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MARCH/APRIL 2020 COMPLIMENTARY

Charcuterie BOARDS Thinking About DRINKING

Celebrating

20 YEARS of Rochester Women Magazine!

Rethinking GENDER Diversity vs. INCLUSION

Living As I Desire, Entertaining Everyone Positively

NEVER LISTEN TO THE NAYSAYERS

+

Student writers tell us about immigrating to Rochester and local international grocery stores RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com March/April 2020

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CONTENTS MARCH/APRIL 2020

32 ON THE COVER

COMMUNITY 10 INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S DAY

39 MINDFULNESS AND MORE

24 LAIDEE P: LIVING AS I DESIRE, ENTERTAINING EVERYONE POSITIVELY

12 LOCAL READS A regional round-

41 SLEEP The health factor you

20 PROM Tradition and changes from then til now.

HOME AND GARDEN 29 BRINGING COLOR INTO YOUR HOME Instill energy and life in your

NEVER LISTEN TO THE NAYSAYERS.

32 CHARCUTERIE BOARDS

Choose your own adventure.

36 THINKING ABOUT DRINKING Benefits and risks.

18 RETHINKING GENDER

Thinking outside of the binary for our definition of women.

15 DIVERSITY VS. INCLUSION

Why it’s important to understand the difference.

13 OFF TO THE UNKNOWN An immigration story.

34 A DASH OF CULTURE

How local groceries are shaping Rochester.

An equal world is an enabled world. up of women authors.

27 KEEPING THE BEAT The legacy of Music In Our Schools Month.

Meditation for beginners. shouldn’t underestimate.

space with these shade trends.

42 WOMEN’S LEADERSHIP CIRCLE Collecting and preserving the stories of local women. 46 AROUND THE TOWN Unique products from local businesses.

WELLNESS 22 STRESSING OVER STRESS

IN EVERY ISSUE 7 From the Editor 44 Calendar Events 45 Advertisers Index

Gaining perspective and overcoming challenges.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

BUILDING LONGER TABLES Happy 20th birthday to Rochester Women Magazine! Thank you to all the readers and advertisers who have supported this publication over the years. As a newbie, I am slowly, but surely, learning the history (or “herstory”) of the magazine. As March is Women’s History Month, enjoy learning about the History Center of Olmsted County’s monthly leadership circle (p. 42). Also, happy International Women’s Day on March 8! To celebrate, we hear from four local women of diverse backgrounds in their native languages (p. 11). In a recent sermon, the pastor reminded us that we are constantly casting votes by how we spend our time and money. Each of these moments is a building block of who we are. I’ve always hoped to be someone who fights for those whose voices are quieter than mine, and one goal I have is for any person who identifies as a woman to see herself/theirself in these pages and in our social media. Learn more about the importance of pronouns in Rethinking Gender (p. 18) and consider Diversity vs. Inclusion (p. 15). I’m also excited to welcome some student writers to this issue. Read about local international grocery stores (p. 34) and the perspective of a daughter of immigrants (p. 13). We are excited to roll out a new column on local women authors (p. 12), so be sure to look for these books to add to your reading list. Enjoy creating some food fashion with our guide to charcuterie boards (p. 32) and stroll down memory lane with our article about prom (p. 20). A podcast I’ve listened to recently talks about “building longer tables,” so that women can share equally in the bounty we find in our world. As we welcome spring and everything feels a little bit lighter, let’s use our time and money to invite others to pull up a chair to our table of life, where we can celebrate each other and put more goodness out into the world.

PLUS

IN THIS ISSUE... Music In Our Schools Month Mindfulness and More Thinking About Drinking

She/Her

ONLINE SURPRISES... Check out more references to enhance

your reading of Diversity Vs. Inclusion on page 15.

Get the English version of the art icle on page 11 abou t International Wo men’s Day (March 8).

Share your tips for non-alcoholic drinks at your favorite local restaurants!

RWmagazine.com March/April 2020

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MEET THE CREW We asked our team "What's your fave way to de-stress?" Here is what they had to say:

ISSUE 114, VOLUME 20, NUMBER 1 MARCH/APRIL 2020 PUBLISHER/EDITOR

Emily Watkins

MARKETING ACCOUNT MANAGER GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Alexandra Petrova

PHOTOGRAPHER

Rosei Skipper WRITER

Depending on the day, my favorite ways to de-stress are going for a run, yoga or meditation. Also a nice walk with my dog can really help clear my mind!

I joined Burn Boot Camp and have been looking forward to my daily workout. They’re never the same, and I leave stronger than I came.

I'm a big fan of intuitive movement—sometimes that means a killer barre class, other times it means simple stretches before bed or a slow walk in the park. Listening to my body is key to my wellness.

Emily Watkins

Tessa Slisz

It really helps me to exercise, especially outdoors. But I also love to watch silly Netflix series.

PUBLISHER/EDITOR

Nikki Kranebell

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Kate Brue Tessa Slisz

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Jen Jacobson

COPY EDITOR

Erin Gibbons

PHOTOGRAPHY

AB-Photography.com COMMUNITY CALENDAR SOCIAL MEDIA

Rosei Skipper

Thank you to this issue's contributing writers:

ASSISTANT

Karine Marsac Rochester Women is published six times per year by 507 communications LLC, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 Shanti Trish Amundson is Argue is a Rochester-area a reader, writer and mom who freelance writer, can't imagine a who loves to decorate her home. better place than Rochester to She’s enjoying adding shades of raise a family. blue décor in her living space in 2020, including a navy wool scarf that she turned into table runner.

Salma Caamir Eva Cruz Pena is an Life is a high school student who is a vocal and passionate community advocate and leader in the district. She spends her free time writing and highlighting the minority experience in Rochester.

Coach, Inclusion & Diversity Consultant, creator of Sacred Inclusion, a Masterclass series for white women who are committed to creating an equitable world.

Gina DeWink Elizabeth Harris is from is a Rochester writer and author with her nonfiction book, "Human, with a Side of Soul," available in stores and on Amazon in December.

Rochester and works full time for the American Cancer Society. She also teaches dance and does wedding coordination, in addition to freelance writing.

Yusra Hassan is a junior at Century High School. She often writes about the obstacles of being foreign in America from a teen perspective.

Subscriptions available for $24 per year (six issues). Send check to the address stated above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Rochester Women assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2020 507 communications, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Rochester Women magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials.

TL Jordan

MSc (they/ them) is a scientist and an advocate in the LGBTQ+ STEM community. You can also find them behind the bar at Queen City Coffee and Juice.

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Annie Mack is beyond grateful and humbled to have the best of all worlds of being a mother, creative and wife.

Erin Pagel is a freelance writer living in Rochester.

March/April 2020 RWmagazine.com

Alison Rentschler

is a writer and editor living in Rochester, Minnesota, with her dog and cat.

Anne Scherer is

a writer, poet and artist living in Rochester, MN. She has practiced meditation on a daily basis for five years. “Breathing is a gift,” she says. “I am grateful for each breath.”

Dr. Rosei Skipper is

an Oregon-born creative, a Mayo-trained child psychiatrist, and a joyful promoter of art and music in Rochester. She is a host and producer at the Rochester Posse.

Heather Weller is a

Realtor® with Keller Williams Premier Realty.

Printed in the U.S.A.

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WOMEN'S DAY AN EQUAL WORLD IS AN ENABLED WORLD BY EVA CRUZ PEÑA

March 8 is International Women's Day. The theme for this year’s campaign is #eachforequal. We asked four Rochester women of diverse nationalities to reflect on the phrase, “An equal world is an enabled world,” and to share their responses in their native languages.

#IWD2020 #EachforEqual

Chao Mwatela Kenya (Swahili)

Sujatha Nair Malaysia (Bahasa Malaysia, Malay)

Chao has lived in Rochester for 11 years.

Suja has lived in Rochester MN for 5 years.

Nilopokuwa msichana mdogo, mama yangu aliniambia kuwa naweza kukua kuwa chochote ninachotaka kuwa, na chochote nilichofanya kazi kwa bidii kuwa. Nilizungukwa na wanawake wengi wenye ujuzi, waliofaulu na waliofanikiwa. Yote nilioambiwa, niliamini, na nilifanya bidii na matuamaini ya kufaulu kwa kila kitu. Lakini, hakuna kitu kilichoniandaa kwa upweke wa kuwa msichana wa pekee kwa masomo ya chuo kikuu, ama msukosuko wa ndani wa kuelewa ujinsia, au bidii ya kufika usawa wa kazi na kazi ya mama mzazi. Nilipofika umri wa mwanamke mzima, niligundua kuwa mashauri ya mama yangu yalikua kweli, na pia uwongo. Ni kweli, wasichana wanaweza kukuwa kuwa wanawake wanaofaulu katika eneo lolote. Wasichana wengi wako tayari kufanikiwa ulimwenguni, lakini dunia haiko tayari kwetu. Shule zetu, tamaduni za kazini na mahusiano lazima zibadilike pia, ili wanawake waweze kufika uwezo na matumaini yao. Maoendeleo hayo yote yote yatakapofaulu, dunia yote itafaulu.

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Walaupun bagus untuk mengerti dan bersetuju bahawa setiap individu bertanggungjawab keatas pemikiran dan perjalanan hidup masing-masing, adalah lebih penting untuk menyedari bahawa ketidaksamaan gender adalah suatu topik perbahasan yang sedang meningkat. Dalam dunia hari ini, kita melihat lebih ramai wanita melibatkan diri didalam situasi yang ‘maskulin’ seperti menjadi pemimpin didalam berbagai bidang pekerjaan termasuk politik. Walaupun sedemikian lebih banyak lagi yang boleh diperusahakan bagi mencapai hak kesaksamaan. Kesaksamaan gender merupakan salah satu hak asasi kita sebagai manusia. Hak untuk hidup secara terhormat, bebas dari rasa ketakutan dan berhak menentukan pilihan hidup. Budaya memainkan peranan penting di dalam situasi sebegini. Saya terdiri daripada golongan wanita dimana budaya memberikan kita peranan cuma sebagai ‘pelengkap’ kepada seorang lelaki. Sudah tentunya budaya boleh dipersalahkan dan kita berdiam diri tetapi sudah tiba masa kita bersuara dan menyoal budaya dan situasi yang menyenyapkan wanita.


Kesedaran harus dipupuk dikalangan wanita bahawa mereka harus meningkatkan kualiti pendidikan dan perancangan karier yang setara dengan lelaki. Apabila kesedaran ini tercapai, secara tidak langsung perubahan akan berlaku dan isu kesaksamaan gender tidak akan menjadi tajuk perbincangan. Kesedaran positif masa kini adalah pergabungan berbagai organisasi diseluruh dunia menyokong isu kesaksamaan. Ini secara langsung telah memberi wanita peluang untuk bersuara. Kita sebagai wanita harus sentiasa bersama-sama berusaha keras menuju keaarah kesaksamaan bagi diri sendiri dan generasi akan datang. Saya bertanggapan bahawa dengan adanya kesaksamaan, dimana semua gender diberi peluang yang setara, maka akan terdapat lebih banyak idea. Ia akan mengeratkan hubungan manusia, tanpa mengira kaum, agama dan gender. Dunia ini akan menjadi lebih progresif, maju dan aman. Tidakkah itu tanggungjawab kita?

To read these inspiring stories in English, go to RWMagazine.com and click on the International Women's Day icon

Eva Cruz Pena Puerto Rico (Spanish) Eva has lived intermittently in Rochester for 10 years.

Sylwia Bujak Oliver Poland (Polish) Sylwia has lived in Rochester for 8 years.

