Page 1

MANAGEMENT

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

NEWS

Hawke’s Bay shepherd seizes his opportunities. PAGE 40

Wraps to be pulled off new Magnum. PAGE 45

Dairy Women’s Network launches social media storytelling project. PAGE 24

TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS SEPTEMBER 10, 2019: ISSUE 684 

www.ruralnews.co.nz

Lamb cracks $8/kg SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

LAMB PRICES have cracked the $8/kg mark for the second successive year and things could get even better. ASB senior rural economist Nathan Penny believes there’s a “50/50 chance” of a record. “At this juncture, we think there is a 50/50 chance that lamb prices will set record highs over spring, particularly as current prices ($8.25/kg) are neck’n’neck with this time last year,”

Penny said in ASB’s Commodities Weekly report. Nationwide prices last year topped out at $8.43/kg. NZ lamb exports to China are booming because African swine fever has butchered the Chinese pork industry, leading consumers to seek other proteins. Rabobank animal protein analyst Blake Holgate also expects lamb prices to end the season on a high. And he notes that prices in the North Island and South Island have

crossed the $8/kg mark. In late August the NI slaughter price averaged $8.35/ kg and the SI averaged $8.10/kg. Holgate says export market sentiment remains positive but key markets are performing differently. “While China’s strong demand and pricing show no sign of waning in the immediate future, there are reports of some weakening of demand in the UK, Continental European and the US,” he said. “At this stage, pricing has not been materially impacted in any of these

Preparing for life on the outside Christchurch Men’s Prison farm’s chief instructor Warren Chilton is pictured with fattening pigs at one of the farm’s Freedom Farms certified straw barns. The farm, 804ha of mixed livestock and cropping, surrounds the prison on the western outskirts of Christchurch. The jewel in the farm’s crown is its 8000-strong piggery. It also runs 2000 breeding ewes, about 250 beef cows and grows about 100ha of barley. Altogether there could be up to 40 low security prisoners “outside the wire” on any given day, training in the skills they will need on release, Chilton told Rural News. “We are here basically for rehabilitation of prisoners, to give them work skills, work ethics, get them work ready and hopefully find jobs for them. That’s our main focus.” A profile of the prison farm will run in the September 24 issue of Rural News. PHOTO: NIGEL MALTHUS

markets, in part due to the limited volume of product available out of NZ.” Penny notes that lamb export supply remains relatively tight in NZ and Australia. The rise in conversions of sheep/ beef land to forestry will reduce lamb supply in the next few years. “While not necessarily a great development for the sheep industry, these conversions will nonetheless underpin lamb prices for an extended period,” said Penny.

NO MORE CREAM AT FONTERRA FONTERRA CHIEF executive Miles Hurrell has told co-op employees that more work is needed to turn the business around. “We are making good progress on our plan to turn our business around: we’re not there yet,” he said in an email to staff last week. “Some tough calls are still needed to put us on the right path.” Miles Hurrell Fonterra employees won’t be paid bonuses for the 2018-19 year. No salaried staff earning over $100,000 will get a pay rise in 2019-20. A remuneration review will still occur for salaried employees earning under $100,000. Waged employees who are part of a collective agreement aren’t impacted. Hurrell says this has been a tough call, but it’s also the right one. “Together as a cooperative we must do what’s right, working together to reset our business and get us back to a position where we can be proud of our financial performance.” He thanked staff for their hard work in helping lift performance and reset the business. • See page 4

Mix and spread to save Endure® slug bait Check your paddocks before and after sowing. Where needed, Endure can be mixed and spread with fertiliser. • Non-toxic to earthworms and slug predators • Save new crops / pastures and on application costs

0800 100 123 ravensdown.co.nz

Keep your spreading costs down and new pasture/crop growth up. Order an Endure slug bait and fertiliser mix today.

Smarter farming for a better New Zealand®


GET A GREAT SPRING DEAL AND INCREASE YOUR PRODUCTIVITY

DEUTZ-FAHR 6185G 185HP, 6 CYLINDER

• Deutz TCD Tier 3A engine • No AdBlue required • Stop and Go function maximises control and minimises clutch usage • 6 speed Powershift ZF transmission gearbox gives a smoother ride • Carraro axle with all new front suspension ensures a great driving experience • Cabin suspension standard on all models • Available with 125 litre CCLS hydraulic pump • From only $3146*+GST per month

UP TO

5

154,000

YEARS

$

AGRO CARE

+ GST

WARRANTY

DEUTZ-FAHR 6 RC PRO SERIES

DEUTZ-FAHR 100GS LOADER COMBO

· Deutz TCD Tier 3A engine means no AdBlue required · 6 speed Powershift ZF transmission · Creeper box standard · Cabin suspension standard

• 40 x 40 transmission with creeper box makes it ideal for front end loader work • True 4WD braking makes it great for operating in hilly terrain

155-215HP, 6 CYLINDER

MONTHLY PAYMENTS

FROM

ONLY

deutz-fahr nz

2,759

$

100-115HP, 4 CYLINDER

*

MONTHLY PAYMENTS FROM * ONLY

1,537

$

deutz-fahr nz

KIOTI RX8030 ROPS

PX1052 P/S

• 80Hp 2435cc Daedong liquid cooled 4 cylinder diesel engine • 24x24 4 main gear x6 range gear shift with Power shuttle and 4WD • Wet clutch • 72.8 l/min total hydraulic flow

• Perkins liquid cooled 4 cylinder diesel engine • 32x32 transmission with power shuttle • Wet clutch with 4WD • 79.2 l/min hydraulic flow • Quality air conditioned cabin

105HP, CABIN

80HP

FREE LOADER

FINAIALANBLCEE AV

53,990

$

SAVE $10,990

MONTHLY REPAYMENTS FROM $895†

4 YEAR POWER

TRAIN WARRANTY

FREE LOADER

KIOTI

FINAIALANBLCEE AV

69,990

$

+GST

TRAIN WARRANTY

KIOTI

+GST

4 YEAR POWER

SAVE $11,990

MONTHLY REPAYMENTS FROM $1,150†

kioti tractors nz

kioti tractors nz

Google Power Farming Facebook/YouTube Power Farming NZ www.powerfarming.co.nz WHANGAREI

09 438 9163 FEILDING

FA1095RN

06 323 8182

PUKEKOHE

0800 570 571 MASTERTON

06 370 8240

TAURANGA

07 543 0021 NELSON

03 544 5723

TE AWAMUTU

07 870 2411

GREYMOUTH

03 768 4370

MORRINSVILLE

07 889 5059

CHRISTCHURCH

03 349 5975

ROTORUA

07 349 6528

ASHBURTON

03 307 7153

TIMARU

GISBORNE

06 868 8908

03 687 4127

DUNEDIN

03 489 3489

HAWERA

0800 480 309 GORE

03 208 9395

HASTINGS

06 879 9998 INVERCARGILL

03 215 9039

Normal lending criteria applies. Terms and conditions apply. Offer ends 31/10/2019. Contact your local dealership for more information. * Requires 30% deposit and full GST in month three, 2.95% interest for 36 monthly payments. ** Terms and conditions apply. Go to deutztractors.co.nz/trydeutz for detailed terms and conditions. † Requires 30% deposit and full GST in month three, 5.85% interest for 48 monthly payments.


// JULY10, 16,2019 2019 RURAL RURAL NEWS //NEWS SEPTEMBER

NEWS 3 ISSUE 684 680 www.ruralnews.co.nz www.ruralnews.co.nz

MPItalk, promises to act All no profit pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

NEWS ��������������������������������������1-16 NEWS�������������������������������������1-29 AGRIBUSINESS�����������������18-19 AGRIBUSINESS �������������� 30-31 MARKETS �������������������������� 20-21 MARKETS��������������������������32-33 HOUND, EDNA EDNA����������������������� 22 HOUND, ��������������������� 34 CONTACTS������������������������������34 22 CONTACTS����������������������������� OPINION ����������������������������22-24 OPINION��������������������������� 34-39 MANAGEMENT �������������� 25-26 MANAGEMENT���������������40-41 ANIMAL HEALTH HEALTH��������������������27 ANIMAL ���������� 42-44 MACHINERY AND AND MACHINERY PRODUCTS ���������������������� 28-30 PRODUCTS���������������������� 45-49 RURAL TRADER TRADER��������������� 30-31 RURAL �������������50-51

HEAD OFFICE Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, HEAD OFFICE Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Top Floor, 29 Northcroft Street, Takapuna, Auckland 0622 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 Phone: 09-307 0399 Fax: 09-307 0122 POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 331100, Takapuna, POSTAL ADDRESS Auckland 0740 Takapuna, PO Box 331100, Auckland Published0740 by: Rural News Group Published RuralPrint News Group Printed by:by: Ovato Printed by: Ovato Print CONTACTS CONTACTS Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Editorial: editor@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Advertising material: davef@ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Rural News online: www.ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz Subscriptions: subsrndn@ruralnews.co.nz

ABC audited circulation 79,553 as at 31.03.2019 ABC audited circulation 79,553 as at 31.03.2019

ALMOST ALL the recommendations from two reviews of the Mycoplasma STATE FARMER Landcorp (Pamu) bovis programme have accepted, returned a net loss of been $11 million in after theto‘surge the year June in 30,activity’ 2019. leading up to Earnings this year’s before moving tax day. were $34m The$48m surgeinarose because of a backversus the previous year. logThe in company tracing has animal movements, declared a special which had unnoticed dividend of gone $5m, essentially based on the one-off and was until April. gain madenot onfully the realised sale of its shares in The reviews were commissioned Westland Milk Cooperative. to Pamu look chief into executive the causeSteve andCarden possible impacts the backlog, recattributes theof poor result toand writeommend how the programme downs and drought affecting could milk improve its and systems processes. production someand costs of changdoneand by diversification. MPI’s chief sciing One farm was systems ence advisor Dr John Roche. The other “The write-downs were quite conwas an independent siderable,” Carden toldreview Rural commisNews. sioned DairyNZ and done by South The by land write-down is related to aAustralia Landcorpanimal reviewdisease acrossmanagement the country. expert Roger Paskin. On the Dr North Island East Coast land Theare independent Technical Adviprices up and in the South Island sory Group has also asked to condairy land prices arebeen down. sider thehas impact backlog andinis “That led toofathe $47m decrease the overall value of our land portfolio-

Carden says about 45% of Pamu milk comes out of the central North Island. TOGETHER, ROCHE and Paskin’s “We have big developmenttoin reports madethat 43 recommendations the Wairakei area, Lake Taupo, improve the systemsnear and processes and they ended up having a really dry within the M. bovis programme. summer and early autumn. These include greater regional “They had the rainfall decisionmaking, thelowest importance of in more than 10 years and that had farmer involvement and improving an impact on production in resourcing. the dairy portstructures, systems and folioMPI with the concentration in that director-general Ray Smith area. We had to introduce more said the two reviews had provided supplementary feed wethe had hoped, concrete ways to than improve toprogramme’s offset the lack of pasture growth, systems and processes. so that resulted in a milk slowdown.” “We’re sorry for the impact this has Pamu is changing its systems had on affected farmers, and thatacross we the board: looking at more organic had to take the action we did at a busy milk, increasing the timeA2, of year for many offorestry them. portfolio, more intensive high tech beef “The programme is working hardsystems and some non animal uses of land to implement the recommendations such as avocados in Northland. of the reviews, starting with enabling Carden admits some of the and changes more regional decisionmaking inrolling systems and investments hit the out a bespoke data managebottom line this year. ment system.” It takes a while to make those changes and it costs a fair bit, he says.

FINDINGS

NIGEL MALTHUS PAM TIPA

MPI director-general Ray Smith has apologised to affected farmers. Pamu chief to executive expected reportSteve backCarden. soon. Roche’s review found that the backlog, smaller first across thealthough country. The land than valuation was due towith issues with isthought, a bit inconsistent what we manhave aginginthe information between seen theflow past.ofObviously land values functions,but andthey in the fluctuate, do disease tend in managefarming ment team’stostructure and resourcing. to continue trend upward. While may have allowed fur“We areitseeing more of thesome pressure ther spread the disease, did come on nowofwith a lack ofRoche potential not believe it had harmed chances buyers in the market and the some challenges in environmental policies tight-

of successfully eradicating M. bovis. Paskin identified issues related to the programme ening up. They arestructure, starting tostaffing, have a training, management and supportbit of an impact on land prices in some ing tools. parts of the country.” Heclaims said the was an He theprimary livestockissue write-down accumulation traces to because and from was not overlyofsignificant it infected properties which had not was to do with timing at the beginning been up, into some cases, for of the followed year compared the end of the about seven year plus howmonths. many livestock are sold or retained.

DHB concedes issues Limits on irrigation,maternity dairy conversions SOUTHLAND DISTRICT Health Board (SDHB) claims it is stepping RESTRICTIONS ON new dairy conup its investment in primary materversions and irrigation are coming services in rural areas. asnity the Government grapples with SDHB’s waterways Lisa Gestroaround – executive improving the director strategy, primary and comcountry. munity – toldwill Rural News itstomaterAll farmers be required have theto entire region have anity farmservices plan byin 2025 manage risks to already been reviewed. freshwater onsystematically their properties. This in response to a Rural Thecomes proposals were outlined in NZ (RWNZ) callStatement for a wide aWomen draft National Policy ranging review. Environment Stanand National “It Freshwater has been paper independently dards: released reviewed andEnvironment found that when fully last week by Minister implemented it will increase services David Parker and Agriculture Minisacross the district,” she says. ter Damien O’Connor. “We’re one year into a will two year Public submissions be implementation timeframe. accepted on the proposals until Octo-

“We recognise that some aspects of this have not gone as will smoothly as ber. The Government decide we’d like are having the implefinally on and the national policy statementation date independently ment by earlytonext year. reviewed.” “From June 2020, changes such as andor others -- including newRWNZ irrigation conversion to dairysignatories two petitions -- are ing will onlyofhappen where there is strongly objecting the downgradevidence it will nottoincrease polluing inthe April of Lumsden Birth Centre tion,” discussion document says. to Among a maternal and proposals, child hub and sevother catcheral subsequent emergency births at ments with high nitrate/nitrogen the centre, in thetocarpark. levels will beone required reduce nitrohas called for urgent reingen RWNZ loss within five years. statement of the Lumsden birthing The Government also wants farmcentre hastocriticised the extent ers to doand more exclude stock from of two current reviews more by Southland waterways. It proposes fencing DHB. Butsetbacks Gestro says a systematic and wider to keep stock out review of primary maternity services of waterways, reduce erosion and cap-

across the DHB’s entire, largely rural, district was precisely thethey exercise ture contaminants before reach done from 2016 to 2018. water. “There had calls to Standards willlong also been be introduced address the provision of maternity for intensive winter grazing, feedlots services theareas district,” she said. and stockacross holding to reduce ero“In particular, we faced challenges sion and pollution of waterways by with the sustainability of the lead nutrients, sediment and pathogens. maternity carer (LMC) midwifery The document talks about extra workforce.” costs facing farmers- $600 million saysfor while LMC midwives overGestro 10 years extra fencing and are paid by the Ministry of $3,500 fordirectly each farm plan. The GovHealth, SDHB recognises thefunding particernment has allocated $229m ular practising in rural in thechallenges Budget foroffarmers. areas require extraorganisations support. Some farmer are She saysthe theproposals. ‘integrated primary welcoming maternity systemNew of care’ aimed to Horticulture Zealand chief take a holistic view to directsays resources executive Mike Chapman every

UPGRADE TO RAIN RESISTANT

® POUR-ON... ... AND wE’LL UPGRADE yOUR TABLEwARE

BUy A 2.5L PAck AND wE’LL GIvE yOU A JAmIE OLIvER 16 PIEcE EvERyDAy cUTLERy SET

BUy A 5L PAck AND wE’LL GIvE yOU A mAxwELL wILLIAmS 16 PIEcE cOSmOPOLITAN DINNER SET* Alleva Animal Health Limited, 1/116a Harris Road, East Tamaki, Auckland. BOSS® is a registered trademark of Alleva Animal Health Ltd. Registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997 No. A010817. See www.foodsafety.govt.nz for registration conditions. Promotional item supplied may differ from the advertised image. * While stocks last.

AVAILABLE

FrOM yOUr

LOcAL

VEtErInAry

prActIcE

www.alleva.co.nz

differently and increase the reach of services across the whole NZer wants clean lakes, district. rivers and “This meant creating maternal streams. And fruit and vegetable and childare hubs in Wanaka,heTesays. Anau growers no exception, andIrrigationNZ Lumsden tosays support midwives it is pleased to in communitiesfreshwater and improvseethose the Government’s proing integration care posals do not pinwith blameprimary for waterway services.” degradation solely on the primary Additional ‘sustainability’ paysector. ments made to beef remote rural midButare sheep and farmers have wives, withconcerns. 16 LMCs in the district significant taking extraNZ payment. Beefthe + Lamb (BLNZ) says plans But down Gestrocurrent says they need will to to lock land uses think more broadlyaffect about best disproportionately thehow majority to use their towhich care for of sheep andresources beef farms arerural low women and theirsystems families.with a light input, extensive – Pam Tipa touch on the environment. • Mothers and babies at riskKissun – Pg 5 – Sudesh


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

4 NEWS

Water ownership debate gets new push JILL GALLOWAY

A WAITANGI Tribunal report and recommendations on water ownership have put Māori rights and interests in freshwater firmly back in the public spotlight, just as the Government releases a raft of policy changes. Irrigation New Zealand (INZ) says we need a commission on freshwater use to look at present and future use of the resource. INZ chief executive Elizabeth Soal says NZ needs a commission with an overarching concept of how water should be used. “While we broadly

support the Waitangi Commission’s finding, we believe present and future use of water needs to be looked at closely,” said Soal. As well as looking at farmer use, the commission must also consider community use -- water for towns and cities. “NZ has so much political advantage from its water use, and while any ownership change or a commission would be a fundamental change, all affected parties need to take a part in any discussion.” She says big changes are coming, notably climate change, and these need to be taken into

account. “We need to ensure there is a non-politicised take on water, for everybody’s good.” Meanwhile, the National Party opposes the proposal for Maori to be given ownership interest in freshwater as proposed by the Waitangi Tribunal report. “National has consistently said no one owns freshwater,” said the party’s Crown-Maori relations spokesman Nick Smith. “We urge the Government to reject the more radical recommendations of this report. The Government is creating uncertainty and confu-

sion by not clearly ruling out Maori having an ownership interest in freshwater.” Smith says NZ is richly blessed with huge freshwater resources with only 2% extracted for use. “A debate over the ownership is an unhelpful distraction from the important work to improve freshwater management to achieve better water quality and further economic opportunities.” The Government

announced, late last week, what it plans to do with fresh and thermal water, but a recommendation from the Waitangi Tribunal says the Crown should acknowledge Maori rights and ownership of freshwater. But Environment Minister David Parker told Radio New Zealand he was happy to acknowledge there were Maori rights and interests in water.

sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

FOOTWEAR LTD

NZ MADE BOOTS

Visit www.lastrite.co.nz for more quality products

HUNTER BOOTS Comfortable, durable and stylish.

The heavy duty sole construction makes this a robust boot designed for climbing over rugged ground. This boot has a soft toe and is made from a thick Mad Dog Nubuck Leather, stitched and screwed construction with a rubber, replaceable sole, that is glued and screwed. Soft padding for ankle support and D-Rings for your laces are an added advantage. Great fitting boots full of comfort, ideal for those long hunting and tramping trips.

FARMER BOOTS Lastrite’s Farmer boots are made for comfort. Constructed from Reverse kip leather they are an ideal farmers, fencers and builders boot. Very sturdy and made to last this boot is robust with a heavy duty construction. It has a leather insole and midsole that is stitched and screwed construction with a rubber, replaceable sole, that is glued and screwed. Update your old boots now and you will never look back.

10 HALL ROAD, RD5, WHANGAREI Phone 09-436 2794 or 027-436 2793

www.wilsonplastics.co.nz

FONTERRA’S EFFORTS to rein in costs now see it turning the screws on staff by suspending bonuses and pay rises for its top earners. But a shareholder farmer is warning that the co-op risks losing good staff over its decision to suspend performance bonuses and annual pay increments. Ashburton farmer and popular blogger Craig Hickman, known as ‘Dairyman’ on social media, believes the co-op’s decision is wrong. Hickman says he supports the management’s decision to revamp the business but penalising staff isn’t the way to go. Fonterra chief executive Miles Hurrell emailed farmer shareholders last week, stating that the board and management had decided not to pay performance bonuses to co-op staff for 2018-19. No salaried employee earning over $100,000 would be eligible for

the annual pay increase this year, he said. Everyone needs to help turn the business around. “Our people understand this is the right thing to do given our current financial performance.” The co-op talked to employees this week about the two decisions. But Hickman told Rural News that Fonterra wasn’t going broke and there was no reason to unfairly penalise staff. “Farmers are angry at the erosion of our share value and the non payment of a dividend but we’re not going broke. The payout still starts with a ‘6’,” he said. “We’re potentially going to lose good staff. “In 2015 when the milk payout dropped to $3.90/kgMS and farmers were going broke, I bet bonuses were still paid back then. “This just feels short sighted and has the potential to do so much damage.” Hickman says he will raise the issue when Fonterra directors and management are in Ashburton later

WT10

WT18

Height 240mm

Height 240mm

Width 325mm

Width 325mm

Length 350mm

Length 510mm

FENCE HUNG TROUGHS We have a range of fence hung troughs that are ideal for calves, sheep, pigs, horses and dogs. The WT10 (10 litre) and WT18 (18 litres) in particular have a patented design that has the inlet and ballfloat on the other side of the fence rail for greater protection. The WT50 (50 litres) is also fence hung. All troughs come with a drain cap. We recommend 32mm decking rails.

“I don’t know that it really takes you any further towards a solution to say there are ownership

rights in water, whether Maori or non-Maori.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

Fonterra staff lose bonuses, pay rises SUDESH KISSUN

WILSON

Environment Minister David Parker.

WT10 & WT18 Protection

AVAILABLE AT YOUR LOCAL FARM OR IRRIGATION STOCKIST

this month to talk about the annual results. “Every Fonterra director who voted for this should be embarrassed,” he said. Hickman wants Fonterra employees who exceed key performance indicator (KPI) targets to be rewarded. “I want the person who unpacks their laptop and does extra work on their holiday to feel valued: I want the highly skilled people to stay put. “Punishing people for poor decisions by the previous board -- decisions they had no control over -- is just awful. You can devalue your assets in line with best accounting practices but you should always value your people.” Fonterra will announce its annual results on Thursday (Sept 12). The co-op has signalled that losses could be as high as $675 million thanks to write-downs on its assets. There will be no dividend payout.

WT50 Height 260mm Width 460mm Length 675mm

PHONE

06 357 8562


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

NEWS 5

Chicken disease controllable - industry PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

A SUSPECTED new disease in the New Zealand poultry industry is a disappointment, says Michael Brooks, executive director, Egg Producers Federation (EPF). He says the local industry had been considered free of IBD type 1 and has worked hard to protect its unique disease-free status for at least 20 years. The detection of the suspected type 1 strain on Mainland’s Waikouaiti farm in Otago has some industry members concerned.

But overall there is “confidence it is being controlled well,� Brooks told Rural News. “We had a IBD type 1 outbreak in NZ in 1993 and were able to successfully eradicate it,� he said. “Biosecurity NZ is working with us and NZ’s trading partners to manage any potential trade impacts and are looking into a range of possibilities to determine how the virus may have arrived in NZ.� Biosecurity NZ says there is no evidence that IBD type 1 poses any risk to humans or animal or bird species. Brooks says the strain was discov-

ered at Mainland’s Waikouaiti farm in Otago via its own regular voluntary testing routine. IBD is contagious amongst poultry aged two to 15 weeks.  “When Mainland’s testing identified a possible positive for IBD, no birds were exhibiting any signs of illness or distress.  They continue to show no symptoms, which is not uncommon with some virus strains, and all birds are through what would be the critical period of the virus.  “Also, a second Mainland property near the Waikouaiti facility has returned suspect results.�

More overseas testing is required to confirm IBD type 1. Biosecurity NZ has suspended trade to four countries which require a guarantee that NZ is IBD type 1 free. Australia is the largest importer of NZ chicken meat. Testing for IBD on egg and poultry farms nationwide has accelerated. Operations at the Waikouaiti farm will continue as usual as none of their birds show any signs of illness. “Mainland has exemplary biosecurity measures in place, and Biosecurity NZ and the industry have confidence the virus will not spread from that facility,� Brooks said.

