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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020 COMPLIMENTARY

THE RESOLUTIONS ISSUE: Why change

is hard and how to make the most of it CHANGING Careers, Wardrobe, Eating Habits

VALENTINE’S DAY Guide to Dates, Gifts & Love

Welcome to a

NEW

Rochester Women Magazine!

ARTYCE THOMAS

New director of Women's Shelter and Support Center RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com January/February 2020

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BE SELF ISH You’re a shoulder to lean on, an ear to listen, and a friend when things get tough. But when you walk through the doors at Olmsted Medical Center, we want you to be there for you for a change. We’re committed to taking the complexity out of healthcare — that’s why we offer things like free parking and over 20 locations. Because your care should be something you can always rely on. To make an appointment, visit olmstedmedicalcenter.org or call 507.288.3443.

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January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com


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January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com


CONTENTS JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020

22 COMMUNITY 13 SIT, STAY, SPEAK Annalissa

ON THE COVER 24 WELCOMING ARTYCE THOMAS

Women’s shelter embraces a new leader.

10 VALENTINE’S DAY

Guide to Dates Gifts & Love.

17 OLD LOOK, NEW PERSPECTIVE Wardrobe change.

22 SECOND TIME AROUND Career change.

28 NEW YEAR, NEW RESOLUTIONS Thinking through your goals.

32 CHANGING YOUR EATING HABITS Eating habit change.

WELLNESS & BEAUTY 26 HEALTHY SELF-ESTEEM

Johnson: from puppies to politics.

The true ‘secret to happiness’?

42 YOUR VOICE COUNTS!

40 THE LONELINESS EPIDEMIC

Vital civic engagement in 2020.

How it’s affecting our seniors.

ENTERTAINMENT 15 GRAY DUCK THEATER Rochester

46 WINTER BEAUTY Hot products for cool days and nights.

theater provides a space to flock around film.

19 LET ME COUNT THE WAYS

Enjoying winter both indoors and out.

HOME AND GARDEN 38 MINNESNOWTA Developing a

snow removal plan.

IN EVERY ISSUE 7 From the Editor 44 Calendar Events 45 Advertisers Index

35 GET INSPIRED Attend the 41st annual Rochester Area Builders Home Show.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2020

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January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

EMBRACING change I am excited and honored to write this letter to you as I take over the reins of this beautiful magazine! Rochester Women was started 20 years ago by Jorrie Johnson, whose dedication has made it a staple on magazine racks in stores, restaurants, salons and waiting rooms throughout Rochester and the surrounding area. The future of the magazine is bright. As Rochester grows, we have the opportunity to hear the stories of women who are here for a short time—like for medical care or a brief work stint, women who are new to the community and plan to stick around awhile, women who have been here for their whole lives (and perhaps whose families have been here for multiple generations), and everything in between. Sharing stories opens us to different perspectives from diverse cultures, ages, life paths and career choices to expand our horizons and help us learn and grow. We will explore change throughout our six 2020 issues, and January is the perfect time to start talking about it. Welcome to our resolutions issue, though our writers agree: Resolutions are for the short term (New Year, p. 28; Changing Your Eating Habits, p. 32). Real change comes with purposeful planning and deep reflection. It can be hard. It’s hard to say goodbye to the way it’s always been. And it’s OK to mourn what once was. But moving on opens us to all kinds of possibilities. Meet the new director of the Women’s Shelter and Support Center (p. 24), be inspired by two local women who are taking a leap into new or enhanced careers (p. 22) and explore a wardrobe change (p. 17). Enjoy our three-part Valentine’s Day story (p. 10), find ways to embrace winter (p. 19) and learn from local skin care specialists how to keep your skin glowing through these dry months (p. 46). We are ever grateful to our advertisers who continue to support this publication and keep it a free resource for the community. Make sure to check out a new opportunity that advertisers have to share their expertise with you in sponsored content ads like the exercise pull-out on page 31.

PLUS

IN THIS ISSUE... Happy Valentine's Day! Learn to Embrace Winter Skin Care for Dry Weather

Thank you, Jorrie, and all of you readers. Here’s to many more years of great stories!

ONLINE SURPRISES... rochesterwomenmagazine

What does it mean to be a Rochester woman?

Interested in seeing if a career change is right for you? Check out a quiz that we found called "What Job Best Fits Your Life?" by Julia Malacoff Links to more resources to help you with your goal setting

What does it mean to be a Rochester woman? #rochesterwomen

RWmagazine.com January/February 2020

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MEET THE CREW We asked our team to share one of the hardest things they have had to change. Here is what they had to say:

ISSUE 110, VOLUME 19, NUMBER 4 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2020 PUBLISHER/EDITOR

Emily Watkins

MARKETING ACCOUNT MANAGER

Nikki Kranebell

Nikki Kranebell

Jen Jacobson ASSISTANT EDITOR We downsized last spring. My girls and I tended to hang onto things (toys, mementos, so many books!) for sentimental reasons. Letting go was tough, but ultimately freeing. Now we try to balance what comes in and what goes out–the clear space feels so great!

MARKETING ACCOUNT MANAGER

The biggest thing I have had to change is believing in myself and my capabilities as a strong woman!

Erin Gibbons

Kate Brue

My husband and I got married in August 2012, then moved in with my parents in October, quit our jobs in December and moved to Guatemala in January 2013. Getting married and changing homes (twice!), countries and languages was challenging, but I wouldn’t change a thing.

My husband and I married in our early 30s and waited another couple years before having kids. Needless to say we were pretty set in our ways at that point. Having kids has definitely been the best thing that has happened to us, but it was a huge change to adjust to, and 12 years later, the change continues.

COPY EDITOR

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Kate Brue Tessa Slisz

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Jen Jacobson

COPY EDITOR

Erin Gibbons

PHOTOGRAPHY

Dawn Sanborn Photography Fagan Studios COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Sara Albertelli Rosei Skipper

Thank you to this issue's contributing writers: Rochester Women is published six times per year by 507 communications LLC, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903

Brittney Marschall

Brittney Marschall is communications projects lead at Olmsted County.

Nicole L. Czarnomski

is a local freelance writer and marketing director at Shorewood Senior Campus. She sees firsthand how senior communities combat isolation and loneliness.

Amanda Ruggeri

Amanda Ruggeri was born and raised in Minnesota but has never adapted to the climate. She will make you hot chocolate while you are outside shoveling!

Grace Menchaca

is an aspiring freelance writer and a leggingswith-a-sweatshirt fan.

Maka Boeve

is owner of WaveMaker Consulting LLC and is a freelance writer and educator based in Rochester.

Terri Allred

Erin Pagel is was formerly a freelance writer the director living in Rochester. of community engagement for the Women’s Shelter and Support Center. She is currently the SE regional coordinator for the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits.

Subscriptions available for $24 per year (six issues). Send check to the address stated above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Rochester Women assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2020 507 communications, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Rochester Women magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials. Printed in the U.S.A.

Gina DeWink Trish Amundson is a Rochester is a Rochesterwriter and area freelance author with her nonfiction book, writer. "Human, with a Side of Soul," available in stores and on Amazon in December.

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Kara Short is a fitness and nutrition coach and owner of FIT Coaching. Kara is a busy mom of three teens and believes that living a healthy lifestyle is doable for everyone.

January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com

Melissa Peterson is a freelance writer and fitness instructor. She blogs at 40fitnstylish.com

Elizabeth Harris is from

Rochester and works full time for the American Cancer Society. She also teaches dance and does wedding coordination, in addition to freelance writing.

Alison Shanti Argue Rentschler is a reader, writer a writer and editor and mom who living in Rochester, can't imagine a better place than Minnesota, with her two dogs and Rochester to raise cat. She is always a family. planning her next adventures and travels.

507-250-4593 info@RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com For advertising information: 507-254-7109


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ROCHESTER WOMEN MAGAZINE

Guide to

VALENTINE'S DAY GREAT DATES, CHANCE ENCOUNTERS AND MEMORABLE GIFTS

GREAT DATES

BY MELISSA PETERSON

My husband and I have gone on a date every Monday night since our very first date in 2015. As I write this, we have been on 213 Monday Night Date Nights, which typically involve dinner and a nightcap. We’ve let nothing stop our tradition— not holidays, traveling or business.

important women in your life by getting together for Galentine’s Day. Board and Brush will be offering several options. Each person chooses a design from a gallery of over 300 options. The class includes a free mini trio (pictured).

Here are some ideas for you to celebrate Valentine’s Day with your special someone, as well as with friends.

SWEET GIFTS

Stumped about what to get the Valentines on your list? Shop small and let the shop owner or staff be your personal assistants. “They have ideas you might not bump into,” said Paul Bennett, owner of Dwell Local. “That’s what small businesses do.” 10

LET’S HEAR IT FOR THE GALS Celebrate the

January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com

Embracing Adventure If you’re looking for something different to do, try an adventure. Ski at Welch Village, go indoor rock climbing at Roca (they’re offering a buy one, get one free deal on Valentine’s Day!) or join the annual Valentine’s Candlelight Ski and Snowshoe event at Quarry Hill Nature Center. Each place has equipment available to rent or use. Follow your adventure(s) with a couple’s massage at Serenity Couture in Apache Mall. After you’ve relaxed, indulge in a Valentine’s Day dinner created by Chef Vincenzo at Figue.

DWELL LOCAL

602 7th St NW, Rochester, and on Main Street in Zumbrota

Glass enamel keepsakes made by Amy Johnson Enamels (starting at $35). Bring a photograph into the store or email it. Johnson will then create a glass enamel reproduction of it to put on a keychain or necklace or mount onto distressed wood.

Camp Craft Cocktails ($24) are perfect for him, her or a Valentine’s Day night in, with non-GMO, vegan ingredients for infusing spirits like Bloody Mary, Cranberry Martini or Sangria.


FINDING LOVE

When you least expect it

SAMM ADAMS

The Samm half of Dunken and Samm in the Morning on 106.9 KROC, your midday gal on Quick Country 96.5 and part of The Q Realty Group

Samm went into the Rochester Mazda dealership to deliver a title while rocking her "nobody sees me, I'm on the radio" attire—a hoodie and jeans, no makeup and hair in a pony—when the most handsome man she’d ever laid eyes on appeared, wearing a full grey suit. A few days later, Samm locked herself out of her car. She called the dealership looking for help from anyone but the handsome man, but he was the only one available. “He found it adorable and used it as a way to score my phone number," she says. Three months into dating, the two went to Old San Juan in Puerto Rico, where they thought about tying the knot. “We both chickened out,” said Samm. “To make up for it, we got married twice,” surprising their closest friends by having an officiant marry them at Victoria’s Ristorante & Wine Bar and then again “in the warm sun, toes in the sand, with the most beautiful backdrop—the Tybee Island Lighthouse.”

