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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016 COMPLIMENTARY

I Am Beautiful Ana Gotmer

CAREERS FOR WOMEN Architecture, Building, Construction and Design

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GIRLS' NIGHT OUT

HEALTHY COMFORT FOOD RECIPES

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Cover Story I Am A Beautiful Rochester Woman Ana Gotmer

Cover photo by Dawn Sanborn Photography

16 Women in Leadership 13

Inspired to Do Good and Change the World Tori Utley has what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur.

Photography by Dawn Sanborn and Tracey McGuire

Community 21

By Trish Amundson

Fashion & Beauty 15

These Boots are Made for Walking And that’s just what they’ll do.

By Terri Allred

22

By Danielle Teal

19

The Beauty of Winter Caring for your skin during the cold months.

43

11

Girls’ Night Out Color your friendships with a coloring party. The Male Perspective John Edmonds talks about life, love and relationships.

45

Look on the Bright Side Gladys Manion celebrates 90 years. By Tracy Will

47

To Dream Perchance to sleep. By CJ Fosdick

in every issue 7 8 10 60

From the Editor In the Know Marketplace Community Calendar 61 Advertisers Index

36

Remodelers Corner Keeping the Pace Building and remodeling for a growing family. By Bob Freund

39

Careers for Women Architecture, building, construction and (interior) design.

Minnesota Aspirations for Women in Computing Award Recognizes young women in information technology. Rochester MN Moms Blog Building community online and off among moms in Rochester. Local Author Catherine H. Armstrong Weaves fact with fiction in debut novel. By CJ Fosdick

By Sarah Oslund

Healthy Living 48

28

Women & Wine Winter wine activities.

By Nicole L. Czarnomski

31 Hot Chef Bartender Amanda Prince Making drinks in downtown Rochester. By Dawn Sanborn

32

Healthy Comfort Foods Satisfy your comfort food cravings with these nutritious recipes. By Dawn Sanborn

Faces of Heart Disease Four inspiring Rochester women “Go Red.” By Laurie Simon

51

More Than the Winter Blues Seasonal Affective Disorder. By Cindy Mennenga

55

Food & Wine

On the Lighter Side 62

Recycled Creations Glass jar luminaries. By Melissa Eggler

By Becky Montpetit

By Pam Whitfield

27

35

By Anne Scherer

By Kim Zabel

24

Home & Garden

Rochester’s Immigration Community Setting aside fear in favor of facts.

By Catherine H. Armstrong

By Caitlin Summers

Let’s Get Personal

Stand Together Hand-in-Hand Poetry by Somali girls from Rochester STEM Academy.

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016

Trekking on Snowshoes Winter is a fun time of year to play in the parks. By Nicole L. Czarnomski

Travel 57

Stewartville’s Own Little known historic district. By Debi Neville

58

Home Federal’s New Jubilee Travel Club Offers members unique experiences. By Cindy Mennenga

RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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1 Wild Winter Wonderland

from the editor

ISSUE 91, VOLUME 15, NUMBER 6 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2016 PUBLISHERS

Jorrie L. Johnson, MBA Doug Solinger EDITOR

Jorrie L. Johnson, MBA MARKETING ACCOUNT MANAGER

Nikki Kranebell LAYOUT

Tulip Tree Studios GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Tessa Slisz

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Erin Gibbons

COPY EDITOR

Ashley Pikel

PHOTOGRAPHY

Dawn Sanborn Photography Fagan Studios Mike Hardwick Photography HIGH SCHOOL INTERN

Sara Albertelli

RochesterWomen is published six times per year by Women Communications, L.L.C., P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 Subscriptions available for $24 per year (six issues). Send check to the address above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. RochesterWomen assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2016 Women Communications, L.L.C. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. RochesterWomen magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials. Printed in the U.S.A. RochesterWomen is a member of the Minnesota Magazine & Publishing Association, Rochester Area Builders, Inc. and the Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce.

Last winter, I was inspired by the book and movie “Wild,” Cheryl Strayed's account of her 1,000-plus mile hike along the Pacific Crest Trail from the Mojave Desert in California to Washington State. One Saturday in January 2015, I headed to Whitewater State Park for a snowshoeing class and ran into Rochester Women magazine writer Nicole Czarnomski (see Snowshoeing article on page 55). Every weekend (11 to be exact) throughout the winter, I visited Whitewater State Park for classes and hiking up to Inspiration Point or the Elba Fire Tower with my Olde English Bulldogge Roxy. It was a refreshing change to my weekend workout routine. I loved the time alone to listen to the breeze, like Strayed, just to be and breathe. I look forward to the hikes again this winter and encourage you to get outside to combat Seasonal Affective Disorder (see page 51). We are excited to feature our first I Am A Beautiful Rochester Woman winner, Ana Gotmer, age 20. It surprises me that someone as young and beautiful has struggled with depression. Because of her struggles, she now has a more mature, positive attitude toward herself and her future. I hope you, too, are inspired by this young woman. Our community is steeping with successful young women. Twenty-two-year-old Tori Utley is prime for a successful career as an entrepreneur (page 13). This amazing, smart, young woman completed her master’s degree in business administration by the time she was 21 years old. Her professional work and volunteer commitments are also inspiring. High Jorrie enjoys walking Roxy throughout the winter at school girls at Rochester STEM Academy share Whitewater State Park. their poetry about Somalia (page 21), performed in front of local and international audiences over the past year. Two young women from Rochester won Minnesota Aspirations for Women in Computing Awards (2013 and 2015) and are now pursing their aspirations in college (page 43). Gladys Manion is still young at heart with her spunky attitude. She insists on fixing her hair, even before taking an ambulance to the hospital. We can all hope our hearts are as happy and healthy as hers at age 90 (page 27). The American Heart Association reminds us to keep our hearts a priority with the annual Go Red For Women Luncheon (page 49). This winter, I’m reading Elizabeth Gilbert’s new book “Big Magic,” creative living beyond fear. I’m already feeling courageous and enchanted. If you are interested in participating in a “Big Magic” book club, let me know! Stay well and warm this winter,

507-259-6362 • info@RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com For advertising information:

jorrie@RWmagazine.com

507-254-7109

We want to hear from you! Send comments, suggestions, ideas or original recipes to: RochesterWomen Editor, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903-5986 or email: editor@RWmagazine.com. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

7


n the know in the know in the know in the know in the know in the know in the know

THE SCIENCE AND ART OF LIVING A BALANCED AND FULFILLED LIFE Sat., January 23, 2016 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., Assisi Heights, Rochester

This workshop will review components from both science and art that lead to living a life that is fulfilling, driven by purpose and passion. Linda Wieser, Integrative Healing Therapist, will draw upon the works of Sonyo Lyubomirsky’s grant from the National Institute of Health and from Martin Seligman, former president of the American Psychological Association. These sessions will be interactive with meditations, creating a wellness mandala and personal goal setting. $60 per person includes lunch. Pre-registration required by January 18. Register online at rochesterfranciscan. org. For more information contact Angie Grimm at 507-280-2195 or ahsc@ rochesterfranciscan.org.

SOME ENCHANTED EVENING: A VALENTINE DATE NIGHT Sun., February 14, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Assisi Heights, Rochester

“No road is long in good company.” With wit and humor, Jim and Rachel Graber will profile some experiences of fulfillment and balance, beginning with an elbow in the soup, endearing and enduring in their growing relationship. This evening is for spouses, partners, good friends and everyone who appreciates their loved ones. $40 per couple includes appetizers, beverages and dessert. Pre-registration required by February 7.

ROCHESTER COMMUNITY EDUCATION

Rochester Community Education offers a plethora of enrichments classes for adults, adults with exceptional abilities, youth, preschoolers and parents of preschoolers. A couple classes and day trips that are coming up this winter include: Snowshoeing at Root River County Park Sat., February 6, 1-3:30 p.m., $20

Just ONCE Guitar for Busy People, Mon., February 8, 6:30-8 p.m., $29 OF MODERN DAY SLAVERY

Think again.

WOMEN ON WEDNESDAYS AT ROCHESTER CIVIC THEATRE January 13, February 10, March 9, March 13, April 13, May 25, 2016

Complimentary appetizers and cash bar at 5 p.m., presentation and discussion 5:30-7 p.m. Admission free but reservations required. Make your reservation the Monday before each Wednesday’s event by emailing info@rochestercivictheatre.org.

GROWING UP BLACK IN ROCHESTER

“Country Roads: The Music of John Denver” Plymouth Playhouse, Wed., March 2, $79 “Gypsy” at Pantages Theatre,

Sun., March 6, $80

For information about Rochester Community Education enrichment courses, School Age Child Care (SACC) and building (facility) rentals visit rochester. thatscommunityed.com or call the main office at 507-328-4000.

Wed., January 13, 5:30-7 p.m.

BREAKING THE CHAINS OF MODERN DAY SLAVERY Sat., January 16, 8:30am – 12 p.m., Assisi Heights Auditorium, Rocheste, sponsored by the Sisters of Saint Francis

Human trafficking occurs in Rochester and in surrounding communities. Find out what’s being done to put an end to this horrific activity.To register call 507-529-3523, rochesterfranciscan.org

All parents know it’s their job to guide and protect their children. But is it more challenging for people of color to keep their children safe? Are there different lessons that need to be taught and rules that need to be followed? Join a multigenerational conversation about growing up black in Rochester.

INCARCERATED FEMALES: IS ORANGE THE NEW BLACK? Wed., February 10, 5:30-7 p.m.

FILM AND DISCUSSION: “RAPE FOR PROFIT,” Thurs., January 14, 6:30-8:30 p.m., Rochester Public Library, 1st Floor Auditorium

rochesterpubliclibrary.org 8

January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

The hit TV show “Orange is the New Black” has proven to be entertaining, but is it realistic? A panel of those who have actual experience with the jail and prison system will discuss how real-life incarceration affects detainees, their families and the community.

A CHAIR AFFAIR BENEFITING THE BOYS & GIRLS CLUB OF ROCHESTER Sat.,February 27, 2016 wwwachairaffair.org,ltrotman@bgclubroch.org


Be There. What matters most to you in life? It’s a big question. But it’s just one of the many questions I’ll ask to better understand you, your goals and your dreams. All to help you live confidently – both today and well into the future. Kari Douglas CFP®, CRPC®, ChFC®, APMA® Financial Advisor Echelon Wealth Partners A private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. 507.281.4341 4115 26th St NW, Ste 100 Rochester, MN 55901 kari.2.douglas@ampf.com ameripriseadvisors.com/kari.2.douglas CA Insurance #0F39661 Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC. © 2015 Ameriprise Financial, Inc. All rights reserved. (10/15)

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UPCOMING COLORING PARTY Join us at Broadway Bar & Pizza on Thursday, February 4 from 7-9 p.m. $15 fee includes markers and the totes for coloring. Reserve your spot at the party by contacting Amy Kastler at 507-272-2500 or email her at amykastler@yahoo.com.

GIRLS’ NIGHT OUT

COLOR

For more information visit the Rochester Women magazine Facebook page.

Photo By Kim Zabel

YOUR FRIENDSHIPS

WITH A COLORING PARTY

I

T STARTED WITH A QUIET, STIRRED EXCITEMENT. APPETIZERS AND DRINKS WERE ORDERED, AND AS WE SAT AROUND THE TABLE AT STUMBLE INN 2 IN PLAINVIEW, THERE WAS A MIXTURE OF ELEMENTS— SMALL, LOW CHATTER INTERSPERSED WITH LAUGHTER, SOMETIMES TWO OR THREE CONVERSATIONS LAYERED AND OVERLAPPING AND COLORED SHARPIES BEING SHARED AMONG US ALL. “WHO HAS THE PURPLE MARKER?” SOMEONE ASKS, GLANCING UP FROM HER COLORING.

COLORING OUTSIDE THE LINES The objects we colored were a bit unusual from what might normally be used at a coloring party. They are not the typical pages from the adult coloring books seen in bookstores. Instead, we attended a Thirty-One Gifts party led by independent consultant, Amy Kastler. Our

BY KIM ZABEL

project for the party was a small, canvas container or tote called an Oh Snap Bin. The canvas container has a black background with a white pattern that is designed to be colored. Each tote has a slightly different outline, so each one will be individualized to the person coloring it. “These are so useful. It’s not like regular coloring on paper. It’s purposeful and productive,” Gina Ihrke, one of the guests, says. The black background soaks up any imperfections, making the project surprisingly forgiving. “You don’t even have to stay within the lines,” Marie Zabel says. “You can’t mess it up.” At first, it seemed as if working with the totes would be awkward. They are threedimensional objects, after all, and not a flat sheet of paper. It turned out to be an easy task, as most of us placed one hand inside the tote for stability and colored happily away with our marker in the other.

COLORING FRIENDSHIPS Over and over I heard my friends tell one another how much fun they were having at the party. What makes coloring so relaxing and fun? “It does release endorphins and slows your mind down,” Liz Bechel, our resident art therapist, tells us. Just like friendships, our coloring party allowed us to relax with one another. We discussed what it means to be a good friend. To one, it meant honesty. To another, loyalty. “This is something we could do all winter long,” Sue Sandberg Tangen says, as she

contemplates planning a coloring party for children at the library where she works. Rachel sits down with Amy to plan the next party that she will host. We all hope we can attend the next one.

COLORING FOR A CAUSE Joanne Melbostad first started coloring to relax. She bought several books such as “Color Me Calm: 100 Coloring Templates for Meditation and Relaxation” by Lacy Mucklow and Angela Porter and a package of colored pencils. This was the beginning of her coloring journey. She enjoyed how freeing it felt to color. “It doesn’t have to be totally perfect,” she says. “I just like to have fun with it.” Then she wondered what she was going to do with all the colored pages that had helped her relax. Her answer was to give back this calming gift to others in the form of “cheer cards.” Cheer cards are pages of coloring that Joanne adheres to cardstock. She cuts out the colored portion and turns the pages into cards. She works with her church congregation and makes about 10-15 of these a month. In essence, Joanne is coloring the gift of friendship—a gift that always gives back. Kim Zabel, a Plainview-based freelance writer and photographer, is a musician, artist, Zumba instructor and lover of the land here in Minnesota.

In addition to writing, Kim Zabel enjoys coloring. Watch for her new regular Girls’ Night Out column in Rochester Women magazine this year. If you have an ideas for Girls’ Night Out, please contact editor@RWmagazine.com. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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women in leadership

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TO DO GOOD

CHANGE THE WORLD

TORI UTLEY HAS WHAT IT TAKES TO BE A SUCCESSFUL ENTREPRENEUR BY TRISH AMUNDSON

“ALWAYS REMEMBER THAT YOU ARE CAPABLE. THERE IS NO HANDBOOK THAT SAYS WHO IS OR IS NOT ELIGIBLE OF HAVING AN IDEA THAT COULD CHANGE THE WORLD. IT COULD BE YOU, AND MOVE FORWARD WITH THE EXCITEMENT AND CONFIDENCE THAT IT IS YOU,” SAYS TORI UTLEY. Increasingly, women are turning their dreams into reality, building and running prosperous businesses from the ground up. National role models like Melinda Gates, Oprah Winfrey and Beyoncé are influencing, inspiring and shaping the world. Entrepreneur Barbie doll—complete with her own tablet, smartphone and Twitter chats—is a model of empowerment for girls. And locally, 22-year-old Tori Utley is climbing up the ladder of entrepreneurial success, rung by rung, building on strong principles that will help her change the world.

DETERMINATION A Rochester-area native, Utley attended post-secondary school at Rochester Community and Technical College. She completed her Bachelor of Science in

Psychology and Addiction Studies and Master of Business Administration through Liberty University by the age of 21. Now, driven to do more, she is pursuing innovative endeavors. “As an entrepreneur, I work jointly in the fields of addiction recovery, philanthropy and technology innovation,” says Utley, who ambitiously is leading two startup companies.

INSPIRATION She is founder and executive director of More Than An Addict, a nonprofit organization that promotes education, employment and entrepreneurship for individuals in recovery from addiction. She also is working toward short-term services for those placed on wait lists for residential treatment or halfway housing to keep them “safe, sober, now.” On top of this, she serves as founder and CEO of Tinua, an early-stage startup tech and social venture company that seeks to reduce monetary waste to impact the world on a global level. “I get my inspiration from my faith in God and the desire to do good for the world,” says Utley. “Every day we are faced with need locally, nationally and globally. I want to be the kind of person that sees a problem and solves it.”