Biosecurity NZ confirmed no birds at the Mainland Poultry farm in Waikouaiti have disease symptoms. The farm is under voluntary biosecurity controls as a precautionary measure. Overseas testing results are expected in mid-September. Departmental chief scientist Dr John Roche says the virus can affect the immune system of young chickens but it poses no risk to human or animal health. Biosecurity NZ response manager David Yard says it will work with industry to consider options to manage the situation.

GE LAWS RIDICULOUS NEW ZEALAND needs to get on with a mature, national conversation about genetic modification, Federated Farmers says. “We’re all agreed climate change and our international commitments on greenhouse gas reductions present big challenges to our economy and way of life,â€? Feds president Katie Milne says. “But we’re currently sidelining a potential major tool that could help farmers tackle ruminant methane and excreted nitrogen.â€? Milne says it’s “bordering on ridiculousâ€? that our laws on GM have forced AgResearch to go to the United States to simulate the sort of growing conditions found in NZ as they trial the properties of genetically modified high metabolisable energy (HME) ryegrass. She made these comments following news about the progress AgResearch is making on field trials of an environment friendly GM ryegrass in the US. Milne adds that no-one is saying we should rush into genetic modification overnight or that it is the answer to everything. “But discussion at government level on progressing measured debate and a review of our current rules appears to be moving a glacial pace. We need some acceleration. – • More on page 28

GET THE WHOLE PICTURE AND MAKE BETTER DECISIONS. TESTING FROM THE GROUND UP With over 30 years testing for NZ’s agriculture sector, Hill Laboratories is your one-stop-shop offering a suite of tests, to give you the complete picture! We have the technology and expertise to test your soil, plants, crops and water for nutrients and spray residues. And with methods developed specifically for NZ’s unique conditions, your results will give you the information you need to make the best nutrient and farm management decisions.         

MORE

FREEPHONE 0508 HILL LAB (44 555 22) www.hill-laboratories.com

FEED IT OUT 1/3 1/3 1/3 Feed out your payments over 24 months and get yourself on a new Suzuki for this season’s feedout. Pay 1/3 deposit now, 1/3 in 2020 and 1/3 in 2021 at an interest rate of only 4.95%.

DR200SE

FARM BIKE

SMZ0496

$5,213 EXCL. GST

LT-F400F

KINGQUAD 400 4X4 MANUAL

$9,999 EXCL. GST

Price Excludes GST. Finance oer based on 1/3 deposit, 4.95% interest with two equal payments over 24 months. All ďŹ nance payments include GST. Payments include $300 documentation fee and $10.35 PPSR. Normal lending and credit criteria apply. Oer not available in conjunction with any other promotion. Oer runs until 31 October 2019, or while stocks last.

WWW.SUZUKI.CO.NZ


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

6 NEWS

Slow plane ride triggers complaint STAFF REPORTERS

FONTERRA’S BIGGEST shareholder, ex director Colin Armer, says it’s unbelievable the co-op’s directors and management have lost so much money. Armer, who stepped down from the coop’s board in 2012, has asked the Financial Markets Authority (FMA) to investigate the accuracy of Fonterra’s financial reporting -- including auditing. Fonterra’s accounts are audited by PwC. He says shareholders may not have been told the full story about how bad the business really went. In the time it took a slow plane to fly from Rotorua to Christchurch, Armer wrote a letter to the chief executive of the FMA, Rob Everett, as fol-

lows: “I am writing to you to formally make a complaint about the last four years of Fonterra audited accounts (F15, F16, F17 a F18). My complaint centres around the accounts recording carrying values of assets [which are] higher than the market price for the Beingmate investment listed on Chinese Stock Market and China Farms, which have not made any EBIT for the entire life of the asset. This is despite Fonterra using internal transfer pricing to mitigate the negative EBITs from those farms.” Armer believes there had been inconsistent valuation methods for carrying values for both of these assets. “Beingmate was valued based on its future earnings, however the valuation of China Farms

1000 3P Cab Kit _Testimonial Sep Ad.indd 1

Colin Armer, former Fonterra director and co-op’s largest shareholder has filed a complaint with the FMA.

was based on the individual animal/asset values. In the F18 accounts, the carrying value of the Beingmate investment

was reduced, but still at a premium to the market value. In the announcement made by Fonterra this

last week, a range of investments including China Farms have been signalled for substantial write-downs estimated at

$820-$860 million for the F19 year.” Armer told Rural News he’s “very suspicious” that shareholders had not been getting a true picture of the company’s finances. His prime concerns were “losses not accounted for and overvaluation”. Armer says he first had doubts about the company’s asset valuations after seeing the accounts for the 2015-16 financial year. He wrote to the coop’s auditors “laying out concerns” in April 2017, questioning valuations for Beingmate and China Farms, in particular. Armer wondered, at the time, whether the auditors were getting “too close to management” and he suggested it may be time to rotate them for a fresh perspective.

Three auditors met Armer on one of his farms at Taupo and assured him that the valuations were fair and accurate. Armer says he asked the auditors whether the valuations, if they were “artificially held up”, would have an impact on performance bonuses. The auditors looked surprised and said they didn’t have any insight into that because they were not auditing performance payments. “They looked each other and said ‘we’re not doing those’,” Armer said. That evaluation was done by an independent director, David Jackson, who retired from the Fonterra board in November 2017. Jackson chaired the co-op’s audit and finance committee for 10 years TO PAGE 7


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

NEWS 7 From director to ‘leper’ in one bound

WE WILL ANSWER – FONTERRA ARMER SUPPLIED Rural News with a copy of his letter to the FMA’s chief executive, Rob Everett. “I acknowledge receipt of your complaint about Fonterra’s audited accounts,” Everett replied. “In the context of their recent announcement, and ahead of their pending audited financial statements for the last period, we have engaged with Fonterra’s management and made some requests for information. We are now considering what further information may be required to assist our enquiries.” Everett says the FMA would forward Armer’s concerns regarding Fonterra’s audits for the 2015, 2016, 2017 and 2018 periods to CAANZ (Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand) and NZICA (New Zealand Institute of Chartered Accountants) “as the front line regulator of licensed audit firms”. He says the FMA would also continue to engage with NZICA over this matter and provide support where needed.  “I would anticipate that process will take some time, but would be happy to update you as we proceed (to the extent we are able to share

FROM PAGE 6

Fonterra chief financial officer Marc Rivers.

NZICA decisions publicly).” Fonterra chief financial officer Marc Rivers says the recent writedowns are in line with the co-op’s market disclosure obligations. He says the projected writedowns were made as a result of the full review of the business over the past year, and the work done so far to prepare financial statements for the 2019 financial year.  The write-downs were “approximates and were yet to be audited,” Rivers says. He adds that the numbers could change following the end of year audit process and that Fonterra will be releasing the final numbers with its annual results on September 12.  

The auditing role could be moved to KPMG if shareholders approve this at a meeting in November. Rivers says the co-op had a constructive, professional relationship with the FMA and respected its role in ensuring investors were fully informed. “We met with the FMA the week we announced these impairments and discussed our methodology and rationale for the decisions with them and will continue the conversation with them throughout the reporting process.” Rivers says he and other Fonterra management and board members will answer shareholders’ questions at its series of regular results meetings.

and held other pivotal positions including chairman of the milk price panel and the nominations committee. He was also a member of the risk committee, the fair value share committee and the TAF (trading among farmers) due diligence committee. Armer says his doubts about inflated performance pay are only a “subset” of a call for full disclosure. He has also called for reform of the Fonterra shareholders council. “They claim to be the cornerstone shareholder. I believe their leadership is inept and [that they] have no idea how to be a cornerstone shareholder hence the need to [make] major changes,” Armer told Rural News.

He says he made his concerns about the coop’s valuations widely known to directors, management and the shareholders’ council in the past two years “so nobody should be surprised”. As a former director, Armer says it’s hard to believe that Fonterra is signalling massive writedowns in the value of its assets. “I would never have believed it was possible, but we had a chief executive [who] wasn’t held to account at the time.” Armer says it appears the current directors and chief executive are doing their best to “clean house” based on the most accurate asset valuations. While he is the coop’s largest individual shareholder -- an outright

owner or shareholder in 85 farms -- Armer says he doesn’t expect anything more from the co-op than other farmers and investors. “We’re all in this together,” he said. He is not considering ditching Fonterra because of his concerns, but will always ask questions about the co-op’s performance, he says. Five of the 85 farms he is involved with supply Westland Milk Products, but Armer says he is a strong supporter of Fonterra “and you can’t get a higher milk price”. Right now, despite getting calls of support from other farmers, Armer says he hardly felt like a Fonterra heavyweight flexing his muscles. “I’m the leper of the company,” he said.

I get good service, a good reliable bike that doesn’t break down and that’s paramount. Kevin Andrews New Plymouth

5/09/19 8:45 AM


Reliable Trough Valve

Time Tested & Trusted for over 60 years www.hansenproducts.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

NEWS 9

Farmers left out of water talks JILL GALLOWAY

FEDERATED FARMERS says it didn’t have a say in a new plan on water quality, even though farmers are expected to bear the brunt of the proposal. Feds environment spokesman Chris Allen says he has no hot line to the Environment Ministry but was keen to talk while there was “clean air” before any announcement was made. But he says Environment Minister David Parker has said announcements on tighter regulations of the agricultural sector are imminent. The new national water regulations were due to be announced on September 5 (after Rural News went to press) with Parker fronting. There were no pre-announcements.

“Rather than just coming up with one water quality system for all the whole country... we should be looking catchment by catchment. Problems we might have here in Canterbury could be very different from issues in Waikato or Otago,” Allen told Rural News. He says many regions have strong regulations on water and most farmers are doing a lot of stock exclusion from waterways, riparian plantings and changes to effluent disposal. “Farmers are doing the right thing, but they need to know. They don’t want to have to do the same thing three times to meet regulations.” Allen believes farmers have moved a long way on water quality. “We can’t blame our grandfathers for every-

Fed’s water spokesman Chris Allen.

thing. But we are looking at the environment through a new lens -things such as water quality and climate change. We have to think about the impact of those on all our farming systems.” But Allen says while

most rivers are moving in the right direction and getting cleaner, it will take time to put solutions in place. “We can generally say farmers are doing the best they can. But we can’t deny we will need

rules for some.” With information on water quality coming from Wellington, some will see it as draconian, he says. “If it was an easy fix for waterways we could do it easily, but it is not.

It is hard to make rivers clear and clean. We need to encourage farmers to do the right thing rather than be punitive.” Allen says in dairy districts, water quality is an issue that should be built on the Sustainable Dairying: Water Accord. “Farmers have already invested huge amounts of time and effort resulting in stock being excluded from waterways on 97.5% of dairy farms and more than 99.7% of regular stock crossing points on dairy farms now having bridges or culverts.” Allen says they are seeing improvements in water quality as a result. “For example, a recent

regional council report shows water in Taranaki Rivers is showing long term improvements.” He says any proposed changes should be underpinned by robust cost benefit analysis, rather than bald measurements of attributes such as nitrogen, turbidity, and phosphorous “The catchment based improvements should be geared to the values of the local community: can you swim in it, can you fish and are macro invertebrates thriving in it,” Allen said. “Farmers would also like to see consistency in approach across all sectors and appropriate recognition of where changes have been made -- whether by urban or rural sectors -- that are improving water quality.” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

®

®

N U T R I T I O N T H AT P E R F O R M S ®

WHAT IF

THEIR NUTRITION WORKED AS HARD AS THEY DO

Performance Extreme 32/30

32% protein and 30% fat to deliver the high energy demands of professional working dogs

High performance nutrition helps extend career of working dogs

Professional formula, for dogs working under extreme conditions

Drives oxygen metabolism for increased endurance (VO2 MAX)

Formulated based on advanced dietary science, PRO PLAN Performance Extreme is a high energy formula with concentrated nutrients to release that potential energy, enabling your dog to maximise their performance.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

10 NEWS

Beef now the major M.bovis casualty NIGEL MALTHUS

A POSITIVE sign for the Mycoplasma bovis eradication programme is that a clear majority of infected farms are now beef rather than dairy. That’s according to Dr John Roche, chair of the M. bovis Strategic Science Advisory Group (SSAG) and MPI’s chief science adviser. The latest M. bovis statistics from MPI show a spring uptick in farms under a notice of direction (NOD), but confirmed cases have remained at 182 since the start of August. Importantly for Roche, that 182 is made up of 96 beef farms, 67 dairy and 19 ‘others’. “So we’re actually seeing a shift greatly away from dairying and towards the beef sector,” Roche told Rural News.

The latest Mycoplasma bovis statistics from MPI show a spring uptick in farms under a notice of direction but confirmed cases have remained at 182 since the start of August. RURAL NEWS GROUP/DATA: MPI

“And beef properties are highly unlikely to infect another property.” The statistics also show the number of farms under active surveillance appearing to trend down after peaking through July. Roche says it’s too early to say the programme is over the hump but all indications are positive.

He expects some increase in confirmed cases as the dairy sector returns to production and bulk milk testing resumes – but far less than last season when bulk milk testing turned up 63 suspect farms. Fourteen of these were already known trace properties and only three or four of the rest were confirmed as infected.

New detections could come from farms where animals were transferred before the programme got to them, where animals were mixed with others or where animal movement records were not up to date. However, Roche says there’s no question that NAIT compliance and on farm biosecurity is improving. “There will always be people who haven’t changed greatly, but the vast majority are more aware of what puts their business at risk and they’re taking action to prevent [that].” Roche believes all indications are positive. He says all of the molecular phylogenetic work still pointed to a single incursion in late 2015 or early 2016. “None of those thresholds have been breached and our numbers look to be improving,” he told Rural News.

CHANGES COMING MEANWHILE, THE M. Bovis programme is making changes to its protocols for ELISA testing of blood samples. Roche says the changes will reduce the amount of time many farms spend under active surveillance and NODs. “This is a positive step forward in reducing the impact on farmers from sampling and testing for M. bovis. Our scientists have analysed the results from hundreds of thousands of samples,” he told Rural News. “From that, they have refined our sampling criteria to effectively halve the number of rounds of sampling and testing required for many farms, while ensuring we still correctly identify infected management groups.” Where possible, blood samples will now be collected from more cattle when a property is tested, and how the ELISA test results are interpreted will change. The threshold for designating an individual animal as a ‘reactor’ will increase, while the percentage of reactors required for a round to be determined positive will decrease. There will no longer be suspicious rounds, only positive or negative. The change will mean that most farms under active surveillance will only have to muster animals for one round of sampling with no need for a second round. Roche says the change has been made because they now understand how good the ELISA test is. “The vast majority of farms we should be able to release from the programme far more quickly,” said Roche.

OPEN LEAN-TO

open gable

american style barn

enclosed gable

Chances are, you’ve been thinking long and hard about exactly what sort of pole shed you need. So come and tell us, and we’ll help you get it down on paper. Then we can quote it, provide plans and deliver all the materials you need to build it. Job done.

If you can think it, we can help you make it. Come and see us in store and let’s get it underway today. itm.co.nz | 0800 FOR ITM (367 486)


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

NEWS 11

Yili’s ‘silk road’ under construction YILI’S TAKEOVER of Westland, the second largest dairy enterprise in New Zealand, creates a ‘dairy silk road’ between Asia and NZ, says Yili Group chief executive Jianqiu Zhang. He says the takeover is a significant breakthrough in Yili’s global expansion. “The acquisition of Westland helps us realise our vision of being the most trusted health food brand in the world by building a vast dairy bridge crossing the Pacific Ocean, helping the world to share health,” Zhang said. Earlier this year, Yili launched its vision of creating a “global health ecosystem” as part of its drive to deepen its global

footprint. It aims to integrate the best resources globally to better meet consumers’ health and nutritional needs. Yili has continued to grow its footprint in Southeast Asia and Asia, offering more product choices to local consumers in Thailand, Indonesia, Singapore and Myanmar. Last year, Yili launched the Joyday ice cream in Indonesia, now available in major cities there and across Southeast Asia. Zhang says the acquisition of Thailand’s largest local ice cream company, Chomthana, was a breakthrough for Yili in growing regional production capacity and gaining market access. He says Yili’s expan-

CREAMING IT THE YILI Group results for the first half of 2019 show that its global operating revenue grew year-on-year by $1.1 billion to a total annual revenue of RMB $10b. Net profit of $800,000 million was a year-on-year increase of $72m. Yili has also signed a strategic partnership agreement with Lincoln University to set up its Oceania Research and Development Centre. In June 2019, Oceania Dairy received the cross border investment award from the New Zealand-China Trade Association (NZCTA). “We are confident our investment here will continue to create better opportunities not only for our employees, the dairy farmers of NZ and the Westland community, but for the global dairy industry and NZ as well,’’ Zhang said.

sion in Southeast Asia will result from its driving local economic development. A total of 85% of Yili’s employees in Indonesia and Thailand are local. Prior to buying West-

land, Yili had invested $660 million in creating the Oceania Dairy plant in South Canterbury, which the company claims is among the world’s largest integrated dairy bases.

6,990

$

EX-GST

RIDE

AWAY

EX-GST

DRIVE AWAY

• 62HP, 800CC V-TWIN EFI ENGINE • CVTECH TRANSMISSION • ENGINE BRAKING • 2WD/4WD & DIFF LOCK • L-H-N-R RANGE • ROPS ROLL CAGE • TIP TRAY • IRS • POWER STEERING • ALLOY WHEELS • ROOF • HALF SCREEN • FRONT PROTECTOR BAR • ROOF RACK WITH LED LIGHT BAR • CAMOUFLAGE

www.ruralnews.co.nz STOP BIRDS NOW!

7,990

$

EX-GST

RIDE

AWAY

• 38HP, 500CC EFI ENGINE • CVTECH TRANSMISSION • ENGINE BRAKING • 2WD/4WD & DIFF LOCK • L-H-N-R RANGE • IRS • POWER STEERING • ALLOY WHEELS • PROTECTOR BARS • WINCH • A-ARM GUARDS • 2YR WARRANTY

15,490

$

EX-GST

DRIVE AWAY

• 62HP, 800CC V-TWIN EFI ENGINE • CVTECH TRANSMISSION • ENGINE BRAKING • 2WD/4WD & DIFF LOCK • L-H-N-R RANGE • ROPS ROLL CAGE • TIP TRAY • IRS • POWER STEERING • ALLOY WHEELS • ROOF • GLASS SCREEN & WIPER • MUD FLAPS • REAR SCREEN • 2YR WARRANTY

CFMOTO NORTH ISLAND

CFMOTO SOUTH ISLAND

Agtraction Taranaki, New Plymouth (06) 759 8432 Brown Brothers Bikes, Whanganui (027) 572 7696 Country Engineering, Tauranga (07) 552 0071 Gatmans Mowers, Silverdale (09) 426 5612 Maungaturoto Motorcycles, Maungaturoto (09) 431 8555 Motorcycle HQ, Pahiatua (06) 376 7163 Northland Powersports, Whangarei (09) 437 5451 Peninsula Motorcycles, Thames (07) 868 610 Rob Titter Farm Services, Kaikohe (09) 401 177 Tahuna Motorcycles & Atvs, Tahuna (07) 887 5790

Ag & Auto Direct, Balclutha (03) 418 0555 Amuri Motorcycles, Christchurch (03) 315 8667 Amuri Motorcycles, Culverden (03) 315 8667 Dan’s Motor Centre, Geraldine (03) 693 8536 T&E Motorcycles, Gore (03) 208 8114

$11,490

$

10,490

EX-GST

DRIVE AWAY

• 38HP, 500CC EFI ENGINE • CVTECH TRANSMISSION • 2WD/4WD & DIFF LOCK • L-H-N-R RANGE • ROPS CERTIFIED ROLL CAGE • TIP TRAY • IRS • POWER STEERING • ALLOY WHEELS • WINCH • ROOF • 2YR WARRANTY

15,990

$

EX-GST

DRIVE AWAY

• 71HP, 1000CC V-TWIN EFI ENGINE • CVTECH TRANSMISSION • 2WD/4WD & DIFF LOCK • REAR LSD • L-H-N-R RANGE • ROPS ROLL CAGE • TIP TRAY • IRS • POWER STEERING • ALLOY WHEELS • 27” TYRES • ROOF • 800KG TOW / 350KG CARRY CAPACITY • BENCH SEAT • 3YR WARRANTY

GET YOURSELF A

ON CFMOTO ATV’S & UTV’S

$685.00 + GST

SAVE $1,000

SAVE $500

14,490

From

$8,490

• 30HP, 400CC EFI ENGINE • CVTECH TRANSMISSION • ENGINE BRAKING • 2WD/4WD & DIFF LOCK • L-H-N-R RANGE • IRS • POWER STEERING • ALLOY WHEELS • WINCH • 2YR WARRANTY

$

ZON BIRDSCARER

SAVE $500

PLUS FREE ACCESSORIES VALUED AT $1,000

$14,990

Read us until the cows come home!

Prior to the recent purchase of Westland, Yili has spent $600m in establishing the Oceania Dairy plant in South Canterbury.

*Ride away prices quoted exclude GST. CFMoto Sweet As Deal 2.99% 1/3 Finance Deal is valid on the following models. Total cost for CFMoto CForce 400 EPS LE is $8530.41 paid via three equal instalments of $2843.47. Total cost for CFMoto CForce 520 EPS Farm Spec is $10,305.15 paid via three equal instalments of $3,435.05. Total cost for CFMoto UForce 800 EPS Farm Spec is $18,582.45 paid via three equal instalments of $6,194.15. The initial instalment is in the form of a deposit at time of purchase. The second instalment is payable after 12 months where the third (final) instalment is payable after 24 months. These totals equate to the cash price including GST plus a $235.60 application/documentation fee and $10.00 PPSR Lodgement (Total charges of $245.60) plus interest costs calculated at a rate of 2.99% per annum. Normal lending criteria apply. Finance offer excludes CFMoto CForce 520, CFMoto UForce 550 EPS and CFMoto UForce 1000. Offer end 31st December 2019 or while stocks last.

www.cfmoto.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

12 NEWS

Groups aim to unite town and country

HIRING AND RETAINING GOOD STAFF MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

STAFF REPORTER

SOUTHLAND FARMERS are creating unique community groups for town and country in response to escalating environmental rules. Feelings are running high in the province as farmers confront new environment plans and activists running hot on winter grazing and nutrient laden waterways. But it’s not all fire and brimstone: farmers are creating catchment groups to measure, monitor and improve practices. Southland now has 20 of the voluntary, farmer-run groups known collectively as the Southland Catchment Group Forum. Unlike catchment-based zone committees in Canterbury, the Southland groups aren’t charged with recommending policy to the regional council. Southland project coordinator Sarah Thorne, an appointee from NZ Landcare Trust, says the network

of catchment groups is unique and growing. The cumulative power of all these on farm changes is making a real difference to the region’s water quality, she says. The groups cover town and rural communities across Southland and are well supported by businesses, rural professionals, farm sector support groups, councils and regional agencies. The groups aim to improve water quality in an area special to them. They choose their boundary, identify their issues, come up with their solutions and celebrate their successes. The groups work because farmers liked talking to farmers, Thorne says. “Farmers are passionate about their land and looking after it for the next generation, and they like taking ownership of their issues and coming up with practical solutions which benefit their farm’s profitability, their families and the environment.” The groups have different priori-

ties, but all work on raising environmental awareness and education, providing a community voice and helping people to get ready for changes in policy and regulations. The catchment groups run field days, find expert speakers and organise workshops to help people look after their farms and waterways. The groups are working with schools, trialling technologies and nutrient modelling systems with agribusiness companies, sharing knowledge on good management practices and providing a community voice on local plans. Farmers and their partners are also starting innovative waterway projects, using citizen science “and most importantly making well informed changes on their farms across Southland”. Thorne’s role is funded by the Ministry for Primary Industries Sustainable Farming Fund until July 2020.

WITH UNEMPLOYMENT hovering under 4%, recruiting good people to the tractor and farm machinery sector is as difficult as to agriculture. At the recent TAMA conference, Katrina Thomson, group HR manager of Moana Fisheries, outlined how her company recruits and retains staff. Thomson said that as in agriculture, a wide range of company locations – even as remote as the Chatham Islands – brings with it a broad range of logistical and cultural considerations. She described the five generations with potential to be employees, each with differing values and expectations: Generation Z (up to age 22), Millennials (23 to 38), Generation X (39 to 55), boomers (56 to 73) and the Silent Generation (74 and above). Each group has a partial disconnect with the next – even more if they are two generations apart, Thomson says. “It’s not uncommon to hear a Gen-X who’s working with a group of Gen-Zs

Round the Farm

to comment ‘I’m lonely’ because the reality is they have very little in common to talk about.” Moana Fisheries believes the recruitment of Gen-Zs needs to start early so her company works closely with communities and schools. In the first case, parents or relatives might already work at one of its sites so they can explain to the young people what’s involved. At schools they talk about their business and its guiding principles and offer work experience days and cadetships for potential knife-hands. Looking at millennials, Thomson says this group, when asked what they want in a job, comes up with a broad wish list. “This centred on variety in the workplace, a defined career pathway, then fun and social activities,” she said. It was also suggested that businesses should not pigeon-hole people in jobs for life, but instead move people around an organisation to make the best of their assets or interests. See more on Tama conference pages 42-43.