ROMANCING AT HOME Pick up the book “Making Love Potions” by Stephanie L. Tourles at People’s Food Co-op. Grab the ingredients to make sweet treats, massage oils and more for your special someone. Make some of the “potions” ahead of time or have some fun DIY time with your sweetheart. Cook up some Thousand Hills 100% Grass-fed Beef Sweetheart Steaks from People’s Food Co-op. Then, play After Dinner Amusements Love Trivia ($8.95, Tangerine), featuring 50 questions about love and romance.

ASHLEY’S HALLMARK 2950 41st St NW

Share a special message with your Valentine along with a bracelet from The Ronaldo Collection. The “Dance with Me” bracelet’s message includes, “It takes a partner to enjoy the dance.”

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111 S Broadway #208, in the Shops at University Square

Chocolaterie Stam’s most popular Valentine sweet, chocolate covered strawberries come in milk, dark and white chocolate and start at $2.95, 6 for $14.95, 12 for $29.95.

SHERYL NESS Author of “Love in a Tuscan Kitchen: Savoring Life Through the Romance, Recipes, and Traditions of Italy”

Sheryl was at Vincenzo’s restaurant in Chianti, Italy and asked him for his hot chocolate cake recipe—she immediately felt a spark. “In my mind, it seemed impossible. My heart was telling me something else.” Even after returning to Minnesota, Sheryl didn’t forget that spark. “Over the next year, I prepared both my mind and my heart to take a chance on getting to know him better.” She continued studying Italian so the two could communicate better. Sheryl left her career and family behind to be with Vincenzo. “Living together in a tiny village in Tuscany was incredible,” says Sheryl. “The people of the village and Vincenzo’s family accepted me and embraced me. It was truly a gift that I never expected to have in life.” After six years in Italy, they moved to Minnesota to be closer to Sheryl’s family and for new opportunities for Vincenzo. “Our dream was to have a little business together, teaching others about the foods and traditions of Italy.” For all the details on Sheryl and Vincenzo’s love story, as well as some amazing recipes, pick up signed copies of her book at Dwell Local and Figue.

TANGERINE GIFTS 110 1st Ave SW

Celebrate love with the children in your life by surprising them with pop-open I Love You Cards ($7.99). Slip one into their backpack on Valentine’s Day or surprise them when they need a little encouragement. Cards have a hidden message and space to write a personal one as well.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2020

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SIT, STAY, SPEAK

ANNALISSA JOHNSON: FROM PUPPIES TO POLITICS BY MAKA BOEVE

Photo courtesy of WaveMaker.

“Work harder. Work smarter,” is her motto. Her work ethic has paid off in both her professional and political careers. Johnson has not only built a successful dog training business, but has also been Rochester City Council’s Ward 6 member since 2016.

OVERCOMING OBSTACLES

Johnson was raised on a farm in rural northwestern Iowa. Despite a childhood fear of dogs, she still pursued her dreams of working with animals. “When I was 4, I was bitten in the face by a Saint Bernard, our family dog, and had about 20 stiches,” Johnson cringes. “I was terrified of dogs.” Her initial desire to become a veterinarian was thwarted because she didn't quite “get” chemistry. She ended up being an environmental sciences major with a political science minor because, according to her, “Every environmental issue is politically-based.”

Not knowing what she wanted to do after graduation, she moved to Rochester and worked a few odd jobs. “It’s a weird lineup of how I got to where I am,” Johnson reminisces. “I was a tattoo artist and did bartending and retail too.”

FINDING HER PASSION

Then, she got dogs—first, a Rottweiler/ Husky mix for protection, but then a Golden Retriever for companionship. After paying someone else to train her dog, Johnson decided to pursue a career in dog training. She enrolled at the renowned National Canine School in Columbus, Ohio—the oldest training facility in the country. When she started Good Dog Camp in 2003, she traveled to clients’ homes and ran workshops. “At the time, I thought I knew everything about dog training,” says Johnson. Now I realize I didn’t know anything. Every dog teaches me something different, whether it is about dog training or about myself.” The timing of starting a business wasn’t ideal. “Starting in the middle of a recession, especially one that required being outside in the winter, seemed like a brilliant idea,” Johnson says sarcastically. But despite the tough times, this helped develop her strength of character. “Thank goodness for the Rochester Greeters because I lived on those books of coupons,” Johnson laughs. “During that time, I realized I needed to make sacrifices to meet my goals. My house was always so cold. Yet, I wanted this business to work, so I just made it work,” she says, knowing she ultimately wanted to do dog training full-time. Now, Good Dog Camp has a permanent home near Cooke Park.

CALL TO SERVE

Johnson got involved in the community through Chamber of Commerce meetings. She has championed the Boys & Girls Club of Rochester and participated in other charity events, even doing ballroom dancing for a good cause.

She got interested in politics initially because of the City’s leash laws and now considers herself a champion of the underdog. “I like to help the quiet people,” she says, “the ones whose voices are not often heard.” She is also focused on leaving a legacy, especially concerning environmental issues.

LEAVING A LEGACY

“We are not building the city for us; we are building the city for our kids and our kids’ kids, and that second generation is who we have to keep in mind with every decision that we make,” Johnson says. “I’m not going to lie, sometimes I forget, but then I refocus and try again,” she admits. “This may mean that some people are unhappy with me, but I need to think about what is best for the future. We must lead by example.”

Photo courtesy of AB Photography.

TENACIOUS IS THE BEST WAY TO DESCRIBE ANNALISSA JOHNSON.

Dancing for a cause.

“We are known as the Med City and should care,” Johnson passionately explains. “We should be leaving things better for our children.” As for her fear of dogs, Johnson says she still has brief panic attacks if a dog is near her face. However, she now has a Bernese Mountain Dog that looks very similar to a Saint Bernard. Johnson smiles and says, “The capacity of love is immense.” ◆

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Gray Duck Theater

ROCHESTER THEATER PROVIDES A SPACE TO FLOCK AROUND FILM BY LEANNA GERRY

IN A WORLD OF EVER-GROWING TECHNOLOGY, IT SOMETIMES SEEMS THAT OUR CAPACITY TO CONNECT WITH ONE ANOTHER IS SLIPPING AWAY.

Sensing this relational deficiency, businessman Andy Smith jumped in to fill the void. With the help of his wife, Anna, Smith opened Gray Duck Theater and Coffeehouse near downtown Rochester last May. While expressing international sensibilities, the cinema aims to bring local people together around thought-provoking films.

Photos courtesy of Gray Duck Theater and Coffeehouse.

FILLING A NEED

Smith spent his adolescent years in Los Angeles, the cradle of cinematic genius. “Because film is just a very important part of the overall culture [in LA], they have things like outdoor screens a lot more,” he explains. Smaller establishments are common and often “foster more conversation around a film and house more obscure things.” In love with this atmosphere, Smith’s dream was to bring cinema to a region that needed it. He began looking for real estate in the upper Midwest in 2017, and eventually decided on Rochester. Med City turned out to be the “sweet spot,” according to Smith; Rochester’s “emerging art scene,” as well as the educated and international audiences drawn by Mayo, provided a perfect environment for the micro cinema he envisioned.

BUILDING A COMMUNITY

Soon enough, Gray Duck Theater and Coffeehouse was born. Anna Smith named the theater in honor of the popular game she played as a child, and Smith, for his part, says the name fits perfectly. “We thought it sounds

cool—it’s a pretty collection of syllables—but also it communicated very clearly that we were here for Minnesota, that we were here to create local relationships.” And create relationships they did. Smith now collaborates with local suppliers like Fiddlehead Coffee Company and Spring Grove Soda Pop, and he hopes to add local beer and wine vendors to the list someday. Films, too, become a local affair when Rochester businesses sponsor Q&A sessions after showings at Gray Duck. In October, for example, TerraLoco co-hosted "Brittany Runs A Marathon;" the shoe company set up makeshift shop in the theater lobby and answered visitors’ questions about running and exercise training. The event was especially exciting for Smith. “We love partnering with local organizations…especially if we get a film that touches on social issues or social justice, or generally things that impact the Rochester community,” he says. More importantly, these occasions allow visitors to become personally involved themselves.

SHARING AN EXPERIENCE

Though Smith’s mind brims with plans for

Gray Duck’s future, for now he intends to give Gray Duck a character all its own. At regular intervals, he selects films “that should be conversed about” and “should challenge or encourage people,” showing them at various times on Fridays, Saturdays and Sundays. He keeps international citizens in mind as well by showing films in other languages, such as Mandarin. Monthly film Q&As, space rentals, free family cartoons and sponsored events are other attractions that Smith uses to draw customers, not to mention the coffee. “We love to have fun with movie-themed lattes,” Smith says. His regular bestseller is a honey, lavender and vanilla latte called “7 Husbands.” Named for the lavender-eyed, husband-exing Elizabeth Taylor, Smith says the drink provides originality and “a great connection with old Hollywood.” He anticipates that movie themes will continue as the coffeehouse creates new holiday beverages. All things considered, Smith is very optimistic about the future of Gray Duck, and not even technological competitors frighten him. He says, “A great restaurant or chef isn’t necessarily thinking that he’s competing with supermarkets, because it’s about the experience that (he offers)—the excellence and quality.” He encourages all Rochesterites to come and encounter the same excellent experience at Gray Duck. “It’s bustling; it’s exciting,” he says, and pauses with a smile. “When you see it when it’s alive…for me it's life-giving.” ◆

Fiddlehead Coffee at Gray Duck Theater is a great place to meet friends or get some work done while sipping a movie-themed latte or other beverage.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2020

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January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com


OLD Look, NEW Perspective

CHANGE YOUR WARDROBE TO MAKE GETTING DRESSED THE BEST PART OF YOUR DAY BY GRACE MENCHACA

THE HOLIDAY TRADITION OF GIVING AND RECEIVING, FOLLOWED BY JANUARY’S PROMISE OF A FRESH START SUPPORTS THE MANTRA: “OUT WITH THE OLD AND IN WITH THE NEW.” Let this new year inspire a new perspective on styling and confidence.

