Page 1

2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

16/5/14

11:02

Page 1

Issue 15 | June 2014

PLUS

MARCEL KITTEL GEARING UP FOR THE TOUR DE FRANCE

FOCUS ON PRODUCTS MADE IN GERMANY HEALTH, BEAUTY & SCIENCE SPECIAL DESIGN, FASHION, CULTURE & LIFESTYLE


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

Stuttgart After Business

Stuttgart After Business Free App for Business Travellers

www.stuttgart-after-business.de

15/5/14

14:35

Page 2


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 3

Discover Germany | Contents

Contents JUNE 2014

22

29

Photo: Residenz Heinz Winkler

COVER FEATURE 6

Augustusburg Palace (Castles of Augustusburg and Falkenlust at Brühl). © Horst Gummersbach

21

Marcel Kittel Just before the start of the Tour de France, German cycling pro Marcel Kittel has granted us an exclusive insight in the world of cycling and the exciting season ahead.

48

Restaurant of the Month 22

All about the perfect smile, well-being through hypnosis, cutting-edge science that improves people’s lives and that all important health insurance.

Master Chef Heinz Winkler guides us around his famous Residenz resort at Lake Chiemsee in Bavaria, where his energizing Cuisine Vitale awaits guests.

24

In the heart of Vienna, yamm! is not only about really yummy food, it is all about conscious cuisine too.

Made in Germany

26

SPECIAL THEMES 34

Focus on Health, Beauty & Science

Federal Minister Sigmar Gabriel explains why the label“Made in Germany”is so precious.To illustrate, we present a few fine examples of German innovation and craftsmanship.

REGULARS & COLUMNS 10

Dine & Wine As our wine columnist takes us to the Baden region, those with a passion for cake might be interested in our insider’s tip on where to get the best nut cake in Switzerland.

42

53

Fashion

Design

Kieler Woche (Kiel Week) Windjammer parade © Landeshauptstadt Kiel / Björn Stähler

modern museum displaying all forms of communication as well as preserving the traditions of this old building.

Business If your offspring is a golfing talent and you are looking for the perfect way to combine sport and school, we have a very special recommendation for you. In addition to this, Gregor Kleinknecht takes a look at the case of Cornelius Gurlitt, who has died aged 81. What will happen to his secret art collection?

How to wear the monochrome trend, fabulous eco-friendly children’s wear and fine high quality gentlemen’s trousers are just a few of this month’s fashion highlights.

All you need to truly enjoy the World Cup at home. Plus a selection of amazing designers and great architects.

Culture & Lifestyle The Council of Constance celebrates its 600th anniversary this year. Talking history, our writer Elisabeth Doehne explains just what makes a UNESCO World Heritage site.

56

58 44

Conference of the Month The Museum für Kommunikation in Berlin is the capital’s new event hotspot, featuring a

Culture Calendar Discover Germany's new Culture Calendar is your good guide to great upcoming events.

Barbara Geier Barbara Geier dedicates her latest column to one of the greatest passions of a German male: The BBQ.

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 3


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 4

Dear Reader,

Discover Germany

Sales & Key Account Managers

Issue 15, June 2014

Emma Fabritius Nørregaard

Published 20.05.2014 ISSN 2051-7718

Lena Meyer Faye Beermann Ariam Bereket

Published by

Laura Hummer

Scan Magazine Ltd.

Antonietta Cutarelli

Design & Print

Advertising

Liquid Graphic Ltd.

info@discovergermany.com

Executive Editor

Discover Germany is published by:

Thomas Winther

SCAN GROUP Scan Magazine Ltd. 15B Bell Yard Mews Bermondsey Street London SE1 3TY United Kingdom

Creative Director Mads E. Petersen Editor Tina Awtani Art Director Svetlana Slizova

Phone +44 (0)870 933 0423 info@discovergermany.com

Copy-Editor Emmie Collinge

For further information, please visit www.discovergermany.com

Contributors Elisabeth Doehne Barbara Geier Jessica Holzhausen Sonja Irani Gregor Kleinknecht

After four years of impatient excitement, the eagerly anticipated 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil™ has finally arrived. The Germans still keep their fond memories of the “Wunder von Bern“ (miracle of Bern) 60 years ago, as West Germany beat champions Hungary 3:2 in Switzerland. In 1974, as Germany hosted the World Cup, it went on to win the final in Munich on home ground. The summer of 1990 marked another magical moment in German football history, when West Germany beat Argentina 1:0 in Italy. This year’s host Brazil is the most successful national team ever, having scooped a whopping five World Cup titles, followed by Italy with four World Cup titles. Germany is next in line with three wins in their pocket. Without mentioning Wembley, let’s just say that a certain football rivalry goes on between England and Germany. The next few weeks will certainly entail a lot of excitement. For those who have no tickets to Brazil, we’ve provided a little list of must-haves in our design section to make the football season at home even more enjoyable. Football aside, great sporting events are scheduled over the summer. You may have recognised our cover star Marcel Kittel, he is Germany’s greatest hope for the Tour de France. Our cycling expert writer Emmie Collinge caught up with him to treat us to a look behind the scenes of top notch road biking. Fingers crossed, he’ll be taking home the yellow jersey. From sport, we move to our Health, Beauty & Science special theme.This is packed with inspiring ideas for a healthy lifestyle that instantly makes you feel better, perform stronger and look great. An amazing insight into the world of scientific research is also part of the package.

Jaime Schwartz

Read along while not cheering on your favourite squad and enjoy this sporty issue of Discover Germany.

Iris Ellmann Jessica Pommer Jessica Ridder

We are ready for Brazil - may the best team win!

Marilena Stracke

Tina Awtani © All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of Scan Magazine Ltd. This magazine contains advertorials/promotional articles

4 | Issue 15 | June 2014


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

16/5/14

11:22

Page 5

Discover real Private Banking At SEB Private Banking, we acknowledge that everyone has a unique set of challenges. It’s why we do not offer ready-made solutions, concentrating instead on developing meaningful, long-lasting financial relationships and making the effort to really understand you and your requirements. Our international network of private banking offices will look after all aspects of your family business finances, from daily transactions to long term investments. Its services cover everything from tailored financial management, through to helping you to optimise the legal and tax structures within which your assets are held. As one of the world’s strongest banks and with more than 150 years of experience in private banking, we have just what it takes to ensure your future prosperity. To find out what SEB can do for your personal wealth, contact us in London: Christian A. Hvamstad +44 (0) 20 7246 4307 privatebanking@seb.co.uk

Sweden • Norway • Denmark • Finland • Luxembourg • Switzerland • United Kingdom • Singapore • Estonia • Latvia • Lithuania


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

16/5/14

11:02

Page 6


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

16/5/14

11:02

Page 7

Discover Germany | Cover Feature | Marcel Kittel

Marcel Kittel With driving rain from the west and very little visibility, the winding roads across the Peak District are not the most welcoming, but a select few have little choice in the matter. Careering through Yorkshire today is Team Giant-Shimano, a Dutch procycling team whose hopes for the 2014 Tour de France lie with the recognisably blond German Marcel Kittel. As part of their Tour preparation they’re riding a recon of the route, planning their strategy and plotting when to perform their renowned lead-out train in the hope of propelling their sprinter to glory once again. TEXT: EMMIE COLLINGE | PHOTOS: COR VOS | PHIL GALE

“You can definitely improve on the weather before we come back for the Tour de France,“ says Kittel with a broad smile. Now clean and tidy looking with his signature gelled quiff, he is sitting opposite me after having all eyes on him in an internationally broadcast press conference. One on one, he seems more relaxed, chatting about his youth and his passion for cycling. It is his first time in England, but the sport has taken him across the globe since turning pro in 2011. Born and raised in Arnstadt, being a sportsman was in his genes. With his mother a talented high jumper and his father keen on cycling, Kittel tried his hand at most sports before acknowledging that he was a far better cyclist than long jumper. What sets great champions apart from other athletes is their drive, so how did the popular Kittel make the step up to the top level, juggling a social life and training?“I was never particularly aware of the decision to forego partying – I just knew I couldn't go to every party. I had to invest a lot of time, being pro is something you really have to want,“ he pauses.“There really was little doubt for me. Riding my bike is a lot of fun, I just want to be myself.“ Kittel became the German national road cycling champion at the age of 16 and the

German national under 23 time trial champion in 2007, after winning the world junior championships in the same discipline in 2005 and 2006. He laughs as he admits that he hasn't won a title of the same level since – even though he has numerous other great victories to his name – but he is hopeful that a future championship might be more suited to him. Renowned as one of the best sprinters, it is Kittel's explosive power that sets him apart from the rest of the peloton. Able to reach and hold speeds of 70km/h in a remarkably short amount of time has ensured that he is more often than not the first cyclist to cross the finish line – even if it is occasionally just by millimetres. The route that they have just ridden from the northern city of Leeds to the industrial steel capital of the UK, Sheffield, was by no means a flat course. A 200km stage, it covers 2000 metres in altitude, putting it just slightly below some of the renowned French Alpine stages. Kittel, with his penchant for long, fast, flat stages, is understandably cautious as he gives his predictions for the Tour. “Seriously,“ he smiles bashfully,“even if I did win the first stage and wore the yellow jersey on stage two, there is little chance that I would be able to defend it on a stage of this nature!“ For the peloton, the ultimate dream is capturing the yellow jersey, worn by the overall

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 7


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 8

Discover Germany | Cover Feature | Marcel Kittel

leader of the race, it swaps hands almost continually throughout the 21-day Grand Tour. Legendary within cycling, wearing it for even one day propels any rider into the elite of the sport. Winning it on the first stage – as he did in the 2013 Tour – is naturally a big deal, but holding onto it is even bigger. Last year was a “very special year“ for the blond 25-year-old, as he clocked up four stage wins at the Tour, including the highly sought-after first stage and the final in Paris, along with numerous one-day race victories. Kittel smiles modestly and admits that pressure on his team has grown.“We are aware of this and know we have to adapt and change, keep challenging ourselves.Teams are expecting us to do the work if there is a breakaway, but it is going to be tough. We enjoy working hard and winning races, which comes through our focus on having fun whilst riding.“ With a team in their mid to late twenties, Team Giant-Shimano believes in nurturing talent, through a relaxed and fun atmosphere and a tight-knit team. While some pro-cycling teams monitor every movement of their riders under the microscope, the riders at Giant-Shimano are given a little more free rein. Everything in moderation, an oft-touted phrase, is apt when it comes to Kittel's ethos. With a wry smile he reveals that he has just eaten a cheeseburger – but he is quick to defend his healthy eating habits.“We do have a nutritionist but we have to find our own way. I probably should concentrate on it a little more but sometimes you just want a little something.“ His honesty is warming and makes us feel better about the snacks we had at the motorway service station on the drive up.“Sometimes you have these moments and you should allow yourself to eat a little of what you like, but naturally in moderation,“ he confirms. As one of the fastest men on two wheels, Kittel naturally has a packed schedule of training, with often as much as thirty hours a week in the saddle. Periods of rest are sporadic but welcomed he says, having just had four days at his home in Erfurt before

8 | Issue 15 | June 2014

coming over to the UK for the recon. Here in the UK, Kittel enjoys mass popularity and his followers on Twitter grow more and more by the day. “It's a bit crazy here, I write one thing on Twitter and everyone responds,“ he says incredulously.“But it is so nice to see people out on the roads – especially young kids. I would hope that I could provide them with some inspiration, even if it is just by a haircut!“ Kittel's own inspiration for cycling came from closer to home, from his father who also cycled competitively. These days they rarely ride together but his father's influence remains one of Kittel's driving forces. With the sprinters in cycling being the high stakes gamblers of the peloton, putting all their efforts for victory into the final 300 metres of a 7hour race, knowing what lies ahead of them is important. Having completed the recon of the route, Kittel heads off to the rest of his season, preparing for the Tour de France. This July will see him and Team Giant Shimano aim for victory at the 21-day Tour, which kicks off on 5 July in Yorkshire and rolls to a finish on the Champs-Élysées on 27 July. We’ll be keeping a keen eye out for Kittel’s imposing figure and blond locks.

Top: Marcel Kittel (Giant-Shimano) wins Dubai finale in February. Middle: Kittel and teammates power on up yet more hills on the undulating recon of stage 2 of the Tour. Photo: Emmie Collinge Botom: Team Giant-Shimano set off on their recon of the second stage of the Tour, heading across the peaks of Yorkshire in wintery conditions. Photo: Emmie Collinge


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 9

Discover Germany | Cover Feature | Marcel Kittel

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 9


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

Discover Germany | Design Xxx | Xxxx | Fashion Finds

Fashion Finds Keeping this summer’s superstar (a black and white leather ball) in mind, designers love the colour combination and monochrome continues to be a key fashion trend. Last season the black and white theme was defined by bold graphic patterns, dots and stripes. For SS14 creative heads gave it a sleek update and the result is much appreciated by celebrities. Both Julia Roberts and Jennifer Lawrence struck style gold with their black and white ensembles at 2014’s Golden Globes. EDITOR’S PICKS

The BLACKY DRESS BERLIN spring/summer 2014 collection is inspired by clean lines, modern design, an innovative fabric concept and clear summer tones. The collection exudes feminine sophistication and conveys a sense of lightness and modern coolness. Vest £196, top £90, trousers £163. www.blackydress.de

10 | Issue 15 | June 2014

14:36

Page 10


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 11

Wear the Kapalua embroidered top with a pair of white jeans for an effortlessly elegant appearance. £107. www.kapalua.de

Team these Closed white stretch five-pocket jeans with a black leather top for a glam rock interpretion of the monochrome theme. £221. www.closed.com

Essen-based footwear company Roland Schuhe has been a shoe specialist since 1900. Meanwhile the product range has expanded and they now offer some very stylish handbags and accessories too. We like this Limelight model, it goes perfectly with the monochrome trend. £41. www.roland-schuhe.de

A sporty version of the monochrome trend. Sleek elegance with a sporty twist – looks great with a pair of patent leather flats. Shirt £163, trousers £155. www.blackydress.de

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 11


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 12

Let the sunshine in …. Europe! Children and adults now have the option for apparel which combines sun smarts and style Founded in 1996, DOTS has held a special place in the children's apparel market for almost two decades. Their special attention to children's needs has led to the “precise development of designs with high functionality” that connect the dots between comfort and care. Their extensive research into the best options for children's clothes has led to innovative designs and the development of apparel that offers UV sun protection. TEXT: JAIME SCHWARTZ | PHOTOS: DOTS

Sunshine is essential to all living beings and is known to boost our health and wellbeing. However, each year the sun's harmful UV rays are reaching us in considerably greater amounts.“Unfortunately,

12 | Issue 15 | June 2014

the risk posed by UV radiation is still underestimated,” explains company director Dieter Jansen.“The consciousness of most people is less pronounced when it comes to the question of natural radiation expo-

sure.” Children are especially susceptible to the sun's dangerous rays because their skin has yet to fully develop the body's necessary defence mechanisms. To limit the damaging effects of these UV rays DOTS provides an effective solution through their UV protective apparel. The clothes are certified to a standard of UV 801 and have been proven to maintain their effectiveness even when the fabrics are wet or stretched and after heavy use. Although the use of suncream is still needed and recommended, DOTS clothes


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 13

Discover Germany | Design | DOTS Textilvertrieb

sories like sunhats and beach shorts that offer even more great ways to stay sun smart. Whether we are looking to enjoy a day in the sun or not, its rays are always there. It is important to always stay protected and DOTS UV protection can also be found in their “needs Kids”line. After toiling away, DOTS finally achieved a way to combine UV protection with natural fabrics in its sunCOrag 100 per cent cotton jersey singlet. Jansen imparts:“with the development of new materials, we have now been able to achieve UV protection in clothing so even an 'everyday' Tshirt can offer this safeguard.”The extra focus on sun care, however, does not mean a compromise on design. The“needs Kids” line features easy elastics and practical buttons that make it easy for kids to enjoy dressing themselves while they develop and discover their individual style.

provide a level of protection that lessens the mess and fuss of having to apply and reapply lotions. The playful and comfortable UV protected clothing options made available by DOTS thus makes sun protection easier for both children and their care takers.