Concrete Trough Designed to protect the trough valve from curious animals. Durable and robust.

For the best deals in the country, see the specialists!

Round Protected 1500 litres

$675

For larger orders, call our friendly team for a quote.

Concrete Culvert Pipes

Greenstripe PE Pipe

Sizes from 225mm to 1200mm available. 2.5m lengths 300mm

$195

375mm

$245

G re a t d e a ls on T ro ug h Va lv e s

For other sizes, contact your local branch for availability and pricing.

Stock water is easy this spring with our PE pipe. Resistant to bloat remedies. Sold in coils of 25m, 50m,100m & 200m. Tough and kink resistant.

Farmflow 8bar 100m 32mmOD

$185

40mmOD

$233

50mmOD

$325

63mmOD

$482

For larger orders, call our friendly team for a quote.

hyndsrural.co.nz

0800 496 377

Super-flo

$30

Max-flo

$64

Planning a stock water trough system? We can help! Call us now to arrange a site visit.

CONDITIONS: For full address details please see our website www.hyndsrural.co.nz or phone us for your nearest store. All major credit cards plus Farmlands, Rural Co cards accepted. Special prices and discounts valid from 1st September - 30th September 2019. Discounts are off Hynds normal retail price. Actual product supplied may be different to that pictured but identical in quality and price. Promotional items are strictly while stocks last. All prices include GST unless otherwise stated. All prices exclude transport/delivery unless otherwise stated.


LIKE TO PUT BACK IN WHAT YOU GET OUT?

THE FEELING’S MUTUAL. Reinvesting into the land is a concept most farmers and growers will be familiar with. Well it’s not so different for FMG. As a mutually owned insurer, any profits we make go straight back into the business, not shareholders’ pockets. If that sounds like the kind of insurer you’d like to have looking after you, ask around about us. Or better still, call us now on 0800 366 466.

We’re here for the good of the country. FMG0862RNFP_M


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

14 NEWS

World trade outlook ‘troubling’ PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE GLOBAL trade situation is going from bad to worse, says trade expert Stephen Jacobi. Some horticultural products are now competing against American goods, fruit in particular, he told Rural News. Competition has increased in Taiwan and Southeast Asia. American product that would have gone to China is flowing into other markets. The latest tariff round takes us into new territory because they will affect consumer products, says Jacobi, a former trade commissioner. “We are seeing more

New Zealand sectors reporting disruption of different kinds. Not necessarily all bad, there are new market openings for NZ in China because the Americans are being displaced. But we are now facing greater competition with American products in other markets. That is accumulating.” The biggest worry is the trade war is starting to impact global economic growth which is now slowing down. “That can’t be good for us. Although exports have been holding up extremely strongly and have been quite resilient, nevertheless the international outlook is worsening by the week,” Jacobi

said. “We don’t want to get into complete dismay and talk ourselves into recession. I am not suggesting that. But all the indicators of trade and growth are starting to be pared back and that isn’t positive at all.” He believes NZ needs to be monitoring the situation very carefully. “We need to be hedging our risks as well as we can, we need to be diversifying into other markets. But these are things that companies do at the best of times. It is a matter of greater attentiveness and really watching what is happening in the global situation. “But at the level of the

Stephen Jacobi says the global trade situation is going from bad to worse.

trade war there is not a lot we can do to persuade the Americans or the Chinese to be more accom-

FREE RANGE EGG PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT OFFERING

VAN GENT nest boxes – total automation SMART NEST – smaller systems with some automation

Plus ... Feeding & Watering and Egg Handling Equipment

• Catering from small to large production systems • Over 57 years supplying poultry equipment • From 125 bird systems to 8000 birds • After sales back up all over NZ

Serving NZ farmers since 1962

INNOVATIVE AGRICULTURAL EQUIPMENT

modating.” We are having some effect in Geneva at the World Trade Organisa-

tion trying to find a resolution to those particular problems but these are long term issues and not immediate trading opportunities. Stephanie Honey, NZ International Business Forum associate director, says the trade war is spawning an increasingly chaotic global trade environment. The old conventions about sticking to the rules and using quiet diplomacy to solve problems seem to be unravelling. “That is not good news for NZ or for the many other small states in the global system.”  A main impact of the trade war is the “corrosive effect of uncertainty”. The IMF has estimated that trade war uncertainty will cause the world economy to contract by $455 billion next year, or 0.5% of global GDP. Other estimates put it at $585b by 2021.  “World trade flows are back in negative territory, and so, last month, was NZ’s export growth,” said Honey. Deeply worrying for

NZ is the effect the trade war seems to be having on global mindsets.   “The global prosperity of the last 30 years has been grounded in clear operating assumptions: global rules exist, everybody follows them, if there are problems there are fair mechanisms to solve them, and the system works best when countries engage constructively.  In the current belligerent climate those assumptions seem less self-evident.” Honey says the “tit-for-tat of August” between China and the US is riding a global trend towards increasing protectionism.  “So far this year, 618 new harmful trade measures have been introduced, but the US and China are together responsible for less than one quarter of these,” Honey said. “This is deeply worrisome for NZ, along with the many other small and medium size states in the global system.” Keeping our heads down and ‘sticking to our knitting’ won’t be enough, she says.

HARD BREXIT ON THE CARDS IT LOOKS like the United Kingdom is heading for a hard Brexit on October 31, says Jacobi. However the situation is so uncertain and confusing it is very hard to work out exactly what is going to happen. Much has been done to prepare NZ exporters. “Certainly our institutional arrangements that we could put in place on veterinary agreements and all those sorts of things are all done. “We are as well prepared as we can be but who knows exactly what will happen.”

www.pppindustries.co.nz • sales@pppindustries.co.nz • 0800 901 902

“I’ve been able to apply Optimise to 3 big hill blocks for the cost of a single application of aglime on just one of them. I couldn’t be happier with the pasture and economic performance.”


ADVANCED APPLICATION. SUPERIOR RETENTION.

Talk to your rural retailer today.

FREE Z2 NO TEAR TAGGER™ with your purchase of 50 or more NAIT Zee Tags™. Applies to new customers only.

TRACTA62144_NZ_RN_R

It’s the combination of our breakthrough Z2 no tear tagger™, and the smart design and toughness of our two-piece tags, that ensure you’ll do the job once and do it right. Save time and money, choose Zee Tags™ by name.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

16 NEWS

Farmer confidence lagging, but... pared to the 20.3% reading in the previous (January) survey.” pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz Global economic uncertainty given THE LATEST survey of farmer con- recent developments in US-China fidence from Federated Farmers does trade tensions, unrest in Hong Kong, not make pretty reading, says BNZ and ambiguity regarding Brexit could be impacting farmers’ outlook. senior economic Doug Steel. Yet primary product But it is not all doom and prices have been holding up gloom. well at good levels. Of those farmers sur“Be that as it may, there veyed, nearly 56% thought is still reason to keep your general economic condieyes open for what might lie tions would worsen over the ahead,” Steel said. next 12 months, while fewer If the US-China trade war than 5% expected improveturned Chinese demand in ment. BNZ’s Doug Steel New Zealand’s direction NZ “The net figure of -51.4% is the lowest in the 10-year history of would struggle to supply all produce the survey. Net pessimism surround- required. “But even if there was some ing the outlook is widespread across all major industries and regions,” said demand improvement via this channel, there are other implications to Steel. However, farmers’ perceptions of consider,” he said. “For example, the US produce current general economic conditions remain net positive – if only just. (largely feed products) not bound for Nearly a quarter of farmers surveyed China would have to find a home elsesaw good general economic conditions where, pushing prices down in the procurrently, while just over 21% of farm- cess. Lower feed costs in the US would likely encourage more production and ers cited bad conditions at present. “So the net is still positive, even if lower prices for beef and milk comthe current 3.6% is much less so com- pared to otherwise. This aspect would PAM TIPA

NOT ALL DOOM AND GLOOM GENERALLY BUOYANT farmgate prices across most of the sector are welcome, says Steel. Some international prices have eased back a bit from recent highs, but an associated dip in the value of the NZ dollar has helped support prices at the farmgate. “Farmers themselves are showing less concern about farmgate and commodity prices, with only 6% citing this as their top concern in the Federated Farmers survey (down from 14% six months ago),” he said. “The flexibility of the currency may well prove useful in future too, if some of the potential negatives discussed above play out. Indeed, with an eye on worsening trade tensions offshore we recently lowered our NZD forecasts for the end of this year and into next.”

be a negative for NZ farmers.” US feed product demand from China has already been curtailed as a result of a major cull of pigs in China due to African swine fever. “The latter brings with it its own lift in Chinese demand for meat imports, including from NZ. The export share of NZ beef and lamb bound for China continues to rise aggressively. This has added to an already strong positive trend of more NZ primary product exports bound for China.” But if uncertainty prevails, world economic activity is likely to suffer as a result.

There are other pressing issues afoot. “Environmental challenges continue to increase for the agriculture sector. This includes the Government’s recently announced targets to reduce biological methane emissions by 10% by 2030, and a further reduction aim of 24% to 47% by 2050. “The Government seems keen to put a price on agriculture emissions as the mechanism to incentivise emission reduction, at the farm level from 2025 if feasible. In the interim, for 2021 to 2025 the Government is looking at pricing at the processor level through the emissions trading scheme (ETS).

N LEACHING

• • • • •

“The Government has committed to a 95% free allocation of agricultural emissions included in the ETS through to 2025. The Zero Carbon Bill is currently being considered by a parliamentary select committee.” An alternative, industry led proposal would support reductions in farm emissions via a formal sectorgovernment agreement, says Steel. “Under this proposal all farms would have a farm environment plan in place by 2025. By then, the aim would be to have an appropriate pricing framework in place to practically implement at farm level.” There are many pros and cons, he says. “For the first time in the 10 year history of the Federated Farmers survey, the single greatest concern for farmers was climate change policy and the emissions trading scheme. Of all farms surveyed, 23.6% identified this as their greatest concern.” The second biggest concern, cited by 19.4% of those surveyed, was regulation and compliance costs. Regards employment, farmers are reporting yet more difficulty in finding appropriate staff.

FEED AVAILABILITY


MSD_MB12_01

®

MULTINE B12

BOOSTED with Vitamin B12

NZ’S LEADING 5-IN-1 VACCINE

New Zealand’s leading 5-in-1 boosted with Vitamin B12 for convenience. MADE FOR NEW ZEALAND, IN NEW ZEALAND.

THE SPECIALISED PRE-LAMB VACCINE

FOR IMMEDIATE TETANUS PROTECTION

Boosted with Vitamin B12. Boosted for convenience. Multine B12. We know New Zealand, so for 80 years we’ve been making world leading sheep vaccines, in the heart of our country, for the whole of our country. Thousands of Kiwi farmers rely on our vaccines because they trust them to work, protecting valuable stock, increasing productivity and boosting farm income. So does it get any better than this? Yes it does. New Zealand’s leading 5-in-1 clostridial vaccine1 just got better. Ask your animal health advisor for Multine B12.

ACVM No’s A11311, A3832, A3977, A0934, A1011. Schering-Plough Animal Health Ltd. Phone: 0800 800 543. www.msd-animal-health.co.nz. NZ/MLT/0518/0001b. © 2019 Intervet International B.V. All Rights Reserved Ref 1: Baron Audit Data. June 2019.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

NEWS 19

Set Fonterra free – Nats proposed changes to this legislation will support our dairy sector to produce and export high value goods in a way that sustains the environment it relies upon,” he said. “One of the 12 priority outcomes of the coalition Government is to build a productive, sustainable and inclusive economy, and the dairy industry is a crucial player in that journey. It is our largest export sector, contributing nearly $8 billion to New Zealand’s total GDP.”    Change is necessary to

PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE TIME has come to reduce aspects of Fonterra’s regulatory burden, National’s Agriculture spokesperson Todd Muller says. National opposed the Dairy Industry Restructuring Amendment (DIRA) Bill at its first reading. Competitive pressure -- rather than half-baked regulation -- should drive the dairy market forward, Muller says. “National believes it is vital we have an efficient and innovative dairy industry that supports the long term interests of farmers and consumers. This means having a strong Fonterra, strong smaller manufacturers and a robust domestic liquid milk and retail market.” The Government’s Bill goes some way to achieving this, he says.  “It makes sense that Fonterra can now build in robust animal welfare and environmental conditions to its supply terms,” he said. “However, we believe the New Zealand market is sufficiently mature for Fonterra to have the ability to treat returning suppliers on different commercial grounds from those who have stayed with the cooperative.  

Todd Muller says “we no longer believe Fonterra needs to give these future competitors a hand up.”

“We’re also opposed to Fonterra having to continue to support scale competitors with startup milk supply. There is a vibrant competitive milk supply landscape in New Zealand, which is only going to increase as global interests eye up our milk pool. We no longer believe Fonterra needs to give these future competitors a hand up.   “National supports rural New Zealand and knows the importance of the dairy industry to our country. We want legislation that will help it succeed on the world stage, not constrain it.” Changes proposed to DIRA will keep the open

entry and exit provisions which Fonterra had been hoping to shed. Instead, Fonterra would get a limited exception where it could reject an application to become a new shareholding farmer or turn down an existing application for an increased supply if the supplier could not meet Fonterra’s terms of supply, or if the farm had been a conversion to dairying. Those terms could relate to and allow different prices based on farm performance, including animal welfare, food safety, health and safety, employment conditions, environmental, climate

help get the dairy sector in better shape for the future, says O’Connor. “The DIRA was passed into law in 2001 and saw the creation of Fonterra. It also promotes the efficient operation of dairy markets in New Zealand. “The industry has changed considerably since 2001, and it is important to ensure the regulatory regime puts the sector in the best possible position.  “The changes the Government is [proposing would] support our dairy sector to produce and

export high value goods in a way that sustains the environment it relies upon. “DIRA drives much of this work and after 17 years it’s the right thing to do to make it fit for the 21st century.” O’Connor says the bill will now move to the primary production select committee. “I encourage people to have their say. I want to make sure we have a law that is going to work for everyone it affects.”  Visit www.mpi.govt.nz/dirareview

Quality Greenhouses change and other sustainability standards. Independent processors with their own supply of 30 million litres or more in a single season would no longer be able ask Fonterra for extra regulated milk. However, the proposals if implemented would raise Fonterra’s obligatory sales volume of regulated milk to rival Goodman Fielder to 350 million litres per season from 250 million litres, albeit at a higher price. Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor welcomed the first reading of the DIRA bill in Parliament on August 27. “The Government’s

• Easy assembly • Strong and durable

• NZ made since 1980 • Grow all year round T/F 03 214 4262 E info@morrifield.com

www.morrifield.com

It protects sheep and boosts Vitamin B12. Multine B12: NZ’s leading 5-in-1 with the boosted convenience of Vitamin B12. Multine® is New Zealand’s leading 5-in-1 clostridial vaccine1, protecting against pulpy kidney, tetanus, blackleg and malignant oedema in sheep, cattle and goats. And now it’s even better with the boosted convenience of Vitamin B12. Ask your animal health advisor for Multine B12.

MSD_MB12_02

MADE FOR NEW ZEALAND, IN NEW ZEALAND.

ACVM No A11311. Schering-Plough Animal Health Ltd. Phone: 0800 800 543. www.msd-animal-health.co.nz. NZ/MLT/0518/0001d. © 2019 Intervet International B.V. All Rights Reserved Ref 1: Baron Audit Data. June 2019.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEBMER 10, 2019

20 NEWS

Championing wool to the world TELLING THE story of wool is one of the keys to its resurgence as the global fibre of choice, according to NZ grower owned company Wools of New Zealand. For this reason, the

company has launched its new 12-part ‘wool benefits’ marketing programme aimed at reintroducing the world to the fibre. Wools of New Zealand executive director

Mark Shadbolt says the recently launched programme resonates with local and international customers alike. “The messages are simple, premised on the fundamentals of style,

people and planet – backed by research – to give front line retailers and others throughout the supply chain the confidence in promoting crossbred wool as a truly sustainable, naturally

Wools of NZ Mark Shadbolt.

0.99% ACCESS ALL

AREAS

FINANCE*

FROM

$99,900

Lift your efficiency with a JCB AGRI LOADALL.

JCB

LOADALL 526.56 Purpose built, 5.6 m lift height Single lever joystick 100 hp JCB DIESELMAX engine Superior maneuverability with 3 steering modes Spacious, high visibility, low noise cab

For your local dealer go to: claasharvestcentre.com * Standard CLAAS Financial Services terms, conditions and fees apply. 0.99% p.a requires 30% deposit followed by monthly repayments in arrears over 3 years. Offer valid until 30/09/2019. Image is illustrative only.

+GST

occurring fibre.” The programme was recognised this month with a flooring innovation award for marketing at this year’s National Flooring Innovation Awards at Harrogate in the UK. Shadbolt says recognition in the key UK market is a great start. “British consumers are the highest per capita consumers of wool carpets in the world so it is important that we reiterate to the retail sector that this is a key focus for Wools of New Zealand,” he explained. “On a wider scale, there has been a significant increase in demand for certified wool and fully traceable products from brands looking for a trust mark for consumers so Wools of New Zealand wool ticks those boxes.” The marketing material and initiative also has appeal to wool growers. West Otago grower Lloyd Brenssell, who runs 41,000 stock units on his 10,500ha property, says sheep farmers have long been looking for something to happen in wool marketing. Three years ago, wool from his Fernvale property at Moa Flat sold for an average $6/kg. This year about half of that sale price was achieved. “This is an exciting initiative for the promotion of crossbred wool. I have finally been shown something that will inform the general public about the attributes of wool and we need to continue distributing material of this kind and getting it in front of consumers.” Brenssell believes part of the problem is the public’s lack of appreciation of the natural qualities of

the fibre. “People simply don’t understand wool and its qualities. We get a lot of negative publicity about the perceived effects of our operations on the environment, yet here we are producing a natural and sustainable product that will not take years to break down. “The Government is very vocal around plastic use and plastic waste. What we should also be shouting about on the environmental side are the natural products that our farmers produce.” Wools of New Zealand has also been given preferred supplier status by leading UK retail group John Lewis, a significant retail partner for leading carpet manufacturer Ulster carpets, due to the integrity and sustainability of its wool. Andrew Gicquel, sales manager at Ulster Carpets, says they have worked in partnership with Wools of New Zealand for several years, notably to develop the popular Open Spaces Auckland, Queenstown and Wellington Stripe ranges. “It can be overwhelming for retailers to communicate the extensive range of benefits offered by wool but this marketing programme has made the process much easier and more effective,” he said. “Combined with our own initiatives, this can only help create a better understanding of the many attributes and benefits of wool, providing retail staff and, ultimately, consumers with more confidence in selecting and buying wool-rich carpets.”

LATEST STORIES EVERY DAY Get up-to-date news at www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

NEWS 21

Mind your feet – Feds PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

THE DAYS are gone when you may wear on a farm the shoes you have worn on overseas trips, says Feds biosecurity spokeswoman Karen Williams. “That’s unless you put them through a high quality cleaning process -- not just a wash down,” she said. Heightened awareness of biosecurity issues is now required. “We should have been taking this seriously for a long time, given pea weevil has been here four years, M. bovis has been significant for 2.5 to three years, then there’s blackgrass, velvet leaf, etc,” Williams told Rural News. “It is up to us. MPI can [work] at the border but no system is fool-

proof. If we want to protect ourselves -- ‘our farms, our fortress’ -then we need to introduce that awareness to maximise our systems on farm.” African swine fever (ASF) is well spread through Europe, so New Zealand is being “shortsighted” if it targets only the Philippines and farm workers, says Williams. “We are all responsible. We all travel a lot -for pleasure, business or looking at new farming opportunities offshore. “All New Zealanders, including farmers, need to be really vigilant about cleaning before we come back, and ideally not wear footwear overseas that we bring back and wear on farm. “We have to be a bit clever about that and consider that is not a

Feds biosecurity spokeswoman Karen Williams.

farm shoe. That is something entirely different.” Or we must sanitise them at a high level of hygiene for which new products are available. We need to invest more in on farm practices, she says.

“It is like your health and safety plan. You need an on farm biosecurity plan and be committed to using that when you get visitors or contractors. There are several things you can specify and checklist,” Williams said.

“If you know you are purchasing seed from a high risk area or livestock from an area that has velvet leaf, you need to lift your own on farm controls. “At home in Wairarapa [with pea weevil] probably any contractor coming on farm presents a reasonable risk. We are talking to our contractors now about cleaning down machinery -- clean down before entering and clean down before leaving -- so there is no plant or soil material there that can harbour pest seeds or any sort of pathogens or bugs. That is the way we need it to go. “Even visitors definitely need a footwear check and maybe just go in the farm vehicle rather than the visiting vehicle. “And then being upfront right at the start

about hygiene protocol and areas where you are welcome on farm and areas which are no go. Just like your health and safety.” ‘Your farm, your fortress’ is the big focus, says Williams. “You ultimately take responsibility. You have signage just like health and safety. Visitors should be alerted to the significant risk and a phone number provided to enable an induction. “Be upfront with visitors about what you are trying to protect and why, and what behaviours you require of them.” Williams says training of staff is important. “Get your staff informed and involved, and share what the risk looks like so everyone buys in. You can generally generate better out-

comes.” She says farmers need to take ownership because ultimately it is their problem. Her personal experience of the pea weevil incursion has been four years of big change in not being able to grow them, hundreds of meetings and emails and costs such as voluntary payments. “We need to work in partnership with MPI. They are front footing anything that comes across the border. “But they are not going to get every last pair of shoes coming in from travel overseas. We are a travelling nation so we all need to take responsibility.” She says the Feds was delighted when Air New Zealand decided to show biosecurity videos on flights.

$11,990 EX GST DRIVE AWAY

FEATURES • 493cc Single cylinder petrol engine with engine braking • CVT Transmission with R/N/L/H • Selectable 2WD/4WD with lockable rear differential • Electronic power steering (EPS) • Bench seat • Independent dual, A-Arm suspension • Steel tip tray with removable drop-down sides • 12 inch black alloy wheels with 4 ply tyres (vehicle pictured with steel wheels)

• Roof kit • 3000 lb winch • 554kg tow capacity • 250kg carry capacity

NORTH ISLAND

Agtraction Taranaki, New Plymouth (06) 759 8432 Country Engineering, Tauranga (07) 552 0071 Gatmans Mowers, Silverdale (09) 426 5612 Maungaturoto Motorcycles, Maungaturoto (09) 431 8555

Motorcycle HQ, Pahiatua (06) 376 7163 Northland Powersports, Whangarei (09) 437 5451 Peninsula Motorcycles, Thames (07) 868 6104 Powerhead Motorcycles, Manurewa (09) 267 7145 Tahuna Motorcycles & Atvs, Tahuna (07) 887 5790

SOUTH ISLAND

Ag & Auto Direct, Balclutha (03) 418 0555 Amuri Motorcycles, Culverden (03) 315 8667

Dan’s Motor Centre Ltd, Geraldine (03) 693 8536 T&E Motorcycles, Gore (03) 208 8114

LANDBOSS.CO.NZ

WWW.COUNTRYTV.CO.NZ *Conditions apply. Country TV Online is only available to Country TV direct domestic customers with an online subscription. Country TV costs $16.10 per month and is subject to Country TV Online standard terms and conditions. Prices are correct as of 1 September 2019, are payable in advance and subject to change.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEBMER 10, 2019

22 NEWS

A home-made success SUDESH KISSUN sudeshk@ruralnews.co.nz

TUCKED AWAY at Paerata, south of Auckland, is another success story of New Zealand’s dairy industry. New Image Group, started 35 years ago by NZ entrepreneur Graeme Clegg, today enjoys revenues exceeding $300 million and is a global leader offering quality nutritional and wellness products made from NZ milk. Its subsidiary, New Image Group Nutritionals, which owns the Paerata plant, earns $100m annually from selling goat milk infant formula in China and

New Image Group’s new factory at Paerata, South Auckland.

greater Asia. The companies celebrated a milestone last month, opening a $50m

expansion to its spray dry milk powder plant. Clegg told guests at the formal opening that

he started the venture from humble beginnings. “Who would have predicted our combined

EDNA CALENDAR 2020

impact on nutrition and wellness... in the world, through the global movement we have created?” Attending the opening ceremony were key customers from China, Vietnam, Thailand and

Malaysia. Also present were representatives of the company’s major Chinese partner Yili. Clegg noted that some people have been with him from day one. “Some of our custom-

ESSENTIAL INVESTMENT GRAEME CLEGG says the investment at Paerata has been large and essential. The first dryer and specialised packaging plant was built in 2011. Expansion started in 2016 and is now complete, with a new dryer and larger scale canning and retail pouch facilities. The plant is coal-free, using only electricity and natural gas to fire the boiler and handle bore water. Production is now in full swing, with goat milk infant formula base production

EDNA!!

