uninsured • HEALTH CARE Continued from page A1 About 1.8 million Illinoisans are uninsured, about 14 percent of the total population, according to estimates based on Census data. Under President Barack Obama’s new law, almost everyone is required to get insurance or face a fee on their federal income taxes if they aren’t covered by March 2014. The new marketplace is where people can shop for insurance plans by tiers – bronze, silver, gold and platinum – based on what portion of medical costs are covered. Bronze plans are expected to be popular because they tend to have lower monthly premiums. In Illinois, those plans will have deductibles ranging from $3,150 to $6,350, according to an analysis conducted for The Associated Press by Chicago-based Stonegate Advisors, an independent health care consulting company. Adrienne Matzen, 29, is

a Chicago actor who’s been mostly uninsured since she turned 21. Her day job as a copyright permissions researcher doesn’t provide insurance. She’s generally healthy, but her thyroid condition and asthma require regular testing and medication. She plans to shop for insurance on the federal website and intends to look for a low monthly premium, even if it means a high deductible. “I am so deeply clueless about all of this,” she admits. On the marketplace, she has an overwhelming choice of 71 different health plans, with monthly premiums ranging from $23 to $291 after a tax credit because of her income. Buying the cheapest plan would leave her with a deductible of $6,000. Instead, if she chooses a plan with a higher premium, she could find a deductible as low as $500. Premium prices vary by region because of differences in what people spend on health care and the prices that hospitals and other providers can negotiate with insurers.

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NEWSPAPER DISTRIBUTION ACI Midwest is seeking qualified applicants for full and part-time positions to assist in the distribution of local newspapers in Kane, DeKalb & McHenry counties.

District Contract Manager (DCM) The DCM will manage the distribution within a geographic area for ACI Midwest, LLC responsible for negotiating contracts with Independent Contractors, managing delivery fees, and achieving service targets. This is a salaried position. Market salary provided commensurate with experience. Previous supervisory experience required. Previous newspaper distribution experience is a plus. Must have reliable transportation, proof of insurance and valid driver's license. Typical work schedule begins at 1 am.

District Assistant District Assistant will assist in all aspects of the daily distribution of the newspaper, including the delivery of open routes, ride-alongs with Independent Contractors and assisting with service issue. Typical work schedule begins at 1 am. This is an hourly position with mileage reimbursement. Must have reliable transportation, proof of insurance and valid driver license. Food Service

DIRECTOR, ACADEMIC ADVISING

COLLECTION AGENCY

NORTHERN ILLINOIS UNIVERSITY COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS & SCIENCES Anticipated full-time, 12-month, supportive professional staff (SPS) position to provide leadership to the academic advising office in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. Responsibilities include oversight of all matters pertaining to undergraduate advising, including but not limited to, training and supervision of advising staff, decision making regarding polices and procedures, coordination of orientation programs, determination and/or resolution of student academic issues, & coordination of commencement ceremonies. Qualifications (only applicants who meet minimum qualification requirements will be considered): Required: Master's degree in Liberal Arts and Sciences discipline, supervisory exp. with academic advising staff, teaching & advising exp. at the undergraduate level. Deadline: 12/20/2013 is the closing date for receipt of complete applications. Send letter of interest, resume, and two letters of reference electronically to advisingdirector@niu.edu. Please direct questions to Sue Doederlein, Associate Dean for Undergraduate Affairs. sdoederlein@niu.edu. Pre-employment criminal background investigation req. AA/EEO.

Full-time debt collector positions available at RFGI in Sycamore.

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Flexible hours available, schedule varies. Benefits available. Sanitation certificate a plus. Apply in person: Barb City Manor 680 Haish Blvd, DeKalb, IL 60115 or call for more information: 815-756-8444, ask for Vickey

Please submit resume and work history to: dstamper@acicirculation.com

DUPAGE COUNTY Launch your career in the fast growing digital marketing industry Shaw Media is looking for a Digital Marketing Specialist who is responsible for developing new local business relationships with digital marketing solutions such as web design, video production, and e-commerce.

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The successful candidate will possess the ability to consistently prospect and meet with decision makers. Our Digital Marketing Specialist must have the ability to strategically and creatively think in a fast-paced environment. Candidate needs to be familiar with web design, social media, mobile, and office including Power Point. Strong communication skills are a must. Ideal candidate will be competitive, self sufficient, and able to maintain a positive attitude. To be considered, an applicant must have a college degree in a related field and relevant experience is preferred. The successful candidate must possess and maintain a valid driver's license, proof of insurance, reliable transportation and acceptable motor vehicle record. Shaw Media offers an extensive benefit package. If you thrive on change and love a good challenge, bring your passion to Shaw Media and be part of an incredibly exciting time in our industry! Qualified candidates should send cover letter & resume to: Email: Recruitment@shawmedia.com Shaw Media is a Drug Free Employer. Pre-employment background check and drug screen required. This posting may not include all duties of position. Equal Opportunity Employer.

For more Jobs and Career Information in DeKalb, Kane, McHenry & Lake Counties in Suburban Chicago

Chief Financial Officer The Ben Gordon Center, a leader in Behavioral Healthcare Services for adults, children and families in Illinois, has a rare opportunity for a dedicated financial professional to join our team of caring professionals. Ben Gordon Center is located in the familyoriented University community of DeKalb, Illinois, which is 60 minutes west of Chicago, Illinois in Northwest Illinois. The Chief Financial Officer reports directly to the President/CEO and the Board of Directors as well as provides leadership to all financial departments for the overall fiscal responsibility of the organization and directs financial operations and strategy for a progressive, community based outpatient Behavioral Healthcare organization and its four subsidiary corporations. This position requires management and oversight of daily operations of the Business and Accounting Office including: budgeting, purchasing, revenue cycle management, client benefit, and accounting departments. Work involves developing and managing procedures, policies, reporting and rules that assure compliance with funding guidelines and contractual requirements. This individual will work with limited supervision, exercise latitude, initiative and independent judgment in areas of responsibility. Bachelor's Degree in Accounting or Finance and the knowledge of generally accepted accounting principles, and verbal, interpersonal and quantitative skills normally acquired through completion of this degree is required. CPA Required. Master's Degree preferred. A minimum of 3-5 years of experience working at the CFO, Finance Director, Controller, Executive or Senior Financial Management level in an outpatient or healthcare environment or related financial experience preferred. Previous experience in a market with significant risk-based payor contracts and fee for service required. Competitive salary and benefit package. Minorities encouraged. EOE.

www.facebook.com/SuburbanChicagoJobs @SuburbanChiJobs

Send resume to: Ben Gordon Center Dept KA 12 Health Services Drive DeKalb, IL 60115


Opinions

Daily Chronicle • www.daily-chronicle.com • Page A9 • Monday, December 16, 2013

8ANOTHER VIEW

8SKETCH VIEW

Bailout all but forgotten as sales surge

How we really feel about economic inequality Americans don’t care much about rising economic inequality, recent surveys suggest. But that’s not quite right. The public may know that the top 10 percent pulled in about half of pretax income in 2012 – and that income inequality is the widest it’s been since right before the Great Depression. Its brain understands that these trends are not good for the society. But Americans express far less concern about the U.S. income gap than do the French, Brits and Germans about theirs. Meanwhile, the ratio between the other countries’ top 20 percent and bottom 20 percent is a fraction of ours. How do we explain these findings from a Pew Research Center study? The numbers are probably solid, but the interpretation of them is tricky. It’s not that most Americans regard growing income disparities as a non-problem. It’s that they are more concerned about the “why” of them than the fact of them. Ours is a work culture. We respect work. The emphasis on time devoted to the job may come with a price – a less full personal and family life – but it is good for the economy. Americans look down on those deemed outside the work culture. And most such people are poor. The problem is seen as a broken work ethic rather than a frayed safety net or shifting economy. One need not be a conservative to regard

VIEWS Froma Harrop many in this group as lazy, preferring to milk various government programs (or relatives) rather than work a job. Some economists describe them in less judgmental ways – as unable to respond to the economic incentives that drive the rest of us. Whatever. Our perpetually unemployed population is growing as many able-bodied, willing-to-work people find themselves without salable skills. Often demoralized by the low pay, some stop trying and drift into the world of non-work. But when struggling workers do get jobs, the American public stands behind them, and incomes become an issue. Exhibit A is the broad support for raising the federal minimum wage to $9 an hour, from the current $7.25. Not surprisingly, 91 percent of Democrats are in favor, according to a Gallup poll. But more than half of Republicans surveyed, 58 percent, also back it, as do 76 percent of independents. Of course, an actual hike in the minimum wage requires a vote of Congress, where fast-food outlets and other payers of low wages have considerable clout. In March, the Republican-controlled House

voted against a bill that would have raised the minimum to $10.10 by 2015. It’s true that one cannot set the minimum wage at an unrealistically high level without loss of jobs or replacement of many workers with machines. But modest increases seem to have little effect on employment. It also helps to know that the minimum wage in 1968 was $10.77 in today’s dollars. Adjusted for inflation, the minimum wage is now 33 percent lower than it was back then. When speaking in vague terms about social programs, Americans and Danes reflect famously different views. But they’re on the same page when it comes to aiding those who try, according to a study by two professors at Aarhus University in Denmark. They presented this scenario: “Imagine a man who is currently on social welfare. He has always had a regular job, but has now been the victim of a work-related injury. He is very motivated to get back to work again.” There was virtually no daylight between Danes and Americans in describing the man as “unlucky” and deserving of help rather than “lazy.” Do Americans care about economic inequality? They do, but with asterisks attached. • Froma Harrop is a member of the

Providence Journal editorial board. Follow her on Twitter @FromaHarrop. She can be reached at fharrop@gmail.com.

8VIEWS

Keeping media out of Newtown sets bad precedent By HILARY KRIEGER The Washington Post It was the worst sound I’d ever heard: shrieks that seemed to come from an animal but that I knew were human. They pealed through the Israeli hospital waiting room on Aug. 31, 2004, hours after the country’s latest bus bombing. I eventually realized that these intermittent cries – shattering the hushed tones of the pallid souls huddled on benches and chairs around me, waiting to hear the fate of their loved ones – were the sign that, for one more family, a doctor had removed all hope. As a newspaper reporter, it was my job to interview these family members at the first instant of their grief. Most moved aside to avoid me; some gave me dirty looks. I wondered if I should give up, and the prospect of leaving filled me with relief. But just then another grief-stricken family walked by, and a girl no more than 20, with fierce eyes and a tear-soaked face, saw my notebook and came toward me. Tell them my story, she urged me. Tell them about my brother who was murdered today. Tell them what he was like. Tell them the price that the killers need to

pay. Tell them. When I began covering terror attacks in Israel during the second intifada, I expected to be seen as a vulture, someone swooping in on human tragedy for professional, and even monetary, gain. Although many victims’ relatives didn’t want to speak to the press – and I would never push a grieving person to talk – often there was someone grateful for the opportunity to describe the person he or she loved and had lost, to have something tangible, a story, to hold onto, to receive the support of the broader community by sharing the ordeal. I was reminded of this experience this week when I read that Newtown First Selectman Pat Llodra, on behalf of her constituents, had asked the media to stay away from the Connecticut town on Saturday, the first anniversary of the mass shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School. To my surprise, many outlets, including CNN, NBC and USA Today, agreed. The desire of town residents for privacy is understandable, and journalists have a responsibility to be sensitive in their reporting, a sensitivity they have perhaps not always shown adequately in covering tragedies. Tim Gaughan of CBS News had

it right when he was quoted in Sunday’s New York Times saying, “Our goal is to have the smallest footprint possible.” (The network later announced that it wasn’t planning to report from Newtown on the day of the anniversary.) But to completely shut out the media goes too far. It means that those who do want to talk can’t, denying that form of catharsis to those who want it. It means that the event will be memorialized without the stories that can come only from being present at that moment, some of which would undoubtedly showcase hope, resilience and new undertakings. Denying the media access to the ways Newtown is commemorating and healing also means that the story line of shooter Adam Lanza will inevitably receive more prominence. The most moving, and memorable, article I’ve read on Newtown was an in-depth feature by The Washington Post’s Eli Saslow six months after the shooting. It explored the unremitting grief of Mark and Jackie Barden, who lost their 7-year-old son, Daniel, and their resulting campaign for gun control. The family’s “purpose,” Mark said, is now “to force people to remember.” Talking to the media is part of that, and doing so imparts a

more complete picture of Newtown. It would be a great loss for other, equally important stories to go untold. That Newtown is coping with tragedy won’t change if the media aren’t there to report on it. But what will change is the precedent for coverage of such tragedies in the future. In a country with a free press, how can a town, even a town in mourning, try to dictate coverage to the media? Could Boston, then, shut out reporters from next year’s commemmoration of the marathon bombing? What other places and events would be declared off-limits? Who else would then call for these limits to be imposed? This is not some private family scandal; this shooting was and is a major news story. Its implications for gun policy, mental health treatment, trauma care and more are still reverberating. The broader public is entitled to know what is happening in Newtown at this juncture. This story is not just Newtown’s but the whole country’s. • Hilary Krieger is an editor in The Washington Post’s editorial department and a former reporter for the Jerusalem Post. She is on Twitter at @ hilarykrieger.

Letters to the Editor Karen Pletsch – General Manager

Eric Olson – Editor

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Dana Herra – MidWeek Editor dherra@shawmedia.com

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Jillian Duchnowski – News Editor jduchnowski@shawmedia.com

We welcome original letters on public issues. Letters must include the author’s full name, address and day and evening phone numbers. We limit letters to 400 words. We accept one letter per person every 15 days. All letters are subject to editing for length and clarity. Email: news@daily-chronicle.com. Mail: Daily Chronicle, Letters to the Editor, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115. Fax: 815-758-5059.

