__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

YOUR FREE SUNSHINE COAST LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

AUTUMN ‘17


FROM THE EDITOR

Living the

DAVE GLEESON COVER PHOTOGRAPHER

I started SurfShots Photography in 2012 after moving from Sydney to Noosa with my young family. My aim was to capture the daily action on and around the Noosa beaches, one of Australia’s favourite surf and family holiday destinations. Since then I have shot thousands of surfers in action, but my business has grown to include landscape, product and action shots. I am the official photographer at many events such as the Noosa Festival of Surfing and World Series Swims, but I still find time to shoot family portraits, weddings, product, aerial and real estate imagery. See more of my work or book me to shoot for you at surfshots.com.au ON THE COVER This image was taken on an early winter’s afternoon in 2016 at Sunrise Beach shortly after sunset, captured on a Nikon D610 with 24-70mm f2.8 Nikon lens (at 70mm). 1/50 second, f6.3, ISO 200, handheld.

EDITORIAL ENQUIRIES editorial@saltmagazine.com.au ADVERTISING & SUBSCRIPTIONS info@saltmagazine.com.au GENERAL ENQUIRIES 0412 210 281 PO Box 528 Noosaville QLD Australia 4566 © Copyright 2017 salt is a free quarterly magazine published by ATD Management P/L. Distribution area between Bribie and Fraser Island and inland to Kenilworth and select areas throughout Brisbane. 4

salt

dream

We’ve all seen the memes and inspirational quotes (they tend to do the rounds on Instagram and Facebook) that urge us to embrace life, to live with passion, to follow our bliss. So, are you living with passion? Are you following your bliss? In the pages of salt, you’ll meet many locals who, if I put those questions to them, would easily respond with an emphatic “yes”. Take Janine Hall (page 24), whose life changed the moment she answered an ad. Janine followed her passion and created her own skincare products, though she never expected that her homemade lip balms would take her to Hollywood. But they did. Now Janine has a thriving business she can pour her energy and her talents into. She’s living a life she loves. I’m also inspired by local wordsmith Lynette Noni, who – without any formal training or experience, and certainly no guarantee of success – gave up months of sleep to create her first manuscript. Lynette writes the type of books she wants to read, and fortunately many others have now read them too. You can check out her story on page 26. We also meet timber craftsman David Suters, who first fell in love with the craft while watching his father work. David is keeping an almost-forgotten tradition alive and has now passed on that creative spark to his daughter. His unique pieces are beautiful, touchable and made with love. Flick over to page 122 for David’s story. Janine, Lynette, David and all the other creative and passionate locals that we are meeting in this autumn edition of salt are proof that if you live with authenticity, if you work at what you love, you can create a life and a business that sustains you. I hope you find these locals and their stories as inspiring as we do.

JEMMA PEARSON EDITOR

CONTRIBUTING TALENTS: WHAT WAS YOUR FAVOURITE ‘BEHIND THE SCENES’ MOMENT THIS EDITION?

THANKS GO TO OUR OTHER CONTRIBUTING TALENTS TOO: LYNNE DELANY PUBLISHER JANE TODD PROOFREADER BRISEIS ONFRAY DESIGNER, WRITER KRISTA EPPELSTUN PHOTOGRAPHER ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS PHOTOGRAPHER

PENNY SHIPWAY WRITER

HING ANG PHOTOGRAPHER

KATIE MACKENZIE SOCIAL MEDIA

Speaking with Ben Skerrett from Equine Connection gave me goosebumps and left me feeling inspired and full of love. Growing up with horses taught Ben so much about himself and he now uses his experiences to help others in their own self-development. Ben’s work is not only revolutionary and transformative but comes from an altruistic desire to help others.

In the Paraplegic Benefit Fund photo shoot for this issue, I thought I’d juxtapose “disabled’ athlete Darron Shields against a group of healthy young athletes. There was little contrast though, as Darron’s energetic presence commanded the attention and respect of the younger athletes as he interacted with them. It completely challenged my definition of “disabled”.

MIKE BENNIE WRITER

@SALTMAG

SALT-MAGAZINE

SALTMAG

@SALT_MAGAZINE

XANTHE COWARD WRITER LILJANA FREY WRITER JOLENE OGLE WRITER LAHNEE PAVLOVICH WRITER LINDA READ WRITER AARON WYNNE WRITER


Noosa Long Weeken d p resen tS

1 0 DAYS OF M USIC, THEA TRE, FO O D & THO UGHT

21 - 31 July 2017

PROGRAMME OUT APRIL 2017 tickets on sale at

Fest iva l Pa rt ner

www.noosalongweekend.com or www.thej.com.au BOOKING ENQUIRIES The J Booking Office Mon – Fri, 9.00am – 4.30pm 60 Noosa Drive, Noosa Junction +61 (7) 5329 6560 www.thej.com.au

B E C O ME A F E S TI VA L FriEN D

G ol d Pa rt ner


CONTENTS

autumn

FEATURES

’17

6 GO WITH THE FLOW

We head down to the river in celebration of our freshwater spaces.

16 SPIRITUAL AWAKENING Move over Byron – the Sunshine Coast is this country’s new wellbeing centre.

PEOPLE

16

24 PURSUIT OF PASSION

Janine Hall loves lips, and with an organic ethos she’s building a business that has taken her to Hollywood.

26 LOOK AT ME

Local author Lynette Noni is conquering the fantasy fiction world, one novel at a time.

TASTES

30 FOR A CAUSE

The owners of 10 Hastings Street fell in love with Noosa long before they moved there.

Darron Shields shares his story and his drive for the prevention of spinal cord injury.

32 SHOOTING STARS

The Bearfoot boys have talent in spades, and their infectious tunes and love of life have them hitting some high notes.

36 YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR What does a country teenager do for fun? Starts a surfwear label of course.

86 BOLD VISIONARIES

Cindy Vogels talks family, fashion and her business future.

90 UP AND COMING

Sunshine Coast dog lovers can’t get enough of Growl Towels’ products, and salt discovers why.

102 ARTIST

Paul Harbour paints those little slices of Sunshine Coast history.

106 OFF THE WALL

Tanya Hoddinott’s intuitive style is proving a hit with local art lovers.

122 MEET THE DESIGNER

David Suters hopes his passion for timber craftsmanship will cause a shift in the way we buy furniture. 6

salt

40 TABLE TALK

44 NOSH NEWS

Foodie news for every palate from all around the Sunshine Coast.

46

CULINARY CREATIONS

Nilla Tomkins from VanillaFood shares her favourite breakfast recipe.

48 PRODUCE PEOPLE

Dale Chapman talks us through Australian native ingredients, a range of super foods we can find right on our doorsteps.

50 PADDOCK TO PLATE

Bohemian Bungalow’s Ned Nolan loves his camel milk, and thanks to his delicious food, the people of the Coast are loving it too.

54 RELAXED RECIPES

We’re in chocolate heaven thanks to Twenty8 Essentials founder Kim Morrison.

58 SALT CELLAR

Wine writer Mike Bennie offers his advice on the best drops for autumn.

IS BORN OF THE PUREST PARENTS, THE SUN & THE SEA. PYTHAGORAS

40


98 LOVESTRUCK 62 KEEPING IT REAL

South Sydney Rabbitohs player George Burgess and his new wife Joanna share their love story.

66 MAGIC MAKER

Something for Catering’s food truck brings the best in Coast catering to any event. Photo Simon J Coulson

70 TO HAVE AND TO HOLD Treats and tips to get ready for the big day.

STAPLES 12 SIX SENSES

A selection of items based on the special powers that humans use to experience their world – touch, see, hear, smell, taste and feel.

86

14

SECRETS ONLY A LOCAL WOULD KNOW

LIFE

72 FASHION

Cooler weather threads for every member of the family.

92 PAMPER AND PREEN

salt’s lucky Linda Read takes the Serengeti Journey at Coolum’s Asante Day Spa.

96 BEAUTY

New discoveries and hidden gems from around the Sunshine Coast.

22 CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Get out and about during autumn with a selection of hand-picked events on the Sunshine Coast.

34 BOOKS & BLOGS

Non-fiction titles to educate, inspire and entertain.

38 A DOSE OF SALT

Say goodbye to dry summer hair and skin with these soothing products.

salt editor Jemma Pearson has autumn on her mind.

98 HEALTH

The Sunshine Coast has some of the best art galleries in the nation. Find out what will be on show over autumn.

Equine Connection owner Ben Skerrett believes in the healing power of horses.

116 IN YOUR DREAMS

Carole Tretheway has designed a classically contemporary home for her Peregian Beach clients.

120 HOMEWARES

Add that personal touch with these personalised pieces for the home.

110 ART DATES

115 ART TRAIL 126 TOURIST INFORMATION

Essential info for all visitors to the Sunshine Coast, including travel times, surf safety and market details.

128 MAP saltmagazine . com . au

7


FEATURE

GO WITH THE

FL W WORDS LINDA READ

OF ALL THE NATURAL WONDERS the Sunshine Coast has to offer, her waterways are the jewels in her crown. And while the sparkling ocean may be at her beating heart, there’s another set of water systems that flow through her veins, in no less spectacular a fashion. The rivers – twisting, tumbling, meandering and rushing along their ancient courses to the sea – are complex and diverse ecosystems that sustain, nourish, protect and produce life in remarkable ways, not to mention providing some of the region’s most stunning scenery. Not only do the Coast’s rivers support and provide some of the world’s unique species and habitats, they are also the lifeblood 8

salt

of the area’s many water-dependent commercial, tourism, fishing and agricultural industries, as well as being a rich source of cultural heritage. There are six river catchments in the Sunshine Coast region: Mary, Noosa, Maroochy, Mooloolah, Stanley, and Pumicestone Passage. As Healthy Land and Water’s Coastal Catchment northern manager Susie Chapman says, “All have their unique personality depending on their underlying geology and soils. “Each of these rich and healthy river systems supports communities of plants and animals and their own special communities of people who care about catchments.” In fact, the collective concerns of these groups became an organisation that was subsequently christened by Sunshine Coast Stanley River


Council’s catchment manager Peter Armstrong as The Sunshine Coast Rivers Initiative (SCRI). The SCRI is an amalgamation of 30 community groups, government agencies, utilities and teaching institutions that work to protect and enhance the water, ecosystems, farmland and scenic values of the river catchments. So successful has SCRI been in its endeavours, in 2011 it won one of the world’s most prestigious environmental awards: the Australian National Riverprize, presented by the International RiverFoundation in recognition of the development and implementation of outstanding, visionary and sustainable programs in river management. Susie describes SCRI as a “continually evolving synergy of organisations that work closely together to keep these waterways and their ecosystems thriving”.

So, apart from the obvious natural beauty they provide us with, what exactly is so special about the rivers that run throughout the Coast and why do they deserve our attention?

STANLEY RIVER The Stanley River flows west from the rainforest of the Blackall and Peachester ranges through farmland and the Somerset Dam to join the Brisbane River. It courses through one of the heaviest rainfall areas in the country. Its catchment provides a home for the endangered Richmond birdwing butterfly and the Coxen’s figparrot, as well as the vulnerable yellow-bellied glider. It is also one of the few remaining havens for the giant barred frog, Australia’s largest ground-dwelling frog species, which lives near streams and creeks in rainforest habitats and is under threat of extinction. >

saltmagazine . com . au

9


The Mary Valley

THE MARY RIVER The majestic Mary River is the longest of the six river catchments, emanating from the forests of the Blackall and Conondale ranges in the hinterland and meandering north to reach the sea at Maryborough. The Mary attracted environmentalists’ attention around the world in the 2000s when the state government announced it was going to dam part of the river. The project, which was eventually cancelled, was vehemently opposed by environmental groups because of the river’s ecological significance. It is home to many vulnerable species, such as the endangered Mary River turtle endemic to the Mary River system, and the critically endangered and protected Mary River cod. The Mary River also provides one of the few remaining habitats of that vulnerable evolutionary masterpiece, the Queensland lungfish, and many other significant and endangered animal species.

10

salt


Mooloolah River

custom made with

Maroochy River

THE MOOLOOLAH RIVER The Mooloolah River begins in the eastern slopes of the Blackall Range and flows east, north-east to its mouth at southern Mooloolaba. The Mooloolah River National Park is one of the Coast’s most significant protected coastal lowland habitats. The park’s coastal rainforest, melaleuca forests, wallum banksia woodlands, scribbly gum open forests, sedgelands and closed heaths are all threatened regional ecosystems. The Mooloolah River Waterwatch and Landcare group, as part of the SCRI, has established the Subtropical Lowland Rainforest Project to lessen the threat of weeds to riparian vegetation.

coloured diamond specialist custom made jewellery repairs and remodelling free design service insurance valuations CAD on request south sea and tahitian pearls diamond & gemstone merchant boutique retail store

THE MAROOCHY RIVER Rising in the Blackall Range, the Maroochy’s tributaries flow through a variety of farmlands and rural towns before joining and delivering its waters to the sea at Maroochydore, through one of the last natural untrained river mouths on the east coast. More than half the catchment has been cleared for agriculture, but some important tracts of natural bushland remain, including the eastern section of Mapleton State Forest and mangrove forests in the low to middle reaches of the estuary. As land use impacts water quality and ecosystem health, the SCRI is focusing on reducing these effects through a series of programs which aim to help with the rehabilitation of stream-bank vegetation, the reduction of sediment runoff from roads, the protection of migratory shorebirds and the promotion of sustainable fishing. >

5443 1955 | ny2k.com.au rovera plaza shop 5, king st, cotton tree Member of the Gold & Silversmiths guild of Australia

ny2kjeweller

saltmagazine . com . au

ny2k

11


THE PASSAGE IS ONE OF THE WORLD’S MOST ECOLOGICALLY IMPORTANT WATERWAYS AND IS INCLUDED ON THREE INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL TREATIES. Pumicestone Passage

PUMICESTONE PASSAGE Not actually a river (although mistaken for one by Matthew Flinders), Pumicestone Passage is the body of water that separates Bribie Island from the mainland, on the southern tip of the Sunshine Coast. Rich in wildlife and natural beauty, the passage is one of the world’s most ecologically important waterways and is included on three international environmental treaties, due to its importance for migratory and shore birds. It is also a year-round habitat for the vulnerable dugong because of the presence of the particular species of seagrasses the dugong feeds on. 12

salt

Booloumba Creek


The Noosa River

THE NOOSA RIVER The Noosa River is perhaps the most glamorous of the Coast’s rivers, synonymous with the town it shares its name with. But there’s more to it than the chic restaurants, quaint houseboats and plethora of watersport lovers who adorn its banks and play in its crystal waters. Beginning in the Cooloola National Park and the farming country of the Kin Kin Creek catchment, it glides through a series of lakes to reach the mouth at Laguna Bay, Noosa Heads, just eight metres lower than its source. The Noosa River falls within the Noosa Biosphere Reserve, which means it has been internationally recognised by UNESCO as having unique and special ecological attributes. The speciesrich river system is currently the focus of a program conducted by the Noosa Biosphere Reserve Foundation to bring fish life back to its waters, which has been depleted by overfishing. The program aims to seek a balance between marine biodiversity and sustainable fishing.

Free Kids Mornings in Centre Come down and enjoy free fun for your little ones every Wednesday! Time: 10am Location: Playground next to Subway No need to book, just turn up! New and exciting activities every week. Full details up on our website.

GPS search: 28 Eenie Creek Road, Noosaville Queensland

Big W � Woolworths � 100 specialty stores


SIX SENSES

HEAR Passenger (Michael David Rosenberg) excels with Young As the Morning Old As the Sea. The beauty and intimacy of his latest indie pop folk album, reminiscent of Whispers (2014), retains Passenger’s universally appealing sound, using lilting melody to look inwards, and soaring strings and vocals to gaze outwards. There’s wonder and wanderlust in the title track, and a sense of longing in Beautiful Birds (featuring Birdy), If You Go and Everything. The acoustic guitar and wisdom of Home, and the steel guitar and simple truth of The Long Road prompt us to remember life is precious. Passenger gently reminds us to celebrate every fleeting moment. REVIEW XANTHE COWARD

TOUCH You’ll want to throw off your shoes and walk barefoot on the latest range of carpets from Australian manufacturer Victoria Carpets. The beautiful 100 per cent wool range offers a luxurious 40-ounce pile weight, perfect for your home’s heavy-duty zones. The contemporary range comes in six colours and is available from CARPETandTILES.com.au, Suite 2, Boulevard Centre, 68 Jessica Boulevard, Minyama. 5477 7192.

six senses Life is all about experiences, so salt offers these sensory delights to entertain and inspire us to see, hear, smell, taste and touch and feel.

SEE We came late to the party and discovered the powerful, unforgettable Black Mirror via Netflix five years after it first aired in the UK. Charlie Brooker’s foreboding look into a dystopian future warns of the dire effects technology can have on our daily lives, but it’s just as much about the people as it is about the gadgets. As horrifying as it might be to accept, such a future may already be on the way. We have the technology. We are the people. A continually changing cast – including Bryce Dallas Howard, Jon Hamm, Rory Kinnear and Australia’s Daniel Lapaine – feature across three seasons with each harrowing episode unapologetically asking, “what if?”. Black Mirror is intelligent and intense, and it will change the way you spend your time online. REVIEW XANTHE COWARD

SMELL If you’re a candle lover, there is nothing worse than discovering your favourite candle in a glass vase you paid a motza for is now down to its last drop of wax. But don’t let go of that gorgeous vase. Just get in touch with Linda from Eco Rose Soy Candles. Simply clean out your glassware (special pieces only) and Linda will refill it for you in the scent of your choice. Linda uses only 100 per cent soy wax, which is biodegradable, is a renewable resource and is non toxic. Linda also has flower diffusers that are pretty, edgy and eco-friendly, and can be refilled when the fragrance oil has been exhausted. Find these pretty products at I Cherry Shoe, Shop 3, 25 Sunshine Beach Road, Noosa. ecorose@westnet.com.au 14

salt


TASTE

FEEL Illustration courtesy of TWIGSEEDS STUDIO, twigseeds.com.au

Who needs the Easter Bunny when Elements at Montville is offering chocolate chai! It’s autumn, which means it’s the perfect time to take a drive into the hills for a cup of exquisitely brewed chai. There are more than 10 different varieties to choose from, including a caffeine-free rooibos and coconut chai from Ruby Chai or try the locally made, fully organic chocolate chai. And of course you’ll need to pair your tea with one of Element’s gluten-free, flourless chocolate cakes. Elements at Montville is at 38 Kondalilla Falls Road, Montville. 5478 6212 or elementsatmontville.com.au

Escape to Kansha

A therapeutic haven, Kansha offers ancient and modern therapies to restore balance and harmony.

CHIROPRACTIC

ACUPUNCTURE

MASSAGE

6 Mary Street Noosaville 07 5473 0724 www.kansha.com.au REFLEXOLOGY

PHYSIOTHERAPY

ESSENTIAL OILS saltmagazine . com . au

15


photo Tourism and Events Queensland

SECRETS

Ditch the lengthy drive south to see dolphins in theme parks and see them right here in the wilds of our northern region’s pristine shores. Tin Can Bay is just 90 minutes north of Noosa and is known for giving visitors a rare opportunity to interact with wild Australian humpback dolphins. THE BARNACLES DOLPHIN CENTRE opens at 7am daily for viewing, with feeding at 8am. To get knee-deep with these magnificent creatures, head straight to Norman Point where all the magic happens. Entry is $5 and each fish is also $5 for those wanting to feed them. Next door, Barnacles Cafe provides cafe meals and a delightful setting to unwind after your dolphin experience. Map reference M5

If you’re after a clean, green smoothie or cleansing juice, the salt team has discovered the perfect cafe for you on Gympie Terrace. Health-conscious locals love DEPOT CAFE’S smoothies, such as the skin cleanser smoothie with creamy avocado, fresh spinach and coconut. Depot also serves yummy snacks, breakfast, lunch and, of course, coffee – the espresso-based cold drinks have been particularly popular over summer. Depot’s acai bowl, pink pitaya bowl (made from dragon fruit) and chia bowls are also winners. Check out Depot on Instagram @depot_cafe. 4/239-245 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville. 5473 0131 Map reference M13

secrets

ONLY A LOCAL WOULD KNOW

16

salt

Animal lovers take note. If you’re looking for a compassionate, caring vet clinic, check out NOOSA VILLAGE VET. The privately owned boutique clinic has the expertise and state-of-the-art equipment to treat your furry or feathered friend. Services range from general medical treatment and dentistry to complicated surgery. Pop in for a tour and a chat, and remember, your first consultation is FREE. 69 Mary Street, Noosaville. 5455 6306 or noosavillagevet.com.au Map reference N13

YANDINA COMMUNITY GARDENS, known for its abundance of delectable fruit and vegetables, offers bi-monthly permaculture workshops suitable for beginners and experienced gardeners. Workshops cover a variety of topics, including organic food production and garden sustainability, and are perfect for those wanting to build practical permaculture skills and meet likeminded people. The edible gardens are open to the public every Monday and Saturday from 8am to noon, and Tuesday 8am to 2pm. Corner of North and Farrell streets, Yandina. yandinacommunitygardens.com.au Map reference L15

FOR MAP REFERENCES SEE MAP ON PAGE 128


Cross the fairy light-lined boardwalk at NOOSA BOATHOUSE and head upstairs to the rooftop Sunset Bar. This hidden gem offers the best sunset views in town, along with the famous Noosa River sling cocktail with something from the delicious new bar menu, such as antipasto share plates or salt and pepper calamari. The Sunset Bar opens at 4pm from Tuesday to Sunday. 194 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville. 5440 5070 or noosaboathouse.com.au Map reference M12

Looking for something different?