Nie urodzilismy sie wiedzac jak zyc, jak traktowac innych, jak sie zachowywac i jak byc dobrym czlowiekiem. Tego wszystkiego uczymy sie przez cale zycie. Bardzo wierze, ze musimy otwarcie rozmawiac o wszystkich niefajnych moralnie i etycznie sprawach. Musimy komunikowac sie nie tylko dlaczego cos sie wydarzylo, ale takze musimy miec odwage, zeby to zmienic. Zeby walczyc z niesprawiedliwoscia musimy edukowac i umacniac glosy tych, ktorzy sa nie rowno traktowani. Ta edukacja zaczyna sie od samego siebie poprzez uczciwa analize wlasnych zachowan, sterotypowania i wyciagania podswiadomych wnioskow o innej plci, religii i narodowosciach. Zeby cokolwiek zmienic i zaleczyc rany, to my musimy wyciagac rece i zaprosic innych, w miejsce gdzie wszyscy sa mile widziani i traktowani z szacunkiem i cierpliwoscia.

Crecí en una cultura rodeada de machismo, donde a los hombres se les otorgaban libertades ilimitadas y se posicionaban por encima de las mujeres. La mayoría de las veces, las mujeres tenían que dejar sus sueños y aspiraciones al servicio de sus esposos e hijos. Mientras crecía en esta cultura, mi abuela y mi madre me modelaron un ambiente diferente. Ellas eligieron perseguir sus sueños y ganar una vida independiente de sus cónyuges. Su sueño para mí era romper con la tradición, inculcando en mí un amor por la libertad, la educación y la independencia financiera. Crecí sabiendo que tenía el poder de elegir, perseguir mis sueños y sustentarme a mí misma. Ante sus ojos, yo era igual a los hombres. Mirando hacia atrás, el contraste entre mi entorno inmediato y la cultura dominante influyó en mi pasión por trabajar con mujeres, para guiarlas a encarnar su verdad: que son seres soberanos con el poder de elegir. El mundo ha demostrado ser inconsistente al proporcionar los medios y oportunidades para que las mujerxs sean consideradas en calidad egalitaria a los hombres. Pero las mujerxs tienen el poder innato de crear. Y podemos elegir crear y hacer posible un mundo donde todxs tengan el mismo acceso para perseguir sueños y alcanzar sus metas. Cuando eso suceda nuestro mundo, será igual y posible para todxs.

RWmagazine.com March/April 2020

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LOCALREADS LOCAL READS

A REGIONAL ROUND-UP OF WOMEN AUTHORS BY GINA DEWINK PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL COACHING INVEST IN YOU

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Koi Pierce dreams other peoples’ dreams. Any skin-to-skin contact transfers flashes of that person’s most intense dreams. It’s enough to make anyone a hermit. Her father who suffers from Alzheimer’s disease, a dream fragment from the brush of a professor’s hand and a mysterious stranger who speaks a rare but familiar Japanese dialect will force Koi to learn to trust the help of others, as well as face the truth about herself.

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AUTHOR: J. Lynn Else (teasippinnerdymom.com) Best thing about being an area author: Local author groups—enthusiastic cheerleaders, honest editors, sometimes even therapists, but always friends. Shout out to Rochester Fantastical Women!

The Edge of Nowhere Despised and feared by her family, Victoria Hastings Harrison Greene refuses to go quietly from her life without revealing secrets she’s kept for more than 50 years—secrets consistent with the rumors her grandchildren whisper. Widowed with nine children during the Great Depression and Oklahoma Dust Bowl, Victoria made desperate choices that reduced a once soft and loving woman into the reviled matriarch she is today. Hers is the story of courage and conviction to keep fighting...no matter what it takes. AUTHOR: C.H. Armstrong (charmstrongbooks.com) Best thing about being an area author: The large number of authors in our writing community, many who have become friends and mentors.


STUDENT ARTICLE

Off to the

UNKNOWN AN IMMIGRATION STORY BY YUSRA HASSAN

SUDAN WAS ALL MY PARENTS KNEW. They grew up

and went to school there, and their families lived there. After they got married, they knew they would start a family. Sudan lacked good health care, and education was expensive. Life wasn’t the safest for children. Everyone always said that America was “the land where dreams come true” and “the life like in the movies.” My parents wanted the best for their future children, so they decided to see for themselves what America was all about. My mom describes leaving Sudan as a “decision based solely on hope.” My parents thought it would be selfish to stay in Sudan just because it benefited them, so they decided to take the chance and head off to the unknown.

THE REALIZATION

In 2000, my parents and my aunt came to Rochester, Minnesota through a travel visa. They later applied for asylum so they could stay in the United States. My dad chose to come to Rochester because he had an aunt here and didn’t want to be in a new country completely alone. Minnesota is known for its easily accessible health benefits, such as Medicare, Medicaid and food stamps, which my parents knew would help support them and their future children. My mom was pregnant with my older sister, so she was lucky enough to get medical insurance right away. My family knew little about Minnesota and only just enough English to get by, but they decided they had to adapt and get used to this new way of life.

THE PROCESS

My parents went to university and got degrees in Sudan, but their degrees didn’t have the same value in America, which meant that my parents didn’t have the same

opportunities. It was completely unfair; my parents had taken the same classes and worked just as hard, but America doesn’t always recognize foreign degrees as equal to their worth. My parents had to give up on their dream of getting jobs they studied so hard for in university, just so their children could have better opportunities here. And even once they were here, they needed to wait until their case was approved to be able to apply for authorization to work in America. During the five-year period before my parents got their green cards, my dad’s father passed away. Since they didn’t have green cards, if they left the United States, they wouldn’t be allowed to come back. My dad had to apply for travel documents and be approved just to go to his own father’s funeral, and he didn’t even get back to Sudan until six weeks after my grandfather's death. He missed his father’s funeral, burial and goodbyes just waiting for documents to be able to come back to America. My dad describes this as “a feeling of being trapped in a country that is supposed to be full of opportunity and freedom.” The green card process includes seemingly endless paperwork, fingerprinting and interviews, but my parents finally received theirs in 2005 and then became citizens in 2010. The naturalization process is only getting more difficult, and the many immigrants seeking refuge in the “land of the free” are struggling just to be able to live in a safe country. My parents left home at a time when things weren’t the best in Sudan, but for those escaping war or countries they can no longer find shelter in, this process must be a nightmare.

BETWEEN TWO COUNTRIES

Not growing up in the country I am from is hard. It’s difficult to learn my native culture

and language when we can only visit Sudan once every few years. Being connected to my roots is extremely important to me, and it’s hard not being able to physically be in the place where I’m from. My mom says one of the hardest struggles of moving here is having to teach us the culture and religion. Sudan is a Muslim country where everyone speaks the same language, and our entire culture is there. My mom wants us to know where we are from and to be proud of it, but it is definitely not an easy thing to do. It’s hard living in a predominantly white country and attending a predominantly white school. I am technically American—I have an American passport and all the privileges, but deep inside of me, I don’t truly feel American. I feel as though there is a part of me that will never be understood by American people. I feel too American for people in Sudan because I’ve been in America all my life, but too Sudanese for American people because I’m not white and I speak another language and follow different traditions. In recent years, Sudan has been going through wars and revolutions, and many people are struggling. Many children in Sudan don’t go to school because it is too expensive. It is my dream to one day be able to give back to the people of Sudan who don’t have the privilege to live in America and receive a better education in a safe environment. I hope the process for immigrants becomes easier and America owns up to its "land of opportunity" and "freedom and justice for all" mottos, especially for those who need it most. One day, I want to repay my parents, who risked it all unselfishly and sacrificed so much so they could provide a better life for my siblings and me. ◆ RWmagazine.com March/April 2020

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DIVERSITY

vs.

INCLUSION

WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO UNDERSTAND THE DIFFERENCE BY EVA CRUZ PEÑA

ACCORDING TO SOCIAL JUSTICE FACILITATOR MEG BOLGER, DIVERSITY IS THE PRESENCE OF DIFFERENCES IN A GIVEN SETTING, AND DIVERSITY EXISTS IN RELATIONSHIP TO OTHERS. These differences

often fall into social categories such as race, ethnicity, religion, gender, sexuality, socioeconomic status, nationality and citizenship, veteran and parental status, body size, ability, age and experience. Diversity is experienced via the five senses and pertains to the quantity of differences. Inclusion, on the other hand, is about different identities feeling valued, welcomed and able to participate fully within a given setting. Inclusion is experienced with feelings, and it pertains to the quality of experiencing being different. Vernā Myers, inclusion strategist and cultural change catalyst, explains that diversity is “being asked ‘to the dance’” whereas inclusion is “being asked ‘to dance.’” The distinction matters because diversity does not equal inclusion. Spaces might look diverse (presence of difference), but they might not be inclusive (make people feel valued and welcomed). Just because someone is present in a setting does not

mean the person feels invited to share in the experience as a valued equal.

FROM MESS TO MESSAGE

In March 2018, my daughters and I experienced a traumatic event secondary to an act of discrimination and racial profiling. As we processed the experience, my goal was to heal the trauma and transmute the pain. I sought to find the message in the mess because I knew the wisdom arising from it would be powerful enough to create positive change in the world. For months, I intentionally looked for clues that would point me toward that message. It wasn’t until October of that year that the message revealed itself. I was in a call with my coach when she asked me a question: “What social change would you like to see in the world?” In that moment, and without hesitating, I shared how I longed to see black, brown, Indigenous women of color (BBIWOC) represented and included in the entrepreneurial space. Ever since I moved from Puerto Rico to the U.S., I experienced the lack of representation of BBIWOC in almost every space I was part of. From work to academia to religious institutions, the presence of these women was missing. Over and over, I found myself being one of few, if not the only woman of color in

these spaces. The feeling of being invisible— of not belonging—was excruciating. This aching pain, now woven into the tapestry of my story, begged me to speak up and bring awareness to this issue. For years, I used my voice to advocate for myself and the women I represented. But 18 years later, I felt my soul was requiring me to use not only my voice, but my gifts of leading, teaching, guiding, creating safe spaces for people to heal and grow and embodying loving kindness to usher in a new paradigm to reflect the beautiful diversity of the world we live in. That day, when my coach asked me the question, I knew the message in the mess was to lead a movement that sought to heal, reconcile and create spaces for the missing voices to be heard, seen and known. And I knew I was being called to do so the only way my soul knows how to go about the hard things—with love, truth and compassion.

BACK TO BASICS

As I began to envision how to create spaces for the missing voices, I realized that not only was there little awareness of the absence of representation, there was a lack of understanding of what the terms “diversity,” “inclusion” and “equality” meant. In order to bring awareness to both the issue and RWmagazine.com March/April 2020

15


the importance of understanding the terms, I created a masterclass. Sacred Inclusion was born out of the desire to guide a conversation, grounded in love and compassion, that addressed the evident need for inclusion and representation of BBIWOC in the entrepreneurial space. It also sought to bring about understanding of diversity and inclusion and why it matters that the difference between these terms is understood.

AWARENESS, WILLINGNESS, COMMITMENT AND PERSONAL RESPONSIBILITY

Awareness is the first step in the conversation about inclusion and diversity. Once it’s raised and there’s an understanding of the terms and their significance, the women in Sacred Inclusion are presented with three concepts and a challenge: • Willingness—The quality or state of being prepared to do something. “Are you willing to do something about the lack of representation and inclusion of BBIWOC in your circles?” • Commitment—Giving your time and effort to something you believe in. “Are you committed

Cruz Peña teaches her Sacred Inclusion class online.

to giving your time, energy and resources to ensure your circles are diverse and inclusive?” • Personal responsibility—The understanding that you choose your actions, therefore you’re responsible to own and work through the consequences. “Are you taking responsibility for your commitment in bridging the gap that keeps BBIWOC from being invited in, valued and leveraged in your circles?” The women have a safe space to reflect on these questions and to ask their own. Then they have the choice to continue doing the work and joining me in creating a new paradigm for all.