2020 Edna Calendar ❱❱ $20 including post & packaging ❱❱ 12 of Edna’s best cartoons

ers, partners and staff here have been with us on the journey right from the very start -- some of you with us for many years and some having just joined. “Whatever stage of the journey, we are most grateful and honoured by your loyalty and support and friendship. “We are all excited about continuing to share our future collaboration together.” It has always been Clegg’s vision to be at the forefront of providing nutritious food and supplements. New Image has pioneered the colostrum industry, developing unique patented products and formulations. Its products also include beauty products and

moving to a 24-hour operation. The first cans and pouches from the plant were produced last month. With brands well established and trusted internationally, Clegg believes the future is looking good. “Our future is exciting, as from the base we have established we compete seriously with the global giants in the industry. “We are a proud NZ corporation taking our unique natural resources to the world.”

FOOTWEAR LTD

NZ MADE BOOTS

Visit www.lastrite.co.nz for more quality products

HUNTER BOOTS Comfortable, durable and stylish.

The heavy duty sole construction makes this a robust boot designed for climbing over rugged ground. This boot has a soft toe and is made from a thick Mad Dog Nubuck Leather, stitched and screwed construction with a rubber, replaceable sole, that is glued and screwed. Soft padding for ankle support and D-Rings for your laces are an added advantage. Great fitting boots full of comfort, ideal for those long hunting and tramping trips.

❱❱ 330mm x 240mm, spiral bound

ORDER NOW! T: 09-307 0399 E: julieb@ruralnews.co.nz

FARMER BOOTS Lastrite’s Farmer boots are made for comfort. Constructed from Reverse kip leather they are an ideal farmers, fencers and builders boot. Very sturdy and made to last this boot is robust with a heavy duty construction. It has a leather insole and midsole that is stitched and screwed construction with a rubber, replaceable sole, that is glued and screwed. Update your old boots now and you will never look back.

10 HALL ROAD, RD5, WHANGAREI Phone 09-436 2794 or 027-436 2793


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

NEWS 23

story

New Image Group chairman Graeme Clegg (right) with John Key at the plant opening.

nutritional supplements. The company was also an early starter in goat milk formula. Clegg said his company recognised the unique features, human compatibilities and health benefits. “There is no question the world has truly discovered the benefits of goat milk, now in mainstream demand with consumers and companies eagerly pursuing its merits,” he said. Sales of New Image’s flagship colostrum based product Alpha Lipid Lifeline have topped $1 billion, making it a market leader. Its goat milk formula accounts for 6% of total goat formula imported into China -- one of the top five goat milk brands there. Goat milk is sourced from farms just 15 minutes from the factory. “Integration of our supply chain enables the goat milk from our part-

ner farms located only 15 minutes away to be collected, spray dried and packed as retail ready products here on site,” said Clegg. “We are one of the few manufacturers able to trace products from the farm to the customer.” Clegg is proud of the operation he has created but there’s no time for complacency. “We have not taken our success for granted. We know for it to continue and for us to stay ahead we need to invest in our production capability, capacity and technology here in NZ to support our future growth and expansion and ensure we produce quality product that can compete on the world stage. “Our vision here at our extended Paerata site is to create a centralised manufacturing facility with the latest technology, quality control and increased scale of production.”

ON A HEALTHY MISSION GRAEME CLEGG says his company aims to lead a global movement forcing governments to ban antibiotics in animal feed. Over 70% of antibiotics are used in animal feed, he adds. “All chickens, pigs, most beef and even fish and prawns in farming are fed antibiotics that transfer into

the food we eat. “This will lead to a microbe apocalypse. Antibiotics of course do not kill viruses. “Scientific evidence is convincing that antibodies in colostrum are far more effective in preventing all infections and are the only defence against all viruses.” He says New Image

Group’s mission is to help people make healthier lifestyle choices. “We aim to stop the increase in preventable lifestyle diseases, to encourage people to take charge of and be responsible for their future health status.” NIG flagship product, breakfast formula Alpha Lipid Lifeline has earned over $1b in sales around the world.

TO ALL FARMERS. FOR ALL FARMERS. www.ruralnewsgroup.co.nz

IN BRIEF KIWI CHAIR FOR FIFTH TIME NEW ZEALANDER Colin Millar has been voted chairman of the World Ploughing Organisation for the fifth time running – a first for the international body. Rural News understands the vote was unanimous. During his time as chairman, Millar has made many improvements to the organisation’s efficiency and planning. According to Will Willetts, president of the New Zealand Ploughing Association, Millar’s attention to detail is exceptional. “He always comes to a meeting fully armed. He is always looking at how to improve the organisation.” The world championships are scheduled next year for Russia at a site Millar says is a 3.5 hour train ride from Moscow.

RURAL NEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HORTNEWS


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

24 NEWS

Telling rural stories better PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

DAIRY WOMEN’S Network (DWN) last week launched a new website, Instagram page and online visual story telling project called ‘Our People. Their Stories’. The website will also use webinars and Vlogs

(video blogs) as part of it visual story telling focus. DWN says looking to create deep emotional connections is the drive behind ‘Our People. Their Stories’, which has already attracted television coverage. The first story features Lucy O’Reilly (9), who prefers the latest

dairy farming catalogues to children’s books. This was released to coincide with the website launch last Tuesday. Lucy has her own herd and loves nothing more than helping out on the farm near Tirau, Waikato. “We all just fell in love with Lucy,” said DWN chief executive Jules

Benton. “Her story is real, authentic and is from the heart. “We sent some early footage to Seven Sharp which resulted in Hilary Barry coming down to the O’Reilly’s farm to spend a morning with Lucy for her ‘Hilary Helps’ segment that ended up being the story of the week for

the show.” Benton says DWN is rolling out a series of short, motivating visual stories, professionally produced, over our social channels and platforms. “We are treating them like a mini television series and some of the content will also be used to pitch to mainstream

Nine-year-old Lucy O’Reilly features in DWN’s new social media campaign.

e a ur ton ri Yo ers ula l rn am tro co r R on fo c

media.” The ‘Our People. Their Stories’ project is intended to have DWN engage more deeply with its members and ultimately the dairy industry. “Stories create deep emotional connections and they start conversations,” says Benton. “We [will tell] stories that will transport and touch people, inspire, educate and engage and provoke an emotional response.” Each story will have a unique angle to make it special, Benton says. “We want to showcase

all the differing elements of agri-industry in New Zealand, and how women are making a substantial difference to the success of dairy businesses that contribute to a better New Zealand. There are amazing stories we can’t wait to show. “DWN is driven and inspired by people actively involved in the agri industry at all levels. By celebrating news, achievements and shared experiences, our members and wider rural communities are empowered to strive for more.”

LETTER TO THE EDITOR

BANK PROFITS

PHOENIX or bust.

®

Septoria and Ramularia can devastate crops and cripple businesses. With resistance to established modes of action growing, the only effective approach is a proactive one. Start early and apply PHOENIX tank-mixed with existing SDHIs and DMIs such as BOLIDE® in your fungicide programme. PHOENIX is your innovative, multi-site protectant that will help you win the resistance battle!

Simply. Grow. Together. www.adama.com HC AGR0251

Registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997 No. P9257. See www.foodsafety.govt.nz for registration conditions. Approved pursuant to the HSNO Act 1996. Approval No. HSR101068. See www.epa.govt.nz for approval controls. Adama and Phoenix are registered trademarks of an Adama Group Company.

THERE’S ANOTHER side to your recent editorial on bank profits (Rural News Aug 27). Profitable banks are strong banks and they support New Zealand households, businesses and the economy. They also make a significant direct contribution to NZ. Last year, banks directly contributed $7.6 billion to our economy. That includes spending $5.4b running their businesses here, paying for local goods and services and employing more than 25,000 people. They also paid $2.2b in tax. That contribution comes before you consider the role they play in financing the needs of everyday New Zealanders – all while giving back through sponsorship and volunteer projects. Banks invest heavily in NZ and shareholder returns are crucial to maintaining that investment. That’s how most successful businesses work. Shareholder returns are in the middle of the pack compared to other major NZ companies. Our banks are profitable because they’re very efficient compared to similar banks around the world. They manage their costs very well. Another factor is that they did relatively well through the global financial crisis. None failed or were bailed out by the Government, unlike in Europe and the US, which recovered their profitability more slowly from a negative base following the crisis. Our banks’ profits dropped post-crisis and recovered more quickly in parallel with other countries with stable banks, like Canada and Australia. It’s always useful to consider how strong banks benefit us when we talk about their profitability. Roger Beaumont, chief executive New Zealand Bankers’ Association


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

NEWS 25

Debt mediation Bill will help hardpressed farmers – O’Connor O’Connor says the scheme has broad support from lenders, including all major banks, the New Zealand Bankers Association and Federated Farmers. He expects each case of mediation to cost about $6000 split

JILL GALLOWAY

THE FARM Debt Mediation Bill will go far in helping farmers deal with farm debt, claims Agriculture Minister Damien O’Connor. Farm debt has risen 270% during the past 20 years and is now at least $62 billion, says O’Connor. The bill will create a new compulsory mediation scheme to support farmers in financial distress in dealings with their lenders. “The Farm Debt Mediation Bill will require creditors to offer mediation to farmers who default on payments before they take any enforcement action,” he told Rural News. O’Connor, who is also Minister of Rural Communities, says farmers have been doing it tough in recent years due to rising levels of farm debt and there is a hefty power imbalance between farmers and lenders. “Farmers are especially vulnerable to business downturns as a result of conditions often outside their control, like weather, market

between farmer and lender -- about $3000 each. The next step will be a second reading of the Bill in Parliament, with changes resulting from the parliamentary select committee process. A report to Parliament is due on the Bill on

November 4. “We are aiming for the Bill to pass into law before the end of the year, with [most of its content] coming into effect in February 2020,” O’Connor said. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

NEED IRRIGATION? WANT EFFICIENCY? Call the experts:

Agriculture minister Damien O’Connor believes the new bill will go along way helping farmers dealing with debt.

price volatility, pests and diseases like Mycoplasma bovis.” He says farmers who run a family businesses often don’t have the resources to negotiate their own protection when dealing with lenders. “That’s where this piece of legislation fits in.” O’Connor says the Bill is pragmatic in being focussed on early intervention.

He points out that farms are often much more than a business. “They are the centre point for a family and for a community. And the failure of a farm business can lead to the farmer and their family losing both their business and their home.” O’Connor claims the Bill will also help to acknowledge and support mental health problems which can be associated with farm debt issues. It

will create opportunities to improve a business and farm practice before they hit a crisis point. “This legislation will give us a system of mediation where a bank and a borrower come together and work out a way of moving forward or find a way for a farmer with an unviable business to exit with dignity. It’s a process that will ensure a fairer system of justice for those in financial distress.”

,--_

& Effluent ► Irrigation Design accredited ► Centre Pivots ► RotoRainers ► Guns ► Pumps ► Electrical ► Repairs & Maintenance ► Stock water...and morel

Cnr Robinson & McNally Sts, Ashburton Phone 307 9049 Email admin@rainer.co.nz www.rainer.co.nz

RAINER

IRRIGATION LIMITED

A NEW LOOK, A STRONGER FOCUS. It’s back to the future for us as we have re-branded away from Tru-Test Dairy Solutions back to what the market has known us as – DTS. As New Zealand’s leading milk cooling supplier and manufacturer of milk vats, we’re all about helping our customers grow through innovation. For smarter production and better rewards contact us www.dts.co.nz | 0800 500 387


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

26 NEWS

Just keep stock out of water! NIGEL MALTHUS

SIMPLY KEEPING stock out of waterways arguably gives the “best bang for your buck” for water quality improvements, says DairyNZ Environment and catchment manager Aslan WrightStow. Speaking to the recent New Zealand Institute of Primary Industry Management (NZIPIM) conference in Christchurch, WrightStow said there is no doubt that land use affects water quality. It is not uncommon or surprising to find waterways in a pastoral landscape with up to 15 times more E. coli and 10 times more nutrients than in a forestry landscape. “The biggest single predictor of water quality outcomes in a par-

ticular catchment is the proportion of upstream land use.” Wright-Stow said farmers have two broad options to reduce contaminant losses. First, changing the farm system itself, such as through feed pads and reducing stock numbers and fertiliser application. Second – the subject of his conference presentation – is what he calls edge-of-field mitigations designed to intercept contaminants before they enter waterways. Farmers can take various practical steps, he said, but simply excluding stock from waterways is very cost effective. It can reduce phosphorus by 20-40%, sediment by 40-60% and E. coli by 50-60%. Riparian buffers (setting a fence back with

planting or simply grass buffers) would take stock exclusion to the next level. There is “a good amount of science” suggesting that grass buffers on their own are hugely beneficial, he said. “You’re adding layers and layers of complexity through those flow paths and the more complexity you’ve got, the more you slow down the water, and the more chances you’ve got for interactions with biological processes.” Both international and NZ science suggests that 3-5 m wide rank grass buffers can reduce nitrogen, phosphorus and sediment by 50-70%. The wider the better, particularly for dissolved nutrients, but with diminishing returns beyond 5-10 m, he said. Wright-Stow said

Aslan Wright-Stow, DairyNZ.

planted buffers give extra benefits including aesthetics and habitat biodiversity. DairyNZ is doing “a whole bunch of work” on optimising buffer design. A farmer could get 6-7 times better result for the

same effort, fencing and planting by changing the buffer width to focus on the critical source areas. “The easiest way to define where these are is to walk around the farm when it’s raining. You’ll see where they are, they

provide a disproportionate amount of overland flows.” Wright-Stow said a recent review by NIWA for DairyNZ said wetlands -- engineered or natural -- could reduce nitrate concentrations and load by 51-98%. “And they’re very very simple to do.” A farmer could get a strong return on investment just by fencing a natural wetland. A wetland that’s about 2.5% of a catchment area could reduce nitrate by 40%, and a wetland about 5% of its catchment area could reduce it by 60%, he said. Another method is bunds (small dams). They work well in rolling and undulating land and lighter soils, although farmers could run into consenting issues if trying

to raise too high a dam in steeper country. During rain, the bund would capture and slow overland flow and allow contaminants to settle. The farmer would pull the plug after about three days to return it to pasture. DairyNZ is also investigating two-stage channels – drainage streams with artificially created “flood plains” either side of the deeper main channel, so that when the water level rises in rain it spreads out over the sides, and slows and allows particulates to settle. Wright-Stow says more and more complex systems are becoming available, eg engineered nitrogen or phosphate filters and bioreactors, but the desired outcome needs keeping in mind.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

NEWS 27

Fight lost to keep potato disease out THE FIGHT to wipe out a potato disease from New Zealand has been lost. Biosecurity NZ and Potatoes NZ have ceased their joint eradication response to Potato moptop virus (PMTV). The industry says it will now be taking the lead on long-term management of the disease. PMTV was confirmed in NZ in September 2018, initially concentrated in grower paddocks in Canterbury. But a national survey has shown the virus is now NZ-wide, indicating that it has been in NZ for a long time. “It became evident earlier during the response that this disease couldn’t be eradicated and that the best out-

come for potato growers was industry management long term,” says Biosecurity NZ’s Sam Leske. “Biosecurity NZ will continue to support industry in helping them develop the long term management plan, which will include non-regulatory controls and voluntary agreement.” It’s the first time the two organisations have worked together on a biosecurity response since signing up to the Government Industry Agreement (GIA). Potatoes NZ chief executive Chris Claridge says it was a successful end to the first joint response. The industry is developing a plan which will incorporate research from world experts, in line with best practice.

“A positive outcome to date is there are no significant losses to growers attributed to the disease,” Claridge said. “This response is an example of how a good partnership between Gov-

ernment and industry works to eventually help industry to be in a position to mitigate impacts posed by biological incursions and to support decisionmaking for the future.”

Potatoes NZ chief executive Chris Claridge.

NEW RULES AIM TO ELIMINATE ‘FOOD FRAUD’ CHANGES ARE occurring all across the global food safety system at speed, according to a draft food safety released last week by New Zealand Food Safety. Increasingly sophisticated food fraud that can erode reputation and brand value are among those changes. “When it comes to trade in food, we are seeing a greater focus by regulators on consumer expectations, strengthening of food safety regimes, and an increased complexity in global supply chains,” the strategy says. “As the regulator, we are facing exciting opportunities from data analytics and technology, alongside an increasing need for specific skills, and competition for these skills.” NZ Food Safety has identified four priority areas in the next five years. The first priority is to ensure NZ’s world class food safety system remains robust in responding to future challenges. The right balance of enabling innovation while managing food safety risks is needed. The second priority is to proactively support consumers to feel confident making choices about food. “We will engage more proactively with consumers about food related risks, provide tools and information to promote safe food handling practices, and develop more effective methods to promote informed consumer choices.” The third priority is to lead new thinking in international forums to expand NZ’s international influence. “We are proposing to do more to shape international standards, to enable the best possible access to global markets for NZ primary products, and to develop more robust and innovative assurances to facilitate trade.” The fourth priority is that NZ Food Safety is “an intelligence led business that proactively prepares for the future”. To deliver priorities it needs to build capability and focus on the highest value activities. ‑Visit https://www.mpi.govt.nz/news-and-resources/ consultations/a-strategy-for-new-zealand-food-safety/

• •

• •

For more information on Orion Agriscience maize portfolio, please visit www.orionagriscience.co.nz ™ACE and Atraflow are Trade Marks of Orion AgriScience Ltd. . Registered pursuant to the ACVM Act 1997, No. P7218 See www.foodsafety.govt.nz for registration conditions. Approved pursuant to the HSNO Act 1996, No. HSR000404 See www.epa.govt.nz for approval conditions.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

28 NEWS

GE grass’s GHG solution PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

NEW ZEALAND forage scientists have been experimenting to discover whether a new, potentially environmentally sustainable grass will perform in the field as it has in controlled environment studies. The genetically modified grass strikes a balance between reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, greater tolerance to drought and farm productivity. AgResearch principal scientist Dr Greg Bryan recently returned from the United States where the Crown Research Institute is conducting the field trials of the high metabolisable energy (HME) ryegrass.

Bryan says the ryegrass research has generated high levels of public and scientific interest here in NZ and overseas. “The HME ryegrass has performed well in controlled growing conditions and I’ve recently returned from the US where we are growing the plants in field trials in competition with one another, just as they would in pasture. “The plants are doing well. “We’re breeding the best novel traits into ryegrass cultivars that will best suit NZ growing conditions and we’re introducing genes into the plants that have simpler genetic patterns that will make future breeding programmes easier.” Bryan says the ulti-

mate goal of the US phase of the research is to conduct realistic rather than simulated animal nutrition studies. “So we can evaluate whether the grass might have the potential environmental benefits, such as reduced methane emissions and reduced nitrogen excretion that our modelling suggests it will.” While the results have been encouraging, Bryan issues a note of caution. “This is complex long term research and we are working on a species with challenging genetics. It takes several years to breed the HME trait into elite ryegrass varieties currently used by farmers, and very importantly to test performance every step of the way.

AgResearch’s GE grass study had to be conducted in the US.

“It’s important to stress that the forecast environmental benefits associated with the grass need to be supported by rigorous research. We have a good understanding of the potential benefits of the grass because of our institutional expertise in animal nutrition, from animal nutrition models and from the biochemical analysis of the

S

PRIN Higher Productivity + Lower Servicing NO Costs G WU N

= AES Waterblasters PH

ON

TORNADO RANGE

• UDOR ceramic plunger pump & gear-box • Genuine Honda petrol engine • 10 models from 1800 to 5000 psi

FREEPHONE 0508 78 78 78

RW

DE

TAI

AY

LS

ALBERTI HOT CLEANERS • UDOR ceramic plunger pump • Heavy duty 1440 RPM motor • 230 & 400 Volt • User friendly

Sales & Service dealers throughout New Zealand

www.aesblasters.co.nz

ONE STOP WATER SHOP 300mm x 6 metre .......................... $410 400mm x 6 metre .......................... $515 500mm x 6 metre .......................... $690 600mm x 6 metre .......................... $925 800mm x 6 metre ........................ $1399 1000mm x 6 metre ...................... $2175 1200mm x 6 metre ...................... $3475 ALL PRICES INCLUDE G.S.T.

SALE

DE

EF OR

ELECTROBLAST RANGE • 230 or 400 Volt 1440 RPM electric motors • 8 models from 1600 to 5000 psi

grasses in in vitro (test tube) studies.” Bryan says AgResearch will eventually need to seek regulatory approval

for HME ryegrass to be grown in NZ for livestock grazing trials. “We need to test in NZ conditions using NZ

animals to ultimately confirm or refute the potential environmental and productivity benefits of HME ryegrass.”

FARMERS INVEST IN RESEARCH DAIRYNZ is investing farmers’ levies alongside AgResearch to support the trials in the US. Dr Bruce Thorrold, of DairyNZ, says dairy farmers are looking for new ways to reduce their environmental footprint and improve productivity. “The science done by AgResearch to develop these plants is world leading, and we’re investing to see how these plants perform in the field and test their potential value for our farmers. While there is a long way to go, we’re encouraged by the results to date.” AgResearch, in support of this project and several other forage related research initiatives, is also investing in new glasshouse facilities on its Grasslands campus in Palmerston North. The glasshouses, designed to precise performance specifications and biosecurity standards, will be used to research novel ryegrass, clover, endophytes and many other forage related species. Dr Richard Scott, science team leader for the plant biotechnology team, says these glasshouses have very sophisticated climate control and irrigation technology.

CULVERT PIPES

New Zealand’s CHEAPEST Culvert Pipes! FREE joiners supplied on request. • Lightweight, easy to install • Made from polyethylene

McKee Plastics Mahinui Street, Feilding Ph 06 323 4181 Fax 06 323 4183

sales@mckeeplastics.co.nz | www.mckeeplastics.co.nz

“But the big game changer for us is that their design will allow us to grow plants that produce higher quantities of high quality seed. “This new facility is very important for the HME ryegrass programme as all seed used in the US trials is produced here in these contained glasshouses at Palmerston North and we will need kilograms of seed to plant enough ryegrass to perform meaningful animal nutrition studies.” Up to a dozen scientists from two teams – plant biotechnology and plantmicrobe interactions – will run various experiments in the glasshouses. “A diverse range of scientists can work together there, including PhD students, so we are expecting to see even greater collaboration between teams, research institutes, universities, and co-funders,” said Scott. “We also know this new facility will enable us to increase the scope and pace of both our field trials and the fundamental research programmes into understanding the mechanisms underlying the higher growth rates observed in the HME ryegrass.”