Montville’s CANDY ADDICTIONS has moved to Noosa. Creator and head confectioner Don Hammond is also adding gelato, chocolate and fudge to the handmade candy range. Head to Hastings Street to check out the two metre-high chocolate wall and lollipop tree. You’ll feel like Alice in Wonderland as you watch the confectioners weave their magic. Bay Village, 18A Hastings Street, Noosa. candyaddictions.com.au Map reference M12

On Friday nights in Palmwoods, THE LANE comes alive. A rustic terraced garden behind locally owned grocery store Renae’s Pantry becomes the backdrop for a family friendly evening of music and organic, ethical food beneath the stars. BYO beer or wine, and enjoy original acoustic offerings from local musicians, and dinner and dessert from 6pm. During the day, shop with longtime locals Renae and Ben, who provide a place for customers to buy life’s essentials with the knowledge they’re contributing to the health of their family, their community and the planet, rather than mindlessly taking from it. Shop 5, The Lane, 4-6 Main Street, Palmwoods. 5457 3347 Map reference L17

Ph: 5477 7192 Monday to Friday 7:30am – 4:30pm


FEATURE

THE COAST’S SPIRITUAL

g n i n e k awa

photo Lisa Michele Burns thewanderinglens.com

WORDS PENNY SHIPWAY

Sunshine Coast Wonderlust SUP Yoga teacher Kat Harding from Yoga Kiss at LIttle Cove 18

salt


Colourful umbrellas line the sandy white beaches at Mooloolaba as children laugh and play, while adults unwind after an exhausting school semester. There are stand-up paddle boarders gliding over the sparkling white waters of Cotton Tree, and campers watching on as they tuck into wholesome burgers and fresh coffee. Noosa’s Hastings Street is its usual hustle and bustle. Cars are nose to nose, while visitors and locals dip their feet into the sea’s blues and walk the jaw-dropping ocean-side cliff of the National Park. Walkers pound the boardwalk at Coolum too, while surfers ride the high waves and topless bathers enjoy some vitamin D in the glorious sunshine. Meanwhile, on Maroochydore’s Ocean Street, the pubs and clubs are thriving with diners feasting on a smorgasbord of healthconscious and cultural eateries, while punters line up with tickets to see local and international musicians and artists. Caloundra makes for an easy day trip for Brisbane folk, with boating families and fishermen exploring the sublime Pumicestone Passage, which is home to dolphins, turtles and more than 350 species of birds. And you only have to visit Montville to see that tourists are in awe of our wild and exotic hinterland, with swarms of visitors spilling out of air-conditioned buses pulling up at every stop. As of 2011, the Sunshine Coast has been named as one of the fastest-growing regions in Australia, with many new arrivals admitting to taking a hit on their career so they can enjoy the simple and relaxed life our coastal region has to offer. As residential estates pop up and businesses thrive, so too do alternative eateries that offer gluten-free, dairy-free and vegan delicacies. These eateries are now seen on almost every corner. Juice and smoothie bars saturate the area, as do wellness retreats, yoga and pilates studios, and meditation groups. Full moon gatherings are celebrated monthly, and locals and tourists alike choose to shop at organic wholefood stores and supermarkets. New age and wellbeing markets are also regular events, and visits to Chenrezig, our own Buddhist temple that offers several self-growth classes, are on everyone’s agenda. Oprah Winfrey’s own spiritual guru, author and speaker Eckhart Tolle, chose the Coast’s Twin Waters Resort for his spiritual workshop in May, with tickets costing around $1000. Our region was the only area outside Australia’s capital cities that Tolle visited. Hay House managing director Leon Nacson told salt that this was Eckhart Tolle’s third visit to the Sunshine Coast. “Eckhart always comments that the Sunshine Coast is such a beautiful part of Australia and it is obvious why they call it the Sunshine Coast. It’s pleasant being so close to the ocean and at the same time surrounded by the beautiful Australian flora and fauna. “Eckhart just completed a retreat at the La Costa resort in San Diego and he was looking forward to presenting a similar retreat >


Maroochydore Pumicestone Passage

8 WELLNESS TRENDS What health and wellness trends will we be seeing more of in 2017? • Cleaner and more organic beauty products • Fitness routines that are slower and more geared towards recovery • Alcohol-free social events • No make-up days • Alternative therapies, such as crystal healing and cupping, becoming more mainstream • Consumers embracing more plant-based proteins • The rise in popularity of wellness retreats and events • The fashionable fitness clothing industry will take off

photo Tourism and Events Queensland

Pumicestone Passage from Golden Beach

20

salt


Eckhart Tolle

ECKHART ALWAYS COMMENTS THAT THE SUNSHINE COAST IS SUCH A BEAUTIFUL PART OF AUSTRALIA AND IT IS OBVIOUS WHY THEY CALL IT THE SUNSHINE COAST.

on the Sunshine Coast. Being surrounded by nature, Eckhart believes, is one of the many conducive environments for meditation as it helps us resonate with stillness.” Twin Waters Resort is also home to international festival Wanderlust, a four-day celebration of mindful living, now an annual event. Just as the population grows, so too does our health and wellness industry and it is interesting to note that our ever-thriving region is pulling major speakers and life-awakening celebrations. Could it be that the Sunshine Coast is taking the crown of Australia’s health mecca from, say, Byron Bay? Twin Waters Resort’s director of sales and marketing Rachel Smith says, “While the northern coast of New South Wales does a great job marketing their region as the go-to destination for events, weddings, festivals, markets, activities and beaches, the Sunshine Coast is certainly an active player in this space. “Given the vast area that the Coast consists of we also benefit from an abundance of beaches, wildlife and varied local produce, with a special focus around the locavore health-conscious,” Rachel adds. >

holistic dental care at noosa junction

At JD Dental, we believe that dental health is just a component of your all over well-being. We would like to help you find the answer to better health. By sharing our knowledge - from amalgam fillings (metal) and root canal treated teeth, to the perfect mix of a healthy diet and lifestyle tailored specifically for you. Find the balance and feel great! 16 Sunshine Beach Road, Noosa Junction (above surf-shop) P 07 5449 2460 E info@noosajunctiondental.com.au www.noosajunctiondental.com.au

Dr Alex Dietz - Dental Surgeon

saltmagazine . com . au

21


photo Tourism and Events Queensland

The Caloundra Music Festival 22

salt


PEOPLE ARE SEEKING MORE, BUT STILL DESIRING TO ACCESS MODERN TECHNOLOGY. THEY SEEK TO ESCAPE THE DRUDGERY OF CITY OR SUBURBAN LIFE FOR GREATER FREEDOM, MEANING AND BEAUTY. “And we’re gaining valuable awareness and recognition for this. With the planned airport expansion, university and hospital, the growth will not only be seen in the domestic market but also reach internationally. So watch this space.” The Coast’s first vegan bar and restaurant, Elixiba on Maroochydore’s Ocean Street, opened in 2015. It was one of the first signs that residents were taking their ‘my body is my temple’ mantra seriously, when seeking out high-end dining options. Elixiba has now expanded to Byron Bay and the Gold Coast, proving its popularity and demand. Co-owner Kittea Ukkola, 31, says she opened the mindful establishment because she too saw this upward trend. “I just felt there was a demand here and the Coast is definitely that place that is a healthy precinct. If you get up at 5.45am it’s like peak hour here,” Kittea says. “People are not only drawn to its natural, healthy lifestyle but one that exudes so much joy – and less ego.”

health, wellness and spiritual destinations,” Simon says. “The region may be just an hour north of Brisbane, but as soon as you reach the Glass House Mountains with their deeply spiritual look and indigenous history, you know that there is much more to the region than first meets the eye. “The Coast has always been at the forefront of healthy food, with products such as dairy [cow, buffalo, goat and now camel], ginger [the famous Buderim Ginger], exotic fruits, herbs and vegetables all making their mark, but the region is now doing as much to feed the mind as the body, with holistic retreats, spa resorts, trekking and a vast range of nature activities designed to provide a complete rejuvenation offer. “Whether it is yoga at Sunrise Beach or on the summit of Mount Coolum, a meditative stand-up paddleboard session in Noosa River or a hike up Mount Ngungun … the Sunshine Coast promises the ultimate in naturally refreshing experiences.” And we couldn’t agree more.

Kittea says when Elixiba’s celiac chef helped open its Byron Bay version, she was surprised that the town had just two gluten-free eateries, compared with more than seven on the Coast. “We’re finding the Coast is turning around massively because there is a culture here.” She says it goes beyond just being a great tourist spot. “Byron is an iconic place to visit, but people are moving to the Sunshine Coast to live that lifestyle.” Palmwoods author, singer and teacher Soraya Saraswati agrees, saying the pressure of life is high and many are feeling let down by the “power mongering and false ideology of our leaders”. “People are seeking more, but still desiring to access modern technology,” Soraya says. “They seek to escape the drudgery of city or suburban life for greater freedom, meaning and beauty. With its varied and stunning landscape between the mountains and the ocean, and the ideal subtropical climate, the Sunshine Coast is the perfect choice.” Soraya says our ideal weather allows for a free outdoor healthy lifestyle that attracts “gentle folk seeking a deeper meaning in life; namely artists, musicians, yogis, philosophers, healers, permaculturists, surfers, cyclists, health gurus, and those wanting to walk gently upon this blessed earth”. “They come to embrace our natural lifestyle that still boasts the sophistication of city life found in hubs like Noosa and Mooloolaba. International gurus such as Eckhart Tolle and Deepak Chopra are choosing to add the Coast to the city hop of Australian performances, due to our stunning beauty, high-class living, and easy accessibility.” Recently, Sunshine Coast’s tourism branch Visit Sunshine Coast launched a new philosophy for the region, officially naming it “naturally refreshing”. CEO Simon Latchford says in a world of glib marketing mottos, this phrase really strikes a chord with its authenticity. “A quick look beyond the spectacular beaches highlights the region’s credentials for claiming to be one of Australia’s premier

saltmagazine . com . au

23


CALENDAR OF EVENTS

KENILWO RTH CHEESE, WINE & FOOD FEST

APRIL ENGINES ALIVE The Queensland Air Museum is firing up its collection of historic operational aircraft engines in a special display of aviation horsepower. It’s an awesome sight and sound when the 1500-horsepower, 14-cylinder radial engine is powered up at 11am, 12:30pm and 2pm on this special day. The museum will also have sausage sizzles and drinks available. As well as experiencing the engine noise, you can take a ride in a World War II Jeep and check out more than 70 aviation displays. when April 8 where Queensland Air Museum, 7 Pathfinder Drive, Caloundra cost $15 for adults, $8 for child, $35 for a family (2 adults, three children) qam.com.au AUSTRALIAN BODY ART FESTIVAL The annual event has moved to Cooroy and this year the theme is ‘Wonderland’. The Australian Body Art Festival attracts artists from around the country and the world and the event is centred on competitions in temporary body painting with categories including brush and sponge, airbrush, special effects and face painting. The event also showcases competitions and exhibitions in photography and wearable art. Spectators can also enjoy street performers and market stalls at this family event. when April 8 and 9 where Mill Place, Cooroy cost free australianbodyart.com.au 24

salt

NOOSA FOOD AND WINE FESTIVAL

DREAM

DISCOVER

MAY

KENILWORTH CHEESE, WINE & FOOD FEST This festival in the Mary Valley town of Kenilworth showcases produce and producers from around the valley. Visitors will be treated to lots of great food stalls, gourmet cooking demonstrations and all-day cheese and wine tastings. There is also a cheese rolling competition, an egg hunt and Easter hat parade, camel rides, a baby animal farm, music and lots more. This is good, clean country fun, so if you’ve never been to the Mary Valley before, add this event to your Easter to-do list. when April 15 where Kenilworth Park and Cheese Factory, Elizabeth Street, Kenilworth cost free kenilworthfoodfest.org.au

EXPLORE

NITRO CIRCUS LIVE Nitro Circus Live is back on the Sunshine Coast. The spectacular show features 30 of the world’s best extreme athletes in freestyle motocross, BMX and skate, plus lots more action from the Nitro daredevils. Expect to see the world’s biggest and most dangerous stunts, in a fully choreographed, action sports theatrical spectacular. when May 6 where Sunshine Coast Stadium, 31 Sportsman Parade, Bokarina cost see website for details sunshinecoaststadium. sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au MELBOURNE INTERNATIONAL COMEDY FESTIVAL ROADSHOW The Melbourne International Comedy Festival Roadshow is making its way to the Sunshine Coast, with a cast of Australian stars, talented newcomers and international performers such as Dave Callan, Carl Donnelly, Andy Saunders, Daniel Fernandez and Sharul Channa. Grab some mates and buckle up for an evening of laughs. when May 9 where The Events Centre, 20 Minchinton Street, Caloundra cost $44 single, $39 concession and students 18+ only event theeventscentre.com.au

COOROORA WOOD & CRAFT SHOW Now in its 28th year, the Cooroora Wood & Craft Show features a large display of beautiful handcrafted entries in the Interclub, High School Student and CWC Member competitions. There will also be woodworking demonstrations and the club’s milling team will have a portable mill set up onsite and will be milling logs. Dried and green off-the-saw slabs and lumber will be available to buy. Pick up a last-minute Mother’s Day gift at this wonderful local event. While you’re in Cooroy on May 13, check out the free Cooroy Fusion Festival, which features food stalls, artisan market stalls, live bands and various demonstrations in the library and Cooroy Butter Factory Arts Centre. when May 12 and 13 where 8 Lowermill Road, Cooroy cost $2 cooroorawoodworkersclub.com


AUSTRAL IAN BODY ART FESTIVAL

JUNE THE VERY HUNGRY CATERPILLAR SHOW Based on the much-loved book NOOSA FOOD by Eric Carle, one of the most & WINE FESTIVAL famous children’s books of all Local food and wine lovers time, this new adaptation is a will join enthusiasts from delightful theatrical experience. around the country as Noosa The family event also features hosts this culinary celebration. characters from three of Eric Event-goers can look forward Carle’s other bestselling classic to discovering Australian tales including The Artist wines, artisan foods, culinary Who Painted A Blue Horse, talent with some of Australia’s Mr Seahorse and The Very leading chefs and producers, Lonely Firefly. New readers and the finest Queensland and first-time theatre-goers are produce against the beautiful encouraged to join those who Noosa backdrop. There will have grown up with these books. be lots of events around town when June 3 so check out the website to where Lake Kawana plan your weekend. Community Centre cost $20 single, $68 for a group when May 18 to 21 of four (minimum 2 children) where various locations scvenuesandevents.com.au around Noosa cost see website for details GARDENING ON THE EDGE noosafoodandwine.com.au The Maleny Garden Club’s annual event is on again. Visitors BIG PINEAPPLE are invited to look around a MUSIC FESTIVAL Birds of Tokyo, Peking Duck, number of beautiful gardens and attend the Garden Market Cloud Control and Safia are at the Maleny Showgrounds. just a few of the acts at this There will be plant stalls where year’s event. But it’s not just the incredible line-up that will visitors can chat to experts. They can also check out the draw locals and visitors to camellia flower display, enjoy Woombye – the festival also some homemade refreshments features the Avant Garden with live art and DIY craft, plus and possibly win a prize at the raffles. there will be a ferris wheel and lots of food stalls. Visitors when June 10 and 11 can camp at the festival. where various hinterland gardens and Maleny when May 27 where Nambour Connection Showgrounds, Stanley River Road, Maleny Road, Woombye cost from $5 see website for cost see website for details bigpineapplemusicfestival.com details malenygardenclub.org

SUNSHINE COAST AGRICULTURAL SHOW Celebrating its 112th year in 2017, this year’s show promises a fresh program with new attractions and events. Highlights will include the mini racing pigs, an interactive young farmers area and the extreme motocross show. when June 16 to 18 where Nambour Showgrounds, Coronation Avenue, Nambour cost see website for details sunshinecoastshow.asn.au SUNSHINE COAST BRIDAL SHOWCASE If you’re planning to get married in the near future, this event has to be in your diary. Get ideas on wedding essentials such as cakes, gowns, floral arrangements, wedding cars and more. You can also enter the draw to win a lucky door prize. when June 18 where Novotel Twin Waters Resort, 270 Ocean Drive, Twin Waters cost $10 online $14 at door sunshinecoastbridalshowcase. com.au

•25 y e a r s e x pe r ience •Pe r so n a lise d in te r ior design •In dividua lly ta ilo r e d concepts C o n ta ct us fo r a co nsultation ph o n e : 0418 441 1 4 9 in te r io r s@ga ilh in kle y design.com www. ga ilh in kle y de sign.com saltmagazine . com . au

25


PURSUIT OF PASSION

TALKING POINT

WORDS LAHNEE PAVLOVICH PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

DID YOU KNOW the lips are the most sensitive part of the body? In fact, they have more than 10,000 nerve endings and a unique print that changes hourly. Lips have also become a bit of a talking point for Sunshine Coast local Janine Hall. The Currimundi mother of three got up close and personal with the lips of some of the world’s A-list celebrities after her Plump & Smooth Lip Therapy kits ended up in the swag bags for Oscar nominees at the 2016 Academy Awards. “Never in a million years did I expect this to happen,” Janine says. “I actually answered an ad and pitched the kit, which had a lip balm and mask in it, to a company who had advertised online, but I didn’t know at the time that the products were for the Academy Awards. It was mind blowing.” Hollywood Baskets requested 50 of the kits, so Janine set about hand-making everything from her home. She poured not just organic ingredients into the mix, but also her heart and soul. “The process was intense,” she says. “Each kit required three days of ingredient infusion and five hours to mix together, package and label, and I did everything myself. I even made the calico bags they went in. I was hand-gluing bags and making products and thinking, ‘Wow, this is really going to the USA and celebrities will be using it.’ It was so surreal.” It wasn’t as though Janine had planned any of her success. “It all started when I had my very first massage in 2000,” she says. “I fell in love with how it made me feel. So I decided to go and study massage myself and from there I became a remedial massage, beauty and healing therapist. “It became a real passion for me and although it wasn’t smooth sailing at the start, I didn’t really know what I was getting into, but I knew I wanted to explore it. I had $200 to my name, so I bought a massage table, a few towels and just started.” Unfortunately, it was around this time that Janine fell ill with chemical poisoning. “I got quite sick so I did a detox and discovered that I was allergic to 90 per cent of the chemicals in the skincare I used,” she says. “Obviously I wanted to get well and to do that I needed to cut out just about every chemical in my body and basically start over. It was really challenging, especially as this was now my livelihood. And even though things were organic or natural I still had to be so careful.” 26

salt


FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A 24-7 PLUMP & SMOOTH LIP REMEDY KIT GO TO THE WIN PAGE AT SALTMAGAZINE.COM.AU But the experience didn’t get Janine down. Instead she saw it as an opportunity to pursue yet another interest. So she founded a holistic day spa in the Sunshine Coast hinterland and learnt to make her own skincare products. Janine now specialises in formulating organic products that don’t just look great and help your skin on the surface, but heal your body too. “I believe everyone wants to feel and look more confident,” she says. “And I love helping people feel beautiful from the inside out. After my own experience, everything I do now leads back to a healthier version of yourself. And a happier one. Happiness is one of the best things we can do for ourselves. And lips speak the universal language of the smile.” Many exciting opportunities came from Janine’s experience with the Academy Awards. One of them was the chance to make a business out of the one product and tie it in with her intuitive and healing side. “I mean, the lips tell such a story – like if you are tired, stressed, dehydrated, allergic – the lips don’t lie. So I’ve combined my intuitive skills, my passion for helping others and desire to empower women and I’ve started doing lip personality readings based on an ancient Chinese method of diagnostics,” Janine says.

The street fair is a must-do experience offering live music, locally-made art and craft, home wares, gourmet street food, delicious sweets, fresh produce, fashion and entertainment for children. See you there!

“Many people don’t know it but your lips are a complete ecosystem of your health and wellbeing. We dispense all of our energy through our lips. They are such an incredible organ.” Janine is also in the process of bringing out 30 new lip balms that are “different to anything else on the market”. “I’m really excited to create beautiful new products but I still haven’t changed my original lip balm, except to add pure vanilla bean to it. It was such a massive hit in its own right and it has so many benefits that it would be crazy to change it. People even stalk me for it now!” Janine is also gearing up for the Emmys in September when her lip balm and new product, Luscious Lips Serum, will be flying across the seas and onto the lips of even more celebrities. organiclipbalm.com.au

Bulcock St, Caloundra ` Caloundra Street Fair www.caloundrastreetfair.com.au


LOOK AT ME

YOUNG AT HEART WORDS LILJANA FREY PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

28

salt


N O O S A S P RIN GS S PA

JUST LIKE THE MAGICAL worlds she creates on paper, Sunshine Coast author Lynette Noni’s flourishing writing career is unfolding like a dream. With the third book in her young adult fantasy series, The Medoran Chronicles, scheduled for release this April, and a fresh North American publishing deal to her name, Lynette would be forgiven for pinching herself to make sure she was awake. Her success story is even more intriguing because Lynette has no creative writing training. In fact, when she started working on Akarnae, the first book in the series, she knew nothing about crafting a novel other than the bare necessities: it required a beginning, middle and end. But she didn’t let that hold her back. Over four sleepless months, Lynette returned from work each evening to sit at her clunky old computer and tap out her first manuscript. At the time, she was in a reading slump. It was the post-Twilight era, and while the market was flooded with young adult fantasy novels, Lynette was frustrated with what was on offer. “I liked different elements in different books I was reading, but I craved a story that combined all those elements in a single book,” Lynette says. “So I wrote the book I wanted to read, but for myself. I didn’t have any intention of publishing it.” The Medoran Chronicles follows the adventures of a 16-year-old girl who steps through a doorway and finds herself stranded in a fantasy world called Medora. In this world, she attends a school for teenagers with supernatural gifts, while she searches for a way back home. Lynette had clear themes she wanted to explore in the story. To ensure the books were suitable for all ages, she chose to avoid the raunchy content that was rife within the genre, and instead used The Medoran Chronicles to explore the facets of friendship. “While my books are targeted for ages 12 and up, I also have eight- and nine-year-olds reading them, so I wanted to include healthy themes,” she says. “I wanted to demonstrate that males and females could be friends, without sexual expectations.” Though it didn’t take long for parents and schools to start buying her books once they were published, the road to publication was a long one. For three years, Lynette submitted Akarnae to publishers in Australia and overseas. Despite the seemingly endless onslaught of rejections, she took all the feedback on board and used it to make her manuscript stronger. Then, just when she’d begun to doubt Akarnae would ever see the light of day, she received an offer of publication from boutique Australian publishers Pantera Press. Luckily, she was already accustomed to the slow turn of the publishing wheel, as the journey from offer to publication continued at a snail’s pace. As part of the process, Pantera Press flew Lynette to Sydney to see that their personalities aligned. She breezed through the meeting with flying colours. “From the moment I met my publishers, I literally fell in love with them as human beings. We’re all basically a publishing family, which is all kinds of warm and fuzzies.” Lynette’s dedication to the craft is reflected in her creative output. In between writing and editing the final books in >

Experience The Dead Sea The Dead Sea Body Wrap - $130

Smoothing and indulgent. Our heavenly Purifying Dead Sea Mud Wrap is designed to eliminate toxins and hydrate the skin (55 mins)

The Dead Sea Experience - $145 Experience the magic of Dead Sea Mud as you relax enveloped in the warmth of our steamy capsule. A deep state of relaxation is achieved plus it’s a great start to a detox program (55 mins) The Dead Sea Ritual - $185 Experience weightlessness in our flotation pool (55 mins) followed by a full Dead Sea exfoliation to remove dry and dead skin then lay back in the warmth of the steamy thermal capsule as you are smothered in the magic of Dead Sea mud (55 mins)

E XC LU S I V E TO S A LT R E A DERS Upgrade your Dead Sea Wrap, Experience or Ritual to include a 1 hour Thermal Suite for only an extra $30 Mention this advertisement on booking.

Bookings phone 5440 3355 or email: spa@noosasprings.com.au

G IFT CER TIFICATES AVAIL A B L E * Terms & Conditions apply. Subject to availability.

Links Drive, Noosa Heads QLD www.noosasprings.com.au


FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A LYNETTE NONI PRIZE PACK GO TO THE WIN PAGE AT SALTMAGAZINE.COM.AU

30

salt


WHILE MY BOOKS ARE TARGETED FOR AGES 12 AND UP, I ALSO HAVE EIGHT- AND NINE-YEAR-OLDS READING THEM, SO I WANTED TO INCLUDE HEALTHY THEMES.

The Medoran Chronicles, she managed to complete a sixth manuscript: Whisper. It’s this book that opened the door to the world of US publishing.

imprint KCP Loft acquired the manuscript. To Lynette’s delight, she discovered she would be working with Kate Egan, editorextraordinaire of The Hunger Games.

After sending out a handful of queries to US-based literary agents, Whisper soon caught the attention of two agents keen to sign her as a client. Lynette clicked instantly with Victoria Wells Arms from Wells Arms Literary in New York, which made her choice easy. Under Victoria’s experienced guidance, Lynette completed several rewrites of Whisper.

Despite her success, Lynette is refreshingly humble with a sparkling disposition and down-to-earth attitude.