COMMITMENT “In my experience, credibility and partnerships develop as I step out of my comfort zone and commit to being teachable,” she says. “Sometimes taking a risk to put yourself—and your ideas—out there can be one of the most effective ways to learn, network and grow your idea into a tangible business.” “I’ll never have all of the answers,” she says. “Asking for help and being honest when I am unsure about what to do are critical values to being a good leader and making the best decisions for a project or company.”

PASSION Utley pushes toward the promise of helping others. “Grit, determination and passion, as well as incredible mentors, have helped me get to where I am today,” she says. Recognized for her aspirations and accomplishments, Tori attended the Forbes Under 30 Summit in 2014 and 2015 and presented at Mayo Clinic’s Transform Conference in 2015. “These experiences were incredibly valuable and allowed me to speak about my companies and my passions.”

PURPOSE “In addition to my entrepreneurial endeavors, I have been blessed with an exciting, fulfilling career at Mayo Clinic, where I have learned so much about leadership and working with purpose,” says Utley. “I would not be where I am today without the mentors, experiences and opportunities Mayo Clinic has given me.” She also works with Mission 21, an anti-human trafficking organization. “When you love all that you do, it really doesn’t feel like work. Outside of work, I love to play music and spend time with friends and family,” she adds. Truly, Tori Utley has what it takes to be a successful entrepreneur and change the world—including a tablet, smartphone, Twitter accounts and website (toriutley.com). She feeds her soul by doing good work and leads forward with excitement and confidence. Trish Amundson is a Rochester-area freelance writer. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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s t o o B T hese ade AreM king l a W r fo

fashion

AND THAT’S JUST WHAT THEY’LL DO BY DANIELLE TEAL

BOOT CUFFS

BOOTS “I love fashion myself. Me, my mom and my sister—it’s our hobby. Picking out things that are beautiful on any figure, that compliments their attitude,” Jessica Pearson, co-owner of Flowers by Jerry Lux Boutique. “We’ve noticed the latest trends arrive later to the midwest, so we’re bringing them here when we see them. Ankle boots are the latest trend. We also see more western style boots in fashion.”

SOREL

DANIELLE IS WEARING CLOTHES from Flowers by Jerry Lux Boutique, Vintage grey/black with wood heel, Diba True, $149 Grey speckled cowl neck sweater, Renee, $59 Rabbit vest, Peri Luxe, $279 Black mid-rise super skinny jeans, Mavi Adriana, $118

“People want boots that are warm but attractive. SOREL does a great job combining fashion meets function. They’re perfect for our climate,” says Angela Lowther employee at Tyrol Ski & Sports. SOREL boots can handle temperatures as low as 25 degrees below zero. They range in price from $160-$220 at Tyrol Ski & Sports.

DANSKO “We’re the largest dealer for Dankso in all of Minnesota. The quality of a Dankso boot will last a long time. They’re comfortable and you can stand in them all day,” explains Netta Putzier, owner of Rochester Feed & Country Store. “They’re the most comfortable shoe I’ve ever worn. Six months pregnant, on my feet nine hours a day, I could stand on my feet a couple more hours on top of that. My feet don’t hurt at all,” claims Tori Baumann, employee at Rochester Feed & Country Store. Dansko boots at Rochester Feed & Country Store are priced $200-$275.

“I think boot cuffs are popular because of their versatility and add a different element of style to an outfit. Add a pop of color or change up the look of your boot with something simple,” explains Tiffany Bowers owner of Blue Daisy Crochet (etsy.com/shop/ BlueDaisyCrochet). “I look at patterns and pick the ones that are the most aesthetically pleasing. I look for designs that are simple yet eye-catching...ones that can be worn with a few different outfits.” Tiffany made a New Year’s resolution to learn something new and started to crochet two years ago. As soon as she got her first set of hooks, she was “hooked.” She really loves creating items with her own colors and designs. A lot of her inspiration comes from things she has seen online or in stores. She looks at something and thinks, “I can make that!” Tiffany loves going into a craft store and browsing through the yarns aisles. It gives her a sense of peace, and the colors inspire her too. She’s a Minnesota girl at heart so a lot of her inspiration also comes from lakes, wildflowers, being up north in the woods and nature in general. She wants to harness those colors and make them into something beautiful that people can enjoy and bring them a bit of peace. It is really uplifting and wondrous to see someone wearing something she’s made. Danielle Teal is a freelance writer and can often be found wearing a pair of her favorite tall boots.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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2 I Am A Beautiful

cover story

Rochester Woman TWENTY-YEAR-OLD ANA GOTMER

Professional photographers Dawn Sanborn and Tracey McGuire are moved to help women see their true beauty through the power of photography and asked Rochester Women magazine to partner with them. We transformed the Extraordinary Rochester Women Award into the I Am A Beautiful Rochester Woman program. Instead

of featuring all six winners on the cover of the January/February issue, we are featuring one or more in each issue of Rochester Women magazine throughout 2016. We hope as we show women how beautiful they truly are that you are inspired to see your own beauty.

OUR FIRST

I Am A Beautiful Rochester Woman

Ana’s makeover was done by Katie M. Kirckof, and her hair was cut and colored by Lisa Richardson at Urban Sanctuary. 16

January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

Nominations for the I Am A Beautiful Rochester Woman were due October 2015. The organizers gathered around a table and read 20 nominations. Half of the nominations were self-nominations, and the other half were nominated by friends and family who see beauty in other women who don’t see it in themselves. In November 2015, Dawn Sanborn and Tracey McGuire had the pleasure of taking Ana Gotmer out for what she thought was for her birthday lunch at Casablanca to tell her that she had been selected to be our first I Am A Beautiful Rochester Woman winner. Ana’s positive attitude about who she is and what she will do in her nomination essay titled “Beauty” is inspirational to women of all ages. Ana says about being selected for I Am A Beautiful Rochester Woman , “I felt really great, not for me (maybe a little bit for me), but for the fact that this could be my chance to inspire so many people.” Her advice to other women is, “Even if you have to look in a mirror, it helps to pick out at least one thing you love about yourself.”


BEAUTY BY ANA GOTMER

1

cover story

I did not feel beautiful when my mother was diagnosed with lung cancer six years ago. I did not feel beautiful when I was diagnosed with severe depression shortly after. I did not feel beautiful when I realized that most of the people closest to my heart were nothing but toxic. I did not feel beautiful when I gave into everything everyone ever said about me. I did not feel beautiful when my father was diagnosed with early onset Alzheimer’s two short years ago. I did not feel beautiful when I went through all of the consequences of depression. But now I am starting to realize...life should never be about the “(I) did nots” but the “(I) am” or “(I) will.” I will become myself again. I am beautiful because my depression cannot define me. I will not let people choose my fate for me. My name is Anastasiya Gotmer. I was adopted from Russia by two of the most wonderful people I know. I am 20 years old and an aspiring photographer. I am currently a student at the New York Institute of Photography, a part-time receptionist (at Intrigue Hair Studio), and a full-time fur baby mom to a beautiful German Shepherd Husky mix who gives me life each and every single day. I studied photography under Dawn Sanborn, photographer and writer for Rochester Women Magazine. She has kept me under her wing ever since. My favorite quote is, “How lucky I am to have something that makes saying goodbye so hard.” I have a wonderful boyfriend who takes care of me and is extremely patient even though he lives two states away (in Michigan). Loving yourself is not easy. I have struggled to gain confidence for over six years now. I cannot leave the house without at least putting makeup on first, afraid I will be ridiculed. Just this once, I would love to love myself. I would love to finally become who I remember being years ago.

Ana is wearing a black dress provided by Kokoon.

THANKS TO OUR GENEROUS SPONSORS FOR MAKING ANA GOTMER FEEL BEAUTIFUL!

GOLD SPONSORS

BRONZE SPONSORS Camy Couture, Crossings at Carnegie, Kokoon, Premier Banks, WInona Radio Special thank you to Elizabeth Harris, our summer 2015 intern, who helped secure sponsors for I Am A Beautiful Rochester Woman.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

17


The black and white patterned dress Ana wore to her reveal party is from Camy Couture located downtown in Rochester.

REVEAL PARTY Ana’s parents, Alfred and Candis Gotmer, her best friend and meter-plugger (during the makeover), Alysha Langfod, and additional friends and sponsors all came together for Ana’s reveal party at Forager Brewery. Laughter, tears and supportive words were offered as the guests recognized Ana’s sense of humor, smile and possibilities for a future in front of the camera in addition to her passion for being behind the camera. Ana says, “I want to thank my parents. I got bullied a lot when I was younger, and they helped me see that everyone has scars, blemishes, stretch marks or wrinkles. It’s up to you how you see yourself, don’t let anyone ever change who you are.”

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Let us make you FEEL that way! Contact us about your very own makeover session and remember what it is it like to find your BEAUTIFUL.

507-252-4662 dawn.sanborn@live.com

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12/21/15 3:57 PM


The Beauty of Winter

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beauty

CARING FOR YOUR SKIN DURING THE COLD MONTHS BY CAITLIN SUMMERS

WE LIVE IN MINNESOTA, WHICH MEANS COLD WEATHER IS INEVITABLE. TO SURVIVE IN THE FROZEN TUNDRA WE CALL HOME, WE STILL NEED TO GET OUT AND BE ACTIVE. HOWEVER, THE DRYNESS OF WINTER OFTEN LEAVES US WITH CRACKED, BUMPY, UNCOMFORTABLE SKIN. We already put our skin through enough during the summer months with exposure to heat and sun, so why do we wait until our skin becomes dehydrated before we really take action? Your skin is the first line of defense for your body, but if you don't take care of it, it becomes weakened and brittle. Skincare experts Jennifer Sanneman, owner of Essence Skin Clinic. Kory Tuominen, M.D., owner of Ansara Medical Spa, gave us the inside scoop on how to take care of your skin.

Photo Provided by Holly Roe, Refined Skin Medi-Spa

LASER IN ON YOUR SKIN When it gets colder outside, the moisture from the air seems to disappear. Our skin reacts to the bitter temperature, and all of our summer damage reveals itself in the form of dry, red, chapped skin. The first thing you can do is see your local skin care professional. The experts at Ansara Medical Spa and Essence Skin Clinic use laser treatment to remove sun-damaged skin, making skin look and feel younger and smoother. A typical laser treatment requires three to five visits but can visibly reduce wrinkles by 40 percent. Dr. Tuominen believes in the mantra, "peel, nourish, protect." After laser treatments, a great moisturizing lotion is exactly the nourishment your skin needs. Using a non-toxic moisturizer will help lock in moisture, keeping skin hydrated. Lotions tend to provide more moisture for the skin than a serum, so if you use something light in the summer, consider switching to Refined Skin Medi-Spa a denser lotion in the winter. At Exclusive Regenlite rejuvenation laser. Essence Skin Clinic, they formulate No pain. No downtime. Great skin! their own products, so you can get the right product for your skin type.

SKIN CARE AT HOME Dr. Tuominen believes the key to protection is, "sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen!" You've heard it before: We need to use sunscreen in the summer, but it's cloudy in the winter so that doesn't matter right? Both of our experts stressed that sunscreen is a year-round necessity for skin protection. Getting a humidifier helps keep the air in your home moist. Get a large humidifier for the whole home or a couple of small ones to put around the house. Jennifer at Essence Skin Clinic also noted that if you don't have a humidifier, household plants release moisture into the air, which can help alleviate dryness. We stomp around snow and slush this time of year, so make sure your gloves and socks are dry. Damp clothing can dry out skin further, so if you find that yours are consistently damp, bring extras with you to work or on your winter wonderland outings. Jennifer advises her clients to make their own skincare concoctions at home using household products. She recommends a blend of coconut oil and sugar for a great exfoliating scrub for the whole body. I personally use this mixture with a few drops of lemon essential oil, and I love it.

TREAT THE WHOLE BODY As if we need more reasons to exercise and eat healthy, having good skin doesn't typically top the list as reasons we should eat broccoli and hit the gym. Our experts told us that really focusing on eating well and staying active can keep skin strong and nourished. Keep your skin hydrated by drinking water. Winter can be a harder time to drink water because it's cold out and a warm, frothy cappuccino sounds much better, right? Try a warm cup of water with a slice of lemon or a decaffeinated green tea when you need something warm. Caitlin Summers is a local certified personal trainer and nutrition and wellness consultant.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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1

Stand Together Hand-in-Hand

community

POETRY BY SOMALI GIRLS FROM ROCHESTER STEM ACADEMY BY TERRI ALLRED

I

Somalia

T BEGAN AS A CHALLENGE. VISITING SPOKEN WORD ARTIST FRANK SENTWALI PROMPTED HIS CLASS AT ROCHESTER STEM ACADEMY TO CREATE SOMETHING NEW. THE STUDENTS HAD WRITTEN POETRY BEFORE BUT NEVER ON A BLANK CANVAS. THAT WAS THE BEGINNING OF THE JOURNEY THAT WOULD ULTIMATELY TAKE THESE TALENTED POETS TO AUGSBURG COLLEGE WHERE THEY PERFORMED IN FRONT OF FORMER PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER AND AN INTERNATIONAL COMMUNITY AT THE 2015 YOUTH FORUM AS PART OF THE NOBEL PEACE PRIZE FORUM.

There is a vibrant Somali community in Rochester, and many of the youth attend STEM. Bisharo Nahir, a senior at STEM, explains, “We tell stories and share poetry in our community. When Dr. Rossi [director of STEM] was trying to decide what we were all good at, he concluded that we all talk, a lot.” Oral tradition and storytelling are integral parts of the Somali culture, so it wasn’t a stretch to understand why writing and sharing poetry became a major part of the curriculum there. The second writing assignment brought four young women—Bishara Nahir, Hibaq Mohamed, Sagal Abdi and Muna Abdiasis— together to co-create a piece about who they are and who they are not. Living as Somalis in the United States can be a difficult experience, for teenage girls especially. “We have a triple whammy,” Sagal shares. “We are girls. We are African-American. We are Muslim. If you don’t tell people who you are, they will just make assumptions.”

This assignment allowed them to break stereotypes and share what they celebrate about their home country.

EAST AFRICA’S MOST BEAUTIFUL The group of four girls gathered for three intense days to write the piece, “East Africa’s Most Beautiful: Somalia.” “Frank taught us to write the details and allow the framework to come out later,” says Bisharo. Their framework became a powerfully written and beautifully performed poem that they first presented at Rochester International Association’s World Festival 2015.

PERFORMING POETRY Initially, they didn’t understand what it meant to perform a piece of poetry. They recited their work but their instructor wanted them to go deeper. “[Frank] wanted third-degree burns,” laughs Hibaq, “I didn’t think I could be that powerful.” Soon they learned the storytelling arts of facial expression, choreography and modulating the projection of their voices.

Photo courtesy of Terri Allred.

I am Somalia You never met a force as strong as me I come from a country that breeds revolutionaries Sent soldiers and brothers to Angola, South Africa, Mozambique Taught the world how to stand on its own two feet What we are is what they wish they could be A country of speakers Poetry in our heart Beautiful songs on our tongues I may never have seen it But vividly I dream it. Muna and Sagal at the Rochester International Association World Festival 2015.

Photo taken by Terri Allred.

BREAK STEREOTYPES AND CELEBRATE

Afrika Is where we all come from A piece of it lives within all of us A land as old as time itself Jagged edges divide the land Yet we all stand together hand-in-hand

Sagal Abdi, Bisharo Nahir and Hibaq Mohamed of Rochester STEM Academy.

