Scan Magazine, Issue 110, March 2018

Page 76

Scan Magazine  |  Special Theme  |  Destination Norway: Top Places to Visit in 2018

Nærøyfjorden is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, West Norwegian Fjords. There are goats, sheep and cows out all summer, which helps keep the cropland open.

World heritage park aims to be everyone’s garden As the southern part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, West Norwegian Fjords, the Nærøyfjorden World Heritage Park boasts an outstanding scenic landscape and unique geology. By Line Elise Svanevik  |  Photos: Nærøyfjorden

Together with the historical Geirangerfjord, Nærøyfjorden is part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site, West Norwegian Fjords. “This means that we need to take extremely good care of them,” says one of the project leaders of the World Heritage Park, Gro Nesse-Bremer.

“There are people and animals – a cultural and cultivated landscape,” says Nesse-Bremer. “There are little villages in the nooks and crannies of the fjord, and people are able to live in cohesion with these natural powers. And that’s pretty amazing.”

This year marks the tenth anniversary of the Nærøyfjord Foundation, which will be marked by sponsoring The Aurland Markets on 6-7 July.

She explains that she wants people to feel like they are coming ‘home’ to their own garden – and to treasure it like it is. “We’re trying to raise awareness for the tourists coming to this area – to teach them how to not leave a trace. It’s these untraceable journeys we want to promote, and it’s an ongoing balancing act trying to preserve the nature while welcoming tourists to the area.”

“The Nærøyfjord is exceptionally beautiful and wild – and has lively geology. You can see the changes happening in the landscape from year to year. There are several avalanches and rockslides every year, which helps shape it. The rivers and waterfalls rub on the rocks and change the landscape over time,” Nesse-Bremer explains. What distinguishes the Nærøyfjord from other wild and beautiful places is that there is an entire community living there. 76  |  Issue 110  |  March 2018

With such high mountains and deep fjords, there is a range of different climate zones, meaning you can go through all the seasons in a day. “In the valleys, there are incredibly fertile grounds because of the soil, which is affected by the precipitation from the glacier and makes

a nutritious ground where farmers can grow high-quality fruit and berries,” says Nesse-Bremer. Small-scale producers also make use of the resources, making traditional foods such as goat’s cheese and cured meats. “Our good helpers are the animals,” says Nesse-Bremer. “There are goats, sheep and cows out all summer, which helps keep the cropland open so it doesn’t grow over, which happens easily.” A place to truly relax and reconnect with the powers of nature, the Nærøyfjord forces its visitors to consider their environment and how to be a part of nature without disturbing it.

Web: www.naroyfjorden.no


Turn static files into dynamic content formats.

Create a flipbook
Issuu converts static files into: digital portfolios, online yearbooks, online catalogs, digital photo albums and more. Sign up and create your flipbook.