“I knew from that first call that she was the right fit,” Lynette says. “I remember one moment during editing when I said ‘I just can’t do it’, and Victoria was so supportive. She helped calm me enough to realise I actually could do it. She’s a very tough editor, which I loved, though she also taught me that I had the freedom to edit the book the way I wanted.” The next step of the journey was to find Whisper a home with a North American publisher, a feat accomplished when publishing

Each day, she receives emails from readers proclaiming their love for her writing, often suggesting plot turns and couplings for future books. Lynette responds to each reader as though she’s responding to an old friend, and it’s this authenticity that’s helping increase her expanding fan base. “Writing, like many things in life, is a step-by-step process,” Lynette says. “You’re always on the journey, and you never really ‘arrive’ because there’s always more to learn, always another story to be told. As is the case with any dream coming true, it’s all very surreal. I still have trouble believing it’s actually happening.” lynettenoni.com


FOR A CAUSE

MOVINGON WORDS JOLENE OGLE PHOTOS HING ANG

Darron Shields with the Swimming Victoria squad on training camp at the University of the Sunshine Coast. L to R: Andrew Rice, Joshua Hargreaves, Bowen Gough, Mikayla Smith 32

salt


DARRON SHIELDS HAS ALWAYS been a keen triathlete. But in 2002, while training for a triathlon in the UK, his life was changed forever. Darron was involved in a cycling accident that left him with permanent damage to his spinal cord. “I was rushed to hospital and underwent surgery to pin fractures in both my neck and spine,” he recalls. “My rehabilitation program took six months in hospital, including eight weeks in a collar to repair the broken bones in my neck that could not be pinned.” Darron says the lengthy stay in hospital meant his whole life had to be put on hold. But as someone who had always lived life to the full – and thanks to his ethos of focussing on the here and now – he was soon making plans for a bright future. Eighteen months after the accident, Darron and his family migrated to Australia where he enrolled in a sports science degree at the University of the Sunshine Coast. He says completing his studies in 2008 was the greatest achievement of his life, but that was just the start. Determined not to become a victim of his spinal cord injury, Darron has continued to fuel his passion for triathlons. With a handcycle and racing chair, Darron has completed the Noosa Triathlon, the Hervey Bay 100, the World Series Swims and the gruelling 70.3 Ironman. “I got into sports very quickly with handcycling and found my passion again in 2010 with para-triathlon events,” he says. Darron is now the Injury Prevention program administrator for the east-coast arm of the Paraplegic Benefit Fund (PBF). He is also a presenter for PBF’s injury prevention programs at schools and workplaces. The injury prevention program is designed to help people realise the risks in everyday life through the sharing of personal stories of spinal cord injury. The PBF is a membership-based organisation offering crucial financial protection in the event of a permanent spinal cord injury such as Darron’s. In locations such as the Sunshine Coast, where many of us enjoy an active outdoor lifestyle, such prevention has never been so important.

Every day someone in Australia suffers a spinal cord injury. That’s about 350 people per year and the scary thing is a spinal cord injury can happen to anyone, at any time, doing anything. More than 40 per cent of spinal cord injuries occur through motor vehicle-related accidents, 28 per cent are related to falls, and nine per cent are water related. For Darron, the often-emotional experience of sharing his story is worth it if he can help prevent even one spinal cord injury. Darron and the other PBF presenters also work closely with people who have suffered a spinal cord injury and help them re-enter the workplace. For Darron, this is deeply important work. “The fund allows people to be employed, to get back out there, and that’s the biggest part of what we do, for me. By us sharing our darkest day and the message that it can happen to anyone, we’re giving people the self-esteem to go back out into the community and bring in an income,” he says. “We’re supporting people living with a spinal cord injury.” The PBF says the best way to prevent a spinal cord injury is to understand how it can happen. Driving down a dirt road, bushwalking, jumping into the ocean and other behaviours that might not seem that risky can all result in injuries to the spinal cord. A PBF spokesperson says making smarter choices while doing normal things can help keep you safe. “This does not mean you have to stop having fun, rather that you need to just take a moment and assess the waterway before diving in, and always go feet first, not head first,” the spokesperson says. “Slow down and take in your surrounds and look for trip hazards while bushwalking. When driving, make sure you give 100 per cent of your attention.” Members of the PBF provide financial protection for themselves and their families in the event of a spinal cord injury. PBF members also support people living with a spinal cord injury and membership fees employ presenters who then share their personal stories in the hope of preventing more spinal cord injuries. For Darron, his work has a twin purpose. “I want to share the message on safety because I don’t want this to happen to anyone else. But I also want to show people with spinal cord injuries that you can live a good life, a positive life, after a spinal cord injury,” he says. “Just keep moving.” pbf.asn.au

W

BRE

DI

UN EUM

EUM

UND

BRE

W

I

EUMUND

I

BREW

saltmagazine . com . au

33


SHOOTING STARS

STEPPING WORDS LINDA READ

P U

“OUR LIVES ARE A BLESSING and not a curse. But some days could be better. And some could be worse.” From the song Could Be Worse, Bearfoot. 34

salt

If you had to choose one word to sum up the philosophy of Sunshine Coast reggae band Bearfoot, it would definitely be ‘feelgood’. Okay, maybe that’s not really one word. But in light of Bearfoot’s latest single Could Be Worse, it should be. If a second word was required for their style of music ‘catchy’ comes to mind. ‘Infectious’, even. And infectious, feel-good music’s not a bad combination on anyone’s playlist. Perhaps that’s why Bearfoot are finding themselves pretty solidly booked at shows and festivals around the country this year, and have just returned from their first overseas gig at Luminate Festival in Nelson, New Zealand. Not bad for a bunch of Sunshine Coast lads with a huge collaborative talent and a passionate desire to share the musical love.


Photo Steven Walsh

STYLE-WISE, I LIKE TO TELL PEOPLE WE’RE BEACH REGGAE.

Then we got Sully [Sullivan Heywood – trumpet] in, for some eye candy.” Damian Khoury [keyboards/backing vocals] completes the group, whose connection to each other and their music is palpable. Each one brings his own brand of individual talent to the organic whole. “Everyone’s kind of different,” says Asher. “Some have a metal background, some a classical background, some a jazz background.” The result is a unique style of reggae becoming increasingly recognised as Bearfoot’s own. “Style-wise, I like to tell people we’re beach reggae,” says Rohan. “Obviously we all live pretty close to the beach and spend a bit of time around there, so there’s an ocean vibe creeping in.” That ocean vibe is front and centre in the Could Be Worse film clip, released in January this year and filmed on both the Sunshine Coast and Stradbroke Island. While the overwhelming vibe of Could Be Worse is positive and optimistic, Bearfoot’s music does not shy away from commenting and reflecting on deeper issues – in true reggae style. The band’s first EP, Tribe, released in June last year, includes the singles Babylon and Impolite, both of which contain political and social messages. Babylon’s lyrics include the lines, “When will the people stand up and take their message to the streets; them politicians be greedy, taking jobs from the needy…” “A lot of the lyrics come from our personal philosophy, and what the world is now, and it’s a reflection,” says Asher. “That’s in the ‘angrier’ songs – what’s happening in the world around us. If you look at Impolite or Babylon, that’s the darker side of what we do. “But to get a message across, it helps to have a positive angle on it.” Babylon, released in 2015, kicked things off for Bearfoot, who went on to win a 2016 Queensland Music Award for best blues/ roots release for Impolite. Spurred on by the award, and with Triple J and community radio giving the band good airplay, Bearfoot gained a strong local following. After playing at a few festivals, the fan base grew.

Top: Sullivan Heywood, Asher Chapman, Rohan Nitschke Front: Damian Khoury, Sean Keenan, Rhys Fox

Bearfoot’s unique brand of reggae is a result of a fusion of talents and styles from its six members, brought together by a shared desire to create music with soul, self-awareness and a feel-good groove. The band began as a trio back in 2013 with original members Asher Chapman (vocals/guitar/lyrics), Sean Keenan (drums) and Rhys Fox (bass/backing vocals). Asher says the process of the band’s formation was “organic”. “We kind of got together just jamming,” he says. “We all played in other bands and all started jamming at open mics. We got a few gigs, then we started playing at Solbar [in Maroochydore] on Sunday sessions. “Rohan [Nitschke – lead guitar/backing vocals] decided to jump in and we couldn’t get rid of him so we’re stuck with him now.

“The festival atmosphere is great,” says Asher. “There are people there who want to listen, not just people who have gone to a pub. And it’s a good time because you get to hang out and chill with everyone else; everyone’s on a good wavelength.” Having played at a string of high-profile festivals here and in New Zealand, Bearfoot are looking forward to a packed schedule for 2017, which includes the Noosa Festival of Surfing and headlining the Queensland Ska and Reggae Festival in April. Recording new music is also on the cards, with a full album planned for later in the year. And at the heart of Bearfoot’s burgeoning success is that collective feel-good vibe that makes beautiful music. “Philosophy-wise, it’s about positivity, good times,” says Rohan. “For us it’s about us guys as players having a good time together and we want to project that vibe to everyone who comes to our shows. We just want you to have fun and a good time and take away a positive experience.” For Bearfoot, that’s a unanimous feeling. “It’s all about love,” says Damian. “We do it because we love it. And it’s fun.”

saltmagazine . com . au

35


BOOKS & BLOGS

THE LAST CROCODILE HUNTER: A FATHER AND SON LEGACY Bob Irwin with Amanda French | Allen & Unwin | $33 I loved Steve Irwin, but who didn’t? He was a kind, funny, adventurous bloke who loved animals, his country, his family and his life. It was impossible to believe it when he passed away! I was recently fortunate to meet Steve’s dad, Bob Irwin, along with writer and conservationist Amanda French with whom he wrote this book. It is the story of this unique father and son team, the adventures they shared and the love they had for each other. I never planned to read the whole book, but I read every word, enjoying sharing these times with Bob and Steve, and learning about the history of one of Queensland’s tourism icons. Bob’s purpose in life is to protect Australia’s wildlife and teach others about the beauty and vulnerability of these unique creatures. Whether you enjoy a family history, a wild adventure story or just a good yarn, this book ticks many boxes. It made me laugh and cry, and it made me want to get into my khaki gear and go bush!

ACQUACOTTA: RECIPES AND STORIES FROM TUSCANY’S SECRET SILVER COAST Emiko Davies | Hardie Grant | $50 Italian cuisine will never go out of fashion. I don’t know anyone who doesn’t love tucking into a simple yet glorious pasta dish or an Italian-flavoured salad, or a gelato so good that your eyes roll back in your head! I don’t think travel to Italy will ever go out of fashion, either. There is a great deal to attract a tourist – firstly the food, then the history, the scenery, the people and much more. This new cookbook will make you fall in love with Italy and is guaranteed to have you salivating over the fabulous recipes and lush photographs. The author lived in a small fishing village called Porto Ercole on the Silver Coast of Tuscany for six months. The local cuisine has been influenced by the fishermen, the farmers and the hunters of the region, and the contents of the book are arranged appropriately into The Woods, The Sea & Lagoon, The Vegetable Patch, and The Farmhouse. The food is simple and wholesome, and created to share. One-pot dishes are the preferred method, and there are a surprising number of vegan and glutenfree recipes. Acquacotta, or ‘stone soup’, is a Tuscan soup with the ingredients varying from village to village, but the word actually means ‘cooked in water’. You will enjoy the recipes and cooking tips, as well as the photography and fabulous stories about the local fishermen, farmers, shopkeepers and cooks.

36

salt

THE REAL DEAL

Make room on your bookshelf for these non-fiction titles for home, health and heart.

A WHOLE NEW WAY TO EAT Vladia Cobrdova | Murdoch Books | $40 This is an attractive yet very simple collection of vegan, vegetarian and paleo recipes – your body will thank you! How does chai-spiced osso bucco in the slow cooker sound for a hearty meal? Or turmeric and lime coconut baked snapper, which you can whip up in less than half an hour, and is an excellent source of lean protein? I love the turmeric, yoghurt and tahini potato salad – it tastes wicked but is actually doing my body good. Nutritionist, author and About Life wellness ambassador Vladia Cobrdova has been working in the organic industry for close to 15 years and has seen organics and wellness go from alternative to mainstream. She is passionate about sharing her knowledge and helping others enjoy the abundance of good healthy produce, freely available in this country. The new string to Vladia’s bow is this very attractive and informative cookbook with more than 130 recipes, which will inspire both novice and skilled cooks, and which will enhance your home cooking and health.


Photo Tonya McCahon

LIVING DESIGN Jamie Durie & Nadine Bush | Penguin | $60 Jamie Durie and his creative director Nadine Bush have put together a new style book with the sub-title: How To Bring The Outside In – Creating A Transterior Home. The word transterior is a Jamie Durie invention, but it perfectly describes the melding of our indoor and outdoor spaces, using colour, texture, lighting, soft furnishings, plants and more. Over the years we have begun to live in an unsustainable way, disconnected from nature, and obsessed with technology, but many people are now moving towards a life more in tune with nature and the outdoors. Many of us have outdoor entertaining and sitting areas, finding that a green environment is conducive to happiness, inspiration and relaxation, but we cannot always be outdoors, so the obvious thing is to bring some of these elements inside. The book is full of gorgeous photographs of Jamie’s own houses plus some of his clients’ illustrating ways of creating successful transterior experiences. He breaks various design concepts down into parts, making an indoor revamp possible for anyone.

Win

FOR YOUR CHANCE TO WIN A COPY OF THE MATHEMATICS BOOK BY HELEN PROCHAZKA GO TO THE WIN PAGE AT SALTMAGAZINE.COM.AU BLOG ROLL — THINGS WE LOVE

THE MATHEMATICS BOOK Helen Prochazka | Self published | $60 I am not a big fan of mathematics myself, having struggled through the subject at school, but since becoming a bookseller I have found many people are entranced by maths, and there are many books on the subject. This superb book by Helen Prochazka promises to help people like me embrace, understand and even enjoy this subject, showing the relevance of maths in our everyday lives. This is a large coffee table book, which is attractive enough to share space with architecture, travel and fashion titles. It’s full of glossy photographs, diagrams and drawings, and information on the history of the use of mathematics, formulae, facts and even poetry. Helen has had a love affair with mathematics since she was seven years old. She says maths gives her a sense of constancy; the rules keep everything the same. This is a book that will be an entertainment and a benefit to anyone just starting to learn mathematics, but can also be enjoyed by maths aficionados.

BLOGS TO BOOKMARK SUNSHINE COAST BIRDS We’ve recently come across this natural history blog by Greg Roberts. If you love our local natural environment, check him out. sunshinecoastbirds.blogspot.com.au THE PARIS REVIEW Like salt, The Paris Review (one of the world’s best-known literary magazines) is a quarterly. But you can get your literary fix at any time on its blog. theparisreview.org/blog ZOTHEYSAY She’s an author, columnist, mum, wife and skincare entrepreneur. Zoë Foster Blake is also pretty good at book recommendations via her blog. zotheysay.com/zoes-blog FASHEMATICS Don’t understand fashion? Then head over to this blog, which offers up simple maths equations that make sense of the most perplexing runway looks. Very funny stuff. fashematics.com Book reviews by Annie’s Books On Peregian, 8 Kingfisher Drive, Peregian Beach. 5448 2053 or anniesbooksonperegian.com.au The blogs were selected by salt HQ.

saltmagazine . com . au

37


YOUNG ENTREPRENEUR

THE FINE PRINT WORDS LINDA READ PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

WHAT DOES A COUNTRY boy with no money, no design experience and no firm plans for the future do in his last year of school? Start a fashion label, of course. At least that’s what Jayden English, now 18, did when he launched surf label Turtl3 Co. late in 2015 while still a schoolboy. Now it seems there’s no turning back for this teenage entrepreneur, whose designs are being worn by sporting superstars. NRL royalty such as Dane Gagai, Ash Taylor and Kalyn Ponga are just a few of the celebrities who have been spotted in Turtl3 Co.’s T-shirts, caps and singlets, and Jayden is pinching himself. “I’ve been playing football since I was about six, so seeing people wearing my stuff, people that I see on TV every weekend and look up to, is overwhelming,” he says. A resident of the Sunshine Coast, Jayden originally comes from the rural town of Gatton, a couple of hours south-west of Brisbane and a million miles, figuratively speaking, from the glimmering surf beaches that inspire his designs. It was while he was still living in Gatton, however, that Turtl3 Co. was born. “Late at the end of year 12, I was kind of looking for something to do after school,” he says. “I wasn’t really sure what to do and it just kind of started off as a joke; I wasn’t really going to follow through with it. I ended up getting a few shirts made for me and a couple of friends and after that, I thought ‘hey, I can make a bit of money out of this’.

38

salt


I LOVE CREATING STUFF AND I LOVE DRAWING. I WASN’T TOO FLASH AT IT BUT I’VE ALWAYS HAD AN INTEREST IN IT.

“That’s how it all started. It just kept going and I learnt as I went.” Although Jayden obviously has a creative streak, he had no formal training, relying instead on instinct and probably a smattering of natural talent, although he is quick to play that down. “I’ve always been pretty artistic,” he says. “I love creating stuff and I love drawing. I wasn’t too flash at it but I’ve always had an interest in it.” While Jayden and his family had always holidayed on the Gold Coast, it was the Sunshine Coast he was really drawn to and where he would ultimately find his creative home. “When I was doing high school my mate’s family had a house at Moffat Beach,” says Jayden. “When I went with his family, I fell in love with the Sunshine Coast. We would come up here every weekend, every school holidays, whenever we had a chance we’d get someone to bring us up here. We just loved it. “What attracted me the most is it feels more laidback, the atmosphere; no skyscrapers. Something just drew me to it. It’s a different feel. A lot more relaxed.” Moving to the Sunshine Coast was an obvious choice for Jayden, who is now in his second year of a bachelor of design and marketing at the University of the Sunshine Coast (USC) – and there’s no prize for guessing why. “The only reason I chose USC is because I want to live up here,” he says. Clearly, it’s the environment he so loves that inspires Jayden’s designs, which he describes as “simplistic”. However, he says Turtl3 Co.’s next range, which he is currently working on, will be “more colourful and less structured”. Jayden does all Turtl3 Co.’s design and marketing himself. Social media, particularly Instagram, has brought huge marketing success for the label. At the start, Jayden had shirts printed through websites that work on a commission, until he built up enough of a bank to go solo. “It all started from zero dollars,” he says. “If they charged $25, I’d get $10. I did that for a while until I got to $1000, then I went on my own. Now I do everything myself except for the actual printing. The money I earn I turn around and put back into [the business].”

However, juggling his full-time university studies with his growing business is not easy. “When I started I didn’t really plan much but as I’m maturing I’m trying to work how to make time to do everything,” he says. “You’ve got to find days when you just do it; you can’t get distracted.” Jayden believes it could well be his appreciation of the Coast, as an ‘outsider’, that gives his design perspective an edge. “My inspiration comes from the beaches and the environment,” he says. “[Coming from Gatton] kind of gives me an outside look on the beach and the coastal life. So I use that in my designs; I kind of have a different view to people who have always lived here.” As for the future, it seems very likely we’ll be seeing a lot more of this young designer’s work, based on his track record. At the moment, Turtl3 Co.’s range is mainly T-shirts, caps and singlets, but Jayden plans to continue developing the range and to see it included in more boutiques and surf shops. And he doesn’t intend on giving up the beach lifestyle any time soon. “I’ll go with the flow, but I do plan on expanding into more items of clothing, and getting into more stores would be another big thing,” he says. “I’m planning to stay on the Coast at least until I finish uni – if not longer. I’m pretty laidback.” turtl3co.com

saltmagazine . com . au

39


A DOSE OF SALT

A COOL CHANGE

WORDS JEMMA PEARSON ILLUSTRATION AMY BORRELL

AFTER THE SUMMER we’ve just had, autumn seemed so far away. And yet, here it is. We’ve sweltered through some of the hottest summer days I can remember. For months we’ve danced on hot sand and burned our feet on melting bitumen, we’ve perspired at the school gates, sought refuge at the nearest air-conditioned shopping centre and nursed our sunburned bodies. And now we wait for the sweet relief that autumn brings. The cooler weather will come, eventually, but in our part of the world it arrives with little pomp or ceremony. March 1 (or indeed mid-March) feels no different to February 28. On the Sunshine Coast, autumn – my favourite of all the seasons – is fleeting. 40

salt

The traditional association many of us have with this time of year is that of harvest, when we turn our backs on summer’s heat and embrace the hard work of preparing for a long, cold winter ahead. It’s a very rural and quite old-fashioned view of the seasons, but one that’s hard to shake. And besides, I like the romanticism of it. While spring is a time of growth and renewal, autumn is a time to take stock, to reap the rewards of effort, to gather and store. William Blake’s poem To Autumn beautifully celebrates the season. Blake treats autumn as an old friend, inviting it to “…pass not, but sit, beneath my shady roof; there thou may’st rest, and tune thy jolly voice to my fresh pipe, and all the daughters of the year shall dance! Sing now the lusty song of fruits and flowers.”


AUTUMN AND SPRING ARE BUT BRIEF INTERMISSIONS BETWEEN THE MORE INTENSE SEASONS. Blake expresses the bounty of the harvest, and the promise of future crops. Autumn is more than the end of summer and beginning of winter; it is the continuation of the cycle of life. And in its turn autumn with also leave us behind. In the poem, Blake urges autumn to stay, but like all seasons it will move on, to make way for winter. Autumn, Blake writes, “girded himself, and o’er the bleak hills fled from our sight; but left his golden load”. I was born and spent most of my childhood in a part of the world where the seasons are far more pronounced than they are here on the Sunshine Coast. Winter in my town was cold, sometimes bleak. The temperature often dropped below freezing and the early-morning ground was crunchy with frost – the winters of my childhood smelled of wood smoke and the hint of snow. We knew spring had arrived when the wattles began to flower, and beneath our old willow tree daffodils and jonquils burst out of the ground. However, spring weather was unpredictable – you didn’t put away your winter coats until December. Summers were hot and dry and the soundtrack to this season, from early morning until late into the evening, was the din of cicadas. But autumn was, and still is, the season when the town glowed. In March and even into April the temperature was still warm, and early morning fog would often cover the trees, where the

leaves were making ready to put on a show. To say the leaves turned from green to shades of orange, yellow and red just doesn’t do justice to the display. Along any tree-lined street you could look up into the trees and pick out shades of wine and burnt umber, golden yellow and deep peach. Tangerine and vermillion, dark purple, ochre and rosy gold hues competed for your attention, and on the ground the leaves turned from tawny brown to dirt brown, and crunched and crackled underfoot.

You could accuse me of sentimentality but I promise you I am not exaggerating. People plan their weddings in and holidays to this town to experience the autumn show. One of the downsides (and there are few) of living on the Sunshine Coast is that autumn is so brief. While our noses and shoulders are still peeling from the last of our sunburns we will be digging out the ugg boots and squeezing into our jeans. Autumn – and spring – are but brief intermissions between the more intense seasons. One week we’re kicking the sheets off our beds as we swelter through summer nights, and the next we’re digging out our doonas and complaining of the cold. So savour autumn while we have it. It comes but once a year. To see more illustrations by Amy Borrell visit amyborrell.com

Mercedes-Benz Sunshine Coast The best or nothing. Mercedes-Benz Sunshine Coast will deliver you the ultimate Mercedes-Benz experience. Offering the finest selection of New & Certified Pre-Owned Mercedes-Benz vehicles and Commercial Vans, along with Service, Parts & Finance, our team is dedicated to providing you with the highest level of service with each interaction. Discover for yourself. www.mbsunshinecoast.com.au

Mercedes-Benz Sunshine Coast 65-73 Maroochy Boulevard, Maroochydore 07 5409 0100 3118753 www.mbsunshinecoast.com.au

saltmagazine . com . au

41


TABLE TALK

Beachy keen

WORDS LAHNEE PAVLOVICH PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

Signature smashed avocado Black sesame, almond and orange cake with decorative white chocolate 42

salt


CELEBRATE

escaping the everyday in the Hinterland

LOUISE THOMS AND STEVE ARNOLD fell in love with Noosa long before they arrived here. When they did come, fresh off the plane, they were dropped off by taxi right in the heart of Hastings Street. And from the moment they inhaled that salty sea air five years ago they knew they were home. Although from England, Louise and Steve were no strangers to beach life – they spent a good part of 17 years living and working in the Mediterranean. This is what inspired their cafe 10 Hastings Street. “We had never owned a cafe before we moved to Noosa,” Louise says. “We had never been to Australia before either, so both things were very new and exciting.” The couple and their children, who now number four, packed up and moved to our part of the world after Steve was recruited by a hotel management company.

VISIT THE TAMARIND AND TRY THE SPEC TACUL AR NEW MENU

“We had to choose a place to base ourselves so we did our research, loved the look and feel of Noosa and the rest is history,” Louise says. “The kids love it too. We have four children under nine and they all love spending days off in the ocean, playing in the sand, exploring. Noosa really is the perfect place for a family.”

We invite you to come and try

After landing in the iconic street, they set about immersing themselves in the local scene, enjoying fresh produce, local designs, homewares and, of course, the beach itself. These activities would later provide Louise with all the inspiration she needed to design her ultimate seaside cafe.

Open for lunch 12-2pm Friday to Sunday and dinner 5pm-late Tuesday to Sunday.