Yet children are not the only ones who need to play it safe outdoors. Through “needs Protect” adults can also benefit from clothing that shields against cancercausing UV radiation. Those who find themselves outside for extensive periods because of activities related to work or pleasure now also have an increased level of sun protection available. According to Jansen,“radiation protection for every human being, regardless of relevant diseases or increased exposure is tremendously important.” Despite their current achievements DOTS is committed to investing

further in research that can expand the protection they already offer to provide UV clothing options to a greater variety of possible customers. The continued success of DOTS over the past decades has been driven by their desire to create stylish and affordable children's clothing that provides the utmost functionality. This care and concern for their customers also extends to how and by whom their clothing is made. DOTS has become a partner in the United Nations Global Compact, which asks companies to embrace and include universal human rights standards in the way their business is run. This includes helping to stop child labour practices and making an effort towards environmentally sustainable practices. Children are at their best when they are free to romp and roam outdoors and DOTS provides a way for kids to enjoy the sun while shielding them from some of its dangers. Their special UV protection lines can be easily ordered through the website's online shop or by visiting either of the two store locations. With DOTS apparel sunny days are here again. www.dotstextil.com www.dotstextil-shop.com

Above: All DOTS products are certified Bottom: DOTS sun COrag T-shirts

As the summer months approach and trips to the beach or pool are being planned, it is the perfect time to take advantage of DOTS“Zwimmstoff”swimwear line. The collection is made from a specially developed material called sunSYrag that creates a barrier even more effective than the strongest sunscreens. New to the line are practical and stylish sun acces-

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 13


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 14

local fashion also have to be accounted for. Hiltl’s tailored creations are also available in larger sizes, but that is not all.“It’s also the silhouettes that have to be taken into consideration. In Scandinavian countries men tend to opt for slimmer cuts while in the Eastern regions a wider shape with a higher waist is required,”Betz says. He reveals the trend for the upcoming winter season.“The dandy-look is key, a groomed look with attention to detail”and“subtle details such as contrast piping on the pockets or special buttons make all the difference. Voluminous materials in muted red hues, dark green nuances and luscious brown are ideal for a perfectly defined wintry look,” Betz recommends. www.hiltl.de

Outstanding gentlemen’s trousers made in Germany Hiltl has been designing and tailoring high quality trousers without compromise since 1955. Today Hiltl’s trousers are available on four different continents and offer the perfect cut for men of all shapes and sizes. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: HILTL

In a persistent and non-compromising quest for the perfect trouser, company founder Fritz Hiltl searched tirelessly to improve his tailoring. Exquisite fabrics manufactured by the world’s leading weaving mills, guaranteed fit (no shrinkage), a special tailor-made style waistband, exclusive buttons and eye buttonholes with cross bar tacks are the Hiltl trousers’ signature features. Furthermore, Hiltl’s creations include metal zippers that comply with high standards, a safety pocket for the wearer’s valuables, extra-long topside lining, non-iron high-tech seams and ultra-precision hemlines that won’t wear out from rubbing along the shoes. Despite the reasonable price tag, Hiltl offers amazing quality.“I am proud of the fact that we have the freedom

14 | Issue 15 | June 2014

to use high quality fabrics and materials for our collections. We do not have to compromise on quality due to budget restrictions,” Michael Betz, Hiltl Product Manager, says proudly. It is these outstanding quality features that have earned Hiltl trousers worldwide recognition. International distribution is flourishing. “Because of the different regional climate conditions, we have to offer enough variety in our summer and winter collections,”Betz explains. While in Europe a thick and luxurious condenser yarn flannel may be a bestseller, the warm textile wouldn’t be of much benefit for Australian or African customers, he points out. As well as variations in climate, body shapes and


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 15

Discover Germany | Design | Dedicated to Design

Dedicated to Design... This month’s picks are dedicated entirely to football. As the world focuses on Brazil, we had a look out for some fun products to make the World Cup season even more enjoyable. Let the games begin!

1

EDITOR’S PICKS

2

Start your day in true World Cup style with a champion’s breakfast set from Könitz Porzellan GmbH. A pretty gift box is included. £29. www.mug-shop.com Table football was the inspiration for this cool coat rack. Available in red or blue, the five figures can each be individually adjusted. £20. www.trendaffe.de

3

Sit on it or use it as an occasional table – this multifunctional stool features the original Werkhaus connecting system, making it is easy to transport and quick to fold away for storage if not needed. £20. www.werkhaus.de This universal remote control comes from Austria and is the perfect sofa companion for all footie enthusiasts. Throw it, squeeze it or kick it to make the most of your telly experience. £11. www.radbag.de

4

If watching the action on screen is not enough, you can now feel the pitch under your toes with these slightly unusual fun flip flops. £29. www.radbag.de

5

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 15


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 16

they actually need it but because they have the desire to own something new. Perhaps someone saw a friend using a certain product and wants to own it too. Take a table and chairs, for example, of course everyone owns these but your opinion may change after looking at catalogues, prompting you to dislike your current ‘out-dated’ chairs. Whether you have chairs or not, the resulting action is the same as the customer decides to buy new ones; this is where design comes into force. Design is lifestyle, fashion sells A product’s modernity and fashion have become an incentive to buy it – just look at successful brands like Apple or Nike. People are attracted not only to their technically advanced products, instead, it is their marketing and social media strategies which attract buying, targeting the desires of consumers: the need to have what others have, the wish to own something nice, something valuable. Fanciful presentations and social media campaigns on Facebook or Twitter have become more and more important over the years. Channelling consumers’ desires is key to success and that is something designers have to acknowledge nowadays as products sell through emotions. Creating trends instead of following old ones

Rainer Bachschmid creates lifestyles with design

Designers like Rainer Bachschmid do not always follow existing trends but create new ones. Design solutions, developed by his design office rabadesign GmbH in Switzerland, always take this into consideration. Head designer Rainer Bachschmid, specialised in customised design, works for

In the middle of the Swiss Alps there’s a design office, hidden from the hustle and bustle of world metropolises. From the outside, it looks like a normal industrial complex, but the inside tells a different story: rabadesign is an internationally established, interdisciplinary and creative design office and full service agency. In our fast developing world, design has become a complex lifestyle aspect – always paving the way, often walking ahead. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: RABADESIGN

As we are living in a saturated world, dictated by desires and not by needs, design

16 | Issue 15 | June 2014

has to take into consideration what makes people buy a product; this is not because

Rainer Bachschmid


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 17

Discover Germany | Design | Rabadesign

a wide spectrum of national and international customers from many industries. Global know-how, versatility, innovation, exclusiveness, significance, quality and rapidity are all terms that can be used to describe the design process and resulting products. Whether it’s furniture or industrial design, corporate or office design – rabadesign is a specialist at finding uniqueness in ordinary things. Designer Rainer Bachschmid, born by Lake Constance in Southern Germany, first trained as a cabinetmaker before studying industrial design at the University of Wuppertal. After graduating he worked together with other designers. One of his most important professional experiences was the time he spent at a Swiss furniture factory where he worked as creative director and learned to give value to things. To increase this work, he founded rabadesign in 2006. Rabadesign has evolved in insecure conditions, one might think of the time after 9/11 when many people felt threatened. During such times, design becomes conservative, and many designers refrain from trying something new out of fear of failing. Yet this is not the case with Rainer Bachschmid. For him enjoying work means enjoying life – even in times of crisis – resulting in new product concepts many of his competitors dare not approach.“In the end the best acknowledgement of my work is when it results in a trustful and partner-like relationship with my clients that exists over a long term, preserving what was gained and approaching something new,” Bachschmid explains.

“Keep it simple” His vast experience in design has been a learning curve of what people actually want when buying new products: They crave something with a secure value, a value that does not change over time. Therefore the main goal in design is“keep it simple”.

cubes. This makes the W-cube outstandingly flexible and individual. A light and filigree design is also distinctive for the Wtable, a table series using aluminium for product stability and a splendid look. The table is distinguished with the Red DOT award and the German Design Award.

One impressive example for this goal is the light Ciconia for the idee.design.licht GmbH, a foldable, softly lightened design object and a highlight among modern floor lamps with a 175 cm span.

Last but not least, the Product D-19 has to be mentioned. The furniture system for offices, living spaces and kitchens emerges in a new form every day – keeping its high quality level, D-19 stands for sustainable and ecological furniture made in Germany.

Furthermore, Rainer Bachschmid has designed products for the Wagner company, including the W-table, the W-lounge sofa and the W-cube, a cabinet reduced to its essentials and puzzled together from single

www.raba.ch www.idee-design-licht.de www.wagner-wellness.com www.d-19.de

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 17


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:36

Page 18

Discover Germany | Design | Giselbrecht & Partner

Fit for the future For the Graz-based architect Ernst Giselbrecht, sustainability is not merely an expression en vogue. It is his mission to create buildings that are both energy efficient and innovative. TEXT: SONJA IRANI | PHOTOS: ERNST GISELBRECHT + PARTNER ARCHITEKTUR ZT GMBH

There is a certain kind of understatement when Ernst Giselbrecht talks about his architectural practice Ernst Giselbrecht + Partner architektur zt gmbh. After all, Giselbrecht, who founded his business in 1985, designed plans for energy-efficient buildings long before it became fashionable.“As architects of today, we must think beyond the known qualities of functional performance towards a meaningful development for the future,”he explains the driving force behind his concept.“We must include the future, the unknown in our planning. This will become the new foundation for architecture and redefine the role of the architect

18 | Issue 15 | June 2014

in society.The architect as creator, as magician and shaman, creates the setting for the dynamic performance that is called the future.” In order to design sustainable buildings for the future, Giselbrecht’s architecture not only has to fit into the urban or rural surroundings or the cultural or social context, it also has to blend into its energy-conscious context in an intelligent way. An example of this eco-friendly strategy is the office building of the media company Vorarlberger Nachrichten (1996/99). The energy for heating and cooling is gained

from the waste heat generated by the inhouse printing machine. Additionally, the 36-metre deep foundation piles that were necessary to implement because of the marshy subsoil, work as a further energy source. As a result, the heating and cooling costs of the building that houses 350 employees are as little as those of a singlefamily home. This strategy, however, only works as long as the company is active – the infrastructure and the employees themselves are an inherent part of the energy system. A new challenge is a new idea Besides sustainability, Giselbrecht’s work is defined by a rather rational architectural language. Considered one of the leading figures of the world-famous Graz school and formal expressionism, Giselbrecht nowadays concentrates on factual design,


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:37

Page 19

Discover Germany | Design | Giselbrecht & Partner Left, main image: Dynamic facade, Kiefer technic showroom. © Paul Ott2 Below: Biokatalyse at Technical University Graz. © Paul Ott Ear, nose & throat clinic, provincial hospital LKH Graz. © Paul Ott Provincial hospital LKH Leoben, rejuvenation House R on Lake Constance. © Peter Eder

tions, office buildings, and faculties at various universities, every project is a new chance to learn, says the star architect.“The project I like the best is whichever we are currently working on. This is because we just love tackling new tasks and because we want to implement those projects with a great design. One of the characteristics of our office is that we simultaneously work on many different things – from small design assignments to big hospital compounds.” His innovative ideas have earned Giselbrecht many important awards such as the Bavarian Architecture Prize for building-integrated solar systems 2011 for his reconstruction project of the Energie Steiermark headquarters in Graz (2010). Thanks to several outstanding measures such as photovoltaic panels integrated into the facade or solar collectors integrated on the roof, the skyscraper that used to “heat its entire neighbourhood”now only uses 16% of its original energy demand.

show project of a façade, whose elements are controlled hydraulically according to natural sunlight. In this context, the facade serves as an interface between external influences and the needs of the inhabitants inside the building. In the show project, it looks as if the facade elements are dancing. “We are also very proud that our ‘Residence above the Bodensee’ was exhibited in the private art gallery Mark Blunck in the USA. This gallery has chosen objects from the 1930s onwards, including, amongst others, the Villa Savoye by Le Corbusier, the Glass House by Philip Johnson or the Farnsworth House by Mies v.d. Rohe, which of course were all huge role models for us.” Nowadays, Giselbrecht and his team get to travel themselves and exhibit their work at such prestigious events as theVenice’s Architecture Biennale 2014.“We’re looking forward to presenting our contribution to this year’s topic ‘Time Space Existence’ at the Palazzo Bembo, close to the Rialto Bridge,” Giselbrecht reveals.