A SEAT FOR ALL

Creating this new paradigm—one that is beautifully diverse like the world we live in— comes at a cost. Those who are intentional about ensuring their circles are comprised of diverse people who feel valued and welcomed understand that it will cost time, energy and money. They’re here for it, attentive and invested in creating a better equitable future. They’re the ones inviting people to the dance, inviting people to dance and ensuring everyone has access and a seat on the party planning committee. ◆

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Rethink ing GENDER

THINKING OUTSIDE OF THE BINARY FOR OUR DEFINITION OF WOMEN BY TL JORDAN, MSC (THEY/THEM)

WORKING AS A BARISTA MEANS THAT I AM CONSTANTLY INTERACTING WITH PEOPLE, WHETHER THAT IS TAKING COFFEE ORDERS, RECOMMENDING MY FAVORITE SPOTS AROUND TOWN OR LISTENING TO CUSTOMERS TALK ABOUT THEIR DAYS.

That also means that I spend a lot of time correcting my pronouns (I use “they/them” and am often assumed to use “she/her”) and explaining that I do not go by “Miss” because I am not a woman, but nonbinary. Over the past few years you may have noticed people putting pronouns in their email signatures, or perhaps you have had a family member or co-worker come out as transgender. The concept of gender is being talked about, and it’s important that we take time to learn what “gender” means, not only to better understand ourselves, but to understand the people we interact with.

CRASH COURSE IN GENDER IDENTITY

Gender is a societally formed concept of how an individual sees themselves. This could be explained as a color wheel, where some people are red, some are blue and some like to try out different colors

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March/April 2020 RWmagazine.com

to express their gender. Most people are familiar with the male/female binary, but there are also nonbinary identities (a gender outside the male/female binary), and some people who don’t identify with a gender at all.

THREE CONSIDERATIONS

Gender is different than sex assigned at birth, which is what the doctor proclaims after looking at our genitals. Gender is an identity that we hold, and gender expression is the physical representation of that gender, like our clothing, our hair, how we do everyday tasks and the way we interact with the world. Altogether, our sex assigned at birth, our gender and our gender expression do not have to match and are not binary. Instead they express themselves on a spectrum. They are separate ways that we look to categorize ourselves and give ourselves context within society. Another way that we express our gender is through the use of pronouns—words that replace proper nouns. Some pronouns (like “he” or “she”) are inherently gendered, whereas other pronouns (like “they”) can be gender neutral. In the same way that gender expression doesn’t have to match gender, pronouns do not have to match. You may see someone on the street dressed in a way that makes you think they might use “she/ her” pronouns, but that assumption may be wrong. That is why it’s important to ask for pronouns, rather than assume based on how

someone looks. Just as a name is important, a pronoun helps a person feel harmony with their identity.

WHAT DOES GENDER MEAN TO YOU?

People who identify with the gender they were assigned at birth may not think about gender as much as someone who is transgender, but gender is something that everyone does. While you may identify as a woman, the way that you express your gender or identify with your gender may change over time. Your red on the color wheel might become more pink over time, or maybe switch between an orange-red and purple-red. What it means to be a woman is different for everyone because women experience and express their gender differently. That is why it’s important to make sure that we have all types of women being represented, not only in the media that we see visually, but within the stories and articles that we read. In the same way that we want to be inclusive of race, let’s aim to raise the voices of nonbinary people. While you may have one way of being a woman, another person’s definition of a woman may be completely different. That is the beauty of gender. We don’t define a person as a woman by the fact that they wear dresses, heels and other things classified as feminine. Even the most feminine people often enjoy having a day where they can wear sweatpants and


a sports jersey—that doesn’t make them less of a woman. In the same way, there might be a woman who uses “he” or “they” pronouns, and that doesn’t make them less of a woman. Our gender identity is tied to many of the things we do and how we move through life. But that doesn’t mean we have to make it one-size-fits-all.

GENDER TO UNDERSTAND OTHERS

If you have never heard or understood the term “transgender” before, or if you are unfamiliar with the pronouns “they/them,” I would encourage you to look further. Odds are, you are going to meet people who use these terms and will appreciate your understanding. The kindness that we give to other people by learning about things that are outside of our experience goes a long way, and all it takes is a moment to read an article or ask someone what their

pronouns are before you make assumptions. Rather than remain in the dark on how other people experience their lives, let’s grow and celebrate with them. It's time to honor every person who identifies as a woman and to lift each other

up so everyone can be heard and given their fullest opportunities. Women are women, no matter their age, race, sexuality, genitalia, size, religion or differences. Women are women because they say they are and identify with being women. ◆

DEFINITIONS: BINARY: Relating to, composed of or involving two things. NONBINARY: A spectrum of genders or gender expressions that are not exclusively masculine or feminine. CISGENDER: People whose gender align with their sex assigned at birth. TRANSGENDER: People whose gender does not match the sex assigned at birth.

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are starting to find outfits and make plans for prom night. Proms are pretty well known in the United States—from when they began in universities around the late 1800s to classic prom scenes in movies of the 1940s (“It’s a Wonderful Life”) to the 1980s (“Back to the Future,” “Footloose,” “Pretty in Pink”) and beyond. Each generation sees a new or revived set of trends and traditions, and that’s also true in 2020.

PROM BACK IN MY DAY From what I remember, back in the 1990s, girls generally got asked out to prom by their dates. Couples usually went to prom together, sometimes in groups. Girls bought nice dresses, went out to dinner and the dance with their dates and sometimes attended after parties. Many girls would go to a stylist to have their hair done before prom. In 1996, I didn’t have a prom date, which was a little disappointing, but my friends

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March/April 2020 RWmagazine.com

and I decided to have an "un-prom"—a girls’ night out complete with getting ready together, wearing nice dresses and eating at a nice restaurant. My friend’s brother and his friend drove us to the restaurant and served us sparkling juice on the way there. Later, we enjoyed ballroom and swing dancing at a friend’s house, and my friend’s brother took turns dancing with each of us. “That was as much fun, if not more fun, than the real prom,” reminisces my friend Shannon Richardson.

PROM IN RECENT YEARS My exchange student Marysia Napieralczyk looked forward to the prom from early in the school year in the fall of 2018. She attended the prom with friends in the spring of 2019. “It’s definitely more popular to go with friends now,” she explains. “Girls get ready together from the morning of prom, and we take photos before with all the girls. People always go for after parties or sleepovers with friends.” She says girls mostly buy dresses in stores, but she borrowed one from a friend. She says, “Many girls still get their hair and makeup professionally done, but a lot get

dal and F ormal W ear.

them done by a friend. They also get their nails done. Everything has to be perfect.”

DRESSES THROUGH THE YEARS Prom has changed over the years, and dress styles have changed over time too. As Holly Mestad of Mestad’s Bridal and Formal Wear says, “Prom gowns have changed styles many times over the years, with several popular styles making a comeback at some point, and other styles never going away. Neon-colored prom gowns, which were big during the late 80s, made a resurgence several years ago, while the ballgown silhouette has always been a classic.” Although dress styles have changed over time, some moms have gone on to buy prom dresses with their daughters at the very store where they bought their own prom dresses. Mestad notes, “Mestad’s has been fortunate enough to be in business for 40 years, so we have had many moms who’ve bought their prom gowns or wedding gowns from us and then bring their daughters back to find the one of their dreams for prom.”

Photos submitted by Alison Rentschler.

IT’S BEGINNING TO LOOK A BIT LIKE SPRING, AND IN HIGH SCHOOLS AROUND THE COUNTRY, THAT MEANS IT’S ALMOST PROM TIME! This means that many attendees

Mestads Bri

BY ALISON RENTSCHLER

urtesy of

TRADITION AND CHANGES FROM THEN TIL NOW

Photo co

Prom


FINDING THE RIGHT PROM DRESS Mestad says, “We always want to help our customers find exactly what the vision in their mind is for prom.” She explains they do this by asking questions about the color and silhouette the girl is looking for. Mestad also notes that shopping for dresses has changed over time. “Online shopping has changed the way girls shop. Girls have the opportunity to look at gowns and see different colors, silhouettes and styles before they even come into the store.” Girls can also find dresses on websites and sales sites, such as Poshmark or Facebook dress sale groups and pages. Or they can borrow a dress or rent dresses from Rent the Runway. Shelly Halfman owns Prom ReSale, a store where she sells used prom and gala dresses at a discount. At the store, girls who sell their dresses can receive part of the profits. “Its purpose is to help girls recover money spent and let other girls enjoy the dresses,” she says. “It’s a win-win for seller and buyer.” She notes that girls who sell their dresses get 80% of the profit from their dresses. She explains the dresses she sells are priced $150 to $250 on average. “It’s super fun. I’m forever going to be the prom mom. You get to help these girls find a dress.”

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SOME THINGS NEVER CHANGE While prom has changed over the years, one thing hasn’t changed: Prom is a great opportunity to have fun with friends. And the planning is fun too—finding the right dress and deciding on plans with friends. So, for girls that are going to prom this year, enjoy the time spent planning and preparing and enjoying your time with friends at prom. ◆ DentistryforChilderenAdolecents_MA20.indd 1

PROM SHOPPING OPTIONS IN PERSON: Prom ReSale, 319 S Broadway Mestad’s Bridal and Formal Wear, 1171 6th St. NW David’s Bridal, 1340 Salem Rd. SW, Suite #101 The Prom Shop, 517 Frontage Rd. NW, Byron Refashion, 1218 7th St. NW Clothes Mentor, 3851 Marketplace Dr. NW Goodwill, 1987 Scott Rd. NW or 239 28th St. SE Savers, 1201 S Broadway, Suite B Kismet Consignment Fashion & Décor, 601 N Broadway Ave.

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STRESSING OVER

t s ress

GAINING PERSPECTIVE AND OVERCOMING CHALLENGES

LIFE IS DEMANDING–WITH DEADLINES, BILLS, WORK AND FAMILY. From small things, like

traffic, to life-altering illnesses, it is important to remember that everyone experiences stress. The management of stress is a critical life skill. Stress can actually be a good thing. “Some level of stress is necessary to prompt a response,” says Amanda Ward, licensed psychologist at Olmsted Medical Center (OMC). “For example, when studying for a test, stress can provide the motivation to do well.” “When I get concerned,” Ward continues, “is when it’s past the person’s coping skills. Then the person is in distress.”

HOW STRESS CAN MESS WITH YOU

Erica Runkle, nurse practitioner at OMC, notes that stress is a physical process. “A lot of times, there’s this misconception that stress is all in your head. Just get over it—it's not a ‘real’ problem. But the mind is part of the body, and there’s no way to tease apart the two.” Runkle explains that your nervous system has two main modes: fight or flight, and rest and digest. “When the fight or flight response is triggered, your body will release either adrenaline, a quick boost of energy, or cortisol, a lower, longer-acting hormone. So as stress kicks in, you have different physiological symptoms.” These hormones are chemical messengers that help your body to prioritize its actions in an intense situation. Your breathing and heart rate increase. Blood, oxygen and glucose rush to your muscles so you can defend yourself. 22

March/April 2020 RWmagazine.com

BY SHANTI ARGUE

In the meantime, other less critical functions can be altered or even suspended. Digestion, reproduction and other cellular functions are put on the back burner because this response is supposed to be temporary. You can digest that meal later, but right now you need to escape from that tiger! Our bodies are not designed to live in a state of constant tension. That’s why extreme stress can cause visible symptoms like hair loss and acne. Other health problems from prolonged distress include: headaches, fatigue, muscle tension, trouble sleeping, digestive issues, weight gain, anxiety, depression and heart disease. “You can’t be bathed in stress hormones at all times and not see some kind of long-standing result,” warns Ward.