“When we originally took the lease on 10 Hotel, I had only ever dipped my toes in hospitality as a teenager,” she says. “I’ve done almost everything else from teaching to office work, marketing, copywriting, I was even a make-up artist in Portugal. Steve has always been in hotel management so it wasn’t such a big stretch for him. “The cafe came about because 10 Hotel had a shopfront,” Louise adds. “I was actually pregnant at the time so I thought I’d open a little coffee shop and just serve coffee and cake while Steve managed the property.” >

The Tamarind’s tantalising new menu inspired by Head Chef Daniel Jarrett’s love for bold, fresh, modern Asian flavours.

Why not linger a little longer and enjoy some rejuvenation at our onsite day spa, Spa Anise? Ask about our Thalasso Therapy Performance Facial - our latest seasonal skin treatment harnessing advanced cosmeceuticals to redefine your skin.

$145 per person for a 60 minute treatment. To visit The Tamarind or Spa Anise phone 5420 5420. Booking essential.


Sangria

Patatas Bravas (tapas)

But it didn’t take long for the humble street-front coffee haunt to evolve into something else entirely. “It was quite incredible really; it just grew very organically from coffee and cake to adding paninis but people kept wanting more,” Louise says. “All we had was a sandwich press, a toaster and a microwave but somehow with just that we managed to do breakfast and keep evolving from there. Now we have three qualified chefs, a great team of staff and we serve breakfast, lunch and dinner.” Influenced heavily by Noosa itself, the beachy ambience, chilledout vibe, and by the Mediterranean life they had loved during their travels, 10 Hastings Street quickly began to take shape. “The beauty of the Mediterranean and relaxed atmosphere of Noosa really influences our seasonal menu and the style of the cafe we have,” Louise says. “When things started to take shape and the cafe got bigger and bigger, I had a clear idea of what I wanted. I love interior design and so I did a lot of research, looked at cafes in Sydney, Melbourne and Bali and that’s where I got most of my ideas when it came to the look and feel of 10 Hastings Street,” she says. 44

salt


“I pretty much lived on Pinterest and Instagram, looking at photos I liked and being inspired by what others were doing, and then turning these ideas into something that incorporated everything Noosa was about. The beachy feel, greens, whites, palms, life near the beach, you know, where you can rock up in your swimmers, it’s really relaxed and you can come in straight off the beach and still enjoy beautiful food. That was what I wanted – a relaxed vibe, fresh food, great coffee, friendly staff and a dynamic place.”

will be cheaper but my response is no, not doing it. I want to be fresh and healthy but still appeal to the masses because Noosa is so eclectic! We get everyone come in from the elderly to the athletes and anyone in between.”

And that is exactly what they have. An establishment where salty hair and sandy feet don’t mean you can’t come in and enjoy the European-inspired menu with a fresh twist.

“It is good to keep feeling inspired by new things. We are obviously really inspired by the food we ate throughout Europe. Europeans cook simple food, but it is always bursting with deep flavours and we want to bring that here to the Sunshine Coast.”

“We always use local produce too.” Louise says she doesn’t want to buy produce from non-local sources. “People always tell me it

Louise says 10 Hastings Street changes its menu quarterly. “People are always surprising me with their menu choices too, so we try to keep things as exciting as possible. I even get 80-year-old locals coming in for acai bowls,” she says.

10hastingsstreet.com.au

saltmagazine . com . au

45


NOSH NEWS

Been to THE LOOSE GOOSE lately? The Twin Waters restaurant is offering the Sticky Beak lunch menu, which will set you back just $30 for two courses or $35 for three courses. It’s available Wednesday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday, with BYO wine and champagne. The Loose Goose deck overlooks a pond where you can get in touch with the local wildlife while enjoying your lunch. 3/175 Ocean Drive, Twin Waters. 5457 0887 or theloosegoose.com.au

Dining has never played a bigger part in our lives, so here salt shares news, information and products that enhance our passionate consumption.

Inspired modern Asian cuisine is how SPICERS TAMARIND RETREAT describes its onsite restaurant. And we couldn’t agree more. Head chef Daniel Jarrett has a talent for harnessing the tastes of Asia, as he effortlessly combines sweet, sour and spicy flavours with fresh local produce. The innovative menu is designed to be enjoyed family style, which means it’s placed in the centre of the table for sharing. Chinese flavours, Japanese inspiration and Thai tastes are all there. 88 Obi Lane South, Maleny. 5420 5420 or spicersretreats.com/spicers-tamarind-retreat

nosh news

Pasture raised and nutrient rich, EUMUNDI MEATS NOOSA’S paleo range includes lamb and beef, an extensive signature sausage and burger range, nitrite- and sugarfree bacon, and locally sourced organic poultry and bones to create gut healing bone broths. Eumundi Meats can be found at Belmondos Organic Market and at selected health food stores across Queensland’s south east. 59 Rene Street, Noosaville. 5474 3817 or eumundimeats.com.au 46

salt

If it’s been a while since you checked out the Eumundi Markets, it’s time to head on up. The salt team has discovered handmade candy maker Damian Brewer (aka Kaptonhook), is the man behind CANDYSMITH and has recently joined the foodie scene at the iconic markets. Locals might remember his candy store Cane & Able, which was open in Coolum from 2003 to 2005. Recently he’s been teaching the 200-year-old candy-making technique around the world. If you’re looking for an unusual gift for an event or just for someone you know who has a sweet tooth, check him out at Original Eumundi Markets, 80 Memorial Drive, Eumundi every Wednesday and Saturday. eumundimarkets.com.au/ stall-holder/candysmith


Did somebody say pizza? One of our salt favourites, HUNGRY FEEL in Buderim, is offering pizza and vino every Saturday from 3pm to 6pm. You’ll pay just $20 for house-made pizza matched with a glass of wine or beer. How’s that for a bargain? The vibe is casual and there is no need to book. Hungry Feel also offers a kids’ menu, drinks menu and snack menu. 29 Main Street, Buderim. 5477 1331 or hungryfeel.com.au

Get away from the bustle of Hastings Street and track down NOOSA WATERFRONT RESTAURANT. Located in a beautiful spot on the river, not only does the restaurant offer award-winning cuisine, but it also has a designated takeaway area. For a casual bite choose from Italian-style pizzas, lasagne or classic fish and chips. Then snag a picnic spot and enjoy. 142 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville. 5474 4444 or noosawaterfrontrestaurant.com.au/takeaway

TANGLEWOOD ORGANIC SOURDOUGH BAKERY offers a range of delicious breads that are made using a 20-hour fermentation process. This makes the bread easier to digest and increases the natural flavour and character of each loaf. Tanglewood’s organic sourdough range incorporates ancient grains and fresh milled flour. Enjoy the breads on their own, or warmed with organic extra virgin olive oil and Celtic sea salt or simply spread with organic butter. Available to buy fresh from Lavish Fine Foods in Coolum, Humdrum Espresso, Providore on Hastings, and Belmondos Organic Market. 59 Rene Street, Noosaville. 5473 0215 or tanglewood.com.au

OPEN FROM 4 PM


CULINARY CREATIONS

CULINARY CREATIONS

CHEF NILLA TOMKINS RESTAURANT VANILLAFOOD

SUPERFOOD BREAKFAST FRITTATA Serves 4 Cooking time 30 mins Preparation 15 mins

Ingredients: 2 tbsp organic olive oil 1 zucchini, sliced 1 broccoli, roughly processed 1 cup baby spinach 4 tbsp cooked quinoa 1 small sweet potato, sliced and roasted 10 organic eggs 1/ 2 cup coconut cream

48

salt


Met hod Heat olive oil in a medium-sized skillet over medium heat. Place zucchini in the skillet, cover and cook for about 10 minutes, until tender. Mix in broccoli, spinach, quinoa and roasted sweet potato. Season with salt and pepper if desired. In a mixing bowl, beat together eggs and coconut cream. Pour over the vegetables in the skillet. Reduce heat to low, cover and cook for 10-15 minutes, or until eggs are firm. CHEF’S NOTE Superfoods are not only exotic fruits like goji, acai or maqui. Everyday superfoods include spinach, broccoli, kale, blueberries, blackberries, sweet potato, quinoa, brown rice and oats, as they are all nutrient-packed foods beneficial for your health and wellbeing. A typical superfood breakfast for me includes protein, vegies and a handful of berries. My favourite breakfast protein is organic poached eggs. If it’s not protein based, for breakfast I would have oats that I have soaked overnight. To that I usually add a few superfoods and coconut yoghurt. PHILOSOPHY The creative behind VanillaFood, Nilla Tomkins was born in Denmark. Her interest in food started when she was a young girl helping out in her mother’s kitchen. After many years of being a chef, her love of organic whole foods and health blossomed, and she decided to open her own cafe, VanillaFood. Available at VanillaFood, 59 Rene Street, Noosaville. 0427 466 977

restaurant . weddings bar . functions

With exclusive river views, Tantalising modern Italian cuisine and exceptional service, the noosa waterfront restaurant & bar is one of the premier RESTAURANTS AND WEDDING VENUES on the Sunshine Coast

open for lunch & Dinner tuesday to sunday

www.noosawaterfrontrestaurant.com.au

(07) 5474 4444

142 Gympie terrace, noosaville, qld, 4567

saltmagazine . com . au

49


PRODUCE PEOPLE

Tuck In WORDS LINDA READ

IS IT A BIRD? Is it a plane? No. It’s the ‘superfood’ phenomenon. The word may be fairly new but the foods it describes have been around for millennia. They are considered super because they are jam-packed with extra nutrients – think acai, chia, quinoa, lucuma. Hailing from exotic and far-flung regions like the Amazon and the Andes, superfoods have had a meteoric rise in popularity in recent years. But there’s another vast and varied range of superfoods right on our doorstep – Australian native bush foods, or bush tucker. These are the foods indigenous Australians thrived on for many thousands of years and they’re growing in many of our backyards. Australian bush foods are steadily gaining a following with chefs and foodies discovering the delicious, nutritious benefits of these 50

salt

native delicacies. That’s why you’ll find them popping up in the gourmet sections in supermarkets, and on the menus of finedining restaurants. On the Sunshine Coast there is plenty of bush food available, some of which is unique to the region. Sunshine Coast chef and bush tucker specialist Dale Chapman, who lectures in food science at the University of Queensland, says the Coast boasts varieties of wild mint, lilly pilly and lemon aspen plants that are specific to the area, and all popularly used in native food cooking. Dale says the rise in popularity of bush foods in the community is due to a couple of things: firstly, a heightened social conscience that encourages the support of indigenous businesses and people across Australia; and secondly, the health craze that is sweeping the population.


“People are looking for healthy alternatives, for another health version of food – superfoods, as they call them,” says Dale. “Food is medicine, and I think it’s never more apparent than in Australian bush foods.” So how do we get them, and how do we use them? Bush foods are either the highly sought-after wild-harvested variety, or commercially grown – a practice that is essential to the sustainability of the Australian bush food industry. Like any cuisine, it helps to learn from an expert if you want to know how to grow, harvest, cook and prepare bush foods. Dale recommends the Yandina Community Gardens for its bush food course, and the Witjuti Grub Bushfood Nursery at Obi Obi as a valuable source of information. If you prefer someone else to do the hard work, keep your eye on Harry’s on Buderim, which embraces bush foods on its fine-dining menu. Dale, a Kooma Yuwaalaraay woman from south-west Queensland who has lived on the Coast for 16 years, breaks bush foods into six different groups: animals; water; plants; seeds and nuts; grubs and insects; and honey and nectar. She relates the food groups to Australia’s six seasons – wet and dry, as well as the four usual ones. Seasonal awareness is vital, Dale says, to using bush foods successfully. Some of the most popular bush foods making their way into products and onto restaurant menus include wild figs, bush lemons, white aspens, bush tomatoes, wild greens, finger limes and Davidson plums. Many of these foods are now being produced in powdered form, making them a handy additive to smoothies, cereals and baked goods. “You only need a little bit of these concentrated formulas to enhance any of your dishes,” says Dale. “And for want of a better word, they are the superfoods. They’re high in antioxidants, great for the brain and the heart and the prevention of different diseases. “We’re getting dehydrated date and plum powder, and dehydrated finger limes. I use fresh finger limes in cheesecakes, then I finish the top with a dehydrated finger lime, which gives this beautiful tanginess and different acidic flavour to the sweetness of the creamy cheesecake.”

FOOD IS MEDICINE, AND I THINK IT’S NEVER MORE APPARENT THAN IN AUSTRALIAN BUSH FOODS.

In the seed department, ground wattleseeds make a delicious flour substitute – a mainstay of indigenous Australians for many generations. Then there are the native fruits, such as the clustered riberry (with three times the folate of a blueberry) or the supersweet crimson quandong (with twice the vitamin C of an orange) that can be eaten whole, or added to baked treats and desserts. One of the Sunshine Coast’s specialties is the iconic bunya nut, the cone-shaped fruit of the majestic, towering pines synonymous with the hinterland areas. According to Dale, the bunya trees on the Coast are the parent trees to the ones in the Bunya Mountains in south-west Queensland. “The bunya was the thing that brought people together every few years to the bunya festivals,” says Dale. “There was a plentiful supply. Aboriginal communities from all over Australia would come to those festivals. I think that’s why the bunya is one of those very sought-after things. It’s also gluten-free, which makes it an excellent product. I love bunya nuts; they absorb whatever you cook them in. So if you’ve done them in a kangaroo stew, they’re going to taste like beautiful kangaroo meat. “I think it’s the versatility of bush foods that makes them appealing to chefs too, because they’re not only sweet; they can be savoury. There’s a whole variety of things you can do with them.” FOR EXTRA SALT visit saltmagazine.com.au for Dale’s Bunya and Coconut Aspen Syrup Cake recipe.

saltmagazine . com . au

51


PADDOCK TO PLATE

photo Sophie Matterson

WORDS PENNY SHIPWAY RESTAURANT PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

52

salt


Bohemian Bungalow’s owner/chef Ned Nolan

BENEATH THE PANORAMIC BACKDROP of the Glass House Mountains lies a pristine piece of countryside, with sweeping grassy plains and undulating land of scrub and bush. And there they roam. Camels – around 200 head – gracefully feasting on the plentiful pasture. This 3000-acre property, located west of Caloundra, is home to QCamel. It’s very private and each camel is given a name and treated as though she is part of the family. QCamel supplies its ethically produced, fresh-pasteurised camel milk to eclectic restaurant and bar Bohemian Bungalow in Eumundi. Owner Ned Nolan uses the unique milk in his exquisite panna cotta, tea and coffee. Ned buys the vast majority of his produce from local farms and says QCamel stood out from the crowd, so he quickly formed a partnership with the dairy farm. “They are very friendly and the camels will come in and get milked on their own accord,” Ned says. “They only milk from a camel when it has a calf.” When the camel is out of milk, Ned says “they are sold to camel riding businesses and as pets. They are very carefully vetted.” With chef qualifications under his hat, 34-year-old Ned left Australia when he was 26 and has worked around the world sharpening and reshaping his culinary skills in the UK, India and Turkey, before residing in Hong Kong for six years. While abroad, he learned through “cooking in old kitchens with old mammas in Turkey”, to later becoming owner and head chef of several highend restaurants. Being exposed to so many different cultures gave Ned the ability to work with many diverse cuisines, but his preference today is mostly Mediterranean, and allowing the seasons to dictate the menu. >

FRESH SEASONAL LOCAL SUSTAINABLE Celebrating 15 years

Breakfast, lunch, dinner, coffee, fresh baked pastries, wine, pizza. Tues + Wed 8am-4pm Thurs, Fri, Sat 8am-late www.hungryfeel.com.au 29 Main Street Buderim 5477 1331

saltmagazine . com . au

53


photo Sophie Matterson

Camel milk cappuccino

IT’S NOT STRONG AND GAMEY LIKE GOAT’S MILK IS; IT’S VERY LIGHT AND MILD.

Realising his family was quickly outgrowing the tight constraints of Hong Kong’s crowded and polluted city, Ned started researching businesses for sale in Australia. The opportunity to move to Eumundi came soon after. With Turkish wife Selda and their son, Kaya, Ned settled into a property at Verrierdale eight months ago. They recently welcomed daughter Ezra to the clan. But Ned had hit the ground running before the family left Hong Kong, organising meetings with suppliers and growers. That’s when he discovered that someone was selling camel milk. “The Sunshine Coast has a lot of amazing growers and farmers, and we have some fantastic produce here, so that got me really excited [about moving],” he says. “You can get what you want any time of the year. In Hong Kong you have to get everything everywhere else. You can follow the seasons here, and supporting the local growers is great, but it’s actually really good stuff.” 54

salt

Camel milk panna cotta with local honey, macerated dates and fennel crumb

Ned says he wanted to have a dish that people would talk about when recommending his restaurant to others. “It was really important to have that point of difference.” He had heard of a chef playing around with a camel milk salted caramel dessert, due to the salty nature of the milk. But not one to copy, he set about concocting his own special recipe. “So I played around with different types of mousses. It’s very difficult to set because it doesn’t have that cream, and separates like cow’s milk. Panna cotta was a standout for me because it would easily set with gelatin.” And that’s when Ned’s now famous camel milk panna cotta came about. It has no sugar, but is instead sweetened with local Pomona honey and served with whipped honey and a fennel crumble. It is plated with dates soaked in Mauritius spiced rum.


Bohemian Bungalow lives exactly up to its name – its bohemian and quirky, but is also uber trendy. It serves up a tantalising, exotic affair such as smoked brisket, pork ribs, chicken and potatoes. “We’ve got a reverse slow smoker in our courtyard which we utilise for our meat. The brisket is smoked for 10 hours and the potatoes are used for our breakfast hash browns.” Fish comes in daily from a local Noosa supplier and is pan-fried in lemon butter, complete with spiced kipfler potatoes and a pickled fennel salad. The breakfast menu features bacon and eggs, glutenfree buckwheat pancakes and local goat’s curd from Gympie. There are also vegetarian and vegan options.

Handmade cakes & pastries

CAKES FOR ALL OCCASIONS • CUSTOM ORDERS CAFÉ • HIGH TEA • CATERING WHOLESALE • MACARONS • COOKIES

If you fancy a camel milk coffee or tea, don’t be stunned by the price. A cup of coffee will set you back $8.50, but it’s not surprising, given camel milk retails for around $28 per litre.

Handmade cakes & pastries

“It’s very similar to cow’s milk, but has a slight salty aftertaste,” Ned says. “It’s not strong and gamey like goat’s milk is; it’s very light and mild.” As well as the taste, Ned was attracted to the health benefits of the milk. “Camel milk itself is very good for diabetics because it naturally contains insulin, and also for psoriasis and eczema, either by drinking it or using it raw, topically. Studies in the US have shown that those with autoimmune diseases and autism who drank camel milk over a period of time had an improved condition.” Ned says that while both camel and cow’s milk contain the milk component casein, camel milk doesn’t transfer casein to humans, meaning many of those who are lactose intolerant can enjoy camel’s milk too.

Monday - Friday 9am to 5pm • Saturday 9am to 3pm Shop 3/37 Sunshine Beach Rd, Noosa Heads

So, maybe it’s time to give camel milk a go! Who’s game? 69 Memorial Drive, Eumundi. 5442 8679. bohemianbungalow.com.au

Shop online: fionasfancies.com.au • 07 5473 5317

saltmagazine . com . au

55


RELAXED RECIPES

GUILT-FREE

treats It’s chocolate season, and we’ve got some deliciously decadent treats that are healthy too.

56

salt


< CHOCOLATE CUSTARD

Ingredients: 80g raw organic sugar 3 eggs 500g organic un-homogenised milk 30g cornflour 6-10 cacao melts (or more to taste)

TEAHOUSE INTERIORS GIFTS Beauty Body & Wellness

Montville - Sunshine Coast Hinterland

Met hod

Place all ingredients into a double boiler and keep stirring until thickened. Once the custard is cooked, immediately transfer into serving bowls. Serve with grated cacao melts or fresh whipped cream.

as well as our amazing cake selection we also do breakfast & lunch

Vintage High Tea

$29.95

CHOCOLATE CRUNCH SLICE

Ingredients:

Met hod

6 cacao melts 125g rapadura sugar 125g white or brown flour (if gluten intolerant use an alternative flour such as rice) 90g desiccated or freshly grated coconut 2 tsp cacao powder 1/ 2 tsp bicarb soda 90g rolled oats 125g butter softened 1/ 2 tsp vanilla extract or ½ vanilla pod scraped 60g chopped nuts (any nut will do)

Chop cacao melts finely in a processor or by hand. In a large bowl, combine with sugar, flour, coconut, cacao powder, bicarb and oats. Using an electric beater, mix in butter and vanilla. When well mixed, add nuts. Press mixture into a greased 20cm square tin. Bake at 180°C for approximately 30 minutes or until a knife comes out clean. Cut into squares and leave to cool in tin. For an extra indulgence, ice the top with chocolate icing or ganache. NOTE: These are great for all the family and fantastic for school lunch boxes. >

y • Classic beauty therapy • Bridal make-up • Wedding packages • Girls day out • Specials online

5478 6212

www.elementsmontville.com.au www.facebook.com/alittlebeauty 38 Kondalilla Falls Rd Montville


VERY BERRY CHOCOLATE SMOOTHIE

Ingredients: cup raw almonds 1 frozen banana 3 dates 4-6 cacao melts 1 cup mixed frozen berries (raspberries, blueberries, strawberries) 1/ 4 cup goji berries 330ml coconut water (or coconut, almond or cashew milk) 2 tbsp chia seeds Ice Extra coconut water to mix to desired consistency 1/ 2

Met hod Blend all ingredients together for 1 minute or until smooth and enjoy! (Honey, rapadura sugar or maple syrup can be added to sweeten more if desired.)

CHOCOLATE MUD CAKE

Ingredients: Cake 375g butter (or coconut oil if you would like it to be dairy free) 10 cacao melts 8 free-range eggs 1 cup honey 1 cup coconut flour 1/ 4 cup cacao powder 2 tsp bicarb soda 2 tsp vanilla powder or vanilla bean paste Chocolate Frosting 10 cacao melts 200g coconut oil 150g avocado (2-3 large) 1 tbsp cacao powder 1/ 3 cup raw honey

Met hod Cake Preheat oven to 180°C. Gently melt butter (or coconut oil) and cacao melts together in a pot on the stove, stirring occasionally. Place eggs into a separate bowl 58

salt


Friendly, Fresh, Fantastic

• Breakfast • LUNCH • Dinner •Tapas

257 Gympie Terrace Noosaville | p: 5445 6688 | www.sirocconoosa.com.au

and whisk together. Add in the rest of the ingredients and combine well. Add the melted butter and cacao mixture and ensure it is well combined. Pour batter into a greased and lined tin evenly. Bake for 35-40 minutes or until a skewer comes out clean. Allow to cool to room temperature. Chocolate Frosting Melt cacao melts in a double boiler. Add coconut oil and blend together until smooth. Add remaining ingredients and mix well. Place in refrigerator for 10 minutes and then whisk

again until it has a butter-like consistency. When cool, cut the cake in half and spread about a third of frosting on the bottom layer. Replace the top and spread with the rest of the frosting. Serve with cacao nibs, toasted coconut flakes and fresh strawberries. NOTE: Inspired by Kehoe’s Kitchen, this moist cake is quick to make. It is whole food, gluten free, grain free and can be dairy free. This recipe makes quite a large cake.