International acclaim Bavaria is not the only place where Giselbrecht’s work has created waves. “One thing that makes us proud is that our video ‘Dynamic Facade’ has been such as huge success on YouTube. We have had almost 500,000 views,”says the architect about his

www.giselbrecht.at

Energie Steiermark. © Paul Ott

autonomy and readability of the structural parts as well as an unpretentious use of contemporary technology.The materials are used sparingly in accordance with the requirements of the location and the function of the building. This working method results in the creation of a varied range of buildings fit for the future. From private residential houses to hospitals, railway sta-

Energie Steiermark (Styrian Energy Service Company). © Reinhard Vedder

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 19


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:37

Page 20

Discover Germany | Design | Werk Nussbaumer

Dare to be different Striving towards perfection or maximum profit has never been their thing. Instead, Werner and Katja Nussbaumer decided to play with radical ideas to create truly original furniture. In the long run, this has certainly paid off. TEXT: SONJA IRANI | PHOTOS: WERK NUSSBAUMER

don’t take risks anymore.”Inspired by this Travelling was definitely one of their priormentality, the Nussbaumers ditched their ities when Mr and Mrs Nussbaumer first fear of making mistakes and started to take launched their own furniture business risks. After all, you cannot discover new WerK – a combination of their forenames possibilities if you don’t try something comWerner and Katja – 25 years ago. Back then, pletely different every now the Viennese couple often and then. delivered their products personally, a chance to see the Even today, this is still world en route. New York, their motto. “Our clients for example, was a turning often have a long list of repoint in their career.“For the New Yorkers, the only thing quests and measurethat counted was your curments,” they explain.“We rent work, not your title or like to just leave all of that background,” the creative aside and instead develop unusually created pieces of pair remembers.“In Europe, furniture that win over our you need to establish a repclients’hearts.This way, we utation first, and out of fear WerK founders Katja & Werner Nussbuild furniture that people of losing that reputation you baumer

20 | Issue 15 | June 2014

Main image: The cantilever chair is made from original seats of the Viennese tramway Top: Small originals Middle: The Floating Table Below: The Metal Box

just feel really comfortable living with.”This refreshingly playful approach has produced a range of utterly unique furniture items. There is, for example, the cantilever chair made from original Viennese tramway seats, book shelves styled in a flatliner design or with a bridge on top, the convex dinner table or the versatile metal box – a very plain sideboard made from thin, black metal plates and a wooden underframe, which changes its appearance according to how it is filled. While innovation is vital, so too is ensuring the high quality of their products. The parents of two are still avid travellers. “Even though we run a small workshop in Vienna, we deliver personally to Switzerland, Germany, the Netherlands, France, New York or London…”the Nussbaumers say with a smile. www.werknussbaumer.at


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:37

Page 21

Discover Germany | Dine & Wine | The WineBarn

Part One

Introducing Baden This month I want to share my long standing love affair with Baden, Germany’s third largest wine-growing region. It lies in the warmest part of Germany, nestled between sheltering mountain ranges and stretching for 400km along the Rhine. Sufficient rain in the summer, protection from cold winds and strong sunshine ensure that Baden has optimal growing conditions. In fact, Baden is the only German winegrowing region to be classified as being in the EU wine-growing zone ‘B’ – the same zone as Champagne, Alsace and Savoie!

Main image: The Heger Winklerberg Vineyards Above, left: Heger Weissburgunder sonett trocken Above, right: Laible, 2012 Riesling trocken CHARA

lar. His wines have mineral notes and are filigree – any wine lover will enjoy the abundant finesse. Equipped with his wine knowledge since childhood and the genes of a great winemaker, his wines will surprise and delight you. A great wine to try is his 2012 Riesling CHARA*** dry which is £21.50 a bottle or £258.00 a case.

TEXT: IRIS ELLMANN | PHOTOS: THE WINEBARN

Historically a great producing region, Baden’s wine cultivation dates back to the Romans, who began cultivating grapes to the west of the Rhine over 2,000 years ago. Baden is primarily Pinot country: Spätburgunder (Pinot Noir), Grauburgunder (Pinot Gris) and Weissburgunder (Pinot Blanc) account for more than half of the varieties cultivated here. Today, Baden is famous throughout the world for its high quality wines and we are proud to have four producers from Baden supplying The WineBarn. This month I am going to introduce you to two of these: Joachim Heger and Alexander Laible. I will continue next month with two other great producers: Bercher and Franz Keller. The Heger Winklerberg Vineyards The Heger vineyard was founded in 1935 by Dr. Max Heger whose previous profession was that of a country doctor, but his passion for wine led him to purchase some

of the best slopes in the Kaiserstuhl area. As the slopes are steeply terraced, the use of machinery is almost impossible, hence a lot of the work has to be done by hand. 95% of the wines are fully fermented which results in clear elegant wines with structure, longevity and complexity.

I look forward to sharing our other great Baden producers with you next month. Happy Drinking! Iris

Joachim Heger The production is now managed by Joachim Heger and if you are new to Heger’s wines I would recommend starting with the 2012 Weissburgunder (Pinot Blanc) sonett dry which we stock for £14.50 a bottle, or £174.00 a case. Alexander Laible Another great Baden producer is Alexander Laible, the son of the famous Laible estate in Durbach. Now with his own estate at the entrance to Durbachtal, Laible sets great value on working his vineyard in conjunction with nature. He ensures consistent and gentle refinement of the grapes in the cel-

Iris Ellmann (left) is managing director at The WineBarn, an award-winning merchant of German wine based in beautiful Hampshire. The WineBarn, Clump Farm Barn, Farleigh Lane, Dummer, Hampshire RG25 2AF E-mail: iris@thewinebarn.co.uk www.thewinebarn.co.uk

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 21


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:37

Page 22

Restaurant of the Month Germany

Modern luxury and traditional charm Michelin star-awarded chef Heinz Winkler hosts guests in his own hotel The Residenz Heinz Winkler, nestled between the Bavarian Chiemsee lake and mountains, offers its guests relaxation and world-class cooking in a traditional and luxurious setting. TEXT: JESSICA POMMER | PHOTOS: RESIDENZ HEINZ WINKLER

When Heinz Winkler opened the Residenz Heinz Winkler in 1991, his name was already famous in the world of hospitality: by the age of 31, the trained chef had already been awarded three Michelin stars, making him the youngest chef in Germany to achieve this honour. Ten years later, when he acquired the old hotel “Post”, which

22 | Issue 15 | June 2014

originated from the year 1405, he fulfilled his life’s dream. Winkler transformed the old building into a modern resort, while preserving its traditional charm. Nowadays, visitors to the Residenz Heinz Winkler can stay in rooms or suites that either belong to the historical building stock or the attached new wing.

Each room in the Residenz Heinz Winkler has its own individual design and character. The delicate interior design reaches the pinnacle of comfort and luxury and all of the 32


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:37

Page 23

Discover Germany | Restaurant of the Month | Germany Left & below: Grand Chef Relais & Chateaux hotel Residenz Heinz Winkler Bottom, left: Heinz Winkler

During his career as a chef, Winkler was inspired by the “Nouvelle Cuisine” when he joined the team of Paul Bocuse. In his own hotel-restaurant he went on to introduce the“Cuisine Vitale”. With this term, he defined his gourmet cuisine as satisfying whilst also energising. In the Residenz’s Venetian Restaurant the guests can witness Winkler´s skills as a chef de cuisine.There is a wide array of dishes to choose from, either à la carte or from the seasonal menu. A substantial selection of wines make the culinary experience more digestive, as the wine cellar stores 25,000 bottles of 950 different types among which noble and rare Château wines from Latour to Lafite are to be found. The restaurant`s interior features elements of Italian classicism. Visitors can also book a cooking class with Heinz Winkler and his team. In small groups, budding chefs get the opportunity to learn how to prepare a scrumptious menu in just three hours. The less food-inclined partner may want to retreat into the wellness area during that time.The Laconium is an oasis of relaxation where visitors can descend into the swimming pool or tepidarium or kick back in the Finnish and Roman saunas. In the Vital Resort an array of tailored beauty and massage treatments are available.

rooms have double room size as a minimum standard. Rooms in a higher price category are equipped with antique furniture. The suites are spacious and filled with distinct features; for example, the Maisonette suites, of which there are four, extend over two floors with the sleeping area on the upper floor.They provide a magnificent view over Mount Kampenwand. “Our crown jewel is the Residenz suite. It has the most outstanding design and opens up to a magnificent view of the Chiemgau mountains,” explains patron Heinz Winkler.

tains act not only as a magnet for those seeking relaxation but also for people who want to have high-level or casual business meetings within attractive surroundings. Sailing on the Chiemsee, skiing on the Kampenwand or Steinplatte mountains, golf and tennis in idyllic scenery, a visit to the Salzburg Festival and the Herrenchiemsee royal palace: there are so many activities that can be pursued in this area, acting as a the ideal counterbalance to the relaxation and gourmet programme of the Residenz. The Residenz Heinz Winkler can be reached by car in less than half an hour from Munich or Salzburg. Thus, stressed urbanites can quickly take refuge in the fairytale landscape of the region and cosiness and elegance of the Residenz. “I think we have achieved a good compromise between luxury and local charm," sums up Heinz Winkler. www.residenz-heinz-winkler.de

Although Heinz Winkler´s name has become a label with its own meaning, Heinz Winkler himself remains modest. He has been awarded three Michelin stars on 21 occasions and specially honoured with the distinction of the Federal Cross of Merit. This award is only given to people of national importance. Winkler was the first chef in Germany to be awarded with the Federal Cross of Merit due to his significance for cooking in Germany and Bavaria. But as the concept of his Residenz shows, Heinz Winkler always remains true to himself. As patron of the house he still feels personally responsible for the wellbeing of his guests.“I want my guests to feel like at home and to feel a warm and friendly atmosphere,” says Heinz Winkler. The picturesque scenery between the Chiemsee lake and the Chiemgau moun-

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 23


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:37

Page 24

Restaurant of the Month Austria

Left, main image: Wild herb salad sitting on avocado and served with crunchy potatoes. © yamm! Right, top: Dessert creations. Photo: Miguel Dietrich Right: Buffet Island at yamm! Photo: Gerhard Wasserbauer

Conscious cuisine in the heart of Vienna Immerse yourself in the culinary world of yamm! yamm! offers a unique dining experience with its mix of contemporary urban lifestyle and a classic Austrian feel-good factor. Its head creative chef, Walter Schulz, pampers gourmets with new taste experiences that combine influences from Mediterranean, Asian and classic Austrian cuisine, raising vegetarian dining to its highest level. TEXT: JAIME SCHWARTZ | PHOTOS: YAMM!

relationships with small, regionally-based Aromatic soups, fresh crispy salads, delipartners. Their local involvement not only cious main dishes, refined snacks, heavensures guests receive the freshest food but enly desserts and exceptional drinks sealso helps to protect the environment by duce diners to a more conscious, vital decreasing transport distances. nutrition. Consciousness, however, does not just arrive on one's plate at yamm! but is found in As a restaurant, cafe, take away, every step from farm to table. and bar&lounge there is someDishes are prepared with thing to suit the mood of every high-quality and mostly local guest.Yet the heart of the yamm! and seasonal ingredients experience is undeniably found bought fair trade or from orin its buffet island where guests ganic farmers. Additionally, can choose from a variety of over special attention is given to fifty different international speselecting suppliers who focialties. Not limited to vegetarians, these numerous options are cus on sustainability and Maître de Cuisine Walter Schulz also available to those with veyamm! seeks out long-term Photo: Miguel Dietrich

24 | Issue 15 | June 2014

gan, lactose-free and gluten-free diets. Extending their already ample dining options, this April yamm! added a new breakfast service that provides guests with the opportunity to enjoy a healthy start to the day.Those who find themselves in a morning rush can easily grab something from the “breakfast2go”take-away options. The delights of yamm! can also be taken advantage of through their catered“walking dinners” which are meant to be served while your guests stand and mingle. A menu of creative starters, hot main dishes or desserts can be created and individualised for business events or private gatherings. With its care for the environment and creativity in the kitchen, the only concern that the yamm! team leaves to its guests is figuring out what to try first! www.yamm.at


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:37

Page 25

Discover Germany | Dine & Wine | Meierbeck Backwaren

Main image: Bauernbirnbrot Urdinkel Left, top: The famous Bündner Nusstorte Left, bottom: Slow food rye bread

Quality is not produced by chance Meier-beck AG from Switzerland sustains ecological and traditional baking The bakery Meier-beck venerates the values that are represented by Switzerland: originality, natural goodness and uniqueness. All of their pastries are based on traditional recipes and regional ingredients. TEXT: JESSICA POMMER | PHOTOS: MEIER-BECK

When Meinrad and Verena Meier opened their bakeshop in the village of St. Maria in the beautiful Val Müstair in the Swiss canton of Graubünden about 40 years ago, they were unaware that 1973 would be the start of their success story. Their unique selling point of baking pastries that draw on old regional recipes and their use of ecologically grown ingredients grew more and more in demand. Initially, their team consisted of five people, but they soon expanded. In 2012 the couple´s daughter Lucia and her partner Giancarlo Marco De Santis took over the management. Nowadays, 24 people are employed there. “All our apprentices learn how to produce real bread here. That is important at a time

when chain bakeries dominate the market that produce their products in factories,” explains Lucia Meier. The origin of Meier-beck´s ingredients can be found mostly in this one region.The various flours, such as rye or oat, are planted on the fields of the UNESCO heritage site Saint John Abbey in Müstair, which was built exactly 1,200 years ago by Charlemagne after surviving a snow storm on the Alps. All flour sorts planted there are certified as organic. Although its production methods seem ancient, Meier-beck doesn’t renounce modern distribution channels like online sales. The online shop facilitates sales abroad, which are becoming increasingly important.