WHAT TO DO?

Runkle says, “Some people learn healthy habits from their family environment and have coping mechanisms integrated from the beginning.” For them, managing stress might seem intuitive. Others need to educate themselves and learn coping strategies. A crisis might require a new game plan entirely. Ward says when she tells her patients that they need to dedicate even small amounts of time to managing stress, they sometimes push back. But the busier you are, the more important it is to spend your time wisely. Dedicating even half an hour a week to organizing your time and making decisions can have a huge return.

THE LITTLE STUFF

Most often, women are just trying to do too much. We have so many options—and we want them all. But, Ward says, “Everything

has a choice point.” You might not like the cost and benefits of the choice point, but there’s still a trade-off. In those cases, Runkle says it’s critical to simplify. If you’re juggling too many things, it’s a matter of determining: "Which ones do I need to do right now, and which can I set aside?" You might not be able to be the best at everything, attend everything, say yes to everything and still have time to sleep and exercise. We just have to choose. And for Ward, that sometimes means helping patients learn how to say “no” graciously without feeling guilt.

THE BIG STUFF

Inevitably, we face circumstances that are beyond our control—a tornado, economic downturn, loss of a loved one—that present a load of negative stress. Even in those cases, it’s beneficial to focus on what is in your control and what choices you have. “Sometimes people are just locked in,” says Runkle. When she asks them to find options and they say they don’t have any, she says, “You could stay in bed all day.” When they say they’re not going to do that, Runkle reminds them that they get to choose, and gradually they realize that even in small ways there are alternatives. Hollie Heil, nurse at OMC, works with patients on taking small steps toward achievable goals. She says, “Sometimes, just getting through the day, or even part of the day, is a goal in and of itself.”

PERSPECTIVE

One interesting aspect of stress is how our feelings become moderators. Heil says that with


positive stress you see an increase in resilience. “When you’re feeling good about it, you can push through. Circumstances can really impact your experience of stress as well.” For example, moving involves packing, planning and disruption. If you are excited about the move, it can be energizing. However, if the move is due to eviction, divorce or a job, the same tasks may feel overwhelming. Ward points out that distress can come from your own personal judgments. She cites the example of a new mom, up with a crying baby. The mom might think, “This goes with the territory. It’s temporary.” Conversely, the mom might think, “What am I doing wrong? I’m not a good mother!” Heil emphasizes that those environmental factors can also amplify our responses to smaller stressors. So maybe a crying baby might not normally bother you, but if you have recently lost your job it might feel like too much.

maintain healthy habits such as physical activity, sleep and proper nutrition. Regular exercise is one of the best ways to regulate stress. Physical activity generates feel-good endorphins, which make you feel happier in general and help you sleep better. Ward says patients who are struggling to cope are often surprised by how much better they feel just by going to bed earlier. The consequences of too little sleep—feeling tired and irritable and having trouble concentrating—all make it harder to deal with whatever else arises. Erica Behrens, licensed psychologist at OMC, says if one of those areas is lacking, that can often be a warning sign that we are dealing with too much. Ironically, when patients come to her for help, Behrens hears, “Well, I was exercising, but then this happened, and I haven’t had time.” So people are sacrificing the things that are actually most likely to help them. Hydration and good nutrition are equally important; dehydration actually increases cortisol. When your body is lacking what it needs to survive, that creates physical stress, making it harder to deal with other burdens.

BACK TO BASICS

When you’re feeling distressed and overwhelmed, it’s especially important to

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SWITCHING OFF

There are also measures you can take to counteract stress by regularly and deliberately switching your nervous system from fight or flight to rest and digest: • Being outside—nature has been shown to reduce blood pressure and stress hormones and to promote feelings of well-being. • Deep breathing—slow, deep breaths signal to your brain that it is time to calm down and relax, interrupting the cascade of stress hormones. • Self-care—such as a warm bath or massage. • Spiritual practice—including prayer or meditation. • Listening to music—really listening, not just having it on in the background, especially slow, quiet, classical music. • Hobbies—such as knitting, painting or crafts. Managing stress comes more naturally to some than others, but it gets better with practice. Prioritize and make choices. Take good care of yourself physically. Finally, find your own personal antidotes for stress and regularly incorporate them into your routine. ◆

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Living As I Desire, Entertaining Everyone Positively

NEVER LISTEN TO THE NAYSAYERS BY ROSEI SKIPPER PHOTOGRAPHY BY AB-PHOTOGRAPHY.COM

JAS TASTIK’S BIGGEST PIECE OF ADVICE FOR ASPIRING CREATIVES?

“Just keep going. Never listen to the people who tell you no. And a thousand people will.” Growing up in Rochester, aspiring to be a hip-hop artist, DJ or actress wasn’t exactly normal. But for Tastik (who’s known professionally as artist LaidEe P), music and performing have been her passions for as long as she can remember. Her first time on stage was at age 8, and by 14 she’d put together a small home recording studio and was releasing her own albums and mixtapes. Every Rochesterfest, local fair and Juneteenth you’d see her pounding the pavement, selling home-burned CDs out of her backpack for whatever people would pay. “Some people graced me with $20, others only had $2—whatever was in their pocket!” Within five years, she’d released five studio albums and three mixtape albums locally. Tastik’s transition to DJing happened almost by accident, when her John Marshall dance team was hosting a mixer and didn’t have a budget for entertainment. A school staff member who happened to be a DJ offered to lend his equipment, and Tastik ran the music with a friend. “I had so much fun, and everyone at the dance had a blast. I realized that I could actually do it as a job.”

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THE RIGHT PLACE, AT THE RIGHT TIME For the next couple of years, Tastik continued plugging away at both her music and DJing. But she was frustrated that things weren’t moving faster. Wanting to make a change, she headed to Florida to advance her career. But it wasn’t until a fateful solo trip to Atlanta that things took off. With a bit of tenacity and a lot of luck, she connected with Ronald Lopes, brother of Lisa “Left Eye” Lopes of TLC fame. “Call it god, or the universe or whatever you want, but my career exploded after that.” Tastik spent an evening in the recording studio with Lopes and TLC, which was “literally a dream come true.” Tastik had idolized the performers since childhood and still considers them her greatest musical influence. Eventually she landed a role in “Crazy Sexy Cool: The TLC Movie.” During filming, she was invited to stay with family member Reigndrop Lopes, which proved to be a valuable connection in the industry. She tagged along to meetups, primers and other red-carpet events, got gigs playing in festivals and appeared in movies. “Lopes would introduce me as ‘her DJ,’ and at first, that irked me. I’d say, ‘I’m not just a DJ though!’ She would always correct me, ‘You’re not, but all you need is one talent outright and tell them the rest after they’re interested!’” Tastik didn’t accept that advice right away but in retrospect says that Lopes was 100% correct. “I became known that way. People I’d never met would walk up to me at events saying, ‘Hey, favorite DJ!’ That’s when I realized it was time to take professional DJing to the next level and things popped off.”

DIFFERENCE IS A MIXED BAG After over 15 years working in the maledominated field, Tastik has many thoughts on her experience of being a woman of color in the industry. On one hand, being a female DJ was unique when she started out, and people took notice. Lopes encouraged her to embrace that uniqueness, and Tastik is proud of the success she has achieved, despite facing discrimination. These days, she doesn’t shy away from embracing the qualities that make her stand out.

I grew up on everything. I love music, period!

Of course, being a female performer of color has had its challenges over the years, which Tastik describes as “slow to change.” For starters, female DJs face entirely different standards than their male counterparts when it comes to their appearance. “A guy can DJ in jeans and a t-shirt and everyone thinks it’s cool, but if I showed up looking like that, people would wonder what’s wrong with me!” In addition to fighting the stereotype of the “female DJ in a bikini, pressing play on a computer,” being a female performer costs more. “I’m expected to get my hair done, nails, full makeup, lots of bling—it’s expensive.” While Tastik enjoys putting on a great show, it’s not lost on her that women

incur considerable expenses that male performers don’t even consider. Tastik also notes that as a woman of color, people tend to assume that the only music in her repertoire is hip-hop. While she loves that genre, she prides herself on having a large repertoire, including honky tonk country, which was a favorite when she was growing up. In the 90s she became obsessed with new jack swing (think a fusion of rhythms, R&B and production techniques found in hip-hop and dance-pop). And while she has always loved rap, she tries to explore every genre. Tastik emphasizes that variety and flexibility are key to her professional success. She says, “I grew up on everything. I love music, period!

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My shows are never a specific genre unless requested by the host.” She notes that she’s found it difficult to break into the southeast Minnesota DJing scene— something she hasn’t experienced in Atlanta, where she spends about half her time. “People here are more likely to hire someone they’re comfortable with—someone who looks and sounds like them.” While other DJs are able to get hired simply by listing their prices on a website, Tastik finds herself working hard to convince potential clients that she’s a legitimate option. “In Atlanta, I work with well-known artists and entrepreneurs with no problem. The ‘Oh-my-gawd! It’s a girl’ and ‘Whoa—she’s brown!’ thing doesn’t happen.” Tastik describes her performance style as “loud, extremely comfortable and a little bit crazy.” While most DJs prefer to sit back and press play, Tastik likes to travel the room,

encouraging the crowd to let loose and have some fun. “I’ll walk up to Grandpa and tell him to shake his booty with me!” Given her background in performance, dance, acting and even stunt work, it’s no surprise that Tastik takes an active role while entertaining the crowd.

EYES ON THE PRIZE Asked for her thoughts on the Rochester music scene, Tastik sounds both frustrated and hopeful. “Honestly, many problems haven’t changed. It’s the same ‘Where can we perform, how can we get people to come, should we have a door price?’ Venues are hard to find. People don’t respond until the day of or say they’ll come but never show.” On the other hand, she sees plenty of room for optimism, particularly noting some of the DIY performance spaces in town, such as Canvas & Chardonnay, which recently hosted a packed

There is SO much talent in Rochester we just need more opportunities to showcase it!

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hip-hop show featuring local performers, including Tastik. “There is SO much talent in Rochester—we just need more opportunities to showcase it!” She hopes that the upcoming generation will continue to build on the successes that have already happened. Asked what keeps her going despite setbacks, Tastik says, “I always try to remind myself that I’ve gone through hard times before, so I can do it again. I look at the photos I have of myself with Grammy-winning artists or Oscar-winning actors and remember that, while I haven’t been in the leading role yet, or been the leading act at EDC (a music festival), I’ve been involved in these things deep enough to where I won’t ever look back.” She hopes that her hometown will continue to support her and other artists to whatever heights of success they may reach. ◆


KEEPING THE

Beat

THE LEGACY OF MUSIC IN OUR SCHOOLS MONTH BY ANNIE MACK

Music is Powerful

For many, being introduced to music at school is one of the first experiences of understanding music as an art form as well as an educational tool. One of my fondest memories of feeling the magic of music was seeing a performance of “Peter and The Wolf” at Orchestra Hall in downtown Minneapolis as a young girl. For weeks leading up to the performance, the music teacher taught our class about classical music and the particular style of this piece. I was struck by how music could tell a story without words. Each character is represented by a different instrument—the bird is a flute, the duck an oboe, the wolf a French horn and the hunters the timpani. To sit in the audience hearing the story and knowing exactly what was going on was priceless. MUSIC TO OUR EARS

The National Association for Music Education (NafME) shares: “For more than 30 years, March has been officially designated for the observance of Music In Our Schools Month (MIOSM), the time of year when music education becomes the focus of schools across the nation. “The purpose of MIOSM is to raise awareness of the importance of music education for all children—and to remind citizens that school is where all children should have access to music. MIOSM is an opportunity for music teachers to bring their music programs to the attention of the school and the community, and to display the benefits that school music brings to students of all ages.”