When President Barack Obama orchestrated the multibillion-dollar bailout of the U.S. auto industry in 2009 – GM and Chrysler were headed into bankruptcy, Ford was struggling – his many critics derided it as either a nefarious socialist plot or an attempt to buy the votes of autoworkers about to lose their jobs. In any event, the government made out like a capitalist when it began to sell its ownership shares in GM and Chrysler and Obama did indeed win, except Indiana, the industrial belt – including Michigan, the home state of Mitt Romney, who despite being the scion of an auto company president, favored letting GM and Chrysler go bankrupt. Remember Indiana State Treasurer Richard Mourdock of Evansville who fought the bailout, taking the case all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court? Mourdock talked principle, but his opponents said if successful, his move would cripple the economy. In the end, Mourdock lost this battle, and his bid for the U.S. Senate. USA Today, in its dissection of the 2012 presidential election, said, “In the end, there is no overestimating how large of a role that the auto industry bailout played in President Obama’s re-election.” And, also in 2012, CNNMoney said of the bailout, “The U.S. auto industry’s recovery is one of the biggest success stories of the last four years.” The Michigan-based Center for Automotive Research believes the massive infusion of taxpayer funds – as much as $60 million on the two companies alone – saved 1.5 million jobs and stopped a wave of bankruptcies from sweeping through the industry’s suppliers. The American auto industry was caught in a triple whammy – a global economic downturn; a mix of products that ran heavily to high mileage pickups and SUVs just as fuel prices began to soar; and crippling legacy costs from previous union contracts that gave foreign makes, even those produced in the U.S., a cost advantage of $350 to $500 a vehicle. Thanks in no small part to that bailout and the economic recovery, November auto sales were 9 percent above a year ago with sales running at an annual pace of 16.4 million vehicles for the year, the strongest since February, 2007. It is perhaps worth noting that major news outlets reporting the robust auto industry figures – The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, The Associated Press – made no mention of Obama or, for that matter, socialism. Evansville (Ind.) Courier & Press

8 LEGISLATIVE DIRECTORY State Sen. Tim Bivins R-45, Dixon 629 N. Galena Ave. Dixon, IL 61021 Phone: 815-284-0045 Fax: 815-284-0207 Email: senatorbivins@grics.net State Sen. Dave Syverson R-35, Rockford 200 S. Wyman St. Suite 302 Rockford, IL 61101 Phone: 815-987-7555 Fax: 815-987-7563 Email: info@senatordavesyverson.com State Rep. Tom Demmer R-90, Dixon 1221 Currency Court Rochelle, IL 61068 Phone: 815-561-3690 Email: tom@tomdemmer.com Website: www.tomdemmer.com State Rep. Robert Pritchard R-70, Hinckley 2600 DeKalb Ave., Suite C Sycamore, IL 60178 815-748-3494 Fax: 815-748-4630 Email: Bob@PritchardStateRep.com Website: www.pritchardstaterep.com DeKalb County Board Chairman Jeffery L. Metzger, Sr. Legislative Center 200 N. Main St. Sycamore, IL 60178 Phone: 815-895-7189 Fax: 815-895-7284 Email: jmetzger@dekalbcounty.org Website: www.dekalbcounty.org Gov. Pat Quinn D-Chicago 207 Statehouse Springfield, IL 62706

Phone: 800-642-3112 Email: governor@state.il.us Website: www.illinois.gov U.S. Rep. Randy Hultgren R-14, Winfield 1797 State Street, Suite A Geneva, IL 60134 Phone: 630-232-7104 Fax: 630-232-7174 427 Cannon House Office Building Washington, D.C., 20515 Phone: 202-225-2976 Fax: 202-225-0697 Website: hultgren.house.gov U.S. Rep. Adam Kinzinger R-16, Manteno 628 Columbus Street, Ste. 507 Ottawa, IL 61350 Phone: 815-431-9271 Fax: 815-431-9383 Washington, D.C., office: 1218 Longworth HOB Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: 202-225-3635 Fax: 202-225-3521 Website: www.kinzinger.house.gov U.S. Sen. Dick Durbin D-Illinois 309 Hart Senate Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-2152 Fax: 202-228-0400 Website: www.durbin.senate.gov U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk R-Illinois 387 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: 202-224-2854 Fax: 202-228-4611 Website: www.kirk.senate.gov President Barack Obama The White House 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. NW Washington, D.C. 20500 202-456-1111 Website: www.whitehouse.gov

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances. – U.S. Bill of Rights, First Amendment


WEATHER

Page A10 • Monday, December 16, 2013

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

7-DAY FORECAST

It will be cold today with some snow showers around early; otherwise, high pressure will dominate and warm up the area Tuesday through Wednesday. Another wintry storm will move through on Thursday with snow, sleet and freezing rain in the morning before all rain in the afternoon. It will get cold for Saturday with a winter storm for Sunday.

TODAY

TOMORROW

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

SUNDAY

Mostly cloudy with a little snow

Partly sunny, breezy and not as cold

Partly sunny and breezy.

Wintry mix of snow, sleet, freezing rain

Cloudy and breezy

Partly sunny and quite cold

Not as cold with a bit of snow and sleet

20

30

26

33

31

21

27

16

16

21

28

8

18

19

Winds: SW 6-12 mph

Winds: W 10-20 mph

UV INDEX

ALMANAC

Winds: SSW 10-20 mph

Winds: E 8-16 mph

Winds: NW 10-20 mph

Winds: ENE 6-12 mph

Winds: NNW 6-12 mph

REGIONAL CITIES

REGIONAL WEATHER

DeKalb through 4 p.m. yesterday

Temperature High ............................................................. 19° Low .............................................................. 10° Normal high ............................................. 32° Normal low ............................................... 17° Record high .............................. 59° in 1971 Record low ................................. -8° in 1985

Precipitation 24 hours through 4 p.m. yest. ......... 0.13” Month to date ....................................... 0.36” Normal month to date ....................... 1.18” Year to date ......................................... 33.22” Normal year to date ......................... 36.01”

Last

New

The higher the AccuWeather.com UV Index number, the greater the need for eye and skin protection. 0-2 Low; 3-5 Moderate; 6-7 High; 8-10 Very High; 11+ Extreme.

AIR QUALITY TODAY

Jan 1

Rockford 19/17

Source: Environmental Protection Agency

Dixon 21/16

What is the warmest it has been in Antarctica?

Joliet 22/18

La Salle 23/21

Evanston 21/19 Chicago 21/18

Aurora 20/15

WEATHER TRIVIA™ Q:

Temperatures are today’s highs and tonight’s lows.

Waukegan 19/15

Arlington Heights 20/18

DeKalb 20/16

Main ofender ................................................... N.A.

Streator 24/20

Hammond 23/20 Gary 24/20 Kankakee 24/18

Peoria 27/22

Pontiac 26/20

Watseka 24/18

Jan 7

NATIONAL WEATHER

Hi 20 37 19 20 26 20 22 24 22 22 25 22 20 23 23 33 20 19 19 30 22 20 19 19 21

Today Lo W 15 sn 28 pc 16 sn 16 sn 20 c 16 sn 18 sf 18 sf 18 sf 19 sn 17 c 19 sf 17 sn 20 sf 18 sf 25 c 18 sn 14 sf 17 sn 24 c 17 sf 17 sn 15 sn 16 sn 17 sf

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 31 14 pc 44 29 s 30 14 pc 31 15 pc 34 20 pc 32 14 pc 31 16 pc 32 17 pc 31 16 pc 33 20 sf 33 18 pc 32 17 pc 31 15 pc 32 17 pc 32 17 pc 38 27 s 33 16 pc 29 14 pc 31 15 pc 36 25 s 31 16 pc 32 16 pc 32 16 pc 31 14 pc 32 14 pc

RIVER LEVELS

WEATHER HISTORY

First

On Dec. 16, 1917, one of the worst ice jams occurred on the Ohio River between Warsaw, Ky., and Rising Sun, Ind. It lasted 58 days.

Dec 17 Dec 25

Lake Geneva 18/16

A: 59(F) at Vanda Station on Jan. 5, 1974

Sunrise today ................................ 7:16 a.m. Sunset tonight ............................. 4:25 p.m. Moonrise today ........................... 4:15 p.m. Moonset today ............................. 6:23 a.m. Sunrise tomorrow ........................ 7:17 a.m. Sunset tomorrow ........................ 4:25 p.m. Moonrise tomorrow .................. 5:05 p.m. Moonset tomorrow .................... 7:12 a.m.

Kenosha 19/16

8 a.m. 10 a.m. Noon 2 p.m. 4 p.m. 6 p.m.

0-50 Good, 51-100 Moderate, 101-150, Unhealthy for sensitive groups, 151-200 Unhealthy 201-300 Very Unhealthy, 301-500 Hazardous

SUN and MOON

Full

Janesville 19/16

City Aurora Belleville Beloit Belvidere Champaign Elgin Joliet Kankakee Mendota Michigan City Moline Morris Naperville Ottawa Princeton Quincy Racine Rochelle Rockford Springield Sterling Wheaton Waukegan Woodstock Yorkville

Location

7 a.m. yest.

Kishwaukee Belvidere Perryville DeKalb

1.27 5.94 2.58

Flood stage

9.0 12.0 10.0

24-hr chg

+0.03 -0.17 +0.01

DRAW THE WEATHER Shown are noon positions of weather systems and precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.

-10s -0s 0s 10s 20s 30s 40s 50s 60s 70s 80s 90s 100s 110s

Cold Front

Warm Front

Stationary Front

T-storms Rain Showers Snow Flurries

City Atlanta Atlantic City Baltimore Boston Bufalo Charleston, SC Charlotte Chicago

Hi 53 34 32 26 21 60 51 21

Today Lo W 37 s 24 pc 22 pc 11 pc 19 sf 38 s 31 s 18 sn

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 58 37 s 46 33 pc 42 30 sn 32 22 sn 33 24 sn 64 40 s 58 34 s 34 17 pc

Ice

City Cincinnati Dallas Denver Houston Indianapolis Kansas City Las Vegas Los Angeles

Hi 33 63 59 64 29 46 65 84

Today Lo W 27 sf 36 s 28 s 38 s 24 sn 29 pc 44 pc 56 pc

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 39 25 pc 65 42 s 61 38 s 68 45 s 35 21 pc 46 32 s 64 42 pc 78 52 pc

City Louisville Miami Minneapolis New Orleans New York City Philadelphia Seattle Wash., DC

Hi 41 75 27 60 28 31 48 34

Today Lo W 32 pc 63 sh 19 sn 39 s 22 pc 22 pc 35 c 27 pc

Tomorrow Hi Lo W 44 32 pc 77 65 pc 26 14 c 66 42 s 38 28 sn 40 28 sn 49 42 r 45 30 pc

Legend: W-weather, s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow lurries, sn-snow, i-ice.

Snow flurries Nicholas, Jefferson Elementary Mail your weather drawings to: Geoff Wells, 1586 Barber Greene Road, DeKalb, IL 60115

Forecasts and graphics, except WFLD forecasts, provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2013

OAK CREST DeKalb Area Retirement Center www.oakcrestdekalb.org

“We found a home we value…” The view from our two bedroom balcony apartment can’t be beat. To say we have it all might be a bit of an understatement. You see, when we were ready to make the retirement decision, we knew we wanted Jim & Bev Gillett to find a community that felt like home and would offer great living accommodations but would also provide a full continuum of care and services. The reality of life is that at some point one or both of us may need some kind of care and support, and we wanted to be sure when that time came we could be together. We also were conscious of the costs associated with retirement living. After visiting other places near our home in Maple Park, we found the costs associated with the care and services didn’t translate into value. So, when we stopped in at Oak Crest we just knew we had come home. Not only were we impressed with the surroundings, the apartments, and services; we found an apartment we love at a price we love even more. Come see for yourself. It really comes down to this: life at Oak Crest translates into value. Jim & Bev Gillett, Residents since 2012

For more information call (815) 756-8461 or visit us on the web at www.oakcrestdekalb.org


Sports

FIFTH WHEEL: Earl Bennett catches the goahead TD with 5:41 remaining in a 38-31 victory that puts the Bears atop the division. Plus, Hub Arkush’s 3-Point Stance and Kevin Fishbain’s 3 and Out. PAGES B6-7

SECTION B Monday, December 16, 2013 Daily Chronicle

Sports editor Ross Jacobson • rjacobson@shawmedia.com

NORTHERN ILLINOIS FOOTBALL

IN

GOOD COMPANY

AP photo

Heisman Trophy finalists (from left) Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch, Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel, Auburn running back Tre Mason, Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron, Boston College running back Andre Williams and Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston stand behind the trophy before it was announced that Winston is this year’s trophy winner Saturday at the Best Buy Theater in New York.

Jordan Lynch finishes Even with a third-place 3rd in Heisman voting finish, Lynch and NIU win By STEVE NITZ snitz@shawmedia.com NEW YORK – Jordan Lynch is the third-best player in college football. At least that’s’ what the nation’s Heisman Trophy voters think. Lynch took third place in the 2013 Heisman Trophy balloting, which was announced Saturday in Manhattan. Lynch, who finished seventh last season, is the highest finisher in NIU history. In 1993, Huskies tailback LeShon

Johnson finished sixth after leading the country in rushing. Lynch also has the best finish from the Mid-American Conference. Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston, the heavy favorite coming in, won the Heisman. “I was really hoping to hear my name,” Lynch said. “But Jameis Winston, it’s well-deserved.” Lynch garnered 40 first-place votes.

See LYNCH, page B3

NEW YORK – A guy from Northern Illinois was just honored as one of the best players in college football. Just sit back and really think about it. For those who followed the program during the dark days of the 1990s, how could you even have imagined a Huskie sitting at a ceremony with some of the best players in college football?

VIEWS Steve Nitz NIU was one of the worst, if not THE worst, program in the nation at one point. Now, it’s almost like Huskies fans are downright spoiled. Four consecutive trips to the MAC Championship. A BCS

bowl appearance, NIU would finish in the Top 25 for the second consecutive year if they beat Utah State in the Poinsettia Bowl. The Huskies’ quarterback finished in third place in Heisman balloting. After the presentation, Lynch said he was disappointed to not win the trophy, which is understandable.

See VIEWS, page B3

SYCAMORE 55, DeKALB 38

Spartans win third straight over Barbs ANTHONY ZILIS sports@daily-chronicle.com DeKALB – Eleven straight times, the DeKalb boys basketball team had beaten Sycamore before the Spartans finally broke through last year, starting a two-game winning streak by sweeping the season series. Make it three. Sycamore took over in the second half of a 55-38 win on Saturday night after the Barbs took a tie game into halftime. “It feels great,” senior Devin Mottet said. “We watched the past five years of them beating us every single game, and now we’re trying to make our own run for ourselves.” Neither team had much luck on the offensive end early, and the Barbs led 8-7 after the first quarter.

Then, the Spartans (5-2, 2-0 Northern Illinois Big 12 East) found success by getting the ball inside, and Mottet scored 10 of the Spartans’ 12 points in the second quarter as DeKalb center Luke Davis struggled with foul trouble. But the Barbs (2-6, 0-2 NI Big 12 East) hung tough in the second, and behind six first-half points from junior Rudy Lopez and five from sophomore Michael Pollack, the game was tied, 19-19, at the half. “We haven’t played in a whole week,” said Mottet, who scored a game-high 20 points. “We came out a little rusty. It was our first away game, so I think we had some pregame jitters. We were playing DeKalb, another conference game, so I think we had to get used to the environment, the crowd, get settled down and get into our

offense.” The Spartans went on a 16-5 run to start the second half behind six points from Ben Niemann, who scored 12 points, and four from Jake Winters, who also finished with 12. The Spartans closed the game out by making 10 free throws in the fourth. “We held them to 19 in the first half, but we just knew we needed to get our offense going, and we were able to do that,” Niemann said. “Luke Davis was in foul trouble, so we were able to get the ball inside. … Our offense was from the inside out, so when we get post touches, we can kick it out to the guards for three, so we knew if we could do that, our whole offense, we could just kind of get it rolling.” Monica Maschak – mmaschak@shawmedia.com

See SPARTANS, page B3

Devin Mottet spins around his opponent in the second quarter. The Spartans beat the Barbs, 55-38.