Recipes are taken from the ebook 69 Shades of Chocolate, co-authored by Twenty8 Essentials founder Kim Morrison and Cyndi O’Meara. If you love these recipes, Kim is giving away 69 Shades of Chocolate, valued at $14.97, to all salt readers. Just go to www.twenty8.com/saltmag to download your free copy. FOR EXTRA SALT visit saltmagazine.com.au for an extra recipe.

saltmagazine . com . au

59


SALT CELLAR

go for BOLD WORDS MIKE BENNIE

IN THE WINTER MONTHS, when they finally show up, we’re rolling around on bearskin rugs and getting stuck into big, fleshy reds by fireplaces. During our long warm summers we’re likely to be found dangling our legs in swimming pools with a crunchy textured white wine while the sun does its job of beating down the heat. Spring comes around and gives us an opportunity to drink the young, fresh, vibrant wines made from grapes that only months before were dangling off vines like shiny jewels. So where does that leave us with autumn drinking? “I kind of see autumn as the best time to get stuck into some left-ofcentre wine styles,” says award-winning sommelier James Hird of the Dolphin Hotel and Icebergs in Sydney. “Not too out there, but reds made from lesser-praised varieties that deserve a chill, or whites that have loads of texture. I’m all about seasonal wine with seasonal food.” Indeed, Hird has a point. Autumn presents a great opportunity to whip out the stew pot, roast some of the earlier-appearing root vegetables or get stuck into game meats. There’s a great synergy between some of the wines that come with characters I associate with the season, like warming, exotic spices, the sweet smell of drying leaves or the touch of extra generosity needed from a wine as the sun dips away and a coolness comes over you. “Gamay comes to mind for reds,” says Hird. “Gamay’s the major variety in beaujolais, and there are outstanding wines from the region that are light to medium bodied, offer soft fruit character, a dash of spice, show a touch of savouriness, and are just ideal with that transition of season. They’re also super versatile with the flavours of autumn cooking. Pretty spot on really.” In Australia, there is an increasing array of gamay wines that float my boat. Indeed, one of my desert island wines would be Sorrenberg Gamay. This wine, a world-beater in every sense, is produced by one of the pioneers of the variety in Australia, the Morey family from its biodynamically farmed plots of vines in Beechworth, Victoria. The wine is typically silky in texture, fleshy in red and black fruit character, and dusted with gentle spice. It’s as moreish as wine gets. A strong second for me comes from the Mornington Peninsula and the incredible boutique producer Eldridge Estate. David Lloyd is the grape grower and winemaker there, and he reliably makes a wine that would sit equally or above many of the world’s best examples of 60

salt

gamay. It’s superbly drinkable, fine in tannin profile and feels velvety in the palate. While gamay is an often-overlooked variety, maligned for its association with the slapped-in-bottle, sweeter ‘nouveau’ styles that the French celebrate with gusto each November, sangiovese, the main grape in Chianti wines, is on the rise and rise. “Sangiovese is something I like drinking as autumn appears, as it matches well with some of our heartier pasta dishes,” says ItalianAustralian sommelier turned wine importer Giorgio de Maria. “Some can be a little boring, but those with some nice tannins, fresh natural acidity and flavours of cherry, herbs and spice are attractive.” Sangiovese from Chianti can be a bit of a minefield, with many overoaked examples and some that are parching, desert dry in their tannins. Australian sangiovese has experienced a real increase in quality, and often offers a bit more fruitiness, juiciness and vibrancy. “It’s not my favourite variety, but some of the really good examples are sensational with food, particularly as the sauces get heavier through autumn and into winter,” says Adelaide-based, South African chef Duncan Welgemoed of Africola restaurant. Of Australian sangiovese Welgemoed says, “At its best, from parts of King Valley, central Victoria and Adelaide Hills, it can have this vibrancy and fine tannin profile that works like a condiment to heartier dishes, or cuts through the richness to refresh the palate.” The Pizzini family has been growing grapes in the Italian-esque hub of King Valley in northern Victoria since the late 1970s. Originally tobacco farmers, the Pizzinis decided to turn their hands to winemaking, and in doing so they capture some of their Italian heritage using classic varieties of their homeland. The family is now renowned as one of Australia’s most dedicated sangiovese producers. “Yes, I see an almost autumnal character in sangiovese at times,” says winemaker Joel Pizzini. “I guess it’s this savouriness and earthiness that can come about. I’ve never been a great lover of typical, Australian, fruity, fruit-driven styles, and want to do the opposite.” The Pizzini family produces no less than six different versions of sangiovese, including a rose. Styles vary from bright, simple ‘pizza


ABOUT MIKE When Mike Bennie isn’t wandering vineyards on the four corners of the globe, he is a freelance wine and drinks writer, journalist and presenter. His work appears in the highly regarded Australian Gourmet Traveller Wine magazine, and he is wine/drinks editor for delicious. magazine. He is editor-at-large and contributor/writer to Australia’s most interactive wine commentary website, WineFront. His work is regularly found in The Sun-Herald Style magazine, Virgin Australia airline’s Voyeur magazine, The Sydney Morning Herald Good Food section, Men’s Style magazine, Wine Business Magazine and various other publications. Mike is a wine judge in Australia and overseas, and a graduate of the prestigious Len Evans Tutorial. He is a co-founder and co-director of the artisan and sustainability focused Rootstock Sydney food and wine festival. He is prolific with his wine work, is a regular presenter at corporate and industry events, and between travels to exotic vineyards around the world, enjoys long walks on the beach with a bottle of wine (or sour beer).

2

wine’ drops through to a ‘reserve’ wine, Rubacuori, which is barrel aged and matured in the bottle for an extended time.

1 3

“I love the flexibility the variety has,” says Joel. “Sangiovese – while offering spice, and red fruits, dried herbs and tannins – can do so many things, from light and fresh through to deep, rich and serious. Yet it holds onto an inherent drinkability that works so well with traditional dishes we eat around autumn like mushroom risottos or veal stews.” While autumn often comes with the disappointment of being the furthest time away from the heady days of summer fun, it’s also one of the best times to be spreading the drinking wings. It’s a season for reds with a touch of richness but also the inherent freshness that works so well alongside days desperately holding onto the warmth of summer. It’s time to embrace these savoury, medium-bodied styles.

A

1 GOLDEN GROVE BARBERA 2016 (Granite Belt, QLD, $24) – Ideal for the autumn dinner table, this bright, juicy red has high acidity and crunchy texture offering a cavalcade of pickled cherry and sweet berry fruitiness. I imagine it best served alongside dishes with simple tomato-based sauces. Needs your best pasta dish to accompany it.

new

2 LANA IL NOSTRO GALLO 2014 (King Valley, VIC,

$26) – From the Pizzini family, this is a sangiovesedominant blend that does a very good job of an easy drinking, medium-bodied red wine style. It’s gently spicy, shows some fresh cherry character and finishes with a fine pucker of tannins. Delicious stuff.

T CM ARKE

P

Acai bowls now available in our organic cafe open 7.30am mon - sat & from 9am sunday

3 VINOQUE ROUNDSTONE VINEYARD GAMAY

NOIR 2015 (Yarra Valley, VIC, $25) – This is unreal value; a class act above its price point. It’s heady in black cherry and dried herb character, but where the magic happens is in the soft, supple texture of the palate. It’s not a complex wine, but it’s bright and flavoursome, and does superbly with a light chill. Drink up.

LA

ORG

NI

TRY THESE

NARA

CE

KU

A delicious blend of organic acai berries, bananas & coconut water – topped off with crunchy granola & seasonal organic fruit.

3 3 0 m o n s r d , f o r e s t g l e n , s u n s h i n e c oa s t, Q L D k u n a r a . c o m . au

@ k u n a r a _ o r g a n i c _ m a r k e t p l ac e

saltmagazine . com . au

61


62

salt


A WEDDING FEATURE WITH

AUTUMN ’17

62 KEEPING IT REAL South Sydney Rabbitohs player George Burgess and his new wife Joanna share their love story. 66 MAGIC MAKER Something for Catering’s food truck brings the best in Coast catering to any event. 70 TO HAVE AND TO HOLD Treats and tips to get ready for the big day.

APHY.COM.AU IMAGE COURTESY OF TOM HALL PHOTOGRAPHY AT TOMHALLPHOTOGR

saltmagazine . com . au

63


KEEPING IT REAL

OFF THE FIELD WORDS JOLENE OGLE

64

salt


g Joanna Kin & rgess George Bu er 3 Decemb 6 1 20

SOMETIMES WE DON’T KNOW what attracts us to another person. For the lucky few there is something deeper than looks, something more meaningful and soulful than physical attraction. Joanna King and George Burgess fell in love deeply and instantly. Joanna, an interior design student, met George, an NRL player with the South Sydney Rabbitohs, at a friend’s Christmas party in 2013. From then they were inseparable. “We had a fun time dancing the night away surrounded by some of our closest friends,” says Joanna, adding that although she thought he was handsome, it was after spending time with George that she saw just how attractive he was. She says he loves art and old-school music, has a beautiful singing voice “and to top it off he is a true gentleman”. “Being incredibly close to his mother Julie and three brothers Tom, Sam and Luke, I knew things were getting serious when I was invited to a meal out in Sydney’s Woolloomooloo Wharf to meet them, along with other close mates for the first time.” Not long after meeting, the couple spent a week together in Coffs Harbour where George asked Joanna to be his girlfriend. Ever the romantics, they returned to the same place on their second anniversary, when George asked Joanna to be his wife. “He’s very romantic and thoughtful,” Joanna says. “I was completely taken away by the proposal as it was a total surprise and very well planned.” When choosing a venue for their wedding they knew straight away they wanted to spend their special day in Noosa. Joanna says, “We decided to have our reception at the Noosa Beach House because it was the vibe we were going for – beachy and sophisticated.” Like confetti tossed over a bride and groom, Joanna and George’s wedding was showered with intimate and thoughtful touches. A close friend completed a three-month online civil celebrant course so he could take part in the couple’s ceremony. Another close friend, Gabby, did Joanna’s make-up and there was live acoustic music at the ceremony. >

saltmagazine . com . au

65


WEDDING DAY ROLL CALL RECEPTION & CATERING Sofitel Noosa Pacific Resort 14-16 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads 5449 4888 or sofitelnoosapacificresort.com.au STYLING Twig and Grace twigandgrace.com PHOTOGRAPHY Lost In Love lostinlovephotography.com “We wanted our wedding to be very personal,” she says. “We had 85 people. We wanted to keep it small, intimate and special. It was important to us that we got to spend time with all our guests.” The couple was married on a private property in Eumundi. Joanna’s bridesmaids were her best friend of 14 years Tessa Boehm, sisterin-law Phoebe Burgess and close friend Ariana Stephens. George’s groomsmen were his brothers and fellow rugby players Tom, Luke and Sam. Joanna even got to see her dad in a suit for the first time on her special day. “I’ve never seen him in a suit,” she says. “He’s such a blokey bloke; he looked outstanding.” Following the intimate ceremony, the wedding party and guests travelled to the Sofitel where they were entertained by pop singer and former Australian Idol contestant Paulini Curuenavuli. The performance was a wedding gift from George’s best man and twin brother Tom. Peter Kuruvita from Noosa Beach House created a special menu, allowing guests the choice of an entree, main and dessert (the couple opted not to have a traditional wedding cake). 66

salt

CEREMONY A private property in Eumundi CELEBRANT Jarrad Bayliss jarradbayliss.com.au SUITS MJ Bale mjbale.com DRESS Pallas Couture pallascouture.com RINGS Isabella’s Fine Antique Jewellery isabellasjewellery.com.au HAIR Brown Sugar Hair & Beauty brownsugarhair.com.au


ABOUT THE VENUE Located on world-renowned Hastings Street, Sofitel Noosa Pacific Resort is Noosa’s only five-star luxury hotel with almost 180 studio rooms, suites and villas. As well as shopping and dining right on the doorstop, the resort has a stunning spa and is a short walk from Noosa’s famous beach and national parks. The resort is home to the Noosa Beach House Restaurant & Bar, plus it has a pool bar and lobby bar. With its enviable position, premium function facilities and menu, Sofitel Noosa Pacific Resort is the perfect space to host a wedding.

For Joanna, being six months pregnant on her wedding day made the occasion even more special. “Life is an adventure for us. With George coming from such a big family, there is always something going on. But our biggest adventure is having a baby together and starting our own family,” she says. Joanna swapped champagne for a non-alcoholic bubbly while George respectfully decided to not drink much. “It was nice because we both remembered everything from our day and felt fresh for the following day spent by the pool,” says Joanna. “Planning a wedding can be stressful, especially without a wedding planner. From the beginning we knew we wanted to plan the entire day by ourselves; it was a great challenge for us. We are a great team.” The pair made a pact to make the planning of their wedding a joyful time and Joanna says everything ran smoothly. “We wanted our special day to be relaxed and for everyone to have a fabulous weekend away celebrating our new married life together.”

saltmagazine . com . au

67


MAGIC MAKER

A MOVEABLE

photo Laine Pictures & Film

WORD PENNY SHIPWAY

68

salt

FEAST


Brent Colautti

THE UBER-COOL FOOD TRUCK scene may be sweeping the world, but Something for Catering couldn’t be further from the usual fish taco or pulled-pork slider stands many of us might be familiar with.

noosa floral s‫﬚‬lists

This is posh nosh on wheels. With chefs on board poached from around the world, cooking up food from Somalian to halal, and its own wine maker and mixologist stirring up dynamic elixirs, it’s no surprise this little van has become big business. Co-owner and founder Brent Colautti, 33, says in 2012 he was broke and unemployed when he was pushed to come up with a solution that would ultimately build a financially secure future for his young family. “I just quit my job,” Brent says. “I was unemployed at the time and had absolutely no money. I’d been doing a lot of consulting work for business set-ups on the Sunshine Coast and I thought, ‘How stupid is this?’ I was giving everyone else my ideas when I could be using them myself.” Brent says he had always wanted to own his own restaurant and bar, but with limited funds he instead thought about bringing his events background into the food truck industry, which was popular throughout the US. So when Brent saw a friend had an old caravan shell lying around, he thought this was his chance to make something of his dream. “One of my mates got a loan out for me to do up the caravan. I took the gamble and it worked.” With a dream in sight, and the help of a few mates, the renovation of the van was soon complete, and Brent’s pop-up restaurant and bar was catering to events such as the Woodford Folk and Caloundra Music festivals. Brent says the business name was sparked during a few beers one night with friends; a play on words saluting great Australian alternative rock band Something for Kate. “The original idea was to have a commercial pop-up restaurant on wheels to take to a paddock or festival,” Brent says. “We had our first festival the day after we finished making the van. It was Woodford and it went really, really well. We ended up catering for Bob Hawke’s corporate New Year’s event at the festival.

We create, we innovate. Naturally www.naturellefloraldesign.com.au naturelle@iinet.au 0411 122 428 * 0437 313 775

“We got noticed very quickly.” > IMAGES ; LINDY PHOTOGRAPHY - DEBBIE LAWRENCE WILLOW & ERIN - PANGA PRODUCTIONS


photo Tom Kenworthy House-brewed organic hibiscus iced tea with blue flax lily-infused vodka.

Quinoa, heirloom tomato, mint, parsley, goat’s curd, toasted seeds and nuts, and bee pollen with a maple and lemon vinaigrette.

WE HAD OUR FIRST FESTIVAL THE DAY AFTER WE FINISHED MAKING THE VAN. IT WAS WOODFORD AND IT WENT REALLY, REALLY WELL. WE ENDED UP CATERING FOR BOB HAWKE’S CORPORATE NEW YEAR’S EVENT AT THE FESTIVAL. 70

salt

photo Tom Kenworthy

Sam Cook


But with just a small team, Brent knew he needed help. “I was hiring chef and staff, facilitating the business, and the marketing was just me. Things started to get really busy and I needed a couple of people on board.” Brent reached out to two friends – Sam Cook, a high school friend of 20 years and wine maker who was living in Melbourne, and Drew Cantle, a restaurant manager from Brisbane. “I just did a ring around to the ones I trusted. I had no idea if they’d be interested. Sam took a lot of convincing because he was very comfortable as a wine maker, but thankfully he has still been able to continue that.”

exquisite handcrafted jewellery & wares from outstanding artists

Initially Brent didn’t have sufficient full-time work for his friends, so to make their move viable, together they opened Gainsbourg – an upmarket food, drinks and espresso bar on Mooloolaba Esplanade. With the two businesses combined there was just enough money to cover the three co-owners’ salaries. However, thanks to the wedding season, the company grew beyond their control. “When the restaurant came on board that was a massive strain on us,” Brent says. “At first I was paying myself $500 a week, and with a mortgage I was living on the line. But when wedding season hit, the ball started rolling.” While the Something for Catering van was initially set up for festivals, the team was consumed by so many wedding bookings they decided to direct all their focus there. “We started getting enquiries for weddings and even more festivals, but the weddings seemed like a more viable idea. So we did more of those and got some incredible feedback.” Brent says many of the weddings are on private properties and 70 per cent of the other venues already have council approval at halls, making it easy to set up. “I jumped on social media myself and it took off like wildfire. Last year we did 40 to 50 weddings and we already had more than 50 booked in last year for this year. The last six months have been amazing and we are growing very quickly. “We are going to need to get a second van sooner or later.” With the booming business, Brent was able to hire two chefs – including one from France – who both relocated to the Coast to run the Mooloolaba restaurant and Something for Catering. Brent says he works directly with clients to meet their needs. “We don’t really dictate menus. We’ve had halal, Somalian-themed, vegan, gluten-free and kosher weddings. We’ve gained a lot of traction being able to create menus unique to each situation. We keep it quite open. “We do put our style on it, however, to modernise the dishes. You never want to take on Grandma’s recipe. So we tweak it and we are big on presentation so people are enjoying the dish before they are even trying it.” The food is fresh, using seasonal local produce, and for those simply wanting modern Australia there are plentiful options to choose from. “Recently Moreton Bay bugs have been popular, as has the apple cider-braised Bangalow pork with house-made pork skin crisps.” There are plenty of lighter options such as the soba noodle salad with radish, cucumber, black sesame, coriander and mint, and the peach mint rocket bocconcini with a roasted walnut salad.

photo Tom Kenworthy

Mixoligist and wine maker Sam infuses his own vodka and creates specialty drinks such as the organic hibiscus iced tea. While it’s usually the bridal cake requested as dessert, Something for Catering has also seen lolly and cake bars, and an avocado cheesecake, using avocadoes straight from the property where the wedding was held. “It was surprisingly really good!” And then there was the cheesecake tower, made out of actual wheels of cheese. “It went from the biggest wheels to the smallest wheels.” It seems the sky is the limit for this little van with big dreams. somethingforcatering.com

OPEN 7 DAYS 10—5 07 5442 9598 www.opalcutter.com.au Shop 4 ‘The Pottery’ 171-183 Main St Montville


TO HAVE AND TO HOLD

AUSTRALIAN CLASSIC

There really is no place like home. Wear a piece of home on your wedding day with a quintessential design from Australian label Suzanne Harward. Drawing inspiration from art, nature and the environment around us, there is no denying Suzanne Harward designs have shaped the Australian bridal industry. Handmade in Melbourne, each gown is meticulously crafted under the direction of Suzanne herself, who offers an unsurpassed level of quality and expertise. From high fashion minimalism exemplifying fine lines and edgy cuts, to intricate designs using the world’s finest fabrics and details, say yes to a Suzanne Harward dress for a true blue beauty. suzanneharward.com

Something Sweet

Here’s our pick of fashionable, must-have products for that loved up occasion.

pamper party Swap party for pamper and enjoy a hens’ weekend you’ll remember forever – no hangover required. Noosa Springs Golf and Spa Resort is the perfect place to catch up with the girls over a glass of champagne under the magic fingers of your own masseuse. At Noosa Springs you’ll enjoy a hens’ party with that extra degree of amazing, such as the girly sophistication of a spa high tea where you’re invited to substitute champagne for tea (and we know you will) or a full body massage and a tropical facial. Keep the bliss going and stay in a luxurious Noosa Springs apartment. Or rent a five-bedroom mansion for you and your bridesmaids and enjoy a late night gossiping and watching rom-coms. noosasprings.com.au 72

salt

E TO HAV AND TO HOLD

True love is finding someone to share the last cookie with. Celebrate your love with SweetP Cakes and Cookies. The Noosa-based cookie studio specialises in bespoke and contemporary treats, perfect for the modern-day wedding dessert bar. Whether it’s a delicate cake, funky cookie or a romantic mixture of the two, add a personalised touch of sweetness to your wedding day menu. Inspired by art, colour, texture and taste, SweetP Cakes and Cookies treats are freshly baked to order using the finest ingredients to ensure your big day is as sweet as your love. facebook.com/sweetpcakesandcookies


Men’s fashion is a) unimportant, b) lacklustre, c) boring or d) none of the above? NOTA (aka, none of the above) is an antidote to the endless number of generic men’s footwear brands and manufacturers pumping out the same cheap shoes with zero attention to detail. Fashion-forward men deserve better; they deserve NOTA. Each pair of NOTA shoes is handmade by a single craftsman using the traditional Blake Rapid technique favoured by luxury Italian footwear artisans. This technique minimises weight and provides flexibility yet keeps the shoe waterproof. Stand stylish in a quality shoe like no other. notashoes.com

A MAN’S BEST FRIEND

A STEP ABOVE

Just as ladies are attracted to bubbles, gents go for crystal. Crystal glassware, that is. Leave the champagne breakfast for the bridesmaids and says cheers to your fellow groomsmen with some whiskey on the rocks. Keep it cool, classy and classic with a set of superior crystal glassware from Bohemia Crystal. It’s a man thing. bohemia.com.au

NATURAL JEWEL

Say ‘I do’ to a dreamy set of Alexis Russell fine-crafted jewellery. Marrying classic design with organic elements, Alexis Russell knows how to make any bride shine, naturally. Using fine recycled metals with conflict-free gemstones and diamonds, each Alexis Russell piece is earthy and understated yet refined and elegant. alexisrussell.com

<

Platter goals

Some people like abstract art, others prefer photo art, but surely everyone loves platter art. There is no better complement to a glass of bubbles than a colourful tray oozing cheese, figs, crackers and an assortment of other delicacies. So when it comes to your wedding day celebrations, don’t settle for an average Sunday afternoon-type platter; spoil your guests with a chefd’oeuvre platter from Your Platter Matters. Combining her creative soul and love of sharing gourmet bites with family and friends, Megan Fernandez (aka the queen of platters) puts in the extra time, precision and dedication to add tasteful elegance and variety to the table. While you’re off getting wedding snaps, let your guests take #plattergoals snaps. yourplattermatters.com

saltmagazine . com . au

73


FASHION

Age of reason FASHION EDITOR BRISEIS ONFRAY

BE IT THE AGE OF INNOCENCE OR THE AGE OF COOL, WE’RE SURE YOU’LL FIND SOMETHING TO LOVE THIS SEASON. A PERFECTLY GOOD REASON TO PLAN ANOTHER SHOPPING SPREE. YOLO!

74 PARTY MODE Be sure to have your mode ready to go-go. 76 SMARTY PANTS A pair of smart pants is a must-have this season. 78 SEASONAL STYLE by Evolve 79 KEEP IT SIMPLE Take it easy in simple and cool. 80 TOP NOTCH It’s what’s on top that counts. 82 WORK IT BABY Let quality menswear do all the hard work. 84 LABELS & STOCKISTS. Munster 74

salt


THE LIFESTYLE BOUTIQUE IN CALOUNDRA

My Sunday Morning

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 84

Opals Down Under Custom 14ct white gold ring featuring Queensland boulder opal

FA S H I O N ACCESSORIES HOME DÃ&#x2030;COR GIFTS Shop 1, 10 Ormuz Avenue Caloundra QLD 4551 07 5491 8890 www.villaverdeliving.com.au

! e l y t s r u o y Live RM WIlliams


Love Stories

Huxbaby

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 84

Amsterdams Blauw

76

salt


NY2K rose gold, white and pink diamond ring

To Hold & To Have vintageinspired and mill-grained Daisy Halo 18ct yellow and white gold and diamond ring

We all love an excuse to gear up for a party. So whatever the occasion, be sure to have your mode ready to go-go. Think stars, stripes and anything that sparkles.