MUSICAL MARCH MADNESS

What is now celebrated over a month was initially just one day. The first celebration was in 1973, when New York City music

educators pushed to bring their music programs to the attention of the community to show how music education benefits students of all ages. Now a full month observance, schools across the nation showcase quality music programs that include performances, educational classes, field trips and more. As art and music programs see increased cuts in their funding, this month has become a crucial part of music education. Rochester-area elementary schools are fortunate to have to have Alash, an ensemble that specializes in Tuvan throat singing, leading interactive educational performances for a week in March. This is part of Riverside Concerts' Artist-in-theSchools Residency program, which brings world-renowned artists directly to our young people. As their mission reads, Riverside Concerts “is committed to continue to bring artists to the local schools that will not only spark an interest in musical performance,

but also to plant a seed that will help solidify our young people's future as ongoing arts patrons. This program builds community and camaraderie among the students while teaching them the history of different cultures and those cultures' forms of musical art."

MUSIC ALL YEAR LONG

Rochester schools offer year-round music for K-12 with classes like choir, orchestra, concert band and jazz band, as well as specialty classes that focus on learning unique instruments like the ukulele. But as budgets shrink, teachers are personally paying for needed items or have turned to funding platforms—which is why this month is critical for demonstrating why arts education is important. Over 47 years ago, New York governor Nelson Rockefeller spoke to commemorate the very first Music In Our Schools Day, and I believe the words still hold true. "Music is a powerful aesthetic force. It brings spirit and joy into the life of every individual. It dignifies the realm of feeling by merging intellect and emotion in the search of a humane way of life. It strengthens international and racial bonds. We must continue to encourage and support this significant art form, which, as it moves more deeply into the core of education, becomes a powerful single channel into the innermost feelings and responses of every child.” Happy Music In Our Schools Month! ◆

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BR NGING INTO YOUR HOME INSTILL ENERGY AND LIFE IN YOUR SPACE WITH THESE SHADE TRENDS

Photos by Marie Ferguson: DM Creative + Design. Designs by Interiors by J.Curry.

BY TRISH AMUNDSON

DOES YOUR HOME DECOR RESEMBLE THE HAZY, PALE SHADES OF WINTER? If so, spring is just around

the corner, and it’s the perfect time to refresh your look with a pop of color. Different shades of well-chosen accessories and accents can round off your interior color palette, bringing energy and life into your space. The latest trends include the 2020 Color of the Year—Classic Blue—and other popular hues that are influencing home furnishings and decor. You’ll find that adding a little color can make a big difference.

SHADES OF BLUE

The Pantone Color Institute announced its 2020 Color of the Year, describing it as “a color that anticipates what's going to happen next.” From the entryway to the

kitchen, living room and bedroom, Classic Blue can be worked into your color scheme as a bold accent or with subtle decor that blends with existing pieces. “There are many ways to bring Classic Blue into your living areas,” says Cindy Jo Dickson, founder and creative director of LUX Design Studios. “Keep in mind,” she says, “just because ‘the color’ is Classic Blue doesn’t mean you can’t use variations of it, such as beachy blues, greens and textures— and natural wood elements.” You can also consider layering shades of blue.

BRIGHTLY HUED LIGHTING

“One of the best ways to add color with lighting is through the use of glass pendants over an island or table,” says Greg Gill, president of Northern Lights & Furnishings, which offers a wide variety of lighting

solutions and home decor. “Pendants can be either standard- or low-voltage, with a wide range of colors and styles.” They are available at a variety of prices and can be easily changed when you want to go with a different look. “Lighting styles and designs are always changing,” says Gill. “Fixtures in black are a growing segment of the lighting industry.” He explains that the modern farmhouse look and new, contemporary styles with integrated LED light sources are very popular right now. Whether you prefer a bit of blue or sleek black, your lighting could be the finishing touch in your color scheme.

WARM, COLORFUL STONE

An eye-catching stone wall can bring in different pigments and serve as a focal point. Known for its durability and elegance,

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Left Top: This blue agate table brings varied shades of blues and is a great conversation piece. Left Bottom: The blue onyx stone can be backlit for an accent wall.

stone requires little maintenance and has unlimited applications. “Our blue onyx can be backlit and is one of our best sellers. It’s timeless,” says Dickson. “With the blue, gray and warm gold tones, it instantly warms up a space.” The real stone is quarried from all over the world. “Each project is so unique, but a few of our strongest selling materials are white onyx, Calacatta gold marble and our river shell mosaic panels, which pair beautifully with Classic Blue,” she says. “Good design should fundamentally be about what you ‘feel’ when you walk into a space.”

SUBTLE AND BOLD ACCENTS

Tile accents are another way to integrate color, but they also will be more permanent.

“In smaller doses, this could be a great option,” says Jessica Curry, interior designer, certified kitchen designer and owner of Interiors by J. Curry. “I really like pulling in some mustard tones, various rich yellow tones or saddle brown leathers for a more subtle accent with added texture,” says Curry. She points out that a refrigeration brand recently introduced a new color option to their line, which is saffron—a vibrant shade of yellow. “Appliances can be significant accent pieces in today’s kitchens, as vendors are coming out with more color options,” she says. Painting a wall also can transform your space, as well as painting a bookshelf or even just the back of a bookshelf. “Greenery or whites and blacks can tie in with everything and anything and still provide crisp yet bold contrast,” she says, while noting green also is a desirable color for her to decorate with. “Anything from moody dark greens to fresh mint or leaf green can make a gorgeous accent piece,” she says.

ACCESSORIES WITH A PUNCH OF COLOR

Classic Blue and other shades can easily and affordably find their way into your home. “Just adding some patterned throw pillows, lamp shades and rugs will bring an instant ‘on-trend’ update to your space,” explains Dickson. “I am also a fan of adding pottery pieces, vases and table linens in shades of blue.” And how about navy curtains or a blueberry boucle pouf? With her company, Seasons, Jodi Hart is busy refreshing her inventory for spring trends, including pillows, candles, throws

and other home decor that incorporate blue. “Textiles are a huge, quick and inexpensive way to add that Classic Blue into your home,” she says. Small kitchen updates are another great option. From dishware, napkins and rugs, to adding a blue teapot to the stovetop, the possibilities are endless. “A touch of color through florals also makes a room come alive,” she adds.

PRACTICAL PALETTE

“The great thing about Classic Blue is it fits in well with the gray and white palettes that a lot of new homes are putting in,” says Hart. “It also goes with taupe and espresso in the warm palette.” With a variety of practical uses, current color trends can work for everyone in ways both big and small. With some creative insights, you can decorate with different shades in 2020 and bring new life into your home successfully. ◆

To learn more about the colorful possibilities for your home, visit: Interiors by J. Curry, interiorsbyjcurry.com LUX Design Studios, luxdesignstudios.com Northern Lights & Furnishings, northernlightsandfurnishings.com Seasons, seasonsbyjodi.com

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Charcuterie BOARDS CHOOSE YOUR OWN ADVENTURE

BY HEATHER WELLER | PHOTOGRAPHY BY AB-PHOTOGRAPHY.COM

ALTHOUGH THE CHARCUTERIE BOARD IS NOT A NEW IDEA, THERE HAS BEEN A RECENT SURGE IN ITS POPULARITY, MAKING IT A “MUST-HAVE” FOR PARTIES, CELEBRATIONS AND EVENTS. To understand the

true origins of the charcuterie board, please fasten your seatbelts as we travel back in time for a brief history lesson.

HOW IT ALL BEGAN

Charcuterie (English: “shahr-KOO-tuh-ree;" French: “shar-kytuh-ree”) is a culinary practice that originated thousands of years ago. The word “charcuterie” comes from the French words “chair” (flesh) and “cuit” (cooked) and was originally used to describe small shops that specialized in selling not only pork products, but also organ meat that was revered as a sophisticated and tasty treat. As refrigeration methods were not readily available at the time, the art of salting and smoking meats rose in popularity. As basic forms of charcuterie such as cold cuts, hot dogs, bacon and sausage have become popular recently, the definition of an actual charcuterie board has taken on new meaning. A modern charcuterie board is an artful arrangement of finger foods that are easy 32

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to serve and fun to eat, with a variety of colors, textures, shapes, flavors and contrasts. Although a traditional selection of meats, cheeses, fruits and nuts may be preferred, there are endless options and ideas for assembling boards that are delightfully nontraditional. With so many possible combinations of flavors and themes, it’s easy to create your own snack board or larger lavish meal board that is sure to impress guests and is guaranteed to be a perfect addition to any gathering.

THE TRADITIONAL CHARCUTERIE BOARD

Meats, cheeses, fruits, vegetables, breads, crackers, nuts, spreads, jellies and jams are the most traditional choices for a charcuterie board, with meats traditionally being featured. Prosciutto, sausages, salami, pepperoni, ham, terrines, galantines and pate are generally the most popular selections. The meat is typically sliced very thin and presented on the board in various ways by folding, rolling and bunching the slices. Cheeses are another traditional staple. With so many colors and textures to choose from, it’s easy to find delicious slices and spreads to complement any board. Seek contrasts in hard and soft, pre-sliced and spreadable options. Gouda, Gruyere,

cheddars, Brie, burrata, Roquefort, Camembert, fresh mozzarella balls and Manchego are common selections. Popular fruits and vegetables for charcuterie boards include grapes, dried mango, apricots, dates, sliced apples, pears, melon, berries, dried bananas, pomegranate seeds, fresh figs, peppers, cauliflower, cucumber, tomatoes and zucchini. Fruits and vegetables contribute appealing splashes of color to the board. Seasonality is often a deciding factor for the inclusion of fresh produce. Breads and crackers provide great filler for open gaps on the board. Artisan breads, toasted baguettes, pretzels and gourmet crackers in different shapes, sizes and thicknesses are all common. Gluten-free options are also available to meet dietary needs. Nuts add texture, dimension, unique flavor and crunch to a board. Dried salted nuts, spicy nuts, chocolate-covered peanuts or raisins, caramelized nuts and almonds are popular choices. Tiny bowls containing jellies, jams, spreads, hummus, dips and honey not only provide added flavor and texture, but also hold important aesthetic value in the layout of the charcuterie board. Small spoons, spreaders and ladles are the perfect size for serving these additions.


PRESENTATION IS KEY for any charcuterie board. It’s important to find a board that not only works well with your theme, but also has the space to accommodate the foods you’d like to include. The most popular charcuterie serving boards and platters are available in many sizes and styles made of natural wood, olive wood, slate, metal or marble.

Basic Step s

ASSEMBLE ADDITIONAL ITEMS with consideration of various textures, colors, flavors, shapes and sizes.

ROLL, FOLD AND BUNCH MEAT SLICES. If you are creating a charcuterie board for use as an appetizer, plan for about 2 ounces of meat per person. Place meats and larger items on the board with special care to separate the various meats onto different areas.

It’s easy to get carried away when shopping for the perfect items to add to the charcuterie board. However, with some simple planning for the appropriate size board, it is easy to create a delicious spread of items that looks expensive, but costs less than $30. Keep the following tips in mind as you shop: Remember that smaller portions are better; select cheeses and items that can be presented in different colors, sizes and shapes; and purchase variety packs of meats whenever possible. Initially, creating a charcuterie board may seem a bit daunting. However, I quickly learned that there is no right or wrong way to create a charcuterie board and have since accepted my obsession for creating unique charcuterie boards that are perfect for all occasions, ages and dietary needs. My charcuterie board adventures have introduced me to a new way of serving up some fun and may do the very same for you! ◆

After choosing the serving board, PLACE TINY BOWLS AND CUPS for dips, jams, honey and spreads on desired areas of the board.