Righ, below: Café Stübli Right, bottom: Meier-beck headquarter

The canton Graubünden is a Swiss region with its own distinct identity and culinary specialties. One prominent pastry is the Bündner Nusstorte. This caramelised, nutfilled, butter shortcrust pastry has also become a signature dish of Meier-beck. On the Swiss television channel SRF, a jury tested the quality of the ten most sold Bündner Nusstorten. The Bündner Nusstorte of Meier-beck, was rated as the best one. “We are very happy about this judgement and want to keep up the high standard of baking traditional pastries from our region,”sums up Lucia Meier. www.meierbeck.ch


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:37

Page 26

Preserving the culture of past and present

UNESCO World Heritage What unites the Great Wall of China and the Leaning Tower of Pisa? Do the walls of Machu Picchu have anything in common with the Grand Canyon or the Great Barrier Reef, or even the Abbey of St. Gall? They do, but it is certainly not their respective dimensions, their locale, their architecture nor their origin. TEXT: ELISABETH DOEHNE

They all share one characteristic; they are all registered on the list of UNESCO World Heritage Sites. All of these sites are regarded as treasures of the past and present that should be preserved for the generations to come. Often, one might think that culture is not tangible, but in some places it

26 | Issue 15 | June 2014

is. “Heritage is our legacy from the past, what we live with today, and what we pass on to future generations. Our cultural and natural heritage are both irreplaceable sources of life and inspiration,�states UNESCO (The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organisation).

Currently, this UNESCO list includes 981 monuments in 160 countries. While the majority of these sites, 759, are cultural monuments, 193 are listed as natural and 29 are marked as both cultural and natural heritage. Both anthropological and natural forces combined form this unique list of places, buildings, traditions, and natural phenomena.To date, 38 German sites have been included on the list, 11 sites in Switzerland, and 9 in Austria with many applications under review. For instance, German artisan bread might one day be listed among this global cultural canon.


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:38

Page 27

Discover Germany | Culture & Lifestyle | UNESCO

Even though the list was only established 42 years ago, a brief glance at it captures your attention and reading through it is equal to a journey through the world’s centuries and cultures.The list pieces the small beads of mankind together and depicts the human experience and the ingenious spirit of people, pioneering and innovation on all continents. Many might wonder, what makes a beautiful or historic monument a UNESCO World Heritage Site? What are the criteria? The guiding principle of the World Heritage Convention is that “parts of the cultural or natural heritage of outstanding importance […] need to be preserved as part of the world heritage of mankind as a whole“. Sites are only included in the World Heritage List if they meet the conditions laid down in the Convention criteria of “uniqueness“ and “authenticity“ (for cultural sites) or “integrity“ (in natural sites) and if a convincing “Conservation Plan“ is presented to the committee.

Main image, left: Cologne Cathedral © Köln Tourismus GmbH Right, from top to bottom: Palace in Potsdam (Palaces and Parks of Potsdam and Berlin). © Prussian Palaces and Gardens Foundation, Berlin/Brandenburg (Leo Seidel) Aachen Cathedral. © GNTB/Rainer Kiedrowski Bode Museum (Berlin Museum Island). © National Museums in Berlin, photographer: Bernd Weingart Wartburg Castle in Eisenach. © Bildarchiv Monheim GmbH

Setting up and identifying the World Heritage catalogue The World Heritage List is based on the Convention Concerning the Protection of the World Cultural and Natural Heritage. This convention was adopted on 16 November 1972 at the 17th General Conference of UNESCO in Paris and came into effect on 17 December 1975. A spokesman for the organisation states:“What makes the concept of World Heritage exceptional is its universal application. World Heritage sites belong to all the people of the world, irrespective of the territory on which they are located.”

Cultural traditions and natural phenomena Signed by 186 countries, the charter established specific conditions for determining when an object can be placed under monument protection. However, the responsibility for the preservation remains with their respective countries. It is up to the regional and local authorities to work to ensure that the monument is protected in accordance with a precise management plan. But what connects ancient ruins, modern cities, coral reefs and parks, is it their unique value as a work of art or as a natural phenomenon? Surely, it is people who unite in the name of the beauty and uniqueness of nature and culture to preserve the world’s heritage and to pass it on to future generations. As a consequence, preservation also means appreciation and keeping sites intact. In fact, many treasures are exposed to numerous threats: wars, uncontrolled development, neglect or progress – quite apart from climate and other evolutionary changes, and natural catastrophes.

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 27


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

Abu Simbel – The first success story The first ever monument to become a UNESCO site was threatened by natural forces. The ancient Egyptian temple Abu Simbel in Upper Egypt was threatened by flooding due to the planned Aswan Reservoir in 1960 to 1980. UNESCO alerted the regional authorities and launched a plan for conservation: dismatling and transporting the

28 | Issue 15 | June 2014

15/5/14

14:38

Page 28

monuments to a safe place. Around 50 countries pledged their financial support, which covered half the cost of the transfer. In the end, the Abu Simbel temple was saved from the Nile floods. The success of the Abu Simbel action paved the way for further campaigns to protect endangered cultural monuments. This al-

Above: Wilhelmshöhe Park in Kassel. © MHK Bottom, from left to right: Loreley rock (Upper Middle Rhine Valley). © Thomas Merz Collegiate Church, Castle and Old Town of Quedlinburg. © Jürgen Meusel / QTM GmbH Bamberg Old Town. © FrankenTourismus TKS Bamberg Hub Right, top: Margravial Opera House, Bayreuth © Bayreuth Marketing & Tourismus GmbH Wieskirche Pilgrimage Church. © Tourismusverband Pfaffenwinkel Right: Augustusburg Palace (Castles of Augustusburg and Falkenlust at Brühl). © Horst Gummersbach


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:38

Page 29

Discover Germany | Culture & Lifestyle | UNESCO

lowed, among other things, to provide protection for Venice and the ruins of Mohenjo-Daro in Pakistan.Today, whether visitors are roaming the shores of Newfoundland, wandering on the ‘L’Anse aux Meadows’ site, the first settlement of European Vikings in North America in the year 1000, or watching the marvellous water displays at Schlosspark Wilhelmshöhe in Kassel, they are often struck with awe. In fact, the Bergpark in Kassel-Wilhelmshöhe has been included in the list since the summer of 2013 and is Germany’s most recent addition. The great size of the park and its waterworks along with the towering Hercules and the castle are a remarkable testimony to the aesthetics of the Baroque, Absolutist, and Romantic periods. Today, with all these dangers in mind, UNESCO has undertaken the task of convincing people and authorities of the need to protect

such monuments and their surroundings, which originated either from the hard work and the creative power of the people or the patient work of nature and time.

whc.unesco.org www.unesco.de

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 29


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:38

Page 30

600th anniversary of the Council of Constance

Setting the course of European history In 2014, the region around Lake Constance will be celebrating the 600th anniversary of the Council of Constance – the largest religious congress of the Middle Ages. TEXT & PHOTOS: GERMAN NATIONAL TOURIST BOARD (GNTB)

Between 1414 and 1418, important figures from all over Europe assembled in Constance to discuss the future of the divided church and to elect a new Pope. At that time, three Popes were vying for the chair of St. Peter and the situation was very delicate. Each had the support of different rulers in Europe, which led to political turmoil both within and beyond the Holy Roman Empire. There was also unrest among the peo-

30 | Issue 15 | June 2014

ple because the clergy was increasingly engaging in worldly pleasures and abusing the sale of indulgences. When Sigismund became the German king in 1410, he recognised the need to restore unity to the Western Church. Using his excellent contacts within Europe and good connections to the three Papal claimants, he orchestrated the 16th ecu-

menical council to heal the schism in the church. Constance was chosen as the venue. The papal election of 1417 is thought to be the only one that has ever been held north of the Alps – this defining event made the town the centre of the Christian world between 1414 and 1418. Never before had a council lasted so long, nor drawn so many participants. Constance became a melting pot of cultures. The dynamic exchange of goods and knowledge alone left an indelible mark on the society of the time. For several years, merchants, artists and representatives from renowned European universities shaped life around Lake Constance.


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:38

Page 31

Discover Germany | Culture & Lifestyle | 600 Years Council of Constance

world descended upon this lakeside town and trading hub. “The anniversary of the Council of Constance next year will present a fantastic opportunity for visitors from all over Europe to get to know another facet of Germany’s culture,” says Petra Hedorfer, Chief Executive Officer of the GNTB. Germany is a very popular destination for cultural travel and was the number one cultural destination for European travellers in 2012. The Anholt-GfK Roper Nation Brands Index, a survey measuring and comparing the reputation of 50 countries around the world, also confirms Germany’s outstanding image as a cultural destination. Petra Hedorfer: “Germany has played a key role in the history of the church, and many travellers see anniversaries, such as the 600th anniversary of the Council of Constance, as an opportunity to travel around Germany visiting the most important sites of historical interest.”

Left, main image: Aerial view of Constance. Photo: Moritz Kertzscher / © Tourist-Information Konstanz GmbH Right, from top down: Constance harbour and the Council of Constance building. Photo: Achim Mende / © Tourist-Information Konstanz GmbH Municipal gardens in Constance. Photo: Moritz Kertzscher © Tourist-Information Konstanz GmbH Constance Minster. Photo: Achim Mende © Tourist-Information Konstanz GmbH

The town of Constance promises to be a magnificent backdrop for the forthcoming anniversary celebrations with its well-preserved historical old quarter and host of authentic locations – the building in which the council was hosted, for example, still exists today. It was built between 1388 and 1391 as a trading post and lakeside market hall. Here, between mighty oak columns, church dignitaries assembled in the upper hall behind bricked-up windows to engage in their deliberations until finally, in November 1417, the Roman Cardinal Oddo Colonna was elected Pope Martin V. The impact of this election is still relevant today. It is thanks to the outcome of the Council

Bottom, left: Mural on Obermarkt square in Constance. Photo: Katja Angermaier © Tourist-Information Konstanz GmbH Bottom, right: Richental's chronicle. © Rosgartenmuseum Konstanz

of Constance that the present-day Catholic Church is united under one Pope. The major regional exhibition‘The Council of Constance 1414-1418. A Medieval World Event’ opens at the market hall on 27 April 2014. On display will be a unique collection of exhibits on loan from a number of important museums in Europe. With its proximity to Switzerland and its vibrant, cosmopolitan flair, Constance is a magnet for travellers. Just as it was at the time of the Council of Constance – when people from all over the

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 31


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1 ße

THE BEST OF BERLIN

aße

rg

str

h

anzer

Güntzelstr.

4

Fehrbelliner Platz

P au ls tr aß

eg Kleis

tstra

ße

Nollendorfplatz

Aden

Pal la

G ru ne w al

S tr a ß e

ee

Bad ens che stra ße

esall

OLYMPIASTADION BERLIN

K

ße tra Hohenzollerndamm ts p u Ha

Rathaus Schöneberg

A high-tech arena with impressive architecture, the Olympic home of countless World Championships, the DFB Cup and Hertha BSC. Bund

Blisse straße

Martin-Luther-Straße

Berliner Str. B e rl in e r

ds

Eisenacherstr.

Bayerischer Platz

e

Opening hours 9am-7pm | Olympischer Platz 3 | U/S Olympiastadion | www.olympiastadion-berlin.de

r.

e raß

Do

mi

nic

us

str

e

Schönebe Innsbrucker Platz Ru be ns str aß e

Bundesplatz Blisse

ße

nia

Halensee

straß

raß

c

ra

Mon-Sat 12pm-8pm, Sunday and public holidays 10am-8pm | Leipziger Platz 7 | U/S Potsdamer Platz | www.daliberlin.de

Bundesalle e

Ko n s t

Me

h

e

ns

er

Sp

e

aße Ho

m

d

U er

ViktoriaLuise-Pl.

See surrealism close up in the heart of Berlin Nacho d s tr afrom with more than 450 works ß e the world Hohenstau fenstr. renowned artist Salvador Dalí. Hohenzollernplatz am

Bism

r.

Westkreuz

ich

straß

hestr

test

isc

An Wittenbergplatz

Augsburger Str. ge r St r. Li et ze nb ur

mm

DALÍ – THE EXHIBITION AT POTSDAMER PLATZ Spichernstr.

This Berlin landmark symbolises turning points in Germany’s history.

Accessible at all times | Pariser Platz | rnd olle U/S Brandenburger Tor enz

rg

aße er

erg

ss

a ed

s t r.

tra

anzer

r g is c

Brei

u klb

ien

ße

Me

ntz

raße

Luth er-S traße M a rt in -

tra ße et ze nb ur ge rs

Ta u e

rnb

e

Joachimstaler straße

damm

Ku r f ürst Messe Nord/ICC ens t

str

rsten

Str

3

Uhlandstr.

Konstanzer Str.

t eS

6

Kurfürstendamm

Ko n s t

enbu

Hubertusallee

n

zo

ll

er

nd

am

ew

Kaiserdamm Zoologischer Garten

e

ö fe rs tr.

be

K li n g e lh

Ti e r g a r t e n s t r a Sophie-Charlotte-Platz

Theodor-Heuss-Platz Ka nt st ra ße

BERLINHohenzollerndamm HIGHLIGHTS – seeing the best of Berlin. More than 15 of the capital’s major attractions and tourist operators have come together to provide this unique arrangement, ensuring that you the visitor can access the city’s most beautiful places, its m most interesting museums and the best sights. B e r li am n S t r a ßcan nd The ‘My Berlin Guide’ acts as your personal tour guide ande r you r e collect it for lo l e Blissestr. z free upon purchasing your ticket from any of the participating partners. Bonus and n he o Premium tickets are also available, giving you exclusive benefi ts at all of the Berlin H Highlights’ venues: upon purchasing one of the respective tickets, you’ll get certain r. S t or an otional Extras at no added cost. Whether it’s a sparkling glass of Prosecco he c is informative audio guide – you’ll never fail to be surprised. After justrgfour visits, b u website lthe k you’ll be treated to one of the two great rewards. Take a peek at c Me www.berlin-highlights.de for a look at our rich offerings. Simply click on ‘My Berlin Heidelberger Pl. Guide’ and flick through the interactive guide. Here’s a taster of some of our many partners…

m

9

ll e e

en

BRANDENBURGER TOR

April to October, Fri 3pm-11pm, Sat 10am-7pm, Sun 12pm-5pm | Alexanderplatz 7 | U/S Alexanderplatz | www.base-flying.de

he

rd

ffé Li

aße

17 . Ju ni St ra ße de s

Ja

la tz

Brand

estr

ße

H o fj ä g e ra

Le ibn izs tra ße

ße

Halensee

Plunge in near freefall from a height of 125m in the directionWeofs Alexander Platz – try Base tfäli Flying for a truly incomparable experience. sch

tra

Str aß e Tiergarten

Savignyplatz

stra

BASE FLYING JOCHEN SCHWEIZER

rS

Ernst-Reuter-Platz

am

Ku r

m ndam

ae

re

e lee

2

O li v a e rp

on

chs -Al

Ku r f ü

Adenauerplatz

e fürst

6 10

traß

e

uhr

ish

kreuz

Bellevue

Hansaplatz

Mar

o-S

b it

Sp

ße

tra

ße

Wilmersdorfer Str. Kants traße

Hee rstr aße Charlottenburg

1

e

ers

tra

aß e

Olympiastadion

Lew

e im er S tr aß

ße

Ott

Neu-Westend Deutsche Oper

a ll e e

Pa ss en he H e e rs tr a

Alt

Ha

Neue Kantstraße Neue Kantstraße

str

Westend

ss

a g n er-S tr

traß che S

Go et he pa rk

- A ll e e F la t o w

sse Nord/ICC Messe Jes

ens se-Ow

eh

zow

Cau

ich

R ic h ar d -W

ic h- St ra ße

k Tr a

A ner

vet

ße

Re

Ka is er-Frie dr

4llee Bismarckstr.