CHALICE ARMOIRE HUMIDITY CHALICE BLEU BLANC ROUGE BLEU BLANC ROUGE WILLOW & ZAC DESIGUAL DESIGUAL LTB

wYse

2/56 Burnett Street Buderim p :: 5445 6616 w :: gingersboutique.com.au e :: gingers@gingersboutique.com.au


Louenhide

There is always one. The smart style that moulds its genius way to whack legs into fashionable shape. Whether slim-fit, loose, flared or printed, a pair of smart pants is a must-have as the cooler vibes set in.

smarty pants

Elk

Amsterdams Blauw 78

salt


Elk

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 84

Birkenstock | Crocs | Skechers | ECCO | Sperry | Klouds | Aetrex | Tsonga Noosaville - 230 Gympie Tce 5447 1755 getset_autumn2017.indd 1

Rasaleela

Mens Ladies

Caloundra - 82A Bulcock St 5492 7185 Shop Online - @getsetfootwear.com.au

16/02/2017 5:23 PM

saltmagazine . com . au

79


SEASONAL STYLE

FEATURED STOCKIST EVOLVE BY ANNIE MURRAY

1

AUTUMN WELCOMES IN DARKER SHADES OF INK AND CHARCOAL, CONTRASTED WITH THIS SEASON’S CERULEAN BLUE, ACID YELLOW AND HOT PINKS. BOLD MINIMAL PRINTS CAN ALSO JUXTAPOSE THE BRIGHT COLOUR BLOCKS AND TEAM UP PERFECTLY WITH METALLIC LEATHER ACCESSORIES. FINE NECKLACES WITH ENAMELLED DETAIL ALLOW FOR LAYERING, BUT KEEP THE LOOK CLEAN AND LIGHT.

3

2

1 Abstract Shapes pendant 2 Are leather circle bag 3 Fjord Contrast Derby shoe

AVAILABLE AT:

Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach, 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au

Elk 80

salt


Humidity

Birkenstock

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 84

KEEP IT

SIMPLE Take it easy in simple and cool. For the in-between season and mood, shop for comfort styles and fabrics in neutral colours and hues. Classic white with dark denim is always simplicity on cue.

stockist for SCOTCH & SODA R.M.WILLIAMS MAISON SCOTCH LOVE STORIES AKUBRA

8, THE HUB, 45 BURNETT ST, BUDERIM 4556 | (07) 5476 7686

Wanda Panda wYse

saltmagazine . com . au

81


Humidity

The Opalcutter Daniel Bentley Fine Jewellery Desert Sands black rhodiumplated sterling silver pendant, ring and bangle

OP T NOTCH FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 84 My Sunday Morning

Chalice 82

salt


n at u r a l / e c o - f r i e n d ly / a u s t r a l i a n M a d e

wY se Noosa shop 1/31 hasti ngs st, noos a soul Diva shop 10/45 B ur nett str eet, B uDe r i M s weet Char lotte 34B Bulcock s t, c alo u n Dr a

w YselifestY le.Com.a u

Ad for Salt magazine.indd 2

9/03/2017 7:53 pm

Apple Blue

RM WIlliams

The best thing about cooler temperatures is the styles and textures to get all cosy in. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s on top that counts. Long sleeves and layers are fun to play around with. Just add boots and everything is top notch.

saltmagazine . com . au

83


WORK IT

BABY photo Tim Love Photography

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not always easy, but a fresh style with macho flair helps. Let quality fabrics do all the hard work. Subtle hits of natural charm will work wonders too.

84

salt

Latitude Pearls, not just for girls


Amsterdams Blauw

FOR LABELS AND STOCKISTS REFER TO PAGE 84

Provides a beautiful, inspiring place for your jewellery to be Skechers

created, repaired and cared for...

Ph 5477 0561

98 King Street, Buderim shop@toholdandtohave.com.au toholdandtohavejewellers RM WIlliams

www.toholdandtohave.com.au


FASHION STOCKISTS Munster

LABELS AND STOCKISTS

AMSTERDAMS BLAUW Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 threads4556.com APPLE BLUE Villa Verde Living, Shop 1, 10 Ormuz Avenue, Caloundra, 5491 8890 or villaverdeliving.com.au BIRKENSTOCK Get Set Footwear, 82A Bulcock Street, Caloundra, 5492 7185 or 230 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville, 5447 1755 or getsetfootwear.com.au CHALICE Gingers Boutique, Shop 2, 56 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5445 6616 or gingersboutique.com.au ELK Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach, 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au HUMIDITY Gingers Boutique, Shop 2, 56 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5445 6616 or gingersboutique.com.au 86

salt

HUXBABY Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach, 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au LATITUDE PEARLS Latitude Gallery, 180 Main Street, Montville, 5478 5771; Shop 3/71-75 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads, 5447 3351 or latitudegallery.com.au LOUENHIDE Signature on Hastings, 18A Hastings Street, Noosa Heads, 5474 9400 or signatureonhastings.com LOVE STORIES Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 threads4556.com MAISON SCOTCH & SODA Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 threads4556.com MUNSTER Evolve, 5/10 Grebe Street, Peregian Beach, 5448 2077 or evolvembh.com.au

Maison Scotch & Soda


LABELS AND STOCKISTS CONTINUED… MY SUNDAY MORNING Who Invited Her Shop 12, Bay Village, 18 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 5474 5941 or whoinvitedher.com NY2K Rovera Place, Shop 5, King Street, Cotton Tree, 5443 1955 or ny2k.com.au OPALS DOWN UNDER 11 Ballantyne Court, Palmview, 5494 5400 or opalsdownunder.com.au RASALEELA Villa Verde Living, Shop 1, 10 Ormuz Avenue, Caloundra, 5491 8890 or villaverdeliving.com.au RM WILLIAMS Threads 4556, Shop 8, The Hub, 45 Burnett Street, Buderim, 5476 7686 threads4556.com SKECHERS Get Set Footwear, 82A Bulcock Street, Caloundra, 5492 7185 or 230 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville, 5447 1755 or getsetfootwear.com.au

THE OPALCUTTER Shop 4, The Pottery, 171-183 Main Street, Montville, 5442 9598 or opalcutter.com.au TO HOLD AND TO HAVE 98 King Street, Buderim, 5477 0561 or toholdandtohave.com.au WANDA PANDA Get Set Footwear, 82A Bulcock Street, Caloundra, 5492 7185 or 230 Gympie Terrace, Noosaville, 5447 1755 or getsetfootwear.com.au WYSE LIFESTYLE Shop 1, 31 Hastings Street, Noosa, 0478 038 349 or wyselifestyle.com.au; Soul Diva, The Hub, Shop 10/45 Burnett Street, Buderim or 5456 4111; Sweet Charlotte Studio, 34B Bulcock Street, Caloundra, 5491 1593

Elk

saltmagazine . com . au

87


BOLD VISIONARIES

Material Girl

WORDS XANTHE COWARD PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

88

salt


Cindy Vogels headpiece worn by Lady Gaga during a performance with Tony Bennett

CINDY VOGELS, MILLINER to the stars, is building her empire on the sewing machines she grew up with. In fact, she says her machines are extensions of herself. “My sewing machines are older than I am; they’re my mum’s.” Cindy is keeping it in the family, working at home, with her mum, on machines she learned to sew on as a child. Though plenty of people have seen Cindy’s designs, few probably realise she handcrafts each unique piece at home in Gympie, and her mum is still her head machinist. When she speaks to salt, Cindy is in the shade of a frangipani tree in her front yard. Magpies are warbling as this fiercely independent creative talks about her life. In 2013, as a single mother of four, Cindy was afraid she’d lost connections in the industry, but was determined to stay home and run her business around the needs of her family. One morning she met a speaker at a business networking event. The speaker told Cindy to come out from “behind the curtain” and that it was time for her to step into the light. It resonated. “I was afraid of stepping into the light,” Cindy says. “It’s not an easy thing to do. Now I just hope I’m standing in that light with gratitude and humanity.” Cindy shared a photo on social media of a magnificent feathered headpiece alongside some clothing she’d made. Lady Gaga’s people snapped up the bespoke headpiece and the humble milliner attracted global attention when Lady Gaga wore it. For four months she worked with Lady Gaga. This time gave Cindy an understanding of what it took to work with a music artist of the highest calibre. Taking that insight and applying it to her business, Cindy says she felt like an accidental entrepreneur. She says, “I really just aligned myself with good people and worked hard.” Since then, Cindy has been busy developing a line of clothing (under the label Racy & Lucky) favoured by country music stars >

saltmagazine . com . au

89


90

salt


WE ALL KNOW SOMETHING WE’RE GOOD AT AND SOMETHING WE ENJOY, BUT WHEN YOU KNOW HOW IT ALL FITS TOGETHER YOU BEGIN TO ATTRACT MIRACLES. including Golden Guitar winner Caitlyn Shadbolt and local singersongwriter Cassi Hilbers. Juggling family demands and a business, Cindy lives by to-do lists. “I look at it as a holistic list to do the things I need to do to earn a good night’s sleep. It came out of baby brain. I love crossing things off, even if it’s just a dentist’s appointment.” A typical day for Cindy revolves around her work and her children. She divides her time between designing, sourcing fabric, sewing and invoicing, although she laughs and says, “The child in me would sew for candy.” Often working through the night, Cindy still manages to find the energy to spend as much time as possible with her children before and after school. “I feel like I owe it to my children to share what I have inside and what I can contribute to this world. I think that’s the best gift I can give my children, to show them who I am.” If an item of clothing can provide insight into who we are, it’s worth noting that Cindy prizes her red high heels “because of Juliette Binoche in Chocolat. The daughter asks, ‘Why can’t you wear beige shoes like all the other mummies?’ She replies, ‘Ahhh, because I’m not like all the other mummies, my dear.’” As an intuitive artist, Cindy puts her trust in the creative process. “I’ve painted for years and I didn’t want Racy & Lucky to become a stressful business, so I’ve almost built it as a therapeutic art form.” “I realised I was very, very lucky to combine something I had loved as a child and fulfil a purpose. I’ve been doing this my whole life and I just didn’t know where it fit. We all know something we’re good at and something we enjoy, but when you know how it all fits together you begin to attract miracles.” Cindy is reminded of a quote she recently shared with her followers, “A grateful heart attracts miracles.”

Cassi Hilbers is one of the miracles Cindy has attracted. The 15-year-old wears a back brace, which inhibits her ability to dress for each stage performance. With this in mind, Cindy and Cassi worked together to create two designs for the singer’s appearances at the Tamworth Country Music Festival. The designs were a hit, and testament to Cindy’s ability to effortlessly combine her unique skill set with a deeper understanding of her client’s needs. Cindy says she enjoys the collaborative creative process as much as seeing the final product on her clients. “I’m at so many festivals these days and I’m always dressing the headline act but I’m also interested in the 15-year-olds who are up at three o’clock. I’ll offer them a T-shirt and a one-time sponsorship so their first video clip looks more amazing than they ever imagined. It’s really lovely to gift an up-and-coming music artist, especially the girls. Racy & Lucky has become a bit of a girl power label because unfortunately the girls have a smaller window in the industry. I’m very much about helping the young female artist in their early years.” As for the future of her business, Cindy is happy to allow it to “do its thing”. “I see great growth the way I’m doing it; it’s an intuitive, artful process. My family will always come first and it’s about finding that balance and growing at a rate that we’re happy with. I love that my children can come into my studio and do their homework while Mummy’s working. I love that my kids are so close. I love that my kids are my closest audience and they are learning about business in this unusual way.” “It’s why I’m not in a hurry. I want the business that I run to feel good for me and everyone involved, and if that takes another five years it doesn’t matter to me. I just want to keep doing beautiful work with good energy.” racyandlucky.thetshirtmill.com.au

AS UNIQUE

as you are. Released from the rough, carefully shaped, and polished to perfection.It's rare, it's precious and utterly unique. There will never be another one like it. We know that what we do is something very special because there is nothing quite like the moment when an opal captures your heart.

See the full collection in-store or online . 11 Ballantyne Ct, Glenview QLD 4553 (07) 5494 5400

opalsdownunder.com.au

saltmagazine . com . au

91


UP AND COMING

coming CLEAN WORDS AARON WYNNE

YOU’RE RUNNING BACK to your car after a swim at any one of the beautiful Sunshine Coast beaches. You’re squinting because you left your sunglasses in the car and the summer sun is beginning to make its mark on your back. You rummage through your bag looking for your car keys as you do the traditional hop from one burning foot to the other, before reaching into the boot for your towel. It’s not until you’ve dried your back, your hair and you’re halfway through drying your face that you realise you’ve grabbed the dog’s towel. If this scenario sounds familiar then fear not; Roselys and Eric Blaich are out to put an end to your wet dog-smelling ways.

92

salt


Roselys Blaich with her pooches Snoopy and Spike

WEL PACK TO WIN A GROWL TO FOR YOUR CHANCE SLIP MAT TH TOWEL AND NONCONSISTING OF A BA M.AU AT SALTMAGAZINE.CO GO TO THE WIN PAGE In January 2015 the couple, with backgrounds in advertising photography, set about creating their Sunshine Coast-based business Growl Towels. On the surface, Growl Towels’ range of dog-friendly beach and bath towels and accessories (including car seat covers and bags) makes what can be a very messy job easier. And a lot more fun! But for Roselys it’s about much more than just drying off your furry friend. “Washing a dog is an important basic care that allows you to check on the health of your pet,” Roselys says. “It can make such a difference to a dog’s wellbeing and quality of life. Sadly there are still many dog owners that aren’t consciously aware of how important doggy bath time is and it’s just another chore most would like to avoid. I see it as a chance to show them I love them and get to know the dogs better. I have a closer bond with our dogs as a result of that special time I have with them.” When it comes to pet ownership Australia has one of the highest rates in the world with more than 60 per cent of Aussie households owning a pet and 39 per cent of households owning a dog. The Sunshine Coast has grown into something of a petlovers’ paradise with more than 25 off-leash dog areas and parks in the region.

“Through the sales of our products we are able to support the RSPCA and other organisations and we promote that spirit of giving as we can see the benefits that dogs and animals in general receive,” Roselys says. “It’s wonderful to see the initiatives progress through donations. The Wacol Animal Shelter has used donations to design wonderful enclosures that allow their animals to be less confined and ultimately experience less anxiety while they await their new owners.”

Roselys has two rescue fur-babies of her own, Spike (aged 14), who is a Doberman cross Greyhound and Kelpie, and Snoopy (nine) a Jack Russell cross Staffy.

After launching locally in 2015, Growl Towels has already established a presence in the United States. “It is certainly a big challenge to roll out across two continents simultaneously,” Roselys admits. “However, the way we use technology now has made it more accessible to communicate and network on an international platform at any given time of the day. We are giving it a good go and we’re very proud to be a Queensland-based company representing Australia with our new brand.”

She says the response to the Growl Towels’ product and brand ethos from the Sunshine Coast community has been fantastic.

While Roselys says the plan is to grow internationally, the Sunshine Coast will always play a special part in the business.

“After coming up with the idea and experiencing how committed dog owners are to their pets, I’m not surprised,” Roselys says. “I’m encouraged and inspired to help create a better understanding of the benefits of involving your dog in many aspects of your life whilst also reinforcing dog welfare as a wider responsibility.”

“We’re looking forward to the ongoing support of our Sunshine Coast population as we bring further awareness of our wonderful events, lifestyle and dog loving culture to the world,” Roselys says. “Our message that all dogs deserve compassion and respect despite cultural difference will grow as we grow. In five years we hope to be a household name on a global scale and we anticipate always being involved in our Sunshine Coast projects.”

When entrepreneurs like Roselys and Eric develop businesses from a real passion for change and social responsibility rather than solely a passion for profit, remarkable things can happen. Growl Towels now plays an important role in supporting not only local charities like the RSPCA, but charities around the world like the The Vanderpump Dog Foundation, a US-based animal welfare organisation.

Next time your furry friends need a bath or you’re madly drying them off in the beachside car park before they fill your car with sand, take a leaf from the Growl Towels’ book and see that moment as an opportunity to connect with your pets. growltowels.com.au

saltmagazine . com . au

93


PAMPER AND PREEN

BON VOYAGE WORDS LINDA READ PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

94

salt


THE FIRST SIGN my experience at Coolum’s Asante Day Spa is going to take me on an exotic detour from real life is the sleek, black Egyptian-esque cat who strolls over to greet me as I walk in. The purebred Oriental Georgio and his svelte chocolate counterpart Armani, sitting sphinx-like on the counter, look less like ordinary cats and more like priceless artefacts. But I am soon to learn this is no ordinary day spa, so the cats’ otherworldliness sets the tone perfectly. Asante (meaning ‘thank you’ in Swahili) offers what it calls “a tribal path to wellness” in a tranquil atmosphere that feels as though the daily grind is a million miles away. African, Moroccan and Mediterranean-influenced decor, along with perfectly adjusted ambient lighting, combine to create a mood well in keeping with the spa’s tribal vibe.

Asante’s treatment menu includes a varied mix of pamper packages, and massage and body treatments, with an emphasis on exotic and tribal-style treatments. The spa offers a range of facials, body, head and foot massages that include spice body polishes and cocoon wraps. A double room is also available for couples and treatments can be customised to your individual needs. I am here to experience Asante’s Serengeti Journey. With the ubiquitous fluffy white robe nowhere in sight, my therapist Donnehl asks me to don a flowing animal-print sarong and lie on the bed. This has the dual effect of protecting my modesty and making me feel as though I could be somewhere far, far away. The combination of clever lighting, African handicrafts adorning the walls and the scent of spices in the air contribute to the effect. The journey begins with an all-over exfoliating body scrub, which is a locally produced product called Filthy Clean Coffee Scrub. The scrub, made from fresh ground coffee, organic pressed coconut oil and ocean minerals, is invigorating and relaxing, plus it smells divine. Donnehl removes the scrub with hot towels before asking >

saltmagazine . com . au

95


THE SCRUB, MADE FROM FRESH GROUND COFFEE, ORGANIC PRESSED COCONUT OIL AND OCEAN MINERALS, IS INVIGORATING AND RELAXING, PLUS IT SMELLS DIVINE.

WHERE IS IT? Asante Day Spa, Shop 5, 7-13 Beach Road, Coolum Beach, 5446 5229, asantespa.com.au WHY IS IT SPECIAL? Asante’s unique tribalthemed atmosphere and treatments will take your mind and body to an exotic, faraway realm. WHICH TREATMENT WAS ENJOYED? Three-hour Serengeti Journey: full body scrub; Moroccan essence bath with mezze platter, herbal tea or champagne; Asante signature full body massage; foot soak and hot towel foot wrap; Massai Tribal head massage with warm towel turban; mini facial ($350). FINAL TIPS? Allow a little extra time at the end to ease back to reality.

96

salt


me to step into my private bathroom, where a bath fit for an African princess awaits. I sink into my spa-sized watery cocoon while Donnehl prepares the room for the next stage of the treatment. I soak in a Moroccan essence bath from the Spanish brand Germaine de Capuccini, one of the luxurious product ranges offered at Asante. As the last granules of my body scrub float away, so do any lingering cares. A mezze platter of fresh fruits, cheese and crackers has materialised, as if by magic, on a slab of marble beside the bath. There is a pot of delicious herbal tea, with champagne also on offer. Donnehl extracts me from the bathroom and I return to my bed, feeling born again already. With my skin feeling silky smooth and my body chilled into a state of relaxation, I am ready for the next step in my tribal odyssey: the Asante signature massage. This is the piece de resistance of the treatment. Donnehl delivers an excellent all-over kahuna-style massage, using long, flowing, rhythmic movements with consistently firm pressure (which is what I had asked for) starting at my tired feet and working upwards. I drop in and out of consciousness as I gradually feel all the niggling tightness in my body dissolving. My journey is not yet complete – my feet are placed into a warm

bath while I am treated to a Massai Tribal head massage. Even my hair receives attention, with Donnehl using amla oil, a natural product that is sourced from the Indian gooseberry and used to promote hair health. (The amla oil acts as a nourishing treatment that makes my hair silky smooth when I wash it later.) Donnehl massages the amla oil into my scalp before wrapping it in a warm towel turban. My feet, never having received so much attention in their lives, are also treated to a hot towel wrap. No all-encompassing treatment would be complete without some attention to my face, and that is where Donnehl now applies her touch. I receive a mini facial, including a cleansing and soothing massage, with particular attention paid to my pressure points. Unfortunately, my journey reaches its conclusion, but Donnehl assures me I should relax a little before rising, as I’ve been lying down for so long. I’m surprised to learn I have been removed from the world for a whole three hours. As I say goodbye and prepare for re-entry to my world, the cats, intertwined like yin and yang, are sleeping on their counter bed. The sunshine outside seems unusually bright, and my step is lighter. My tribal journey may be over for today, but I think I’ll keep my Asante experience with me for a long while yet.

Discover

Smartbond

Smartbond is our new protective and strengthening service. This unique system protects and strengthens the hair during technical services (such as bleach and haircolouring). Discover it now at suite three hair. Book a consultation: 5445 6700 suitethree.com.au

hair

saltmagazine . com . au

97


BEAUTY

AUTUMN GIVEAWAY For your chance to WIN a Flotation Experience from Noosa Springs, go to the WIN page at saltmagazine.com.au

AUSTRALIAN MUD MASK $25, 65g. Available at Sixth Sense Skincare, Original Eumundi Markets, 80 Memorial Drive, Eumundi every Wednesday and Saturday. 0435 792 203 or sixthsenseskincare.com.au

ÉMINENCE ORGANIC SKIN CARE FIRM SKIN ACAI BOOSTER-SERUM $98, 30ml. Available at Noosa Springs Spa, Links Drive, Noosa Heads. 5440 3333 or noosasprings.com.au

GERMAINE DE CAPUCCINI HYDRACURE $102, 50ml. Available at Asante Day Spa, Shop 5, 7-13 Beach Road, Coolum Beach. 5446 5229 or asantespa.com.au

THALGO HYALURONIC FILLER $73, 15ml. Available at Aqua Day Spa, Sofitel Noosa Pacific Resort, 14-16 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 5449 4777 or aquadayspanoosa.com.au

soothe & smooth BEAUTY EDITOR BRISEIS ONFRAY

After a long, hot summer it’s time to hydrate, replenish and moisturise. Embrace autumn and stock up on products that restore and nourish body, skin and soul.

NEEM GUARD AYURVEDIC HEALTHY SKIN SUPPLEMENT $36, 60 capsules. Available at Yoga Therapy & Ayurveda Wellness Centre, 2/87 Burnett Street, Buderim. 5476 5166 or yogaayurvedacentre.com.au

INIKA BAKED MINERAL FOUNDATION $65, 8g. Available at Yukti Botanicals at Belmondos Organic Market, 59 Rene Street, Noosaville. 5447 1122 or yukti.com.au

SAYA ROSE & CEDARWOOD BODY WASH $34.95, 500ml. Available at Saya, Shop 6, 41 Gateway Drive, Noosaville. 5473 0257 or sayaskin.com

L’OREAL PROFESSIONNEL PRO FIBER RECONSTRUCT MASQUE, $35, 200ml. Available at Suite Three Hair, 3 Ballinger Place, 3-5 Ballinger Road, Buderim. 5445 6700 or suitethree.com.au 98

salt


Our services include: • • • •

General Practice Skin Checks Child Immunisation Ante-Natal Shared Care • Work Cover • Travel Vaccinations • Yellow Fever Vaccinations (Coolum Beach Only)

• Medicals • Queensland Transport Medicals • Scuba Dive Medicals • Pre-employment Medicals • Aviation Medicals • Recreational Medicals • Aged Care


HEALTH

HEALING HORSES WORDS PENNY SHIPWAY PHOTO ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

100

salt


AS THE PERSON ENTERS the horse’s round pen there is an immediate reaction. The horse might respond in a variety of ways, such as facing the person directly or wandering away. It all depends on the person’s energy. “Thousands of years of nonverbal communication between horses in herd environments have made them masters at reading and communicating body language and intention,” Equine Connection owner Ben Skerrett says. “Even the subtlest shift in energy or emotion from a horse can be sensed and interpreted by another horse without the need for verbalisation.” Ben grew up with horses, but it was in his 20s that he realised through their powerful body language, horses were teaching him more than he realised. Ben, who also owns BLS Horsemanship in Valdora, recently opened Equine Connection to offer holistic healing. This form of therapy can help address many different mental, emotional and physical conditions, from autism and post-traumatic stress disorder to physical disabilities and addictions. “As human beings our bodies continuously transmit subtle energies which are consistent with our mental and emotional state,” he says. “What makes horses so good at helping people is their exceptional ability to pick up on these subtle energies and reflect them back to us. “They respond with incredible accuracy to how we really are in the present moment.” >

saltmagazine . com . au

101


NEED HELP? Equine Connection can help with many disorders and conditions such as: • Autism • Post-traumatic stress disorder • Physical disabilities • Anxiety and depression • Addictions • ADHD • Domestic violence and sexual abuse perpetrators and victims • Prisoner rehabilitation programs • Eating disorders • Developmental learning disorders equineconnection.com.au 102

salt

Ben says the horses act as a doorway for clients to let go of their personas and masks, and find their authentic selves. “Even when we try to hide our feelings horses will still respond to our underlying emotions. Horses can see through the social masks that we often wear in order to conceal how we are really feeling. “Horses honour us when we are true to ourselves. When we are authentic, and we allow ourselves to be emotionally vulnerable, horses always respond in an amazingly supportive, nurturing and healing way.”