Phone

0800 625 826 for your nearest stockist

Joiners supplied FREE with culvert pipes


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

NEWS 29

Rural women recognised the inspiring work they’re doing, from the boardroom to the back paddock and everywhere in between,” McLean said. Each year, a supreme winner is chosen from the 10 category winners. Past recipients include family violence campaigner Jackie Clark (2018), food entrepreneur Cecilia Robinson (2017) and businesswoman Helen Robinson (2016). The 82 finalists are invited to attend the Women of Influence Day of Celebration in Auckland on October 24, where they can share ideas and discuss challenges and opportunities in their respective fields. The Women of Influence 2019 winners will be announced at the Awards Dinner at SkyCity that evening. www.womenofinfluence. co.nz

PAM TIPA pamelat@ruralnews.co.nz

NINE FINALISTS have been named in the rural section of the Women of Influence Awards. They are among 82 finalists in 10 categories shortlisted for the awards dinner on October 24. Entrants were judged on the impact of their actions and the influence they’ve exerted. The awards, jointly presented by Westpac NZ and Stuff, attracted 371 nominations in the 10 categories. The rural finalists are: Ash-Leigh Campbell, chair, NZ Young Farmers board/technical farm manager; ​ Aimee Charteris, managing director, Aimee Charteris Genetics; ​ Jacqui Cottrell, founder, Kiwi Quinoa; Toni Croon, owner, Hotel Chatham; ​ Fiona Gower, national

Young Farmers board chair Ash-Leigh Campbell is one of nine rural women nominees.

president, Rural Women NZ; ​Kylie Leonard, regional leader, Dairy Women’s Network; ​ Gina Mohi, trustee, Rangiwewehi Charitable Trust; ​ Lindy Nelson, founder, Agri-Women’s Development Trust; and ​ Chloe Walker, director, Glynleith Farms. Westpac NZ chief executive David McLean

says the huge number and impressive calibre of the nominees this year left the judges with a daunting task to pick the finalists. “For the last seven years these awards have celebrated the amazing achievements of Kiwi women, and 2019 is no exception. Our finalists showcase the breadth of

LITTLE APPLES REALLY ROCKETING AWAY ROCKIT GLOBAL is building a new headquarters and post-harvest facilities in Hastings. The Hawke’s Bay apple company says it is experiencing massive growth in the snack sector. The company has bought land in the Irongate Industrial Park, in Longlands, Hastings, and aims to open the facility in advance of the 2021 apple harvest. Rockit Global chief executive Austin Mortimer says going ahead with the purpose built coolstore, packhouse and global headquarters is a monumental milestone for the company. “This project signifies the growth of the apple industry in Hawke’s Bay, and signals the coming of age of Rockit and a reflection of our confidence and belief in our product and brand,” says Mortimer, who took the reins at Rockit in 2015. Stage one will create the new office suite, cool storage and automated, high spec packhouse, with a mezzanine level allowing packaging material to be gravity fed. The second phase, earmarked for 2025, is likely to add more processing technology to raise production

capacity through to 2030 and beyond. Rockit Global is world renowned for its miniature Rockit apples now sold in Asia, Australia, the Middle East, Europe, the US and in New Zealand. Earlier this year, the company launched a new, kraft cardboard pack for its snack size apples. The 100% biodegradable and recyclable cardboard is a more environmentally friendly packaging option, is sourced from sustainably managed forests and is PEFC (Programme for the Endorsement of Forest Certification) approved. RGL’s ambition is to do no harm to the environment as it grows the business and builds the new facility. “We will be dealing with the treatment and discharge of all our own wastewater, the refrigeration plant will have a zero global warming impact and we’re looking into the use and placement of solar panels as a sustainable source of electricity,” Mortimer said. • Read more about the NZ horticultural sector in the September edition of Hort News out with this issue of Rural News.

WHEN THE HEAT COMES ON THIS SUMMER, KEEP YOUR COOL WITH DTS. As New Zealand’s leading milk cooling supplier, we can help you and your milk stay cool this Summer. To help you meet cooling regulations, we’re celebrating the launch of our new brand with some fantastic offers on pre-cooling refrigeration units. We also have peace-of-mind vat management solutions so you can keep track of essential cooling data wherever you are.

To find out more, talk to one of our nationwide experts about the best cooling solution for your farm. It’s all about DTS helping you grow through innovation.

For smarter production and better rewards contact us. www.dts.co.nz | 0800 500 387

WATER/GLYCOL CHILLER TT10 TT15 $

Usually

NOW

16,725 .00

$

13,000

Usually

.00

TT50 6HP NOW

$

$

25,650.00

22,750

21,500 .00

$

16,500

.00 Offers exclude GST, freight, installation and while stocks last.

ICE BANK Usually

NOW

$

.00


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

30 AGRIBUSINESS

NZ apple industry GRASPs the nettle on labour laws speakers were overseas experts David Camp, chief executive of the NEW ZEALAND Apples Association of Labour & Pears is positioning Providers, and former itself as a global leader GlobalGAP vice-chair Jim in social practices and Jefcoate. in eliminating exploitaJones was recently tion of workers on supply chains, its business devel- elected to the GlobalGAP board and will attend his opment manager Gary first board meeting when Jones says. his term officially begins NZ A&P has recently in November. Half the introduced the GRASP board represents retailers (GlobalGAP Risk Assessment on Social Practices) and half producers. Of the producer repframework, implemented by the Europe based farm resentatives, Jones is one of only two from outside assurance organisation Europe and the only one GlobalGAP. from the southern hemiHe says the issues sphere. of modern slavery and He says an example worker exploitation were of how GRASP standards major themes of the could impact NZ was the recent Apples & Pears METAREX INOV RURAL NEWS X 200H MM case of265W a grower who had annual conference. The NIGEL MALTHUS

hoped to export apples to Europe last season. But because his orchard had no seasonal workers at the time he filled in a GRASP risk assessment, he scored a zero for one particular element. A German retailer who saw that said, “Well there are people with better risk assessment than [the New Zealander]. I don’t want any of his apples”. “That was a short sharp commercial reality check for everyone,” Jones told Rural News. “I can assure you I don’t know anyone who’s failed to meet that standard since. But it was an example, just as we were introducing GRASP, that

NZ Apples & Pears business development manager Gary Jones. SUPPLIED/ SIMON CARTWRIGHT PHOTOGRAPHY

it really means something.” Jones says big challenges facing the industry include increased digitisation and automation and big data. Integrated systems will ensure growers do not have to put

in data many times, and allow them to share it with appropriate people, whether customers or regulators. The other big area is worker exploitation, the UK having enacted modern slavery legisla-

SUPERIOR SLUG AND SNAIL CONTROL FROM SCIENCE AND NATURE Metarex Inov is a breakthrough in slug and snail baits containing

technology.

Only Metarex Inov from DeSangosse, the global leaders in slug and snail bait formulation technology, contains Colzactive – specially selected oil seed rape extracts, formulated as an integral part of the bait. Metarex Inov, containing unique Colzactive delivers a bait more attractive, more palatable and faster acting against slugs and snails.

Maximum attractiveness Enhanced palatability Unequalled fast action Long-lasting protection Controlled spreading ® Registered trademarks of DE SANGOSSE SAS

tion in 2015 and Australia doing so last year. Businesses will have to report what they’re doing within the supply chain to eliminate suspicion of slavery and exploitation. “That’s a newish area for us, but over the last two or three years we’ve been working hard to make sure we are reactive in that space.” Jones believes the NZ primary industry – and certainly horticulture – has to take a lead in this. “Because if we continue to get 14,000, 15,000 or 16,000-plus RSE (recognised seasonal employer) workers from the Pacific we’re going to have to be squeaky clean.”

Jones says the International Labour Organization (ILO) recognises the RSE as the best scheme of its kind in the world and it is very unlikely anyone is “misbehaving”. But there are wider connotations for supply chains. “You might be a large business that brings people in from the Pacific and you’re growing some of your own fruit but you’re also packing someone else’s fruit in your branded box,” he said. “We have to make sure everyone, not just RSE employers but everyone in that whole ecosystem or sector [has very high quality employment practices].”


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

AGRIBUSINESS 31

A focus on maximising carcase value A LINCOLN University student, Lucy Hewitt (20), has a keen interest in maximising the value from every animal carcase. Hewitt, in her third year of a bachelor of agribusiness and food marketing degree, is this year’s recipient of First

Hewitt visited Hawke’s Bay in late August to meet First Light and speak at the company’s annual farmer conference – the Spring Muster. She spoke about wanting to see processors make better use of whole animal carcases. “Less than 50% of an

“On a gram by gram basis they are much more nutrient dense than their muscle meat counterparts. Now is the time for organ meats to take the lead.” Light Foods’ annual scholarship. She grew up on a sheep and beef farm in Pahiatua and returns each summer to help her father on his land. Hewitt has long known the First Light brand through an aunt and uncle who supply the grass-fed meat company. She was attracted by the hands-on experience the scholarship offers. The scholarship, awarded annually since 2014, is for $5000 and an opportunity to spend a week at First Light’s Hawke’s Bay premises. “First Light is a small company... agile and able to try new things,” Hewitt said. “I was excited to have won, particularly as it is a company I’d like to work for.” Hewitt’s interest in supply chain management fits with the company’s criterion of awarding the scholarship to a person planning a career in a land based industry with an emphasis on agribusiness and food.

animal’s carcase is converted into valuable cuts of meat. “The remainder is classified as low value or discarded as waste material,” Hewitt said. “As the industry faces sustainability and food security issues it needs to make better use of that remaining 50%.” She believes organ meat and offal is one future solution. “On a gram by gram basis they are much more nutrient dense than their muscle meat counterparts. Now is the time for organ meats to take the lead.” Hewitt told the 200 farmers, business people and First Light managers at the conference that now is the time to capitalise on the premium pet food sector. “Many consumers consider their pets equally important as family members, hence an untapped market for petfood of prestigious quality,” she said. Greg Evans, First Light

co-founder, says Hewitt was selected as the 2019 scholar because of her attitude and effort as a student, and a Set up in 2003 by Gerard Hickey, Greg thirst for workEvans and Jason Ross, First Light is New ing in the red meat Zealand’s only commercial producer industry. of 100% grass-fed Wagyu beef. The “Our objective is company also markets premium venison. to develop relationIt has developed a unique value chain ships with young model to produce and deliver grassleaders and encourfed meats directly from the farm to the age them to conperson who presents or consumes the tinue to strive to be steak. the best they can,” he said. “Lucy is passionate about putting this differentiated model.” Hewitt’s career vision into practice in business, is to work in the red meat she understands farming Third-year Lincoln student Lucy Hewitt sector beyond the farmand she is an avid supwas this year’s First Light Scholar. gate. porter of the First Light

All about First Light

SHEEP JETTER

Sheep dipping... made easier!

Serving NZ Farmers since 1962

• Manufactured from stainless steel • Electric Eye • 800-1000 sheep per hour • Fantastic penetration • Get one now before price increase

7685

$

Innovative Agriculture Equipment

+ GST

www.pppindustries.co.nz / sales@pppindustries.co.nz / 0800 901 902

KVERNELAND GRASS GEAR

• Disc mowers from 2.4m to 10.2m, all with round discs to reject stones • Tedders from 5.2m to 13.3m • Twin or quad rotor rakes up to 15 metres

MOWERS FA5231

Kverneland |

Power Farming

TEDDERS |

www.powerfarming.co.nz

Terms and conditions apply. * Normal lending criteria applies, finance conditions are 1/3 deposit, 1/3 in 12 months, 1/3 in 24 months. Offer ends 30.9.19. While stocks last

RAKES

0

RING NOW TO GET FINANCE ON ALL STOCK*

%


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

global agribusiness research analysts sharing market outlooks

32 MARKETS & TRENDS

Rabobank supports clients from farm to fork in

40

COUNTRIES

100 000

12630

farmers to connect Content supplied by Rabobank – Grow with the bank farmers for farmers with by worldwide , founded

Positivity remains; headwinds ahead Dairy Global dairy commodity prices remained steady in August. While Oceania butter prices continued to modestly decline, powders found price support across the month of August. Global dairy market fundamentals remain well-balanced. Growth in global milk production remains very modest, while import demand has been robust across a number of key markets. Risks to the global market remain evenly balanced at this point in time. However, weaker macroeconomic settings and growing buy-side stocks remain key downside risks in the short-term. RaboResearch still thinks that a farmgate milk price of NZD 7.15/kgMS is possible for the 2019/20 season.

Winter conditions have been relatively mild across most dairying areas so far. RaboResearch still forecasts national milk production to be lower by 1% for the 2019/20 season, but we note that this is dependent on conditions over the next few weeks.

Beef

Northern Hemisphere milk flows are underwhelming. US milk production was flat for July 2019 compared to July 2018. This follows two months of lower year-onyear milk flows for May and June, helped by lower cow numbers. Meanwhile, European

milk flows have been impacted by intense heat, causing June 2019 milk production to be marginally lower by an estimated -0.1% year-on-year. The next six weeks of weather will be crucial for moving the dial either way on New Zealand milk production.

Rabobank expects farmgate prices to remain largely stable over the next month, with some potential for upward price pressure as a result of seasonally tight supplies, solid export market conditions, and a favourable exchange rate. Farmgate prices continued to push higher through August, generally in line with the normal seasonal trend, as cattle supplies remain restricted over the winter period.

Bull and prime cattle prices in both islands are currently at, or ahead, of where prices were at this stage last year. As at the end of August, the North Island bull price is 3% higher MOM, averaging NZ$5.60/kg cwt, with the South Island bull price

moving up 4% MOM to NZ$ 5.30/kg cwt. Prime cattle prices in the North Island are now sitting at NZ$ 6/kg cwt (+3% MOM), while South Island prices moved to NZ$ 5.85/kg cwt (+ 4% MOM). The demand outlook from the Chinese market

$97,500 New Holland T7.235 Auto Command 180 base hp with boost to 235 hp, 3921 hrs. 404179. Mosgiel.

Pre-Spring Clearance

$38,900 New Holland TS115A SR

c/w MX100 FEL, 5170 hrs. 403215. Mosgiel.

$76,000 New Holland T6070 Plus SR

c/w FEL, 2011 model, 140 hp, 3150 hrs. 402537. Te Awamutu.

Super Steer, 155 hp boost to 200 hp, 3600 hrs. 403409. Masterton.

$10,000

norwood.co.nz 0800 66 79 663

403266. Hastings.

All prices are plus GST. Errors and omissions accepted.

$9,995 Celli C-Drill 3000

Rotospike and seeder. 404027. Te Awamutu.

$49,500 Vaderstad Rapid RD 300C

Very popular heavy-duty 3 metre seed drill. 402937. Whangarei.

Seed only 6m drill, system tine. 403584. Christchurch.

$29,995 Ferrari Vega 95 RS

95 hp, 2710 hrs. 403983. Pukekohe.

$15,000 Rotor Cut baler. 402151. Hastings.

$29,000 Lemken Zirkon 10/500K

$24,000 Simba Solo 300 disc rippers

Power harrow, packer roller. 403365. Hastings.

$49,900 Vaderstad RDA600S

c/w FEL, 75 hp. 403474. Te Awamutu.

New Holland BR740 ECR

Disc mower, 320 conditioner kit fitted. 402019. Stratford.

Brevi 3 metre power harrow

New Holland T4.75 PowerStar

$7,995 Fella SM320 KC

c/w Trima 220 FEL, 85 hp, 2934 hrs. 403777. Whangarei.

$37,000

$72,900 New Holland T7.200 PC

$25,000 Landini Atlantis 85

is still positive, although in the short term it will be important that building inventory levels start to come down from October onwards when Chinese domestic consumption rates of beef traditionally pick up. While US imported beef prices continue to

403233. Te Awamutu.

$19,500 Sam 10 cubic metre side feed wagon Tandem axles, scales in good condition. 402668. Morrinsville.

$26,500 Kubota U17-3

2015 model, hyd hitch, 900mm wide, 2212 hrs. 404066. Pukekohe. 19NWD081b

HC CBN0309-2


usiness ysts et outlooks

Rabobank supports clients from farm to fork in

40

RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

MARKETS & TRENDS 33

COUNTRIES

Content supplied by Rabobank – Grow with the bank founded by farmers for farmers sit well-above where they were a year ago, actual demand from importers is relatively soft, with ample domestic beef supplies deterring US buyers from importing New Zealand beef at current pricing levels.

Sheepmeat Rabobank expects some further upward pressure on farmgate prices over the last month of the 2018/19 season, as

supplies hit seasonal low levels. The exact degree of any price increases will likely vary between regions depending upon how local lamb availability aligns with processing capacity in those regions. Tighter-than-normal supplies through July continued to see farmgate prices make healthy gains over the last month, with prices in both islands now above the NZ$ 8 mark. A

s of the end of August, the slaughter price in the North Island averaged NZ$ 8.35/kg cwt (4% higher MOM), while South Island lamb averaged NZ$ 8.10/kg cwt (4% higher MOM). In the four weeks up to 27 July, the national lamb kill was down 14% on the same period last year. This is a result of having both a lower 2018/19 lamb crop, as well as disruptive climatic conditions distorting the normal timing of stock flow through different stages of the season. The YTD national lamb kill is down 6.7% YOY, meaning 1,216,137 fewer lambs have been killed so far this season. Overall, export market sentiment remains positive, although there is some divergence between how key markets are performing. While China’s strong demand and pricing shows no signs of waning in the immediate future, there are reports of some

weakening of demand out of the UK, continental European and the US.

Horticulture New Zealand fresh citrus exports rebounded to increase export receipts for the year end 30 June 2019. Opportunities also exist in other South-East Asian import markets that are rising rapidly for citrus imports. And, while off a low base, citrus exports are competing well in growth terms with the big export crops. Good import

demand growth from key markets US, China, and Japan helped lead a significant YOY rise in export receipts of around NZ$ 2.8m (+29%). New Zealand fresh lemon and lime producers have in particular enjoyed a strong export year to June 2019, with much of the strong overall citrus sector value growth coming from this group. Absolute export values grew in all key markets but with a strong rebound in US imports,

the market share of the US grew as a percentage of overall export receipts. And while Japan dropped market share in percentage terms, it remains the key export market for NZ citrus exports overall. Other markets across South-East Asia have continued to show strong import demand growth over the past five years. Meanwhile, citrus exports by value for New Zealand have performed well in comparison to the other key export sectors for New Zealand’s permanent horticultural tree crops, avocado, kiwifruit, apple and cherry.

Foreign exchange The NZ$ fell USc 2.5 against the US dollar in the month to 26 August, to reach just under USc 64 – its lowest level since September 2015. The slump in the NZ$ accompanied falling local and global stock markets (as investors exited riskier assets) and surging

bond yields and record gold prices (reflecting the flight of capital to safer investments). Investor concerns stemmed from a combination of poor economic data and a significant escalation in the USChina trade war. In a tumultuous month, Trump and China both ratcheted up tariffs to new highs. China allowed its currency to devalue, and ordered SOEs to stop buying US ag products. Trump ‘ordered’ American companies to “immediately start looking for alternatives to China”. Meanwhile, ongoing protests in Hong Kong raised concerns of how much worse things could still get if China opts for heavy-handed intervention and the US responds with yet more sanctions. Despite the sharp fall in the NZ$ through August, we still see further downside. Rabobank forecasts the NZ$ to hit USc 63 by August 2020.

Nurse’s love affair with mat stops back pain Twenty-five years of nursing had wrecked Caroline’s back. Chronic pain had forced her to stop working for the past two years. “I just hated having to accept this was as good as things were going to get for the rest of my life,” says Caroline. “I’m an outdoor person and I still had things that I wanted to do! “Being a nurse, I was aware the long-term side-effects of pain killers and anti-inflammatory were not good and create their own problems with the stomach and liver. I was desperate to get some relief and looking for some other way.” Clinic owner Hayley Brown still remembers the first phone call she got from Caroline in Christchurch. “She was a bit scary – skeptical and very grumpy from being in pain for such a long time. Like many people she was worn down to a nub just dealing with day to day life while living in a world of pain. When she purchased her QRS mat, she ended our phone call with a threat... ‘This better work!’ “We sent her the QRS home unit and two months went by without a word. Until one day I got a phone call and it was Caroline. She sounded a tad worked up and I immediately began preparing for the worst...” ‘Hayley’, she said, ‘That mat you sold me...!’ ‘Yes?’ ‘It’s bloody AMAZING!’ she said. ‘I was hoping for a reduction in pain but...I have NO pain, I just can’t believe it!’ Caroline had begun a long-lasting love affair with her QRS mat. Now wildly enthusiastic about the technology, she set about contacting other people involved in medicine to introduce them to this proven, effective and non-invasive treatment. “Coming from a hospital background, I could see applications for this technology throughout mainstream medicine. I wish rehab units and orthopedic surgeons would adopt QRS. Pulsed Electromagnetic Field therapy (PEMF) is long recognised to do wonders for bone,” Caroline says.

“QRS is a mainstream treatment in many countries. France, Germany, Austria, Canada, Israel; in those nations doctors will write you a PEMF prescription for back pain, arthritis, depressions, anxiety, high blood pressure,” says Hayley. “Our success rate is about 80% with chronic pain.” “QRS mats are designed to go in your bed - you sleep on them! You can travel with them too as they are easily transportable. You lie down on your mat, select the appropriate frequency and you treat yourself – it’s as easy as boiling the kettle” Hayley explains. “And remember, vets use them too – and there’s no placebo effect on a dog or horse!” “With sixty years of clinical evidence, there’s no argument, PEMF’s work! Yes, it is complicated – subatomic particles, pulsating electrons and protons, ionic transfers, you may not understand it, but that doesn’t mean it’s not effective” says Hayley. “Perhaps the best description for PEMF technology and its effects on the human body is to think in terms of a battery. A battery is designed to hold an electrical charge, when used, it discharges to the point of requiring recharging.” “Our body works in an identical fashion. We are electrical beings; every activity from opening your eyes in the morning to closing them at night is driven by electricity. Your cells, like batteries, have positive and negative polarity, they are bio-batteries! “When you injure yourself, your body must develop additional energy or voltage to drive the immune and repair processes. The older you get the slower and the longer it takes for the battery to recharge. When your ‘battery’ remains flat you may experience that as a nonhealing ulcer, a wound which won’t resolve, or no energy.” “PEMFs allow you to ‘plug yourself in’ to a proven, reliable and constant source of positive electromagnetic energy which recharges you cells, allowing you to heal faster.”

“If you are a doubter, simply do some research, type into your computer ‘PubMed’, then in the search box add ‘PEMF’ in upper case and you’ll see an extensive list of clinical trials for depression, fibromyalgia, arthritis, back pain to name a few. Remember it’s not the PEMFs that fixes these conditions...you do! You just need enough cellular charge to heal yourself – and that is what QRS has proven itself to do fantastically well.” We rent QRS home systems all over New Zealand – or purchase your own. Find us at www.healthevolution.co.nz Or phone our clinic in Kapiti, Wellington 04 298 6158.

MEDICAL DISCLAIMER Information and statements made on our website and all our associated literature are for educational purposes only and are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Hayley Brown and Health Evolution do not dispense medical advice, prescribe restricted medicines, or diagnose disease. If you have a medical condition, we recommend that you consult your physician of choice.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

34 OPINION EDITORIAL

EDNA

Butt out! POLITICIAN SHANE Jones says his position as Associate Minister of SOEs, including Landcorp (Pāmu), gives him the right to have a crack at the quality of Fonterra’s farmer governance. He would do well to look in his own backyard, or ministerial portfolios, for evidence of underperformance before attacking a privately owned company. Landcorp just posted a net loss after tax of $11 million, quite a turnaround from the $34m net profit last year. Jones is noticeably quiet about this, preferring to draw attention to his favourite whipping horse, Fonterra. Landcorp says the loss was due largely to a $22 million “fair value loss” on the valuation of livestock and forestry assets at June 30, 2019. The comparable result for 2017-18 included a $25m “fair value gain” on biological assets. Chairman Warren Parker and chief executive Steven Carden said net profit suffered from the impact of the valuation write-downs. Revenue was impacted by lower milk production due to drought. “Like other New Zealand farmers, Pāmu saw relatively high dairy and red meat prices through 2018-19 which were offset by weather extremes lowering production volumes,” said Parker. “Most notably, summer and autumn rainfall was significantly below average across the North Island and parts of the South Island.” Total revenue was down 2.4% to $241m (201718: $247m) because of lower milk, livestock and carbon credit revenues. Carbon credit revenue of $3m from a recent allocation of carbon units is less than half of that received last year ($8m). Somewhat ironically, the company has declared a special dividend of $5m, largely due to a one off gain made on the sale of the company’s shares in Westland Dairy Cooperative. Jones has also attacked the quality of governance and recent sale of Westland. Pamu’s poor result on behalf of its owner, the taxpayer, deserves an explanation from the ministers responsible, especially given the ongoing poor return on capital of this state owned asset. Don’t expect one from Jones. Much easier to use Landcorp’s shareholding in Fonterra as an excuse to continue his attack on a farmer owned, private asset and use his power to issue veiled threats about forcing changes to DIRA. Fonterra is being held to account by its shareholders. And if accountability is the call, how about running the rule over outcomes from the Provincial Growth Fund -- Jones’ personal $3b slush fund?

RURALNEWS TO ALL FARMERS, FOR ALL FARMERS

HEAD OFFICE POSTAL ADDRESS: PO Box 331100, Takapuna, Auckland 0740 PUBLISHER: Brian Hight ......................................... Ph 09 307 0399 GENERAL MANAGER: Adam Fricker ....................................... Ph 09 913 9632 CONSULTING EDITOR: David Anderson .................................. Ph 09 307 0399 davida@ruralnews.co.nz

“You anti-vaccination people should be ashamed of yourselves!”

Want to share your opinion or gossip with the Hound? Send your emails to: hound@ruralnews.co.nz

THE HOUND Making it up

He/she/it

What a jerk

Quota watch

THIS OLD mutt is unsurprised that the highly paid mouthpieces at the multinational, tax dodging eco-terrorism group Greenpeace continue making stuff up to fit its anti-farming narrative. The latest example followed a recent IPPC report -- ‘Climate Change and Land’: the Dutch headquartered lobby group repeated its call for the New Zealand Government to halve the national cow herd and ban synthetic nitrogen fertiliser. But your old mate and many others note that the IPCC report made no such call. In fact it recommends that low emission meat and dairy products – such as those produced by NZ farmers – are among the answers to addressing global climate change. The Hound reckons it’s long past time some Kiwi media called out Greenpeace’s lies instead of swallowing and repeating its patently false PR statements.