Ka ise rd am m

RichardWagnerPlatz

is O ly m p

Sophie-Charlotte-Platz

Le

stra

How to make a visit to the city on the Spree unforgettable: Da m m Sp an da ue r Experience Berlin with the BERLIN HIGHLIGHTS

Olympia-Stadion

traße

m

A lt - M o a

Lessingstr

Dam

t

klin

uer

oltzs

abi

A

Fr a n

Söm me ring str.

nda

h Helm

Mo

aße

Alt-

Ruhleben

Spa

Str

Turmstraße Turmstraße

Mierendorffplatz Kaise rin-A ugus ta-Al lee

e

er

ssee

ow

ger C hau

er St raß

Turmstr.

Jungfernheide hen

We g

nbur

brück

r

er

Rat

r Te g e le

lotte

Osna

Pe

rg

illst

ße

sstra

e leb

Sch

Gaus

B

Page 32

Stro mst raß e

sstra

14:38

aßee traß lstr sels eussse Beu

O lb e r

15/5/14

S


raße

dtd

uer

r. st

e raß rst rge nbe

hte

Lic

traße kens Brüc

e traß h-H

ein

von-Richth ofenS t r a ß e d-

e

amm

Tempelhofer Damm

e s tr a ß

har

en

all

fre n Ma

500 m

As the green heart of Berlin, the Tiergarten is an oasis of calm.

Explore Berlin with a ‘Hop on-Hop off’ bus tour. With open-top buses arriving at each of Berlin’s landmarks every 15 minutes, simply hop on and off

Accessible at all times | Straße des 17. Juni | U/S Tiergarten

Daily 9.30am – 4.30pm (last trip) | Audio guide availHerrfurthplatz Herrfurthpla tz able in 12 languages | www.top-tour.de

F lu g h a

Ma

fe n s tr a

rx-

str .

ße

Boddinstr.

anns t r.

s

Tempelhofer D

ch

-Str.

TOP TOURBER SIGHTSEEING Flughafen Flughafen

rl-

ee

Herm

Südkreuz

TIERGARTEN & SIEGESSÄULE

traße

wen

m

m

Sa

am

am

er

Col um bia dam m

more information: www.spymuseumberlin.com Paradestr.

nd

nric

Ka

B o e lc k

Loe

Schöneberg

nn

Platz der Luftbrücke

Dude nstra ße

e

se

Hei ße stra

ldst

rwa

So

The capital of spies will get its museum of espionage in 2014. A unique insight into the murky depths of agents and secret services.

ch

10

Hermannplatz

SPY MUSEUM BERLIN

Sa

Südstern Hasenh e id e

Hermanns

e

n

mm r Da

straß

Urba

s t r a (last entry at 11pm) | Mon-Sat 8am-midnight ße Platz der Republik | U/S Brandenburger Tor

sse

Gneisenaustr.

9

©AlliiertenMuseum/USArmy

Frequent boat trips every day | Boarding piers: G n e i including in front of Berlin’s Hauptbahnhof | various, sena ustra | U/S Hauptbahnhof ße www.reederei-riedel.de

8

nen

Schönleinstr.

raße

e

Bae

tbu

tr cks

Görlitzer Bahnhof

Ko t

Potsd amer Straß e

Home to the German Federal Government since 1999, the Reichstag is a symbol of political change.

Katzbach straße

ße

REICHSTAG

With multiple boarding piers across the city, this is an opportunity to discover Berlin from the water.

U/S Potsdamer Platz

lon

Skalitzer Straße

An emblem of Berlin’s ‘new centre’, there are shops, cafes and a casino to be explored here.

Yo r Yorckstraße Accessible at any time | Potsdamer Platz |

Ko

Sk alit zer Str aße

e Git sc hin er Str aß Prinzenstr.

rs tr a ß e REEDEREI B lü ch eRIEDEL

traße

ds tr aß e Kleistpark

Kottbusser Tor

. rstr

G ru ne w al

un

m am nd ße stra den Lin

7

POTSDAMER PLATZ Mehringdamm

Yo r c k s

Moritzplatz

sse

raße

n s tr.

e

6

les Te m c h e s U Hallesches Tor pelh f r ofer er lo o - U fe Ufer W a te r

Goebe

r

tbu

Pal las stra ße

raß

zen

Möckernbrücke

Gleisdreieck

Bülowstr.

St

Ko t

wst

nst

nn

Bülo

nie

Prin

me

Ora

Kochstr.

Hal

ndorfplatz

Jannowitzbrücke Ho lzm ark tst raß e

HeinrichHeine-Str.

s tr a ß e . str

ma

sda

t

W il h e lm

rS traß

e

A Anhalter Bahnhof

e raß

se

n

rS

lter

re

rge

Märkisches Museum

Spittelmarkt

ße

Str.

St

Sc

Po t

Frie dric hstr.

nha

e eb

ra ße Le ip zi ge r St

Strausb Platz

e-S

tr. E b e r ts

e

MendelssohnBartholdy-Park

5

Hausvogteiplatz

Ko ch st ra

10

10 6

6

Stadtmitte

8

3

Potsdamer Platz

hle

Fr ie dr ic hs tr.

traß

5

Klosterstr. Str ala uer Str.

Französische Straße

elms

é s t r.

Gr

ab in -S tr. Yi tz ha k- R

n Linden

ra ße Le ip zi ge r St

Kurfürstenstr.

s pt

nzla

Lie

e P au ls tr aß

eg

t r.

ew

rS

Unter de

2

raße

r ts c h u fe R e ic h p ie fer U r e g neber Schö

tr.

ue

10

Wilh

rgartenst

10

10

Mohrenstr.

Lenn

Schillingstr.

da

Friedrichstr.

Brandenburger Tor

tra

rl-

1 Alexanderplatz

10

Ju ni Str aß e de s 17 .

e

an

7

raß

Platz Der Vereinten

Sp

Lu is en st ra ße

6 10

llst

Hackescher Markt

10 Bundestag

Mo

Lic hte nb erg ers

Re

dtst inhar

Weinmeisterstr.

tr.

6

o a b it

Oranienburger Str.

Ka

aße

Hauptbahnhof

ch

g - S t r.

Oranienburger Tor

10

ße

Fr ie dr ic hs

Str A lt - M

tra

ße

t-S

bur

Rosa-Luxemburg-Pl.

er a Inv

ns lide

tra

hsha

ne

aße

t r. er S

Str.

r To r s t

hal

ersche

d ri c A m Fri e

Pre

ent

r. Ha nnov

To r s

t r.

Ros

St

. str

he

ee

e

ße

Page 33

ss

tra

isc

14:39

Rosenthaler Platz

au

str

ow

I

nva

ns lide

ss

Rosa-Luxem

15/5/14

Ch

ide

He

bk

He

2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

L


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

34 | Issue 15 | June 2014

15/5/14

14:39

Page 34


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 35

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Health, Beauty & Science

Special Theme

Health, Beauty & Science

Live healthy, look beautiful Looking fabulous and feeling good at any age is no longer a mystery. A healthy lifestyle including a balanced diet and a good amount of regular exercise can prolong the signs of aging and keep our minds and bodies in better shape for longer. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTO: CURADEN

Just weeks ago it was declared that the fivea-day rule for fruit and vegetables no longer applies. Instead, the new guidelines suggest that a minimum of seven portions a day reduces the risk of cancer and heart disease. Now, even more scientifically proven data has emerged about how to reduce the risk of heart disease. As it is not only our nutrition that has an immediate as well as a long-term effect on our bodies, this latest research project scrutinised the correlation between exercise and the risk of heart disease. It turns out that little more than 20 minutes of physical exercise per day can reduce a woman’s risk of heart disease significantly. According to the Center for Research on Exercise, Physical Activity and Health from the University of Queensland, Australia, 150 minutes of at least moderateintensity physical activity each week could result in a significant decrease in the chances of heart disease. Based on a study of almost 40,000 women, the research concluded that the risk of heart disease amongst those aged 30 to 80 who partake in regular exercise was considerably lower.

The study is a prime example of pointing out how important the topic of prevention has become in the recent years. Instead of simply treating the existing symptoms, a person’s wellbeing is now examined in a more holistic approach and scientific research aims to find a way of reducing soaring health costs through prevention in an aging society. Alongside the financial implications of improved health, the side effects are also worth mentioning. Healthy people tend to be happy people and happiness is what triggers beauty from the inside. And for those who wish to help Mother Nature a tiny bit, the beauty industry is constantly striving to develop ever more amazingly effective products and services. In the following pages Discover Germany shows you how to achieve that perfect smile, how hypnosis can improve performance, as well as telling you all about cutting-edge research that can prevent diseases in the future and giving you some vital information about international health insurance.

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 35


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 36

A swiss smile can change the world Splendid oral health care from Switzerland ‘A smile can change the world’ is swiss smile’s claim. But a beautiful smile isn’t just about clean white teeth, as luscious, smooth lips play an important role too. swiss smile began with luxurious, highly specialised dental clinics and today the name stands for both: the swiss smile clinics and high-end dental cosmetics – in short everything people need to achieve and maintain a beautiful winning smile.

den inside: an exquisite, state-of-the-art dental cosmetic range of highest quality. They are the perfect blend of aesthetics and function, a combination of professional care and exclusive lifestyles.

TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: CURADEN

A morning routine for a bright smile

Swiss smile’s dental cosmetics range from oral care to facial cosmetic products. The Swiss-based company sells its products in Germany, Kuwait, Russia, Switzerland and

36 | Issue 15 | June 2014

the Baltics, as well as in the UK, and even has current plans to expand the brand’s presence even further. Beautifully designed packaging hints at the great products hid-

The morning dental routine is one that should not only remove existing stains and whiten the teeth but it also needs to offer the teeth protection during the day. The swiss smile whitening toothpaste does


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 37

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Health, Beauty & Science

Below, from left to right: Curaden swiss smile herbal and dental range. Whitening range. Pearl shine. Dental floss. Bottom: Curaden swiss smile lip care

both; even a brief brush with their medium-soft toothbrush gives the teeth a smoothness that can be felt with a flick of the tongue. Special micro-polishing particles in the toothpaste as well as on the outer bristles of the toothbrush remove residue from between the teeth and stains from tea, coffee or smoke very effectively. The toothpaste also prevents new plaque deposits from forming. To brighten the teeth even further one can use the swiss smile whitening pearl shine dental conditioner, a soft foam that can be applied with a toothbrush or sprayed directly onto the surface of your teeth. The conditioner contains extra-white hydroxyl apatite nanocrystals extracted from the natural mother-ofpearl of seashells. The nanocrystals have a structure identical to that of dental tissue and therefore adhere seamlessly to affected or exposed dental surfaces thus naturally repairing them. While

impurities are lifted from the surface, the particles repair microscopic cavities, form a protective layer and add a white, pearly shine to the teeth. In this way further discolouration, for example from lipsticks, can be prevented. Softer care in the evening Before bedtime, teeth need a more gentle routine, which swiss smile offers in the form of the vitalising herbal toothpaste consisting of highly concentrated natural extracts of Swiss edelweiss, Echinacea, green tea and chlorophyll. The fresh taste and the softness of the sensitive-soft toothbrush is a relaxing experience, ideally done shortly before taking a good night’s rest. Let the herbs do their work – Echinacea strengthens the immune system, the bioflavonoids of the edelweiss unleash strong antioxidant properties while green tea possesses a natural antibacterial effect and chlorophyll fights malodours. To enhance the cleansing process even further, customers may also use the swiss smile waxed dental tape; the waxed fibres are simple to hold and slide easily between even the tightest interdental spaces, which a common toothbrush cannot reach. Complementing beautiful teeth with full, sensual lips Since a beautiful smile consists not only of healthy teeth but also of well-cared for lips, swiss smile offers two outstanding lip-care products. As a daily companion, swiss smile day gloss nude gives lips a seductive shine.

Its nutrient-rich formula with oxidised oils meets the most stringent demands and promotes soft, supple skin. The gloss helps to get the perfect pout; the tingling, instant boosting effect creates fuller and sensual lips in no time at all. Lines and wrinkles are smoothed out, leaving eye-catching glossy lips throughout the day. swiss smile day gloss nude does not contain any colourants and it is applied with an applicator, thus making it an ideal complement to any coloured lipstick. The swiss smile night care lip balm is a nocturnal energy booster, which – thanks to its pleasant aroma – is also suitable for use during the day if required. Designed as a complement to the swiss smile day gloss nude, the night care lip balm enables the lips to regenerate overnight. The composition contains nourishing as well as healing components such as the oxygen-binding epaline. Cracks disappear and the lips regain their suppleness and natural protection. Distributers wanted While business in the aforementioned markets is steadily growing, swiss smile is currently planning to expand its global presence and is therefore seeking new distributors with access to the relevant sales channels. www.myswiss-smile.com www.swiss-smile.com

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 37


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 38

Roche strives to make a difference in the lives of millions of people The Swiss company F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd (Roche Group) is the epitome of cutting-edge science to improve people’s lives around the world. At the heart of this mission to advance health, people, and society at large, lies a unique symbiosis of cross-border and cross-discipline research and development. TEXT: ELISABETH DOEHNE | PHOTOS: ROCHE GROUP

From its humble beginnings over 118 years ago to being one of the world’s largest pharmaceutical and healthcare firms today, Roche has always stayed true to its innovative and pioneering spirit. Founded in Switzerland in 1896 by Fritz Hoffmann-La Roche, Roche’s growth and success has been driven by the company’s ability to bring products and medical breakthroughs to the market. Roche’s focus today is on pharmaceuticals and diagnostics. The company develops, produces and supplies products for the early detection, prevention, diagnosis and treatment of a wide range of diseases.