Since starting her business a few years ago, Erickson follows a different kind of mantra: “need less, not more." “Women may say, ‘I don’t know what to wear, and I don’t feel good about what I’m wearing.’ Or ‘I have a lot of clothing but nothing to wear.’” She continues, “A lot of times it’s needing less and just finding the right things.”

COMPARISON AND INSPIRATION

Photos courtesy of Becca Haugen of Twelve Ten Photography.

Before renovating wardrobes and mindsets, Erickson worked at a salon and learned how to navigate a client’s core intention of a look. “I was taught that when someone came in with a photo of a specific person with a specific hairstyle, first I needed to figure out if the style worked for their hair type. I would take my thumb and cover the person’s face in the photo,” she pauses and smiles. “Then I’d ask if they still liked the hairstyle.” Women then had to ask themselves: Did they like the hair or the gorgeous person wearing the hair? This is when inspiration and comparison clash. “In a world so heavily saturated with ‘inspiration,’ it can be difficult to find your own voice.” Once you do, there’s no more need for comparison.

A STYLE STEP FORWARD

LESS IS MORE

Samantha Erickson, founder of the personal styling company Everyday Mae, helps women hone their wardrobes. “Some women know they simply have way too much; others aren't sure if they have the right pieces or how to build outfits,” she says. “An overarching theme or challenge that I find most important is the lack of understanding of how to embody their authentic self through their wardrobe practically and effectively.”

When searching for a starting point for a style renovation, the first step is to get honest and intentional and reflect on why you love certain styles. Is it because of the pieces or the feeling they embody? “Take a couple weeks before shopping and work with what you have to see how you feel in the clothing,” Erickson suggests. “Usually women impulsively buy something super trendy that coincides with the season. They may wear the piece twice because it’s fun and new, but if it’s not part of their personal style, then it will get pushed to the back of the closet.”

Samantha Erickson of Mae & Co. loves to find cozy clothing as well as home decor and signature foliage at Flowers by Jerry Lux Boutique.

Following reflection, inventory is a must. After testing their clothing, women can get rid of the pieces they dislike and fill in the style gaps from there. Lately, styles are scaling back and focusing on fun elements. Patterned boots, statement necklaces and textured coats are classic pieces that evolve to fit modern styles. But there is one trend that is a staple

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now. “Athleisure is something that is not going away. It’s very lifestyle appropriate,” Samantha laughs. Despite a woman’s age and habits, there are some elements that would create a great base in any wardrobe. First of these is a layer formula—but not a literal formula. Basic tees and blouses with a cardigan, blazer or button-up can add creativity in a closet. Pants come in a variety of colors and cuts, but a structured, comfortable bottom, like stretchy denim, is a great go-to. Statement pieces such as jewelry, handbags or shoes elevate a basic, comfortable wardrobe into a look with personality. At the end of the day, comfort is queen. Loungewear is just as important and should be part of any woman’s wardrobe. Leggings, kimonos and sweatshirts that give a great textural feel or have personal meaning (i.e. Vikings sweatshirt) can lift a mood. If women are still unsure of their styles, but not quite ready to hire a personal stylist, then friends and family come in handy. “We all need a hype crew, but definitely shop with people with an opinion. Also, shop with someone with a completely different style,” suggests Samantha. There are many ways women can add versatility to their wardrobes, but focusing on how they feel creates the best confident look. ◆

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Rochester offers a variety of clothing stores for women. From consignment to thrift, here are stores that elevate wardrobes. Primp. Looking for a range of budget-friendly, extremely trendy pieces? Primp’s Rochester store allows customers to look high-end without paying the expensive price tag. They also allow customers to book stylists, if needed.

On Track Boutique. Created by the owners of Hers, the boutique offers a range of casual clothing pieces and accessories.

Real Deals. Shoppers can always find something new with the store’s weekly inventory change. Their pieces can fit most women with their small to SXL size range.

Flowers by Jerry. The flower arrangement shop now offers clothing, along with decor and boutique gifts. Their style pieces consist of basic go-to and seasonal trend items. Kismet. The consignment store is a Rochester classic. Their eclectic collections in clothing and decor are great for shoppers looking for style inspiration. Clover & Rose. The shop combines vintage and handmade pieces

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LET ME COUNT THE WAYS ENJOYING WINTER BOTH IN AND OUT BY GINA DEWINK

EMBRACE THE SEASON OUTDOORS

STAY COZY INDOORS

Winter doesn’t have to mean staying inside. Embrace the cold and enjoy one of these local activities for some seasonal fun.

In the past few years, the idea of hygge hygge is has gained momentum, particularly in pronounced the winter months. A Danish word, hygge encompasses the appreciation of slowness, ‘hooga’ coziness and comfort. Incorporate hygge into your own home by changing your frame of mind. Instead of dreading a dark, cold morning, celebrate the moment you are warmed by your soft sweatpants and a hot drink. Candlelight and fireplaces are often included in hygge, along with fluffy blankets and spending quality time baking and cooking quality delights.

WASECA SLEIGH & CUTTER FESTIVAL

SNOWSHOEING AT QUARRY HILL

Located just an hour west of Rochester on Highway 14 is the quaint community of Waseca. Recently gaining fame as a top-10 finalist for season five of “Small Business Revolution,” Waseca is also home to the Sleigh & Cutter Festival that takes place from January through March. Enjoy nearly 30 different activities ranging from ice sculptures, a dance and fireworks to “Car on Ice,” a contest in whichparticipants guess when a car will fall through the ice on Clear Lake.

Quarry Hill Park offers more than 8 miles of groomed winter trails. Simply rent snowshoes and attach them to your boots to enjoy this easy outdoor activity for fresh air and exercise. A variety of sizes are available for kids and adults. Bringing a group? When securing equipment at the nature center, ask about a group rate. Rental rates begin at $5 for four hours. Skis are also available.

SKIING AT OXBOW PARK

SOCIALICE SocialIce is coming back to Rochester in February. This free outdoor event includes a variety of vendor booths, cocktails, music and more. The exact location of the 2020 event is yet to be determined. Enjoy opening night on Thursday, February 6 from 5-9 p.m., and come back for more Friday and Saturday, February 7-8, from 4-10 p.m.

Oxbow Park Ski Trail is a 2-mile, groomed cross-country ski trail rated as easy. Enjoy the natural beauty of the park, located just a few minutes from Rochester. Ski equipment and snowshoes are available for rent for all ages, starting at $5, from the nature center.

ICE SKATING AT SOLDIERS FIELD PARK Throughout January and February (weather permitting), make a stop at one of Rochester’s seasonal outdoor skating rinks. Soldiers Field Park turns its running track into a skating path, complete with a warming house and skate rentals available from 12-5 p.m. on Saturdays.

If you like the idea of hygge, but still need to get out of the house, consider local establishments offering a cozy atmosphere.

LOCAL COFFEE SHOPS Several coffee shops in Rochester have large fireplaces and reading material, on top of a variety of warm beverages. Make a plan to hit a new one each week. Whether it’s chai tea latte at Dunn Brothers, espresso at St. James Coffee or ethically-sourced, locally batch roasted coffee from Fiddlehead, get out and celebrate the simple idea of being cozy.

GRAY DUCK THEATER & COFFEEHOUSE Rochester is home to an independent, locally-owned, independent micro cinema. Regular single movie tickets are $8. Also a home to Fiddlehead Coffee, the movie theater combines the joy of a good film with a warm beverage. What could be more hygge?

ROCHESTER ART CENTER If you like the idea of staying indoors, but want more than a cozy afternoon, stop by the art center for a variety of exhibitions and events. Open Tuesdays through Saturdays, admission starts at $5. With a backdrop of the river and downtown, it might be just the thing to cure your cabin fever. ◆ RWmagazine.com January/February 2020

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OMC UNVEILS NEW BRANDING CAMPAIGN

For you as a woman, caring for others comes naturally, often more so than caring for yourself. You make time to prepare a meal for neighbors, make sure gifts are carefully chosen and beautifully wrapped, and spend hours with a family member who needs a shoulder to cry on. You tell a friend who hasn’t been feeling well to take time off work to see a doctor, but you wouldn’t dream of calling in sick yourself. If you are ill when your spouse/partner and your children are ill, you prioritize their needs above your own. Women are wired that way, and there is nothing wrong with that. But at Olmsted Medical Center (OMC) the doctors and clinicians are reminding women—reminding everyone—to take the time to “be a little more selfish” when it comes to taking care of themselves.

Dr. Hemann

WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO BE SELFISH?

Self-care is not a new term. Just like the terms work-life balance, mindfulness, and resilience, self-care is becoming more important in our day-to-day lives. Although it is important to take care of yourself during stressful times, self-care goes beyond that, and it is also critically important to take care of yourself in a preventative way. When it comes to self-care for our patients, four of OMC’s physician leaders want to share why they feel it is important. According to OMC’s Chief Medical

Officer Randy Hemann, MD, OMC is actively reminding patients to take care of themselves and offering more reminders about their routine tests and wellness exams. When you are feeling good, it is easy to put off scheduling your annual wellness exam, but you shouldn’t. Dr. Hemann uses the example of a tree when it comes to taking care of yourself and getting regular healthcare exams. With a tree, it’s important that the roots are nourished and cared for so it can support the trunk and branches. As a physician in family medicine who has been seeing patients at OMC since 1989, Dr. Hemann explains “I see patients everyday who are designated the CEO of their household.

When we finally get to the point of our conversation when I tell them it’s ok to take care of themselves, I can see the relief in their faces. So I think it’s our duty as providers of care to say that out loud. It’s ok to talk about yourself.”

TAKING CARE OF YOURSELF SO YOU CAN CARE FOR OTHERS

An OMC physician in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Kim McKeon, MD, sees women patients exclusively. Working at OMC since 1992, she has delivered thousands of babies. She has cared for new and returning moms who burn the candle at both ends, face sleepless nights, and want to do it all. McKeon says that we are gradually shifting our thoughts about being able to do it all, because it is not sustainable. “All through life, it’s absolutely important to find yourself, love yourself, and care for yourself. Only then can you recognize how to help others,” says Dr. McKeon. OMC physicians and clinicians want patients to set goals for their health. “Most of my patients are women. Most of my patients are, therefore, caregivers, so they need to be healthy to take care of the people

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Dr. Hoffmann

A HISTORY OF CONNECTING WITH THE COMMUNITY

OMC President James Hoffmann, DO, points to OMC’s history of serving patients in southeastern Minnesota for more than seventy years. “Our rich history compels us to connect with the community on a personal level, on a more empathetic level, and on a very genuine level that shows we understand our patients’ lives,” says Dr. Hoffmann, a practicing OB/GYN since 1994. In July 1949, Dr. Harold (Hal) Wente began his practice in downtown Rochester and grew his practice into a multi-specialty clinic by putting his patients first and developing a personal connection with those in his care. He inspired the people working with him to “do for the patient what you would do for your family.” OMC continues to believe this message and wants to share with patients that it is important that they be actively engaged in their care and health.