Even experiencing the performance wasn’t enough to impress upon the performers the depth of their impact. “We didn’t know we had that potential, that impact on the audience, until we saw the video of our performance. It was really powerful,” Sagal remembers. A large part of sharing their work is accurately being able to read or assess the audience and their potential reaction. “Regardless of what you write, you regulate your performance to the audience,” explains Bisharo. During their performance at Augsburg College, there were over 1,000 people in the audience, with countries streaming in live from all over the world. When the girls took the stage, they realized that the audience had begun snapping their fingers in cadence with the poetry and vocalizing affirmations. They were emboldened to put their hearts and souls into the performance resulting in a standing ovation from the audience. Rochester STEM Academy students will be performing at the World Festival on Friday April 29, 2016 at 7 p.m. at Mayo High School. Other performances will be listed on the STEM web site as they are scheduled: rochesterstemacademy.org. Terri is the owner of Third Eye Tribal Dance Studio and Business Consulting. She lives in Rochester with her husband and two sons. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

21


community

2

Rochester’s Immigration Community SETTING ASIDE FEAR IN FAVOR OF FACTS BY CATHERINE H. ARMSTRONG

I

MMIGRATION HAS BECOME A HOT TOPIC, FIRST WITH THE QUESTION OF WHETHER THOSE WHO ARE HERE IN THE UNITED STATES ILLEGALLY SHOULD BE DEPORTED, AND NOW WITH RECENT TERRORIST EVENTS OVERSEAS LEAVING MANY TO QUESTION WHETHER THE UNITED STATES SHOULD CLOSE HER BORDERS TO SYRIAN REFUGEES. IT’S DIFFICULT TO IGNORE THE PERVASIVE FEAR OF THE UNKNOWN, AND ROCHESTER IMMIGRATION ATTORNEY SUSANNAH NICHOLS OF RYAN AND GRINDE LAW FIRM UNDERSTANDS THESE CONCERNS.

RELOCATING TO THE UNITED STATES “I understand the fear,” Nichols comments. “You’re letting a stranger into your house and you don’t know 100 percent what they’re going to do.” However, according to Nichols, it’s important to understand that the process of relocating to the United States as a refugee is neither swift, nor easy. In fact, the process is so stringent that it takes nearly two years to complete. Catherine Bauer, an immigration attorney with Bauer Law Firm, agrees. “Each year the government decides the number of refugees they will accept. Those refugees are then processed with nonprofit organizations and then relocated to areas not currently overpopulated,” Bauer explains. This process traditionally takes a minimum of 18 months, but new legislation passed Susannah Nichols is an immigration attorney with Ryan and Grinde by congress in late November now Law Firm. requires a stricter look at those seeking refuge, and will likely add an 22

January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

additional six months to this process. Syrian refugees currently applying for asylum in the United States will likely not arrive until late 2017 at the earliest.

IMMIGRANTS IN ROCHESTER The United States—and Rochester in particular—has always been especially welcoming to immigrants. According to the 2004 “McGill Report,” Minnesota has traditionally seen a higher number of immigrants than most other states. The report attributes these numbers to the active sponsorship of Lutheran and Catholic charities and the tradition of stable social services offerings. With what appears to be an increase in immigrants to Rochester, some citizens have voiced concerns regarding what effect the immigrant population might have on local resources for social services. Bauer addresses these concerns head-on and states that these worries are largely unfounded. Before relocating to Catherine Bauer is an immigration the United States, “[Immigrants] attorney with Bauer Law Firm. must be able to show that they will not apply for public benefits,” Bauer explains. With the exception of refugees who come here with little more than the clothing on their backs, immigrants are sponsored by organizations or individuals who sign a contract with the federal government promising that they will be fully responsible for their financial support. As a result, these immigrants are not afforded the opportunity to apply for social service programs, and their sponsors may face serious legal penalties if they attempt to apply. Carole Pasternak, an immigration attorney at Klampe, Delehanty and Pasternak Law Firm, agrees. “The idea that we’re going to get 100,000 refugees and they’re going to use all of our resources is not likely. Most of the refugees that we see are looking to work and better their lives.”


1

HERE TEMPORARILY FOR WORK AND EDUCATION

community

APPLY FOR PERMANENT RESIDENCY

According to Bauer, Nichols and Pasternak, it’s important to note that Rochester’s immigrant population is not limited to those seeking refuge from war-torn countries. In fact, a good percentage of immigrants to Rochester come here by request from large companies who are seeking employees with unique skill sets not easily found among our citizens. Additionally, some of these immigrants relocate here temporarily for an opportunity to learn from our education system and take those skills back to their home countries. Nichols estimates that roughly 75 percent of Rochester’s immigrant residents are here legally, and many are here with strong occupational Carole Pasternak is an immigration guidelines that allow them to work attorney with Klampe, Delehanty and Pasternak Law Firm. here for a period of time before returning to their home countries.

Bauer has personal experience with this as she, herself, is an immigrant from France. In 1997, Bauer followed her husband to Louisiana on a three-year exchange visa to pursue medicine. While there, their plans changed, allowing them the opportunity to remain permanently. “After the first year, we played in what is called the ‘diversity lottery.’” Bauer explains. This “diversity lottery” is hosted by the State Department and allows for a random computer drawing among legal immigrants who, if selected, are granted the opportunity to apply for permanent residency. Bauer’s number was drawn, and in the years that followed, Bauer (who was trained in France as a physical therapist) went back to school to pursue a degree in law. Since then, she and her husband have relocated to Rochester, raised a family and taken the final steps to become American citizens. “We’re all immigrants, for the most part,” Nichols explains, estimating that 99 percent of us descended from immigrants or are immigrants ourselves.

Catherine H. Armstrong is a 1992 graduate of the University of Oklahoma, an avid blogger and the author of the historical fiction novel, “The Edge of Nowhere,” under the pen name C.H. Armstrong. For more information, visit charmstrongbooks.com.

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Rochester STEM Academy has been growing its PSEO Program over the past 3 years and now over 20% of our students have passed the ACCUPLACER Collage Entrance Exam and are enrolled either full or part time at RCTC. We focus on English and math preparation to assure that our students are college-ready as soon as possible. Our PSEO Program includes transportation, college coaching, homework help, and a PSEO Seminar class at RSA is required of all PSEO participants. For more information go to www.rochesterstemacademy.org or call Dr.Rossi at 612-310-6925 Commonweal_JF16.indd 1

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12/18/15 RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

9:40 AM

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let's get personal

2

the MALE perspective LIFE, LOVE AND RELATIONSHIPS BY PAM WHITFIELD Name: John Edmonds Hometown: New York City, New York Age: 68 Relationship: Married to Karen Teenagers Living at Home: Kira, Jaeden and Kalia Adult Children: Rachel, Dane, and Nor Job: Supervisor of Family Support Programs, Olmsted County Child & Family Services EDITOR: Can you explain your involvement with Project Legacy? JOHN: My involvement with Project Legacy has been to assist with the planning and the articulation of the philosophy and mission of the program. I think my greatest contribution has been in supporting Karen. My personal passion and work has focused on the issues of racism, disproportionality and inequality that impacts AfricanAmericans and other people of color. Much of my work has focused on analyzing and strategizing about systemic racism (on a macro-level), but I've also contributed practice (micro) level models. Project Legacy is one of those micro-level models which is highly effective in creating a healthy pathway to the future. By its very nature, it relies heavily on positive, nurturing relationships. PAM: How did you meet Karen? JOHN: We met online, back before that was a thing. People were very skeptical of it at the time. Folks thought she was crazy when she came east to visit me in New York. They thought she would come home stuffed in a trunk. PAM: Can we say that you moved across the country for love? 24

January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

JOHN: They asked me that in my job interview with Olmsted County. And I told them, “Yes.” I had a friend from NYC who went to college in Minnesota and eventually settled down here. So I made many trips out here in the 1970s. I’d always wanted to live in Minnesota.

John Edmonds is a great father to his own children and a good father-figure to many young people through Project Legacy.

When I was 47, I began to reevaluate where my life was heading, reevaluate my pursuit of money. Then I had a pivotal moment: My boss, a woman whom I really respected and cared about, died of breast cancer, pretty quickly. That deeply affected me and made me think about relationships and what was meaningful. My priority ceased to be my salary; it became, “Am I doing something that is important to me?” When I arrived in Rochester, I didn’t have a job, but I had confidence. There were many things I could do, and I knew I could survive. I was hired within a week. I became the first African-American social worker for Olmsted County Child & Family Services. I was hired to work specifically with AfricanAmerican clients, to do child protective services and develop programs for that population, and that was fine with me.

The people who find themselves in child protection often are coming out of poverty and large urban centers. Coming to Rochester is a culture shock for them, and I understood that. I experienced it myself when I first arrived in 1997. It used to be, if I saw another African-American person around, it was startling. Back then,

“I had a pivotal moment: My boss, a woman whom I really respected and cared about, died of breast cancer, pretty quickly. That deeply affected me and made me think about relationships and what was meaningful.”


1

Time to Time to Time Take Care Take Care Care Take of You! of You! You! of

Rochester was nowhere near as diverse as it is today, and it’s still not that diverse. PAM: You have diversity within your family too. JOHN: Yes. Kira and Jaeden are our biological children, and Kalia is adopted. We also have a grown daughter, Nor, whom we consider to be our daughter, though it’s not a legal relationship. Karen had a friendship with a Hmong woman whose family had come to the U.S. at the end of the Vietnam War. Her husband had died in the war. When she emigrated, she brought seven children, including Nor and Yer. When Nor was 6, their mother died of cancer. So Karen took them both in. I entered the picture when Nor was 9; we raised her together. Yer eventually left to live in St. Paul. Nor became the first member of her entire extended family to go to college (at St. Olaf). Photo taken by Cathleen Murphy Photography

PAM: My kids are bi-racial, and people used to ask me if they were adopted. Have you had any experiences like that? JOHN: Karen has gotten some weird questions about our kids, like, “Where did you get them?” People do look at us strangely sometimes. And people feel this sort of freedom to come up and say things. It’s a little invasive. How can we help people to be more sensitive? PAM: How do you feel about raising three teenagers later in life? JOHN: I’m a late-in-life dad. That has positives and negatives associated with it. The positive is that I wasn’t ready to be a father when I was younger, so it’s good that I waited. Kira was born when I was 50. I was ready to be a dad then. I had my priorities in order. Because of the timing, it was easy for me to say, “This is the most important thing for me now.” I don’t want to miss anything my kids do. PAM: What about the “con” side to being a late-in-life dad? JOHN: The down side is that you get to 50, and you don’t have the energy that you used to. Then you get to 60, and it’s even worse. I [probably] won’t live to see certain significant events of my kids’ lives, and I regret that. But I wouldn’t change my timing in terms of becoming a father.

let’s get personal

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PAM: You could retire now. JOHN: I have a job that I’m very invested in because it squares with my values. I love what I do. It’s fun and I’m passionate about it, but I can still be very present in my kids’ lives as a father. Why would I even consider retiring?

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Pam Whitfield is a teacher, writer, horse show judge and spoken word artist. In 2011, she won the Minnesota professor of the year award from the Carnegie Foundation.

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Look onthe

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let’s get personal

GLADYS MANION CELEBRATES 90 YEARS BY TRACY WILL

FOOD LOVE: After we got married, Marv and I lived in Rushford. I worked in two restaurants until we got our own coffee shop. When you add it up, I worked in restaurants for about 40 years. I've always loved to cook, even when I was little. When I was about 10 years old, I perfected a one-egg cake. It was beautiful. TAKING A STAND: When Peggy was a baby, she got sick. I felt that I needed to go to work that day anyway. Marv called me at work to tell me that Peggy was getting worse, and he asked if I could come home to check on her. I told my boss I had to go home because my little girl was very ill. He said if I went home, I could just stay home because my job wouldn't be there when I came back. I wasn't going to let that stop me. I replied, "That's fine with me. I don't have to come back." In a couple of minutes, he apologized. He told me I could go. He didn't want to lose me.

l Nikki Kranebel anddaughter gr r he d . an 11 n 20 Gladys Manio n’s wedding in r Sara Manio all dolled up fo

A TIME FOR LAUGHTER: My mother, Nellie, and I had lots of good laughs together. One time, we were putting wallpaper on the kitchen ceiling. We set up a scaffolding, so we could reach up there. We started in the middle and worked our way out, putting up the paper as we went. It was heavy, heavy stuff. As we made it to the walls, the paper in the middle came down and fell on top of us. We were on the scaffolding, underneath that heavy wallpaper, and we got the giggles. We laughed and laughed. I've never forgotten that. I don't know how, but we finally did get the wallpaper to stay up. HAPPY MEMORIES: We went to Texas in the winter for many years. They would have dances. Marv didn't always go to those dances with me because he had a foot that sometimes bothered him. One particular night he did, and he loved to dance. I requested they play "Cab Driver," our favorite song. We got up to dance, and the people

Jackson Kra neb helping his g ell, 15, randmother Gladys curl her hair to get ready for her 90th birthda y part y.

Photo submitte

EARLY DAYS: I was born in 1925 in Hart, Minnesota. My earliest memory is when I was about 3 years old. Someone came to our house taking pictures. That was unusual. I have a picture of myself then. I got to sit on my little red chair in the front yard, and my sister let me wear her beads. They were a long, long string. I remember how proud I was to wear my sister Lucille's beads for that picture.

d by Nikki Kr anebell.

HOMETOWN: Rushford, Minnesota AGE: 90 FAMILY: Wed in 1946, Gladys and Marvin Manion were married for 62 years. The couple had three children—Stephen, Peggy and Gerald. Gladys now has five grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren, with another due in February 2016.

cleared the floor for us. Just Marv and I were out there dancing together. It's a special memory that makes me cry, but they are happy tears. THE NEXT GENERATION: I dearly love my grandchildren, and the little greatgrandchildren are so precious. That's one of the pluses of getting old: You get to see children grow up. A SUNNY OUTLOOK: I'm a happy person. At the restaurant, they called me "Smiles." I've had my sad times, but I surprise myself by how I've been able to handle those things. I think maybe you get stronger over the years. How come I've lived to be 90? I think part of it is that I don't carry a grudge, and I try not to dwell on the bad things. Sometimes you have to just let stuff go and look on the bright side. I've got a good life.

Tracy Will is a freelance writer who lives and works in Rochester. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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food & wine

2 WINTER WINE ACTIVITIES BY NICOLE L. CZARNOMSKI

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INTER CAN BE LONG AND DREARY, AND IT CAN MAKE MANY OF US WANT TO HIBERNATE AT HOME (WITH A GOOD GLASS OF WINE). GET YOURSELF OUT THIS WINTER WITH OTHERS WHO ALSO ENJOY FESTIVE SPIRITS AND A GOOD TASTING WINE.

OUTDOOR WONDERLAND Add SocialICE to your social calendar February 18, 19 and 20, 2016. The Rochester Downtown Alliance hosts this event in its eighth year, transforming Peace Plaza into an outdoor wonderland. It features seven 12-foot, uniquely designed and themed ice bars from select restaurants and bars in the downtown area. Rochester Downtown Alliance Executive Director Jenna Bowman says, “The ambiance this event creates is fantastic. It gives people a reason to get outside in our colder months. There are also unique events like marriage proposals that make SocialICE pretty amazing.” Initially, the purpose of the event was to allure people downtown for fancy cocktails, great music and creative sculptures. But there’s been a push to get folks to move inside and visit other establishments for appetizers or dinner, which can make the evening more enjoyable. But before you go inside to thaw out, take advantage of all there is to offer outside. Because this is a visual experience, pick up a selfie stick from the information kiosk and pose with your pals in front of your favorite themed ice bar. Bowman says, “Visitors are encouraged to take pictures and use #SocialICE on their social media platforms. We anticipate giveaways and promotions for those who post images with #SocialICE.” After you return the selfie stick to the information kiosk, pick up a token and vote for your favorite themed ice bar. Then ask where to find the airplane-shaped ice sculpture and register to win two free travel vouchers courtesy of the Rochester International Airport.

SOCIALICE February 18, 19 & 20, 2016 Peace Plaza Downtown Rochester 5-9 p.m. Thursday 4-10 p.m. Friday and Saturday downtownrochestermn.com/events/socialice

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January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

SocialICE photos submitted by Rochester Downtown Alliance.