38 | Issue 15 | June 2014

Roche is the world’s largest biotech company, with truly differentiated medicines in oncology, immunology, infectious diseases, ophthalmology and neuroscience. Also, Roche is the world leader in in vitro diagnostics (IVD) and tissue-based cancer diagnostics, and a frontrunner in diabetes management. "During the 115-plus years of its existence, Roche has pioneered many medical breakthroughs. Our Pharmaceuticals and Diagnostics Divisions’ products play a major role in improving patients’ quality of life,” says Dr. Severin Schwan, CEO of Roche.

Providing healthcare worldwide Roche is a truly global company that employs more than 85,000 people across 150 countries. The company’s success has been profoundly shaped by the globalisation of its products, research, workforce and manufacturing. At the same time, Roche maintains strong roots in Switzerland. The global headquarters are still located in Basel, Switzerland, where over 9,000 people work. More than 2,000 people are employed at Roche Diagnostics’ site in Rotkreuz, in the Canton of Zug. Roche has been making important contributions to global health for more than a century. Twenty-four medicines developed by Roche are included in the World Health Organisation Model Lists of Essential Medicines, among them life-saving antibiotics, antimalarials and chemotherapy.


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 39

Above left: Research at Roche. Above right: Patient care and Roche’s personalised healthcare. Construction of headquarters in Basel-Kaiseraugst.

Several milestones mark the company’s long history of scientific innovations and healthcare solutions. From Roche’s founding and initial successes with mass productions of pharmaceuticals like vitamins, tranquilizers and cancer treatments, to its international expansion. Lastly, the pioneering of new technologies went hand in hand with new approaches to medicine such as the use of antibodies for the treatment of cancer. Innovation to tackle global healthcare challenges Being aware that the demand for better healthcare is rising around the world faster than countries’ ability to fund it, Roche is committed to redefining global healthcare. The company’s philosophy is “Doing now what patients need next”. This aspect is highlighted by Roche’s ethos to develop medicine and treatments that matter and make an impact, especially in terms of personalised healthcare. “Personalised Healthcare is based on a sound understanding of the disease. We preselect or stratify sub-population of patients, which can then be treated in a highly

targeted way based on the specific mode of action of that treatment,” explains Dr. Severin Schwan. In practical terms, this power of knowledge means that doctors are empowered to help their patients by answering questions more comprehensively, and hospitals and labs can deliver information more quickly and reliably.

In the future, Roche will continue to build on such innovation and follow the philosophy that research and science thrive in open conditions that allow for creativity, discovery, and giving room for scientists to roam. They’re convinced that their work will eventually improve the quality of life for people.

Research and Development

www.roche.com

One example of Roche’s ability to innovate is the work of the Roche-owned company Glycart, based in Schlieren near Zurich. The bio-technologist Pablo Umaña and his team developed a drug candidate, GA101, to help patients with certain blood cancers. Pablo and his colleagues developed a completely new way of making antibodies used to treat certain cancers more efficaciously. Believing that GA101 had the potential to become a breakthrough in the treatment of these blood cancers, Roche bought Glycart in 2005. At the time, the small biotechnology start-up company consisted of only 29 employees. In 2013, GA101 was approved and is now available on the US market under the brand name Gazyva to treat a particular form of leukemia.

Bottom: Gazyva Molecule

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 39


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 40

Left: Marta Hegyaljai Python, lic.phil.

working for the International Committee of the Red Cross as a delegate in the Middle East, Asia, Africa and in the Geneva Headquarters as well as working as a psychotherapist. Today, Python lives with her family in the bilingual canton of Fribourg (French/German) in Switzerland and supports teams and individuals as an independent coach. “I offer intensive coaching for business leaders and management teams. Together with my colleagues, I have developed a variety of programmes including a range of coaching and hypnotic techniques to get results as quickly as possible,”Python adds. The different methods are tailored to business-related needs and include, for example, Mein Tag (my day), a one-day multipleperspective coaching session with four clients and four individual coaches each focusing on a different aspect of the client. Another example is the rapid and efficient Tandem coaching, carried out with two coaches. There are many other types of sessions, amongst them is the burn-out prevention programme, which aims to reduce stress and instil balance to one’s life.

The road to success Business coaching and hypnosis We all sometimes wish we had a coach to guide us through difficult situations or empower us to achieve our goals. Through a combination of business coaching and hypnosis, Marta Hegyaljai Python has helped many clients to improve their wellbeing and master both private and business challenges. TEXT: MARILENA STRACKE | PHOTOS: KEREN BISAZ / WWW.MIRAGESPHOTO.COM

Over eight years ago Python was approached by well-established business coaches during a seminar and they asked her to collaborate with them. To this day, she has not stopped. Explaining her genuine passion for coaching, she says: “Working with clients, who are motivated and

40 | Issue 15 | June 2014

curious and who take responsibility for themselves and want to grow, is something that I found instantly fascinating.“ Her impressive professional track record includes ethnological field studies in Asia and Africa for the University of Zurich,

Python says:“I also offer business coaching for private clients, who want to analyse their current work situation, identify personal or professional goals or who would like to break through self-made barriers and reduce stress. These programmes are designed for a short period of time and with fair financial conditions. Hypnosis combined with coaching turns out to be particularly effective and long-lasting.” For the past three years Python has been training business coaches at the MBSZ (Marketing and Business School of Zurich). This year, as a certified instructor for hypnosis, she has also started offering Hypnosis Training at her OMNI Hypnosis Training Center Suisse Romande and France. www.mhp-coaching.ch www.mhp-hypnosis.ch


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 41

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Health, Beauty & Science

Good insurance around the globe Switzerland has a lot to offer: a stable political environment, highly specialised jobs, an excellent transportation system, stunning natural landscapes and one of the best healthcare systems in the world. However, regardless of where you live or work, a comprehensive health and safety plan is essential for everyone. Visana, a leading Swiss health and accident insurance provider, offers global protection against illness or unexpected misfortune. TEXT & PHOTOS: VISANA | TRANSLATION: JAIME SCHWARTZ

Ensuring the best protection and care, available always and anywhere, is what Visana does best. Their all-round service is demonstrated through their various health and property insurance plans that guarantee full protection and customised solutions. Visana believes the health of their customers is too precious to make any compromises on their care. Providing excellent customer service is part of their full-care concept and Visana representatives are always happy to take the time to answer any customer questions and concerns. Always the right insurance – anywhere in the world Do you live in Switzerland but often find yourself travelling abroad for business or

pleasure? Do you live abroad but plan on settling in Switzerland? Or are you expecting guests from abroad who will be in Switzerland for an extended stay? No matter what your particular situation is, Visana has the right insurance solution for you, your family and your friends. "We offer the full service – without compromise," promises Roland Lüthi, Head of Private Clients Visana health insurance.

achieved through independent testing and customer surveys. It is no wonder their motto is: “For each insured a suitable insurance solution.” Let Visana convince you of their customisable services and benefits that offer comprehensive protection, attractive bonuses and many benefits – all of which can be taken advantage of worldwide. www.visana.ch

All-round support Visana is one of the leading health and accident insurance providers in Switzerland with over one million insured clients relying on their services. With Visana, excellent service is a promise, regularly confirmed by their high scores

Roland Lüthi, Head of Private Clients

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 41


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 42

Discover Germany | Business | Solicitor Column

Art restitution cases back in the limelight TEXT & PHOTO: GREGOR KLEINKNECHT

The publication last year of details of a controversial collection of some 1,400 artworks, including many 19th and 20th century masterpieces, found by German tax authorities in the Munich apartment of Cornelius Gurlitt, the son of Nazi-era art dealer Hildebrandt Gurlitt, sparked a wave of renewed interest in Holocaust restitution cases. There was significant public debate about the rights or wrongs of returning artworks to their former owners or, as is mostly the case today, their heirs. The discovery of yet further artworks in Mr Gurlitt’s Salzburg home only served to keep this interest alive; as did George Clooney’s Hollywood take on art restitution in the movie Monuments Men. Ironically, Hildebrandt Gurlitt’s art collection had briefly been seized by allied troops at the end of the Second World War but returned to him again shortly afterwards when he persuaded them of his legitimate ownership interest. It appears that the artworks confiscated from Mr Gurlitt broadly break down into three groups: first, those which his father legitimately acquired in his capacity as an art dealer; secondly, a body of what was considered ‘degenerate’ art, de-accessioned by regime compliant public museums, and bought cheaply (some might say saved from destruction) at knock-down prices; but, thirdly, the collection also contains looted art that was confiscated from its Jewish owners or bought at an undervalue at forced sales. It is this third group of paintings on which most of the attention has focused and which could potentially form the subject of restitution claims. Legal challenges In reality, claimants seeking to recover artworks from Mr Gurlitt that once belonged to them or their deceased family members would have faced a number of legal and procedural hurdles that may well have prevented restitution. Now that Mr Gurlitt has passed away, and it appears that he left a will in favour of as yet unknown beneficiaries, the legal position can only become even more complex.

42 | Issue 15 | June 2014

Because the Gurlitt case raises private ownership issues, as opposed to artworks in the ownership of public museums or collections, the 1998 Washington Conference Principles and other international instruments promulgated to encourage the just and fair resolution of claims relating to Nazi-confiscated art do not apply. Instead, potential claimants are obliged to commence litigation in German or Austrian civil courts to prove that they are the rightful owners, or lawful heirs to the original owners, of the artworks in contention, a challenge that may be insurmountable in cases where provenance documentation may not have survived the Second World War and German law provides a long-stop limitation period of 30 years for ownership claims. Practical solutions Even if Mr Gurlitt’s ownership of artworks in his collection may have become legally unassailable as a matter of German law, in practice, looted artworks have become all but unsellable on the international art market. In light of these realities, there has also been a suggestion from Mr Gurlitt’s lawyers that he may be minded to reach amicable solutions with private claimants, even though their legal title has technically been extinguished. It remains to be seen what position his heirs adopt.

constituted by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport for the purpose of making recommendations for the resolution of Naziera ownership disputes affecting cultural objects. The panel takes into account not only legal arguments but also moral considerations. In making its decision in the Tate Gallery case, the panel evaluated on the balance of probability the validity of the claimants’ original legal title and determined that the painting had in all likelihood been looted from the family by the Nazis following the German invasion of Hungary in 1944. The panel also found that Tate Gallery could and should have done more to fill obvious gaps in the painting’s provenance. Based on the strength of the claimants’ moral case, the panel recommended to the Secretary of State that the painting should be returned to the claimants. It very much stands to the credit of the English legal system that justice can still be done in these cases some 70 years after the end of the Second World War.

The recent restitution case against Tate Holocaust restitution issues are not confined to Germany. Once in a while, they also touch on the UK, as a recent decision demonstrates, which required the Tate Gallery to return a painting by John Constable entitled ‘Beaching a Boat, Brighton’ to the heirs of a prominent Hungarian art collector from whom it had been looted in Budapest in 1944/45. Moral considerations The case followed very different rules and considerations from those in issue in the Gurlitt case because the painting was found in a national collection, not in private ownership. The claim was reviewed by the Spoliation Advisory Panel, a quasi-judicial expert body

Gregor Kleinknecht LLM MCIArb is a German Rechtsanwalt and English solicitor, and a partner at Hunters Solicitors, a leading law firm in Lincoln’s Inn. Hunters Solicitors, 9 New Square, Lincoln’s Inn, London WC2A 3QN, E-mail: gjk@hunters-solicitors.co.uk www.hunters-solicitors.co.uk


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 43

Discover Germany | Business | LG Electronics

LG Electronics wins the Plus X Award 2014 for the MonoX B3-version The electronics and solar specialist LG Electronics proudly received its first award of 2014. The Solar business division was granted the Plus X Award 2014 in the categories of innovation, functionality, ecology and product quality for its much admired MonoX module B3-series. For the second time running, the company has been awarded the much sought-after prize for innovative technology.

manufacturers and products which demonstrate significant quality, added value and a future proof design. www.lg.com/de/solar

TEXT & PHOTOS: LG ELECTRONICS

The B3 version of the MonoX solar panel is the latest addition to the MonoX family. Thanks to an enlarged active cell area, LG have succeeded in enhancing the performance of its standard device even further than in the previous model. Due to an optimised product design, LG Electronics have increased the performance of the attractively priced solar panel, taking it to a maximum power of 275 watts without changing its size. In the MonoX B3 series, it is the edge and the inter-cell spaces which have been significantly enhanced. At the same time, improved finger lines ensure the panel’s greater reliability. The black

glossy surface and the black eloxicated frame make the product particularly appealing to design savvy users. Due to the panel’s improved performance, its value for money nature and sleek design features, the Plus X Award jury members selected the MonoX in multiple categories. The Plus X Award was created in 2003 and rewards innovative technology, sport and lifestyle products. The jury consists of a group of renowned, independent journalists and personalities from 25 different industrial sectors. When selecting the award winners, particular attention is paid to

B3-S1C N1C2

B3-S1K N1K

Franz Marc Blauer Reiter Brücke www.franz-marc-museum.de Franz Marc, Hocken im Schnee, 1911 (Detail), Franz Marc Museum, Franz Marc Stiftung

FMM_AD_DiscoverGermany_Druck.indd 1

05.05.14 12:43


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 44

Conference of the Month Germany

Both a museum and Berlin’s most exclusive and beautiful venue

The Museum für Kommunikation The Museum of Communication in Berlin covers not only the origin and development of modern communication, but recent developments as well. Situated in the historical building of the former Reichspost museum it combines history and actuality: a modern museum to experience all forms of communication as well as the tradition of an old building. The Museum für Kommunikation is Berlin’s most beautiful venue for big and small celebrations. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: MUSEUM FÜR KOMMUNIKATION BERLIN

“What makes our museum so special is its diversity,”says curator Dr Lieselotte Kugler. “Our collection dates back to the year 1872 and displays, for example, the world’s first telephone and a functioning tube mail.”The museum originates in the old Reichspost museum and therefore looks back on a venerable tradition. Originally housed in a postal building it moved to the newly built and more representative museum in 1898.