The practice of using horses therapeutically dates back to the ancient Greeks, with the earliest recorded writings from Hippocrates, who was a physician and mentioned the value of horses in the healing process. The benefit of using horses therapeutically was also mentioned in 17th century writings – horse riding was prescribed for people with gout, neurological disorder and low morale. Most modern-day equine-related therapies have emerged in the past 80 years, which has brought with it a more widespread awareness and understanding of its uses and benefits. Ben studied with Linda Kohanov, who developed Eponaquest, a model of equine-facilitated experiential learning (EFEL) and personal development in the 1990s. “Even though I already had my counselling diploma, I really wanted to integrate my love for horses and my horsemanship skills into a much more embodied way of empowering people,” Ben says. So what can clients expect from a session? Each one begins with a body scan, which, says Ben, “is a tool we use to get people to scan down their body and notice any sensations they have going on”. This could be tingling in their hands, aches in their shoulders, a fast-beating heart or tension on one side of the body.

Locally Handcrafted Furniture and Homewares

Ben then asks clients to expand that sensation. “And I ask that sensation for a message. They usually get an intuitive message. This can sometimes be a poetic phrase, a picture, a word. It can come in all different forms. I ask them to go back to the sensation and see if it’s been changed, if it’s been shifted or diminished.

THINGSOFMETALANDWOOD.COM.AU 1-2/45 WISES RD MAROOC HYDORE

“If it’s shifted to another sensation we ask for a message from that sensation as well. Once the sensation has been diminished the client enters the horse pen.” Ben stands outside the pen and watches closely as the client interacts with the horse. “Sometimes if the person can’t get the horse to move, the horse is bored. That person may need to learn leadership-based skills and that would include engaging with the horse and motivating it to join them. This can be achieved by using circular sweeping motions to draw the horse’s energy towards them and using more assertive means to connect.” After such leadership sessions, many of Ben’s clients feel they can embody the energy of being a leader. Ben says these active types of sessions can be more effective than self-development seminars where people sit and take notes. “By going to a seminar we get information but we don’t embody what we need to do. In a session with a horse that energy stays with you, rather than something written down on paper.” One of Ben’s favourite moments has been during a reflective session, which involves bringing a person’s desires to the forefront. “Once I witnessed a lady whose heart’s desire was related to self-love and loving herself for who she was. She was trying to get the attention of the horse but the more she wanted its love and attention [the more] it would walk away. “When she finally let go and started loving herself it embraced her and acknowledged her. When she turned and faced the horse she opened up and cried. It was quite a powerful experience for her. She had that epiphany that she didn’t love herself, and the horse confirmed that.” Ben says as a society people are often conditioned by other people’s agendas and belief systems, leaving them with little selfesteem. “But it’s all in our head. If we haven’t been successful we believe this to be true. If we listen to our heart it has a different feeling and message. “It’s often quite abstract. But once they go in there, and have the experience, it’s quite profound what happens. The synchronicity of it, it’s quite magical.”

saltmagazine . com . au

103


ARTIST

SUMMER LOVING WORDS JOLENE OGLE PHOTOS ANASTASIA KARIOFYLLIDIS

104

salt


TARRAGINDI BUTTERFLY

PAUL HARBOUR WOULD never describe himself as a leading local artist. Infinitely humble, the Marcus Beach resident would cringe to know he was thought of as one of the region’s most flourishing painters who is helping to capture and recreate parts of the region’s history. But that is exactly who he is and what he is doing. Paul and his wife moved to the Sunshine Coast from Melbourne more than 30 years ago and in the past decade Paul has experienced a high demand for his custom paintings of the charming fibro beach shacks that once lined the dirt roads of coastal communities. The call for his work could be attributed to the high popularity of all things mid-century modern, but Paul thinks there’s a deeper, subconscious reason people want him to paint their old fibro shacks. Paul is often approached by people who once spent their summers in a haze of sand, sun and surf, crammed into bunkbeds in a hot fibro beach shack. They want Paul to recreate their childhood memories of an idyllic, simple summer holiday when the most important thing to think about was whether there might be surf tomorrow. For Paul, a former architect, painting beach shacks was an obvious idea. “When I started painting when I retired, I was just painting beach scenes. I used perspective. They were very simple so I was trying to think what else I could paint,” he says. “We were selling our house in Coolum and we had an empty wall.” So Paul’s wife asked him to do something for the wall. “I said I would just do a house. So I did a really rough, really abstract house and it turned out really well. “I did it with house paint, the same colours we’d done our house with. I thought ‘jeez, that’s a good idea’, so I started thinking of >


BRISBANE MODERN #4

I HAVEN’T BEEN PAINTING THAT LONG SO I WANT A CHANCE TO TRY SOMETHING NEW. what I could paint and I suddenly thought, ‘You fool! You have been doing this your whole life’. “It was already there and here I was agonising over what I was going to paint.” His many years spent working as an architect means in an instant Paul can see the construction of these simplistic homes and the way light and shade work to create the essence of the building. With a few strokes of his three-inch paintbrush, Paul already starts to create the bones of the home he is painting. His original works were quite abstract, created with only this threeinch brush and three colours mixed to create a muted palette. Paul originally focused on Queenslanders, often built in the 1920s, and says his creations were very popular with interior designers. Today, Paul’s studio is his covered patio in the private bushland 106

salt

garden of his Marcus Beach home where he is surrounded by natural flora and dappled light that itself creates a sense of peace, calm and nostalgia. Here, Paul has set up his paint-stained easel, a box of paintbrushes and his three bottles of paint – blue, yellow and red. Paul is working on a series of commissioned works of beach shacks from old photographs. “I had a lady who had a very big beach shack right on Australia Avenue in Surfers Paradise. They had their house, a sandy road and then the beach. It was built in about 1957 and they had all the original pictures so I could paint that home. They spent many summers there, kids everywhere bunked up, cars and surfboards,” he says. “That was an interesting one because you forget. I was at a state school back then and you remember the macro stuff, everyone sleeping everywhere, but you really forget how simple a time it was.”


CHIMNEY HOUSE

“It gives me a chance to try new techniques, something a bit more abstract with a little more freedom. I want to explore this. I haven’t been painting that long so I want a chance to try something new.” Paul says he loves painting the snippets of urban, mostly brick homes and has found he’s unintentionally drawn attention to the issues of urban landscaping. “A lot of the houses in Brisbane, the landscaping is shocking,” he says. “All they do is get a pair of clippers out and just cut the hell out of the plant and turn it into a box or a ball. This is because the maintenance man does it and he doesn’t care about the shape of the plant. “So I’m addressing that in the paintings; the suburban landscaping industry that has stuffed up the landscaping. The architects who did the original designs for the ’60s houses, they wouldn’t have done landscaping like that.” Paul is keen to continue to explore the urban architecture and landscaping scene and his love for capturing such a unique perspective is evident in the way he talks excitedly about the home’s characteristics and charm. With an already extensive study of nostalgic beach shacks and now modernist brick homes, there’s no guessing what architectural detail Paul will focus on next. But, it is safe to say, there is no doubt Paul is fast establishing himself as a local master of modern architectural art. You can get a taste of Paul Harbour’s beautiful work at midmodoz, Shop 3, Peregian Beach Village Square, 2 Kingfisher Drive, Peregian Beach. 5448 2314. paulharbourart.com

Paul spent a number of “hot and uncomfortable” summers in Victorian fibro shacks and says while you can’t go back to simple times, you can certainly paint them.

Painting and sculptures by Mark Howson

While there’s a high demand for Paul’s fibro beach shack paintings, the thriving artist is keen to try something new and has started to experiment with a more modern approach to early ’60s architecture in the urban landscape of Brisbane suburbs. These paintings are much more abstract with thicker brushstrokes, a muted colour palette, less detail and a focus on the growing trend of sad and unloved landscaping.

STEVENS STREET GALLERY 2 Stevens Street, Yandina QLD 4561 +61 448 051 720 contact@stevensstreetgallery.com.au W stevensstreetgallery.com.au H Wed to Sat 9am - 1pm or by appointment P E

“I’ve been painting so many of the beach shacks, which is fun and you try to extract the most out of it in terms of what people are going to see in the painting,” he says. “But I’ve been thinking of new themes and the modernist is a logical transition.

saltmagazine . com . au

107


OFF THE WALL

COLOURFUL

expression WORDS LAHNEE PAVLOVICH PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN

108

salt


TANYA HODDINOTT RANDOMLY CHOOSES a colour, responds to the moment and without any rationale, gently sweeps the brush across the canvas or lunges at it, purging the brush of its paint.

Living her life in free form, the Yandina artist likes to paint in quite the same way. “My paintings are very intuitive,” she says. “It all starts with the colour and simply making marks on the canvas. I build layers to create depth and wait for images to appear. Then the decision making comes into it and the painting starts to takes its shape.” Born into a Queensland farming family in 1966, Tanya spent much of her childhood on the Sunshine Coast and attended Eumundi’s primary school. She moved to Brisbane for high school and then to Melbourne where she studied sculpture, archaeology and ancient history, subjects that to this day influence her work in some way. “It’s funny because a lot of art critics pick up on the ancient history in my work,” she says. While in Melbourne, Tanya fell in with a group of young, eager and rebellious artists who opened one of Melbourne’s earliest artist-run galleries, Roar Studios. “This helped me in many ways to establish myself as an artist,” Tanya says. “David Larwill and I were together for many years and our home was a real gathering place for many artists including Charles Blackman, John Perceval, John Olsen and Ginger Riley Munduwalawala. “I was lucky and I had great success quite quickly, exhibiting in Melbourne, Sydney and the Gold Coast. I also had the chance to work with some of the most incredible Aboriginal artists in their communities west of Alice Springs. All of these experiences were hugely influential and I learnt so much.” From there, Tanya was one of only a few artists selected to travel to a destination of her choice and create new artworks as a result of her experience. The work would go on to appear in Unfinished Journey, a book published in 2006. >

saltmagazine . com . au

109


I HAVE SPENT MANY YEARS NOW LOOKING AT NATURE, LEARNING ABOUT IT, COMING TO KNOW IT BETTER, PAINTING IT.

110

salt


Art on Cairncross “I had this book offer with the opportunity to go anywhere in the world and paint and then be featured alongside other amazing artists,” Tanya says. “I decided to go to Tulum in Mexico and base myself in a gorgeous abode right on the beach. I painted there on and off for a few years. It was such a beautiful place and a beautiful experience,” she says.

-Photo—Johanna De Maine

“I learnt early that if you do what you love you will be successful. There have been a lot of fantastic things that have happened along the way on my own unfinished journey and all of the bits that seem to pop up as pinpoints so far.”

“Oceania Series “

One of those pinpoints is having her artwork commissioned by Al Pacino’s wife. “She actually purchased one of my pieces for Al, which told a sort of murder mystery story,” Tanya says. “That was quite exciting.” These days, Tanya lives with her nine-year-old daughter Elisabeth, who is turning into a talented artist in her own right, and her partner Patrick Handley, founder of Waterscapes Australia, on their property in Kiamba. She runs Yandina’s Stevens Street Gallery while creating abstract and expressionist works of art.

“Imperfect Beauty” Rowley Drysdale April 8 - 30, 2017

“I bought the old IGA building in Yandina when I was living in Melbourne with the intention of turning it into my studio,” Tanya says. “It had a lot of rot and was in desperate need of a facelift so I renovated and separated the building into smaller tenancies. “I brought some artwork up from Melbourne to fill the walls and all of a sudden I had a gallery and it took off like a hungry baby. I sold 15 paintings in four weeks, which was so surprising and exciting. The township has been amazing and so supportive too. It’s an iconic building and with the renovations, it’s really made the street come alive.” Inspired by her surroundings, Tanya’s own artwork has taken on a new meaning and direction too. “I am a narrative painter, but relate to the more abstract works of Miro and Klee,” she says. “And I’m informed by a lot of things around me – the landscapes, travelling, the radio, everything.

Cairncross Corner, 3 Panorama Place, Maleny, Qld. P. 07- 54296404

E. admin@artoncairncross.com.au

Open Tuesday to Sunday - 10am to 5pm

www.artoncairncross.com.au

DONALD JAMES WATERS OAM

g n i g n C ha

SOLO EXHIBITION OPEN FROM 10TH JUNE TO 1ST JULY 2017

“I used to paint based on a lot of interpersonal relationships and urban stories. Then, when I became pregnant, I decided to slow down. I was on the farm, it was hot, I was slower and I just spent a lot of time staring at the trees and nature, and my work switched to a purist landscape – but still relationships in many ways also. Symbols that point to a bigger picture. “I’m inspired by water – waterfalls, rock pools. There is a lot of water in Kiamba,” she says. “I’m surrounded by sub-tropical rainforest and I think you get that from the circles and spirals in my work. I have spent many years now looking at nature, learning about it, coming to know it better, painting it.”

T i d es

But Tanya’s work isn’t just swirls on canvas. There is naive symbolism and a fluid style to not only tell deeply autobiographical stories, but also capture and reflect the Australian forest landscape. “It is a process of building up and peeling back. But a feeling of freedom, space and balance is important, and colour, of course. After that, a mood or a rhythm. The initial marks are free from anything controlled. They are just pure expression and at some point making sense of it; seeing where the story or the beat unfolds. “And there is a lot of information stored in the innocent-looking symbols too. If you were to study them with a little knowledge you would see that there are many layers there, much more than what you actually see,” she says. “I suppose even the colour selection is inspired by combinations and colours I see around me. I might see dirty blue and orange together and will store that in the think tank for later. Everything tells a story.”

25 GLOUCESTER ROAD, BUDERIM, QLD | P. 07 5456 2445 MON BY APPOINTMENT | TUES TO FRI 10AM - 5PM | SAT 9AM - 12NOON

WWW.ARTNUVOBUDERIM.COM.AU

Find Tanya’s work at Steven’s Street Gallery, 2 Stevens Street, Yandina. stevensstreetgallery.com.au

saltmagazine . com . au

111


ART DATES

1

ENCHANTED FOREST BY MAREE WELMAN

Acrylic on canvas 1000mm x 1000mm, $2000

ART

DATES

Take a moment to peruse some of the finest works from some of the best galleries on the coast.

3

Acrylic on stretched linen, 1000mm x 1000mm, $5900

PADDLING GIRL BY ADAM HARRIDEN

ONGOING 1 HEARTS AND MINDS ART

Hearts and Minds Art continues to showcase a stunning range of works by Australian artists including Beatrice Prost, Susan Schmidt, Maree Welman, Peter Kordyl, Jan Carlson, Richard John, Steve Graham and Jenni Kelly. when ongoing where Hearts and Minds Art, Noosa Marina, Parkyn Court, Tewantin. 0418 108 299 or heartsandmindsart.com.au

2 RED DESERT GALLERY

As specialists in Australian Aboriginal art, Red Desert Gallery has recently opened at Artisans Gallery Eumundi.

4 Archival rag paper, framed 760mm x 1015mm, $900

112

salt

when ongoing where Artisans Gallery Eumundi, 43 Caplick Way, Eumundi. 0409 848 098 or artisanseumundi.com


APRIL 5 CLOSE ENOUGH COUNTRY LANE BY GARY MYERS

This show includes works by post-emerging Queensland artists whose practices are concerned with shared and personal histories. Through a variety of media, these artists (Sam Cranstoun, Dale Harding, Alice Lang and Tyza Stewart) explore a range of issues from the personal to the political. when now to April 13 where Caloundra Regional Gallery, 22 Omrah Avenue, Caloundra. 5420 8299 or gallery.sunshinecoast.qld.gov.au

6 MEL BRIGG & STEPHEN

GLASSBOROW Kicking off the 2017 exhibition schedule, Art Nuvo is joining two of its most established and esteemed artists. Mel Brigg is a Buderim artist who is featured in international art collections. He has put together a collection of works featuring our coastal and rainforest scenes. Joining him is Australiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading bronze sculptor Stephen Glassborow, with his contemporary take on the female form in bronze. when now to April 22 where Art Nuvo, 25 Gloucester Road, Buderim. 5456 2445 or artnuvobuderim.com.au

Lindsay Muir

7 RACHEL NEWLING

Rachel Newling is exhibiting a selection of her distinctive and beautiful hand-coloured linocuts, engravings and pastel drawings of native birds, wildlife, landscape and flowers.

3 GARY MYERS

Local, contemporary artist Gary Myers shows his latest artworks. when ongoing where Maleny Art Direct, 2/30 Maple Street, Maleny. 0413 885 220 or malenyartdirect.com.au

4 ADAM HARRIDEN

midmodoz features the work of Doonan-based artist Adam Harriden, who takes photographs on vintage Polaroid Land cameras and then transfers the photos to archival rag paper. when open daily where midmodoz, Shop 3, Peregian Beach Village Square, 2 Kingfisher Drive, Peregian Beach. 5448 2314 or midmodoz.com.au

when now to April 23 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Tewantin. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au

Gary Myers

8 CAPTIVATING CREATURES II This show is a fresh take on the recent Captivating Creatures as Fiona Groom and Janet Carew invite Sara Bell to join the conversation for this second public outing. Inspired in their practice by the animal kingdom, each artist shares a fascination in the expressions of animals, and works to translate these through their work. when now to April 23 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Tewantin. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au >

Jane Nicol

Other Artists Also Featured

Shop 2/30 Maple Street, Maleny, Queensland p: 0413 885 220 www.malenyartdirect.com.au malenyartdirect@gmail.com

saltmagazine . com . au

113


5

EPIC FAIL BY ALICE LANG

16

ALBIZIA TIMBER CONSOLE TABLE

with chrysocolla inlay on antique cast-iron base, $1800

Acrylic wool and polymer clay, 4500mm x 900mm

8 HEY LET ME LOOK BY FIONA GROOM

9 ANIMAL FANFAIR: HUMANS

– ANIMALS – ENVIRONMENT Animal FanFair draws attention to humankind’s changing relationships with animals. The selected artists (Katka Adams, Marian Drew, Hayden Fowler, Kelly HusseySmith, Owen Hutchison, Claude Jones, Sam Leach, Emma Lindsay, Rod McRae and Walter Stahl) have dedicated much of their arts practice to this challenge. when now to April 23 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Tewantin. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au

10 RICHARD BOGUSZ

Richard’s delightful, narrative paintings are simple yet sophisticated, evoking a deep questioning response from viewers. Truly a unique artist.

Acrylic on canvas, 800mm x 800mm

114

salt

when now to April 30 where Montville Art Gallery, 138 Main Street, Montville. 5442 9211 or montvilleartgallery.com.au


13

BIOMORPHIC BOWL BY ROWLEY DRYSDALE

Ceramic, 130mm x 360mm x 390mm, $500

21

LUNCHEON ON THE GRASS BY KARAN HAYMAN

Oil on canvas, 300mm x 400mm, POA

11 CONVERSATIONS

WITH MT NINDERRY Stevens Street Gallery presents a selection of works by a group of local artists including Tarja Ahokas, Deni McGuin, Katharine Nix, Jenni Radke, Carole Roberts, Karen Wockner and Meg Woods. Various mediums and techniques are explored both in 2D and 3D. when now to May 29 where Stevens Street Gallery, 2 Stevens Street, Yandina. 0448 051 720 or stevensstreetgallery.com.au

FABRICS, YARNS, PATTERNS AND CLASSES

13 IMPERFECT BEAUTY

This exhibition is a new and diverse collection of sculptures, wall works and wood-fired vessels by master potter Rowley Drysdale.

TRADING HOURS Mon - Fri 9am - 4.30pm Saturday 9am - 2pm

when April 8 to 30 where Art on Cairncross, Cairncross Corner, 3 Panorama Place, Maleny. 5429 6404 or artoncairncross.com.au

14 WANTON, WILD

Irish artist Bernard O’Scanaill offers contemporary, abstract pieces influenced by his homeland.

& UNIMAGINED Wanton, Wild & Unimagined is Alison McDonald’s playful exhibition of sculptured recycled plastics that stirs the imagination and evokes environmental reflection.

when now to May 31 where Maleny Art Direct, 2/30 Maple Street, Maleny. 0413 885 220 or malenyartdirect.com.au

when April 28 to June 11 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Tewantin. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au >

12 IRISH WHISPERS

THE PATCHWORK ANGEL

343 Mons Rd, Forest Glen 4556 | Phone 07 5477 0700 Email info@patchworkangel.com.au www.patchworkangel.com.au Take Exit 200 off the Bruce Hwy Just 1 hour North of Brisbane & 30 mins South of Noosa

saltmagazine . com . au

115


MOOLOOLABA BY TODD WHISSON

Oil on board, 2700mm x 7700mm, $1950 SEA BREEZE BY DONALD WATERS

MAY

18 23

Giclee on canvas, various sizes available

17 BARUNG WOOD 15 GREER TOWNSHEND

HEARTBEAT Greer Townshend’s work is frequently underpinned by the concept of fragility, whether related to the process of memory, language or the self. Her practice combines portraiture and elements of nature, inferring an inherent connection between the two. when April 28 to June 11 where Noosa Regional Gallery, Level 1, Riverside, 9 Pelican Street, Tewantin. 5329 6145 or noosaregionalgallery.com.au

16 UNEARTHED

David Suters’ exhibition provides a sensory experience where you can smell, touch and see numerous Australian hardwoods and exotic species, handcrafted into bespoke furniture. The exhibition also features glass, clay, stone, metal artworks, plus textiles and visual mediums created by guest artisans. when now to late August where Artisans Gallery Eumundi, 43 Caplick Way, Eumundi. 0409 848 098 or artisanseumundi.com 116

salt

EXPO WOOTHA ART PRIZE This exhibition will showcase timber artworks from the expo. when May 2 to 18 where Maleny Art Direct, 2/30 Maple Street, Maleny. 0413 885 220 or malenyartdirect.com.au

18 TODD WHISSON

Todd is passionate about ‘plein air’ and the ‘alla prima’ approaches to painting as they enable him to create very loose, spontaneous works that have a wide appeal. when May 2 to 31 where Montville Art Gallery, 138 Main Street, Montville. 5442 9211 or montvilleartgallery.com.au

JUNE 20 WAYNE MALKIN

Wayne is a talented, self-taught landscape and portrait artist who has been short-listed twice for both the prestigious Doug Moran National Portrait Prize and Tattersall’s Landscape Art Prize. when June 1 to 30 where Montville Art Gallery, 138 Main Street, Montville. 5442 9211 or montvilleartgallery.com.au

21 KARAN HAYMAN SENTIO

AND BEYOND This is an exhibition of James McKay’s landscapes including some that are familiar and others from further afield, all expertly executed in beautiful watercolour.