Cutler rusty in return, Jeffery saves Trestman but gets the job done from a ton of abuse All the Bears needed in Cleveland was a win, and that’s pretty much all they got. Their 38-31 victory over the Browns on Sunday kept the Bears’ playoff hopes very much alive. In his first action since Nov. 10 against the Detroit Lions, Jay Cutler did more to feed the controversy over his return to the starting lineup ahead of Josh McCown than he did to silence it, but he also did enough to win. Seventeen of the Browns’ 31 points came courtesy of two Cutler interceptions by Tashaun Gipson, the second returned 44 yards for a touchdown, and a 51-yard fumble return by T.J. Ward after Martellus Bennett put the ball on the ground. Cutler clearly was rusty and his passes were wild Sunday, but other than those three plays,

BEARS INSIDER Hub Arkush the Bears offense did do some nice things. Cutler finished 22 of 31 for 265 yards and three touchdowns with two interceptions and a 102.2 passer rating. That made for his second best passing day of the season, efficiency-wise. Alshon Jeffery once again provided the turning point of the game, this time with a 45-yard touchdown reception on a jump ball at the goal line with just more than 11 minutes left to tie the score at 24.

See ARKUSH, page B6

CLEVELAND – Marc Trestman’s day wasn’t going well. “The Plan,” the Bears’ case-closed, double-bolted decision to start Jay Cutler once he returned to health, was looking sickly early in the fourth quarter Sunday. Cutler, making his first appearance after four stellar games by Josh McCown, already had thrown two interceptions against the Browns, one of which was returned by safety Tashaun Gipson for a touchdown. If it were only that, maybe Trestman would have felt better. But there were pre-snap penalties and timeouts burned prematurely. A holding call wiped out a Robbie Gould field goal attempt, forcing the Bears to punt. Cleveland returned a Martellus Bennett fumble for

VIEWS Rick Morrissey a touchdown. And as things fell apart, Cutler seemed to be in every security-camera shot. Then came “The Play,” which gave “The Plan” a major makeover and saved Trestman from pitchforks and torches back in Chicago. And I’m still not sure how the Bears pulled it off. With about 11 minutes left in the game, Cutler reared back and threw a pass intended for Alshon Jeffery. Browns linebacker Jabaal Sheard hit Cutler’s arm just as he let go of

See MORRISSEY, page B7


SPORTS

Page B2 • Monday, December 16, 2013

8PREP SCHEDULE TODAY Girls Basketball Paw Paw at Hiawatha, 6:45 p.m. LaMoille at Indian Creek, 6:45 p.m. Genoa-Kingston at Pecatonica tournament, TBA

TUESDAY Boys Basketball Rockford Guilford at DeKalb, 7 p.m. Kaneland at Hinckley-Big Rock, 7 p.m. Girls Basketball Genoa-Kingston at Pecatonica tournament, TBA Boys Bowling Dixon at DeKalb, 4 p.m. Girls Bowling Kaneland at Morris, 4 p.m. Dixon at DeKalb, 4 p.m.

WEDNESDAY Girls Basketball Genoa-Kingston at Pecatonica tournament, TBA

THURSDAY Boys Basketball Genoa-Kingston at Burlington Central, 7:15 p.m. Hiawatha at Durand Holiday Classic, TBA Girls Basketball Hiawatha at Newark, 6:45 p.m. Hinckley-Big Rock at LaMoille, 7 p.m. Genoa-Kingston at Pecatonica tournament, TBA Wrestling Morris at DeKalb, 5:30 p.m. Boys Swimming Jacobs at DeKalb-Sycamore, 5 p.m. Boys Bowling St. Charles East at DeKalb, 4 p.m. LaSalle-Peru at Sycamore, 4 p.m. Girls Bowling LaSalle-Peru at Sycamore, 4 p.m. Girls Gymnastics DeKalb at Geneseo, 5 p.m.

FRIDAY Boys Basketball Hinckley-Big Rock at Indian Creek, 6:45 p.m. LaMoille at Hiawatha, 6:45 p.m. North Boone at Genoa-Kingston, 7:15 p.m. Girls Basketball Rochelle at DeKalb, 7 p.m. Sycamore at Willowbrook, 7:30 p.m. Kaneland at Ottawa tournament, TBA Genoa-Kingston at Pecatonica tournament, TBA Wrestling Rochelle at Sycamore, 7 p.m. DeKalb at Hinsdale Central tournament, 4:30 p.m. Kaneland at Yorkville, 5:30 p.m.

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

DEKALB CROSS COUNTRY/TRACK AND FIELD

NFL

Schrader commits to Arkansas By ROSS JACOBSON rjacobson@shawmedia.com Kelsey Schrader was looking for three specific things in picking a college. The DeKalb senior wanted a university that would help her in a future career, further her growth as a runner, and remain strong in her faith and religion. She found all of them in the University of Arkansas and verbally committed on Friday to run cross country and track and field for the Razorbacks next year. She will sign her national letter of intent in February. Schrader also was considering Minnesota. “My visit to Arkansas was just over the top,” Schrader said. “Those three things

were so present there. I just couldn’t ignore that.” Schrader had never really considered Arkansas until she received a letter from the coaching staff after her junior year. She sent the recruiting questionnaire back and kept in contact with the team until making an unKelsey Schrader official visit to the campus in Fayetteville. She went back for an official visit later on and stayed overnight. “It was really nice to see that and I think that was the time where I really fell in love with the whole campus and the girls on the team,” Schrad-

er said. Arkansas has one of the most successful collegiate cross country programs in the nation. Under coach Lance Harter, the Razorbacks have won 14 Southeastern Conference titles in 24 years, including this past season. They placed 15th at the NCAA Championships this fall. “Coach Harter he’s kind of like a legend in the coaching realm for running. To be able to get to know him so well … it was a wow factor at first,” Schrader said. “I know he can develop really good runners. He’s worked with a wide range of runners, he’s coached some Olympians before. Having a coach with that type of record, it’s hard to turn down.” Schrader, who was named

SATURDAY’S PREP ROUNDUP

DeKalb girls basketball beaten at the buzzer DAILY CHRONICLE

WRESTLING Spartans go 1-2: Sycamore

The DeKalb girls basketball team suffered a 52-51 loss at East Moline United on Saturday afternoon, with EMU hitting a 3-pointer to beat the Barbs at the buzzer. Brittney Patrick led DeKalb with 16 points and six assists. Madelyne Johnson had 10 points for the Barbs, while Ashlei Lopez had seven.

earned a 39-28 win over Antioch on Saturday at the Antioch Quad. The Spartans lost to Cary-Grove (34-30) and St. Charles East (48-18). DeKalb goes 2-1: DeKalb earned wins over Zion Benton (42-29) and Harvard (48-18) at the Grant quad. The Barbs lost to host Grant, 32-28. G-K 17th in Plano: G e noa-Kingston finished 17th at the Reaper Classic. Christian Ordlock finished in fourth place at 120 pounds. Brian Dehmlow took fifth place at 113.

BOYS BASKETBALL Cogs get win: Genoa-Kingston beat Harvard, 62-43. Eli Thurlby led the Cogs with 16 points, while Colin Broderick had 12 and Griffin McNeal scored eight. G-K now is 6-1 overall and 1-0 in conference play. “Definitely a positive win for us tonight, playing without Tommy Lucca and Sal Lopez,” G-K coach Corey Jenkins said. “Thankfully we’re deep enough his year where we’ve got enough guys to get in there and get the job done.”

in the 200 IM and 100 breaststroke. Jacob Bjork won the 500 freestyle. The co-op also won three relays – the 200 free (Austin Bockman, Bjork, Dylan Rasmussen, and Tyler Schultz), 400 medley (Michael Carlson, Ryan Schultz, Daniel Hein, and Holden Mackey) and 400 free (Bockman, Schultz, Rasmussen and Mackey).

BOYS BOWLING Sycamore 15th at Guilford: Sycamore finished 15th at the Rockford Guilford Invite with a total of 5,275 pins.

BOYS SWIMMING Co-op wins triangular: The

GIRLS BOWLING Barbs fifth at Steamwood:

DeKalb-Sycamore co-op swimming team won a triangular over Rock Island and Sterling. The co-op finished with 375 points, while Rock Island took second place with 308 and Sterling was third with 259. Daniel Hein won both the 100 butterfly and 100 backstroke for DeKalb-Sycamore, and Ryan Schultz took first

Maddy Jouris had 1,231 pins as DeKalb finished in fifth place at the Roy Maxwell Streamwood Varsity Invite. Abby Kuzmanich had 1,046 while Taylor Mershon finished with 1,027.

Johnson leads Sycamore at Strikefest: Sycamore’s Kelsey Johnson led the Spartans with a 1,070 series at Strikefest in

Labor court halts work at Brazil World Cup stadium

Army fires Ellerson after 5 years, no wins vs. Navy Army fired coach Rich Ellerson after five seasons at West Point and no victories against Navy. Army athletic director Boo Corrigan said Ellerson was notified that he would not be retained Sunday night, about 24 hours after the Black Knights (3-9) finished the season with a 34-7 loss to Navy. Ellerson went 20-41 at the U.S. Military Academy and couldn’t snap the Black Knights’ losing streak against their most important rival. The Midshipmen have won 12 straight in the series, the longest streak by either side. – Wire reports

Joliet. Kelly Drake had an 828 while Alexis Kolberg finished with a 780. Sycamore took 40th in the tournament, which featured 44 schools. The Spartans finished with a score of 4,562.

FRIDAY’S LATE RESULTS BOYS BASKETBALL H-BR tips Hiawatha: Hinckley-Big Rock defeated Hiawatha, 43-40, on Friday. Jacob Ryan hit a 3-pointer with 13 seconds left in the fourth quarter to erase a one-point Hiawatha lead. Ryan then added a free throw to finalize the scoring. Eric Phillips had 15 points, seven assists and six steals. Ryan scored 14 and Dutch Schneeman had nine. H-BR (3-5) hosts Kaneland on Tuesday. Sophomore Evan Williams scored 19 points for Hiawatha. “We had ’em. We had ’em. We just let it get away,” Hiawatha coach Franz Schumacher said. “We had a great effort from the kids; they did great.”

Heisman Trophy finalists (from left) Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron, Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel, Boston College running back Andre Williams, Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston, Auburn running back Tre Mason and Northern Illinois quarterback Jordan Lynch react moments after it was announced that Winston is this year’s trophy winner Saturday at the Best Buy Theater in New York.

8SPORTS SHORTS SAO PAULO – A labor court Sunday halted construction in part of the World Cup stadium where a man fell 115 feet to his death while working on a roofing structure in the jungle city of Manaus, further delaying the venue that will host England vs. Italy and three other matches in June. The decision was announced after public prosecutors requested the immediate interruption of work in all areas where laborers need to be high above the ground. Work will only restart after constructors show that all safety measures are in place at the Arena Amazonia, which also will host United States vs. Portugal.

the Daily Chronicle Girls Cross Country Runner of the Year each of her four years and finished fourth at the Class 2A state cross country meet this fall, said she was helped in the recruiting process by her older brother, Nick, who runs for Southern Illinois. Now Schrader will enter her final track and field year with her college plans finalized. “It’s definitely a relief knowing that I have my college decision made and I don’t have to worry about that anymore going into track season,” Schrader said. “It’s also a lot of motivation. It makes you want to go a little faster and reach your next best and get to a new level.”

NATIONAL CONFERENCE Bears Detroit Green Bay Minnesota Philadelphia Dallas N.Y. Giants Washington New Orleans Carolina Tampa Bay Atlanta x-Seattle San Francisco Arizona St. Louis

North W L T 8 6 0 7 6 0 7 6 1 4 9 1 East W L T 8 6 0 7 7 0 5 9 0 3 11 0 South W L T 10 4 0 10 4 0 4 10 0 4 10 0 West W L T 12 2 0 10 4 0 9 5 0 6 8 0

Pct .571 .538 .536 .321

PF 406 346 353 363

PA 391 321 362 425

Pct .571 .500 .357 .214

PF 364 393 251 305

PA 349 385 357 434

Pct .714 .714 .286 .286

PF 359 328 258 309

PA 270 208 324 388

Pct .857 .714 .643 .429

PF 380 349 342 316

PA 205 228 291 324

AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF 10 4 0 .714 369 8 6 0 .571 310 6 8 0 .429 246 5 9 0 .357 300 South W L T Pct PF y-Indianapolis 9 5 0 .643 338 Tennessee 5 9 0 .357 326 Jacksonville 4 10 0 .286 221 Houston 2 12 0 .143 253 North W L T Pct PF Cincinnati 9 4 0 .692 334 Baltimore 7 6 0 .538 278 Pittsburgh 5 8 0 .385 291 Cleveland 4 10 0 .286 288 West W L T Pct PF x-Denver 11 3 0 .786 535 x-Kansas City 11 3 0 .786 399 San Diego 7 7 0 .500 343 Oakland 4 10 0 .286 295 x-clinched playoff spot y-clinched division New England Miami N.Y. Jets Buffalo

PA 311 296 367 354 PA 319 355 399 375 PA 244 261 312 362 PA 372 255 311 393

Sunday’s Results Bears 38, Cleveland 31 Minnesota 48, Philadelphia 30 Atlanta 27, Washington 26 San Francisco 33, Tampa Bay 14 Seattle 23, N.Y. Giants 0 Indianapolis 25, Houston 3 Buffalo 27, Jacksonville 20 Miami 24, New England 20 Kansas City 56, Oakland 31 Carolina 30, N.Y. Jets 20 Arizona 37, Tennessee 34, OT St. Louis 27, New Orleans 16 Green Bay 37, Dallas 36 Cincinnati at Pittsburgh (n) Today’s Game Baltimore at Detroit, 7:40 p.m. Thursday’s Result San Diego 27, Denver 20

NBA EASTERN CONFERENCE Central Division W L Pct Indiana 20 3 .870 Detroit 11 14 .440 Bulls 9 13 .409 Cleveland 9 14 .391 Milwaukee 5 19 .208 Atlantic Division W L Pct Boston 11 14 .440 Toronto 9 13 .409 Brooklyn 8 15 .348 New York 7 16 .304 Philadelphia 7 18 .280 Southeast Division W L Pct Miami 17 6 .739 Atlanta 12 12 .500 Charlotte 10 14 .417 Washington 9 13 .409 Orlando 7 17 .292

GB — 10 10½ 11 15½ GB — ½ 2 3 4 GB — 5½ 7½ 7½ 10½

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct San Antonio 19 4 .826 Houston 16 9 .640 Dallas 14 10 .583 New Orleans 11 11 .500 Memphis 10 13 .435 Northwest Division W L Pct Portland 21 4 .840 Oklahoma City 19 4 .826 Denver 14 9 .609 Minnesota 12 12 .500 Utah 6 20 .231 Paciic Division W L Pct L.A. Clippers 16 9 .640 Phoenix 14 9 .609 Golden State 13 12 .520 L.A. Lakers 11 12 .478 Sacramento 7 15 .318

GB — 4 5½ 7½ 9 GB — 1 6 8½ 15½ GB — 1 3 4 7½

Sunday’s Results Sacramento 106, Houston 91 Minnesota 101, Memphis 93 Portland 111, Detroit 109, OT Oklahoma City 101, Orlando 98 Phoenix 106, Golden State 102 Denver 102, New Orleans 93 Today’s Games Orlando at Bulls, 7 p.m. Detroit at Indiana, 6 p.m. Philadelphia at Brooklyn, 6:30 p.m. Minnesota at Boston, 6:30 p.m. Utah at Miami, 6:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Atlanta, 6:30 p.m. Washington at New York, 6:30 p.m. San Antonio at L.A. Clippers, 9:30 p.m. Saturday’s Results Toronto 99, Bulls 77 L.A. Clippers 113, Washington 97 L.A. Lakers 88, Charlotte 85 Miami 114, Cleveland 107 New York 111, Atlanta 106 Portland 139, Philadelphia 105 Dallas 106, Milwaukee 93 San Antonio 100, Utah 84

NHL

AP photo

WESTERN CONFERENCE

Jameis Winston was the Lynch: It was an honor just to be here heavy favorite coming in • LYNCH Continued from page B1 “It was an honor just to be here. We’ve got a chance to do something no Northern Illinois team has ever done and that’s win 13 games,” Lynch said. “Looking forward to getting back on the field.” Winston’s the first Seminole to win the award since Chris Weinke in 2000. He garnered 668 first-place votes. “I cannot explain the feeling that I have inside right now,” Winston told reporters after the ceremony. “I’m so overwhelmed. It’s just awesome.” Lynch’s honor comes after another stellar season for NIU’s quarterback, who helped the Huskies to the cusp of a BCS berth before losing to Bowling Green in the MAC Championship. Lynch finished the regular season with 4,557 yards of total offense and 45 total touchdowns. His average of 350.5 yards of offense a game

ranks fourth in the country. He’ll end his collegiate career Dec. 26 in the Poinsettia Bowl, where NIU takes on Utah State. “I’m extremely happy for Jordan and his parents. Well-deserved,” NIU coach Rod Carey said before the ceremony. “Sure, we’re riding his coattails, there’s no question. That’s first and foremost, is Jordan and his family.” Winston becomes the secnod consecutive freshman to win the award. Texas A&M quarterback Johnny Manziel won last year. The Seminoles quarterback’s win comes with some controversy, as last month, Winston was investigated for a sexual assault complaint from 2012. Charges were not filed. Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron finished second while Boston College running back Andre Williams was fourth. Texas A&M QB Johnny Manziel was fifth and Auburn tailback Tre Mason finished sixth.