EMPOWERING WOMEN TO FOCUS ON THEMSELVES

Stacey Vanden Heuvel, OMC’s Vice President for Marketing and Philanthropy,

shares that the new branding campaign supports the notion of OMC’s caregivers embracing the individuality of every patient and giving them the ability to hit the “pause” button in their life and focus on their own health and care. “Women are socially and culturally expected to put other people first. We aspire to be caring, strong, loving, loyal, giving, reliable, and so much more. We can only live out these aspirations by being well ourselves,” shares Vanden Heuvel. “When we say we want patients to make time for themselves and be a little more selfish, we aren’t asking them to make a choice between being ‘giving’ or being ‘selfish.’ We are saying there needs to be balance. Taking care of yourself doesn’t just benefit you. Taking care of yourself means you are—in the long run—being strong and well for the people you love most,” she adds. Empowering patients to be actively engaged in their healthcare is consistent with that idea. An advertisement currently running in the media for OMC shares a clear message to patients: “When you’re out there in the community, we know how important it is to be focused on doing everything you can for the people you love. But when you walk through the doors at Olmsted Medical Center, we need you to be all about you.”

Stacey Vanden Heuvel

GIVING PERMISSION TO PRIORITIZE SELF-CARE

Care providers at OMC help patients find ways to make time for themselves and make their health a priority. Dr. Hoffmann explains, “Ultimately, we are giving them

permission to take time from their very busy lives to make their health a priority. In that sense, being selfish, ironically, is the greatest gift a person can give to their family and friends. It is only when they are healthy that they can be in the best place to care for, nurture and support the people that are important to them in their lives.”

Dr. Nistler

A dialogue around the importance of prioritized healthcare decision-making is vital to the health of our communities, and OMC has heard from many patients over time about their busy lives and the difficulty of prioritizing themselves. This input from patients led to the thoughtprovoking messaging OMC is sharing with the community. In addition, all OMC staff have received new name badges which read, “I’M ALL ABOUT YOU,” a statement that is intended to affirm OMC’s purpose and promise to the patients who trust OMC to care for them and their families. Patient members of OMC’s Patient and Family Advisory Council had a role in designing the name badges. Posters of OMC employees with personalized messages about their commitment to OMC patients hang throughout OMC locations as well. These posters serve as a reminder to the OMC team of caregivers and a promise to OMC patients. “When we put our patients first in all that we do, we are empowering patients to put themselves first. They, in turn, can go back to their lives to take care of family and friends,” says Dr. Hemann.

To learn more about Olmsted Medical Center and the “All About You” campaign, visit www.olmstedmedicalcenter.org.

in their lives,” states Carole Nistler, MD, another family medicine physician at OMC who has served patients at OMC since 1998. “We think healthcare is really important and people should take the time to make it a priority in their life,” says Dr. Nistler.

Sponsored Content Provided by Olmsted Medical Center www.olmstedmedicalcenter.org RWmagazine.com January/February 2020

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Second Time Around

BIG CAREER CHANGES BY INSPIRING WOMEN BY ERIN PAGEL PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAGAN STUDIOS

TAKING A BIG STEP IN CHANGING CAREERS CAN BE HARD BUT VERY REWARDING. From a pediatric physical therapist to

student of construction technology and from executive director to executive director plus alcohol and drug counseling intern, we caught up with two amazing women who are embracing the unknown and reaching for new career dreams. Here are their words of wisdom.

ERIN KIELEY: HEALTH CARE TO CONSTRUCTION

After 19 years and a fulfilling career as a pediatric physical therapist, Erin Kieley was accomplished in her career. Kieley provided physical therapy focusing on pediatric incontinence and pelvic floor issues. She loved her job yet was ready for something new. When a friend asked Kieley what gives her energy, Kieley’s thoughts settled on a home-building project and how much she liked working through its expected and unexpected challenges. She enjoyed working with the construction team and was learning a lot along the way. Kieley was intrigued by the construction industry but didn’t know much about it. After serious self-reflection, Kieley

began looking at different types of construction jobs and talking to people who work in construction. She asked about a typical day and what individuals like most and least about their roles and the industry. Knowing that she was leaving her medical practice in good hands, Kieley decided to quit her job as a physical therapist and enroll in the construction technology program at Southeast Minnesota State College in Winona. “The hardest part was leaving my coworkers,” says Kieley. “It’s exciting to prove to myself that I’ve still got it and can do most things I put mind to.” Physical therapy is a demanding and physical job, but now, as a student, Kieley spends about 30% of her time in a classroom with students (mostly young men) about half her age and about 70% of her time in her 30-pound tool belt working on a hands-on building project. “It’s invigorating and so much fun!” says Kieley. A mother of two, Kieley knows her kids are watching and learning not to let fear hold them back. “That’s so important,” she says. Deciding to make a major career change comes with some anxiety. “I wasn’t completely confident in my ability to go back to school after 20 years,” says Kieley, “Construction is physical work. Could I physically do it?” Balancing school, family, kids and financial obligations was a concern as well. Kieley has been surprised by how much fun she’s had working alongside adults nearly half her age. “There are no expectations,” she says, “and I’ve proven to myself that I can do this.”

REGINA MUSTAFA: ADDING ADDICTION COUNSELING

Kieley on a job site in Rochester

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Regina Mustafa, founder and executive director of Rochester’s Community Interfaith

Mustafa felt called to help people who are struggling.

Dialogue on Islam (CIDI) advocates for interfaith connections and bringing religions together. In her work with CIDI, Mustafa discovered a need to address the stigma of addiction and mental health challenges in the Muslim community. Mustafa notes a lack of culturally competent people to offer services in minority communities. Feeling called to a role where she could help people who are struggling, Mustafa notes that her passion “kind of found me.” Mustafa credits her supportive family and the faculty at Winona State University in Rochester for supporting and encouraging her to add to her master’s in human services coursework to become a licensed alcohol and drug counselor (LADC). Currently an intern in the program, Mustafa is working through the requisite 880 hours to get her LADC license. “Every day is different, and I just love it so far,” says Mustafa. “It’s an honor to be able to help people.”


Mustafa cites a major concern in making the decision was how to balance her new role with her home and family life. Logistics like transportation were also a concern. Though she was confident she would enjoy it, Mustafa has been most surprised by just how much she loves her new work as an LADC intern.

ADVICE WHEN CONSIDERING A CAREER CHANGE

Do you know someone considering a major career change? “Cheer them on, be a cheerleader, lend your support!” says Kieley, who credits her friends and family with being in her corner even when they thought she was a little out of her realm. “Support them,” Mustafa adds. “Talk about how the decision will impact their household.” If you’re considering a major career change, Kieley and Mustafa have a bit of advice. “Do the research, meet with people doing what you think you are interested in and ask lots of questions,” says Kieley. “Be curious, and don’t forget the financial considerations.” Mustafa highlights the importance of weighing the pros and cons of the new position, as well as making sure to discuss with those important to you how their lives will likely be impacted. “Especially with immediate family members, be open,” Mustafa says. “Your decision will impact Expert Installation everyone. Make sure they can express themselves and how Sanding they are feeling.” Refinishing These inspiring women felt the need to try something new, researched, planned ahead and took a big risk. Custom Designs NorthRiskPartners_JF20.indd 1 “We as women think we have to go in knowing everythingFree Estimates and don’t want to look like we don’t know what we are doing. Men aren’t like that,” says Kieley. “Keep in mind,” says Mustafa, “if you get into the new space and realize HARDWOOD FLOORS, INC. it’s not for you, then at least you know and you tried. You Jim Brogan Oak • Maple • Cherry • Hickory • Exotic Woods accomplished something.” Trent Rutledge Cork • Bamboo • Prefinished Flooring Kieley and Mustafa agree that it’s never too late. “Don’t Tony Horsman be afraid to advocate for yourself,” says Mustafa. “You haveOver 50 years a lot of life experience. You know what works for you andcombined experience www.creativehf.com what you deserve—what you’re worth. Don’t be afraid to 3532 Hwy 63 South, Rochester speak up and advocate for what you need in your new role.” “Go for it,” says Kieley. ◆

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ARTYCE THOMAS WOMEN’S SHELTER EMBRACES A NEW LEADER BY TERRI ALLRED PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAGAN STUDIOS

WHEN YOU WALK INTO THE WOMEN’S SHELTER AND SUPPORT CENTER, IT FEELS VERY MUCH LIKE WALKING INTO A HOME. A friendly advocate greets you

warmly. The reception area has novels and self-help books, and there is a computer station for researching job possibilities or connecting to social media The Women’s Shelter and Support Center (formerly the Women’s Shelter) has been offering shelter and support services to survivors of domestic violence in Rochester and the surrounding area since the 1970s. What began as an idea of a few advocates and the National Organization for Women 24

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(NOW) chapter has flourished to serving nearly 4,000 victims of domestic violence and their families annually.

BEST-KEPT SECRET IN ROCHESTER

The Women’s Shelter and Support Center is often recognized as the “best-kept secret” in Rochester. The nonprofit owns multiple properties around town where they provide emergency housing, transitional living and a host of other services. They provide the only emergency shelter for victims in an 11-county region. At any given time, more than 30 domestic violence survivors, their families and sometimes their pets reside at the main shelter in Rochester.

The shelter’s vision is for women, individuals and families to have the freedom and dignity to live safely in our communities. They work toward that vision by providing the emergency housing that most people associate with a domestic violence shelter. However, their services are much more comprehensive than most people understand. Emergency provisions also include food, clothing, toiletries and other items often left in the course of fleeing an abusive situation. Many families leave under such difficult conditions that they come with only the clothes on their backs. Children receive school supplies and backpacks, toys and art supplies—simple items that help them feel more at home during a tumultuous period in their lives.