FILL EMPTY SPACES with small items like nuts, breads and crackers.

Creative

CHARCUTERIE THEMES/IDEAS TO GET YOU STARTED:

• Breakfast board

• Grilled fruit and vegetable board

• Movie snack board

• Grilled breakfast board

• French toast breakfast board

• Big game sandwich board

• Mother’s Day brunch board

• Mediterranean-, Greek- or

• S'more charcuterie board

Indian-inspired boards

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STUDENT ARTICLE

A DASH OF CULTURE

HOW LOCAL GROCERIES ARE SHAPING ROCHESTER BY SALMA CAAMIR

MORE THAN EVER, INTERNATIONAL GROCERY STORES ARE AVAILABLE TO ROCHESTER RESIDENTS.

With an extensive variety of stores popping up in recent years, these shops are hard to miss, but some remain largely overlooked in our community. The range of spices and foods offered truly gives citizens a taste of the whole world only a few blocks from work or home.

THE ORIGINS OF THE STORES

Rochester prides itself on its diverse community. It’s hard to go anywhere without seeing half the world’s countries represented through its people. No matter the origin story, it isn’t a challenge to meet someone who has a different worldview from yours, and quite possibly this person is an immigrant. You can imagine the frustration when said immigrants came to America and realized they couldn’t find ingredients for foods they have spent their lives preparing. That is the most common underlying thread of these grocery stores—that no matter where these people come from, they bring pieces of their culture. Walking into a metaphorical—and literal—new world can understandably be intimidating. The initial greeting of foreign music, aroma of spices and chattering of an unfamiliar language may seem like a lot for the average Rochester citizen. However, the beauty in these stores is that we get a tiny glimpse of the experience that these shop owners left behind. It’s like a free vacation to a foreign, mystical country. The only

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difference? You can walk out of those stores and resume your regular routine. In contrast, the majority of these owners put their lives on pause in their home countries to pursue new life in America. For them, this is no vacation.

FROM FAMILIARITY TO GROWTH

That story is not a new one. The immigrant narrative is an underlying theme in American history and is deeply embedded in Rochester’s roots. But because of a tightly knit culture, many people feel a sense of anxiety walking into these groceries. Even as a child of immigrants, I still find myself a bit nervous when I have to run an errand for my mom and go into one of our wonderful Somali grocers in Rochester. With these stores there is no language barrier. There is no culture barrier. Why on earth would I be so intimidated to walk in? This is a prime example of the mere-exposure effect, a social psychology phenomenon that we often submit to in our daily lives. According to the American Psychological Association, the mere-exposure effect is “the finding that individuals show an increased preference

Shoppers find a variety of international products at Rice N Spice and International Spices & Grocery.

for a stimulus as a consequence of repeated exposure to that stimulus.” In simpler terms, people are naturally less inclined to go out of their way to do something that deviates from their personal norm. For me, growing up more inclined to go to Walmart than Halal Meat made stepping into a store of my family’s origin incredibly nerve-racking. But while finding variety in our lives is a challenge, it’s important to try so we can grow as people.

DIVERSIFY YOUR PALATE

Consider trying to diversify your food palate. There is an extensive range of international grocers here in Rochester, and each holds a multitude of cultures. Instead of being intimidated by the experience, try to put yourself in the shoes of the people who had to grow accustomed to the feeling of unfamiliarity. Remaining tied in the bonds of fear of what you don’t know limits yourself from making new bonds, meeting new people and trying some great food! ◆


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THINKING ABOUT DRINKING BENEFITS AND RISKS BY SHANTI ARGUE

TRUE OR FALSE

Red wine is more concentrated, so it has more resveratrol—a plant compound that acts as an antioxidant. Answer: False. Grapes and berries actually contain more resveratrol, so you get more health benefits from a bowl of fruit.

Some people absolutely should not drink at all, depending on medical and family history. But there’s a huge range of drinking habits between total avoidance and falling down drunk.

HEALTH BENEFITS

IT SEEMS AS THOUGH EVERYWHERE YOU LOOK THERE’S A JOKE ABOUT HOW INSEPARABLE WOMEN ARE FROM THEIR WINE.

“Wine is to women as duct tape is to men—it fixes everything.” Gift shops carry mugs reading, “This might be wine,” and oversized wine glasses that say, “Mommy’s sippy cup.” Even internet memes tout wine as the solution for every problem, from work stress to parenting— “Wine makes everything possible” or “There’s no problem that six glasses of wine can’t solve.” There’s an idea that wine is healthy— gotta get those antioxidants—and that it’s sophisticated, classy and harmless. After all, humans have been drinking wine for thousands of years! It’s even a component of the healthy Mediterranean diet. But how much is too much? 36

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First of all, the benefits don’t necessarily outweigh the risks, so don’t feel you should start drinking if you don’t already. However, if you enjoy an occasional glass of wine, a beer or a cocktail, you will be pleased to know that there are a number of studies that show moderate alcohol consumption can be part of a healthy lifestyle. Red wine in particular has been shown to correlate with living longer and slightly increasing omega-3 fatty acid levels. Moderate alcohol consumption has been linked with benefits such as possibly reducing risk of ischemic strokes, heart disease and diabetes, although it’s not clear whether it’s the alcohol that makes the difference or corresponding lifestyle factors such as taking time to relax and socialize. However, every study that shows a potential benefit has only shown a benefit with light to moderate consumption. If you exceed that, you are hurting your body, not helping. For women, the safe upper limit for “moderate” consumption is one drink per day or no more than seven per week. More than that is considered heavy or high-risk drinking. Make sure to measure; a serving of red wine is 5 ounces.

!

Alcoholism is a serious medical condition. If you think you need help reducing or stopping alcohol use, there are many local resources:

• MN Adult & Teen Challenge Women’s Program in Rochester: 507-288-3733 • The Gables (women only): 507-282-2500 • Recovery is happening: 507-218-4773 • Empower CTC: 507-292-1379 • Fountain Centers: 507-252-0818 • Common Ground: 507-281-0023 • Mayo Foundation Addiction Services: 507-255-4151


WOMEN’S BODIES ARE DIFFERENT FROM MEN’S

The obvious hazards of excessive alcohol use for anyone include vomiting, alcoholism, drunk driving and fetal alcohol syndrome. But in yet another instance of gender bias (this one biological, not social), women’s bodies react differently to alcohol than men’s. The limit of seven drinks a week for women (as opposed to 14 for men) is about more than just body size and composition. Metabolic and hormonal differences allow men to process alcohol more efficiently. This means that women can have alcohol circulating in their system for a longer period of time—even when they drink less than men—putting them at higher risk for health complications like dementia, memory loss, heart damage and cirrhosis of the liver. Mayo Clinic’s web page on cancer prevention says, “The more alcohol you drink, the greater your risk of developing breast cancer.”

CUTTING BACK

If drinking alcohol becomes a daily habit, if one glass becomes two or three, if you find yourself suffering headaches or feeling sluggish in the morning or if you just want to improve your overall health, cutting back on alcohol consumption can have a positive effect on how you look and feel. Here are a few benefits you might notice within days: • Better sleep: Alcohol can prevent your brain from experiencing the deep, restorative stages of sleep. • Better hydration: Alcohol is a diuretic, causing you to lose water as the alcohol is flushed from your body. • Better skin: Alcohol affects estrogen and other hormones that can cause breakouts. Plus dehydration causes skin to look dull and makes fine lines more noticeable. • A slimmer waistline: The calories in drinks can add up, and alcohol in particular contributes to the accumulation of abdominal fat. • Better mood: Too much alcohol interferes with neurotransmitters—the messengers in your brain—harming your mental health. So if you’re already feeling sad or anxious, alcohol is likely to make you feel even worse.

YOU MAKE THE RULES

Many women find it helpful to establish their own “rule book” to ensure moderate alcohol consumption. Here are some ideas: • Start by measuring your servings. See how much you are actually consuming. • Be mindful about when you choose to drink. • Be mindful about what you drink and how it fits into your overall health and goals. • Give your body a rest from alcohol periodically. Alcohol is a toxin that your body has to work to process. Taking a “dry” week or month every now and then allows your body to recuperate. • Keep a weekly tally with a goal to stay under. • Have a glass of water before and after a serving of alcohol to help offset some of the dehydrating effects and ensure that you aren’t accidentally drinking too much because you feel thirsty. • Choose quality over quantity. Sip slowly, savor and relax—it’s an indulgence. Be grateful for the opportunity to socialize and unwind. • Only order one drink in a restaurant or bar. This habit will save you money too! • Order your mixed drink in a larger glass, but with only one serving of alcohol so it lasts longer. For example, a Gin and Tonic with twice as much tonic. • Only drink with dinner, and limit yourself to a single serving. • Don’t use alcohol to deal with stress. Call a friend instead. • Don’t consume alcohol on consecutive days. If you had a glass of wine yesterday, skip it today. • Don’t store alcohol at home. Limit yourself to a drink when you’re out with friends, or buy a special bottle of wine for a special dinner.

!

Do you know of another place in town to get a great nonalcoholic drink? Share these along with your ideas for moderation on our Facebook page.

WHAT IS A MOCKTAIL?

Simply a “mock” cocktail—a mixed drink with no alcohol. Make your own Easy Mojito Mocktail: INGREDIENTS: 1 tsp. sugar 4-5 mint leaves Juice from 1 lime Soda water TO MAKE: “Muddle” (or mash together) the mint and sugar. Combine in a glass with lime juice and ice, then top off with soda water to taste.

PLANNING A NIGHT OUT IN ROCHESTER? Check out these local nonalcoholic options:

• Bleu Duck Kitchen has a rotating menu of handcrafted mocktails • Cameo at The Castle offers a mocktail called The Placebo • Chester’s Kitchen and Bar features: Teatime, Peach Mule and Rosemary Blueberry Smash • The Half Barrel serves Fever Tree Ginger Beer, Kaliber N/A Beer, and San Pellegrino flavored waters • Thesis Brewery has Kombucha (fermented tea) ◆

...Out of curiosity, I poured myself a glass of wine at home, then dumped it into a measuring cup to see what I was typically serving myself. It was nearly 7 ounces! If I decided to have a second glass, I’d be looking at 14 ounces, which is nearly three servings in one night. It would be very easy to exceed seven servings per week. RWmagazine.com March/April 2020

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Visit PINE ISLAND Minnesota

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Mindfulness AND MORE MEDITATION FOR BEGINNERS BY ANNE SCHERER

“AT THE HEART OF MEDITATION IS THE PRACTICE OF MINDFULNESS— THE CULTIVATION OF CLEAR, STABLE AND NONJUDGMENTAL AWARENESS.

Photo courtesy of Josh Jacobs who serves on the steering committee of the Rochester Meditation Center

It is this training of attention that wakes us up out of our habitual thinking patterns and reveals the nature of who we are, our ‘basic goodness’ and our natural wisdom and compassion.” This is according to Paula Smith, a school psychologist, professional harpist and certified Dynamic Mindfulness Trainer through the Niroga Institute. Smith is also a certified pre-K through fifth grade yoga teacher through Yoga Ed International. She believes, “Meditation includes many practices, with breath meditation being the central foundation.”

WHY IT HELPS

Smith—who serves on the steering committees for both the Rochester Meditation Center and Compassionate Rochester MN— has been practicing meditation for 40 years. “For myself,” she says, “the whole process was made so much easier when I realized that mindfulness is an innate quality that every human being already possesses.” Being present can be cultivated through seated, walking and standing meditation. At first, meditation may seem overwhelming because our minds are in the habit of making things more complicated. “Meditation is not obscure or exotic, nor is it a special added or ‘conjured up’ thing to do. It is entirely doable and cultivates the best of who we are as human beings,” reassures Smith.