• VIEWS Continued from page B1 He also said it was an honor just to be invited to New York. Even though he finished in third place, Lynch and the Huskies won Saturday night. Before Saturday night’s ceremony, the six Heisman finalists took questions from the media – large pennants with each of their school’s logos draped in front of them. The NIU logo by Lynch sort of seemed out of place compared with legendary programs such as Alabama and Florida State. At the same time, it shows how far the program has come. It was obvious Lynch wasn’t going to win the Heisman Saturday. The winner, Florida State quarterback Jameis Winston, was the heavy favorite coming in. But a guy from NIU, a player from a non-AQ conference, a player from the MAC, was in New York. It’s great for Lynch, great for the Huskies and great for Huskie fans, especially the ones who witnessed so many of the down years. Before the ceremony, Lynch’s father, Jim, put it in perspective.

Jim and Lynch’s mother, Sheila, certainly enjoyed their time in the Big Apple. Lynch joked that his dad was taking pictures of everything. “This is a big win for Jordan,” Jim Lynch said. “It’s a big win for Northern Illinois. It’s a big win for the MAC conference.” When NIU started Lynch’s campaign this summer, I felt him being in Manhattan this weekend would have been a surprise, despite what he accomplished last year. Non-AQ players have to do a ton to earn the trip. Him being one of six finalists says a lot about what he did this season, especially with NIU losing the MAC title game. He had the numbers, he had the wins. Oh yeah, those midweek games some people complain about certainly helped his chances. Lynch didn’t win the Heisman tonight. But don’t kid yourself, him being honored in New York was a victory in itself.

• Steve Nitz is the Daily Chronicle’s NIU beat writer. He can be reached via e-mail at snitz@ shawmedia.com and follow him on Twitter @SNitz_DDC.

Central Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA 36 24 7 5 53 135 101 31 22 6 3 47 110 73 31 21 9 1 43 88 73 35 19 11 5 43 81 81 31 15 11 5 35 90 93 33 16 14 3 35 77 92 34 14 15 5 33 90 100 Paciic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Anaheim 35 23 7 5 51 111 89 Los Angeles 34 22 8 4 48 94 68 San Jose 33 20 7 6 46 108 82 Vancouver 35 20 10 5 45 98 83 Phoenix 32 18 9 5 41 104 100 Calgary 33 13 15 5 31 86 106 Edmonton 35 11 21 3 25 93 120 Blackhawks St. Louis Colorado Minnesota Dallas Nashville Winnipeg

EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Boston 33 22 9 2 46 92 70 Montreal 35 20 12 3 43 88 75 Tampa Bay 33 19 11 3 41 90 80 Detroit 35 15 11 9 39 89 94 Toronto 34 17 14 3 37 97 99 Ottawa 34 13 15 6 32 96 111 Florida 34 12 17 5 29 78 109 Buffalo 33 7 23 3 17 55 96 Metropolitan Division GP W L OT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 34 23 10 1 47 105 74 Washington 33 18 12 3 39 105 97 Carolina 34 14 13 7 35 79 94 N.Y. Rangers 34 16 17 1 33 76 91 Columbus 33 14 15 4 32 85 92 Philadelphia 33 14 15 4 32 76 91 New Jersey 34 13 15 6 32 78 85 N.Y. Islanders 34 9 19 6 24 83 118 Two points for a win, one point for OT loss Sunday’s Results Washington 5, Philadelphia 4, SO N.Y. Rangers 4, Calgary 3, SO Tampa Bay 3, Detroit 0 Florida 2, Montreal 1 Chicago 3, Los Angeles 1 Anaheim 3, Edmonton 2 Today’s Games Toronto at Pittsburgh, 6 p.m. Winnipeg at Columbus, 6 p.m. St. Louis at Ottawa, 6:30 p.m. Dallas at Colorado, 8 p.m. Saturday’s Results Minnesota 2, Colorado 1, SO Calgary 2, Buffalo 1, OT Los Angeles 5, Ottawa 2 Dallas 6, Winnipeg 4 Toronto 7, Chicago 3 Pittsburgh 4, Detroit 1 New Jersey 3, Tampa Bay 0 Montreal 1, N.Y. Islanders 0, OT St. Louis 4, Columbus 3, OT Nashville 3, San Jose 2 Carolina 3, Phoenix 1 Vancouver 6, Boston 2


SPORTS

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Monday, December 16, 2013 • Page B3

DeKALB BOYS BASKETBALL

DeKalb needs to change halftime routine By ANTHONY ZILIS sports@daily-chronicle.com DeKALB – Coach Dave Rohlman and the DeKalb basketball team know they need to change something about their halftime routine because momentum seems to go to the Barbs’ locker room to die. As the whistle sounded to end the first half of Saturday’s game against Sycamore, the Barbs came off the court enthusiastically jumping and yelling, a few players chest-bumping members of the student section after tying the game at 19. Rohlman thought his team played as well as it had all season during those first 16 minutes. But as usual for DeKalb, the strong play didn’t carry over to the third quarter, when they fell behind by double digits in the 5538 loss.

More online For all your prep sports coverage – stories, features, scores, photos, videos, blogs and more – log on to Daily-Chronicle.com/dcpreps. “We changed the way we talked at halftime, we changed the routine,” Rohlman said. “Kids are still talking about that after the game, about changing things. They’re smart enough to realize that it’s our play in the third quarter, and it’s just something that we’ll keep working on.” The young Barbs, who prominently feature two sophomores and start only one senior, succumbed to a 16-5 Sycamore run right out of the gate in the third. Just like their loss to Yorkville

last week and another to Auburn in their season-opening tournament, the Barbs couldn’t make up for a poor start to the second half. “It’s happened a few games, and there’s really no explanation for it,” senior Pat Aves said. “We just come out into the third quarter lackadaisical, and next thing you know, we’re down 15 points. I don’t really know what to say.” The Barbs certainly are going through growing pains, with only two prominent players back from last year’s team, Aves and junior Rudy Lopez. The speed of the game on the varsity level is certainly an adjustment for the numerous juniors and the talented sophomores, which include starters Luke Davis III, a 6-foot-6 center, and guard Michael Pollack. “Our sophomores that we’ve pulled up, they definitely have

varsity quality,” Aves said. “I think the thing for them sometimes is that it’s a little faster on varsity, so they get caught up in the moment, but if you give them time, they’re going to get used to it and adapt, so we’ve got a long season ahead of us.” The Barbs will have plenty of games to figure out their third-quarter woes when they play five games at the Chuck Dayton Christmas tournament, then five more in three days in late January when they play Morris then head to the Hononegah tournament. The Barbs hope that by then, they’ll have their halftime routine worked out. “We’re just looking for consistency on our own part,” Rohlman said. “We’re looking for four quarters, and we’re getting three quarters. The third quarter is killing us.”

Barbs stung again by a rough third quarter • SPARTANS Continued from page B1 The Barbs were stung once again by a rough third quarter, but coach Dave Rohlman was positive about his young team’s effort. “I told the kids, first of all I’m very proud of the way we played, especially in the first half,” Rohlman said. “That’s as good as we’ve played this year. Sycamore’s a good basketball team. The other thing is that we have to understand is that we didn’t take care of the ball in the second half. We had as many turnovers in the third quar-

ter as we had in the first half, and we didn’t rebound the ball.” But a new trend in area basketball continued Saturday, with the Spartans once again asserting their dominance in the rivalry. “I thought we played really well defensively,” Sycamore coach Andrew Stacy said. “Offensively, I felt like we were a little sluggish in the first half. … In the second half, we did a little bit of a better job getting the ball inside, and because of that, we were able to score a little bit more easily than we did in the first half.”

SUNDAY’S ROUNDUP DOLPHINS 24, PATRIOTS 20 MIAMI GARDENS, Fla. – Tom Brady’s latest comeback bid came up short, and Miami helped its playoff chances with a breakthrough victory over AFC East-leading New England. A fourth-down pass from Brady was intercepted by reserve safety Michael Thomas, in his first NFL game, in the end zone with 2 seconds left, and Miami held on to win. The Patriots had mounted second-half rallies to win their past three games, and Brady moved them from their own 20 with 1:15 remaining to the Miami 14. But he threw three consecutive incompletions before Thomas sealed the third consecutive victory for the Dolphins (8-6), who improved to 5-2 since tackle Jonathan Martin left the team in a bullying scandal. Miami snapped a streak of seven consecutive losses against the Patriots (10-4).

CHIEFS 56, RAIDERS 31 OAKLAND, Calif. – Jamaal Charles tied a franchise record with five touchdowns in a game and gained 215 yards from scrimmage as Kansas City beat Oakland and clinched at least a wild-card spot. Kansas City (11-3) is tied for first place in the AFC West with Denver but needs help to win the division because the Broncos swept the season series. Matt McGloin threw four interceptions and lost a fumble while sharing time with Terrelle Pryor as Oakland (4-10) allowed the most points in franchise history and lost its fourth straight game.

49ERS 33, BUCCANEERS 14 TAMPA, Fla. – Vernon Davis caught a touchdown pass for the fifth straight game and Michael Crabtree scored his first TD since returning from injury to help San Francisco beat Tampa Bay (4-10). The victory was the fourth straight for Colin Kaepernick and the 49ers (10-4), who pulled away for good with a 10-minute, fourth-quarter drive that produced a field goal.

SEAHAWKS 23, GIANTS 0 EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. – Richard Sherman had two interceptions, Marshawn Lynch scored on a twisting, triple-effort 2-yard run, and Steven Hauschka kicked three field goals as Seattle manhandled New York for its sixth road win. The Seahawks (12-2) are closing in on the NFC West title and their best overall record; they went 13-3 in 2005 before losing to Pittsburgh in the Super Bowl. The Giants (5-9) have their first losing record since 2004, and lost top receiver Victor Cruz to a concussion in the fourth quarter.

COLTS 25, TEXANS 3 INDIANAPOLIS – Andrew Luck threw two touchdown passes, and Robert Mathis broke Indianapolis’ single-season and career sacks records by forcing a second-half safety to lead the Colts past Houston. Luck finished 19 of 32 for 180 yards with one interception and needed only two quarters to put up 20 points, four short of Indy’s combined firsthalf point total from the previous six games. But the Colts (9-5) did it against a team that has lost 12 straight overall and is 0-12 all-time in Indy. Mathis, the NFL sacks leader, has 16½ this season and 108 in his career, breaking the franchise records held by longtime teammate and close friend Dwight Freeney. Case Keenum was 18 of 34 for 168 yards for Houston (2-12).

PANTHERS 30, JETS 20 CHARLOTTE, N.C. – Cam Newton threw for 273 yards and a touchdown, Captain Munnerlyn had two sacks and returned an interception for a score and Carolina bounced back from its most lopsided loss of the season. With New Orleans losing 27-16 to St. Louis, the Panthers (10-4) pulled even with the Saints with the rematch set for Sunday in Charlotte. The Jets (6-8) will be eliminated from playoff contention if Baltimore wins at Detroit on Monday night.

RAMS 27, SAINTS 16 ST. LOUIS – Drew Brees threw interceptions that led to touchdowns on New Orleans’ first two possessions and St. Louis (6-8) got big days from Zac Stacy, Robert Quinn and on special teams in the victory. The Saints (10-4) missed their first chance to clinch a playoff berth. – The Associated Press

AP photo

Bears quarterback Jay Cutler (center) celebrates with offensive linemen Jermon Bushrod (left) and Matt Slauson (right) after running back Michael Bush ran 40 yards for a touchdown against the Cleveland Browns in the fourth quarter Sunday in Cleveland.