Thomas works to create a safe space for clients and staff alike.

SAVING LIVES, RESTORING HOPE, CHANGING FUTURES

You may not know that the shelter also provides transitional housing and support to women who don’t have resources to live independently. Maybe their abuser controlled the finances, and they have no resources. Some women have been prohibited from working and have no work history from which to build a resume. Women and their families who utilize the transitional housing receive very low-cost housing and services, including career counseling to help them become independent.

NEW LEADERSHIP, NEW OPPORTUNITIES

Recently the Women’s Shelter and Support Center welcomed a new executive director, Artyce Thomas. With a warm smile and calm demeanor, Thomas seems naturally at home in the shelter and for good reason: She has worked in domestic violence most of her adult career. She has a passion for social justice, particularly fighting against the oppression of women, kindled early on when she was an AmeriCorps service member placed at a domestic violence agency. During her time with AmeriCorps, she began understanding domestic violence through the eyes of the children for whom she provided care while their mothers were seeking outpatient treatment. From that experience, she realized her calling to work on behalf of individuals who experienced domestic violence.

Thomas’ career path led her to the Pennsylvania Immigrant and Refugee Network. There she confirmed what she already understood from her previous work: People who are marginalized by language barriers, immigration status, race, religion and cultural challenges desperately need advocacy and support. They face many more challenges and barriers to finding safety and services. However, while she loved the enrichment that diversity brought to her life, she missed shelter work. That desire to re-engage in the work of providing emergency shelter and care to domestic violence survivors brought her to Rochester. She visited Rochester and the shelter for the first time in May of 2019 and knew immediately, “This is the place.” She was impressed with the caring and competent staff and could see herself fitting in and leading the organization.

BEACON OF LIGHT

Early on in Thomas’ career, she faced the trauma of a close friend being murdered by domestic violence. That experience provided the unwelcome opportunity to experience deep empathy with those she was serving. “This work is vital. It is a lifeline and a beacon of light in so many communities and for so many individuals. Without these services, there would be no place for individuals to go,” Thomas explains. Losing her friend also helped Thomas appreciate the secondary traumatization that domestic violence workers face from being exposed to trauma on a daily basis. Thomas understands the importance of creating a safe space for shelter clients and staff alike as they manage the daily stresses of domestic violence. This is one of the gifts that she brings to the Women’s Shelter and Support Center.

HOPES AND DREAMS

When Thomas thinks about her hopes and dreams for the future of the shelter, her eyes light up. She seems most excited about building relationships with other organizations, forming partnerships and collaborations that haven’t previously existed. “We can’t do this work in silos; the most effective approach to working with survivors is collaborative,” she shares. “There is so much intersectionality in the work we do, with law enforcement, social services and all of the other wonderful service providers.”

She is also excited about becoming more visible in the community. “There was a wonderful foundation made already, and the shelter is a part of the fabric that supports the community. It is so important for people to know that we are here.”

HOW YOU CAN HELP

The Women’s Shelter and Support Center is always looking for donations and volunteers. Financial donations allow the organization to utilize the gift quickly where it needs to go. On any given day, that may be to purchase a bus ticket to get a woman to safety with family in another state, pay for a cab to transport someone to a medical appointment or assist with a security deposit for a family who is moving out of shelter. The shelter also posts an updated wish list of needed supplies each month. Additionally, volunteers are always needed for a variety of roles including community education and outreach, data entry and cleaning. To view the shelter’s current needs, make a donation or volunteer, visit womens-shelter.org. ◆

If you suspect that you or someone you love is in an abusive relationship, call 507-285-1010 at any time day or night. The trained advocates at the Women’s Shelter and Support Center are available to talk through your concerns and options, either on the phone or by meeting you at a safe space in the community. You are not alone. Warning signs of an abusive relationship include: • Name-calling • Jealously • Possessiveness • Isolation • Intimidation • Economic control • Emotional abuse • Forced sexual activity Domestic violence often starts with emotional abuse and moves to physical abuse later. Advocates recommend creating a safety plan so that you know what to do if your partner abuses you again. Trained advocates can help you create a safety plan. You have the right to live without physical, sexual, verbal, mental or emotional violence or fear of such abuse.

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Healthy Self-Esteem THE TRUE 'SECRET TO HAPPINESS'? BY SHANTI ARGUE

cook. It can change day to day or be impacted by major life events. Self-esteem, however, is an internal state, not tied to your circumstances. Licensed counselor Allison Loftus, of Flourish Counseling Center, says, “It’s a reflection of the voice inside your head and whether that voice is fundamentally friendly or a bully.”

AM I GOOD ENOUGH?

WHEN I FIRST RECEIVED THIS ASSIGNMENT, I EXPECTED THAT I WOULD TALK TO SOME MENTAL HEALTH PROFESSIONALS AND GET SOME “TIPS AND TRICKS” FOR FEELING BETTER ABOUT YOURSELF. Instead, I realized that I

was confusing self-esteem with confidence, and it took a couple of hours of deep conversation with two therapists before I truly understood the difference.

CONFIDENCE VS. SELF-ESTEEM

Confidence can fluctuate in different domains. For example, someone might think she’s a terrible singer but an excellent

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“Our perception of ourselves begins to be formed in infancy, beginning with trust,” says licensed social worker Jaime LeimerDecker. “Are my needs being met?” In her daily work counseling children and families, Leimer-Decker sees many children who are already experts at negative self-talk. By adulthood, these destructive thoughts can dominate the subconscious. Many people allow external factors to affect the way they evaluate self-worth. Some believe that happiness is achieved by finding someone to love, reaching that goal weight or scoring a dream job. But if you have a core negative belief about yourself, it won’t go away just by changing your circumstances. With poor self-esteem, you can be externally successful, but there’s a voice inside that says, “It’s not good enough.” In many cases, we are our own worst bullies. Conversely, if you doubt your ability to do something well, your confidence might be low. But with healthy self-esteem, you won’t berate yourself for not being good at something. Loftus says, “It is possible to find

satisfaction—joy even—right where you are, simply by learning to curb your inner critic.”

IT FEELS GOOD TO BE RIGHT

Humans have a confirmation bias, meaning that we pay closer attention to information that supports our deeply held core beliefs and even disregard information that contradicts those beliefs. A few examples: • If you hold the belief that you are “too fat,” then every time you look in the mirror or at a photo of yourself, your eyes will gravitate toward the “evidence” that supports that. • If, in your core, you think you’re unlovable, you might unconsciously interpret other people’s behavior in a way that supports that belief or gravitate toward people who treat you poorly. • If you believe you are incompetent or always make mistakes, you might do 100 things well in a day but berate yourself for missing an exit or forgetting to return a call. That’s why people with low self-esteem struggle to accept compliments—it doesn’t hold with their self-evaluation. Studies have shown that people with anxiety and depression engage in more frequent negative automatic thoughts.

SELF-ASSESSMENT

To break the cycle of negative automatic thoughts, Loftus suggests asking yourself, “What am I thinking, and how does it affect


FALL IN LOVE with your skin this Valentines Day

my emotions?” Then ask, “What is my relationship with myself, and how did it get there?” Mindfulness can help you identify which core beliefs are helpful and which aren’t. In order to develop healthy self-esteem, Leimer-Decker says a person “needs to be open to changing their core beliefs about themselves.” She points out that most people are not explicitly taught how to navigate the emotional terrain of life, which is one reason she suggests working with a mental health professional. She disputes the idea that a therapist is only for people with “really bad” problems. Anyone can benefit from time spent focusing on their emotional state.

SELF-COMPASSION

Realistic self-worth can give you strength, even when things aren’t going according to plan. Fortunately, this is a habit that can be cultivated. Being mindful, working to accept compliments and paying attention to your positive attributes and strengths can establish a healthier concept of self. Journaling or working with a mental health specialist can help you reframe your selfperception in a more compassionate light.

Loftus points out, “We all have choices in how we think about ourselves.” She encourages her patients to ask, “What do I think a person who loves themselves would look like?” The answer might change over time, but it’s a good place to start. It is urgently important to treat yourself kindly and to learn to appreciate your unique strengths and weaknesses.

BEING YOU

What happens when the people around you don’t respect your worth? Whether it comes in the form of discrimination, sexual harassment, parental disapproval or judgmental friends, it can be difficult for anyone to defend their self-worth, especially if self-esteem has been a challenge. You might not be able to change the entire world, but Loftus insists that there steps you can take to improve your interactions with the people who are important to you. Identify your personal priorities. Recognize your worth. Making sure that you are living in harmony with your values and focusing on healthy boundaries can give you the confidence to guide people on how to be in a relationship with you. ◆

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Year, New New Thinking Through Your Goals BY ALISON RENTSCHLER

Matt

Amy IT’S A NEW YEAR—2020!

Time to start working on new goals, thinking of new resolutions and planning new visions. But why do we think of new resolutions each year? And how can we reach our goals?

COMMON RESOLUTIONS

Amy Kuth, employee well-being specialist at the Mayo Clinic’s Dan Abraham Healthy Living Center, notes that common resolutions include losing weight, exercising more, making nutrition goals, improving finances and quitting smoking. According to Matt Arnold, owner of Detour Athletics, “Weight loss is number one probably 99% of the time. People also want to be more active, get physically fit and make better food choices.” Sylvia DeMott, a mindset coach for business owners and professionals, has heard similar goals including people wanting to lose weight, make more money, get out of debt, stop smoking, spend less time on the phone, start or grow a business, travel more and wake up earlier.

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January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com

Sylvia Eva Cruz Peña, an emotional mastery coach, says, “The most common resolutions revolve around changing behavior that’s kept us stuck in a lifestyle that’s incongruent with what we desire. They usually involve the replacement of unhealthy behaviors with ones that are in support of our goals.” For example, she explains if it’s your goal to have a healthy body, you might set resolutions to stop drinking, start exercising and stop eating unhealthy foods.

WHAT’S BEHIND THE DESIRE TO MAKE RESOLUTIONS?

“It’s a fresh new start, a whole new year,” explains Kuth. “It’s a good time to start a new habit. We can start with a clean slate.” DeMott agrees, “I think we humans love having a fresh start. We love having new things to look forward to, and we have high hopes for ourselves and how we can change. We like having goals that we can move toward. We want to keep growing and feel excited about where we're going.”