HOW TO MEDITATE

“Basic mindfulness meditation follows the breath, which helps synchronize and calm the body and the mind. When we breathe, we feel the essence of being alive,” says Smith. Follow these steps: 1. Take a comfortable position either on the floor, on a cushion (“zafu”) or in a chair. 2. Set a time limit (start with five minutes). Any amount of time spent meditating is helpful. 3. Establish a sense of presence with your body, eyes open with a slightly downward gaze or closed. 4. Notice the physical sensations of breathing without controlling your breath. 5. Notice when your mind has wandered and simply return your attention to the breath.

Paula Smith practicing meditation.

“Rather than participating in thoughts and stories, try gently naming the state of your mind with a mental note, such as ‘thinking,’” suggests Smith. 6. Be kind to your wandering mind. Release and return. 7. Relax and show appreciation for your practice.

Smith explains, “The training isn’t difficult; it’s remembering to take a pause that’s the hard part. Be gentle and patient with yourself. Most of us have lived lives of such constant distraction that learning how to be more present takes some time.”

“We often regard our meditation as formal practice—with a definite beginning and end—and the rest of our day as post-meditation. Ideally, the two are equal partners,” says Smith. Eventually our meditation practice spills into everyday experience. Then we begin to notice mindful pauses in our internal dialogue, and we ask ourselves: Where can I find other places in my life to just be present? Take moments in the day to check in with yourself. Close your eyes and turn your awareness inward. Practice mindful eating or try drinking a cup of tea slowly. Take a mindful walk; slow down.

“Your thoughts, feelings and perceptions will likely be present in your meditation,” says Smith. “There’s no way to completely quiet your mind, and that’s not the goal. A more workable approach is to change your relationship with your thoughts.” When a thought comes into your mind, let it be. Don’t engage—release it. Your mind will calm down. “Meditation is all about returning your attention again and again to the present moment, to the breath,” Smith says. “Each breath is an anchor to the present moment.” ◆

AN ANCHOR TO THE PRESENT

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registering or call Olmsted County Elections at 507-328-7650.

New polling place in Rochester – 2122 Campus Drive A new Rochester polling location – 2122 Campus Drive – will be available for early absentee voting for these election events. Any voter in Olmsted County is welcome to early absentee vote at the new 2122 Campus Drive location. Voting will no longer be available at the 1421 building at Graham Park.

November 3, 2020: General Election

Early Absentee Voting: September 18 – November 2, 2020

For more information Your Voice Counts! www.co.olmsted.mn.us/vote 2020 Elections www.rochestermn.gov/vote www.mnvotes.org Register to vote

In order to participate in the 2020 elections, you must be a registered voter. Visit www.mnvotes.org to learn more about registering or call Olmsted County Elections at 507-328-7650. Mark your calendar for two major election events:

New polling place in Rochester – 2122 Campus Drive

A new Rochester polling location – 2122 Campus Drive – will be available for early absentee voting for these election events. Any voter in Olmsted County is welcome to early absentee vote at the new 2122 Campus Drive location. Voting will no longer be available at the 1421 building at Graham Park.

August 11, 2020: Primary Election November 3, 2020: General Election Early Absentee Voting: Early Absentee Voting: September 18 – November 2, 2020 June 26 – August 10, 2020

Your Voice Counts! 2020 Census WHO GETS COUNTED? Everyone! The census is mandated by the U.S. Constitution and counts all people who reside in the United States, regardless of citizenship or immigration status.

WHEN IS THE CENSUS? Census Day is April 1, 2020. Starting in March 2020, the U.S. Census Bureau will mail letters to every household in the United States inviting all to respond to the Census survey.

HOW DO I GET COUNTED? Online, by telephone, or via mail. This is the first Census to go digital, so you can fill out your household survey on your home computer, phone, tablet, or even at the public library!

WHY DO WE HAVE A CENSUS? Census data determines how many congressional seats a state receives; how much federal funding will be allocated to local communities for public services and infrastructure needs; and provides a picture of the changing demographics of the country.

For more info visit: co.olmsted.mn.us/census2020 | co.olmsted.mn.us/vote | mnvotes.org

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2/17/20 11:23 AM

Spring Event

Join us on Thursday, April 30, 2020 for OMC Plastic Surgery’s Spring Event! OMC Hospital – Founders Room 1650 Fourth Street SE, Rochester, MN This informational and fun-filled event will include discussions on platelet-rich plasma (PRP) treatments, V-Beam Laser techniques, and other skin care offerings. This year’s event will also offer appetizers and door prizes!

Register Today!

Please RSVP to 507.529.6740 by April 20. Seating is very limited, so RSVP today!

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March/April 2020 RWmagazine.com

Dr. Clay and Dr. Babovic


SLEEP

THE HEALTH FACTOR YOU SHOULDN’T UNDERESTIMATE BY GINA DEWINK

THERE’S AN INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATION OF SLEEP EXPERTS WORKING TOWARD INFORMING, EDUCATING AND ALIGNING RESEARCH IN THE FIELD OF SLEEP MEDICINE. With more than 88 countries having

participated in the past, it’s a pretty big deal…and it all started in Rochester. Before you assume it’s an effort of Mayo Clinic or Olmsted Medical Center, know that— though specialists from both hospitals attend this congress—it is organized by a small but mighty nonprofit called World Sleep Society, located right in our community. If you haven’t heard of the organization, don’t be surprised. The organization’s mission to advance sleep health worldwide means members must be established in the sleep health community to which they belong. But one day per year, the public is invited to participate—on World Sleep Day.

AN AWARENESS DAY FOR SLEEP

World Sleep Day is a global awareness day in March. In 2020, it will occur on Friday, March 13. In years past, #WorldSleepDay has been the top trend of the day on social media in several countries. But why all the fanfare about the mundane activity of sleeping? “There are close to 100 disorders of sleep, but most can be modified or managed with the help of sleep specialists,” explains Dr. Birgit Högl, the head of the Sleep Disorders Clinic at Innsbruck Medical University and president of World Sleep Society. “Though most sleep disorders are preventable or treatable, studies have shown that less than one-third of sufferers seek professional help. That means sleep problems threaten health and quality of life for up to 45% of the world’s population.” World Sleep Society cites a myriad of both physical and mental ailments that have been connected to sleep—or usually, lack of quality sleep. Longer-term effects are being studied, but poor-quality sleep or sleep deprivation have been associated with significant health problems such as obesity, diabetes, weakened immune systems and possibly some cancers and Alzheimer’s disease. Not getting enough quality sleep negatively impacts your cognitive function, mood, reaction time, learning and memory.

Share your passion for sleep and its vast importance. On World Sleep Day, the World Sleep Society will host a one-hour community event at Cascade Meadow with speakers from Mayo Clinic, Olmsted Medical Center and Rochester Athletic Club discussing sleep’s overarching impact on health. In a culture that works 24/7, sleeping can seem like a low priority. Push yourself ahead and function your best by adding quality sleep to the top of your list. ◆

World Sleep Day is designed to raise awareness of sleep as a human privilege that is often compromised by the habits of modern life. A few studies have noted: • People with insomnia suffer from more symptoms of anxiety and depression than do people without. • Sleep loss affects social abilities such as moral awareness, leadership ability and empathic accuracy. • Just one night of bad sleep can negatively affect attention span, memory recall and learning the following day. • Short sleep duration appears independently associated with weight gain, particularly in young age groups.

TAKE ACTION AND CHOOSE SLEEP

While we would all like to lessen the chances of chronic illnesses and obesity, what if an entire night’s sleep without interruptions isn’t possible? It may be time to make an appointment with your doctor. Work to overcome the stigma that sleep quality is less serious than other medical ailments. Devoting time to deal with a chronic sleep problem is an important form of self-care. And if you are dealing with insomnia, sleep apnea, snoring or one of the other 94 classified sleep disorders, connecting with others who share your disorder may help you find comfort and solutions. Find your community.

WORLD SLEEP DAY IN ROCHESTER Friday, March 13, 2020 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Saint Mary’s University at Cascade Meadow Wetland and Environmental Science Center 2900 19th St. NW

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WOMEN’S

Leadership Circle COLLECTING AND PRESERVING THE STORIES OF LOCAL WOMEN BY ERIN PAGEL

Their lives, their work, their art and their stories can be overshadowed by spotlights focused elsewhere or the ongoing passage of time. In the spirit of Women’s History Month, we look to a group of Rochester women who are telling the stories of local women and illuminating the extraordinary accomplishments of women in our communities.

WOMEN’S HISTORY CIRCLE

Women’s History Circle is a young organization associated with the History Center of Olmsted County. The group is dedicated to assuring that contributions of women are honored and shared, so current and future generations can learn and be inspired. Women’s History Circle encourages the collection and preservation of stories and organizes programs and exhibits to celebrate women. Coralee Grebe is a volunteer with the History Center of Olmsted County working as the facilitator for Women’s History Circle. Grebe says the organization is “committed to telling the untold stories of women and their historical contributions and documenting the women of today, who are the history of tomorrow.” Planning team member Barb Milburn echoes this sentiment, calling Women’s History Circle a “group of wise women who are excited to share their knowledge of the roles women have played, and continue to play, in the life of Olmsted County.” Part of the mission of Women’s History Circle is to preserve history both near and far in time and across background and race. In pursuit of this goal, the group is collaborating with Diversity Council and other local organizations to connect with those interested in history from all walks of life and hear as many perspectives and stories as possible. Women’s History Circle is also working to connect with local youth, like Girl Scouts, to encourage young students to better understand the role of women in history.

SPEAKERS AND EVENTS

Women's History Circle gives hands on demonstrations.

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Women’s History Circle organizes monthly opportunities for area residents to learn about how women impact local history. Previous circles have celebrated art and stories and facilitated experiences, like

rug making. The group has organized discussion including opportunities in sports, involvement in medicine, women in the skilled trades and the art of holiday foods. Women’s History Circle events sometimes offer a food component in the form of old family recipes and food tasting. “We’re as much about eating as we are about meeting,” laughs Grebe.

Sharing old family recipes helps preserve history.

Women’s History Circle events have also included conversations with a local historical novel author, the Minnesota League of Women Voters, various artists and several “first” women (including the first Rochester woman mayor, Kim Norton, and the first woman judge in rural Minnesota, Ancy Morse). “Not only do we have many still living ‘firsts’ for women in our community, but also a rich social and economic history in which women were significant participants,” highlights planning committee member Amy Caucutt. Prudy Knaak, another planning committee member, adds about the monthly events, “The learning that has come as a result of the programs, the value of learning what has been and what can be accomplished, the positivity of hearing the stories of women, the opportunity to talk with like-minded people and the value of being

Photos courtesy of Coralee Grebe.

AT TIMES, WOMEN OF HISTORY CAN BE OBSCURED OR HIDDEN.


open to new ideas and new people—the events have had such a great impact on those who attend because it challenges us to look deeper into women's accomplishments.” All interested are welcome and encouraged to attend the monthly events.

CELEBRATING SUFFRAGE THIS YEAR

There is no question that the list of women’s contributions to the world we live in is far-reaching. One in particular—the woman suffrage movement—is enjoying well-deserved attention in 2020. Obtaining the right to vote has been called the most significant achievement of women in the progressive era. Across the country, celebrations of the 100th anniversary of the 19th Amendment are in full swing. Women’s History Circle and Rochester are in on the celebration through much of 2020. The History Center of Olmsted County’s Suffrage Centennial exhibit will kick off in May

A few excellent resources on exploring and preserving women’s history can be found on our website, rwmagazine.com.

and run for much of the year, bringing alive the story of Rochester’s suffragettes.