Photo taken by Brian Hale with Bear Creek Services

WINE FOR A GOOD CAUSE

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food & wine

STYLE & DESIGN IN PERFECT BALANCE

Bear Creek hosts the annual Wines of the World on Friday, March 4, 2016 to raise money for group home residences. Bear Creek Services Operations and Events Coordinator Pam Alberts says, “This is our largest fundraiser of the year, and this year we’re celebrating the 25th anniversary of Wines of the World, so we’re going all out.” Bear Creek Services provides group homes in Rochester for developmentally disabled individuals or folks with traumatic brain injury. Alberts says, “We want our residents to be active members of the community. We provide residents with the staff and tools to make that happen.” She says many of the residents of Bear Creek work in local schools or grocery stores, or they’re employed through PossAbilities and Ability Building Center (ABC). Wines of the World, featuring 25 wine vendors from Minnesota, will provide tastings of about 100 wines from all around the world. Ted Alberts, wine buyer at Andy’s Liquor, says, “The wine vendors are extremely knowledgeable; some are even sommeliers.” This is a wonderful opportunity to learn more about different wines from different regions. The event also features exquisite food pairings prepared by the Tile • Stone • Granite • Quartz Rochester International Event Center, where this fundraiser is located. Carpet • LVT • Laminate • Vinyl Prepare your taste buds for salmon sandwiches on rye bread, shaved New York Strip with horseradish sauce, warm spinach and artichoke dip and a gourmet pizza station. For dessert, there are mini cheesecakes, coconut 507.287.8788 apricot macaroons and 3532 Hwy 63 S • Rochester, MN 55904 BEAR CREEK SERVICES chocolate petitfores. www.degeusflooring.com WINES OF THE WORLD The fundraiser is $50 March 4, 2016 per person or $45 if Rochester International Event Center purchased by Saturday, Degeus_JF16.indd 1 12/18/15 $50 per ticket, $45 by February 27 February 27. It includes bearcreekservices.org/events.php#event3 wine sampling with food pairing, live music, a commemorative wine glass and the satisfaction of donating money to a ATTORNEYS AT LAW wonderful cause.

11:45 AM

FOUR DAUGHTERS GOURMET DINNER AND LOCAL WINERIES WINTER HOURS When you are looking for a romantic date with your sweetheart or a fun getaway with your girlfriends this winter, visit an area winery. Every Thursday Four Daughters Vineyard and Winery hosts an event featuring wine, hors d’oeuvres, dinner and an intimate tour with the wine maker. You’ll learn about Minnesota grapes and wine production, along with the equipment used in the process. Call in advance to schedule a reservation at 507-346-7300. Other local wineries are open all winter. The Post Town Winery (posttownwinery.com) tasting room is open on weekends with live music on Saturday afternoons from 3-7 p.m. Salem Glen Winery (salemglenvineyard.com) is conveniently located in southwest Rochester with winter hours and events as well. Rather than hunkering down at home, go out for wine this winter.

FOUR DAUGHTERS VINEYARD & WINERY Visit their website for a sample menu fourdaughtersvineyard.com/gourmet-dinner-and-winemaker-tour/

Nicole L. Czarnomski is a freelance writer who lives in St. Charles.

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Amanda Prince is the strawberry margarita-loving bartender of Salute Wine Bar. And she’s hot – the hot (meaning talented) bartender of this issue.

GETTING TO KNOW GUESTS Meet Amanda Prince, born and raised in Rochester, Minnesota. She is the bartender at Salute Wine Bar & More located in the Marriot Hotel downtown on the Peace Plaza at 101 First Avenue SW, Rochester. Salute is rated four out of five on TripAdvisor and ranked in the top 75 of 275 restaurants in Rochester. “I would say that 95 percent of our business at Salute comes from Mayo Clinic patients and employees. We are so convenient for those guests because we are located right downtown,” explains Amanda. The customers and the visitors make Amanda love her job. “Our guests are from all over the world. I love talking to them and listening to stories about their lives and where they are from,” Amanda says. “Remember what guests drink and their names. They will appreciate that you remembered them, and it’s a great way to get to know people.”

FAVORITE BARTENDING TOOL As a bartender, some may say that perhaps their blender, strainer or even a torch might be their favorite tool, but not for Amanda. She goes right back to the good ol’ standby:

MAKING DRINKS IN DOWNTOWN ROCHESTER BY DAWN SANBORN

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

HOT \HÄT\ (SLANG) PERFORMING WITH GREAT SKILL AND DARING the wine bottle opener. “I use it every day. Mine has a hinge, which I find easier to use than the openers without one. It makes it so you don’t have to pull as hard to get the cork out of the bottle,” claims Amanda. The quicker the cork comes out, the faster you get the wine!

CREATING DRINKS AND MEMORIES Amanda loves creating new and exciting drinks. She gets her inspiration from the popular website that inspires so many: “I browse the drinks on Pinterest. When I find one that looks good, I make it, then tweak it to make it my own.” But there is a limit to where she’ll go for herself. Although her first drink choice is a strawberry margarita, she shies away from the hard liquor. “I hate Jägermeister and anything mint,” she says. Amanda didn’t elaborate too much on why Jäger was something she doesn’t care for (we all have those bad memories!). What’s one of Amanda’s favorite drinking memories? “Last summer my dad and I went

camping for the fourth of July. We made up a drink called the ‘Prince’ (our last name). It consists of vodka, Squirt and orange juice. We went tubing down the river drinking and fishing.”

MORE THAN WINE While I was sitting there enjoying a very nice pumpkin spiced martini Amanda made for me to try, a man next to me ordered the quesadilla. The smell was intoxicating (along with the martini). I would highly recommend checking out Salute’s Italian American food menu as well as their amazing cocktails. Salute will be participating in the SocialICE on the Peace Plaza in February. Go check out the two special drinks that Amanda has helped create: the “Grown Up Root Beer Float” with RumChata and ice cream and the “Drunken Apple Pie” served warm—to keep you warm out there in the cold. Dawn Sanborn, professional photographer, food lover, wine and spirit lover but agrees with Amanda; Jägermeister is not for her either. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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HEALTHY COMFORT FOODS

SATISFY YOUR COMFORT FOOD CRAVINGS WITH THESE NUTRITIOUS RECIPES

BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

I

T’S TIME TO HUNKER DOWN AND HIBERNATE THROUGH THIS YEAR’S COLD MINNESOTA WINTER. IF THERE’S ONE THING WE NEED IN HIBERNATION, IT’S COMFORT FOOD.

Comfort foods tend to be traditional, which often provides a nostalgic or sentimental feeling for us; we associate it with warmth, family and overall good feelings. In the context of a normal, balanced diet, there’s nothing wrong with occasionally indulging in your “naughty” childhood favorites—especially if you make them yourself with fresh, nutritious ingredients. Eating well may make you believe that these nostalgic or sentimental comfort foods can no longer be on the menu, but we are here to prove that theory wrong. We have gathered several recipes that keep the comfort in comfort foods without all the “bad stuff.”

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January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

HEALTHY CROCK POT CHICKEN AND DUMPLINGS SOUP

• 4-6 cups reduced sodium chicken broth • 1 1/2 pounds boneless skinless chicken breast • 1 cup frozen peas • 1 cup chopped carrots • 1 onion, chopped • 2 celery stalks, chopped • 2 minced garlic cloves • 1 tsp. basil • 1 tsp. thyme • Salt and pepper to taste

DUMPLINGS

• 1 1/2 cups white whole wheat flour • 1 1/2 tsp. baking powder • 1/2 tsp. garlic powder • 1/8 tsp. onion powder • Salt and pepper to taste • 1/4 cup light butter (room temperature), cubed

• 1/3 cup fat-free cheddar cheese, shredded • 2/3 cup fat-free mil • 1 egg white

1. Toss everything for the soup into the crock pot. Cover and set to cook for 6-8 hours on high or 8-10 hours on low. 2. When nearly done, remove the chicken and shred. You can use two forks or shred in your stand mixer. Add the chicken back to the crock pot and cover. 3. If you’ve been cooking on low, set the crock pot to high. 4. Combine the flour, baking powder, parsley, garlic powder, onion powder, salt and pepper for the dumplings together in a medium bowl. Cut in the butter using two forks, or your hands, until it begins to form a grainy mixture (resembling corn starch). Add in the cheddar and milk. Mix just until a thick dough forms and all lumps are out. Drop the dough by rounded spoonfuls into the crock pot. Try to do this quickly as to not let much heat escape from the crock pot. 5. Cover and cook on high for 30-60 minutes. 6. Once done, the dough will still look a little wet on top, but will be soft, fluffy, and cooked through on the inside. Serve warm and enjoy.


Using lean ground beef is an excellent way to cut back on saturated fat and the light Worcestershire sauce helps to reduce sodium. Fresh bell peppers add color to the dish as well as dietary fiber, which helps to keep you full longer and aids in digestion .

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food & wine

CARAMELIZED PEPPERS MUFFIN PAN MEATLOAF • 1 pound 93 percent lean ground beef • 1/2 cup chopped onion • 1/2 cup (Hy-Vee) panko bread crumbs • 1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley • 3 Tbsp. ketchup • 1 large egg white • 1 tsp. (Hy-Vee) Light Worcestershire sauce • 3/4 tsp. (Hy-Vee) dried Italian seasoning • Salt and black pepper to taste. • 1 Tbsp. (Hy-Vee) Select olive oil • 1/2 each red pepper, green pepper,

Source: Hy-Vee.com

and onion, thinly sliced

CHICKEN POT PIE

• 2 bone-in, skin-on chicken breast halves (12-14 oz. each)

• Coarse salt and ground pepper • 3 Tbsp. olive oil • 4 carrots, sliced 1/4 inch thick • 1 medium onion, finely chopped • 1/4 tsp. dried thyme leaves • 1/4 cup all-purpose flour • 2 1/2 cups low-fat (1 percent) milk • 1 package (10 oz.) frozen peas, thawed • 6 phyllo sheets (each 12x17 inches), thawed 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Place chicken on a rimmed baking sheet; season with salt and pepper. Roast until an instant-read thermometer inserted into thickest part of breast (avoiding bone) registers 165 degrees, 25-30 minutes. Let cool slightly; discard skin and bones. Shred meat and set aside. 2. While chicken is roasting, heat 2 tablespoons oil in a large saucepan over medium. Add carrots, onion, and thyme, season with salt and pepper and cook until carrots are crisp-tender, 8-10 minutes. Add flour and cook, stirring, 1 minute. Gradually add milk, stirring until smooth. Cook, stirring occasionally, until mixture comes to a simmer and thickens. 3. Remove from heat; stir in peas, and chicken and season with salt and pepper. Pour filling into a 9-inch deep-dish pie plate. 4. Stack phyllo on a work surface. Using a paring knife, cut out an 11-inch circle from the stack. Discard trimmings. Stack 2 circles on work surface, and brush gently with 1 tsp. oil; repeat with remaining circles and oil. Place phyllo stack over filling, and press down about 1/2 inch from the edge so phyllo fits inside rim of pie plate. Bake until golden and bubbling, 20-25 minutes. Let pot pie cool 15 minutes before serving.

1. Preheat oven to 350 degrees. 2. In a medium bowl, combine ground beef, onion, panko, parsley, ketchup, egg white, Worcestershire sauce, Italian seasoning, salt and black pepper. Divide mixture into six balls (about 1/3 cup each) and place each portion in a lightly greased muffin tin. 3. Bake for 30 minutes or until meat reaches 160 degrees. Meanwhile, in a small skillet, heat olive oil over medium heat. Add red and green peppers and onion and saute until tender and light golden. Serve caramelized peppers over each meatloaf. Recipe provided by Melissa Bradley, R.D., L.D., Hy-Vee Barlow Plaza Registered Dietitian

COMMENTS FROM A NUTRITION CONSULTANT We asked Certified AFPA Nutrition and Wellness Consultant Caitlin Summers about these comfort food recipes. She comments, “All of these recipes are great. I love the use of herbs and spices, which are a no calorie way to flavor foods and make them taste better. You can also hide vegetables from picky eaters in these recipes. The meatloaf especially is great for those that don't love vegetables. Fat is calorific at about nine calories per gram, so using lean meats and low fat ingredients can remove extra calories that your body doesn't need. Portion sizing is still important though. The low-sodium recipes are great for those with high blood pressure and won’t make you feel bloated, which happens from eating high-sodium foods.” I love the chicken pot pie recipe. Phyllo sheets are so thin and delicate unlike a normal, denser pie crust. It’s going to eliminate some of the guilt from eating something that is normally high in calories. Phyllo sheets give a little more of a crispy texture. If you love crunchy foods like I do, you’ll love this recipe. What a great way to eat comforting foods and not feel bloated the next day.

Dawn Sanborn loves cooking comfy food in the winter, because it’s better than being outside in sub-zero temperatures.

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Read Between the Wine with Rochester Authors at Post Town Winery Tuesday, January 19th at 7 p.m. Author: C.H. Armstrong Author book signing and reading from The Edge of Nowhere Tuesday, March 15th at 7 p.m. Author: Laurie Jueneman Author book signing and reading from Climbing the Mount Everest of Depression

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^

RECYCLED CREAT I NS GLASS JAR LUMINARIES

I

BY MELISSA EGGLER

PHOTOGRAPHY BY MELISSA EGGLER

N THE DARK OF WINTER, AFTER THE HUSTLE AND BUSTLE OF THE HOLIDAY SEASON IS OVER, AND AFTER THE GLITZ OF HOLIDAY DECOR HAS BEEN PACKED AWAY, THERE SEEMS TO BE A GLOOMY STILLNESS THAT COMES OVER US. WE DEFINITELY NEED SOME BRIGHT SPOTS. One of my favorite recycled creations to make, especially at this time of the year, is a glass jar luminary. These luminaries are so easy to make and help those dark, chilly nights seem a bit brighter. Repurposing the many glass jars we toss into the recycling bin every week is a great way to keep them out of the landfill, and it is easy to repurpose them into this beautiful and easy home decor project. Using antique doilies, lace pillowcase trims or your grandmother’s vintage lace that you’ve been saving in her sewing box is a wonderful way to keep the past memories alive, while adding a soft glow to your winter nights. These are also wonderful during the rest of the year, as they add a beautiful touch to your outdoor patio, front porch or special gathering, like a summer party or wedding. Trendy Mason jar crafts in boutiques are everywhere for a hefty price tag. So let’s gather up the following materials to create these glowing lanterns ourselves

MATERIALS

^^Various sizes of glass jars from your

recycle bin (blue mason jar, jelly jar, spaghetti sauce jar) ^^Assorted crocheted trims or lace, doilies, new or old ^^High-strength spray ad hesive (Scotch, Krylon, or Elmers), available at craft stores. ^^Vintage buttons, burlap, and jute for embellishments ^^Protective table covering

GATHER JARS, LACE AND EMBELLISHMENTS Begin by thoroughly washing and drying your jars. Using a variety of sizes, colors and heights creates a magical look with your luminaries when they are placed all together. Make sure to cover your workspace with newspaper or a protective covering, as spray adhesive can be very messy. Measure the diameter of your jar and cut strips of your laces and trims accordingly. Use various patterns of lace and trims to create a shabby chic, vintage feel. If you are using doilies, use various sizes, creating a layered look. Place your hand or fingers on the inside of the jar to hold securely, and spray a thin coating of the adhesive on the entire outside of the jar. This will create a frosted look, and creates a beautiful aura through the holes of the lace when the luminaries are lit. Carefully place your strips of lace or trim onto the jar and press down firmly so they adhere to the glue. You may want to fold raw edges of lace and trims under so that they do not pull up or unravel. Let the luminaries dry according to adhesive instructions.

ILLUMINATE THE NIGHT Embellish your luminaries with vintage buttons or tie a jute bow at the top. Place tea light candles or LED tea lights down into the bottom of the jars, illuminate and enjoy the soft glow that will add ambience and coziness to your chilly winter nights. Melissa Eggler resides in Rochester and is a stay-at-home mom and artist. Her Facebook group entitled “Don’t Judge A Book” Recycled Creations has over 500 fans. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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KEEPING THE PACE BUILDING AND REMODELING FOR A GROWING FAMILY BY BOB FREUND PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAGAN STUDIOS

SUBCONTRACTORS CarpetsPlus COLORTILE

CONTRACTOR:

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verything seemed to meet in the mudroom at Blair and Stephanie Seelhammer’s house for years. It was the day-to-day entrance, as well as the family laundry center, where the washer-dryer-sink worked hard and often. Add three children under 10 to the scene and the traffic could turn “chaotic,” Stephanie says. “There was no place to put anything. This was always just a problem area.” Today, the mudroom still is the entry and drop point for outdoor gear, but the youngsters’ winter coats can hang neatly in newly built lockers. Boots and shoes wait for action in cubbies, and overhead cabinets hold belongings. A granite shelf also provides a drop-off point for stray stuff—or perhaps seasonal decorations. The laundry room migrated upstairs to the second floor because, as Blair observes, “That’s where the clothes are.”