BEARS 38, BROWNS 31

Cutler had support of teammates all along CLEVELAND – You go up and down and all around with this Jay Cutler guy. And at the end – if he still is there at the end – you often win. The Bears did just that Sunday at FirstEnergy Stadium, beating the Browns, 38-31. Because of the way backup quarterback Josh McCown had been playing in relief of the injured Cutler the past few weeks, there were Bears fans who didn’t want Cutler to play, those who kind of didn’t want him to play and those who wanted him sent back to Santa Claus, Ind., on a dog-sled runner. The way Cutler started out, all those vibes seemed warranted. Indeed, on the Bears’ first drive, he threw an off-target ball to receiver Brandon Marshall that was tipped by the Browns’ T.J. Ward before being intercepted in the end zone by teammate Tashaun Gipson and returned 35 yards. Nice scoring threat, huh? McCown, the most humble man on the planet, had thrown one interception in his past 220 passes. At that point, Cutler had thrown one in four attempts. If this had happened at Soldier Field, Cutler might have become the first Bears player to be pelted into submission by snowballs from his own team’s fans. But let us say this: Cutler

VIEWS Rick Telander never seems fazed by failure. He came right back and threw an even worse pass in the second quarter that Gipson picked off and ran back 44 yards for a touchdown. To a cynic, the score at that point was Bears 3, Cutler minus-7. But here was the thing: Gossipmongers notwithstanding, Cutler never had been abandoned by his teammates. As surly and snarky as he can be, he truly had gone out of his way to get teammtes on his side. During the week, knowing he was going to replace McCown, he had spoken with the offensive line, with Marshall, with running back Matt Forte. “I just wanted to talk to them man-to-man and be like, ‘Hey, if you’ve got a problem with this, I want to know because this is a team game,’ “Cutler said. “No one reacted negatively. No one flinched.” And they played well for Cutler. The line held up. Forte ran for 127 yards. And Marshall and glue-fingered teammate Alshon Jeffery combined for 167 yards receiving. Maybe it was Jeffery’s impos-

sible touchdown catch of a wild 45-yard fling by Cutler – a pass Marshall declared in mid-route, “This is gonna be an interception” – that changed everything. That score made it 24-24 four minutes into the fourth quarter and heralded what I guess we can call “Cutler Time.” Through three quarters, Cutler had a passer rating of 74.0 and had thrown two interceptions. In the fourth quarter, he went 5 for 7 for 71 yards, two touchdowns, no picks and a 143.5 rating. He has done this again and again this season: off-key early, sharp late. Sometimes it’s his own hole he’s filling – the interception return for a TD was the fourth turnover TD he’s given up this season – but that’s how gunslingers roll. They don’t always pick the best target as they fire from the hip. But, man, are they fast. And as he has grown and matured as a person, Cutler has seemed to win his teammates more to his side. Marshall said the first interception was totally on him (a bad route) and the second was a “terrible” throw by Cutler, the kind of funny-truthful thing you only could say about a pal, somebody right there with you. Maybe it was all the “noise” around Cutler last week, as Bears coach Marc Trestman called it,

the distraction of the doubt and second-guessing by fans and media that strengthened Cutler’s resolve. Certainly, there was the support of the greatest, most loyal sidekick ever, McCown. “I’m probably more proud today than any game this year,” said McCown, the NFL’s offensive player of the week last week. “Because what he did was so cool. There was a lot swirling around this thing.” Give me a teammate like McCown and I’ll put him in my will. “His teammates had his back the whole time,” Trestman said of Cutler, whom he never considered removing. After the game, there was Cutler himself, more expansive, more courteous, more human at the rostrum. So you asked him if he is more communicative with his teammates than he was when he first arrived in Chicago. “For sure,” he said, stating that teamwork was the direction the Bears wanted to go. “Because at the end of the day, it takes all of us.” Then, as he left, he truly blew our minds. “Thank you,” he said.

• Rick Telander is a Chicago Sun-Times columnist. Write to him at rtelander@suntimes.com.


ADVICE & PUZZLES

Page B4 • Monday, December 16, 2013

Daily Chronicle / Daily-Chronicle.com

Suggestions for widower dreading Christmas Dear Abby: Christmas is coming, and I dread it. I have only my brother, his wife and their kids. I’m on Social Security disability and I barely make it each month. They buy me gifts, but I feel embarrassed to accept them because I can’t buy anything for them. It makes me feel small. Even though I have nothing to offer my nieces, my brother and sister-in-law persuade me to go anyway. They are financially much better off than I am. I lost my wife a year ago. I see everyone else having someone in their lives and I feel alone. There’s just me and my dog now. The holidays hurt. What can I do? – Miserable in Massachusetts

DEAR ABBY Jeanne Phillips Dear Miserable: You have something to give to your relatives. It’s the gift of your PRESENCE. If you have a talent, share it with them. Because this is your first Christmas without your wife, it’s no wonder you feel alone. At this time of year, many people do. A way to lessen the sense of isolation would be to do something for someone else. If you’re able, volunteer at a food bank, a homeless shelter, a senior center. It will give you less time to brood, and you will feel welcome and

a first date. It has nothing to do with whether they are tattooed or use four-letter words. on a first (and last) date with They like their independence, a “gentleman.” He ordered and sometimes earn more himself a beer and a prime than their dates do. rib dinner. He never asked Dear Abby: After 25 years of me if I wanted anything to eat marriage, my wife no longer or drink. wants to shave her legs. She As flabbergasted as I was, is starting to look like a goI have a theory: Men today rilla. I think it’s a slap in the ARE different from those of face. She says it has nothing the past, and my guess it’s to do with me. I don’t know if because the pierced and tattooed gals today speak and act I should move to another zoo like sailors, therefore ruining or buy her some bananas. – Peeved in Poughkeepsie it for the rest of us. Am I right? – Puzzled in Florida Dear Peeved: This may be your wife’s way of rebelling, Dear Puzzled: No. You need just as some retired men to speak up! The RULES OF forgo shaving because they DATING have changed over the last decades. Many women no longer “have” to. Or, the expect – and prefer – to pay for winters in Poughkeepsie their own meal and drinks on may be so cold she feels she needed.

Dear Abby: I recently went

needs the insulation. Stay in the zoo you’re used to – after all, it’s home. (If it’s causing problems in your marital relations, close your eyes and pretend it’s cashmere.) Dear Abby: Would it be a breach of etiquette to enclose a self-addressed, stamped (blank) thank-you note with gifts I plan to send to my grandchildren, since they do not respond when I mail them gifts or cards? – Grandma in Marshfield, Mo. Dear Grandma: I think it’s a great idea as a last resort – and no, it would not be a breach of etiquette to do so.

• Write Dear Abby at www. DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069.

Going from high cholestorol to heart attack Dear Dr. K: Can you explain how high cholesterol causes a heart attack or stroke? Dear Reader: Cholesterol is a type of fat that travels in the bloodstream. Our bodies need some cholesterol to survive. But high levels of cholesterol in the blood – particularly low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, or “bad” cholesterol – increase your risk of cardiovascular disease. Let’s look at the cascade of events that begins with high cholesterol and ends with a heart attack or stroke. (I’ve put an illustration of this process on my website.) • LDL cholesterol enters the artery (blood vessel) wall. When there’s too much LDL cholesterol in your bloodstream, some of it sticks to

ASK DR. K Anthony L. Komaroff your artery walls and penetrates into them. These form what are called “fatty streaks.” Even young adults in good health develop fatty streaks. They don’t do any harm until and unless they grow into fat plaques of atherosclerosis. Inside such plaques are a lot of LDL cholesterol. The higher your LDL level, the more LDL particles find their way into your artery walls and into the plaques. • An inflammatory response begins. When LDL cholesterol penetrates an artery’s wall, your immune system “sees”

it happening. The cholesterol is not supposed to be inside the wall; it’s “foreign” in that location. Since the immune system is supposed to eliminate things that are foreign, it goes on the attack. This leads to inflammation inside the plaque. Inflammation causes certain proteins and a group of white blood cells called monocytes to enter the plaque. Over time, the monocytes grow and make granules inside themselves. They’re now called macrophages. • The inflammatory cycle continues. Unfortunately, inflammation doesn’t eliminate the cholesterol. If anything, it makes the plaque bigger. Macrophages stay in the artery wall, feeding on LDL and becoming engorged with cho-

lesterol. At this point they are called “foam cells.” If these fat-stuffed foam cells could walk, they would waddle. When the foam cells die, they spill their cholesterol and the inflammatory substances they are making right back into the plaque. • Fibrous caps form and rupture. The artery attempts to seal off each plaque of atherosclerosis by covering it with a fibrous material. Eventually, what is called a “fibrous cap” forms over the area. This cap keeps the cholesterol and inflammatory substances inside the plaque. However, the inflammation inside the plaque can eat away at the fibrous cap, weakening it. If and when the cap weakens a lot, it suddenly ruptures.

Cholesterol and the inflammatory substances inside the plaque spill out into the central channel of the artery. This can cause a blood clot to form. When that happens, the plaque and the clot, together, can suddenly block the flow of blood through the artery. If the blockage is severe enough to rob a part of the heart muscle of the blood it needs, that part of the heart dies. That’s a heart attack. A similar process in the brain causes a stroke. That’s how constantly high levels of “bad” cholesterol in the blood, year after year, can slowly lead to plaques that can cause a heart attack or a stroke.

• Visit www.AskDoctorK. com to read more.

Mom tells child to lay off the handcrafted gifts Dr. Wallace: I’m 12, and every year at Christmas I make a gift for my mother. She always acts excited and happy about it. This year, I painted her a picture of our cat, Cuddles, and I really think it turned out pretty well. I thought it was my best handmade gift yet and I just knew Mom was going to love it. But then this year she told me that I was old enough to buy her a gift and that I could just “lay off” the handcrafted gifts now. This really burst my bubble because I thought she liked my “handmade” gifts and that she liked the idea that I was saving for college. I’m confused now, and I don’t know what to do. What do you think I should do? –

’TWEEN 12 & 20 Robert Wallace Sue, San Antonio, Tex. Sue: Give Mom the painting! I’m positive she’ll be excited to get it and will display it in an appropriate place in your home. I don’t think she was serious about her comment. Your Mom understands that the worth of a Christmas present isn’t determined by the figure on the sales receipt, but by the love behind it. If for some reason she has forgotten this, I suggest that the whole family should sit down and read O. Henry’s famous story, “The Gift of

8ASTROGRAPH By BERNICE BEDE OSOL Newspaper Enterprise Association

TODAY – This is the year to fight for what’s yours. Past limitations have lifted, and it’s high time that you got your house in order. Learn from experience and avoid situations that seem too risky. Use your instincts and follow your intuition. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) – You may get an opportunity to meet people who can help you reach your career goals. You’ll need to mount a massive charm offensive if you want to bolster your reputation. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) – Your moodiness and changing attitudes may alienate you from friends and family. Be careful what you say. Try to avoid being controversial, and make amends quickly before a situation spins out of control. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) – Avoid getting caught up in details. Maintaining a general overview of a situation should do for now. Your time is better spent reading or meeting up with friends and colleagues who provide mental stimulation. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) – Traveling or group activities will foster new partnerships. Avoid investing in moneymaking schemes. Be sure to consult with a financial adviser before you open your wallet. ARIES (March 21-April 19) – Seek a promotion or a more lucrative position at work. Be wary of competition – peers may try to make you look bad. If you take special care to avoid being criticized, affairs will work out well. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) – Now is not the time to worry about your personal life. Focus on your professional goals, and you’ll be amazed by what you can accomplish. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) – If you get out and meet like-minded people, you could expand your network of friends. It is also a very good time to consider expanding your family or circle of loved ones. CANCER (June 21-July 22) – Opportunities for partnerships abound among the right people. Now is the time to make a difference through involvement in humanitarian ventures. Take a measured, rational approach when dealing with children. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) – Your work rather than home life is where you will shine most right now, so focus your energy there. But don’t neglect your domestic responsibilities entirely – try to maintain a balance. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) – Plan to travel, whether for business or pleasure. Self-improvement efforts will make you feel good and boost your aesthetic appeal. Make decisions while free from outside influence. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) – Pay attention to nutrition, as unwanted weight gain is likely at this time. Maintain a healthy and active routine. You can take control if you pay attention and are willing to work at it. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) – Close friends and relatives may steer you in the wrong direction regarding a sensitive situation. Keep in mind that it is you who must endure the consequences of your actions.

the Magi” together. Have a wonderful holiday with your family! Dr. Wallace: My best friend has been telling me lately that she wants to commit suicide because she is having a lot of parent problems and her boyfriend just dumped her for another girl. I’m not sure she is totally serious, but I want to try and help her, just in case she is. She keeps saying that she feels like a failure and that the whole world is against her. What should I do? – Nameless, San Francisco, Calif. Nameless: First of all, let your friend know that you care for her very much and that you will do everything possible to help her. It’s always important to take a

8SUDOKU

suicide threat seriously. Too often, because of fear or uneasiness, a friend will laugh off a plea for help. According to the California Suicide Prevention and Crisis Centers, you should ask your friend if she has a plan for how she would commit suicide. Asking this question shows you are willing to take your friend’s threat seriously and are not afraid of discussing anything she might be feeling. If the answer is yes, this indicates imminent danger and the need for immediate professional help. Encourage your friend to speak with a school counselor or nurse who will know how to handle the situation. Check with her each day, and if she has not spoken to a counselor

in 2 days, offer to go with her. If she still refuses, stop by and mention the situation to the counselor yourself. The counselor will know how to assess the situation in the most beneficial way. Your friend confided in you that she might commit suicide. That’s because she wants help, but just doesn’t know how to ask for it any other way. Even if your friend says she doesn’t want any help and becomes angry when you talk about getting assistance for her, continue to get the necessary help. It’s much better to have an angry friend who is alive than one who is dead.

• Email Dr. Robert Wallace at rwallace@galesburg.net.

8CROSSWORD

BRIDGE Phillip Alder

Heading toward elevated heights Phyllis Diller said, “We spend the first 12 months of our children’s lives teaching them to walk and talk and the next 12 telling them to sit down and shut up.” At the bridge table, some players are scared of 12 – the number of tricks needed for a small slam. Others zoom that high whenever there is the faintest aroma of slam in the air. But the ideal is between those two extremes. This week, let’s study some of the factors for accurate slam bidding. First, when two balanced hands face each other, combined point-count is a surprisingly reliable indicator. Some years ago, I ran a computer analysis. I gave the partnership’s hands no five-card suit and no 4-4 fit. I found that when the total point-count was 33, six no-trump was a favorite; but when it was only 32, that slam was an underdog. Here is an easy example for the bidding, but not so simple in the play. How can South make six no-trump after West leads the club 10? South’s two-no-trump rebid shows a balanced hand with 18, 19 or a poor 20 points. It is in principle forcing to game and does not deny four spades. South cannot risk a nonforcing one-spade rebid with that strong a hand. South has 11 top tricks: three spades, four hearts, two diamonds and two clubs. The clubs might split 3-3, but that is unlikely both mathematically and given the opening lead. However, the contract is assured if declarer takes trick one, unblocks dummy’s diamond ace-king, returns to his hand with, say, a spade, and leads the diamond jack to drive out the queen. The diamond 10 is trick 12.


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Monday, December 16, 2013 • Page B7

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With the Ravens Monday night, the Giants at home next week and a trip to Minnesota the last day of the season, the Bears best hope for the Detroit loss they will need to win the NFC North is in Baltimore. The good news for the Bears is that the Ravens have won three straight and their only loss in their past five was at Soldier Field. The bad news is, unlike the Bears, the Lions are fourth in the league against the run and the Ravens haven’t run the ball on anyone but the Bears all year long. Ray Rice continues to struggle and no team has been able to consistently move Lions tackles Ndamukong Suh and Nick Fairley out of the middle.

2

If the Ravens are going to beat Detroit, it will have to be with Joe Flacco, Torrey Smith and Dallas Clark through the air, and the

defense pitching in field position, takeaways and maybe even points. Lions quarterback Matt Stafford will put the ball up for grabs and Reggie Bush has put it on the ground in several key spots this year. Terrell Suggs, Elvis Dumervil and Arthur Jones will test the Lions’ improved offensive line, and unlike the Bears game in which he missed, Haloti Ngata is healthy again and should dominate the middle of the field.