One of the founding members of the Roar group of artists from Melbourne, Karan Hayman is well known for her warm and highly personalised paintings, which combine images such as animals, seascapes, layered mountains and childhood memories to create a narrative worthy of long contemplation.

when May 6 to 8 where Art on Cairncross, Cairncross Corner, 3 Panorama Place, Maleny. 5429 6404 or artoncairncross.com.au

when June 1 to July 31 where Stevens Street Gallery, 2 Stevens Street, Yandina. 0448 051 720 or stevensstreetgallery.com.au

19 SUNSHINE COAST

22 BRONZED AUSSIES

Chris Gavins offers his skillfully executed bronze sculptures of native birds and wildlife, from small lizards to birds in flight, with some pieces including boulder opal. when June 3 to 25 where Art on Cairncross, Cairncross Corner, 3 Panorama Place, Maleny. 5429 6404 or artoncairncross.com.au

23 DONALD WATERS

This is the contemporary Australian artist’s first solo exhibition in Buderim. His works can best be described as a romanticised recall of memory tainted with childhood naivety. He takes you on a childhood journey of climbing trees and playing in the dusty red soil of the vast outback; through a sunburnt adolescence stretching across the Australian Coastline. Originals and limited-edition prints will be available at the exhibition. when June 10 to July 8 where Art Nuvo, 25 Gloucester Road, Buderim. 5456 2445 or artnuvobuderim.com.au 


art TRAIL 6 COOROY

1 NOOSA HEADS

ENIGMATIC DRAWINGS HEARTS AND MINDS ART JIVE POETA HERFORD ON HASTINGS

2 NOOSA JUNCTION FINE ART GALLERY ENIGMATIC DRAWINGS

3 NOOSAVILLE

HEARTS AND MINDS ART NOOSA REGIONAL GALLERY

5 POMONA

POMONA RAILWAY STN GALLERY

7 EUMUNDI

ARTISANS GALLERY DAVID SUTERS TIMBER CRAFTSMAN RED DESERT GALLERY

10 MAROOCHYDORE GO ARTY

11 BUDERIM

12 MOOLOOLABA

ART NUVO

UNIVERSITY OF THE SUNSHINE COAST GALLERY

14 MOFFAT BEACH

HOLLOWAY GALLERY SEAVIEW ART GALLERY

15 CALOUNDRA CALOUNDRA REGIONAL ART GALLERY

16 GLENVIEW

OPALS DOWN UNDER

LANDSBOROUGH GALLERIES

18 CAIRNCROSS

DAVID HART GALLERIES GALLERY BENEATH

13 SIPPY DOWNS

STEVENS STREET GALLERY

MIDMODOZ



8 YANDINA

9 PEREGIAN BEACH

ARTVISION

4 TEWANTIN

17 LANDSBOROUGH

THE COOROY BUTTER FACTORY ARTS CENTRE

CORNER

ART ON CAIRNCROSS

19 MALENY

BEN MESSINA GALLERY DAVID LINTON GALLERY HOLDENS GALLERY MALENY ART DIRECT PEACE OF GREEN GALLERY

20 MONTVILLE ARTIQUE MAIN STREET GALLERY MONTVILLE ART GALLERY THE OPALCUTTER saltmagazine . com . au

117


IN YOUR DREAMS

Beach

REVAMP WORDS LAHNEE PAVLOVICH PHOTOS PAUL SMITH

CICADAS AND THE unmistakable purr of the ocean greet you as the sturdy red door, contrasting against beachy white and brown brick, opens to reveal a house of pure seaside style. Classically contemporary is a good way to describe the Peregian Beach house designed by Carole Tretheway. Owners Ivan and Veronika enlisted Carole’s services after finding her online while they were still living in Prague. “We were relocating to Australia and deciding where we wanted to make our life here,” Ivan says. “I remembered how beautiful the Sunshine Coast was from my many trips here in the ’90s and knew the Noosa region was just so relaxing too.” The family of four, with two boys aged nine and six, had been going to Cairns for many years to holiday, but when they did a little research into the best areas able to tick off all their wish list 118

salt

items – great beach, a good school and tennis program for their two sons, laidback lifestyle and warm community feel – they couldn’t go past Peregian Beach. “We decided on the location, bought a house and then found Carole,” Ivan says. “After a few emails and a two-hour meeting we entrusted her with the entire home project from concept and design to the finished result. We gave her the brief that we wanted a beach-house feel and it was really the best decision we’ve ever made,” he says. After seeing the house and the floor plans, Carole set about transforming the 1989 property, which was purchased from its original owners, into a classically modern home. “I saw that the house had potential and great bones,” Carole says. “It had a great feel to it. It was a good size and in a fabulous location, so we had a wonderful starting point to work from and I knew we could enhance it to make it a home Ivan and Veronika would love. It’s a big responsibility working with clients to ensure you get things just right and I think we did that. It’s not too modern; it’s simplistic and classic with a beach house feel to it.


“I wanted to retain many of the qualities and the history of the original house by keeping a lot of the brickwork and enhancing the look and feel of it with contemporary finishings. I worked with the floor plan and layout to ensure the home had functionality, then moved on to the joinery and plumbing features and from there it was about designing beautiful living spaces. “I wanted to utilise every space and simply improve on the elements that needed work, while combining the old and the new. The house hasn’t been overblown at all; it’s been kept quite simple really, but with everything Ivan and Veronika needed for their family life with two boys. Even as they grow they will find the house grows with them to suit their needs.” Tailored to the family’s lifestyle and desire for a home that lets the outside in, the property boasts three levels, three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a media room, and an open kitchen and dining area that flows seamlessly into the indoor/outdoor living space. “The red door at the entrance is really your first look into the home.” Carole says the door is very different to the design of the home “because we wanted to keep with parts of the original exterior, >


Before

which is brick, then add the white VJ walls. But the house really needed something to make it ‘pop’, so we went with a bold red door and I think it works beautifully as a welcome to the home. “The guest room and guest bathroom are both downstairs right next to the kitchen and dining space,” she says. “It was designed this way so that the many guests Ivan and Veronika entertain can still have their own privacy in the home. “We then removed some of the walls and pushed back an old beam to open up the living area and turn it into an indoor/ outdoor living space that complements the location perfectly. The property backs onto a nature reserve and a pathway that leads right to the beach, so letting nature in was the best way to accentuate this location. In the end we created something really beautiful and very special, extending the deck and bringing it all together.” 120

salt

After

Throughout the house, the features and designs are subtle and make use of white VJ walls, doors and ceilings. “On the top floor of the home you find the main bedrooms and bathroom. The stairway upstairs features classic timber tread with white risers – it’s all in the classical details and working with what we had already,” Carole says. “There is a new flyover roof and we kept the original windows in the boys’ room, which they share while still having their own space and privacy. We did paint the windows white to fit with the aesthetics of the house. The main room is also very simple, down to the white linens and in the main bathroom we used some detailing in the tiles to give it a fresh look and feel,” Carole says. On the lower level of the house, a grassy yard backs up to the reserve, and to the side of the property is the pool in a vibrant


I WANTED TO RETAIN MANY OF THE QUALITIES AND THE HISTORY OF THE ORIGINAL HOUSE BY KEEPING A LOT OF THE BRICKWORK. aqua, which contrasts with the grey tiling.

“We also created another outdoor living area downstairs and an indoor media room for the boys,” Carole says.

YOUR DREAM HOME IS WHERE OUR HEART IS At New Designer Homes, personalised service, superior quality and a hands-on approach are the hallmarks of our brand. We offer affordable style, believing that highest quality service and results shouldn’t cost a premium. Every home receives the same dedicated service and attention to detail that our reputation is built on.

This is something Ivan is very happy about. “The kids can watch Star Wars downstairs and we can have a normal adult conversation upstairs. It’s great.

COST-EFFECTIVE CUSTOM-DESIGNED PERSONALISED SERVICE

“We love what Carole did with the entire project,” he adds. “Being a civil engineer it was hard to step back and just let it happen but I’m so glad I did because we are so happy with the finished result. Carole pretty much designed the entire house even down to the furnishings, towels and linen. In fact everything in the house was Carole, except for the Nespresso machine – we thought we needed to contribute something!”

PHONE 07 5437 8766 Shop 1, 2 Main Drive Warana Qld 4575 newdesignerhomes.com.au

ct-design.com.au


HOMEWARES

Premium Lighting Atlas pendant, $187. Available at Noosa Lighting, 168 Eumundi Noosa Road, Noosaville. 5449 8422 or noosalighting.com.au

Quick Quarters quilt kit, $175, or pattern book, $32.95. Available at Patchwork Angel, 343 Mons Road, Forest Glen. 5477 0700 or patchworkangel.com.au

Selection of genuine mid-century and vintage ceramics and glass from Denmark, Sweden and West Germany, from $45. Available at midmodoz, Shop 3, Peregian Beach Village Square, 2 Kingfisher Drive, Peregian Beach. 5448 2314 or midmodoz.com.au

totally

done

LIFESTYLE EDITOR BRISEIS ONFRAY

Locally made oxidised copper heart block, $210. Available at Hearts and Minds Art, 1 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 0418 108 299 or heartsandmindsart.com.au

PUT THE FINISHING TOUCHES TO YOUR HOME WITH PERSONALISED PRODUCTS AND UNUSUAL PIECES THAT ADD WARMTH AND COLOUR.

122

salt

Handmade Pretzel chair, $595, and handmade beaded chandelier, $450. Available at Villa Verde Living, Shop 1, 10 Ormuz Avenue, Caloundra. 5491 8890 or villaverdeliving.com.au

Vertical garden hangers made from sustainable, plantation kiln-dried hardwood, from $20 to $40, pots, from $5, and hooks, $15 for four. Available at Original Eumundi Markets, 80 Memorial Drive, Eumundi every Wednesday and Saturday. 0414 810 087.


Australian red cedar with sapphire blue pearl resin infills Shield mirror by David Suters Timbercraftsman, from $900. Available at Artisans Gallery Eumundi, 43 Caplick Way, Eumundi. 0409 848 098 or artisanseumundi.com

Handmade Japanese ceramic bowl, $90. Available at The Cooking School Noosa, 2 Quamby Place, Noosa Sound. 5449 2443 or thecookingschoolnoosa.com

S&P Michigan vase, $49.95, S&P Michigan candleholder, $24.95, and dusty pink lantern, $89.95. Available at Domayne, Maroochydore Homemaker Centre, 11-55 Maroochy Boulevard, Maroochydore. 5452 1400 or maroochydorehomemakercentre.com.au

A’sh coconut and lime scented candle, $49.95. Available from Signatures on Hastings, 18 Hastings Street, Noosa Heads. 5474 9400 or signatureonhastings.com

Entertainment unit, Victorian ash top with New Guinea oak veneer fronts and matt black drawers, $3600. Availabe at Things of Metal and Wood, 1-2/45 Wises Road, Maroochydore. 0407 011 772 or thingsofmetalandwood.com.au

LIGHTING DESIGN BY LIGHTING PROFESSIONALS

Brilliant ideas in light.

168 Eumundi Road, Noosaville Q 4566 • 07 5449 8422 • noosalighting.com.au

saltmagazine . com . au

123


MEET THE DESIGNER

AGAINST THE

GRAIN

124

salt

WORDS PENNY SHIPWAY PHOTOS KRISTA EPPELSTUN


mainlinen Hotel Quality Linen Factory Outlet Prices

BUY DIRECT & SAVE UP TO 70% OFF

AS A YOUNG BOY David Suters would watch his father with a careful eye. The hammering of wood, shovelling of soil and tinkering with joinery were all familiar sounds at his family’s Port Macquarie home. David would often be pushing wheelbarrows, mixing cement and gathering the required tools as his father constructed decking and pergolas, and reconstructed anything that needed fixing. “Occasionally I would be labour as most boys do with their dads, watching them and learning,” David says. “My father worked in bridge constructions for the New South Wales Department of Main Roads. There wasn’t much he couldn’t create with his hands. I guess that’s my earliest introduction to being a craftsman.”

Stand out hospitality performer Hygiene, comfort and commercial longevity combine in our exclusive range of 5-star bedding and luxury accessories. Priced to excite all budgets. Great gift ideas for any occasion!

Fast forward more than 30 years and David’s hands are still at work. However, now they move with care and precision, sanding and shaping exquisite, handcrafted bespoke pieces of furniture and artistic works mostly from Australian native wood. David, a highly sought-after timber craftsman and owner of Artisans Gallery Eumundi, was 16 when he completed his apprenticeship and forged his career in furniture making. “My exposure to what Dad was doing, and being involved in creating things, led me to technical subjects at school, which I found very interesting. We used to tinker and waste good timber,” he says fondly. >

Factory Outlet 2/27 Premier Cct, Warana Open to the Public Monday - Friday

Ph | 5437 8544

SHOP ONLINE mainlinen.com


David worked for a furniture company for 17 years, where his position evolved to workshop manager, training new apprentices and designing and prototyping new pieces. “In the early days I mostly crafted pine furniture, which back then was normal to be stained a particular colour to emulate a more exotic species of timber, for example teak, walnut and cedar; occasionally undertaking a project using Australian red cedar or Tasmanian blackwood. “That’s when my passion for solid timber was born.” David’s one-off pieces started being displayed in several galleries across Australia’s east coast. With designs that were unusual, he hit the ground running, literally – knocking on doors of galleries to show them his master creations, such as free-form mirrors and hall tables. “I knocked on a few doors and no one ever said no.” And as his reputation grew, so did the sales; it was not long before David launched his own business here on the Coast. “With design change came the need and the market for more exotic species of timbers, mostly Australian hardwoods,” he says. “My designer range evolved into a new phase, and at that point I opened my own furniture-making studio.” A large percentage of David’s studio time is dedicated to designing and handcrafting commissions for private and corporate clients. However, he always factors in time to work on new pieces or concepts for his Eumundi gallery, where he has lately been experimenting with a more free-form sculptural style of works. 126

salt

IDEAS COME FROM NATURE ALL AROUND ME; FROM FLORA AND FAUNA, AND LANDSCAPES AND THE COUNTRYSIDE, FROM INLAND TO THE SEA.


biggest source of ideas comes from the trees themselves – with natural curves, shapes, colours, textures and grain. “Each piece of timber can remain in my workshop for months, and even years before an idea will come to me. Other times, ideas are brought to me by clients, who I then work with on concepts and evolve a design to specifically suit their requirements. My clientele wants one-of-a-kind fine furniture that lasts a lifetime, not mass-produced factory-made pieces that are prone to falling apart and need to be repaired or replaced.” Of his three children, Kahlee has shown the most interest in taking on her father’s passion in a world where mass-produced furniture is consuming the market. Just as David watched and learned from his own father, Kahlee has spent much time with her dad from an early age, hammering nails into wood, gluing offcuts together, sanding timber, and making her own gifts for family and friends. “More recently she has developed a fascination for creating artworks, using pigments and liquid acrylics. Her first artwork sold quickly, and from there she has since delivered two larger commissioned pieces. She has quickly learnt a few tricks of the trade, and has been successful already as an emerging visual artist with sales in the gallery and commissions of her own. With her passion and creativity, perhaps she will become the next generation of designer and furniture maker.” David also offers “meet the maker” talks at the gallery, sharing the furniture’s journey from start to finish, and how the timber was sourced. He says with each piece comes the thrill of sourcing “that unique slab or pack of timber”. “I never tire of a timber’s natural beauty. For me, it’s the raw material where no two pieces are the same. I love the shape and the grain structure.” David always sources responsibly, and uses a lot of recycled or salvaged timbers, with Tasmanian black woods, Huon pine, blue gum, and native eucalypts and exotics as stand-out favourites. Inspiration is no doubt abundant when your studio is set on two beautiful acres in Eumundi, where David lives with his wife Cindy and three children, Luke, 26, Sharni, 24, and Kahlee, 14.

Montville Art Gallery

“Ideas come from nature all around me; from flora and fauna, and landscapes and the countryside, from inland to the sea. My

April - Richard Bogusz

138 Main Street, Montville Opposite the ‘Village Green’

Salt Q2 2017.indd 1

And while David remains one of a few craftspeople who custom designs and creates fine furniture from solid timbers using traditional techniques, he has faith the market will soon return to more clients seeking individual, quality and locally sourced furniture. “Having seen design influences change over the years, I am heartened to see market trends now shifting back to timber furniture; for its timeless natural beauty, as well as the elegance, warmth and character it brings to its environment in a home or corporate setting. White painted or chrome furniture has for too long suppressed and depersonalised many family homes and workplaces. “Goodbye the sterile look! Bring on the warmth of timber furniture, textiles and wall art.” Artisans Gallery Eumundi, 43 Caplick Way, Eumundi. artisanseumundi.com

Our “Artists of the Month” for:

May - Todd Whisson

June - Wayne Malkin

Phone: 5442 9211 montart@montart.com.au

Open daily 10 - 5 www.montvilleartgallery.com.au

29-Jan-17 3:08:07 saltmagazine . com . au PM127


photo Ian Borland

SALT FEED

GLASS HOUSE MOUNTAINS NOOSA HEADS MONTVILLE LAKE COOTHARABA

Dear salt-y readers, We hope you enjoyed your autumn dose of salt. Follow us @saltmag and share your Sunny Coast moments via #saltmag for your chance to WIN a year’s subscription to salt magazine. The team at salt. xx @SALTMAG #autumngiveaway

TOURIST INFORMATION

CLIMATE No wonder it’s called the Sunshine Coast, with an average of seven hours of sunshine daily (one of the highest amounts in the world). Autumn (March to May) days are cooler but still inviting, with an average temperature between 13°C and 25°C and an ocean temperature of 24°C. Temperatures in the hinterland can be several degrees cooler. MARKETS Blackall Range Growers Market, 316 Witta Road, Maleny, third Saturday of the month (except January), 7am to noon. Caloundra Country Markets, 17 Buderim Street, Currimundi, every Sunday, 6am to noon. Caloundra Street Fair, Bulcock Street, Caloundra, every Sunday, 8am to 1pm. Cotton Tree Street Market, King Street, Cotton Tree, every Sunday, 7am to noon. Eumundi Courtyard Village Market, 76 Memorial Drive, Eumundi, every Saturday, 8am to 2pm, Wednesday 8.30am to 1pm. Fishermans Road Sunday Markets, Fishermans Road, Maroochydore, every Sunday, 6am to noon. Kawana Waters Farmers’ Market, Sportsmans Parade, Bokarina, every Saturday, 7am to noon. Maleny Market, Maple Street, every Sunday, 8am to 2pm. Marcoola Market, 10 Lorraine Avenue, Marcoola. Every Friday evening 4pm to 8pm. Nights On Ocean, Ocean Street, Maroochydore, second Friday of the month from 5pm. Noosa Farmers’ Market, AFL Grounds, Weyba Road, Noosaville, every Sunday, 7am to noon. Noosa Junction Twilight Markets, Arcadia Street, Noosa Heads, third Friday of the month, from 5pm. 128

salt

SCHOOL HOLIDAYS April 1, 2017 to April 17, 2017. EMERGENCY TELEPHONE NUMBERS Ambulance, Fire Brigade, Police, Coastguard, Rescue......................000 Poisons Information Centre...............131 126 Ambulance Transport........................131 233 TRAVELLING DISTANCES Brisbane to Caloundra........................ 100km Brisbane to Mooloolaba...................... 105km Brisbane to Nambour......................... 110km Brisbane to Noosa ............................. 148km Noosa to Montville............................. 56 km Mooloolaba to Maleny........................ 41km Caloundra to Kenilworth..................... 77km SURF SAFETY PATROLS (Times vary between 7am – 5pm) Year round 7 days/week Noosa Heads, Sunshine Beach, Peregian Beach, Coolum Beach, Twin Waters Resort, Maroochydore, Alexandra Headland, Mooloolaba, Dicky Beach, Kings Beach. TO STAY SAFE AT THE BEACH REMEMBER: Too much exposure to the sun can cause serious damage to your skin. Make sure whenever you are going in the sun that you take adequate precautions. SLIP, SLOP, SLAP, SEEK AND SLIDE Slip on a shirt (preferably a long-sleeved shirt). Slop on the sunscreen (+30 reapply as needed). Slap on a hat. Seek some shade. Slide on wrap around UV protective sunglasses. It’s also a good idea to avoid direct exposure to the sun during the hottest part of the day – between the hours of 10am and 3pm – and try to take advantage of shade when possible.


DIRECTORY

USEFUL INFORMATION

WHEN VISITING THE SUNSHINE COAST MEDICAL

MEDICAL

SKIN

Peregian Springs Doctors Open 8am to 5pm Monday to Friday Coles Peregian Springs Shopping Centre, 1 Ridgeview Drive, Peregian Springs, 1st floor above Amcal Pharmacy. 5471 2600 lookingafteryourhealth.com.au

General Practice and Skin Check Clinic Open 7am - 6pm Monday to Friday and 8am - 5pm Saturday and Sunday. Coolum Village Shopping Centre 8-26 Birtwill Street, Coolum Beach. 5471 6333 lookingafteryourhealth.com.au

Early skin cancer detection. Scan QR code with smartphone for details

Children under 16, pension concession and DVA card holders. Bulk bill.

Surgical and non-surgical treatments. Suite 1, Kawana Private Hospital, 5 Innovation Parkway, Birtinya. 5438 8889 skinsurveillance.com

Children under 16, pension concession and DVA card holders. Bulk bill. *

IS YOUR AVIATION MEDICAL DUE? DR HEATHER PARKER OAM, BA, MD, FRACGP, ACCAM.

Aviation Examiner for Australian, New Zealand, Canadian, USA and South African medicals. Phone 5471 2600 for an appointment 1 Ridgeview Drive Peregian Springs Sunshine Coast Queensland 4573 lookingafteryourhealth.com.au

*

Would you like to advertise in our directory? Contact salt magazine 0412 210 281 ADVERTISE WITH SALT FOR FREE* Each edition salt gives away a third page advertisement worth $1100 to a worthy non-profit organisation that tugs on our salt strings. This edition weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to donate a third page advertisement to Pillowcases for Oncology Kids. If you know or are a part of a non-profit organisation that needs to spread the word, please let us know. To find out more visit saltmagazine.com.au and click on the free ad link.

We provide handmade cotton pillowcases to children undergoing cancer treatment Australia-wide.

Founded in 2012, by then 14 year old Brittany, our mission is to provide a bright and uplifting pillowcase to all children undergoing cancer treatments Australia wide.

If you wish to sew a pillowcase or make a donation towards the making of pillowcases,we would love to hear from you. Please call 07 5429 6675 or email pillowcases4oncologykids@hotmail.com Brittany on her 2nd birthday

Pillowcases for Oncology Kids

PO BOX 250, MALENY, QLD 4552 saltmagazine . com . au

129


SHOPPING CENTRES: SF state forest

MAP

NP national park SF state forest SF state forest NP national park

NP 1 national park highway major road

1

KEY: highway state forest SFMAP

golf 1 courses highway

state park forest major road NPSF national

1 major airport highway road

minor roadnational park 1 NP highway

road golfmajor courses minor road

major golf roadcourses

minor road N airport

N

minor airport road

minor road

ON THE COVER: Sunrise Beach

130

salt

Map Disclaimer: This map was not created to any scale, and no claim is made to its accuracy. Most natural features are eliminated, as are changes in elevation. This map does provide a starting point for finding your way around. Map depicted is subject to change.

gol

airp N


AVQ915

DO YOU ENJOY HOME COMFORTS AND SUN-SOAKED GETAWAYS?

We’ve got a new place to retire, Yarran Rise release now selling. With our brand new Yarran Rise villas ready to move into, there’s never been a better time to retire at Aveo Peregian Springs Country Club. • • • • • •

Be part of a vibrant community adjoining an 18-hole golf course Newly refurbished community centre Beautiful hinterland location close to Peregian Beach World-class facilities – restaurant, pool, bowling green, gym Variety of activities – exercise classes, dancing, walking group, book club 24/7 care staff and visiting healthcare professionals

Aveo Peregian Springs Country Club 13 28 36 aveo.com.au

21 Gracemere Boulevard, Peregian Springs

New release now selling!


IS BORN OF THE PUREST PARENTS, THE SUN AND THE SEA” PYTHAGORAS

Profile for salt magazine

salt magazine, autumn 2017  

salt magazine is a quarterly tourism and lifestyle publication based on the Sunshine Coast of Australia.

salt magazine, autumn 2017  

salt magazine is a quarterly tourism and lifestyle publication based on the Sunshine Coast of Australia.

Advertisement