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January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

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MORE THAN A MUDROOM Blair, an optometrist, and Stephanie, a Mayo Clinic physician, have owned their home in the Scenic Oaks subdivision since 2008, the year after it was built. The Seelhammers encountered general contractor Mike Allen, who had built some homes in their neighborhood, about three years later at an open house. Allen frames the opportunity he saw: “Can we accommodate a growing, fast-paced family of today?... That’s really what we did.” Allen and the couple started planning their project in late 2013 and construction began in June 2014. A revamp of the mudroom relieved the Seelhammers’ congestion. Yet, it was just one facet of a combination renovation-addition project aimed at making the 4,000-square-foot-plus house a better living space.

BEDROOM PERCH Perhaps the biggest single project was building an addition on the second story at the south end of the house. One discovery turned the bedroom construction from problematic to practical. Allen found


the home’s unheated porch at ground level had been built with full footings instead of minimal support. “So, we were able to [build] right on top…leaving the screen[ed] porch and putting [on] the second story as living space,” Allen describes. The homeowners had one important requirement for the upper-level addition—a seamless appearance. “How do you make it look like it was supposed to be there?” Blair says. On the exterior, Allen’s subcontractors were able to splice the bedroom into the roof line over the garage. They also succeeded in closely matching the size and color of the home’s siding. “You want the addition to look as natural as the day the house was built,” Allen agrees. Meanwhile, the interior blueprints called for removing several walls, extending the main hallway and lengthening a deep, walk-in closet for the master bedroom. The interior merge is so subtle that it takes a practiced eye to spot the changeover from old to new. Stephanie insisted on cork flooring in the walk-in closet. Why cork? “Because I thought it was fun,” she says. A cork surface can also cushion feet better than some other floor coverings, she notes.

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inconvenience from construction was 2 1/2 months when duct work prevented clothes washing at the house. They are enthusiastic about Allen’s work. ”I felt like he listened [to us],” Stephanie says. Allen made the Seelhammers' project a showcase for his work by entering it in the 2015 Remodelers Tour by Rochester Area Builders. Bob Freund is a Rochester-based freelance writer.

The addition for the house’s fourth bedroom also created an opportune spot for a laundry room. Allen’s crews were able to convert part of the previous fourth bedroom, including a stretch of wall shared with the master bath. “We were able to grab on to some of the plumbing that was in there [for water supply and drains],” Allen says. The Seelhammers also added some decor to the basic laundry room. Among them are: a drying rack for drying clothes, which drops down from a wall compartment; a pull-out ironing board, hidden in a wall cabinet; and a sliding pocket door to the room to help quiet noise; laminate counter tops in a petrified wood pattern and floor tiles carrying a wooden boardwalk design.

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careers for women

Careers for Women IN ARCHITECTURE, BUILDING, CONSTRUCTION AND (INTERIOR) DESIGN

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ANY INDUSTRIES ARE MORE HEAVILY POPULATED BY ONE GENDER OR THE OTHER BUT FEW SO DISTINCTLY AS THE BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION FIELD. NATIONALLY, THE WOMEN’S LAW CENTER REPORTS THAT ONLY 2.6 PERCENT OF CONSTRUCTION WORKERS ARE WOMEN, BUT IN ROCHESTER, WOMEN ARE CLAIMING THEIR PLACE AMONG THEIR MALE COUNTERPARTS AND LITERALLY CLIMBING THE LADDER TO SUCCESS.

ROADS TO WORK IN CONSTRUCTION There are many influences that can lead to a chosen career field. For women in the building and construction industry, family is often a major influence. “My father brought home drawings when I was young,” says Mary Benike Kisilewski, Vice President and Project Manager for Alvin E. Benike, Inc. Mary’s interest in those drawings ultimately led her to choose a career in construction. Kate Van Hout found her way into the field through both family and the influence of technology. “My dad is in the industry, Mary Benike Kisilewski and I always thought what he did was pretty cool,” says Kate. “But ever since I was young, I enjoyed designing homes with games like ‘The Sims.’” Kate’s pastime as a youth developed into a full-time passion leading her to a career as a technical designer for Widseth Smith Nolting & Associates, Inc. Karen Blissenbach’s path into the field was Kate Van Hout not as linear as Mary’s and Kate’s. “When I

BY SARAH OSLUND

started my college program for interior design, I was surprised how much the courses concentrated on building structure,” she recalls. “I had no idea I would be tested on roof types and cabinet construction.” But Karen found she loved all the work and spent several years after graduation traveling around the U.S. working on a variety of projects before returning to her home in the Rochester area to start Design Studio B. Brea Koebele works alongside Mary as a project estimator at Alvin E. Benike, Inc. She was hired at 15 years old to work at a lumberyard. Brea Koebele She enjoyed the position so much she kept it throughout high school and college. “Working at the lumberyard made it easier to adjust to being the only female in most of my college classes,” she says. Brea graduated from Minnesota State University-Mankato with a degree in construction management. At only 42 years old, Brea has already spent 27 years working in the building industry.

UNIQUE CAREER CHALLENGES FOR WOMEN IN CONSTRUCTION In a field where men historically worked, it’s no surprise that women face a unique set of challenges. Women lack same-sex role models and often have difficulty finding supportive and welcoming work environments. At times they struggle to be taken seriously. But women in the industry bring a different and important dynamic to the table and often inspire a more balanced culture. Alyssa Fordham Vagt is the design director at CRW architecture + design group. CRW has 10 employees, three of which are female. “As a woman in a predominantly male industry,” she Alyssa Fordham Vagt says, “I feel the need to prove that I bring value to projects and contribute an alternative and valuable perspective.” RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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Pamela Krueger, owner and operator of Diamond Dust Construction and the only female drywall contractor in Rochester, agrees. “It’s a day-to-day challenge to stay relevant. But if you can conquer your fears about working in a ‘man's world,’ being a woman in construction can be very rewarding,” she says. Jodi Wiemerslage, president of the Southeast MN Chapter of the National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) and project manager for Hunt Electric Corporation, explains that the biggest challenge she has observed in women is a lack of confidence. “So often I hear from female peers how hard it is to bring their knowledge to the table and feel respected by those involved,” Jodi says. “But once you get past that, the sky is the limit.”

INDUSTRY ASSOCIATIONS HELP PAVE THE WAY Women in building and construction are increasingly becoming the face of the companies for which they work. They are taking on leadership roles in industry associations and are actively involved in the growth and development of their communities. “There are a lot of strong, confident women working in the industry in Rochester right now,” says Jodi, who recently won the 2015 NAWIC Future Leader of the Year award. The purpose of organizations like NAWIC is to support and promote the professional development of women in construction and provide them with educational and mentorship opportunities. Jodi Wiemerslage Jodi feels her role as chapter president has been of great benefit. “Our members not only raised me up to become a better leader for our chapter, but I have also become a better leader for my company.” Rochester Area Builders (RAB) is a professional organization of commercial and residential builders, remodelers, developers and associated businesses that are working to advance the building industry in the region. And while John Eischen, the executive director of RAB, is male, he is the first to point out the important leadership role women involved in the association play. “Just as Rochester is a leader in other industries, I believe we are a leader in the number of women involved in the construction industry,” he says. RAB has had four female presidents in its history and has elected a fifth and sixth to serve in 2016 and 2017 respectively. Design Studio B owner Karen Blissenbach will fill that presidential role in 2017 and credits a great deal of her professional success to her involvement with RAB. Karen Blissenbach “Without the Rochester Area Builders,” she says, “I don't know if I would be where I am today.” “We can be proud of the high percentage of women that are successful in the industry locally, both in leadership roles and in the field,” John remarks. “Women have played and will continue to play a major role in the growth of southeastern Minnesota.”

PROMISING FUTURE IN ROCHESTER With substantial community growth projected as a result of initiatives like Destination Medical Center (DMC), Rochester-Olmsted 40

January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

Planning Department director Mitzi Alex Baker echoes John’s feelings about the impact those involved in building and construction will have in Rochester in the future. “It’s an exciting time to be working in the building and construction field in Rochester,” Mitzi says. “Capitalizing on an already great community foundation, the opportunity to envision and pursue a future that offers more housing and transportation options, supports high quality of life and draws and retains employees, visitors and customers is promising.” Envisioning the future of Rochester is a consideration that permeates Mitzi Alex Baker every step of the building and construction process, from planning and design to execution and usage. Planning and design professional Leslie McGillivray-Rivas, WSB and Associates, understands the importance of having a vision firsthand. “My projects have included everything from single family subdivisions to commercial site plans,” she explains. Leslie’s most notable design accomplishment is the vision and master plan for the Soldiers Leslie McGillivray-Rivas Field Veteran’s Memorial. In 2015, the memorial celebrated its 20th year honoring veterans for their service in the Armed Forces and is recognized as one of Rochester’s most significant landmarks. Sustainability, like vision, is a critical component in planning for the future. “At CRW, we recognize the importance of taking the future of the community into consideration when we’re planning any project,” says Alyssa Vagt. CRW architecture + design group believes in sustainable design practices as the foundation for their work. “We want to encourage building that is forward-thinking but minimizes impact on our natural resources,” Alyssa says.

GROWING NEED FOR WOMEN IN BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION In recent decades, there has been a diminished appreciation for the importance of skilled laborers resulting in a shortage of individuals qualified to fill those roles. But the demand is evident. “We need women and men to choose the trades to address the shortage in our labor force,” says Jean DeWitz, owner of DeWitz Home Builders. While a college education is crucial for some careers, it can no longer be touted as the only path to professional success. There are many well-paying jobs that do not require years of college. But with shop and trade classes less common Jean DeWitz in high school curriculums, the majority of millennials have not had the exposure to tools and trades like that of previous generations. “Our society has placed so much emphasis on higher education that kids today are not choosing the trades as a career,” Jean continues. Curriculum and instruction staff at Rochester Public Schools (RPS) is aware of the shortage of skilled laborers and works to guide students in selecting courses best suited for them, regardless of their


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chosen field. “We understand that the path for all students does not necessarily lead to four years in a university,” says Heather Nessler, executive director of communications for RPS, “so we continue to explore ways in which we can introduce them to a variety of career options.” The high schools offer two career pathways, Residential Construction and Woods, for students interested in building and construction industries. Each pathway offers three successive courses and incorporates mentorship, hands-on projects and teamwork into each series. With the highly anticipated opening of the Career and Technical Education Center (CTECH) at the Heintz Center this coming fall, RPS will be able to provide students with additional unique career pathway experiences in information technology, hospitality, manufacturing and health sciences in addition to the current pathways of engineering, construction and agriculture.

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As the existing workforce ages, there is a conscious push within the building and construction industry to encourage and support the young persons interested in a career in the trades. “At Benike, we love opportunities to mentor,” says Brea. “I want to help girls to understand that working in construction does not necessarily mean being out in the field swinging a hammer. There are a lot of opportunities to work in an office setting as well.” Apprenticeship and scholarship opportunities are plentiful through a number of organizations, including the RAB and NAWIC. “Nearly all of the trades offer programs in which students can work while they attend school,” says Jodi. Most of the programs provide a mixture of experiential and educational training, allowing students to earn money while they work their way through an apprenticeship. RAB offers scholarships to both traditional and non-traditional students who want to pursue a career in building and construction. “We can be the pipeline to the employer,” says John Eischen. While the industry’s demographics won’t change overnight, encouraging women Pam Krueger to pursue non-traditional careers can provide them with an intrinsic sense of satisfaction and empowerment, a chance to make a visible impact on their communities and an opportunity to open doors for women in generations to come. “If you enjoy construction and seeing the progress of building from start to finish, then go for it,” says Pamela Krueger. “Never let a man or a woman tell you that you should not be doing what you love. The reward is much greater than the effort.”

in Architecture, Building, Construction, and Design Hear from Rochester area women about how they got started in their careers and how you can get into a career in architecture, building, construction or interior design. Sarah Oslund will be moderating the discussion. Saturday, February 6, 2016 11 a.m. – 12 noon

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1 Minnesota Aspirations for Women

community

in Computing Award

RECOGNIZES YOUNG WOMEN IN INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY TWO ROCHESTER AWARD WINNERS

BY ANNE SCHERER

Russell Fraenkel, interim executive director of Advanced IT Minnesota says, “Women simply bring a fresh perspective to a company or organization’s need for technological solutions to problems and issues and to utilize technology to create opportunities for business growth in the marketplace.” However, women are only 25 percent of the nation’s technology workforce. Every Minnesota economic engine, from health to engineering, is highly dependent upon technology tools and systems to remain relevant and responsive. Young women are needed to fill the employment gap with their skills and to be technology’s next generation of leaders and innovators.

Photos submitted by Herchran Singh.

Photos submitted by Devon Sayles.

A PHENOMENAL OPPORTUNITY The Minnesota Aspiration for Women in Computing Award recognizes young women from Minnesota for their interests, accomplishments and community involvement, as well as their aspirations and leadership in the field of technology. Through collaboration with a growing list of Devon Sayles is a business partners, there are opportunities analyst for General Mills. for girls beginning in middle school through high school to participate in year-round IT exploration, associate with girls who have similar interests, engage with women in the field and build non-technical skills for individual growth, confidence and competence. The Aspiration Award was created by the National Center for Women and IT (NCWIT) and is sponsored locally by Advance IT Minnesota, a nonprofit organization. Bellmont Partners and General Mills partner together to find these exceptional young women. Devan Sayles, General Mills business analyst, says, “The girls come to our attention through an application process.” The application is multi-faceted and includes sections where girls can elaborate on their involvement in computing-related activities, experience, leadership and college and career goals. Helping these young women to recognize their talent and see that their technological skills and computing-related activities are more than just extracurricular activities is important. “By having these awards and celebrating what they have done and encouraging their future aspirations, we are helping them think differently about technology and exposing them to all of the different career options it provides,” says Sayles.

Ruoting Jia, a 2015 award winner, graduated from Mayo High School. “Receiving this award definitely gave me the confidence about my accomplishments and my ability in technology,” says Ruoting. She is majoring in computer science and mathematics at Rutgers University Ruoting Jia attends in New Jersey. Ruoting says, “Both Rutgers University in New Jersey. the theories and practical exercises are definitely preparing me for my future career.” In four or five years Ruoting sees herself as a software developer or pursuing a master’s degree in computer science. Her short-term goals are to make small, effective and useful software programs for college students. Ruoting would like to specialize in software development: computer programming, testing and debugging. “Creativity is also another important reason to make this ‘sounded–boring’ job really interesting,” says Ruoting. Her hope is to encourage more girls to join the field of technology not only to fill the gender gap, but also share the amazing things technology can do to make the world better. Herchran Singh, a 2013 award winner, graduated from John Marshall High School. Receiving the award “showed me that my hard work in becoming educated and educating others on the importance of technology was valued,” says Singh, who is majoring in biology with minors Herchran Singh is attending in neuroscience and classics at Gustavus Adolphus College. Gustavus Adolphus College in Saint Peter, Minnesota. She would like to become a surgeon. “If we want to create more advances in medical treatment and cures, we are going to have to use technology to our advantage,” she says. Herchran’s most recent idea was a medication reminder mobile application. She wants to work with healthcare providers to link prescribed medication, dosage and directions to the application directly. Applications for the 2016 Aspirations Award were due in November 2015. There are 96 final applications submitted from Minnesota. That is a 113 percent increase from last year! For more information visit advanceitmn.org.

Photos submitted by Ruoting Jia

A

DIVERSE MIX OF PEOPLE IS IN THE MARKETPLACE, ACCESSING PRODUCTS AND SERVICES THAT SERVE THEIR NEEDS. A COMPANY IS BEST SUITED FOR SUCCESS WHEN ITS WORKFORCE MIRRORS THE MARKETPLACE.

Anne Scherer is a freelance writer living in Rochester, Minnesota.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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community

BUILDING COMMUNITY ONLINE AND OFF AMONG MOMS IN ROCHESTER

BY BECKY MONTPETIT

W

HAT ARE YOUR FIRST THOUGHTS WHEN YOU HEAR THE TERM “MOM BLOG?” DO YOU THINK OF RECIPES, DO IT YOURSELF TODDLER ACTIVITIES OR FREEZER MEAL PLANS?

What I thought of when approached about creating a mom blog in Rochester was an incredible opportunity to unite the energy of a powerful group of women in our community.