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Counting on Flacco is iffy at best, but if the Lions have an Achilles’ heel, it’s still the secondary. Smith, Clark and Jacoby Jones will all have to have big games for Baltimore to swap points with the Lions, and a decent game from Rice catching the ball could be the difference. – Hub Arkush, harkush@shawmedia.com

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Bennett calls Jeffery ‘The Human Highlight Reel’ • MORRISSEY Continued from page B1 AP photo

ching a touchdown pass against the Cleveland Browns in the fourth quarter Sunday in Cleveland.

man, Bennett clutch again

found Bennett for a with 5:48 left — almost time as Sunday’s score Steelers away. touchdown had help mates to put Bennett in Bears started off with osition, thanks to Devin yard punt return. Matt ually got it to the Cleveline, but then was loss of two on the next

hird-and-goal, the Bears six yards, and the play to Bennett’s touchthe game in the first Dallas last week. went in motion, right Jeffery wide right and unched next to Bennett. tracted the eyes of safeGipson, who already terceptions. Linebacker kson kept focus on Forte

out of the backfield. That opened things up for the Bears’ slot receiver to make his play. Bennett ran a quick post route, beating corner Buster Skrine on his change of direction to catch the short touchdown pass. “Great, great, great group of guys around me. I can’t speak enough about the offensive line and Earl making big catches today,” Cutler said. For a player that missed most of the preseason with a concussion and took a pay cut, Bennett has often (and understandably) been lost in the discussion about the Bears’ explosive offense, but he came through again in a crucial situation. “We were resilient. That’s one of the words we talked about this week, that we knew we’d have to face some type of adversity,” he said. “Just got to be resilient and continue to fight, and we were able to.”

Defense steps up: For the first time in more than two months, the Bears held a team to less than 100 yards rushing. The defense also kept the Browns to a rate of 3-for-9 on third down. “I thought we were able to keep everything in front of us, make them go the distance and make the stops when we needed to,” coach Marc Trestman said. “It was a good day, a sunny day for our run defense.” Not the best play call: The Bears had a third-and-8 from the Browns’ 9-yard line at the start of the second quarter and the call was for a screen pass to Jeffery, who was stopped five yards short of the goal line. “I was disappointed in one drive, we had a hook screen and we didn’t get to the second layer,” Trestman said. “I would have liked to have given the guys a better call. I don’t think I made the best call.”

e to stir up conversations in the media

with nice balance, finding arshall with six completions, artellus Bennett had six catchJeffery finished with five and Bennett caught four passes. defense, Zack Bowman Jeremiah Ratliff both took being the star against the owns. Ratliff was only credited with tackles, but he was disrupon the line of scrimmage. He one tackle for loss and three arterback pressures. Bowman had two intercepand returned one for 43 rds and a touchdown to give

the Bears a short-lived 17-10 lead 2:12 into the second half. James Anderson also had a nice bounce-back performance after two less-than-stellar performances against the Vikings and Cowboys. He keyed the defense with 11 tackles and seemed to help Jon Bostic into better run fits, as well, although Khaseem Greene was again, for the most part, missing in action. It was a good day for coach Marc Trestman, as well. Although the great quarterback debate will rage on, the Bears followed their 490-yard, 45-point

outburst against the Cowboys with 440 yards of offense, 38 points and a 9:36 advantage in time of possession. Trestman also knows his club now can move on from the quarterback drama, even if the fans don’t, and focus on what will be a very angry Philadelphia team that figures to pose a much tougher test for the Bears in prime time Sunday.

• Hub Arkush covers the Bears for Shaw Media and HubArkush. com. Write to him at harkush@ shawmedia.com.

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the ball at his own 46-yard line, and the pass lost some of its power. With Jeffery behind him, Gipson stood like a center fielder waiting on a lazy fly ball. If he had yelled out, “Mine!” I don’t think the other outfielders would have waved him off. But he misread the ball. He slowed at his own 5-yard line, stepped back to the 4 and took another step to the 3 before mistiming his jump. The Immaculate Miscalculation? Jeffery pulled in Cutler’s pass with the care of someone being handed a newborn, then fell into the end zone. The touchdown tied the score and changed everything for the Bears in a 38-31 victory. “The Human Highlight Reel,” teammate Earl Bennett called Jeffery afterward. Was that part of “The Plan?” That somehow, some way Jeffery would find a way to make an athletic catch after a defensive back missed a two-foot putt, pardon the mixed-sports metaphor? If it was, then Trestman isn’t just a genius, he’s a hokey Hollywood scriptwriter. The Bears’ victory over Cleveland raised their record to 8-6 and kept their playoff hopes alive. With Detroit not playing until Monday night, they had first place to themselves in the NFC North. There was so much riding on Trestman’s decision to finish the season with Cutler, who had been sidelined by an ankle injury. The people’s choice was McCown, who had averaged 351 passing yards the previous three games. But Trestman seemed oblivious to the potential ramifications of going with Jay over Josh. “I don’t look at anything as me having something at stake,” he said. “Every decision we make is completely within the interests of our football team and what’s best at this time.” Trestman doesn’t deal in

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hypotheticals. He has said that repeatedly since the season began. Fortunately, the rest of us aren’t burdened by such constraints. If Cutler had played in the second half the way he had played in the first (73.9 rating), Trestman would have found himself wanted, and not in a good way. Come to think of it, just like last week. “There was a lot of noise around our team” going into the game, Trestman said. “They hung together.” Afterward, the Bears talked about the “adversity” they had faced Sunday (poverty? homelessness? death of a loved one?) and their resiliency (better). They easily could have let this game get away, especially with the way their defense has played this season. They did not. And many other quarterbacks would have had a hard time dealing with the criticism Cutler faced last week for the crime of not being McCown. You might have thought he was the guy called up to replace Gandhi. Cutler finished with a very Cutler-like line: 22 of 31 passing for 265 yards, three touchdowns, two interceptions and a rating of 102.2. But everything started with the pass that a Browns safety had and then didn’t. Even if Gipson had picked off the pass, a roughing-the-passer penalty would have given the ball back to the Bears. But who knows if they would have gotten into the end zone again? Maybe the Browns hold on to their 24-17 lead, and the Bears never get any traction. “Just making a play,” Jeffery said. And saving a head coach from a ton of abuse. Trestman might want to volunteer to be Jeffery’s Secret Santa this year.

• Rick Morrissey is a Chicago Sun-Times columnist, Write to him at rmorrissey@ suntimes.com.

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With white lights with remote control. Beautiful and very full tree! Excellent condition, $150/obo. 630-934-4040 CAT – LOST South DeKalb County Area I'm lost, have you seen me? I was near Howison, McGirr and Perry, but could be anywhere. Large neutered male, mostly white with brown Was wearing a red collar. If you see me, please call my people at 815-501-9724. $500 FOR SAFE RETURN! We miss our big boy.Thank you.

DIGITAL PRODUCTION COORDINATOR CRYSTAL LAKE Shaw Media is seeking a full time digital production coordinator to support the sales teams and designers. This position will be responsible for scheduling online orders, maintenance of all online ad schedules, oversight and metrics of advertising campaigns, traffic reporting, maintain database, revenue reporting, assistance with local sales support as needed and other duties as assigned. The successful candidate will possess a high level of organizational skill and be detail oriented, with an advanced level of competency using Microsoft Office (Excel and Word) programs. Some college is preferred. Previous experience working databases is required. Shaw Media is an information company serving Grundy, DeKalb, Kane, Lake, McHenry, Cook & DuPage Counties in Illinois. We have an intense passion for serving our local communities, and that passion separates us from other media companies in the region. Shaw Media offers a comprehensive benefit package. Interested may send their resume to: Recruitment@shawmedia.com Shaw Media is a Drug Free Employer. Pre-employment background check and drug screen required. This posting may not include all duties of position. Equal Opportunity Employer.

SNOWBLOWER - 5 HP 24 Inch Chains on tires, good condition $175. 815-758-0591 Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527 Having a Birthday, Anniversary, Graduation or Event Coming Up? Share It With Everyone by Placing a HAPPY AD!

Daily Chronicle Classified 877-264-2527

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DeKALB COUNTY-SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, INC. PLAINTIFF VS LINDA CONDON A/K/A LINDA E. CONDON A/K/A LINDA E. GRIMES; STEVE CONDON A/K/A STEVEN CONDON A/K/A STEVEN J. CON-

DON, JR.; BMO HARRIS BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION F/K/A HARRIS, N.A.; DEFENDANTS 12 CH 489 218 NORTH MAPLE STREET SYCAMORE, IL 60178 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on October 24, 2013, DEKALB COUNTY SHERIFF in DEKALB County, Illinois, will on January 30, 2014, in 150 N. Main Street, Sycamore, IL 60178, at 1:00PM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DEKALB, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be sufficient to satisfy said Judgment: TAX NO. 06-32-253-004 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 218 NORTH MAPLE STREET SYCAMORE, IL 60178 Description of Improvements: 3 UNIT WITH NO GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $142,087.51. Sale Terms: This is an "AS IS" sale for "CASH". The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1215979 Plaintiff's attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I578216 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 16, 23 & 30, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY-THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY SYCAMORE ILLINOIS U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Wachovia Bank, N.A., as Trustee for Chase Funding Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2004-2 Plaintiff, vs. Jesse D. Jackson, III; Joan M. Makela Defendants. 13 CH 229 422 Georjean Court, Sycamore, IL 60178 Judge Thomas L. Doherty NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on September 19, 2013, DeKalb County Sheriff will on January 9, 2014, at the hour of 1:00PM at DeKalb County Sheriff's Office, Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Street, Sycamore, IL 60178, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Commonly known as 422 Georjean Court, Sycamore, IL 60178 Parcel Number(s):

(s): 0905329002 The real estate is improved with a Single Family Residence. Sale terms: Bidder's must present, at the time of sale, a cashier's or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successfully bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. The subject property is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. The property will NOT be open for inspection. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than the mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g) (4). For information call Plaintiff's Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski LLC, One East Wacker, Suite 1250, One East Wacker, Suite 1250. Phone number: 312-651-6700. Attorney file number: 13-025166. Joel A. Knosher MANLEY DEAS KOCHALSKI LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff One East Wacker, Suite 1250 Chicago, IL 60601 Telephone: 312-651-6700 Fax: 614-220-5613 Attorney. No.: 6298481 I576179 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 2, 9 & 16, 2013.)

DeKalb/Sycamore. Need Office/ Warehouse to Buy/Rent 20,000 sq ft Adolph Miller RE 815-756-7845

Starting @ $599, 2 Bedroom $683, 3 Bedroom Near the heart of NIU. Incl gas and forced air heat. Off street parking, lush grounds, on site laundry room. Outdoor pool, tennis and basketball courts, patios and balconies. Cats OK.

University Village Apts. 722 N. Annie Glidden Rd. 815-758-7859

DeKalb – 1148 ½ Market St. 2 BD residential upper apt. 1st/sec dep. $600 month 815-756-6201 DeKalb – 3BR / 1BA Lower Apt Washer/dryer hook-up $925 1st/lst/sec. Sec 8 welcome 815-739-6170 DEKALB ADULT, QUIET, REFINED Building. 2 Bedroom Apt with homey environment. Car port. For mature living. Excellent Location! No pets/smoking. Agent Owned. 815-758-6712

DEKALB EAST SIDE 2-3BR Non-smoking, cats OK. $550/mo + utilities and deposit. 815-758-2872

DeKalb Newly Remodeled 2BR 1BA, A/C, off St parking for 1 car. Lndry in bldg, pets OK. $760/mo + deposit. Pete 630-363-3430

DeKalb Quiet Studio 1, 2, 3BR Lease, deposit, ref, no pets. 815-739-5589~815-758-6439 DeKalb Upper 2BR. Newer appl, carpet, heat furnished, $585. ALSO 2BR, 1 st floor, new kitchen, $650. No pets/smoke. 815-762-4730

DEKALB 1 BEDROOM Available Dec/Jan. Close to NIU, Free heat & water, quiet lifestyle. Varsity Square Apts. 815-756-9554 www.glencoproperties.com

Autumn Creek Management 2BR, 2BA, W/D, DW in Cortland. AVAILABLE NOW! Call Amy 815-756-1988 or George 847-912-0504 BIG APARTMENTS, LESS MONEY! Rochelle: 15 minutes from DeKalb 1 BR & 2BR Starting at $530 Recently updated! Affordable heat. Walk to shops! (815) 562-6425 www.whiteoakapartments.net Now accepting Visa, M/C, Discover

Cortland Estates

Stone Prairie 2BR, 2BA APT. Washer & dryer, central air, fireplace, exercise center. Cat friendly. Private fishing. $765/mo.

Laing Mgmt. 815-758-1100 or 815-895-8600 SYCAMORE - (two) 2 bedroom 1 bathroom available. lower unit $800 mo. upper unit $650 mo. text/call 815-501-2284

Sycamore Upstairs 2BR, 1BA 2900 DeKalb Ave. Laundry, non-smoking, all utilities except electrical, $675. 815-758-2911

SYCAMORE ~ 2BR, 1BA

Within walking distance of downtown, parks and schools. 1st/last/sec. 630-854-6161

WATERMAN UTILITIES INCLUDED 1 Bedroom, 1 bath $640 2 Bedroom, 1 bath $760 3 Bedroom, 1 bath $950 Close to schools and downtown, Housing Authority accepted. Half security. 310 N Elm, Waterman IL just south of DeKalb. 630-205-7078

DeKalb- 1 BD upper, heat incl, quiet tenant, no smoking, private entrance, street parking $625/mo 847-845-6639

DeKalb 2BR condo. 1st, lst, sec. No pets/smoking. $1200/month. Call 815-501-5217

DEKALB: 2BR Apts.-$750/m. Incl. heat, water, garb. & cable. W/D on premises. Nice Neighborhood. Ready ASAP! 815-756-1424

2 bath, W/D, gas fireplace, 2 car garage, no smoking. $1200/mo + 1st, last sec. 815-970-1637

Dekalb: 2BR, 1.5BA, all appl., D/W, W/D, 1 car gar., patio, big yard, $975, 815-494-0861

Sycamore Newer 2 Story Luxury TH on quiet Arbor Lane. 3BR, 2.5BA. Full fin bsmt, 2 car gar, great room w/fireplace, W/D. No pets/smoking. $1300 + Assoc. 847-343-3333

DeKalb: Upper 1 BR Apt. No smokers. Heat, air, stove & refrigerator furnished. $500/mo. 1st mo & sec deposit. 815-758-4178

HINCKLEY 2BR, 1.5BA

Stove, fridge, D/W, W/D. NO PETS. $755/mo + sec. Water sewer, garb incl. 815-739-1250

MALTA 1 Mo Rent FREE! 2 Bedroom Duplex, Appliances, W/D hook-up, no pets, $595/mo. 815-562-7368 Malta- Cozy 1 BD Upper, efficiency off street parking. Non-smoker. Utilities included in rent. Malta- 2 BD ground floor W/D hook-ups 815-981-8117

SYCAMORE 2BR CONDO

Sycamore TH Like New 2BR

Great location! 2BA, 2 car garage, skylights, appl, W/D, C/A, $935. No pets. 815-758-0123

The Knolls Hot new deluxe townhomes. 2 & 3 Bedrooms. Garage, C/A, Basement. Pets?