THE POWER OF STORIES

Much of what we know about our past is carried on by stories shared between people and generations. Grebe says “I just love stories—the personal perspectives, depth and multiplicity—even if it’s a story of an event I’ve already heard. If you hear it from a new point of view, a new perspective, it can be mind-blowing.” She explains that stories are an essential part of our history, regardless of the form in which they come. The more perspectives we have, the better we can understand. Grebe shares that through stories, we learn about those surrounding the more famous aspects of history, like women who held the home front while men were at war, women who nursed broken soldiers and women who fought for the right to vote.

Jewelry Making Classes

V E S T E R H E I M F O L K A RT S C H O O L

Grebe encourages you to think about your own family history. Have you preserved it? “With today’s technology, whose story can’t we tell?” says Grebe. Consider a video or audio recording to simply gather the information. It could be useful beyond your family, as well. Personal family stories can be shared beyond family members and may inform local researchers, historians and beyond. Check out Women’s History Circle at the History Center of Olmsted County on the first Sunday of each month at 2 p.m. All are invited to learn a bit of history, challenge a few assumptions and consider women’s impacts on our past, present and future. ◆

Make it, then wear it!

Vesterheim

The National Norwegian-American Museum & Heritage Center

Find a full schedule and register online at vesterheim.org

Viking “Knit” Chain Bracelet - A p r i l 4 Pierced Celtic Knot Pendant - A p r i l 5 Carved Wooden Bracelets - A p r i l 1 8 & Birch Bark Necklace - M a y 2

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March / April Events GATHERED BY ROSEI SKIPPER

MARCH

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J-Sarah Burger Stearns and Nellie Francis: The Struggle for Women's Suffrage in Minnesota, History Center of Olmsted County, Dr. Bill Green, scholar of Civil Rights and Minnesota history, discusses two Minnesota women, one white and one black, who fought for the right to vote, 7-8:30 p.m.

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Uptown X // General B and the Wiz + Ali and the Scoundrels, Thesis Beer Project, Enjoy some fresh funky music at this free show, 7 p.m.

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Brew-Beard-Bulls#it 2020, Little Thistle Brewery, Music, beard and mustache competition, and plenty of food and drinks, 8-11 p.m. Ruth Moody, Chatfield Center of the Arts, Internationally-renowned bluegrass singer with a soulful heart, 7:30-10 p.m.

“Let the Crows Come," Ashwini Ramaswamy and Ragamala Dance Company, St. Mane Theatre in Lanesboro, 7:30-9 p.m.

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Riverside Concerts World Music Series Presents Tuvan Throat Singers Alash, Rochester Civic Theatre, 7:30-9:30 p.m.

Ladies Night Out, Downtown Rochester, a special night of shopping, drinks, deals and more, hosted by local downtown businesses. 5-9 p.m.

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In Plain Sight, Rochester Art Center, Opening reception featuring the work of seven Somali artists based in Minnesota, 5-7 p.m. Exhibit runs until July 11.

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Taste of the Town, Rochester Event Center, enjoy local cuisine at this annual benefit for the Salvation Army. 5-8 p.m.

A Night in Monte Carlo, Mayo Civic Center, Annual fundraiser benefiting Legal Assistance of Olmsted County with gaming tables, live jazz band, auction, a wall of wine, cash bar and plated dinner, 5:30-10 p.m.

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Rochester Woodcarvers 44th Annual Free Show, Graham Park, featuring carvings, turnings, tools, patterns and other wood arts, 10 a.m to 4 p.m.

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My Town My Music Presents: Lissie with Jillian Rae, The Castle, internationally-acclaimed indie folk singer/songwriter with local opener, 7-11 p.m.

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Driftless Dance Festival, Page Theatre in Winona, a weekend of performances by national, regional, and local dancers, as well as artist talks, master classes and workshops.

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The Rochester Thaw, Castle Community, a full day of music and fun for the entire family, 11 a.m. to 10 p.m.

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The Rochester Thaw After Party, Bleu Duck Kitchen, featuring The Shackletons, 10:30 p.m

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APRIL

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Loud Mouth Brass Residency, Thesis Beer Project, ernjoy brass music and a different guest opener while you sip local brews, every Wednesday from 6-9 p.m. O NGO ING

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Bloom: An Event for New and Expecting Moms, Rochester Art Center, an afternoon of learning, support, educational resources, treats & beverages, photo booth, giveaways and swag, shopping and connecting moms and families with relevant local resources, 1-4 p.m.

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The 2020 Assistive Tech Challenge, Rochester Civic Theatre, watch teams develop and pitch real-world solutions to the challenges of living with a disability, call for times.

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Studs, Struts and Stilettos, Mayo Civic Center, a construction fashion


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125 Live................................................................ 19

Allegro School of Dance & Music........................... 6 Altra Federal Credit Union...................................... 4 Art on the Go........................................................ 38 Bicycle Sports....................................................... 23

Blades to Ballet....................................................... 6 Bounce World....................................................... 14 Camp Victory........................................................ 17 Carpet One .......................................................... 28 Commonweal Theatre........................................... 40

DECO DING THE DRIFTL ESS

Creative Hardwood Floors, Inc............................. 31

exposé designed to showcase the creativity and resourcefulness of our community while raising funds for Two Rivers Habitat for Humanity, 7-10 p.m.

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The Practice of Journaling: Opening the Door to Unconditional Acceptance, Assisi Heights, using writing prompts, freewriting exercises and optional sharing, this workshop will help participants expand their awareness and creativity, 6:30-8:30 p.m.

16-26

The Laramie Project by Absolute Theatre, The Castle, this true story chronicles the reaction of a community the year after Matthew Shepard’s murder.

17-24

Rochester International Film Festival, Marcus Rochester Cinema + IMAX, a full week of critically-acclaimed films from around the world.

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Rochester Record Store, Little Thistle Brewing, The Collective Record Store and other local businesses, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Bleu Duck Sunday School: Knife Skills, Bleu Duck Kitchen, get more comfortable using and caring for your culinary knives, 1-3 p.m. Taizé Prayer Service, Assisi Heights, Taizé Prayer is a repetitive prayer set to simple music, interspersed with meditation, 6:30-7:30 p.m.

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Decoding the Driftless, Assisi Heights, a film celebrating and showcasing the beauty of the Driftless Region, 10-11:30 a.m.

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Taste of Nations Community Festival, Austin Packer Arena in Austin, MN, food, dancing and cultural activities from around the world, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.

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Home Free: Dive Bar Saints, Mayo Civic Center, four vocalists perform rich Southern harmonies, 7:30 pm.

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100 Mile Garage Sale, Lake Pepin river towns, residents and stores clean out their attics, garages and basements to create a spectacular garage sale. RUNS THRO UGH M AY 3

Degeus................................................................. 31 Dentistry for Children & Adolescents, Ltd............. 21 Dunlap & Seegar, P.A........................................... 16

Echelon Wealth Partners......................................... 3 Energyworks......................................................... 12 Essence Skin Clinic.............................................. 48 Family Hair Styling................................................ 38

Foresight Bank........................................................ 9 Garden of Massage.............................................. 12

Hair Studio 52......................................................... 9 Hexum Companies - Calendar Sponsor............... 44 History Center of Olmsted County........................ 43 Home Federal....................................................... 17 Lacina Siding & Windows, Inc.............................. 35

Luya ....................................................................... 6 Mayo Employees Federal Credit Union................ 19 Melissa Adams-Goihl, Keller Williams................... 17 Nicole Mills Photography...................................... 38 North Mr. Pizza..................................................... 21 North Risk Partners............................................... 31 Olmsted County Your Voice Counts...................... 40

Olmsted Medical Center......................................... 2 Olmsted Medical Center Plastic Surgery.............. 40 On Trend............................................................... 38 PI-CO Coworking.................................................. 38 Polish Fest............................................................ 14 R.J. Manemann Custom Homes

and Remodeling..................................................... 6 Rochester Area Builders

Spring Showcase of Homes.................................. 35 Rochester Area Builders

Studs, Struts & Stilettos......................................... 47 Rochester Greeters............................................... 14

Rochester International Airport............................... 3 Sargents............................................................... 31 Trailhead Grill and Lanes...................................... 38 Vesterheim Folk Art School................................... 43 Vitality Chiropractic............................................... 23 RWmagazine.com March/April 2020

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AROUND THE TOWN UNIQUE PRODUCTS FROM LOCAL BUSINESSES BY ELIZABETH HARRIS

The Bramble –

Weighted Blanket

The Bramble at Bar Buffalo on Historic Third Street is a tasty way to introduce gin to your palate. It’s a take on the Whiskey Smash and tastes as good as it looks. Ingredients include gin (usually Tanqueray), sugar, water and lemon, and it is topped with raspberry liqueur. Mixed with crushed ice and garnished with lemon zest and a blackberry, it’s a delightful thirst quencher. Bar Buffalo has over 80 types of gin and a full menu with a wide variety of vegetarian and vegan options.

Ashley’s Hallmark

Weighted blankets have become very popular for people of all ages. They are known to help reduce stress and anxiety by mimicking the feeling of a cozy embrace. This supposedly increases serotonin production, creating a sense of calm and promoting a better night’s rest. Ashely’s Hallmark, on the north side of Rochester, carries a 10-pound weighted throw by Northpoint Trading. This cozy blanket, which measures roughly 4 feet by 5 feet, is soft and fuzzy to the touch and is filled with small glass beads that apply even weight across the body's pressure points, which helps the user to feel more relaxed.

Bar Buffalo

Metal Prints and Hand-Painted Scarves SEMVA Art Gallery

SEMVA Art Gallery, located on South Broadway, is the home of the artwork of 72 local artists. It’s somewhere you could spend hours admiring the work of this area’s most talented creatives. Photographer Larry Ricker creates stunning photographs that could be mistaken for a window right into the wilderness. Many of his pieces are printed on metal, giving them an extremely vivid and eye-popping look. Dr. Monika L. Glovivzki creates not only beautiful paintings, but also wearable art. Her spectacular hand-painted silk scarves are the perfect accessory to any outfit. SEMVA should be on every Rochester resident’s must-visit list.

Hypervolt Massage Gun –

TerraLoco

Increase blood flow, improve mobility and relieve sore muscles—the Hypervolt massage gun is known to do all these things. Hypervolt has five interchangeable heads and three different intensity settings. This tool is a great investment piece, and many people use the Hypervolt in place of in-person massages. It is even becoming increasingly popular in the world of physical therapy. Many athletes use the device to aid with workout recovery, but it can be and is used by people of all athletic abilities. TerraLoco in south Rochester is where this deep tissue percussion massager can be found.

MJ Rose Bag

Luya Shoes and Other Fine Things Luya is located in Zumbrota and is a one-stop shop for all types of women’s footwear and accessories. One of the many great finds is the MJ Rose Bag. Ideal for all types of travel, this bag has a removable canvas liner. When the liner is removed, the bag lays completely flat, making it perfectly packable. This bag comes in four different colors.

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March/April 2020 RWmagazine.com

SoapRocks –

KD Fine Jewelers

SoapRocks are made in Oneota, a small New York town. Here in Rochester they can be found at KD Fine Jewelers on North Broadway. One of the best ways to describe these bars of soap is functional art. Over 180 steps go into making each handcrafted gem. SoapRocks contain all organic ingredients and are completely cruelty free. The glycerin-based and vitamin-packed ingredients are gentle, natural and perfectly moisturizing for all skin types. While they look beautiful next to bathroom and kitchen sinks, many users say they also work great as shaving cream, volumizing shampoo and a gentle make-up remover. Each soap is completely unique and is made to replicate various stones like opal, amethyst, tiger’s eye and many more.


A BENEFIT FOR

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Profile for Rochester Women Magazine

Rochester Women Magazine March/April 2020 issue  

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