AMBASSADOR FOR ROCHESTER I was born and raised in Rochester and have known no other city as home, outside of my time in college in St. Paul and a six-month stint as a nanny in London. As I’ve built my career and family in Rochester, I have slowly understood that I have a strong sense of place and space in my life. Where I live, move and breathe is monumentally important to me. Without even realizing it happened, I became an unofficial ambassador for Rochester. Helping people love Rochester became a defining characteristic. I became a mother for the first time 18 months ago and am due to become a mother for the second time around the turn of the year. Shortly before my daughter’s birth, I kept looking for a website that had dedicated resources for moms and parents in our community and wondered who on earth would start such a thing? At the beginning of summer 2015, I decided that it was time to stop waiting and start doing. Who could be better qualified than the (unofficial) ambassador of Rochester? That’s when the “Rochester MN Moms Blog” was born.

BUILDING COMMUNITY “Rochester MN Moms Blog” seeks to build community online and offline. Our goal is to build trust by providing information and content that is accurate, timely and relevant. We are a parenting resource website rich with

original, locally-sourced and focused content that engages parents and non-parents alike. Our team consists of 16 volunteer contributors, as well as guest writers who have a wide variety of backgrounds and Photo Submitted By Becky Montpetit. experiences that offer unique parenting perspectives, anecdotes, advice and ideas. This group of women represents Rochester’s diverse backgrounds, viewpoints and perspectives. Their distinct voices offer credibility, are relatable, and contribute to the strength of “Rochester MN Moms Blog.” We want all parents—new to town or born and raised—to feel at home in Rochester, Minnesota and proud to be a part of our incredible city. Additionally, the site offers guides, suggestions, opinions and research on the Rochester area to help parents navigate the choppy waters of parenting with ease. Our contributors submit at least two posts per month that can be based on a series or a topic for the month, while others are simply a topic that a contributor is passionate about. We have lively discussions around marriage, relationships, toddler activities, preparing for your first baby and more. We plan to dive into topics that offer unique perspectives on either side of relevant parenting issues such as breastfeeding, co-sleeping, schooling choices, parenting techniques and more.

LOOKING AHEAD Keep an eye out in the near future when we introduce Neighborhood and Community Groups. This will be a unique opportunity for moms to build a community with their next-door neighbors. We also have in the works hosting local events for women suited to their needs and interests or simply for a night on the town. We recently launched Rochester Moms Blog Gives. This program allows moms to shower local and deserving organizations with needed supplies and services. We can’t wait to see these two areas of our community come together, and we can’t wait to see mothers in this community feel more connected, empowered and ready to tackle each day in this amazing town. Parents are a powerful group. We look forward to channeling this power and energy back into our community here in Rochester. Becky is the owner and founder of “Rochester MN Moms Blog.” Born and raised in Rochester, she considers herself a Minnesota girl through and through.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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Love Yourself

Sunday, February 14, 1-4 p.m. Hosted by Rochester Women Magazine at Post Town Winery SPACE IS LIMITED Yoga Class 1-2 p.m. Yoga Leader Catherine McBride (Bring your own yoga mat.)

5-Minute Chair Massages Cheese, crackers and chocolate!

Enjoy a wine tasting, glass of wine or bottle purchase. $15 per person includes yoga class, chair massage, cheese/crackers and chocolate. Please pre-register by Wednesday, February 10 by contacting Jorrie Johnson at editor@RWmagazine.com or 507-259-6362.

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January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

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Local Author CatherineH. Armstrong

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WEAVES FACT WITH FICTION IN DEBUT NOVEL

community

BY CJ FOSDICK

Pho

itted b to Subm

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rine H. A

rmstrong

INSPIRATIONAL CHOICES

“THERE IS NOTHING IN THE WORLD MORE IMPORTANT THAN FAMILY,” EXPLAINS C. H. ARMSTRONG. SHE MAKES THAT ABUNDANTLY CLEAR IN HER DEBUT HISTORICAL FICTION NOVEL, “THE EDGE OF NOWHERE,” BEING RELEASED BY PENNER PUBLISHING ON JANUARY 19, 2016. INSPIRED BY STORIES PASSED DOWN FROM THE LARGE EXTENDED FAMILY OF HER LATE GRANDMOTHER, ARMSTRONG TELLS A POIGNANT TALE, WEAVING FACT WITH FICTION TO EXPLAIN WHY THE FAMILY MATRIARCH MAY HAVE BECOME THE OVERBEARING WOMAN SO MISUNDERSTOOD BY HER GRANDCHILDREN.

LANDSCAPE OF A BITTER HEART The novel begins with a prologue, written in 1992 by a dying 87-year-old woman who offers no apologies or excuses for her desperate actions and life choices. She assures her family that the love she found so hard to demonstrate was bound up in lifelong secrets and invisible scars of survival: family tragedy, hunger and physical abuse, effects of the Oklahoma Dust Bowl and the Great Depression, challenging the strength of a young widow raising nearly a dozen children—alone. Viewing the powerful Ken Burns documentary series about the Dust Bowl era helped Armstrong understand that such a punishing physical landscape affected the landscape of her grandmother’s heart. “My grandmother’s life was a hundred times harder than I portrayed in the book,” she says. “I didn’t think people would believe her real story. My grandmother actually raised 14 children—nine biological children, along with five stepchildren who were closer to her age when she married a widower more than twice her age.”

A native of El Reno, Oklahoma, Armstrong moved to Rochester in 1992, after her husband was offered a job by IBM, incidentally, on their wedding day. With a degree in journalism from the University of Oklahoma, Armstrong spent 20 years writing and editing non-fiction for various non-profits. She wasn’t sure she had enough creative bent to write fiction. Reading an interview with the prolific Diana Gabaldon of “Outlander” inspired her to unfold her fictional wings and incorporate the family stories that fueled her imagination. “When I sat down to write, I was shocked at how quickly it all came back to me—all those stories about the Dust Bowl era,” Armstrong comments. Five weeks and 91,000 words later, Armstrong completed a first draft. After querying a hundred agents and small publishers, she received a publishing offer from Penner Publishing in May of 2015. She was adamant about choosing traditional book publishing over selfpublishing. “With my first foray into fiction, I wanted the ‘legitimacy’ that comes with knowing someone—besides me—liked my book,” says Armstrong.

FAMILY STILL INTACT “The Edge of Nowhere” conveys a passionate message about surviving desperate odds to keep a large family intact. Though Armstrong’s grandmother died in 1992, a key year for the author in truth and fiction, she might be pleased to know that multi-generations of her descendants routinely gather for Oklahoma family reunions and keep in touch online. The book has already helped family members to better understand the matriarch it is based upon and the tenacity that still binds them together. Following “The Edge of Nowhere,” Armstrong wrote a young adult novel about a homeless Rochester family. She currently has a women’s fiction title in progress. CJ Fosdick is working on the sequel to her debut novel, “The Accidental Wife.” Her new candy heart story, “Hot Stuff,” will be released in February 2016 by Wild Rose Press. Follow her on Facebook, her newsletter or visit her website at cjfosdick.com.

UPCOMING AUTHOR APPEARANCES

“The Edge of Nowhere” is available online at Amazon, Barnes & Noble, Kobo and iTunes for iBooks. C.H. Armstrong will also sign copies at the following sites: • January 19: Post Town Winery 7 p.m., Book Release • January 23: Rochester Public Library 3 p.m., Reading & Signing • January 26: History Center of Olmsted County 7 p.m., Lecture & Signing For more information about this novel or other works by this author, visit her website at charmstrongbooks.com. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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Faces 2 of Heart Disease

healthy living

FOUR INSPIRING ROCHESTER WOMEN “GO RED” BY LAURIE SIMON PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIKE HARDWICK PHOTOGRAPHY

I

N COMBINATION WITH STROKE, HEART DISEASE IS STILL THE NUMBER-ONE KILLER OF WOMEN IN THE U.S. ITS VICTIMS ARE OUR MOTHERS, SISTERS, NEIGHBORS AND FRIENDS. BUT HEART DISEASE IS NO MATCH FOR THE POWER OF WOMEN'S VOICES AND THE MISSION OF THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION. WHEN LORI ARNDORFER, SUSAN YDSTIE, ELIZABETH MCGEENEY AND DIANE MITCHELL TAKE THE STAGE AT ROCHESTER’S ANNUAL GO RED FOR WOMEN® LUNCHEON ON FEBRUARY 11, 2016, A COMMUNITY OF WOMEN WILL HEAR FOUR INSPIRING STORIES OF SURVIVORSHIP AND RESILIENCY.

LORI ARNDORFER Lori’s busy lifestyle was unexpectedly halted last summer when nagging back pain landed her in the ER. Tests revealed that the 47-year-old teacher, wife and mother of teenage boys had two coronary blockages—one at 90 percent and the other at 75 percent. She immediately underwent a stent procedure and since recovery has undertaken a new regime of healthy eating and exercise. “I’ve got a second chance to get it right,” says Lori, “and I won’t take life for granted.”

DIANE MITCHELL Diane was getting ready to attend an event with her daughter when she felt a sudden, extreme pressure in the middle of her chest, followed by violent vomiting. Her husband dismissed it as heartburn and she continued with her normal activities. When she experienced the same symptoms four days later, on her 56th birthday, she asked to be taken to the ER. She knew she had symptoms of a heart attack. “Women should never ignore their intuition,” says Diane. “I’m grateful that I received a second warning and am here to share my story.”

SUSAN YDSTIE Susan was just 5 years old when doctors diagnosed her with bicuspid aortic valve disease—a congenital heart defect in which the valve has two leaflets instead of three. Though her heart had to work harder than typical, Susan enjoyed a mostly active and asymptomatic lifestyle until her mid-20s, when tests confirmed her valve had reached the end of its life. At age 27, she underwent open-heart surgery to receive a porcine replacement valve. For Susan and her husband, Isaac—both teachers—heart disease has not deterred their vision for life together, including bicycle rides, trips to Germany and plans to start a family later this year.

ELIZABETH MCGEENEY Last spring, at 47 years old, Elizabeth found herself feeling increasingly tired and fatigued. Though she had a strong family history of heart disease, the busy wife, mother of two and volunteer did not want to believe her time for cardiac intervention had come. Elizabeth had a triple bypass surgery that was initially deemed successful but went on to suffer a stroke and continued to experience shortness of breath. Her heart disease was so aggressive that doctors determined she needed a second procedure for stent placement. Recovery continues today, and though life has been different for Elizabeth, she is working to regain energy, prioritize exercise and reduce stress. “It wasn’t easy at first,” she says, “but my family has really helped pick up the slack for me, and I’m feeling better and stronger each day.” 48

January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

GO RED FOR WOMEN LUNCHEON “Lori, Susan, Elizabeth and Diane are helping to make a difference for women everywhere,” says Anne Wolter, a clinical exercise physiologist in Mayo Clinic Cardiovascular Health Clinic where the women each underwent cardiac rehabilitation. “This is a great opportunity for them, for us [real women] to pave the way for better care, education and prevention.” “The Rochester Go Red Luncheon celebrates the energy, passion and power we have to fight heart disease in women,” says Sara Clausen, regional director, American Heart Association. “We invite women everywhere to take part in this extraordinary event.” To learn more about these four survivors and ways you can join the movement, attend the Rochester Go Red for Women Luncheon February 11, 2016. For tickets and more information visit rochestergoredforwomen.org. Laurie Simon is a freelance writer living in Rochester, Minnesota.


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WORKPLACE WELLNESS: • Reduces overall health care costs and health claims • Increases productivity • Reduces absenteeism • Improves employee morale and recruitment/retention • Improves customer experiences • Improves the overall health of the community • Allows the community to be competitive for recruiting both employers and workforce

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healthy living

MORE THAN THE WINTER BLUES SEASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER BY CINDY MENNENGA

S

EASONAL AFFECTIVE DISORDER (SAD) IS AN INSIDIOUS TYPE OF DEPRESSION THAT WRAPS ITSELF AROUND THOSE WHO ARE IMPACTED, BINDING THEM TIGHTLY IN A PROFOUND COCOON OF SADNESS AND LETHARGY THAT SHOWS ITSELF DURING THE LONG WINTER MONTHS. USUALLY BEGINNING IN MID-TO-LATE SEPTEMBER, AS THE DAYS BECOME SHORTER AND WE HAVE LESS EXPOSURE TO NATURAL DAYLIGHT, THE SYMPTOMS COME ON SLOWLY, BUILDING TO THEIR CRESCENDO OF AGONY BY THE HOLIDAYS AND INTO JANUARY. GRADUALLY, EVER SO SLIGHTLY, SYMPTOMS IMPROVE AS THE DAYLIGHT RETURNS TO THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE, HERALDING OF LONGER DAYS. SAD OFTEN LASTS UNTIL EARLY APRIL.

I AM SAD. ARE YOU? If you or anyone you know has SAD, you understand the profound impact it can have on the person who grapples with the disorder. I have struggled with SAD for the past 15 years. Initially, I slipped into a deep, dark depression, and it seemed as though nothing could pull me out of the despair. Eventually, as spring arrived, I noticed that I felt better. I had more energy and a sense of joy returned. When autumn came again, I felt the same depression slipping over me and delivering me back to the sense of hopelessness and dread I had experienced the previous winters. My doctor diagnosed me with SAD, prescribed antidepressants, sent me to counseling and suggested I get a lightbox to treat my disorder. Being the ever-dutiful patient, I got a lightbox and used it religiously every day, as prescribed. It helped somewhat, but I still felt a tremendous sense of sadness and experienced incredibly low energy.

There is a common rule of thumb which suggests that anyone who lives north of Atlanta, Georgia should supplement with vitamin D to mitigate the symptoms of the winter blues. Many people experience the blues during winter; however, SAD is an extreme version of the blues.

WHAT IS SAD? According to Dr. Jeff Gursky, physician chair of Olmsted Medical Center’s Psychiatry/Psychology department, “Seasonal Affective Disorder is the most commonly used name for what psychiatrists and psychologists call Major Depressive Disorder with Seasonal Pattern. The most common symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder include depressed mood, low interest or pleasure in activities, reduced energy, increased amount of sleep, increased appetite with a potential increase in carbohydrates and weight gain. It is not uncommon for people to feel some of these symptoms during the winter months, as there is less sunlight and opportunity for physical and enjoyable activities. However, to meet the criteria for Seasonal Affective Disorder (Major Depressive Disorder with Seasonal Pattern), one’s symptoms must cause significant distress or impairment in social, occupational or other important areas of functioning. Treatments with evidence of effectiveness include antidepressants, cognitive-behavioral therapy and the use of a light box.”

ALLEVIATING SYMPTOMS There are several things one can do to manage the effects of SAD. Getting regular exercise is a good idea, year-round, as it helps to get the endorphins firing. Also, getting outside for 20-30 minutes each day is a great way to absorb some vitamin D from the sun. Supplementing with vitamin D has been helpful to many SAD sufferers, myself included. Another popular treatment option is the use of a light therapy box. According to Mayo Clinic, “Light therapy is thought to affect brain chemicals linked to mood, easing SAD symptoms. Using a light therapy box may also help with other types of depression, sleep disorders and other conditions.” There are a variety of things you can do to lessen your symptoms and return to your normal activities. If you feel that you or anyone you know may have SAD, take a peek at the tips below and implement as many as possible to help you begin to feel better. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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healthy living

2

TIPS TO REDUCE SAD SYMPTOMS Here are some tips from a variety of resources to help prevent and conquer Seasonal Affective Disorder. As always, if you suffer from depression or are facing other mental health concerns, it is best to seek professional help. Get outside every day. If the sun is shining, stay outside longer. When you’re outside, avoid sunglasses for at least 30 minutes. This allows your eyes to absorb more of the sunlight and helps to boost your mood. If possible, arrange your office so you sit near a window. This will allow you to benefit from natural daylight and will lessen the overall effects of SAD. Plus, having a window near your work station helps you to feel less isolated. Keep window blinds/curtains open all day to allow in as much natural light as possible. For those who have SAD, the importance of access to extended periods of natural daylight cannot be overstated. Get exercise several times a week. Exercise is good for you, whether or not you have SAD, but it is of particular importance for those who struggle with SAD. Eat healthy and whole foods. Eat plenty of fresh fruit and veggies throughout the day and avoid eating fattening and unhealthy snacks, such as muffins and doughnuts. You may experience a brief burst of energy after eating unhealthy sugary foods, but the crash that follows will send your energy levels and/or mood plummeting. Supplement with vitamin D to protect yourself from a host of ailments and boost your mood. Many people have noticed significantly reduced SAD symptoms by taking a vitamin D supplement. Purchase a light therapy box. This will help boost your serotonin levels and may help you to feel less depressed. If possible, place the light therapy box on your desk so you can benefit from its effects all day long. Consider taking a vacation in a southern climate during winter. This will help to alleviate some of the symptoms of SAD and make it a bit easier to get through the remainder of the winter. Implementing these suggestions may reduce symptoms and enable those diagnosed with SAD to enjoy a better quality of life during the long winter months than they have in the past. If you think you may have SAD, make an appointment to see your doctor and get help, so you can enjoy life once again. Cindy Mennenga, owner of Straight-Talk Wellness, is a health coach and freelance writer based in Rochester. 52

January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com


I had heart troubles for years. I was on my third pacemaker. And I couldn’t even walk up and down stairs. Then, my doctor referred me to a cardiologist at Olmsted Medical Center. I’ve seen a lot of doctors, but Dr. Tabatabaei was the first to tell me about a new pacemaker that could get both sides of my heart in sync. Now, I feel so good I’m walking three miles a day — and I don ’t even get winded.