YOUR CANINE crusader is sure readers will be comforted to know that the gender diversity of New Zealanders will in future be better reflected in statistics. According to Stats NZ: “Starting this year, the household surveys will ask people to describe their gender – whether that is male, female or whether they see themselves another way, such as one of many non-binary genders.” Apparently, until now, the boffins at Stats NZ … “have been relying on our survey interviewers to describe a person as male or female”. Apparently, Stats NZ is now hoping this new information – combined with a question about sex at birth – “will help to ensure that the transgender population is better reflected in the data collected”. While Stats NZ can’t run a census properly, at least we know that the trans numbers of NZ will now be top notch.

YOUR OLD mate notes that serial whinger Mike Joy continues to put the boot into the farming sector. This time he’s gone international, with an ‘opinion’ piece recently published on The New York Times website. Joy and co-writer David Larsen (a film critic on the left wing millennials blog The Spinoff) claim that Canterbury’s “freshwater easily ranks among the worst environmental disasters in New Zealand history,” in their piece titled ‘The Incontinent Cows of Middle-Earth’. And this is not the first time Joy has committed such ‘economic treason’ against NZ. About a decade ago, he gave a BBC journalist similarly overly sensationalised and simplified claims about the country’s freshwater status for the Pommy’s hit-job interview with then PM John Key.

THE HOUND understands that Mike Petersen’s time as NZ agriculture’s special trade envoy will soon end. Your old mate hears that a number of quisling mates of the current administration are lining up for the role, with rumours rife of a very close confidante – described as the favourite bootlicker of the agriculture minister – being Damien O’Connor’s preferred candidate. Unfortunately for the aforementioned sycophant and O’Connor, this favoured contender is male, pale and stale and – as we all know – this government is hellbent on having gender, race and sexuality quotas when appointing such roles. So this old mutt suggests that any minority race, wheelchair-bound lesbians keen on international trade should get their CVs in pronto.

PRODUCTION: Dave Ferguson ........................Ph 09 913 9633 davef@ruralnews.co.nz Becky Williams ........................Ph 09 913 9634 beckyw@ruralnews.co.nz REPORTERS: Sudesh Kissun ....................... Ph 09 913 9627 Pamela Tipa ............................ Ph 021 842 220 Peter Burke .............................Ph 06 362 6319 Nigel Malthus ...................... Ph 021 164 4258 MACHINERY EDITOR: Mark Daniel ............................. Ph 021 906 723 or 07 824 1190 SUB-EDITOR: Neil Keating ............................Ph 09 913 9628

AUCKLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Stephen Pollard ....Ph 09 913 9637/021 963 166 stephenp@ruralnews.co.nz

WELLINGTON SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ron Mackay ......... Ph 04 234 6239/021 453 914 ronm@ruralnews.co.nz

WAIKATO SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Ted Darley .......... Ph 07 854 6292/021 832 505 ted@ruralnews.co.nz

SOUTH ISLAND SALES REPRESENTATIVE: Kaye Sutherland Ph 03 337 3828/021 221 1994 kayes@ruralnews.co.nz

ABC audited circulation 79,553 as at 31/03/2019

DIGITAL STRATEGIST: Jessica Wilson ........................ Ph 09 913 9621

Rural News is published by Rural News Group Ltd. All editorial copy and photographs are subject to copyright and may not be reproduced without prior written permission of the publisher. Opinions or comments expressed within this publication are not necessarily those of staff, management or directors of Rural News Group Ltd.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

OPINION 35

Zero debate on climate change DOUG EDMEADES

THE MEDIA have a vital role to play in a progressive, open democracy. Its job has been variously described as ‘to serve the truth’ or ‘to provide the balance of opinion’. At least that is the theory, the intention and what society has come to accept. But NZ Herald on March 6, 2019 said in a headline: ‘Media should

The media, and indeed sections of the public and academia, reinforce and control this blinkered vision with their choice of words. Those who do not agree with them are called ‘deniers’. It is a label they would readily apply to me. I am a climate sceptic as defined in the dictionary: ‘a person unconvinced of a particular fact, theory or hypothesis’. So what is it that I am scep-

‘We welcome robust debate about the appropriate response to climate change, but we do not intend to provide a venue for denialism or hoax advocacy.” not give climate deniers a platform’. Then came the statement: ‘To allow climate denial is totally irresponsible for the general public and particularly for our children and grandchildren’. Stuff was more explicit: ‘Stuff accepts the overwhelming scientific consensus that climate change is real and caused by human activity. ‘We welcome robust debate about the appropriate response to climate change, but we do not intend to provide a venue for denialism or hoax advocacy. ‘That applies equally to the stories we will publish in ‘Quick! Save the Planet and to our moderation standards for reader comment’. This same media platform dutifully gave wholesome encouragement to our millennials when they marched and placarded NZ-wide demanding greater action on climate change. In praising their efforts, Stuff expressed the view that the millennials are well informed. This extends logically to regional authorities. The public assumes they are well informed when declaring a ‘climate emergency’ on their patch. Can you spot the incongruity? How can millennials and regional authorities be well informed on this issue if the media are publishing only one side of the argument? It is more than a bias.

tical about? I accept that the climate undergoes changes – it always has and it always will, and these fluctuations occurred long before humans arrived and long before they discovered fossil fuels. No denial there. This fact, readily discernible from the geological record, suggests that there are other mechanisms – other than the greenhouse gas effect of carbon dioxide and methane – which affect the temperature of the earth. Many have been suggested and some are being investigated. I am also a member of the NZ Climate Science Coalition (NZCSC), a network of normal, honest, intelligent, Kiwi professionals who, like me, are sceptical. This coalition in turn, networks with international groups of scientists. Day after day I am exposed to articles and science papers questioning the CO2 global warming hypothesis. (So much for consensus). The public does not hear about these alternative possibilities because, for the media and a cohort of scientists with their heads in the research money trough, that would contradict the carbon dioxide narrative. So, who is denying what? The question is not, ‘does the climate change?’ but more precisely, ‘is there any evidence that humans are having a dis-

cernible effect over and above the ‘noise’ – the natural cycles?’ On behalf of the coalition, I wrote to Sir Peter Gluckman, the previous science advisor to the Prime Minister, and to the president of the NZ Royal Society, suggesting that this whole topic should be opened

Doug Edmeades

for debate, in the grand tradition of science. No progress. Astoundingly, members of the coalition wrote to the NZ Royal Society and to the IPCC asking for the specific evidence, apart from the output of models, proving the theory of dangerous man-made global

warming. No evidence has been forthcoming. Yet New Zealand is soon to vote on a Zero Carbon Bill. The intention is to become carbon neutral by year 2050. The NZ Institute of Economic Research estimates that this will cost about $28 billion per year to achieve

50% of the target by 2050 or, if we go the whole hog, $85b per year. It would cripple our economy. I think it is about time we had an open debate about the need for it. What do you reckon? • Dr Doug Edmeades, MSc (Hons), PhD, Dip Management.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

36 OPINION

We are not quislings or sellouts ANDREW MORRISON and JIM VAN DER POEL

THE SUGGESTION that groups such as DairyNZ and Beef + Lamb NZ are selling the sector out over agricultural emissions is way off the mark and fails to grasp the complexity of the issue. (‘Sellouts?’ – Rural News, 16 August). We accept these are difficult and challenging

times for farmers and the sector, but it’s vital the industry works together to achieve the best possible outcome. Farmers have very clearly and repeatedly asked us to work together, and we agree we’re more powerful as a united voice. Our bottom line is to

DRAINAGE AND SOIL AERATION PAY BIG DIVIDENDS

ensure that sheep, beef and dairy farmers can continue to have sustainable and profitable farming businesses and that is what we are working towards. If we collectively get this right, then farmers will continue to have sustainable businesses into the future and our industries will continue to be global leaders.

AERATORS

NOW AVAILABLE, 5, 6 OR 7 LEG MODELS

Don’t put good fertiliser on compacted soil which can’t absorb it. If your soil can’t support 15cm root growth and good worm population check for compaction. You could need aeration. In dollar terms, what would 20% production increase mean to your yearly turnover?

HEAVY DUTY AUTO RESET

MOLEPLOUGH

YOUR GREATEST ASSET IS THE SOIL YOU FARM. DON’T DESTROY IT!

• SOIL AERATION SPECIALISTS •

PRE RIPPERS

MAITLAND RD5, GORE. PH/FAX 03-207 1837 OR 027-628 5695 www.james-engineering.co.nz

Andrew Morrison

Jim van der Poel

Of course these are difficult issues, opinions will differ and there will be disagreements within the sector, but these differences are at the margins. There is in fact broad agreement within the sector on most of the Zero Carbon Bill. We all support the split gas approach -- the net zero target for nitrous oxide and carbon dioxide being reduced to net zero by 2050. We all agree that the proposed 24-47% reduction range for methane is unacceptable. The science on methane is evolving and so there are some nuances in our positions, but we are all fundamentally in the same ballpark and all far away from what the Government is proposing. It is unhelpful to suggest that we are collaborators with the enemy. We stand up to the Gov-

ernment when we don’t agree and advocate what we believe is in farmers best interests. On many occasions each of our organisations has publicly questioned the Government’s approach. We have also spent a lot of time supporting farmers to make practical changes and highlighting to the Government and to New Zealanders the great strides farmers are making in reducing their emissions, improving water quality, soil health and biodiversity. These things matter to New Zealanders and to our customers globally. If we ignore these we risk losing our social licence to operate. Throwing stones, slamming our fists and stamping our feet may gain some temporary satisfaction. But in our experience, it’s ineffective in advocacy, risks destroying

any chance of policy gains and alienates New Zealanders – the very people we need to convince. In fact, what we hear from many farmers is that they want us to engage and find solutions and not just dig in. The rest of the country is closely following many of these issues. How we engage publicly is vital. That’s why from the outset we have been working constructively with the Government to help create the best possible policy outcomes for farmers. BLNZ and DairyNZ have long term strategies that drive what both our organisations do in this space. We’re not just thinking about tomorrow, we’re thinking 20 to 30 years ahead to the next generation of farmers. We work for farmers’ collective interests

to ensure their voice is heard in a range of areas including the environment, trade policy, resource management, biosecurity, animal welfare and food safety. We also recognise we must be responsible and prudent with farmers’ money. We’re always looking for efficiencies and driving the dollar further. Importantly, every six years farmers have an opportunity to have their say on BLNZ and DairyNZ and to signal their support for continued investment. We’re committed to playing our role in tackling climate change and advocating for all New Zealanders to do their share. We don’t want to be on the wrong side of history. • Andrew Morrison is chair of Beef + Lamb NZ and Jim van der Poel is chair of DairyNZ.

Farm mowers that are simple, robust, reliable, and versatile MAXAM Mowers have a tough belt drive and rugged construction to absorb the knocks of mowing and topping. Clean mowing and effective spreading create high quality forage. Toppings decompose quickly, enriching the soil. A proven all-round mower that staff find safe and easy to use.

MAXAM Mowers and Toppers

For more info visit www.farmgear.co.nz or give us a call on 0800 36 27 76


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

OPINION 37

For the world’s sake – get it right JOHN JACKSON

‘POLICY ON the fly’ has never been a good option and our Government appears to be combining this with ideology at the forefront and common sense trailing behind. The reality is that the global warming ‘bull’ has already escaped from the yards into the china shop and we need to get it back in the yards, whilst incurring as little damage as possible. The planning of this manoeuvring must not be rushed. It is, after all, a long term project. Much has been written about the idiocy of directly taxing at farm level purely on the quantity of methane emissions and N fertiliser only to have a less efficient producer pick up our shortfall elsewhere in the world. Hopefully those that govern us – and those that represent our industries – can be convinced that haste is not the issue here, but that direction is. Effective policy with regard to carbon dioxide is not to remove your most efficient hybrid cars from the road is it? Therefore, let’s slow down, take a deep breath, and have some sense on methane and the potential removal of a large quantity of New Zealand’s agricultural produce from world trade as a direct result of the proposed tax. Thinking clearly on ‘cause and effect’ both within this country and internationally, the aim should not be to exacerbate this global warming effect by rash implementation of the wrong policy. The correct policy here would be to have the greater good of the world in mind. While we are in an enviable position, we cannot rest on our laurels. In the interests of further improving our efficiency we must continue and – if possible – accelerate the good work

now being done to find effective mitigation techniques and solutions. Take note of what we have learnt over time on the effectiveness of techniques such as riparian planting and wetland development on mitigating sediment, phosphorus and nitrogen losses within our on farm systems. The science and techniques are now proven. However, it has been a 10-year-plus process from development to measurement. We already hold a position in the top quartile of efficiency for pastoral production. We have been blessed with a climate that generally aids farming and we have developed systems to utilise this. This is our country’s natural advantage, and we have every right to be proud of that, to utilise it to our own benefit and to the benefit of the world. Our agricultural industry representatives need to be strong in their resolve over GHGs. If you were to believe the hype from government officials, the speed at which Beef + Lamb NZ and DairyNZ appeared to have acquiesced in agreement with Government ideology has surprised and disappointed most farmers. I am told by industry representatives that this is not so. I have yet to be convinced and would argue strongly that any concession is on ideology rather than in the interests of cooling the world. Greenhouse gas emissions are a global problem. There is no reason to ‘lead the world’ if we lead them in the wrong direction. Every country has the responsibility to assess their needs on an individual basis, but they should make decisions in the best interests of the world. From an agricultural perspective, countries that emit the greatest footprint per kg of product need to be at the forefront of such innovation and mitigation. After all

theirs is the most pressing need. NZ might be the first in the world to see the sun, but for the world’s sake it needs to be

amongst the last to make significant changes to the nature of its pastoral agriculture. • John Jackson completed a Bachelor of Agricultural

Commerce at Lincoln University and read social studies at Oxford (philosophy, politics and economics). He farms sheep and beef at Te Akau.

John Jackson

Hits weeds harder and faster Use Hammer® Force with glyphosate for better control and faster brownout of broadleaf weeds including some hard-to-kill-weeds such as mallows, nettles, willow weed, staggerweed, water pepper. Get your crop into the ground faster with Nil grazing withholding after application and Nil withholding after application for establishing a crop. Visit www.fmccrop.nz for more information.

ALWAYS READ AND FOLLOW LABEL DIRECTIONS. Copyright © 2019. All rights reserved. Hammer Force® is a registered trademark of FMC Corporation or its affiliates.

FMC New Zealand Limited Phone: 0800 658 080 www.fmccrop.nz

FMC New Zealand Limited Phone: 0800 658 080 www.fmccrop.nz


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

OPINION 39

Clearer understanding of water needed NEW ZEALANDERS like their rivers to be clear, to be able to see through the water to the bottom. A NZ Institute of Economic Research (NZIER) survey last year asked people to choose between 20% of rivers being swimmable and clear or 40% being swimmable but muddy. Most people chose clear. NZIER mused that the result might reflect an idealised view, perhaps stretching back into their childhood, that seeing the rocks/stones signified what a river should look like. NIWA scientist Dr John Quinn (died November 2018) suggested as much in 2017. In the June NIWA magazine he wrote that ‘people think they remember what water looked like in their childhood, but they do so through rose-

coloured spectacles’. He reminded readers that water quality in most rivers is now considerably better than during the 1960s. His comment was about water quality in general, not sediment in particular, but it is sediment that is increasingly of concern. An investigation by Waikato Regional Council last year ranked sediment management as of most importance for rivers, followed by riparian, instream and then nutrient management. Fish and Game river ecologists agree. The problem with sediment is that it gets in between stones, fills up the gaps that could otherwise be hiding places for small organisms and smothers plants which provide food. But sediment is natural. It is part of

The challenge is for presentday producers of food and fibre to mitigate the actions of their forefathers, using the best available research. COMMENT

Jacqueline Rowarth the formation of rivers as well as the landscape. Over time, rivers create gorges, waterfalls, banks and plains as they flow from source to sea. Sir David Attenborough has described the process of rivers in The Living Planet, explaining that ‘young rivers are by nature vigorous and dangerous: they flow fast and form rapids, thick with mud and sediment’. In New Zealand, with regular and frequent earthquakes, plus volca-

nic activity, and heavy rainfall in some areas, sediment is part of our heritage. But the legacy of settlement and development, whether hill country, housing or highways… is increased sediment. Soils without their original vegetation are vulnerable. Measurements in Auckland in the 1990s indicated sediment load from urbanising areas was 50 times greater than from pasture. Techniques of building have improved since then, but anybody now passing by a motorway construction site after heavy rain may

see that problems still exist, new technologies or not. NIWA has estimated that sediment has increased from less than 1mm per year prior to human settlement, to 2-5mm per year. The challenge is for present-day producers of food and fibre to mitigate the actions of their forefathers, using the best available research. Dr Mike Dodd and coauthors from AgResearch and NIWA, have reviewed the options. In a paper for the Grassland Association Hill Country Symposium in 2016, Dodd concluded that cul-

Fodder beet has become the winter feed of choice on many farms around New Zealand due to its superior yield capacity, feed quality and bulb storage ability. And Geronimo has become a leading fodder beet variety based on consistent performance in the field, strict seed quality control, very good bolting tolerance and disease resistance. Geronimo is a mono-germ fodder beet with a yellow – orange tankard shaped bulb of medium dry matter content (15-17%) that sits approximately 45% above the ground. Geronimo can be grazed in-situ, or lifted and fed whole or chopped. It is suitable for sheep, cattle and deer. Geronimo seed has gone through strict quality control programmes to ensure only the highest quality seed is supplied. It has been pre-screened to minimize the incidence of ‘genetic’ bolters, and to remove any potential contaminant weed seed. AVAILABLE FROM YOUR LOCAL FARM MERCHANDISE OUTLETS AND SEED RETAILERS For further information contact us on freephone 0800 427 676 or contact our local agronomy team member: North Island: James Bryan Tel. 0272 354989 Upper South Island: John Pedofsky Tel. 0274 344495 Lower South Island: Richard Moate Tel. 0274 327868

YEARS ANNIVERSARY

100 % NZ OWNED

New Zealand’s only remaining 100% New Zealand owned forage grass and brassica breeding and marketing company.

verts and bridges had a relatively high effect on reducing sediment, whereas riparian fencing had a low effect. Both were estimated to cost thousands of dollars per hectare. And, as indicated by Sir David Attenborough, at least some sediment is part of nature. Indeed, Professor James Brasington, Waikato Regional Council chair of river science at the University of Waikato, has stated publicly that ‘New Zealanders are in danger of creating zombie rivers, not because of nutrient overloading but because we’re locking our waterways into positions between stop-banks and impounding the headwaters.’ Brasington, suggested we should be allowing rivers to erode their corridors and flood naturally.

Erosion on river banks is sediment in waterways. Clearly the issues are complex. Public concern could be questioned given the result from NZIER that 60% of the general public would not be prepared to pay a levy of $50 a year to improve flora and fauna affected by sediment. However, farmers are doing what they can to reduce the current impact of past action. The LAWA 2018 report indicated that they are having an effect: fewer than 10% of rivers are deteriorating whereas 25% are improving. As new technologies become available, more improvements will occur. But rivers without sediment would not be natural. • Jacqueline Rowarth, CNZM CRSNZ HFNZIAHS, has a PhD in soil science.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

40 MANAGEMENT

Hawke’s Bay shepherd seizes his opportunities CHRIS HURSTHOUSE (22) is proof you don’t have to grow up on a farm to succeed in farming. He is a shepherd for the R+C Buddo Trust at Poukawa, near Hastings. And he chairs Tikokino Young Farmers, a position he took last October. Hursthouse has been in his current job at Poukawa for one year. Finishing 12,000 lambs through the winter and spring, and 3000 more in the summer and autumn, is no easy feat. “There are three of us plus the boss, and we get together weekly to determine what needs to be

done and set a plan.” His day can include weighing or drenching lambs, shifting stock or repairing fences. “In spring we spend a lot of time weighing and drafting lambs,” he said. “September, October and November are our biggest months when we’re supplying lambs weekly to the meat works.” The trust finishes 15,000 lambs and 500 bulls a year on four blocks totalling 825ha. All the animals are used to being around people. “The operation has a big emphasis on using plantain and clover forage crops to fatten lambs,”

says Hursthouse. “Plantain grows really well here through the autumn and spring with stock finishing exceptionally well on it.” Hursthouse was recently named winner of the inaugural Hawke’s Bay Shepherd of the Year award. He put himself forward for the title, part of the Hawke’s Bay Primary Sector Awards, after seeing a post on social media. He says he found the application and judging a beneficial exercise which encouraged him to think about his future.  “As part of the application process I had to

submit a CV, a cover letter and a five year career plan,” he explains. “It made me stop and think where I’d like to be in five years and what I have to do to ensure I achieve my goals.” On a rapid rise through the industry, Hursthouse was raised on a lifestyle block and attended Lindisfarne College. A “passion for being outside and for animals” led him to study through Taratahi to gain basic farm skills.  He landed his first summer job in Ongaonga. He then took the plunge to dramatically grow his knowledge by taking a

While not originally from a farm, Chris Hursthouse has carved out a rewarding career in the agriculture industry.

job in Kereru, working on two farms. It was a great way to learn from different farmers. One property was a sheep and beef breeding and finishing farm, the other a large scale deer breeding, finishing and velveting property.   “I’d never seen a deer until I started working at that farm,” he said. “It was a good way to gain a broad range of skills and understand different aspects of farming production.”

Hursthouse also enjoys getting involved in his local community as chair of NZ Young Farmers at Tikokino. “NZ Young Farmers clubs are a great way for young people, especially those new to an area or working in isolated jobs, to make friends.” As a past student of Taratahi, Hursthouse was saddened to hear about the education provider’s demise. “It can be a struggle to get into the primary

industries if you’re not from a farm,” he said. “Taratahi played a vital role in giving young people training and an understanding of basic skills to help launch their careers. Its closure has left a big gap that needs to be filled.” His advice for young urbanites considering a career on the land is to work for progressive employers who embrace new ideas. Hursthouse’s goal is to one day buy a farm.

PUSHBACK ON DISEASE AFFECTING BRASSICA CROPS

TR ROTOWIPER

Trailing model towed by a 4 wheel bike

FANTASTIC NEW FEATURES!

• Single height adjustment • Roller drive disengagement • Fold-up drawbar • Tank leveller adjustment

• New strong design frame • New stub axle hub arrangement • All covers now stainless steel

Rotovacuum: 350lt bin, Stihl BG86 blower motor. Great suction to clean your paddock or garden.

Rotocart: RC270, RC300 & RC500. 3 sizes, super strong rotationally moulded in our factory.

48 Bremners Road PO Box 333 Ashburton www.rotowiper.com P: 03-308 4497 M: 027-311 9471 E: rotowipersales1@gmail.com

A TEAM led by Punjab Agricultural University, India, with researchers from The University of Western Australia, reports a breakthrough in disease resistance in brassica crops. Brassica is an important genus of plants in the mustard family. Varieties commonly used for food include broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, turnip and – especially – oilseed crops for producing canola oil and the condiment mustard. The researchers claim their findings will lead to advances that strengthen crops against attack from Sclerotinia stem rot. This disease is particularly damaging to brassica crops such as canola and mustard, causing major yield losses worldwide. The study, recently published in the journal Frontiers in Plant Science, describes genetic markers associated with resistance against the Sclerotinia stem rot disease in Brassica juncea (Indian mustard). Professor Martin Barbetti from the UWA School of Agriculture and Environment and Institute of Agriculture says that managing Sclerotinia stem rot could be achieved by the genetic resistance present within brassica crops. “Developing crops with greater disease resistance is the only effective avenue for long term, cost effective management of this devastating, world-

Professors Martin Barbetti and Surinder Banga with brassica crops.

wide pathogen. “Our research has opened the way for deployment of the introgressed resistance genes from wild weedy Brassicas into a wide range of high-yielding cultivars, of B. juncea initially and, subsequently, into canola and other crop and horticultural brassica species.” Barbetti believes this breakthrough has benefits for agriculture in NZ, Australia and India. “Brassica juncea is the premier

oilseed crop of India and has great potential for drier regions in Australia,” he explains. “This research will provide the opportunity to develop disease resistance in other Brassica crops, such as canola, the major oilseed crop in Australia and NZ.” The study was supported by the Department of Biotechnology, Government of India, the Indian Council of Agricultural Research and The University of Western Australia.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

MANAGEMENT 41

B

E

Catch-ups can be used to mop up excess nutrients following winter grazing.