Starting at $645

815-757-1907

OREGON, IL 1 & 2BR APT. Clean, no pets, $400-$435. 815-973-8290 Rochelle Large Upper 3BR

Heat paid. Formal dining, large kit, encl front & back porch, 2 car gar. $760/mo, 1st, last, sec with small pet dep, no smkg. 815-757-1045

ROCHELLE ~ 2 BEDROOM

Remodeled, available now. Clean and quiet, $550/mo. 815-758-6580 ~ 815-901-3346

DeKalb – Duplex, 4BR, 3BA, 2 car garage, large yard. Drive by 1424 Moluf St. $1250/mo 1st/lst/sec 815-739-6170

DeKalb ~ The Knolls Sub. 4BR, 2BA, D/W, W//D, 1 car garage, $1025/mo + 1st , last sec. Available Jan. 815-751-3806 Sycamore 2BR, C/A, near North Grade School, gar., bsmnt, appl., $800/mo 1st, last, security, no pets/smoking 815-517-1018

$300 1st Month's Rent 3 BR Apartments Dishwasher On-Site Laundry Facility Playground Washer & Dryer Connection 6 months free cable if you sign a lease by 12/31/13

Creston 2 Bedroom Appliances, garage, no pets. $875/mo. 815-562-7368 DEKALB - HOUSE FOR RENT 609 Davy St, DeKalb 3 BR, 1-1/2 bath, large fenced back yard/deck. Short bike ride to NIU. $ 975/mo + all utilities. 815-757-5599 DeKalb 3BR, FR with fireplace, new carpet, D/W, garage w/work shop, basement, patio, $900. No pets/moke. 815-762-4730

230 McMillan Court Cortland, IL 60112

815-758-2910 income restriction apply

DeKalb 4 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath

SHABONA, 2 BR UPPER, QUIET & CLEAN, Priv. Prkg., $595/mo. 815-979-7012 DeKalb 1 & 2BR Starting $540

Hillcrest Place Apts.

220 E. Hillcrest. 815-758-0600 hillcrestplaceaptsdekalb.com DEKALB - 3 bedroom 12th St. Garage, lots of storage. Small pets ok. $860/month. 815-758-4539 DEKALB - ONE BEDROOM Spacious one-bedroom on Pleasant Street in DeKalb. Cats allowed with pet deposit. Upstairs unit. Wood floors. $565/month. 815-793-3313. Available in Dec. Daily Chronicle is DeKalb County's local paper.

on College Ave. Available Immed. $1200 + 1st, last security, no pets. 815-757-5079 DeKalb 4BR, DR, Office, Hrdwd flrs, 2 car gar, shed, near NIU, $1200. ALSO 3BR RANCH, $795. No pets/smoke. 815-762-4730

DEKALB 842 SOUTH 1 st St.

877-264-2527

Large 4BR, 2BA, large yard, bsmt. W/D hook-up. 815-758-4615 or 815-375-4615

Buying? Selling? Renting? Hiring?

Dekalb: Tilton Park Area Lovely remodeled 2BR, 1BA, w/den, A/C, all appl., deck, fenced in yard, 2 car gar., avail 2/1, no smoking, pets neg., $800/mo. 630-675-4485

To place an ad, call 877-264-2527

Full kitchen, W/D, 10x10 storage shed, $775/mo + $950 sec. No pets/smkg. 815-970-0126

Daily Chronicle Classified

FOR SALE – GREAT PRICE

NEWSPAPER DISTRIBUTION

DEKALB - SPACIOUS MARKET APARTMENTS

Daily Chronicle Classified

Genoa ~ 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath

Check us out online

www.Daily-Chronicle.com

FOR SALE

ACI Midwest is seeking qualified applicants for full and part-time positions to assist in the distribution of local newspapers in Kane, DeKalb & McHenry counties.

District Contract Manager (DCM) The DCM will manage the distribution within a geographic area for ACI Midwest, LLC responsible for negotiating contracts with Independent Contractors, managing delivery fees, and achieving service targets. This is a salaried position. Market salary provided commensurate with experience. Previous supervisory experience required. Previous newspaper distribution experience is a plus. Must have reliable transportation, proof of insurance and valid driver's license. Typical work schedule begins at 1 am.

District Assistant District Assistant will assist in all aspects of the daily distribution of the newspaper, including the delivery of open routes, ride-alongs with Independent Contractors and assisting with service issue. Typical work schedule begins at 1 am. This is an hourly position with mileage reimbursement. Must have reliable transportation, proof of insurance and valid driver license. ACI Midwest is an Equal Opportunity Employer. Please submit resume and work history to: dstamper@acicirculation.com

*

EXCELLENT OPPORTUNITY FOR A GROWING BUSINESS ENTREPRENEUR – INVESTOR

3 Bdrm plus NEWER Furnace, C/A, Siding, Roof, Windows, Electric, Plumbing, Appliances, Driveway, Garage Door, Etc., Full Basement. All for $115,000

Over 22,000 sq. ft. -- 2 Phase Building – Loading Docks & Parking. Sycamore

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997

CALL NEDRA ERICSON, REALTOR 815-739-9997


CLASSIFIED

Daily Chronicle / daily-chronicle.com HINCKLEY ~ 3BR,1BA

Appl, W/D, $1000/mo + sec. 630-707-0466 SYCAMORE 3BR, FR, $995 2BR $950, 2BR, $850. Apts $600-$795. Betsy Smith 815-751-1025 ~ 815-895-2488

Call Us!!! We have some Great Deals!!! Adolph Miller RE 815-756-7845

WINTER STORAGE RV's, Campers & Boats - Indoor & secure, West of Sycamore. Owner resides on property 815-825-2571

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE 23RD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DeKALB COUNTY-SYCAMORE, ILLINOIS OCWEN LOAN SERVICING, INC. PLAINTIFF VS LINDA CONDON A/K/A LINDA E. CONDON A/K/A LINDA E. GRIMES; STEVE CONDON A/K/A STEVEN CONDON A/K/A STEVEN J. CONDON, JR.; BMO HARRIS BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION F/K/A HARRIS, N.A.; DEFENDANTS 12 CH 489 218 NORTH MAPLE STREET SYCAMORE, IL 60178 NOTICE OF SALE PURSUANT TO JUDGMENT OF FORECLOSURE UNDER ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE ACT ***THIS DOCUMENT IS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT ON A DEBT. ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE*** PUBLIC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered by said Court in the above entitled cause on October 24, 2013, DEKALB COUNTY SHERIFF in DEKALB County, Illinois, will on January 30, 2014, in 150 N. Main Street, Sycamore, IL 60178, at 1:00PM, sell at public auction and sale to the highest bidder for cash, all and singular, the following described real estate mentioned in said Judgment, situated in the County of DEKALB, State of Illinois, or so much thereof as shall be suffi-

cient to satisfy said Judgment: LOT 14 IN THE RESUBDIVISION OF BLOCK 7 OF THE ORIGINAL VILLAGE (NOW CITY) OF SYCAMORE, DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS, ACCORDING TO THE PLAT THEREOF RECORDED MAY 13, 1925, IN BOOK "D" OF PLATS, PAGE 97. SITUATED IN DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS. TAX NO. 06-32-253-004 COMMONLY KNOWN AS: 218 NORTH MAPLE STREET SYCAMORE, IL 60178 Description of Improvements: 3 UNIT WITH NO GARAGE. The Judgment amount was $142,087.51. Sale Terms: This is an "AS IS" sale for "CASH". The successful bidder must deposit 25% down by certified funds; balance, by certified funds, within 24 hours. NO REFUNDS. The subject property is subject to general real estate taxes, special assessments or special taxes levied against said real estate, water bills, etc., and is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to plaintiff. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the court. Upon payment in full of the bid amount, the purchaser shall receive a Certificate of Sale, which will entitle the purchaser to a Deed to the real estate after confirmation of the sale. The property will NOT be open for inspection. Prospective bidders are admonished to check the court file to verify all information. The successful purchaser has the sole responsibility/expense of evicting any tenants or other individuals presently in possession of the subject premises. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than a mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by The Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g)(4). IF YOU ARE THE MORTGAGOR (HOMEOWNER), YOU HAVE THE RIGHT TO REMAIN IN POSSESSION FOR 30 DYAS AFTER ENTRY OF AN ORDER OF POSSESSION, IN ACCORDANCE WITH SECTION 15-1701(C) OF THE ILLINOIS MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE LAW. For Information: Visit our website at http:\\service.atty-pierce.com. Between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. only - Pierce & Associates, Plaintiff's Attorneys, 1 North Dearborn, Chicago, Illinois 60602. Tel. No. (312) 372-2060. Please refer to file #PA1215979 Plaintiff's attorney is not required to provide additional information other than that set forth in this notice of sale. I578216 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 16, 23 & 30, 2013.) Find. Buy. Sell. All in one place... HERE! Everyday in Daily Chronicle Classified

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY-THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY SYCAMORE ILLINOIS U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Wachovia Bank, N.A., as Trustee for Chase Funding Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2004-2 Plaintiff, vs. Jesse D. Jackson, III; Joan M. Makela Defendants. 13 CH 229 422 Georjean Court, Sycamore, IL 60178 Judge Thomas L. Doherty NOTICE OF SALE PUBLIC NOTICE is hereby given that pursuant to a Judgment of Foreclosure and Sale entered in the above entitled cause on September 19, 2013, DeKalb County Sheriff will on January 9, 2014, at the hour of 1:00PM at DeKalb County Sheriff's Office, Public Safety Building, 150 North Main Street, Sycamore, IL 60178, sell to the highest bidder for cash, the following described mortgaged real estate: Lot 162 in Fourth Addition to Somonauk Meadows Subdivision, a Subdivision of part of the Southwest 1/4 of Section 5, Township 40 North, Range 5, East of the Third Principal Meridian, according to the Plat thereof recorded September 14, 1971 as Document No. 361025, in Plat Book "P", Page 63, and Certificate of Correction recorded December 30, 1971 as Document No. 363016, in DeKalb County, Illinois. Commonly known as 422 Georjean Court, Sycamore, IL 60178 Parcel Number(s): 0905329002 The real estate is improved with a Single Family Residence. Sale terms: Bidder's must present, at the time of sale, a cashier's or certified check for 10% of the successful bid amount. The balance of the successfully bid shall be paid within 24 hours, by similar funds. The subject property is offered for sale without any representation as to quality or quantity of title and without recourse to Plaintiff and in "AS IS" condition. The sale is further subject to confirmation by the Court. The property will NOT be open for inspection. If this property is a condominium unit, the purchaser of the unit at the foreclosure sale, other than the mortgagee shall pay the assessments and the legal fees required by the Condominium Property Act, 765 ILCS 605/9(g)(1) and (g) (4).

(4). For information call Plaintiff's Attorney, Manley Deas Kochalski LLC, One East Wacker, Suite 1250, One East Wacker, Suite 1250. Phone number: 312-651-6700. Attorney file number: 13-025166. Joel A. Knosher MANLEY DEAS KOCHALSKI LLC Attorneys for Plaintiff One East Wacker, Suite 1250 Chicago, IL 60601 Telephone: 312-651-6700 Fax: 614-220-5613 Attorney. No.: 6298481 I576179 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 2, 9 & 16, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE CIRCUIT COURT FOR THE TWENTY-THIRD JUDICIAL CIRCUIT DEKALB COUNTY, ILLINOIS IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF ELEANOR PRICE, Deceased Case No. 2013 P 152 INDEPENDENT ADMINISTRATION PUBLICATION NOTICE TO: CREDITORS AND CLAIMANTS 1. Notice is given of the death of ELEANOR PRICE, who died on November 22, 2013 a resident of the City of DeKalb, County of DeKalb, Illinois. 2. The Representatives for the estate are: Jerome Smith, 139 Buena Vista Drive, DeKalb, Illinois 60115. 3. The Attorney for the estate is: KRUPP & KRUPP, LLP, 3281 Commerce Drive, Suite B, DeKalb, Illinois 60115. 4. Claims against the estate may be filed on or before June 17, 2014. Claims against the estate may be filed with the Clerk of the Circuit Court, 133 West State Street, Sycamore, Illinois, 60178, or with the Representative, or both. Any claim not filed within that period is barred. Copies of a claim filed with the Clerk must be mailed or delivered to the Representative and to the attorney within 10 days after it has been filed. 5. The estate will be administered without Court supervision unless an interested party terminates independent supervision administration by filing a petition to terminate under Section 28-4 of the Probate Act (755 ILCS 5/28-4). Dated: December 12, 2013

Monday, December 16, 2013 • Page B9

Robert J. Krupp Attorney for Representatives (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 16, 23 & 30, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on December 5, 2013 a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of DeKalb County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as BOB TAYLOR PHOTOGRAPHY located at 704 Birch Dr., Kirkland, IL 60146. Dated December 5, 2013 /s/ Douglas J. Johnson DeKalb County Clerk & Recorder (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 9, 16 & 23, 2013.)

PUBLIC NOTICE ASSUMED NAME PUBLICATION NOTICE Public Notice is hereby given that on December 5, 2013 a certificate was filed in the Office of the County Clerk of DeKalb County, Illinois, setting forth the names and post office addresses of all of the persons owning, conducting and transacting the business known as EVENT BRILLIANCE located at 611 Stonegate Dr., Sycamore, IL 60178. Dated December 5, 2013 /s/ Douglas J. Johnson DeKalb County Clerk & Recorder (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 9, 16 & 23, 2013.)