— Back in Sync

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Join us for a relaxing evening of gentle yoga poses to help you deepen your relationship. We will begin with a yoga practice with poses and flows, follow that with guided Thai massage and finish with tasting delicious wines and appetizers. Work together, helping one another through poses and focusing on each other.

Boot Camp offers strength training, cardio, core strength as well as self-improvement in a fun & dynamic team environment. You’ll get a trainer and lots of accountability whether your goal is weight loss or core strengthening. Group fitness classes at Empowered Wellness & Fitness Studio are a blast! Our focus is on fun, whether we’re dancing in Zumba or Dance Club or working hard in HIIT and nurturing the whole person through yoga and community events!

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Trekking on

Snowshoes

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healthy living

WINTER IS A FUN TIME OF YEAR TO PLAY IN THE PARKS BY NICOLE L. CZARNOMSKI

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WHITEWATER STATE PARK SNOWSHOEING CLASS Darst begins the snowshoeing class at Whitewater State Park with a lesson in dressing for the cold as well as a few tips on snowshoes and how they work. It’s important to dress in layers. “It’s not necessary to have extremely warm clothes and gloves because you expend a lot of energy snowshoeing. Dress in long underwear and lightweight wind pants. If your clothing is too warm it will cause you to sweat. When you stop for a break, you’ll get cold from the sweat.” He also says lightweight gloves and a hat are ideal for snowshoeing. “You may want to wear sunglasses because of the sun’s reflection on the snow,” says Darst. Many of the guests are new to snowshoeing, so Darst explains the importance of staying on the snow. “If you walk across the parking lot or other hard surfaces, you will likely break the teeth used for gripping and hiking through the snow,” says Darst. He also says it’s best not to walk on any trees lying across the trail. After the basic snowshoeing lesson, attendees carpool to the Nature Center parking lot. At the beginning of the hike Darst points out beaver lodges and a manufactured bat house. The Whitewater State Park Saturday snowshoeing class trek is about an hour and half.

MORE SNOWSHOEING TRAILS AND RENTALS

Photo by Nicole L. Czarnomski

nterpretive Naturalist Jeremy Darst enjoys giving tours and educating visitors about Whitewater State Park. Darst says, “The beauty of winter is that you can go lots of places off the trails because there’s no vegetation. There are also historical markers [in Whitewater State Park] you can see in the winter that aren’t visible in the summer.”

Whitewater State Park Snowshoeing Classes Hidden History Snowshoe, 1-3 p.m., Saturday, January 23, 2016 An afternoon on snowshoeing while you discover some historic relics only visible in the winter. Snowshoe Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 12 p.m., February 6, 13, 20 and 27, 2016 Visit the forest, streamside and meadow to look for signs of wildlife and to explore the winter world on snowshoes. All ages are invited. Alyssa (right) and Gabriel (Left) Anguiano enjoyed a cold morning trekking out in the snow at Whitewater State park (January 2015).

Whitewater State Park provides snowshoes free of charge for Saturday events. However, if you’re interested in snowshoeing in the park at other times, you can rent snowshoes for $6 a day. If you have your own snowshoes and you aren’t sure if conditions are appropriate for snowshoeing, call the park office for snow depth and other conditions. For more information you can call 507-932-3007 or visit dnr.state.mn.us. Nicole L. Czarnomski is a freelance writer who lives in St. Charles and frequents Whitewater State Park. A portion of this article was reprinted through permission from the St. Charles Press by Nicole L. Czarnomski, St. Charles Press Staff Writer.

Oxbow Park in Byron has about 2 miles of groomed trails beginning and ending at the northeast corner of the parking lot. The trails are rated easy, so it’s a great family outing in the winter months. They offer adult- and child-sized snowshoes for $3 a pair. Equipment can be rented from 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. Visit co.olmsted.mn.us/pw/parks/oxbowpark/Pages/ SkiTrail.aspx for more information.

Quarry Hill Nature Center offers snowshoe rentals. They have knowledgeable staff to help select the perfect pair of snowshoes. There are 8 miles of groomed trails for beginners and experts. Snowshoe rentals can be rented for a half day, full day or all weekend. Prices vary. Visit qhnc.org/park/cross-country-skiing for more information. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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Inspired style, lasting quality and irresistible value are our passions at The Woods

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1965-2016 50 YEARS OF QUALITY WINTER GEAR

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January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

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travel

Stewartville’s Own LITTLE KNOWN HISTORIC DISTRICT

D

ID YOU KNOW STEWARTVILLE HAS AN HISTORIC “SILK STOCKING ROAD?”

Neither do many Stewartville residents, according to Pat Johnson, librarian and history buff. “You mention that term and many look surprised, but it was called that in the early 1900s. It’s an area along Lake Street, just off Main Street,” she says. “People named it that because if you could afford silk stockings, you could afford to live there. It was a very desirable area.” At the turn of the century, the new homes were built by doctors, lawyers and prominent citizens of Stewartville.

Stewartville Heritage House Photos provided by Van Beach.

309 NORTH MAIN STREET The stately home of William Davis stands as a testament to the era and area. Located at the corner of Lake Street and Main (U.S. Highway 63), the large home was occupied by individual families until 2004 when it became a gift shop. If you drive by today, you will see the sign: Stewartville Heritage House owned by Van and Lori Beach, who say they purchased the home “to share with the community.” Lovingly preserved, the carved woodwork, hardwood floors, stained glass window and even the wallpaper speaks to a time of elegance. As a guesthouse and lovely location for meetings, retreats and celebratory occasions, it holds its age exceptionally well. Rooms are furnished with period pieces. Paying homage to past residents, guest rooms are named for past owners. The home was built by William Davis, beginning in 1897, and first occupied in 1901. Davis was a Wisconsin resident who used it as a second home and office for his Stewartville crockery and general store. In 1910, his store was destroyed by fire, so he left Stewartville. An interesting twist: Van Beach’s great-grandfather, John, built a barn with many materials coming from the Davis store. Several families subsequently called the Victorian “home.” When the country fell on hard times during the 30s, the Mayou family owners took in boarders to pay the mortgage. It was rumored that a secret still in the attic conveyed alcohol to its renters via a dumb waiter that went from attic to basement.

BY DEBI NEVILLE Laurie Wildeman, the guesthouse hostess, says many heirs of previous occupants have visited. “They are so happy that they can go ‘home’ again.” Whoever visits the Victorian appreciates its heritage and beauty, which is just the way Lori and Van want it for years to come.

601 6TH STREET SOUTHWEST The red farm house in Stewartville was built by one of the first five settlers in the area, Truman Wooldridge. It was constructed in 1853 with materials brought by ox and wagon from mills near Winona. After his death 15 years later, the farm and home passed on to his son, Eugene S. Wooldridge. After serving in the Civil War, Eugene returned to the farm and became an important figure in the growing village. When the railroad came through the area in 1891, Carlson Home photos submitted by Debi Neville. Wooldridge platted portions of his land, ready for development. He promoted new businesses in the area and donated a total of 14 lots to the village to help Stewartville grow. The home now sits on 16 acres of the original farm. Through its more than 100 years, the farmhouse has always been occupied by families. Twenty-seven years ago, Ron and Shirley Carlson purchased the property. They fell in love with the history and the buildings. “The house needed extensive work when we bought it,” Shirley says. Following information regarding the original layout and design by architect husband Ron, “We have restored all but one closet in the home; it’s been a labor of love.” The work has yielded a beautiful residence, which has been on home tours several times in the past. People are very interested and love to see the restoration. The Carlsons’ quarter century of work protects the integrity of a century-old home and will keep it safe for future generations. Debi Neville is a Rochester freelance writer who finds it difficult to abbreviate the history of these interesting properties. RWmagazine.com January/February 2016

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2 Home Federal’s New travel

Jubilee Travel Club

OFFERS MEMBERS UNIQUE EXPERIENCES BY CINDY MENNENGA

If you love to travel and you are age 55 or older, you may be interested to know that there’s a new group travel option in Rochester. Home Federal Savings Bank recently started its own travel club and had its first trip in September. The travel club has been a raging success already, and they’ve just gotten started. Home Federal’s Jubilee travel club offers members day trips, regional trips and extended trips. Many members choose to take several trips each year and love the variety of trips offered. The travel club attracts a variety of travelers: Some are traveling alone and enjoy making new friends on the trip; others are girlfriends getting together to enjoy a day together; while still others are couples enjoying an outing within a group setting. One thing all of the travelers have in common is their readiness to enjoy themselves and make some fantastic memories.

THAT SPECIAL TOUCH One of the key reasons Home Federal’s Jubilee travel club has been so successful is that Home Federal was fortunate to secure the services of Jean Jech to plan and lead all of the tours. Because Jean orchestrates every detail of each trip, she is able to slather on her secret sauce of providing that extra, ever-so-special, concierge-level, superior service. When planning trips, Jean makes sure that she can reserve the best seats in the house or dine at the best restaurant in the area or she selects another venue. Pampering travel club members is Jean’s number one priority, which she takes very seriously. She is adamant that members “deserve, and will receive, a special day” when they travel.

REPEAT TRAVELERS Sandy Henslin, a frequent traveler with Jean, joined Home Federal for the sole purpose of becoming a member of the travel club. Sandy and her husband, David, have traveled with Jean several times in the past and have taken several day trips with Jean since becoming members of Home Federal’s Jubilee travel club. Sandy says that she likes the day trips because they are “well-organized and Jean takes care everything.” Sandy loves the fact that Jean thinks of the littlest details and always goes the extra mile. Sandy adds that, “Jean makes an effort to make the trips worry-free and wants them to be perfect.” Another repeat traveler, June Gansen, says that the day trips are a “real treat to go on” and they always see great shows and enjoy wonderful meals together. The day trips are also a great way to visit with friends and meet new folks. June enthusiastically says that Jean Jech “treats us like royalty.” June advises that anyone interested in taking a Jubilee day trip should try it and find out for themselves if they enjoy the experience.

COMING UP Upcoming fantastic day trips include an evening performance of “Trick Boxing” at the Joseph Page Theatre in Winona on January 27; an evening performance of “Sinatra and Company: Music from The Rat Pack Era” at the Sheldon Theatre in Red Wing on February 26; and “Blithe Spirit,” a matinee performance at the Old Log Theatre in Excelsior on March 23. These day trips, all accompanied by Home Federal’s Jean Jech, include the performance, meal and motor coach transportation to and from the venue. Home Federal’s Jubilee travel club is offered only to Home Federal customers meeting club membership criteria. If you are interested in experiencing life with Jubilee, call Home Federal Jubilee at 507-535-1231, stop in at a Home Federal branch location or visit JustCallHome.com. If you are considering taking a day trip with the club, be sure to make your reservation as quickly as possible as trips are filling fast. Cindy Mennenga, owner of Straight Talk Wellness, is a health coach and freelance writer based in Rochester. 58

January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com


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Calendar Events GATHERED BY SARA ALBERTELLI

Check out our Community Calendar online for additional listings at RWmagazine.com

Deadline for submitting events for RochesterWomen March/April 2016 issue is January 31, 2016. Send events to calendar@RWmagazine.com Events in purple are sponsored by RochesterWomen magazine. *(507 area code unless stated)

JANUARY

MnSure Enrollment Assistance, Rochester Public Library, Certified MNSure Navigator will answer questions, review options, and assist with enrollment, 328-2300, rochesterpubliclibrary.org

JANUARY 2 Polar Bear 5K Predict Your Time Run, Gloria Dei Lutheran Church, 9:15 a.m. registration, ziehen2@charter.net, rochestertrackclub.com

JANUARY 5 Bingo, Bango, Bongo...Goal Setting & Accountability, Rochester Public Library, goal setting and accountability in your job search, 1:30-2:30 p.m., 328-2300, rochesterpubliclibrary.org

JANUARY 9 Wedding Extravaganza, Mayo Civic Center, over 100 wedding vendors and industry professionals, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 876-0199, weddingxtravaganza.com

JANUARY 9 Tribute to the Music of John Denver, State Theatre, Layne Yost and Jon Shimoda tribute to John Denver, 7:30 p.m., 732-7616, crossingsatcarnegie.com

JANUARY 9 & 23, FEBRUARY 6 & 20 Rochester Winter Farmers Market, Olmsted County Fairgrounds, locally-grown produce and homemade products, 9 a.m.-12 p.m., 273-8232, rochesterdowntownfarmersmarket.org

JANUARY 13 Women on Wednesdays, Rochester Civic Theatre, 5-7 p.m., 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

JANUARY 13 Nonfiction Discussion Group, Rochester Public Library, discuss nonfiction through a thought-provoking book by Caroline Moorehead, 2-3 p.m., 328-2300, rochesterpubliclibrary.org

60

January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

JANUARY 13 iFilms: International and Independent Films, Rochester Public Library, Marie's Story recounts the courageous journey of a deaf and blind nun, 6-8 p.m., 328-2300, rochesterpubliclibrary.org

JANUARY 14 16th Annual Beat the Odds Scholarship Celebration, Rochester International Events Center, 281-7771, rctc.edu

JANUARY 14 Documentary Rape for Profit, Rochester Public Library, human trafficking awareness film and facilitated discussion, 6:30-8:30 p.m., 328-2300, rochesterpubliclibrary.org

JANUARY 15 Riverside Concerts Presents Minneapolis Guitar Quartet, Mayo Civic Center, performance with beautiful voicing, style, and musical mastery, 7:30 p.m., 328-2200, rochestermn.gov

JANUARY 15 Scottish Folk, Crossings at Carnegie, lively show rooted in Scotland’s rich and cultural music, 7:30 p.m., 732-7616, crossingsatcarnegie.com

JANUARY 15-16, 21-23, 28-30 Enchanted April, Rochester Repertory Theatre, journey of four women and their self-discovery in Italy, 8 p.m., 289-1737, rochesterrep.org

JANUARY 16 Once in a Blue Moon: An Evening for Autism Awareness, Rochester International Event Center, 6 p.m., 261-6950, rtaaf.org

JANUARY 16 15th Annual Wit Wisdom & Wine, Rochester Public Library, 6:30-10 p.m., 328-2300, rochesterpubliclibrary.org

JANUARY 16

Gassenhauer, Christ United Methodist Church, Cellist Laura Sewell, clarinetist David Townsend, and pianist Horacio Nuguid will perform, 7:30 p.m., 287-9765, rochesterchambermusic.org

JANUARY 16 & 17 62nd Annual Eagles Cancer Telethon, Mayo Civic Center, Watch KTTC to witness musical talent and raise money to fight cancer, 358-4744, eaglescancertelethon.org

JANUARY 18 21st Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration Breakfast, Mayo Civic Center, Designed to commemorate Dr. King and update community leaders on diversity initiatives, 288-1122, business. rochestermnchamber.com

JANUARY 19

Read Between the Wine, Post Town Winery, release of and reading from “The Edge of Nowhwere” by C.H. Armstrong, 7 p.m., cathie@charmstrongbooks. com, posttownwinery.com

JANUARY 23 Visiting Author: C.H. Armstrong, Rochester Public Library, Learn more about “The Edge of Nowhere” a work of historical fiction, 3-4 pm, 328-2300, rochesterpubliclibrary.org

JANUARY 23 The Science and Art of Living a Balanced and Fulfilled Life, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, meditations, creating a wellness mandala, and personal goal-setting, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 280-2195, rochesterfranciscan.org