R

related. “Once the soil temperatures warm up enough to start the oats growing, it is exactly the same time as the nitrification process kicks into gear.” Oats, with their larger seed, are also more robust and have deep roots to capture the soil N. Carey says one of the challenges with catch-crops is having the ability to get the crop established in winter-

ROOD

300kg N/ha sitting there with nothing to take it up.” Carey says although they are comparing triticale and Italian ryegrass as part of the catch-crop trial, oats are ideal because they are more winter active, and therefore are growing when the bugs in the soil start turning the ammonium from the deposited urine into nitrate. The whole process is temperature

Y A

RELLO

R

A R XT

E NG R I CI W N wet soils. Last winter was particularly E favourable, but comparisons between

F

EGA N IA LIOC RD

RETA

KNAT

T N E C LU NG S N I A OF R T O GN I R EPI PN ETTUG WOD &

Peter Carey, a field research scientist with Lincoln Agritech, who is doing the three year SFF project, says they have three trial sites in Canterbury and two in Southland, all on commercial farms. Last year four out of the five trials were very successful which reinforced the value of catch-crops as part of a crop rotation. “Catch-crops increase the efficiency of the operation by retaining N in the system which farmers would otherwise have waved goodbye to.” Carey says forage crops can yield 15-25t DM and carry a lot of stock in a small area at a time of very low plant growth. This means a lot of urea is sitting in the soil which will be turned into ammonium and then nitrified to nitrate, the most mobile form of N. “While they are on relatively small areas, these crops are potentially big sources of N loss and can have up to

CATCH-CROPS ARE sown as early as possible after a winter feed crop has been grazed, with the aim of mopping up excess nutrients in the soil before they disappear over or down the soil profile and make their way into waterways. Early results from the first year of a Ministry for Primary Industries Sustainable Farming Fund (SFF) project – which is looking at using catch crops to mitigate nitrate (N) leaching during winter forage grazing – has shown that the inclusion of a catch-crop (such as greenfeed oats) can generate a gross profit of $2500/ha. That is from a 12 tonne dry matter (DM) per hectare crop harvested in November (range 8-12 t/ha). The DM is valued at 25c/kg. In this particular example – where oats were sown into a grazed kale paddock in mid July – the oats pulled up 223kg N/ha N that would potentially have been lost to the environment.

W

Catch-crops could rise in importance in crop rotations, particularly as the regulatory spotlight lights up the environmental impact of winter feed crops.

REB GN I C M I T NE F

Bottom-line and environmental benefits

conventional cultivation and direct drilling (with minimal passes) showed that while initially the conventionally worked crops looked to be ahead of the direct drill treatments, by harvest there was little – less than one tonne – difference in yield. “It was a bit surprising and of course the direct drilling was cheaper, so if conditions allow, the direct drill looks to be the best option.” Conventional cultivation also accelerates the nitrification process so there is potentially greater N loss from the cultivated soils before the crop is established. One of the exciting finds last winter was the use of a one-pass inversion or spader drill in the Gore tillage trial. This drill enabled establishment seven weeks earlier than the conventional cultivation/drilling treatments and resulted in significantly greater DM production and N uptake. This year Carey will compare cultivation techniques again but also investigating different crop mixes comparing oats only with an oats-Italian ryegrass Y mix.

S E AT

N O

C

G

LL A

LANRE

WE’VE GOT LLAW

YOU COVERED

A IN IL A R CO

D

www.placemakers.co.nz | 0800 PLACEMAKERS

B AL S E TERC

ERIW GN I C NE

F

NOC

SETA

G

YA B A RTX E

TNEC ULSNA GN I F R T OOR

SHEDS

T NI

G E W N A I IP B L R P A A T E EN XTRN C E IR T WN Y U R L W A S R T O N W E B A ING E U D N R R G T A N I E R E T T F T GU ENT N S L UXC F F TR RE NG R AIN G& LL OO ROO T I E P PI N W Y O E I & DO T W C R D BNA R OOFING E C EN A U EXTRA B R G F SL T G UTTERING N G UG T N N E G T TUETRTING C N AX FI L U C E N T ER ANSLU IN E TNRG RI RE E P K E P ANS N R RI A T E T T T T I DOWNPI T U R G T E T & G P PE WA D&OWD OO N TOPW PI I N F N O N O R RANSLUCENT N I T P U E R G E E N P I F I P KOW O G D N O R & DO W UC YI N G IRNAG AF OO TTER U E XTRARB G & AN T L N YE N T SL LU AC U N SB C AA E RR N G T T XT S E E T P PI N B N N W O G TMABNEKR RTOROAFNING A FI & D G UTTRERIN FING EXTRA T O N O E R C U L S R TA N K R I N G T OO PI E NT EER EEWRU K NE AP TT N CING & NG IR TOG ANSLUCENT O O FT R WAD R R E L E L G P O R N PI TE I N R W A E O E T N K & DG U T T G E C R G N U I L F S O Y N E O N A A R TR XTERXAT R NAP BA K LLER A YB T OR TAW O NIPI ONCABON D TOEWRR PNEE A D & W C G R I N S O I Y F ROO E W IRSE L C E XATTERA B A OR TE NP R KABTE O AN R TT T IWM D S W G E XTAFTREETANECBIANYG R GU DO R E E TE L FRENTCAINNKGROMRLBLNEE GR ROL & LER L R O G R R I T O R E K O C N O LLER DOOR R TAB DI WATEG G ALL ON OOR N D I C C N E M W R F C E DOOR R N EI N R OLLER NAL B NG LE R I RI IP T E L C ESLL N TE NP RR F TE ONO D E RO OO LLER O R T W I R EF I A WA K T W D G N G OLLE OR A RL DOR G AL DO DRAI NAGER TA S IN N AFTEENC N G I R E R L I L R O R O O DA O E AL W AL L C O IALTE TRN N TE I N C R R DOO I W R D E L R LL AT E S L A G O O GE GE E SE S LAB GATES ATET GCR W DRAINA GER DO ON CW AL L W AL RN TE N I L L AL L ON CR ET C AL W A R AL L NI L N TENRN A AL INTERN G I EC IO A N B L RI OI M C DRAINAGE ER N C TI ED T E RN AL W AL L COIL NT F I I N T E R N A LINW A L L S E T A G GATright ES Talk to our team for professional advice onL the shed Afor you. TE S L AL W AL A GE INTERN S ON C RE T EC G CONCRE L your requirements. W ALto LI N A GEWe can supply kit sets or help you design RN ALbuild RIA INTEand GTAETSELSACBON CR E C ON C O IL WI NTERI N G SH EDS • H AY E N TE RN AL W AL L G BA RNS • STO R AGE SH EDS • STA BLES •ISECU RE LO CK- U PS • WO RKSH O PS • C A R P O RTS


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

42 ANIMAL HEALTH

Multi-prong attack in combatting worms CHANGES IN a farm’s land use or policies which result in it having mostly young livestock could be disastrous in promoting the development of drench resistance. Ben Allott, of North Canterbury Vets, says sheep and beef farmers are often encouraged to use triple active drenches to get around drench resistance issues. But this ignores a need for changes that would address the fundamental causes of an environment in which drench resistance occurs. Stocking policies that drive a reliance on chemicals to control internal parasites create the perfect environment for breeding drench resistant worms. These include intensive lamb finishing operations, particularly under irrigation and dairy heifer grazing. A 50:50 cattle/sheep ratio is very effective at controlling internal parasites, with each species effectively vacuuming up the other’s species specific worm larvae off pasture. Farming systems that target adult animals and run relatively low numbers of young stock, such as hill country breeding and store properties, will also be at lower risk of developing drench resistance than finishing farms or farms with a dedicated intensive finishing system within them, says Allott. “When stocking ratios are out of balance and you have 100% sheep or cattle, or just young animals, it forces you to use a lot of

What’s Wormwise? Wormwise is part of the industrys work to develop a national worm management strategy. This involves managing and integrating research work, education, communication and extension services for farmers, veterinarians, key influencers and retailers. Beef + Lamb NZ runs the Wormwise workshops which can be held on request.

chemical to control parasites,” he said. He says refugia is critical to prevent drench resistance, but insists that it is a complex issue that can be difficult to fully understand. Put simply, refugia is implementing stock management strategies that enable populations of drench susceptible worms to be maintained and critical to prevent drench resistance occurring. But these strategies must be fully understood and implemented correctly, so Allott encourages farmers to attend a Wormwise workshop to gain a clear understanding of this vital management tool. “Refugia must be a focus,” he said.

He says the provision of ‘clean’ feeds, eg summer rape crops and lucerne stands, can allow the interval between lamb drenches to be extended. The 28 day rule is to prevent pasture recontamination. “But again, this is just another tool to effectively control internal parasites and needs to be managed correctly.” Allott says faecal egg counts (FEC) are not a simple measure of internal parasite burdens because other factors, eg worm species and the feed the animal has been eating, can have a big influence on egg counts. A low drymatter feed, for example, will dilute the number of eggs. “FEC is a convenient, easy tool but a lot of factors influence it,” he said. “If you are relying on FECs to drive the timing of drench decisions you need to repeat them frequently otherwise you will miss the boat.” Allott is also concerned that

many sheep and beef farmers don’t know whether they have drench resistance on their properties and may be using drenches that are not effective. “This can be determined very simply with a FEC reduction test and having an understanding of the resistance or susceptibility status of the worm population on an individual farm. It will be central to developing a long-term strategy for the control of production limiting internal parasites.” Allott believes genetics are also crucial to long term management of internal parasites. “Genetics are going to be a huge part of the solution.” He points out that it takes 10 years before genetic traits such as resistance and or resilience become firmly established in a ewe flock, so farmers need to start exploring genetics long before they need it to manage internal parasites.

NEW STANDARDS TO IMPROVE TRACEABILITY OSPRI SAYS new NAIT standards and guidelines will bring added value for farmers. It also claims that other NAIT users – such as tag manufacturers, accredited entities and information providers – will all now come under greater scrutiny. These changes come after the recent NAIT standards consultation. “The three new standards will mean more targeted performance and monitoring of third-party information providers to NAIT, says head of NAIT Kevin Forward. “These will also provide more accountability on livestock data transfer and privacy with formal contracts, regular audits, and renewal of accreditation every three years.” He says the NAIT system can no longer operate in isolation. “Improving how the NAIT system works with third party providers is vital for supporting biosecurity preparedness or a response in the event of a future incursion.” Tag manufacturers will also be closely monitored to see that they provide tags that don’t fall off. A tag reporting process is to be introduced with more education for farmers on best practice in applying and replacing tags. Forward says this will help OSPRI improve the integrity of NAIT data, alongside the key traceability aspects of tag retention and readability. “We’ve listened to farmers, and it’s apparent there are issues with tag retention,” he says. “The new Animal Identification Device Standard will ensure tag manufacturers are held accountable for their products and that they meet international standards.” Forward says it’s up to farmers now to report any issues with tags. “OSPRI will be managing this process with NAIT reporting annually on complaints received and any emerging trends.”


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

ANIMAL HEALTH 43

Reducing stress on in-lamb ewes MOST OF the ewes that make up the New Zealand ewe flock are high performance animals, many of them sitting on a metabolic knife-edge as they get closer to lambing, says Ben Allot, North Canterbury Vets. He says 30 years ago, ewes averaged 55kg and scanned an average of 110%. Today, ewes are 70-75kg and are scanning 190% and over and are similar to high performance dairy cows. Most of these ewes will be carrying twins and triplets and it is important farmers understand the feed requirements of these animals going into lambing. In their last 30-40 days of pregnancy, their energy requirements will increase in line with demands from the fetuses and in these later stages of pregnancy ewes

ANIMAL HEALTH PLANS ALLOT ADVOCATES farmers use a fence-at-the-top-of-the-cliff approach to animal health, rather than using vets as the ambulance at the bottom. Animal health plans, tailored to the individual farm, take a proactive and long term approach to animal health with a focus on productivity and profitability. Allot says in the North Canterbury area where he practices, he’s been involved in the development of 70 active animal health plans for sheep and beef farmers and these are used to inform livestock management decisions. While animal health plans are a requirement of some processors’ compliance programmes, he says they can add real value to the business by identifying current and potential animal health issues and making a plan to manage them. Allot recommends farmers talk to their vets about working together to develop an animal health plan for their business.

are less resilient to feed restrictions and stress. Shearing is the single most stressful management practice ewes are subjected to, so pre-lamb shearing in late pregnancy is particularly hard on ewes. Mustering the ewes into the yards, holding them off feed and the significant increase in energy demand in the 10

days after shearing are all very stressful on ewes. “We are taking ewes right on the knife-edge and shearing them three weeks out from lambing or putting them on the conveyor a few days from lambing and then we are surprised when we get high peri-natal lamb losses,” said Allot. He encourages farmers to think about the timing

of shearing in relation to feed intake, reproduction and animal welfare. Similarly, set stocking going into lambing is a complex issue that can, if not managed correctly, stress ewes at the point of lambing. “We need to think about alleviating stress and changes around that set-stocking event,” he said.

Pre-lamb shearing is hard on ewes.

Allot says too often everything is done at once: ewes are taken off winter feed, walked and often held in holding areas off feed, then receive pre-lamb animal health treatments. They are then walked out to their lambing blocks. “The change of feed

type is enough of a stress let alone standing them off feed for a day while they are vaccinated or drenched,” he said. He urges farmers to consider doing animal health procedures a month out from setstocking or transitioning sheep onto their lambing

blocks if they are a long distance from where the ewes have been wintered. “Think about the stress and the impact it has on animals at such a critical time and think about ways to reduce that stress.” • https://beeflambnz.com/ search?term=ewes+lambing

Glenview Romneys Bred for high performance and ‘cast iron’ constitution

We deliberately challenge our Romneys by farming them on unfertilised native hill country in order to provide the maximum selection pressure and expose ‘soft’ sheep.

FERTILITY

Over the last 5 years ewes (including 2ths) have scanned between 190% and 216% despite droughts.

GROWTH RATE Over the same period weaning weights (adj. 100 days) have exceeded 36kg from a lambing % consistently above 150%. & SURVIVAL COMMENTS: • All sheep DNA and SIL recorded. • No crops are grown and no supplements are fed. • Ram hoggets have been eye muscle scanned since 1996. • All ewe hoggets are mated. • Breeding programme places a heavy emphasis on worm resilience – lambs drenched only once prior to autumn. • Scored for dags and feet shape. DNA rated for footrot and cold tolerance. • We take an uncompromising approach – sheep must constantly measure up.

We aim to breed superior Romneys that produce the most from the least input.

Glenview Romneys & South Suffolks GEOFF & BARB CROKER Longbush, RD 4, Masterton email: bob_barb@slingshot.co.nz www.glenviewromneys.co.nz Phone 06-372 7820


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

44 ANIMAL HEALTH

Tough season calls for livestock health JULIE WAGNER

IN THIS season we are again asking a lot of our stock. If we don’t look after them they may suffer flow on effects to their

health, wellbeing and performance. Cows too fat or too thin are at increased risk of metabolic disease and should be managed as higher risk animals. Feeding stock is a

large part of your job. Dry matter intake and quality feed are the most important aspect of stock management. Often metabolic disease outbreaks can be addressed by increas-

ing the amount of good quality feed which raises the intake of energy, calcium and magnesium. But taking a holistic approach via general good husbandry and good feed and supplementation is

shown by research to be more important than ever before. Intricate links between a cow’s homeostatic processes (the regulation of the cow’s internal environment)

“I SUPPORT LIVESTOCK TRACEABILITY AND BIOSECURITY BY TAGGING AND REGISTERING MY CALVES IN NAIT”

RICHARD MCINTYRE, SHAREMILKER, HOROWHENUA

Julie Wagner

and metabolic processes are being continually uncovered. Homeostasis arises from a natural resistance to change in optimal conditions and acts as an internal regulator to maintain equilibrium (wellbeing) despite changes in an animal’s environment, diet or level of activity. For a cows’ metabolism to work at maximum efficiency it needs effective homeostatic control to keep things balanced. Without it, a failure of one metabolic process impacts on the efficiency of others and the cow becomes vulnerable to external threats and stresses. Because of the influence of the homeostatic system, the concept of transition feeding prior to calving has evolved. Rather than focusing on the control of milk fever alone, the process requires the farmer to take an integrated nutritional approach. This will optimise: ●● rumen function ●● calcium and bone metabolism ●● energy metabolism ●● protein metabolism

immune function. Developing integrated strategies based on an understanding of the homoeostatic process will greatly benefit a cow’s wellbeing pre- and post-calving. In that brief, important transition period a careful manipulation of a cow’s diet can help her health and productivity. Managing other factors will also affect a cow’s homeostatic system and consequent ability to absorb and retain nutrients at critical periods. The farmer must manage the stresses caused by: ●● Lack of shelter in bad weather ●● Deep pugged soils which make it hard for cows to get to feed, shelter and water ●● Trucking (do this well before calving). Like everything, the balance of the hormone system and calcium levels is controlled by the homeostatic system. So optimal conditions and diet are critical to give your cows the best start to the season. • Julie Wagner is Ravensdown animal health product manager. ●●

VETMARKER

®

DOCKING LAMBS IS EASY WITH THE VETMARKER

Lifetime traceability starts at the farmgate. All calves being reared or sold, must be registered in NAIT within 7 days or before moving off-farm. NAIT is an OSPRI programme

Need help?

ospri.co.nz

0800 482 463

• Vaccination • Earmarking & tagging • Castration • Drenching

• Automatic flystrike application • Releases lambs onto their feet

FREEPHONE 0800 DOCKER 0800 362 537 www.vetmarker.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 45

Wraps to be pulled off new Magnum MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

IT MIGHT be a while before New Zealand sees Case IH’s new AFS Connect Magnums, but they were on show at the Farm Progress Show last week in the US and at AgQuip in Australia. In common with other models in the range, the new tractor has a redesigned cab, new AFS Vision Pro operating system, AFS Pro 1200 display and automated brake assisted steering. But the new flagship Magnum 400 model differs in the engine and transmission. Firstly, the 8.7L six-cylinder FPT Cursor 9 is the same as that used in the Magnum 380 CVX, which also peaks at 435hp. But the rated power is up from 380hp to 400hp.

The new AFS Connect Magnum.

Until now, the biggest Magnum models could only be specified with a stepless CVX box, but the new 400 has

an upgraded 21F x 5R powershift meaning more ratios over the 19F/4R powershift used in the smaller models.

The company says the new transmission puts down a constant 435hp at peak to the ground with a 10% power growth in both wheeled and Rowtrac configurations. Also, the set-up offers lower speeds in first gear and the wheeled tractor reaches its maximum speed of 50km/h at a reduced engine speed. Taking many visual cues from the autonomous concept tractors shown over the last two years, a new hood can house optional LED style grill headlights. And telescopic rear breakaway extremity markers take their place over the rear fenders. A new cabin, with pillarless fullwidth glass doors has improved seating, heating and cooling and more storage space. As one would expect, charging points, USB sockets and data

ports are the norm, as is the can’t-dowithout cup holders. A new multi function armrest/control lever has better ergonomics and eight configurable hot keys for any machine function in a favoured position. This ability is carried over to the hydraulic remote valves. In the tech arena, the Vision Pro operating system now has a new interface display. This includes new graphics for the mapping function based on an Android operating system and photorealistic images for the tractor and implement. Other interesting additions to the series include electronic telescoping rear view mirrors, tyre pressure monitoring via the AFS Pro 1200 display and a semi-active cab suspension option.

BLACK IS THE NEW ORANGE! SURE TO brew up a storm in New Zealand, a Dutch Kubota dealer is marketing a Black Edition of a 150hp M7151 tractor. It sports an all black paint finish, silver wheel rims, LED work lights, orange and black upholstery and black rubber floormats. It’s so popular with local contractors that the dealer has taken three forward orders and is now offering the ‘conversion’ on the rest of the Kubota tractor range. -- Mark Daniel

E a s y Cu t R S e r i e s Mower T h e E a s y Cu t R e a r M o u n t e d Mower is renowned for its s t r e n g t h a n d r e l i a b i l i t y. Fe a t u r e s i n c l u d e t h e d i r e c t drive shaft and SAFECUT protection system for the c u t t e r b a r.

* Fr o m $ 0 d e p o s i t or from 2 % interest*

Increase your work rates and productivity with this ver y capable machine.

Fo r m o r e i n f o r m a t i o n c o n t a c t

www.tulloch.nz

Schuitemaker wagons are the perfect partner for New Zealand farming and contracting requirements. Guaranteed chopping length from the hydraulically pressurised knife bank, shaped pick-up tines, unique trailing pick-up and compact design and steering make these market favourites.

06 370 0390

DEALERS NATIONWIDE

Unique traili up with exceng pickground follo ptional wing.

ZERO GRAZER

WITH BEATERS & TWO-WAY CONVEYOR Rotors allow capacity and for higher horsepower lower usage.

www.schuitemaker.co.nz NORTH ISLAND www.gaz.co.nz Call Jarred L’Amie | 027 203 5022 CAMBRIDGE | OTOROHANGA | ROTORUA

SOUTH ISLAND www.cochranes.co.nz Call Alastair Robertson | 027 435 2642 AMBERLEY | LEESTON | ASHBURTON TIMARU | OAMARU | WEST COAST


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

46 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS - TAMA CONFERENCE

Conference sets industry tone MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

TRACTOR AND machinery importers, manufacturers and dealers gathered recently in Wellington for the inaugural conference of the New Zealand Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA). Their industry was calculated recently as being worth about $1.3 billion annually and providing 2500 jobs. Supplying key industry data to its 38 members, TAMA also acts to understand and disseminate current and proposed legislation affecting the industry.

TAMA plans to expand its membership to the wider industry and to serve parts and service staff in the various companies. Its plans include more training, particularly in health and safety, a scholarship scheme for youngsters and an idea for a North Island working field day. The 80-strong conference audience heard from a broad range of speakers: economist Cameron Bagrie looked at challenges to the rural sector; Alan Kirsten, of Agriview, spoke about industry statistics; and Ian Yule, of Plant Tech, spoke about the change of new technologies and their likely effects.

Moana Fisheries HR manager Katrina Thompson was a keynote speaker.

Katrina Thomson, group human resources manager, Moana Fisheries, addressed the challenge of how to attract and retain millen-

nials to the industry -while recognising that not all younger people aspire to own a house or drive a flash car. Group discussion

covered the skills required in employees -- now and moving into the future. During the conference dinner, guest speaker Patrick (Paddy) Gower, a former political journalist, had the audience laughing loudly at his stories about reporting on ego driven politicians -- many far out of their depth. The evening concluded with the President’s Awards for Enduring Service and Emerging Talent in the Agricultural Machinery Industry. These were awarded to Graeme Tulloch, of Tulloch Farm Machines, and Kieran Steffert, of Origin Ag, respectively.

Sector aims to train Kiwis THE TRACTOR and machinery industry is welcoming a challenge by the Minister of Agriculture to train New Zealanders rather than continue relying on seasonal migrant workers. Answering questions at the recent Tractor and Machinery Association (TAMA) conference in Wellington, Damien O’Connor said the industry’s reliance on migrant workers during seasonal spikes is “problematic”. He says training labour for the primary sector is long overdue. “The focus instead should be on the long term and training our

into vocational trainown people to be part ing and far fewer of the most noble coming out. We industry – feeding don’t want to disrupt the world,” O’Connor unnecessarily but we said. do need to change “This industry things.” has invested a lot in O’Connor’s plea land and in technolto train youngsters ogy and machinery, was echoed by TAMA but we’ve invested president John Tullas little as we can in TAMA president John och who said the traclabour. The system Tulloch tor and farm machinery sector has failed because we just don’t have enough skilled people to had to work to develop a strong career pathway. deliver what the economy needs. “There are exciting and chal“We have fewer people going

lenging career opportunities in our sector, especially in the technology area. But school leavers need to be made more aware of them,” Tulloch said. The need for skilled workers was the major theme of the conference, with many other speakers pointing to this as a more pressing issue for the industry than rising costs and extreme weather.  The inaugural TAMA conference was attended by about 80 people from across New Zealand, including farm machinery importers, manufacturers and retailers.