44 | Issue 15 | June 2014

During the Second World War, exhibits were removed and during the division of Germany two smaller exhibitions existed – one in the western and one in the eastern part of the city. In the year 2000 they were reunited in the old museum complex that today unifies history and modern technology. Besides the world’s most famous and expensive stamp, the Blue Mauritius, it houses modern computer technology too.

Special exhibitions address modern problems in communication “Our special exhibitions always focus on recent problems.”Kugler talks about the current exhibition ‘Außer Kontrolle?’ – German for ‘Out of Control?’ – that addresses life under constant surveillance. Systematic observation of citizens did not start with the NSA scandal or modern technology, even though these topics are covered in the exhibition as well, but has its origin, for example, in neighbours spying on each other or breaches of postal privacy. Does camera surveillance make our life more secure? How can security and freedom be achieved under such conditions? Surveillance has always been a structuring element in modern society but also a threat of abuse. The exhibition is interactive, inviting visitors to try out a fingerprint scanner or a device used for searching for bugs in a wall.


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 45

Discover Germany | Conference of the Month | Germany

Interactivity is an important part of the museum’s policy; visitors can try out how a Morse code or a flag alphabet work and three charming little robots welcome guests to the museum’s interactive stations in the atrium. A venue for celebrations like no other The atrium is impressive in itself. “Our guests are always mesmerised by it,” says curator Dr Lieselotte Kugler, and that is not only because of its size but also because of the architecture and the open galleries. In the atrium all the imperial glory of the former Postpalast is displayed. Flooded with natural light from the glass roof during the day, the atrium is lit by blue lights at night. Seen from the outside it glows like a crystal in the Berlin night making it a unique landmark in the city. “That makes our atrium the most exclusive and beautiful venue in all of Berlin,”says the curator. The tradition as a museum makes it even more special. The atrium seats 320 people, and when standing up to 600 guests can find a place in the 380 square

metres that the atrium and its galleries has to offer. High-class customers due to serviceoriented event management The distinctiveness of the museum today has become widely known. “We have a high-class circle of corporations, politicians and private organisers that traditionally hold their celebrations in our house.”Every year new customers can be added to that list. For smaller gatherings the museum also offers smaller rooms for press conferences and presentations, for example. The Kaffeehaus in a Viennese Style has 198 square metres and can be booked for up to 80 people while the even smaller media room with its 102 square meters offers space for between 40 and 80 people. The museum’s courtyard on the other hand is a great place for outdoor events. For catering, the museum works together with Sarah Wiener Berlin GmbH, owned by the well-known Austrian chef who features in numerous German television shows. The catering team cooks inspiring dishes and

new taste creations always pay attention to the food’s sustainability. An event team is responsible for organising a programme and can, for example, book artists to perform in the museum. And since the venue is a museum, it also offers exclusive guided tours in German and English making an event a place to gain new insights into technology and communication as well. www.mfk-berlin.de

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 45


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 46

Discover Germany | Business | Zinzendorfschulen

The Zinzendorfschulen established one of Germany’s first golf boarding schools Compared to other countries, golf has long been perceived as an elite sport in Germany, yet fortunately its reputation is changing now. Indeed, golf is a perfect sport for pupils as it not only allows them to exercise in the open countryside, but their movement abilities and concentration benefit too. This especially makes it ideal for children and young adults. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: ZINZENDORFSCHULEN

One of Europe’s biggest, privately-run Protestant schools decided to work together with a renowned German golf school to open a golf boarding school. The Zinzendorfschulen is a group of schools

offering various educational pathways for pupils aged 11-18, including the gymnasium where students complete the Abitur, the German equivalent to the A level. These schools lie within walking distance of one of southern Germany’s most beautiful golf courses and this close proximity led the school administration to pair with the Golf & Country Club Königsfeld as well as with the renowned golf school Complete Golf. A long history and experience in education The first school of what is today the Zinzendorfschulen was founded in 1806 as a new school location for the Moravian Church that had its origins in Herrnhut, a small town in Saxony. Since its initial open-

46 | Issue 15 | June 2014

ing, the school and the village of Königsfeld have formed a close community and pupils can still achieve academic success with the Abitur while attending one of the schools that form the Zinzendorfschulen. The founding principle stays alive: “One shall not turn children into copies but let nature take its course and sanctify it.”Even though the school is based on fundamental Christian values it has attracted pupils of different beliefs and nationalities from the beginning. Since the Zinzendorfschulen educate according to the Baden-Wuerttemberg curriculum it is easy for children to change to or from state schools to the private Zinzendorfschulen. All qualifications are officially recognised. Additionally, Zinzendorfschulen, located in the Black Forest just an hour's drive from both Stuttgart and the Swiss border, provide boarding houses for children and adolescents of different ages. The buildings are surrounded by nature giving children space for sports, exercise and adventure. Living


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 47

Above, middle: Boys’ boarding school. Boys’ boarding school. Above, right: Katharina v. Gersdorf school building. Charity run for kindergarden in Lambarene.

together in a community of their peers often enough results in new connections and lifelong friendships. Like other boarding school attendees, the pupils of the golf boarding school learn and live together. Their training is in the afternoon and adjusted to the curriculum, thereby allowing them to concentrate on the sport without interfering with their courses in maths, biology or their grades. Students from all kind of schools, whether it’s the gymnasium, middle school or technical college, can attend the golf boarding school in Königsfeld. Courses for children embarking on a career as professional golf athlete There are two different educational packages. The basic training consists of about 5.5 hours on the golf course every week. For the more ambitious children who are seeking a career as a top-class athlete, the school offers a more advanced training package of 8.5 hours every week to prepare children for their future career in the sport. With this premium package, the young golf talents train in small groups of up to five pupils. Today, Julian Mayer, PGA professional and qualified golf instructor, is responsible for the golf training. He has a

clear concept: “It is no use standing on the driving range for hours practising the sport,” he says. Instead, his students work on their technique, and the training schedule is adjusted to their growth stage. During the summer children participate in tournaments, each time accompanied by the school’s staff. When parents come for a visit they can take a round on the golf course with their children as well. School and golf instructors work together for the best results Close cooperation between the school and the golf instructors is vital. The fact that school and boarding house work under the same administration allows them to integrate the training schedule ideally into the pupils’ daily routine. Not only are the teach-

ers informed about a child’s progress in golf, the golf instructor also knows how the child is fairing in school. If a pupil was to fail a vocabulary test, for example, the golf instructor is able to approach the child on a different level as a teacher could and therefore will more likely to find the reasons behind the failed test. Playing golf is also possible for children who are not members of the golf boarding school. Those interested in playing golf can try it out on an afternoon course organised by the school and gain a licence to play German golf courses that is also necessary for entering the golf boarding school programme. www.zinzendorfschulen.de

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 47


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 48

Special Theme

NOMOS Ahoi Atlantik—watch with a sea view. Photo: NOMOS Glashütte

Made in Germany

Made in Germany Over 125 years ago, the British trademark law (Merchandise Marks Act 1887) was introduced on August 23, 1887. Leaving producers obliged to indicate the country of origin of their goods, it was meant as a way to protect UK consumers from supposedly inferior foreign goods. With this new need for declaration, the “Made in Germany” label was born. TEXT: FEDERAL MINISTER SIGMAR GABRIEL | TRANSLATION: JAIME SCHWARTZ | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

Nowadays, however, the "Made in Germany" label means much more than simply denoting a product’s country of origin. The label enjoys a global reputation for its reliable, innovative, and high-quality German products. This perversion of the original intent is thanks to the achievements of the small to medium-sized German businesses and their respective employees. Their accomplishments have laid the foundation which has allowed German businesses to compete internationally. Entrepreneurs and consumers recognise that "Made in Germany" means 21st century German quality and innovative progress. Yet, beyond exemplifying high performance and significantly adding to the economic success of German companies, the "Made in Germany" label has also influenced Germany's positive stature in the world.

48 | Issue 15 | June 2014

Germany can be proud of its industrial strength and exports. Its competitive edge and tenacity in the export market have proven themselves to be a source of strength for the whole European economy. Maintaining this competitive industrial base while leaving room to expand is Germany's goal both nationally and across the EU. "Made in Germany" also shows that the foundation for economic success and favourable economic conditions is not protectionism. Germany's success stems from its social market economy that, in the age of globalisation, concerns itself with the connection of sustainable economic growth, social advancement and social security, as well as environmental responsibility. In this sense, the German Federal Economic Ministry is not just responsible for conveying the federal government's economic inter-

ests; rather, it demonstrates how economic policy also means social policy in a social market economy. Therefore, the Federal Ministry of Economics acts not only as a lobby in the interests of the German economy, but as a partner for all participants in the development of its social market economy: employers, trade unions, economic as well as environmental and social organisations, economists and social and cultural scientists.

Sigmar Gabriel, Minister for Economic Affairs and Energy and Vice Chancellor of Germany. © Bundesregierung/Bergmann


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 49

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Made in Germany

Brilliant construction, outstanding design

Mechanical watches from NOMOS Glashütte NOMOS Glashütte, one of the youngest, but most exciting watch brands in Germany, specialises in producing mechanical timepieces in Glashütte, the birthplace of fine watchmaking in Germany.

Left, main image: Caliber DUW 4401 with the NOMOS swing system, an inhouse escapement. Above: The new model Metro is equipped with the NOMOS swing system. Below: Berlinerblau, the in-house creative agency of NOMOS Glashütte. Bottom: Glashütte: The town’s designation of origin has been given protected status.

TEXT & PHOTOS: NOMOS GLASHÜTTE

For a watch to bear the designation “Glashütte” strict guidelines have to be adhered to – the most important of which stipulates that at least 50 percent of a caliber’s value must be produced on-site. With a production depth of up to 95 percent, this is a requirement that NOMOS Glashütte far exceeds. NOMOS’ focus on in-house production makes it one of the very few watchmaking brands worldwide to be called a “manufactory”; that is, a company which builds almost everything itself. NOMOS has become renowned for its unique combination of traditional craftsmanship with an innovative approach. This is evident in the more than 120 prizes it has been awarded since 2000, highlighting design and quality. Both are writ large at NOMOS Glashütte, which boasts its own design and R&D departments. The latter is responsible for NOMOS’ latest innovation, an in-house

escapement, requiring seven years of research and 11 million EUR in funding. The system of the balance, balance spring, escape wheel, and pallet that powers a mechanical watch and sets the pace goes by many names in the watchmaking world. NOMOS Glashütte now has its own, called the NOMOS swing system. Only very few watchmaking companies around the world can adjust, classify, and calibrate accurately enough to create such an assembly, with a perfect interaction of all the parts. What NOMOS Glashütte has achieved here is a small sensation in the watchmaking world.

Glashütte; after all, independence in production and quality assurance of the movements will ensure the growth of the watchmaking company for the years and decades to come. www.nomos-glashuette.com

At the heart of the entire watch industry, as well as in each and every mechanical watch, the escapement system essentially defines the accuracy, robustness and durability of a watch. To be able to produce it in-house is a significant leap forward for NOMOS

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 49


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:39

Page 50

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Made in Germany

effect® - the mental energizer shines in black-red-gold Football World Cup limited supporter editions in ten national colours Just in time for the World Cup in Brazil, innovative Paderborn-based MBG International Premium Brands is launching a limited Supporters Edition of Germany’s number one energy drink. The significant 15 red dots effect® logo has been given a new colour scheme, so the limited editon shines in the German national colours of black, red and gold. TEXT: UGW COMMUNICATION | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

“The Supporters Edition was created to transmit the anticipation of the football tournament, the pride in the team and the sense of community that surrounds the World Cup. We reckon that sales of all effect® related products are going to rise significantly,“ says Cord Hendryck Vinke, Marketing Director at MBG. “The black-red-gold can also underlines our position as Germany’s number one energy drink,“ Vinke adds. Approximately five million cans of MBG group’s Supporters Edition’s ‘mental energizers’ will be available nationally. As an international brand effect® is available globally and a further nine countries – besides

50 | Issue 15 | June 2014

Germany – will have special editions. Amongst these are European favourites such as Spain, Portugal and Italy and fans in the individual countries can show support for their national team. The sleek design of the ‘mental energizer made in Germany’ remains. The stylish brand look underlines the premium character of the energy drink. Developed in Germany the drink has already reached prominence and is ranked second in the growing premium-energysegment. It is no longer limited to extreme sports and motor sport engagements. Revenue in the energy segment rose by eight per cent last year – this is by far the

highest increase in the non-alcoholic drinks market. MBG distributes effect® with the typical energy taste and emphasis on ‘developed in Germany’ in 55 countries worldwide. High quality standards and seamless logistics are guaranteed in all the regional markets spread over five continents. Launched in 2002, effect® has become an established and trendy in-crowd drink. The effect® brand is underpinned through branding and interior design elements within the individual gastronomy venues and can be found in over 7,000 places such as bars, restaurants and hotels. With the original effect® energy drink, Paderborn-based beverage group MBG International Premium Brands addresses a target group that values spiritual fitness and mental performance. www.mbgglobal.net www.effect-energy.com


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan 1 15/5/14 Charle Berlin_Full Page:Layout 1 13/5/14 Magazine 15:13 Page 1