JANUARY 23 Comedy Hypnosis Show, Zumbrota State Theatre, Master Hypnotist David Danzig will transform volunteers and leave the audience laughing, 7:30 p.m., 732-7616, crossingsatcarnegie.com

JANUARY 24 Jazz Jam, Rochester Civic Theatre, live jazz and open mic with John Sievers and D’Sievers, 5:30-8:30 p.m., 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

JANUARY 26 One Glass of Water at a Time, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, Hear the Crabtrees’ story about developing lifechanging water treatment in Guatemala, 6:30-8 p.m., 280-2195, rochesterfranciscan.org


JANUARY 28-FEBRUARY 14 Winterfest XIV, wintertime activities, raising awareness and funds for area nonprofit organizations, 261-6708, rochesterwinterfest.com

JANUARY 29

FEBRUARY 8-9

Lyra Baroque Orchestra: Berlin in the Baroque, Zumbro Lutheran Church, featuring W.F. Bach, Georg Philipp Telemann, and Johann Joachim Quantz selections, 7:30 p.m., 651-321-2214, lyrabaroque.org

JANUARY 30 Make-N-Take: Book Folding, Rochester Public Library, fold pages to transform books into pieces of art, 2-4 p.m., 328-2300, rochesterpubliclibrary.org

JANUARY 31 Festival of Music Concert, First Presbyterian Church, Nordic Choir of Luther College will perform in a capella style, 4 p.m., 282-1618, fpcrochester.org

FEBRUARY

FEBRUARY 5

13th National Wear Red Day, awareness for the leading killers of women-heart disease and stroke, 1-800-2428721, goredforwomen.org

FEBRUARY 5-2 Almost Maine by John Cariani, Rochester Civic Theatre, the story of the mythical town Almost, Maine, Thurs Fri Sat: 7 pm; Sun: 2 pm, 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre. org

FEBRUARY 5-7 37th Annual Rochester Area Builders Home Show, Mayo Civic Center, Fri: 3-8 p.m.; Sat: 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Sun: 11 a.m.-4 p.m., 282-7698, rochesterareabuilders. com

FEBRUARY 6

FEBRUARY 6-7

Revolutions in Music, Lourdes High School, performed by the Rochester Symphony, Sat: 7:30 p.m.; Sun: 2 p.m., 86-8742, rochestersymphony.org

Careers for Women in Architecture, Building, Construction and (Interior) Design, Rochester Area Builders Home Show, Mayo Civic Center, 11 a.m., women in nontraditional careers will present and be available for questions, 507-259-6362, RWmagazine.com

FEBRUARY 6 14th Annual Frozen Goose Run, University Center Rochester Atrium, benefits Mayo Clinic Childhood Cancer Research and Brighter Tomorrows, 1 p.m., 282-9968, minnesotarunner.com

FEBRUARY 6 13th Annual Hearts and Diamonds Spectacular, Somerby Golf Club, dinner, dancing, and diamonds to support the Ronald McDonald House, 282-3955, rmhmn.org

Open Auditions for Mary Poppins, Rochester Civic Theatre, 7 p.m., 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

FEBRUARY 10 Women on Wednesdays, Rochester Civic Theatre, 5-7 p.m., 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

FEBRUARY 12 Remember When Rock Was Young: The Elton John Tribute, Mayo Civic Center, celebrating Sir Elton John’s hits with singer Craig Meyer, 7:30 pm, 328-2200, rochestermn.gov

FEBRUARY 12 - 14 "A Thirties Affair" comedy presented by Brave Community Theatre of Spring Valley, Spring Valley Community Center, dinner theatre Friday and Saturday at 6:30 pm., $32.50 plus cash bar; beverage and dessert matinee, Sunday at 2 pm., $19 adult, $15 senior and student, 507-5290988, BraveCommunityTheatre.com or

FEBRUARY 13 Polar Plunge, Foster Arend Park, supports Special Olympics Minnesota, 612-604-1280, plungemn.org

FEBRUARY 14

Love Yourself, Post Town Winery, 1-4 p.m., yoga 1-2 p.m., chair massage, cheese/crackers and chocolate, $15 per person, wine may be purchased by the glass or bottle, RWmagazine.com, pre-register by Wednesday, February 10, editor@RWmagazine. com or 507-259-6362

FEBRUARY 16 Spring Marathon Training Clinic Introductory Meeting, TerraLoco, course designed to train runners for spring running events, 7:15 p.m., lsgentling@charter.net, rochestertrackclub.com

FEBRUARY 21 Voices, Bethel Lutheran Church, Featuring all four Southeast Minnesota Honors Choirs ensembles, 4 p.m., 252-0505, honorschoirs.org

FEBRUARY 27 Latin Jazz, Christ United Methodist Church, annual jazz concert featuring vocalists Ana Wells and Corissa Vought, 7:30 p.m., 287-9765, rochesterchambermusic.org

FEBRUARY 27 A Chair Affair Benefiting the Boys & Girls Club of Rochester, wwwachairaffair.org, ltrotman@bgclubroch.org

FEBRUARY 28 Jazz Jam, Rochester Civic Theatre, bring your instrument/voice and play with a live jazz rhythm section, 5:30-8:30 p.m., 282-8481, rochestercivictheatre.org

Thank you to the advertisers who made

this issue of RochesterWomen magazine possible. Altra Federal Credit Union........................................................4 Ameriprise, Kari Douglas..........................................................9 Ameriprise, Nancy Emerick................................................... 49 Andy’s Liquor.......................................................................... 20 Anew Medispa Clinic ........................................................... 64 Associates in Psychiatry & Psychology....................................4 Bark L. Consulting Engineers, LLC......................................... 42 Benike Construction................................................................ 44 Beyond Kitchens..................................................................... 50 Bicycle Sports......................................................................... 54 Boys & Girls Club Rochester, A Chair Affair........................ 10 Budget Blinds.......................................................................... 42 C.O. Brown Insurance Agency............................................. 44 Careers for Women in ABCD.................................................41 Casablanca Creative Cuisine & Wine................................. 10 Chanhassen Dinner Theatres................................................. 59 Coffee Mill Ski & Snowboard Resort.................................... 10 Commonweal Theatre Lanesboro......................................... 23 Creative Hardwood Floors, Inc............................................. 44 Dawn Sanborn Photography................................................. 18 Degues Tile and Carpet......................................................... 29 Dentristy for Children and Adolescents, Ltd......................... 44 Design Studio B...................................................................... 38 Dunlap and Seegar, P.A........................................................ 29 Empowered Wellness............................................................. 54 Essence Skin Clinic................................................................. 20 Flowers by Jerry Lux Boutique............................................... 14 Foresight Bank......................................................................... 38 Garden of Massage............................................................... 10 Hair Studio 52.........................................................................12 Helping Hands Home Cleaning............................................ 23 Home Federal......................................................................... 59 Katie Marie Kirckof...................................................................3 King Orthodontics.................................................................. 59 Lacina Siding & Windows Inc............................................... 34 Le Jardin Floral........................................................................ 50 Lakeside Dentistry, Dr. Lucy Gores...........................................9 Mayo Employees Federal Credit Union................................12 Mayo Clinic Research Study..................................................12 Mike Allen Homes.................................................................. 37 Mike Hardwick Photography................................................ 56 Mr. Pizza North...................................................................... 14 Nietz & Eversman, LLC........................................................... 10 O’Brien and Wolf, L.L.P.......................................................... 26 Olmsted County Public Health.............................................. 50 Olmsted Medical Center....................................................... 53 Olmsted National Bank......................................................... 20 Peoples Food Co-op............................................................... 46 Pepin Cottages........................................................................ 46 Post Town Winery.................................................. 10, 34 & 46 Premier Banks.......................................................................... 34 R. Fleming Construction Inc. Highlands at Hundred Acre Woods............................... 63 Refined Medi Spa.................................................................. 25 Reiland’s Hair Clinic............................................................... 38 Renew Retreat (Duluth)........................................................... 46 Riverbend Assisted Living....................................................... 26 Rochester Area Builders......................................................... 30 Rochester Area Family Y........................................................ 59 Rochester Catholic Schools................................................... 38 Rochester Feed & Country Store........................................... 14 Rochester Greeters................................................................. 10 Rochester International Airport.................................................2 Rochester Lapidary Jewelers....................................................3 Rochester STEM Academy.................................................... 23 Rochester Trolley & Tour Company...................................... 59 Schmidt Goodman Office Products Inc................................ 42 Shorewood Senior Cottages................................................. 42 Sola Salon, Francoise Leger.................................................. 10 The Woods.............................................................................. 56 Thirty-One, Jean Cutherberson Dwire.................................. 10 Thrive, Missy Nagel..................................................................6 Tips N Toes Nail Salon.......................................................... 14 Townsquare Media...................................................................9 Tracey McGuire Photography..................................................9 Tyrol Ski & Sports................................................................... 56 Waseca Area Tourism & Visitors Bureau.............................. 56 Wells Fargo, Jillian Knutson................................................... 10 Winona Radio......................................................................... 26 WSB and Associates, Leslie McGillivray-Rivas.....................41


on the lighter side

To

2

m a e r D PERCHANCE TO SLEEP BY CJ FOSDICK

S

LEEP IS A NECESSITY, NOT A LUXURY. DOCTORS SUGGEST TODAY’S ADULT REQUIRES SEVEN AND A HALF TO EIGHT AND HALF HOURS (A NIGHT). TEENAGERS NEED NINE HOURS, AND INFANTS NEED 16 HOURS OF SLEEP TO OPERATE EFFICIENTLY. BY THOSE STANDARDS, I’M AN “INEFFICIENT MACHINE.”

LIFE STAGES OF SLEEP

SLEEPING AT RETREATS

As a toddler, I was not big on napping…or lingering in my crib. Once, the story goes, my babysitter was asleep when my folks returned home to find their baby crawling around with a butcher knife. This earned me the nickname, Butchie. Once I learned to read, I had a bedtime ritual that took a bite out of sleeping hours. By the time I hit the teens, I was an avid reader and a determined night owl. When I did fall asleep, however, it was deep. A 5 a.m. fire alarm at the bank on our block failed to rouse me, as did my alarm clock and my shrieking mother when I overslept on school days. Skipping breakfast, I would run to the bus stop, praying the buses were also running late. The last morning bell would be ringing as I raced up three flights of stairs in my high school, threw my jacket on the floor outside my homeroom and sauntered casually to my seat, red-faced and breathless. Fortunately, I worked on the weekly school paper and "journalists" had privileges. I could sign out on the blackboard, pretending to interview someone, then take my time to run a brush through wind-swept hair.

On frequent quilt retreats, I learned that men were not masters of the snore. One memorable retreat I had two roommates. One snored and suffered from sleep apnea. With her CPAP machine, she went to bed wearing equipment appropriate for a pandemic outbreak. After adjusting to the white noise of the machine, I fell asleep, only to wake up hours later thinking I was in a tsunami. The CPAP had come loose and the "storm" was confined to the room. Strange clicking began before I was able to fall back to sleep. The lodge had a geo thermal system, and I was certain something had gone haywire in pipes that clicked and hissed. When I mentioned this to my roommates, the woman in the bunk above me apologized. Bruxism was the medical term for her teeth-grinding, she explained. My apnea friend bought me some bright orange earplugs the next day. On a recent retreat, I was reading my Kindle in bed while two new roommates were sawing wood in concert. One of them began to shout angrily in her sleep. Afraid I might be the cause, I snapped my Kindle shut and shoved in my orange earplugs. The next morning, the shouter non-chalantly confessed to having night terrors. Today, I sleep between a dog with bad breath and a sleep-talking snorer with restless legs and a teacup bladder. The luxury of a good, efficient sleep might always be my biggest dream.

WHAT GOES AROUND COMES AROUND My first child was a colicky baby, resisting naps, much less eight hours a night. We were both sleep-deprived. My husband, it turned out, also had his own sleep problems. I often carried on nonsensical conversations with him while he sat up in bed, wide-eyed but technically asleep. "That kid out there, he's looking in," he once told me. I closed the curtains and locked all doors. He was fast asleep when I returned to bed with a baseball bat—just in case "that kid out there" broke in. Hubby also snored. His serenading didn’t bother me until I put down my latest read. A pinch or a punch usually silenced him until I could drift off. He also had a restless foot, which he often wobbled hard enough to vibrate the bed, but I found that rather comforting. 62

January/February 2016 RWmagazine.com

Cj Fosdick is still a night owl, hoping to find avid readers for her novel, The Accidental Wife, and the sequel in progress. Her new story released on Feb. 10 is a romantic comedy called Hot Stuff. For her newsletter sign-up and more information, check out www.cjfosdick.com


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Welcome to anew medspa clinic…where each patient is treated like family. With nearly 30 years of experience…Board Certified & Mayo Medical School Graduate Dr. Victoria Hagstrom, MD assures you are in capable hands when you seek treatments & results from our services at our locations in Minnetonka & Rochester. Body Contouring: • Non-Surgical…Body Fat & Cellulite Reduction…All Body Types…No Pain or Recovery Time…Rapid Results…Maintenance Programs…Tighter skin… Skin Rejuvenation: • ProFractional Laser Treatments available Minnetonka location only with Sciton Laser… • anew BBL, anew Blizzard Peels, and anew Artic Peels available in Minnetonka location only with Sciton Laser… • anew MesoPen Medical Microneedling… the most advanced microneedle cartridge & device on the market for the results every patient is looking for… • Medical grade, state-of-the-art micro-needling designed to stimulate your skins natural ability to produce collagen formation creating healthier skin & improved appearance. Not just for wrinkles, micro-needling and Sciton Lasers treat hyperpigmentation, fine lines, scars, sun damage & stretch marks, Loss of Resiliency, Large Pores, Thin & Lax Skin…on all skin types & colors.

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Take control of your hair loss with “the” premier top 1% hair restoration company…anew FUE institute is dedicated exclusively to hair & eyebrow restoration with procedures performed and supervised by Mayo Schooled physician Dr. Victoria Hagtrom, MD…Our highly skilled team performs FUE ONLY procedures with the artistry of natural graft placement of your own hair, where the patients hairline is recreated with their original hair pattern growth to give our patients their natural younger look back. • All FUE procedures are virtually painless with little down time for Men, Women & Children. • FUE allows follicles to be removed from a larger donor area on the sides and back of the head which is virtually unnoticeable & gives the patient great flexibility to get their desired results. • Highly Recommended Hair Loss & Thinning Products for Men & Women •#1 in the country for eyebrow restoration…restores permanent natural eyebrow hair loss for men and women for reasons such as over-plucking, genetics, skin conditions, scarring, burns, congenital conditions and aging…all within 2-3 hours. • NO Scars…NO stitches…Permanent results…outpatient procedure…fast recovery… • Over 9 years of experience exclusively in FUE…

$4 FUE Grafts Everyday!

Specializing solely in the exciting medical aesthetic injectables… No Surgery & Little to NO recovery time…Dermal Fillers have been called liquid facelifts because of the many beneits of a surgical facelift without the downtime…results are instant. • Refresh your appearance & rejuvenate facial skin by replenishing the volume & contours you skin has lost. •Diminish smile lines, plump thin lips, soften facial creases, marionette lines, chin wrinkles, plumping sagging hands, pre-jowl •Immediately smooth out wrinkles & unwanted lines with minimal recovery time. • Results last from six to twelve months with our new product Bellafil lasting 2-5 years. Injections and injectors must have an artistic value over and above their credentials. We are blessed to have our Managing Partners Nancy Ruth, RN…the national injection trainer for Bellafil & Galderma and Mayo Medical School Graduate Dr. Victoria Hagstrom, MD…on our team.

$10 BOTOX & $4 Dysport Everyday!

Great Financing Available for ALL Services… 3135 Superior Drive NW, Suite C Rochester, MN 55901 507.258.6553 13570 Wayzata Blvd Minnetonka, MN 55305 612.208.0741

www.medspa.clinic

WE ARE MEMBERS OF THE FOLLOWING ASSOCIATIONS: • American Medical Association • American Family of Family Physicians • Minnesota Women Physicians • American Society for Laser in Medicine & Surgery • American Medical Directors Association •International Society of Hair Restoration Surgery

Victoria Hagstram MD Board Certified & Mayo Clinic Trained Physician

January/February 2016  

Rochester Women magazine begins the new year with articles focused on our community's original women. Look for articles discussing careers f...

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