SERIES 2 EXPANDER Includes

❱ 3.1m-5.1m telescopic mast ❱ 340kg hammer ❱ 6 bank valve

19,840 + GST

$

Normal RRP $22,045

SERIES 2 WITH ROCK SPIKE

TRACTOR SALES HIT A RECORD SALES OF tractors and machinery set a record in the 2018 financial year, says TAMA. Data supplied by Agriview at the recent TAMA conference in Wellington shows the market for ‘whole goods’ hit $615 million, up from $513m in 2017. The industry is valued at about $1.3 billion in sales, parts and service. Of that total market, tractors made up the lion’s share at $438m. Then came balers and hay tools contributing $81m, spray equipment $29m and headers and self-propelled forage harvesters $19m. The only negative sector in the 2018 year was the tillage and seeding category where sales dropped 20% to $31m from the 2017 result of $38m. Total sales of tractors was a record 4640 versus the five-year average of 3792. Of that, the sub 40hp lifestyle sector accounted for 927 tractors and the 40 to 100hp sector 1152 units. The increasingly popular 100-180hp achieved 2074 tractors and 180hp+ scored a healthy 487 units. Deliveries were split between the North and South Islands in a 63:37 ratio, achieving sales of 2920 and 1719 respectively. This compared to the five-year averages of 2327 and 1465. In the North Island, six of the nine regions reported increases: from 6% in Auckland to 56% in Manawatu, while three regions had falls ranging from 4% in Hawkes Bay to 25% in Taranaki. In the South Island, which has eight regions, six saw rises from 7% in South Canterbury to 32% in Nelson. The remaining regions had comparable results to the 2017 season. As in previous years, the key dairy areas of Waikato and Southland sustained the two largest markets, with sales of 841 and 433 units respectively. This represented about 27.5% of the total market. – Mark Daniel

World’s most powerful variable speed clipper is here!

handypiece

Includes

❱ 4 bank valve hydraulic top link and angle adjustment ❱ 4.25m 150UC beam ❱ 270kg hammer ❱ Adjustable legs ❱ Rock Spike kit with 90mm spike

$

Dirty jobs made easy!

16,750 + GST

Normal RRP $19,030

NZ MADE FOR OVER 40 YEARS

■ Ideal for shearing sheep, alpacas, goats and cow tails. ■ Variable speed from 2400-3500 rpm. ■ Latest brushless motor technology means minimal heat build up ■ 1400gms means 100-200gms lighter than standard handpiece. ■ At 2700 rpm the 12-volt lithium battery will catch up to 300-400 sheep, 400-500 cow tails. ■ Tough alloy switch box with auto rest fuse for overload or lockup – clips to belt. PREPARE YOURSELF FOR THE NEW SEASON View in action go to www.handypiece.co.nz

Freephone www.kinghitter.com •

0800 476 868 • Sales@kinghitter.com

0800 474 327

email: dave@handypiece.co.nz


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS – TAMA CONFERENCE 47

Are the dark clouds looming? MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

ECONOMIC DRIVERS such as dairy prices, credit availability, house and land prices and migration are hitting headwinds, says economist Cameron Bagrie. “This is leading to disruption in the marketplace. Indeed, 43% of businesses agree there have been changes in the last two-five years. “But in turn, only 39% are saying they will change going forward. A case of she’ll be right being wrong?” Bagrie told the recent TAMA conference in Wellington that the global economy is not a happy place, with total debt hitting $16 trillion and, in many countries, negative interest rates. He noted that the New Zealand economy is evolving in the service sector and said the substantial fall in the official cash rate – from about 8% in 2009 to 1% today – means it’s time to forget about interest rates moving upwards. “Our terms of trade show we focus on commodities at the expense of

Cameron Bagrie

manufacturing,” said Bagrie. “We sell butter and buy cars, we sell steak and buy clothes and we sell fish and buy technology.” Bagrie warned that, although export numbers and commodity prices appear

to be holding, we now face the seven ‘Cs’: contagion risks, confidence, cost of funds, commodity prices, currency, China and credit channels (banks). He noted that dairy sector growth had averaged 8% since 1999, meaning

that by 2030 dairy should be earning $30 billion. But unfortunately, environmental and social constraints mean we have now hit “peak cow”, so the real likelihood is a stall at the $15b -$20b mark. Although the sector has fair magnitude, it will not achieve the expected export growth, he said. So where will it come from? Bagrie pointed to dairy’s debt problems -- $41b (two thirds of all agricultural debt). This is causing banks to look at cutting their exposure to the industry, reducing access to further credit and moving towards horticulture. This problem is compounded by banks focussing on returns to shareholders rather than working with customers, Bagrie says. “Currently, employers are reporting their greatest concerns are increasing regulation and the lack of skilled employees.” Bagrie believes the latter issue is unlikely to improve in the short term with unemployment levels at a low 3.9%. Although he sees an anomaly, as the number of people seeking the Job

Seekers Allowance has risen by 14,000 in the last 12 months. On farm, Bagrie says, while headline inflation rates are 1.7%, expenses are trending at 2.5%, driven by rises in, eg animal health, electricity, fertiliser and seed costs. Change will be the new norm, he says, with the global economy becoming high-risk with darkening clouds. He believes income prospects for agriculture will remain, but rising costs and the limited prospect of raising prices will cause concern. “Government policy has typically been short term looking at capital gain versus cashflow and production versus value and environment,” he said. “We should be looking at the longer game, although I accept this is often stymied by a short election cycle.” Bagrie says the Government must make a plan and stick to it rather than tying up huge resources in running inquiries. “These currently number about 200, including why are Air New Zealand making too much money?” @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

MBO

X SERIES LOADER CO

DEUTZ-FAHR AGROLU

ANCE WITH

FORM EXTRAORDINARY PER

S T S O C G IN N N U R VERY LOW • 80-85HP SDF 1000 series engine gives extraordinary reliability together with extremely low running costs • Option of 15x15 or 20x20 synchromesh gearbox • Four-wheel independent braking for maximum stopping ability • 100% front and rear locking differentials gives excellent traction • Robust build quality and easy operation • PTO offers two speed modes, 540 rpm or 540 ECO (economy), for maximum productivity when working with implements with low power demands • From only $44,990 +GST (loader combo)

FROM ONLY

926/MONTH

$

AGRO CARE

*

NG POSITION

COMFORTABLE DRIVI

Deutz Fahr NZ Phone 0800 801 888 | deutztractors.co.nz | powerfarming.co.nz FA5157RN

5

YEARS

Incredibly versatile and boasting state of the art technology, these are, to all intents and purposes, the perfect tractors. Contact your local dealers to demo one today.

UP TO

Normal lending criteria applies. Terms and conditions apply. Offer ends 31/10/2019. Contact your local dealership for more information. * Requires 30% deposit and full GST in month three, 2.95% interest for 36 monthly payments. ** Terms and conditions apply. Go to deutztractors.co.nz/trydeutz for detailed terms and conditions.

WARRANTY

LS

EASY TO USE CONTRO

OUT INTUITIVE DRIVING LAY


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

48 MACHINERY & PRODUCTS

New ploughs on show MARK DANIEL markd@ruralnews.co.nz

NO SURPRISE to see the giant Kverneland Group will introduce several new plough ranges at Agritechnica, in Germany, in November. Kverneland’s history dates back 140 years, when its first ploughs were made in Klepp, Norway. Ploughs have remained a key focus of the business. The new ploughs are the 2300S, 3300S and 3400S mounted units and the semi-mounted 6500S Series. Production will begin early next year. They will have many of the features first seen in the clever I-Plough launched in 2015, including the swept leg design, centralised skimmer adjustment and a new leaf spring design for the auto-reset system. The new series will be sold alongside existing ranges and the older ranges will eventually be phased out. Looking at how the new models slot into the product offering: the 3-, 4- and 5-furrow 2300S is the new version of the EG Series, with the 200 headstock. And the 4-, 5- and 6-furrow 3300S is the 300 compar-

ison. The 5-, 6- and 8-furrow 3400S ploughs are on-land/in-furrow versions of the PO, while the 5- to 8-furrow 6500S lines up with the PB series. Headstocks for the mounted models use the same configuration as the I-Plough. This allows them to follow like a trailer when carried on its land wheel during transport. All new models can be optioned with Variomat manual or hydraulic variable furrow width adjustment which now has top and bottom rails to the side of the main beam. Depending on model, the furrow width can be adjusted between 30 to 55cm. The front furrow and draft links are synchronised automatically.

The 2300S and3300S models (rated to 240hp and 330hp, respectively) can be supplied with 85cm or 100cm inter-body clearances. The under-beam clearance has been increased from 70 to 80cm. Both series can be fitted with a packer arm or integrated Packomat press. The company notes that when ploughs are ordered for manufacture with the optional packer system, the headstock construction is manufactured from higher grade, close grain steel. The new 6500S series also has many of the changes seen in the mounted ranges, and includes Cat 3/4 compatible headstocks and a larger 480-80R24 rear wheel. www.powerfarming.co.nz

SAFETY SOFTWARE WINNER OFF TO UK A KIWI company that believes its computer software can help reduce farm accidents and fatalities is joining the New Zealand 2019 Agritech mission to UK and Ireland. Zero Harm Farm will join 20 other businesses representing the sector, taking in the Irish Ploughing Championships. National Fieldays Society will pay for its flights and accommodation. The company contested the 2019 Fieldays International Innovation Award with its simple, portable and paperless system for better managing safety, communication and compliance in agribusiness. As participants they were eligible to apply

Zero Harm Free co-founder Mark Orr.

for a $5000 scholarship to take part in the mission. Fieldays’ international business manager Jim Grennell says Zero Harm Farm won funding because its software application addresses a big problem associated with workplace safety on farm. “The location based hazard management system can be simply and rapidly adapted to specific workplaces,”

he said. “It can work in all farm systems needing hazard management and so is scaleable from a global perspective.” Zero Harm Farm co-founder Mark Orr says its system can help reduce serious harm and fatalities on farms globally. “This trade mission will help us understand the nuances of additional markets, and give us a feel for the UK and Ireland’s agricultural future direction in general.” The company will exhibit in the Enterprise Ireland Innovation Precinct, where it will have a booth and facilities for the three day of the event, and opportunity to present at functions. – Mark Daniel


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

MACHINERY & PRODUCTS 49

Training beats ‘engineering’ solutions

ON AVERAGE five people are killed each year on quads in New Zealand. Particularly tragic is that nearly all these deaths were preventable. These machines are common in the NZ landscape, with about 120,000 quads and side-by-side recreational vehicles on farms and rural properties. Commonly, quad accidents tend to be overturning, riding into ditches and losing control. As well as the devastation the deaths have on families and friends, many more riders and passengers are seriously injured at a huge cost to victims and the community. And while the accident rate may not seem overwhelming, given how many and how often machines are used every day, we can do more to prevent these crashes. Our rural industry and the Government need to take quad riding seriously and give it the same respect and attention we give on-road motorcycling. We need more emphasis on skills and knowledge and ensure quad riders are suitably equipped. The no-brainers are wearing a helmet, remaining sober while riding and keeping children off adult size machines. There should be no debate that rider training is a key area where safety can be improved. It hasn’t exactly been ignored but neither has it had the attention it deserves. In 2009 the ACC’s Ride Forever training

programme for on-road motorcycles was piloted in response to a large spike in crashes that came with a popularity boom in biking, particularly amongst new and often inexperienced riders. Ride Forever provided accessible, subsidised motorcycle rider training. About 30,000 riders have done the course in the last ten years and ACC says this has resulted in a 27% decrease in accidents amongst course graduates. That number is adjusted for risk bias because of the likelihood that the riders taking the course are likely to be safety focused. Ride Forever will now become permanent, with a plan to train 10,000 riders annually. I’d like to think that similar quality, accessible and subsidised training could be available for quad riders. Quads, like on-road motorcycles, are not toys and can be extremely unforgiving if poorly ridden or ridden in the wrong places or conditions. Skilled, knowledgeable and mature riding will go a long way to preventing tragic consequences on quads. It is better to reduce the accident rate than seek to modify these machines with untested and untried engineering solutions. Let’s stop experimenting with farmers’ and their workers’ lives. It’s time to take quad safety seriously by promoting accessible, affordable and proven training for riders. @rural_news facebook.com/ruralnews

David Crawford believes rider training is being overlooked in new moves to address quad bike injuries and deaths.

FOR GREAT PASTURE AND CROP YIELD. CHOOSE DUNCAN DISC OR TINE DRILLS. Enviro DD30 A double disc drill, ideal for rock conditions and for cutting through trash to place the seed at an even depth.

Tine/disc: Disc

Operation Size: 100Ha-300Ha

• Dual 700 litre hoppers • Narrow 125mm row spacing • Rigid heavy duty chassis • Optional press wheels

Eco Seeder Designed to sow a variety of seeds from clover, rape and swedes right up to oats, wheat and peas.

Renovator Classic The ideal farmers drill. Whether you want to sow winter feed, ryegrass or cereals the Classic will handle it all.

Tine/disc: Tine

Operation Size: Up to 100Ha

• Entry level drill - 3 point linkage or trailed option • 25mm coil tine and Duncan inverted “T’’ boot • Peg tooth roller distribution system • Disc openers optional

Tine/disc: Tine

Operation Size: 100Ha-300Ha

• 3m sowing width • 25mm coil tine and Duncan inverted “T’’ boot • Peg tooth roller distribution system • Disc openers optional

A division of Giltrap Engineering Limited

0800 177 171 • DUNCANAG.COM

TRACTA_GIL61302_RN

Rider training is overlooked in recent moves by the Worksafe and the ACC to address quad crashes and injuries, says Motor Industry Association chief executive David Crawford. Better rider skills – not ‘engineering solutions’ – are needed to prevent serious injuries and save lives.


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

50 TRAVEL / RURAL TRADER ADVERTORIAL

UK & Ireland farming tour THERE’S ALWAYS plenty happening in the UK and Ireland during the Northern Hemisphere summer -- royal celebrations, summer concerts, festivals, Wimbledon and other major events such as this year’s Cricket World Cup to name a few. There’s a lot going on in the farming scene at this time of year too: vibrant agricultural shows, stock enjoying summer pastures, crops ready for harvest and ever-changing

DIESEL HEATER

European dynamics!     London in early June is a wonderful starting point for Farm To Farm’s month-long adventure through England, Scotland, Wales and Ireland. You’ll have seen places like Westminster, Buckingham Palace, Lord’s and Piccadilly Circus in the media or in movies, but there’s nothing like taking in these iconic sights with your own eyes.  It’s also pretty special seeing the Queen and family

VETMARKER Docking Chute

0800 DOCKER

(362 537)

www.vetmarker.co.nz

0800 379 247 SEE IT NOW

www.avonheating.co.nz

DOLOMITE

NZ’s finest BioGro certified Mg fertiliser For a delivered price call... 0800 436 566

mixed beef and arable farm which also gives a unique perspective of its famous neighbour, Stonehenge. Our warm host and her family have been welcoming us to their farm since our very first UK farming tour some 26 years ago.  It’s been interesting following the farm and family through different stages and conditions and time chatting in the

amidst the pageantry of a royal parade as some do at Trooping the Colour. West End Shows, Black Cabs, “Bobbies”, leafy green parks and charming centuries-old pubs add to the experience.  Much of our tour is spent in the picturesque countryside, starting with England’s rolling green pastures, hedgerows and charming villages.  Our first farm visit is to a

ognise some breeds and farming systems but you’ll also see plenty that’s different and perhaps even take home an idea or two. Edinburgh and Scotland’s Royal Highland are always a highlight of our tour - it’s a wonderful chance for Kiwis to mix with their British farming counterparts. International visitors are warmly welcomed and the Scot-

garden over Pimms and strawberries and cream certainly keeps us going back! From Portsmouth to Devon and scenic coastal Cornwall, the pretty Midlands, Peak and Lake Districts and rural Wales; local livestock sales, farms and related enterprises will give you a good picture of life and agriculture in this part of the world. You’ll rec-

Global Travel

l

AUSTRALIA

l

June/July 2020

Join us AFRICA

- Made in NZ - Saves lives - Flexible

l

EUROPE

l

SCANDINAVIA

l

ASIA

l

SOUTH AMERICA

l

NORTH AMERICA

Travel, learn and enjoy!

l l

l

Global travel l Escorted group tours l Exclusive experiences Connect with farming colleagues l Trusted for over 30 years

www.farmtofarm.co.nz

ph

0800 3838 747 for details

BUFFALO BOOTS - spring sale! Earthwalk Buffalo Boots have thick buffalo hide uppers which are 175% more crack and water resistant than normal leather. This means they last longer and offer you better value for money. The nitrile rubber outsole won’t crack, split or break down in soil. And it is traditionally stitched to the leather upper so it won’t fall off. To make extra sure of this - the stitching goes all the way through the tread. The Lace Up boot offers superb ankle support on hill country, and a calfskin tongue & collar for great internal comfort. The Slip On boots are ideal for any work application. Both models have a traditional full length back stay for optimum durability around the heel area. Sizes sell out quickly over Spring/ Summer - so please order early. PHONE 9am-5pm

0800 16 00 24

valued at $320

$1300 inc GST

RECOMMENDED BY WORKSAFE 0800 782 3763 | info@atvlifeguard.co.nz

www.atvlifeguard.co.nz

ENDS 30 SEPT - WHILE STOCKS LAST!

SLIP ON

LACE UP

$120

FREE Freight

UK & IRELAND RN 100 x 187mm 08/19

UK & IRELAND

tish certainly know how to put on a great event. Soaking up the stunning scenery and rich history of the Highlands from Inverness to Culloden and the coastal north give a diverse insight into Scotland before ferrying across to Northern Ireland.  A week or so of farming and highlights of Ireland, from the Giant’s Causeway and Belfast in the north to the Ring of Kerry and Dublin in the south, is a great way to finish your travels.  Meet colourful Irish farmers, better understand the relationship between the north and south, enjoy lively Irish music and dancing and sample a Guinness at the source! Farm To Farm is returning to the UK and Ireland in June 2020 – ph 0800 3838 747 or visit www.farmtofarm.co.nz for details.

STEEL TOE X (with Scuff Guard)

sizes 7, 11, 12 arrive Nov

PLAIN TOE (without Scuff Guard)

$115

valued at $280

STEEL TOE X (with Scuff Guard)

sizes 5, 6, 7 arrive Nov

STEEL TOE (without Scuff Guard)

sizes 7, 13 arrive Nov

all sizes arrive Nov

Other sizes in stock now!

PLAIN TOE (without Scuff Guard) sizes 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 13 arrive Nov

Buffalo Leather - Dark Brown 175% more crack resistant Leather Traditional Stitched on soles Wide Fit Nitrile Rubber Outsole Heavy Duty Elastic Sides (Slip On) Outsole won’t Crack or Split Calfskin Tongue & Collar (Lace Up) Deep Tread

ONLINE

earthwalk.co.nz

sizes: 5 - 13 (NZ) CHEQUES

earthwalk, r d 2, palmerston north

please add $12 freight per order


RURAL NEWS // SEPTEMBER 10, 2019

RURAL TRADER 51

SINGLE TOP DOG BOX DOG BOX

CRAIGCO SENSOR JET • Robust construction • Auto shut gate • Total 20 jets • Lambs only 5 jets • Side jets for lice • Adjustable V panels • Davey Twin Impellor Pump • 6.5 or 9.0hp motors

Accommodates up to 4 dogs 6 individual air vents Removable centre board 2 lockable galvanised gates In-house drainage Tie down lugs on each side Fits all wellside & flatdeck utes (2 models) Raised floor for insulation

❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱ ❱❱

The magic eye sheepjetter since 1989

Quality construction and options • Get the contractors choice Featuring...

SHEEP JETTERS SINCE 1992

• Incredible chemical economy • Amazing ease 1500+ per hour • Unique self adjusting sides • Environmentally and user friendly • Automatically activated • Proven effective on lice as well as fly • Compatible with all dip chemicals • Accurate, effective application

GUARANTEED PERFORMANCE QUICK TO SETUP – EASY TO USE – JOB DONE

PH 06-835 6863 • MOB 021-061 1800 JETTER VIDEO: www.craigcojetters.com

GST $850 incl

GST $605 incl

FLY OR LICE PROBLEMS?

Rubber Safety Matting • ATV Carrier Mats • Exit/Entry Areas • Calf Trailers • Horse Floats & Trucks • Weigh Platforms • Bale Mats • Comfort Mats for Wet & Dry Areas • Utility Deck Matting

Phone 0800 625 826 • www.mckeeplastics.co.nz

Phone: 0800 80 8570 www.burgessmatting.co.nz

07 573 8512 | dipping@electrodip.co.nz – www.electrodip.com

Growing fodder beet this spring? Still paying crazy prices for seed and chemicals?

EPIC

Water Filter Systems

$

* Whole House * Town or Tank Water

Low dry matter mono germ beet. 100,000 seeds

319

IVORY

* Chlorine Removal * No Expensive Cartridges

$

* Installer Network SHOP ONLINE

Medium dry matter mono germ beet.100,000 seeds

plus GST

FarmersFirst.co.nz CONTACT:

PH 09 376 0860 - www.jder-cintropur.co.nz

319

plus GST

Heydon

Ph 027-842 3008

FREE

nationwide delivery

QUADBAR

595

$

+GST delivered

Proven beyo nd do ubt! “I have no doubt that if I did not have a Quadbar fitted, my accident would have been fatal!” – Rozel Farms “The Quadbar saved our employee from significant injuries.” – Colin van der Geest

Recommended by Worksafe. ACC subsidy available

For a Quadbar, call me, Stuart Davidson, owner of Quadbar NZ, on 021-182 8115. Email sales@quadbar.co.nz or for more info go to www.quadbar.co.nz

600 500 400 300 200 100 0

BEST QUALITY | BEST Price | BEST ADVICE BEST QUALITY | BEST Price | BEST ADVICE

BEST QUALITY | BEST Price | BEST ADVICE WATER TANKS, PUMPS & FILTRATION WATER TANKS, PUMPS & FILTRATION

WATER TANKS, PUMPS FILTRATION DEVAN CALPEDA • PURETEC • OASIS CLEARWATER DEVAN •• PROMAX PROMAX • •CALPEDA • PURETEC •& OASIS CLEARWATER

QUADBAR 5 YEAR SURVEY

NUMBER OF QUADBARS 479

ROLLOVERS 61

DEVAN •TANKS, RX • CALPEDA • AQUA • OASIS CLEARWATER WATER PUMPS & FILTRATION

DEVAN • PROMAX • CALPEDA • •PURETEC • OASIS CLEARWATER P: 326 8888 www.thetankguy.co.nz P:0508 0508 326 8888 • www.thetankguy.co.nz A: A: 30 30 Turners RoadRoad – Feilding Turners – Feilding

NUMBER OF DEATHS 0

ALASKA & CANADA Don’t just visit Experience it on a KTC MOTORHOME & CRUISE COMBO TOUR

P: 0508 326 8888 • www.thetankguy.co.nz A: 30 Turners Road – Feilding

Escorted 28 Day Motorhome Tour – Departs 6 May 2020

Vancouver – Anchorage – Whitehorse Plus Optional 7 Night Inside Passage Cruise

28 DAY ESCORTED MOTORHOME TOUR

NZD $10,000 per person twin share

EAR L BIRD Y PRIC ING

7-NIGHT ALASKAN INSIDE PASSAGE CRUISE

NZD $250

per person twin share in an Ocean View Stateroom with Motorhome Tour Purchase

Exclusive offer not available from travel agents. BOOK NOW – Only limited places at this price

KTC MOTORHOME TOURS Web ktcrvtours.com • Email info@ktctours.com • Free Phone NZ 0800 895 194


A NEW ‘GAME CHANGER’ PERENNIAL RYEGRASS

Avatar is a very high yielding, late heading (+22 days) tetraploid perennial ryegrass containing the NEA endophyte, bred for a combination of improved animal safety and persistence against insect pests. It has strong year-round growth performance, with high pasture quality and metabolizable energy content for high livestock performance. Based on high yields in company and industry trials Avatar is expected to become the benchmark amongst tetraploid perennial ryegrasses.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION FREEPHONE 0800 427 676 OR CONTACT OUR REGIONAL STAFF

Tetraploid quality with high yields and persistence AGRONOMIC TRAITS HEADING DATE SOWING RATE (DAYS C.F NUI) (KGS/HA) +22 25–30 PERSISTENCE WINTER ACTIVITY (YEARS) TETRAPLOID HIGH 5+ *1 = SUSCEPTIBLE, 9 = RESISTANT RUST RESISTANCE 8* PLOIDY

AVATAR IS AVAILABLE FROM YOUR LOCAL SEED MERCHANT OR FARM MERCHANDISE OUTLET

NORTH ISLAND: JAMES BRYAN Tel: 0272 354 989 UPPER SOUTH ISLAND: JOHN PEDOFSKY Tel: 0274 344 495 LOWER SOUTH ISLAND: RICHARD MOATE Tel: 0274 327 868

New Zealand’s only fully NZ owned forage seed breeding and marketing company YEARS ANNIVERSARY

100 % NZ OWNED

www.cropmark.co.nz

freephone 0800 427 676

email: sales@cropmark.co.nz

Profile for Rural News Group

Rural News 10 September 2019  

Rural News 10 September 2019

Rural News 10 September 2019  

Rural News 10 September 2019