Every child can be a World Champion this year CharLe offers children's apparel that excels at sportsmanship with a fashionable and ecological twist It’s about that time that smaller football fans and followers will be needing clothing to highlight their massive support for the FIFA World Cup. CharLe children's apparel offers great options for kids aged between one and ten to express their enthusiasm for the sport. Their children's collection provides “world champion� quality and ecologically-minded clothing with playful football motifs. With CharLe children can actively be football fans on the inside and outside without the typical, over-sized balloon silk team shirt. A variety of high-quality, long-lasting T-shirts, long-sleeved shirts, skirts, and trousers are available in five different themes, each boasting smart designs, colourful fabrics and soft materials. These motifs are also made with the intention of being mixed and matched so children can individualise their dedication to the game. As a member of the International Natural Textile Association (IVN), eco-friendly and socially-minded criteria set the tone for the entire CharLe production chain. They place a special emphasis on the ecological quality of their fabrics and materials and use only organic cotton that has been certified under the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS). While the cotton mainly comes from Turkey, all their other suppliers and producers are based in Germany and Austria. Clothing can be purchased on the CharLe webshop, through the internet shopping portal DaWanda and in selected retail locations.

www.charle-berlin.de

14:39

Page 51


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:40

Page 52

ADINA . EU | T OGAH OTE L S .CO M ADINA.EU TOGAHOTELS.COM

APARTMENT SPACE HOTEL SERVICE ADINA STYLE

HOTEL DESIGN HOTEL DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT DEVELOPMENT HOTEL H OTEL INVESTMENT INVESTMENT HOTEL H OTEL OPERATION OPER ATION

BERLIN | FR BERLIN FRANKFURT ANKFURT | HAMBURG HAMBURG | BUDAPEST BUDAPEST | COPENHAGEN COPENHAGEN SYDNEY ADELAIDE CANBERRA WOLLONGONG S YDNEY | MELBOURNE MELBOURNE | BRISBANE BRISBANE | PERTH PERTH | A DELAIDE | C ANBERRA | DARWIN DARWIN | W OLLONGONG


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:40

Page 53

Coppenrath Bakery Honour the old, dare to try the new Once a small country bake house, now a flourishing family business. Coppenrath Bakery was founded in 1825 in Geeste, Germany by Heinrich Coppenrath (the first) and has produced the finest baking delicacies for over six generations spanning nearly two centuries. TEXT: JESSICA RIDDER | PHOTOS: COPPENRATH

A remarkable entrepreneurial spirit and a dedication to create only the highest quality fine pastries, helped turn Coppenrath into a modern bakery that continually adds new creations to its product range. Today, this thriving family business, run by Andreas Coppenrath, employs over 250 people and their pastries can be bought in over 60 countries worldwide. Managing director Andreas Coppenrath explains:“The company motto, Honour the Old, Dare to Try the New, is the driving force behind our actions and is our guiding vision. Our specialties continue to be baked according to original recipes, responsible

for the special Coppenrath taste. We now deliver our pastries all over the world, but we never forget our roots. To be involved with hand and heart – this is what characterises us as a family business with conviction and distinguishes us from many anonymous corporations.” The end of their expansion at home and abroad is nowhere near in sight. “We are constantly in search of new interesting product ideas and creations to keep surprising our customers. Therefore, in 2014, we will add some new products to our range, such as the delicious Smile Cookies, Little Cookies and Wild Cookies.”

The trend towards healthy eating has not escaped their attention either. In addition to their popular pastry classics, Coppenrath has developed a delicious sugar-, glutenand lactose-free product range. “For some years we have been observing that the market for special nutrition is growing steadily. A rising share of the population suffers from diabetes. Food intolerances including lactose intolerance or celiac disease are increasing and diagnosed more frequently. Furthermore, we noticed a general growing awareness and increasing demand for healthy nutrition,“ Coppenrath elaborates. Moreover, to live up to their gold in Prize of the Best, an award only given to companies that have proven their place among the quality elite of the German food industry, the packaging also has to measure up to their extremely high standards. And customers appreciate it.“We received very positive feedback for our new Reseal-ItTechnology, a practical label with a re-closure system for the packets of our cookies,” Coppenrath adds. And with that, Coppenrath wraps it up. www.coppenrath-feingebaeck.de/en

Issue 15 | June 2014 | 53


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:40

Page 54

Discover Germany | Special Theme | Made in Germany

For companies with a high volume of mailings, such as data centres, insurance companies and banks, the creative engineers at Mayer-Kuvert-network have developed the Kuvermatic®. This specially designed machine produces envelopes that are the same size on every side. With the Kuvermatic® envelopes can now be stacked completely flat and therefore in greater quantities.

The envelope – much more than a disposable product Each day it’s carelessly torn up and thrown away but the next day it’s found anew and intact in our letterbox: The envelope. That faithful companion who brings us a daily selection of orders and invoices, good and bad news, advertising messages; and if we are lucky, even love letters. This reliable part of our day most likely also means a reliance on the companies that comprise the Mayer-Kuvert-network who produce more than twenty billion envelopes a year. This means approximately every fourth envelope sent from Europe was produced by one of its more than forty affiliated companies. TEXT & PHOTOS: MAYER-KUVERT-NETWORK | TRANSLATION: JAIME SCHWARTZ

The diversity that can be found inside each envelope demonstrates the importance and need for a range of envelope types. MayerKuvert-network offers a variety of standard sized envelopes, padded mailers and shipping envelopes. One of the network's star products is the Envirelope® produced in the Swabian town of Heilbronn. At first glance these envelopes might be indistin-

54 | Issue 15 | June 2014

guishable from their conventional counterparts, yet they set themselves apart with their environmental friendliness. Envirelope® products are manufactured with bright white carbon neutral paper and also feature biodegradable plastic windows, water-soluble glues, and fully deinkable interior inks that guarantee one hundred percent recyclability.

Individually designed advertising envelopes for direct mailings is yet another focus of the Mayer-Kuvert-network. As the company motto states: "You only have one chance to make a good first impression." Customers can benefit from the expertise in creating products with visual impact offered by the extensive network of companies associated with Mayer-Kuvertnetwork. For example, allure can be added through choosing a unique print motif or the use of innovative materials with unusual windows or closure techniques. Just imagine a coloured envelope with an atypical form suddenly appearing amongst the standard white and brown envelopes normally found in the letterbox; it’s not hard to believe that this intriguing piece of mail will be picked up and opened first. The products of the Mayer-Kuvert-network ensure that envelopes get sent straight into the receiver's hand and not straight into the rubbish bin. www.mayer-kuvert-network.com


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:40

Page 55

You appreciate

individuality and personality? Discover Germany and Austria with PrivateCityHotels. Enjoy your stay in privately run city hotels and experience unforgettable moments in our cities: photos: private, shutterstock / monkey business images

Hamburg, Nuremberg, Bonn, Vienna, Salzburg and more!

„how to spend a perfect day“ – get individual tips by your local host

Find out more on our pages

www.private-city-hotels.com www.facebook.com/privatecityhotels

it’s abou t

Salzburg

Hamburg

Bonn

Nuremberg

Vienna

Further

People.


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:40

Page 56

Culture Calendar

Left, main image: Händel Festival, concert in the Marktkirche. Photo: Thomas Ziegler Bottom, left: Rock am Ring © 2014 Marek Lieberberg Konzertagentur Bottom, right: Castle Illumination Heidelberg © Heidelberg Marketing GmbH

From baroque music festivals and striking art exhibitions to great sporting events, Discover Germany’s Culture Calendar is your perfect guide to upcoming cultural events. Händel Festival Halle/Saale (5-15 June)

Bachfest Leipzig

Art Basel (19-22 June)

Running since 1922, the Händel Festival is celebrated in the birthplace of the famous baroque musician. A top tip for classical music lovers. www.haendelfestspiele.halle.de

Over 100 events in and around Leipzig take place in memory of the great composer J.S. Bach, a former resident of the town. www.bachfestleipzig.de

The premier international art show of its kind for modern and contemporary works, bringing over 300 leading galleries from around the world to the heart of Europe. www.artbasel.com

Rock am Ring (5-8 June)

Kieler Woche (21-29 June)

Probably Germany’s most iconic rock music festival held at the world famous Nürburgring racetrack. www.rock-am-ring.com

With over 2,000 events taking place within these nine days in June along the Kieler Förde, the town centre and the Olympic harbour, this is without a doubt the world’s largest sailing event. www.kieler-woche.de

56 | Issue 15 | June 2014

TFF Rudolstadt (3-6 July) For the 24th time, Germany’s largest folk-rootsworld music festival takes place on more than 20 stages. www.tff-rudolstadt.de.


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:40

Page 57

Discover Germany | Culture | Calendar

Right: Kieler Woche (Kiel Week) Windjammer parade. © Landeshauptstadt Kiel / Björn Stähler Top: Kieler Woche (Kiel Week) © www.segel-bilder.de Above: Sophie Weguelin, Kiel Week 470er © okpress

Heidelberg Castle Illuminations with Fireworks (7 June, 12 July & 6 September) Every year the legendary Castle Illuminations capture the imagination of thousands of people – just magical! www.heidelberg-marketing.com ATP-tournament in Stuttgart (7-13 July) The MercedesCup tennis event is certainly one show not to be missed this summer. www.atpworldtour.com Issue 15 | June 2014 | 57


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:40

Page 58

Discover Germany | Culture | Barbara Geier

Let the BBQ season begin Is it that time of the year again? Yes, it is. You call it BBQ, we call it Grillen. One of the things where the UK and Germany have a lot in common; both nations love a get-together round the barbecue, with lots of meat as the men attend to the sausages, steaks and the like. There is, no doubt, a special bond between a man and his barbecue. At least, that is certainly the case in Germany. TEXT: BARBARA GEIER

I have been to many a barbie but never, ever in my life have I actually turned sausages on the grill, or steaks, or whatever of meats. There’s been no need to since it has always been done by men. German fact. It’s weird, though, isn’t it? The majority of these men are almost never found cooking in the kitchen. However, once the BBQ comes out, something seems to be happen. There they stand, proudly, next to the fire and with their tools. Of course, each expert chef has his own technique, which, of course, is the best and the one and only correct way to bbq. I find it quite amusing how seriously so many German men take the whole business of grillen. On the other hand, I also take it for granted that there is always a man around who does take it seriously and knows how to handle the BBQ. Since I have no great interest whatsoever to get involved with fire, coals, gas and any other kind of grill paraphernalia, I just happily eat the finished products. Aside from the fact that those products are becoming ever more sophisticated – simple meat or sausages don’t cut it anymore, there are all types of different seafood now, and specially marinated items and goodness knows what else – I also noticed in recent years that barbecue

58 | Issue 15 | June 2014

grills have become a kind of status symbol for the German middleclass, just like the type of kitchen you have, or the pushchair brand you use. I remember a couple of years ago being invited to a Grillabend (BBQ evening) and finding the host standing behind this massive, shiny futuristic thing which turned out to be “der neue Grill” (the new BBQ). What type of BBQ you invest in, seems to have become very important. And, in this case, the host was very proud of his new machine. Perhaps it has something to do with the fact that this particular grill event took place in the Saarland region in Germany’s far west. Size-wise, it’s the smallest federal state but it has a huge BBQ tradition, including its own baffling (whether you’re a German native speaker or not) vocabulary. So, just in case you should ever make it to this corner of Germany in summer where Grillen is almost like a religion and then undoubtedly end up at a BBQ, there’s essentially one important word you need to know: Schwenker. In the Saarland, it stands for three things: Firstly, a special type of meat (more precisely, huge slabs of pork) that are put on the grill, secondly, the specific Saarland grill itself which consists of a tripod type construction from which a round

grill rack hangs down in the middle suspended over the fire, and lastly, the man, who (always, see above) is BBQing. Handy, isn’t it. One word, three meanings, lots of meat. The latter – also essential vocabulary – is also known as Grillgut in general and if spoken about in the specific BBQ context. This applies to the whole of Germany, by the way, and it is one of those wonderful words that can’t really be translated. Just remember it should you be invited to a German Grillabend and asked to bring your own Grillgut which can happen, you’ll know what to do then.

Barbara Geier is a London-based freelance writer, translator and communications consultant. She is also the face behind ww.germanyiswunderbar.com, a German travel and tourism guide and blog that was set up together with UK travel writer Andrew Eames in 2010.


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:40

Page 59

FEEL THE HEARTBEAT CULTURE AND EVENTS. 2014 is full of cultural highlights: On May 10th, “Nacht der Museen” presents the variety of Frankfurt’s museums in a single night. On August 29 – 31, the “Museumsuferfest“ will form the highpoint of the Frankfurt’s summer open air events.

Enjoy cultural diversity throughout the city.

For all the infos visit www.museumsufer-frankfurt.de

ONLY

SUBSCRIBE TO DISCOVER GERMANY

£40 for 1 2 Iss

Sign up to a year’s subscription and you will

ues

receive each new issue of Discover Germany through your letterbox. The price for 12 issues is £40.00 (Outside UK £75.00) Name: Address:

Postcode

Country

Phone

Email

Occupation

Nationality

Age (optional)

Tick here if you do not wish to receive newsletters from Scan Group. Return with payment by cheque to: Scan Group, 15B Bell Yard Mews, Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TY, United Kingdom or pay online at www.discovergermany.com


2_2_DiscoverGermany_June2014_Issue15:Scan Magazine 1

15/5/14

14:40

Page 60

DISCOVER MODERN INDUSTRIAL DESIGN AS A SUCCESS FACTOR FOR YOUR COMPANY Industrial design is becoming ever more important in people’s purchasing decisions. A brand can only be successful once it has achieved the right blend of aesthetics, functionality, innovation, and cost-effectiveness. With this guiding principle in mind, we develop innovative solutions. Our signature: balanced forms reduced to their essential elements. Clear lines combining aesthetics with functionality. Objects which stand out through their high-quality materials and finish, as well as their physical appeal. Understated yet striking, our design exudes elegance and harmony. Experience the success that modern industrial design can bring!

sample work intelligent high-tech mini camera designed on behalf of Frauenhofer-Institut Germany

Emamidesign’s spectrum includes: • Strategic consulting for product development and product optimisation. • Industrial design for consumer goods, key areas, electrical engineering, household appliances and lifestyle. • Design management.

Trust the Winner 52 x international awarded: among them the Red Dot Award (best of the best), iF Design Award (Gold), the Good Design Award Japan and USA and the German Design Award. Nr. 1 of the worldwide red dot design ranking for the best design concepts since 2011

Winner GOOD DESIGN AWARD

more information:

www.emamidesign.de


Discover Germany | Issue 15 | June 2014  

Discover Germany promotes German, Swiss & Austrian Design, Tourism, Food, Culture and Business.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you