“The beginning of every year presents itself as a blank canvas, a new notebook and lots of space that allows us the opportunity to create anew,” Cruz Peña notes. “By making a resolution, we are intending to free ourselves from anything or anyone that prevents us from living the life we desire. We set resolutions when we find ourselves in the gap between who I currently am, what I do and what I have and what I desire to be, do and have.”

WHY IT’S HARD TO CHANGE HABITS

“People look at the end goal and don’t see the underlying issues to change habits,” says Arnold. “They see the big massive end goal and skip the baby steps to get there and build the mental base needed to see permanent change.” He explains that people have to be realistic about their goals and honest about themselves and their ability to follow through. As DeMott explains, “We try to make big changes happen too quickly. We focus on changing big things rather than focusing on


Resolutions Eva

Peña. “Leaving the known to step into the unknown can be really scary for people. The idea of losing control of our environment, even if we know it’s not favorable, can be overwhelming enough to keep us stuck. Also, most people only change at the level of doing— our behavior. Unless we change at the level of being, our patterns of behaviors will pull us back to the path of least resistance—our comfort and safety zone (status quo).”

MAKING STEPS TOWARD LASTING CHANGE

creating small consistent habits that lead to change. We set goals that are too high, and we get easily discouraged because we don't focus on giving ourselves credit for what we're doing right. Habits and change take time. We have to work on things consistently, and this means starting small and adding as we go.” “People don’t set realistic goals, or they fall into all-or-nothing thinking,” says Kuth. “People think they can do it on their own, but it’s helpful to get support and accountability. For example, you can tell a friend what you’re doing or do it with someone.” Kuth asks clients why the goal is important and what their motivation is. She says this helps identify what’s important in order for them to be successful. She notes, “People are more likely to meet a goal if they have a specific goal, a clear vision about it and what they’re going to achieve.” “Changing our habits is hard because, in order to create something new, we must release something that we’ve known or become comfortable with,” describes Cruz

Kuth explains, “People need to make realistic goals, take small steps and leverage their strengths. They need to elicit support and accountability. They need to identify barriers and come up with possible solutions.” “Get support and accountability,” adds DeMott. “I'm an entrepreneur, and I have two accountability buddies that I check in with each week. If you know you do best with outside accountability, look for ways to build this into your week.” Arnold says, “Everyone has excuses, but people use that as a crutch. Balance life with your health. Situations might happen but think about how you’re going to handle it. Don’t let those situations overtake you.” “The biggest way to create lasting change is to change the way you see yourself—to create a new identity for yourself around the changes you want to make,” notes DeMott. “For instance, instead of saying that I'm going to lose 10 pounds, see yourself as a healthy person and ask yourself what other healthy people do.” This might mean telling yourself you’re the type of person who exercises three to four times a week, who tracks food and plans meals for the week, who gets seven to nine hours of sleep

or who journals when stressed instead of opening up the fridge. “Lasting change happens when we are able to bring the mind, heart and body into alignment and sustain it,” says Cruz Peña. “Unless these three components are in alignment and sustained, the change will be temporary.” She explains the process she follows for implementing change with clients is holistic and integrative: “We need to take into account the emotional, physical and mental aspects.” According to Cruz Peña, she guides clients through a discovery exercise to take inventory of their life and rate their levels of satisfaction in different areas. She asks them to pick one area, and they focus on finding what they want to transform in that area.

THOUGHTS AS YOU MAKE YOUR RESOLUTIONS AND GOALS

“The goal has to be important to you,” says Kuth. “You need to feel confident that you’re able to achieve it.” DeMott says, “You don't have to wait until the New Year to start making changes! Create small habits first based on the goals you want to achieve. When you shift your identity, you can really create long-lasting habits based on that identity. Also, focus on giving yourself credit and not beating yourself up for what you did wrong. Be very kind to yourself. Try your best not to compare yourself with others! You're on your own journey.” “What we do in one day may not get us very far,” notes DeMott. “But if we keep up the action most days for a period of time, our results will compound, and we’ll reap the rewards.” “It doesn’t matter what you do; it’s following through and being consistent,” says Arnold. ◆

RWmagazine.com January/February 2020

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BY EMILY WATKINS Certified Personal Trainer, NASM Certified Barefoot Training Specialist, EBFA Precision Nutrition Level 1 Certified

BASIC CORE STRENGTH

PHOTOS BY AB PHOTOGRAPHY

EASE LOW BACK PAIN AND IMPROVE YOUR POSTURE Lay on your back, knees bent, feet on the floor. Relax as you breathe deeply. 1. DEAD BUG: Engage your core muscles. Pull your belly button back toward your spine, with your spine in a neutral position. Lift your legs up. Reach your arms to the ceiling, palms facing in. Inhale and lower one arm and opposite leg as far as you can without arching your back. Exhale and engage your core to bring arm and leg back to starting position. Repeat on the other side. Do 10 each side.

1

2. BRIDGE: Place feet on the floor with knees bent and arms at your sides. Inhale. Exhale as you engage your core; press your heels into the floor and push your hips as high as you can, squeezing your glutes. Inhale as you slowly lower down. Do 10-15 times. 3. BIRD DOG: On hands and knees,

wrists under shoulders and knees under hips, engage core. Lift one arm and opposite leg and reach away from your body in opposite directions. As you stretch long, gently pull your shoulder blade back and down, and squeeze your opposite glute to keep your hips parallel to the floor. Repeat on the other side for 10 reps each side.

3

4. FOOT EXERCISES: Stand

tall, ears over shoulders, shoulders over hips, core engaged and legs hip distance apart. Spread your toes as far apart as possible and lift the arch of your foot away from the floor. Maintaining this gentle muscle engagement, now use the muscles of your legs as though you want your feet to tear a piece of paper without actually moving them. You’ll feel muscles around your knees engage.

2

Do everything 1 - 3 times.

5

5. BALANCE: Release one foot off the floor and balance on one leg. Hold

as long as possible, timing yourself. Try to increase your balance time a little each day.

Always consult your physician before beginning any exercise program. You should be in good physical condition and understand that when participating in any exercise program, there is the possibility of physical injury. Rochester Women Magazine and Empowered Wellness & Fitness Studio are not responsible or liable for any injury sustained from these exercises. For best results, seek the advice of a professional fitness provider.

Sponsored content provided by Empowered Wellness & Fitness Studio LLC | empoweredwellnessfitness.com | 507-218-2282 RWmagazine.com January/February 2020

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Changing Your EATING HABITS

SUSTAINABLE SHIFTS FOR BIG RESULTS BY KARA SHORT PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANDBORN

I REMEMBER WORKING OUT LIKE A CRAZY WOMAN FOR MONTHS ON END. It was 2011, and I had discovered

the weight room. I was so proud of my efforts and new-found consistency! The weight-loss results, though, were minimal. I was super strong, but I had only lost a few pounds. I realized that it was time to change my eating habits—the one thing that I had been putting off. If I was going to put in this much physical effort, I wanted to have results, and that meant taking an honest look at what and how much I was putting in my mouth and why. You can’t, they say, “outrun your fork.”

RETHINKING RESOLUTIONS

It’s the time of year for New Year’s resolutions. I’m personally not a fan. Waiting until January 1 to “be good” and expecting to suddenly go through some sort of instant transformation is unreasonable. Grandiose expectations often lead to disappointment by January 31. Studies show that humans have an 85% chance of success when trying to make one change. However, trying to change two things at once has a drastically smaller success rate of around 35%. Three things at once? Almost zero. Well, what do many resolutions involve? Change everything, and change it now!

OUT OF THE COMFORT ZONE

Not surprisingly, this isn’t sustainable. And when unable to be successful, it’s easy to just revert back to familiar, comfortable habits—the path of least resistance. I get it. I’ve had times in my life where I didn’t care and I didn’t try. And there have been times of rice cakes, diet pills, restrict and repeat. When it was time to be honest with myself and make real change, I remember being afraid: afraid of restriction, of having to give up things that I love and of failing again.

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SUSTAINABLE HABITS

So, what can you do differently this year? And how can you build healthier eating habits for the long term? 1) TAKE AN HONEST LOOK AT WHAT YOU’RE CURRENTLY DOING. • Build awareness by keeping a dietary record for a week. Write everything down and note what’s going well and what needs improvement. Are you missing anything (like vegetables)? Do you have a certain eating pattern? • Look at where you eat and why. How much do you eat out? Do you plan and prep meals in advance? Do you have hunger awareness? Do you know how fast or slow you eat and WHY you are eating? 2) WHAT IS YOUR ENVIRONMENT LIKE? • Examine your kitchen. If you have junk food in the house, you will eat it. Bring those tempting treats in only on occasion and in small amounts. • Factor in your social environment: Who is around you? Do family, friends and


co-workers help you or make it harder for you to be healthy? What changes can you make in your household and social circle right now?

Kara recommends these bowl recipes

For more bowl recipes recommended by Kara, go to:

EASY GREEK SALMON BOWLS

RWMAGAZINE.COM/ READ/COLUMNS/ FOOD

3) WHAT ARE YOUR EXPECTATIONS? ARE THEY REALISTIC OR ARE YOU SABOTAGING YOURSELF FROM THE GET-GO? • Avoid high expectations of change, especially if you have low confidence in your ability to act on it. • Set a realistic expectation of ONE change that you can start with (for example, eat slowly or increase your veggies). • Choose something you are confident in changing. It should almost seem easy to work on this change. • Go SLOWLY. Slow = sustainable. Master what you are working on and then add another change. Good eating and lifestyle habits should enhance your life, not rule it. If you end up feeling restricted, it means you’re changing too much, too fast. Find your own version of balance. Be well and be healthy, but also enjoy your life and the process. ◆

From cookinglight.com/recipes/easy-greek-salmon-bowls Serves 4 (serving size: 1 salmon fillet, ¾ cup quinoa mixture and 1⅓ cups of vegetables) By KAREN RANKIN November 2018 Heart-hero salmon teams up with protein- and fiber-forward quinoa to fill you up; spinach delivers a hit of iron, while green beans and cucumber up the veggie count. Great warm or at room temperature, this also makes a standout packed lunch.

INGREDIENTS

KARA’S TIPS

2 3

1

KEEP THINGS SIMPLE. If it’s simple and you feel confident, you will do it.

PLAN AHEAD. Prepare to have meals ready during a busy week.