Need Help Rebuilding, Repairing or Replanting? Check out the

At Your Service Directory in the back of today's Classified

PUBLIC NOTICE

GROSS PAYMENT FOR CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL Salary Range: Less Than $25,000 DONALD ANDERSON Elizabeth Anderson Sharon Anderson Thomas Battista Dennis Benson Brittany Bishop Andrew Blakey Beata Boies Quinn Bolander Toni Boylen CYNTHIA BRANDLEIN Kristen Buck Kathy Burgess Kevin Caldwell DIANE CALLIGAN VERNA CARLSON SHERRY CHANDLER Stephanie Claesson Daerielle Culver KENNETH CULVER Jennifer Cygan Thomas Darden Elaine Dhamer Robin Eskew ROBERT FARLIK James Fell EUGENE FOGLE Lee Foresman Anthony Foulk Alice Frankowski Isabella Giannelli Julie Grendahl Kim Grever Cecilia Grimson Gelaine Gushi Michael Hanley Mary Haydock Jill Henson Pamela Hill JAMES HUGHES Molly Humes Mary Hwang Mark Inman William Iwans Traci Johnigk Kristen Johnson CANDACE JOHNSON MARGARET JOHNSON DONNA JOHNSON Rachel Kaufmann Karen Kidd Amy Kim DONNA KLEVELAND Patricia Knapp CHERYL KUHN JANETTE LAMPARD Cathy Larkin Joan Lasken Gail Ledbetter Misty Leman Diane Lizer William Marlin Holly Martin Kristina Mathey Cheryl McCoy Peggy McLean DODIE MERRITT Thomas Meyer Sabarina Mueller Linda Nagy Brian Oberg David Peek Vivian Penny Michelle Prestia Cheryl Quinn MEGAN RAKOW Annalise Reed SANDRA RIFFLE Dane Rybicki Alicia Ryley Renee Schambach Lynn Schnieder-Ray Georgianne Scholz Steven Silverstein Stacy Smith TREVOR STEINBACH Sara Sutherland Erica Swan PATRICIA THURLBY Karen Trost Paula Trzynka Jason Uecker PATRICIA ZACHWIEJA David Zoberis Salary Range: $25,000 - $39,999 Alicia Acosta Mary Anderson Kara Atwater Stacy Catalano Saundra McPherson Bethany Shinault Salary Range: $40,000 - $59,999 TIM ANDERSON Sandy Arndt CINDY BAKANAS Amy Barr DENISE BEHLING LISA BEYNON WILLIAM BOLGER Kendra Brauer SYLVIA BRAY Tracey Busby KIMBERLY CAMPBELL Eva Castillo Mary Church Leslie Cihock CARA COULTER Taryn Dennison KAREN DEVERELL Martin Eich Michelle Eklund KRISTEN ENGEL Bryan Evans Jamie Fallon Keith Foster EMILY FOWLER TRAVIS FREDERICK Amy Freeman SANDRA FROMI JON FROMI RHONDA FRUIT DANI-JO GALAUNER LISA GOLEMBIEWSKI Patricia Graves WENDY GUSTAFSON STACIA HALE Whitney Hart STEPHANIE HAYWARD CAROL HENCKEN Kyle Henkel Stephanie Henkel Kaitlin Holcomb Katherine Hopp Annica Hulstedt Adam Jankovich COREY JENKINS CLAYTON JOHNSEN Diana Johnson EMILY JOHNSON Andrea Laben Oliva Lebensorger TORY LOGSDON BRENDA LUCCA SHANNON MANSFIELD DONALD MCCUNE RACHEL MCPHEETERS

LEEANN MENDENHALL ELIZABETH MOORE Jill NICHOLSON AMBER NIEDERMEIER JANE OLSON CHRISTINA PACHECO MEGAN PERRY Matthew Pierce TIFFANY RAUMAN ERIN RENNER CONNIE RICH KARMEN ROBERSON Thomas Rucker PATRICIA SALAZAR DOUGLAS SCHILLER BARBARA SIKSNA SHARON SIMONSON Cathrine Thomas Tiffany Thurlby GRETCHEN TILLETT SANDRA UECKER ALAPATI UILI KATHRYN UNDERWOOD STACY VOLDEN Kari White TARA WILKINS Krista Young Thomas Zambrovitz Salary Range: 60,000 - $89,999 KAREN BAKER VICTORIA BECKMANN BARBARA BENZINGER MARCY BILLINGTON MARY BROWN Derrick Burress Craig Butcher AUDREY CAMPBELL Dirk Campbell KRISTINE COOPER NANCEE DEMINGS Anson Ellis KAREN FACTOR SUE FINNEY MICHAEL FRANCKOWIAK Jennifer Franz JULIE FRENCH LYNN HANSSEN STEVEN HARRINGTON STEFANIE HILL ANN HIRSCHBEIN MARY HUGHES CHRISTINE JENKINS PHILIP JERBI DONNA KOEHNKE MICHAEL LAUER MARIE LEAHY Todd McDillon KATHRYN MICHAELS Drinda Milinac LISA MILLER THOMAS OESTREICHER RUTH OLLE CAROL RASMUSSEN CYNTHIA REED CAROL REISER DEBORAH RIDDER CAROLYN ROACH Gina Sandora BARRY SCHMIDT KATHRYN SCHUMACHER JULIE SORENSEN EMILY WEIL PAMELA WHITTENHALL CARY WIEBENGA CYNTHIA WILLS Kirsten Yargus Salary Range: $90,000 and over DONALD BILLINGTON Joe Burgess Jr JOHN FRANCIS KAREN KNIZEK-SIMMONS ANGELO Lekkas WILLIAM MCCARTY Brett McPherson BRADLEY SHORTRIDGE GROSS PAYMENT FOR NON-CERTIFICATED PERSONNEL Salary Range: Less Than $25,000 Brandon Alexander Antonio Amaya DONALD ANDERSON Elizabeth Anderson Linda Anderson Sara Anderson Kenneth Austin Brent Bacon VIRGINIA BAKER WENDY BARTHEL Brandon Baumgarten Bryan Baumgarten Judi Beach KAREN BEAUCHAMP DIANE BEISNER Layne Bennett Linda Berndt Craig Billington KEVIN BILLINGTON Brittany Bishop Andrew Blakey DIANNA BOEHMER Beata Boies Quinn Bolander Kathe Boor Toni Boylen CYNTHIA BRANDLEIN Eric Brant Sandra Buddinger Debra Buetow Amie Burgess Kathy Burgess Steven Burke Jennifer Butler Kevin Caldwell Dominick Calendo BARBARA CALLAHAN DIANE CALLIGAN Natalie Campbell Julie Carlson VERNA CARLSON Ma Carrere de Parra Rhonda Carroll EDNA CIESLICA Stephanie Claesson Alexandra Clark Jennifer Clark SUSAN CLELAND Debra Coffman Susan Colgan CINDY CORNELL Cody Crackel Julie Craig BARBARA CRAVATTA MARY CRAVATTA Daerielle Culver Jennifer Cygan Mitchell Dander Thomas Darden Judy Daugherty Barbara Devine Elaine Dhamer Adam Dobson Melissa Dodd Tracie Duffield DANIEL DUVAL Nathan Dwyer Martin Eich Robin Eskew Duane Fisher

PATRICIA FISHER CAROL FLOIT EUGENE FOGLE Lee Foresman Rebecca Foss Jeffrey Foster Anthony Foulk Florence Fradkin MICHAEL FRANCKOWIAK Alice Frankowski Amy Freeman Karl Froehlich LAURA GEILS-GRAVELLE Barbara Goff ERIC GOLEMBIEWSKI Crystal Gonzalez FRANCES GORRELL Julie Grendahl Cecilia Grimson Nicole Gudall Dianna Guzy CARY HANSEN David Hansen Kathryn Hansen KIMBERLY HAWKINS LAURA HAYES Karen Heeter Danielle Heichel Cathleen Heiniger Tracy Hengels ANDREA HENSLEY Jill Henson ROBERT HEWLETT Pamela Hill Kenneth Hodgson Jamie Hodkinson Shelby Huffman Molly Humes Mary Hwang Mark Inman Diane Jennings PHILIP JERBI Brittney Johnson CANDACE JOHNSON Carol Johnson Kristen Johnson Earl Jursich Donna Kayes Amy Kim DONNA KLEVELAND Patricia Knapp RHONDA KUHN TINA KUHN Darrin LaForce Amanda Lancaste Cathy Larkin Amanda Larson Joan Lasken Cynthia Lauritzen Gail Ledbetter Dava Lee Justin Lee TRACY LEITSCH Misty Leman George Lifka Holly Lippold Adam Lucca Bret Lucca Shelley Madey Cheryl Marth Holly Martin Kristina Mathey Kenneth McCarty Todd McDillon KATHRYN MCDONALD LORENE MCINTYRE VIVIAN MCMURRAY Patricia Mendoza DODIE MERRITT Monica Mesenbrink Matthew Milligan MARIA MIRANDA MONIQUE MUNTNER Monica Napiorkowski CARLOTTA NELLANS STACY PACEY SUSAN PACEY Vivian Penny Susan Peterson Lisa Pope BARBARA POTTER ANNETTE PUCKETT Cheryl Quinn LINDA QUINN Sandra Rease Rose Reynolds SANDRA RIFFLE PAMELA ROYALTY Teresa Russell Dane Rybicki Alicia Ryley Nicklaus Sanderson Renee Schambach ROBERT SCHERER Georgianne Scholz ANN-MARAGREE SCHULTZ Alyssa Seguss Victoria Shaver Hannah Smith Stacy Smith Christine Spena TREVOR STEINBACH HERTA STEPHENS Lori Stone JAMES STRUCK Erica Swan MICHELLE TANSLEY Randy Tate PATRICIA THURLBY Alex Tijerna Deborah Todd KATHERINE TODD Karen Trost BRENDA TRUJILLO Paula Trzynka DANA TURVILLE Jason Uecker Jeremy VanDerpluym Jana Vartanian JANINE WACHOWSKI Amber Walitzer Amy Walker NAOMI WALSH TIMOTHY WARD Maryann Weinert MARY WILSON Lindsay Wucki PATRICIA ZACHWIEJA David Zoberis Salary Range: $25,000 - $39,999 SANDRA ACEVEDO CHERYL BOCK David Boehmer Jerry Dobson TIMOTHY FLACK Jennifer Fraedrich CHRISTINE FREISE Steve Hayes Scott Herrig MARLENE KNUCKEY Cathleen Kruse MICHELLE REYES Robert Rood SANDRA TEWKSBURY Thomas Tomlinson Christi Volkening Salary Range: $40,000 - $59,999 TERRY BENNETT ROBERT DAVIDSON CAROL FOGLE DONNA FREISE

Renee Hoffman BRAD KUHN VALERIE LEE Ernest Nelson ANN PICKERILL JAMES SANFORD DANIEL SPEAR RICHARD WADE Salary Range: $60,000 and over Bruce E Burkhalter JAMES R SLATER GERALD L STOFFREGEN PAYMENTS TO PERSON, FIRM, OR CORPORATION OVER $2,500 Payments over $2,500, excluding wages and salaries. Person, Firm, or Corporation Aggregate Amount ADI $24,415.17 Adrianne Roggenbuck $8,500.00 AFLAC $5,906.80 Alan Browne Chevrolet $20,734.60 Amalgamated Bank Chicago $1,955,000.00 AmSan LLC $22,522.83 Anderson Excavating $16,125.63 Apple Computer $64,908.50 Aramark Corporation $170,445.20 Behm Pavement $11,425.00 Blackboard Connect Inc $6,137.00 BMO MasterCard $393,715.56 Bob Ridings Inc $12,000.00 Brad Shortridge $3,080.96 BSN Sports Inc $3,105.19 Camelot Schools LLC $27,020.24 Canon Financial Services $10,612.08 Capital One Bank (USA) $2,952.88 Cargill Incorporated $4,120.29 Case Lots Inc $4,837.50 CenterPoint Energy $65,870.55 CenturyLink $2,514.75 Chloride Sales $3,430.98 City Of Genoa $15,558.73 ComEd $3,806.29 Connor Co $7,873.34 Continental American Ins $12,081.34 Contract Paper Group Inc $20,470.80 CPM Educational Program $7,366.40 Curriculum Project $24,494.59 Deborah Dudley $15,862.12 Discovery Education $5,665.00 Drive Right $40,020.00 Earthgrains Baking Co Inc $4,435.56 Educational Benefit Coop $1,153,767.80 Emerald Data Solutions $2,700.00 ENTEC Services Inc. $12,732.00 EPS/School Specialty $11,934.72 FES $6,600.00 Fiberlink Communications $6,000.00 FIRM Systems $3,741.00 Flinn Scientific Inc. $3,593.70 Follett Education Service $4,516.52 Fox River Foods $105,713.25 Frontier $2,601.02 Frontline Technologies $5,841.55 Genoa Automotive Repair $4,727.63 GENOA-KINGSTON UNITED WAY $7,444.50 Giant Steps $54,741.28 G-K High School $36,200.32 G-K Middle School $13,867.85 GKEA-Dues $121,482.50 Grainger $7,247.83 GreatAmerica Financial $5,031.56 Harder Corp $6,470.80 Hawthorn Associates Of $5,715.00 Hillmann Pediatric $41,929.55 Hinshaw & Culbertson LLP $107,737.99 Hintzsche Oil $111,364.59 Humana Insurance $47,782.03 I.D.E.S. $28,067.37 IL Assoc School Boards $5,622.00 IL. DEPT. OF REVENUE $520,125.41 IL. MUNICIPAL RETIREMENT $423,842.12 Illinois Reading Council $2,968.00 ING $160,286.76 IRS—FICA $310,206.78 IRS-FIT $1,140,346.23 IRS—MED $347,388.86

ISAC St Loan Collec Serv $6,480.00 James P Hughes $5,360.00 Jim George & Sons LLC $9,000.00 Joe Burgess Jr $6,256.69 John Deere Government & $20,981.39 Jon-Don $6,449.44 K & S Printing $4,659.70 Kishwaukee Corp Health $3,637.00 Kishwaukee Education $141,015.24 Klein Hall & Associates $3,712.50 Lanter Distributing LLC $2,913.36 Larkin Center School $16,245.00 Lawrence Anderson $3,147.03 Manhard Consulting Ltd $13,548.07 Martenson Turf Products $8,335.00 McDermaid Roofing $4,667.50 METLIFE SBC $94,062.34 Metro Professional $8,824.15 Michael Fritchen $4,500.00 MidAmerican Energy Co $220,106.26 Midwest Orthopaedic Inst $10,000.00 Miller Guidance Inc. $10,800.00 Morrow Brothers Ford, Inc $23,309.00 Nadig LLC $3,000.00 National Bank & Trust Co $6,146.37 National School Boards $2,975.00 NCS Pearson Inc. $34,028.65 Neff Company $3,918.82 Nelson Carlson $2,953.00 Nicor Gas $5,446.83 NIU $16,996.74 NIU Accounts Receivable $5,590.00 Northwest Evaluation Asso $20,075.00 Northwestern IL Assoc $62,435.06 Office Depot $33,142.91 Palos Sports Inc. $3,020.44 Partners 4 Results $21,152.00 Patti B Ogden $14,000.00 Pearson Education $48,838.37 Perma-Bound $4,711.71 Pioneer $5,995.00 Players Edge Apparel $2,520.00 PMA Financial Network Inc $8,500.00 Provantage $12,552.45 Radi-Link Inc $5,548.50 Really Good Stuff $2,790.93 Reliance Standard Life In $7,608.81 Riddell All American $4,245.98 RK Dixon $7,727.41 Rockford Tech Systems Inc $6,016.82 Scholastic Inc. $27,053.88 Schuring & Schuring Inc. $20,881.84 Service Concepts Inc. $120,153.76 Software Technology Inc $3,188.13 Sovereign Leasing LLC $223,334.00 Stalker Flooring Inc $6,700.00 Standard Chair Of Gardner $3,756.00 STATE DISBURSEMENT UNIT $3,772.46 Summit School Inc $31,418.80 Susan Meyer $5,600.00 TBC Net Inc $20,658.10 Teacher Retirement System $47,893.83 Teachers Curriculum $13,611.50 The CLM Group Inc $4,330.78 The Music Factory $21,900.00 THIS $153,760.19 TigerDirect Inc $100,161.58 Totalfunds By Hasler $9,000.00 Trevor Steinbach $29,475.00 Tri-Dim Filter Corp $2,670.24 TRS - .58% $55,506.98 TRS – 9.4% $897,939.17 TRS-FEDERAL FUNDS $76,977.12 Turner Educational $10,373.73 US GAMES $4,019.80 Utility Help Inc $2,800.00 Village Of Kingston $2,920.57 Ward's Science $2,676.84 Waste Management $9,802.57 William Goad $13,688.80 Zenz Buildings Inc $19,301.00 (Published in the Daily Chronicle, December 16, 2013.)


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DDC-12-16-2013