•4

• 1½

•½

(5-oz.) skin-on salmon fillets tsp. dried dill • ½ tsp. dried oregano • 1 tsp. kosher salt, divided • 5 Tbsp. canola oil, divided • 1 (8-oz.) pkg. haricots verts • 3 cups packed baby spinach leaves, finely chopped

•½

cups cooked quinoa cup chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley • ¼ cup fresh lemon juice • 1 tsp. honey • 2 cups halved grape tomatoes • 2 cups chopped English cucumber • ¼ cup crumbled feta cheese

HOW TO MAKE IT STEP 1 Sprinkle salmon with dill, oregano, and ¼ teaspoon salt. Heat 1 tablespoon oil in

a large nonstick skillet over medium-high. Add salmon, skin side up, to skillet; cook 2 to 3 minutes per side for medium. Set aside.

CELEBRATE PROGRESS. I tell my clients to strive for progress, not perfection!

STEP 2 Fill a large bowl with ice water. Cook haricots verts according to package directions; place in ice water until completely cool, about 1 minute. Pat dry.

4

STEP 3 Toss together spinach, quinoa, and parsley in a bowl. Whisk together lemon juice, honey, and remaining ¼ cup oil in a small bowl. Add ¼ cup lemon dressing to spinach mixture; toss to combine.

BE KIND TO YOURSELF. If you have a day that you indulge more than planned, hit the reset button and practice some self-forgiveness.

STEP 4 To serve, spoon ¾ cup spinach mixture into each of 4 bowls. Arrange ½ cup tomatoes, ½ cup cucumber, and ⅓ cup cooked haricots verts in each bowl. Drizzle with remaining dressing; sprinkle with remaining ¾ teaspoon salt. Top each bowl with 1 flaked salmon fillet and 1 tablespoon feta cheese.

DON’T WAIT TO BE MOTIVATED TO CHANGE. Take action NOW, motivation will follow.

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ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW THE 41ST ANNUAL EVENT BRINGS TOGETHER DEDICATED HOME EXPERTS AND MOTIVATED HOMEOWNERS BY TRISH AMUNDSON

LET'S FACE IT, AFTER TOO MUCH TIME INDOORS, ESCAPING THE COLD, WE'RE SICK OF STARING AT THE SAME OLD WALLS. Shake off your cabin fever and attend the annual

Rochester Area Builders (RAB) Home Show, February 7-9 at Mayo Civic Center. Whether you want to build, remodel or just get new ideas, the event offers inspiration to transform your indoor and outdoor living spaces.

MEET INDUSTRY EXPERTS

Exhibitors will display their products, hand out literature and visit with attendees, many of whom are interested in building or remodeling their homes. With different representatives from some of the same specialties on hand, you can see the variety of options before choosing a company to work with. And rather than driving or calling all around town, you will have easy access to many professionals in one convenient location. You’ll find qualified experts who can provide information and answer your questions about garage doors, landscaping, plumbing and heating, real estate, custom homes, countertops, fireplaces, interior design, flooring and more. Lindsay Lueck collaborates closely with John Eischen, executive director of Rochester Area Builders Inc., and serves in dual roles

with the home show. “I am chair of the Home Show committee, and I also help with a booth for Quality Overhead Door,” she says. Lueck is the office administrator at Quality Overhead Door and has staffed the company’s eye-catching exhibit for the past two years. “We will have garage doors on display, and we like to have a working garage-door opener on display as well.” Lueck was eager to join the Home Show Committee in 2018. “Rochester Area Builders has supported the local trades industry for years,” she says. “The home show is an event that has benefitted not only Quality Overhead Door, but hundreds of local businesses throughout southeastern Minnesota. I jumped at the chance to be involved in such a well-respected and highly attended event.”

SEE INNOVATIVE TRENDS

Experts will showcase innovations and trends, including home products and building practices that focus on quality assurance, energy efficiency and green building. According to RAB, green building is “incorporating environmental considerations and resource efficiency into every step of the home building and land development process to minimize environmental impact.” The RAB Home Show promotes environmental consciousness, and green building options will be highlighted through the Resource Way feature. Look for exhibitors with green curtains, as they offer products and services that are sustainable and energy-efficient and can help you explore different aspects of green building. “I enjoy looking at new energy efficiencies and learning about things like furnaces, because when it needs replacing, I’ll have a better idea of what I'm looking for,” says Catharine Bliss, who has been attending the home show with her family for about 10 years.

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FOREVER CAREERS AND “FUREVER HOMES”

RAB gives back to the community in many ways. Recognizing an ever-increasing labor shortage in building trades, the organization promotes building careers and collaborates with Rochester Community & Technical College and Riverland Community College, which both offer carpentry programs. A feature of the home show will be a Construction Career Center, with representatives from the local colleges providing information about educational programs and careers in the construction field. If you’re a pet lover, you’ll want to register to win an indoor or outdoor custom “furever home.” Building experts have constructed and donated these dog or cat homes, which will be raffled off at the event. Proceeds will benefit the Paws and Claws Humane Society, which helps animals find their forever homes.

SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

The home show is an opportunity to see your favorite things, while spending time with some of your favorite people. “My husband and I really enjoy seeing all the offerings for homes

in one space,” says Bliss. “I love looking at the new landscaping ideas and chatting with all the contractors in one place.” Rochester native and 20-year attendee Patti Price is a gardener, and her favorite exhibits are the landscaping and outdoor displays, such as the exhibit for Custom Retaining Walls and Landscaping, Inc. She also looks forward to getting ideas on high-tech improvements. “So many home technologies are developed each year to make life easier and more streamlined. It’s fun to see what's out there, even if I don't plan to purchase anything,” she says.

BEFORE YOU GO

“If you have a specific project you are working with, come with a list of questions,” suggests Bliss. “Then you can narrow down the best person to interview for your project.” With several exhibits and activities, it’s easy to forget your questions without a checklist. Take time to browse the home show exhibitor list and map at rochesterareabuilders.com/ home-show to locate the vendors you want to meet. If you’re interested in a service or product, consider leaving your contact information at

their booth, and ask the exhibitor to follow up with you at a later date. Go early and plan on staying awhile. At the RAB Home Show, you can explore any aspect of a home, from small design options to large home additions and new builds. Rochesterarea professionals will be accessible to share their valuable knowledge to bring your ideas to life—or to inspire you with new concepts to make your dream home a reality. ◆

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Minne SN Wta DEVELOPING A SNOW REMOVAL PLAN BY AMANDA RUGGERI

DON’T BE SURPRISED AND UNPREPARED WHEN THE SNOW BEGINS TO FALL. Follow these tips to get your snow

removal plan in place.

CITY REGULATIONS

Rochester residents are responsible for snow and ice removal on all sidewalks bordering their property. The phrase to remember is, “When snow is here, you have 24 hours to clear.” The width of the sidewalk must be cleared and also any snow that may be blocking a handicapped ramp, fire hydrant or catch basin. Never shovel snow into the street. The Rochester City Council adopted new seasonal parking restrictions in September 2019. Megan Moeller, communications coordinator for the Public Works Department, says the biggest change is the implementation of alternate side parking regardless of weather and no parking in the circular part of cul-de-sacs at any time between October 1st and May 1st. Between 2 a.m. and 3 p.m., vehicles must be parked on the even-numbered side of the street on even-numbered calendar dates and on the odd side on odd dates. This does not apply to metered spaces, but remember that posted parking signs must be obeyed regardless of the calendar date. Look for further communications from the City Council on these new rules.

SNOW REMOVAL SERVICES

Snow removal services can be very convenient and cost-effective. Russell Riley, from CBS Lawn Care and Snow Removal Services provides contracts for clients that are tailored to their individual needs. Riley works with his clients to put together a plan for the snow season that can include not only plowing and snow blowing but regular sand and salt delivery, roof raking and

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January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com

even ice dam removal. Contracts take your schedule into account to ensure that you are able to get out of your driveway on time in the morning. Due to high demand for snow removal services in our area, Riley recommends looking around early for a company that’s taking new clients. Since all properties have different needs and snow removal can be arranged as either a one-off or on a contract basis, cost can vary considerably. Most local companies provide free estimates via their website or by phone.

DIY SNOW REMOVAL

After you have used your snow blower for the last time at the end of the season, make sure to drain all the fuel out. Neglecting to do this can have a negative effect on the carburetor. This is also the best time to change the oil and filter. In the fall, check and possibly replace the spark plugs, paddles, scraper bars, cogged belt, rubber drive disk and control cable. Choosing a nice autumn day to give your snow blower a once-over may save you from fixing a problem in the middle of a blizzard. When you begin blowing snow, create a strip down the middle of your driveway, aiming the snow away from your home, but still on your property. With each pass, overlap slightly the last area you cleared, attempting to blow the snow to the outer edge of your yard. You should not need to use too much physical force to move your snow blower; let the machine work for you. Pushing too hard can not only put strain on your muscles but jam the blades with snow. If this happens, turn your engine off and wait at least five seconds before using a solid object (not your hand!) to remove the blockage. Remember that snow blowers are dangerous machines, and children should never be allowed near them. ◆

RUSS RILEY’S SHOVELING TIPS • Don’t wait to shovel. Remove snow every few inches, if possible. Breaking the job up into smaller chunks makes it more manageable and prevents injury by allowing your body to rest between. • Choose a good shovel. Look for a length that allows your back to remain straight, with a lightweight blade. • Keep your back straight, lifting snow with your legs to prevent back strain and injury. • Wear proper clothes: boots with good traction, a warm coat and insulated gloves. As the Norwegian proverb says, “There’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothes.” • Always carry your cell phone in your pocket. This way you can alert someone in case of a fall.


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The Loneliness Epidemic HOW IT’S AFFECTING OUR SENIORS

HUMANS LIVE THEIR ENTIRE LIVES AS A PART OF A COMMUNITY. Our social circles

begin with family and grow exponentially until the age of retirement, after which they can start to shrink. Because isolation is increasingly common in seniors, it’s believed to be contributing to a loneliness epidemic.

HOW DOES ISOLATION OCCUR?

“Impairment of our five senses can cause some seniors to isolate,” says Tricia Schilling, nursing home services manager at Olmsted Medical Center. For example, if hearing is impaired, seniors may skip social gatherings for fear of answering a question incorrectly. The weather in Minnesota can also be a deterrent to leaving home. The cold can be painful on the body, and many seniors are fearful of falling on the ice. Because of this, seniors are more likely to skip their doctor’s appointments in the winter months. Isolation also stems from a restricted budget. Seniors may think twice about going out for a celebratory dinner or drink with friends and family.

THE EFFECTS OF ISOLATION

Social isolation significantly increases the risk of premature mortality. Judy Strenge, a nurse with Visiting Angels states, “Isolation and loneliness are equivalent to smoking 15 cigarettes per day or abusing alcohol. Isolation is also two times more harmful than obesity.” According to Strenge, loneliness and isolation cause many seniors to miss taking their medications or getting them refilled. Their personal hygiene suffers. They may drink or smoke more. Their nutrition suffers, and often, there are significant mood changes, specifically depression.

SENIOR COMMUNITIES AND OTHER SOLUTIONS

Living in a senior housing community is an excellent way to combat isolation. These

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January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com

communities foster relationships and provide transportation to social outings and doctor appointments. They offer nutritious meals and engaging activities and programs and may offer access to nursing or health care. According to Schilling, senior housing takes the work out of being social. The programs and meals are prepared; you just show up to participate. In addition, Schilling says Rochester provides several solutions to keep seniors active and social. “125 Live does a fabulous job of looking at the importance of developing social companionship. Lutheran Social Services and Elder Network are other agencies that go above and beyond to pair peers together.” Other ways to combat loneliness include becoming a volunteer and getting a pet. “We know that pets provide a great deal of support, love and purpose for many, so having a program with pets could be a great intervention,” says Schilling.

HOW OMC HELPS COMBAT SOCIAL ISOLATION

Olmsted Medical Center recently launched Active Aging Services, a program to help older adults who use the emergency room for non-emergent illnesses. Noticing that some seniors were coming in for headaches and upset stomachs in order to socialize with their favorite nurses and realizing that these older adults needed more companionship, they developed the program alongside Lutheran Social Services. Schilling says the program is designed for adults over the age of 50 who have five or more emergency room visits in a three-month period. “These adults were paired with long-term senior companions at no charge,” she says, “and OMC covers the cost for these services.” Another solution for seniors at OMC is the Transition Coach program, which helps seniors who are leaving nursing homes and returning home. Transition Coaches make house calls and provide safety assessments for seniors to encourage them to remain independent. ◆

Photo courtesy of Chad Holder.

BY NICOLE L. CZARNOMSKI

IF YOU’RE EXPERIENCING LONELINESS, THESE LOCAL SERVICES CAN HELP: Olmsted Medical Center's Active Aging Services Program 507-529-6869 olmmed.org/clinical-services/ active-aging-services Lutheran Social Services 800-582-5260 • lssmn.org Elder Network 507-285-5272 • elder-network.org 125 Live 507-287-1404 • 125livemn.org Visiting Angels 507-289-1147 visitingangels.com/rochester/home Salvation Army Caring Partners Adult Day Center 507-288-5191 centralusa.salvationarmy.org/ northern/ RochesterAdultDayCenter


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Join us each month for our Educational Programs we are sponsoring at 125 Live: Shorewood Senior Campus offers: "Creative Solutions to Challenging Situations" • Daily Activities and Enrichment Opportunities • Elegant dining room to enjoy meals with friends 507-289-1147 • www.VisitingAngels.com • Supportive and engaging seniors only health club • Outings and events to build camaraderie Book a tour today by calling 507-252-9110.

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Your Voice Counts! VITAL CIVIC ENGAGEMENT IN 2020 BY BRITTNEY MARSCHALL

BIG EVENTS IN 2020 WILL HELP SHAPE OUR COMMUNITIES FOR YEARS TO COME. Your voice is important, and Olmsted County and the

City of Rochester are committed to providing information and resources you need to participate.

2020 CENSUS

2020 ELECTIONS

An accurate and complete 2020 Census count is vital to our community and state. Census data is used to determine funding for programs and projects ranging from early childhood education to senior nutrition. Here are some of the most important things to know.

There are three major election events in 2020: • March 3, 2020: Presidential nomination primary • August 11, 2020: State and local primary • November 3, 2020: General election Legislation was passed in 2016 which established a presidential nomination primary for Minnesota starting in 2020. This means instead of using the caucus system to identify preferred presidential candidates for the state’s four major parties, Minnesota will now conduct a primary, administered by election officials on behalf of the parties, to help select each party’s preferred candidate for the November general election. Each party is responsible for deciding which candidates will appear on their primary ballot. The Minnesota presidential nomination primary will be held March 3, although absentee voting for this primary begins January 17, both by mail and in person.

WHO GETS COUNTED?

Everyone! The census is mandated by the U.S. Constitution and counts all people who reside in the country, regardless of citizenship or immigration status.

HOW DO I GET COUNTED?

Online, by telephone or via mail. This is the first Census to go digital, so you can fill out your household survey on your home computer, phone or tablet or even at the public library!

WHEN IS THE CENSUS?

Starting in March 2020, the U.S. Census Bureau will mail letters to every household inviting all to respond to the Census survey. Surveys should be completed by Census Day on April 1, 2020.

WHY DO WE HAVE A CENSUS?

The data collected from the Census is used to make sure everyone is equally represented in our political system and that government resources are allocated fairly. Census data determines how many Congressional seats a state receives and how much federal funding will be allocated to local communities for public services and infrastructure needs. It also provides a picture of the changing demographics of the country.

REGISTER TO VOTE

In order to participate in the 2020 elections, you must be a registered voter. Visit mnvotes. org to learn more about registering or call Olmsted County Elections at 507-328-7650.

SELECTING YOUR POLITICAL PARTY AFFILIATION

All who would vote in the presidential nomination primary, including early absentee voters, must select a political party and will receive the ballot for their party of choice. The party you choose is not public information, though it will be available to each major party.

ELECTION JUDGES NEEDED

If you are looking for a way to get more involved in the political process, consider becoming an election judge. Election judges are always needed to fulfill duties such as opening and closing the polls on Election Day, aiding voters, ensuring only qualified voters are permitted to vote and "CIVIC ENGAGEMENT certifying precinct election results. means working to make a difference in the Election judges are paid for their work. civic life of our communities and developing The pay rate is set by cities, townships thecombination of knowledge, skills, and school districts. If you’re interested values and motivation to make that difference. It means promoting the quality of life in becoming an election judge, complete in a community, through both political an online application by visiting Olmsted and non-political processes.” County: olmstedcounty.com or City of Rochester: rochestermn.gov/vote ◆ - Thomas Ehrlich (Ed.) Civic Responsibility and Higher Education.

If you are looking for ways to get involved contact Brittney Marschall at marschall.brittney@co.olmsted.mn.us or 507-328-6013. 42

January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com


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January | February Events GATHERED BY SARA ALBERTELLI AND ROSEI SKIPPER

JANUARY

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Riverside Concerts Presents: The Fab Four, Mayo Civic Center Presentation Hall, Emmy award-winning group performing Beatles tribute music, 7:30 p.m.

3

J-Term 2020 – Driftless: Anatomy of a Region, Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center, outdoor environmental activities, 12 p.m. (THROUGH JANUARY 13)

9

20th Annual OAKS Scholarship Ceremony, Rochester International Event Center, celebrating high-school and first year college students who are achieving academic goals, 5 p.m.

11

Screwtape, Rochester Repertory Theatre, a comedy by James Forsyth about hell, heaven, religion and humanity, Thurs., Fri., Sat. 7:30 p.m.; Sun. 2 p.m. (THROUGH JANUARY 19 AND 23-26)

14

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January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com

Trace Adkins, Mayo Civic Center,

17

A Side of Soul Book Launch, Collective Books & Records, celebrating a nonfiction book about one woman’s soul quest through open-minded interviews, 3-4:30 p.m.

Living & Leading with Purpose 2020, Hear from influential area women

24

Lewis Black: It Gets Better Every Day, Mayo Civic Center, 8 p.m.

24

Lyra Baroque Orchestra Presents: Passaggi, Mount Olive Lutheran Church, special guest Bruce Dickey will play on the cornetto with the orchestra, 7:30 p.m.

25

Barbaro with special guest My Grandma's Cardigan, Little Thistle Brewery, 8-11 p.m.

FEBRUARY

1

Annual Wit, Wisdom & Wine, Rochester Public Library, hors-d’oeuvres, speakers, silent auction and more, 6:30-10 p.m.

6

SocialICE, Downtown Peace Plaza, an outdoor ice bar experience with signature drinks, DJ and entertainment, Thurs. 5-9 p.m., Fri. and Sat. 4-10 p.m. (THROUGH FEBRUARY 8)

7 7

16th Annual National Wear Red Day

The Other Place, Rochester Civic Theatre, a drama about a successful neurologist whose life becomes unhinged, Thurs., Fri., Sat. 7 p.m.; Sun. 2 p.m. (THROUGH FEBRUARY 23)

8

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My Backyard Songwriters in the Round, Gray Duck Theater, My Grandma's Cardigan, Amanda Jay and host Pat Egan will take the stage and share original songs, 7-10 p.m.

7 p.m.

18

Mindful SelfCompassion: New Year’s Gift to Yourself, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, find a newfound freshness for the entire year, 9:30-11 a.m. (ALSO ON JANUARY 21 AND 28 AND FEBRUARY 4)

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Rochester Downtown Winter Farmers Market, Graham Park, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. (ALSO ON JANUARY 25 AND FEBRUARY 8 AND 22) Space Clearing and Blessing, A Beautiful Soul, a workshop focusing on tools for clearing, blessing and creating sacred space, 6:308:30 p.m.

and be inspired to succeed in 2020. International Event Center, 7:30 a.m. - noon

Polar Plunge, Foster Arend Park, support Special Olympics Minnesota programs and help athletes transform their lives, 11 a.m.

8

Intuitive You–Wisdom from Within, Hermitage Farm Center for Healing, MY GRANDMA'S CARDIGAN


SPONSORED BY THE HEXUM COMPANIES COMMERCIAL REAL ESTATE BROKERS

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THANK YOU! WE COULDN'T DO IT WITHOUT OUR ADVERTISERS Altra Federal Credit Union........................................ 6 Amy Lantz............................................................... 9 Arlene Schuman-Remax........................................ 39 Blades to Ballet...................................................... 30 Bounce World........................................................ 12 Carpet One............................................................ 37 Chanhassen Dinner Theatres................................. 14 Creative Hardwood Floors, Inc............................... 23 Dentistry for Children & Adolescents, Ltd................ 12

LENA ELIZABETH AT BIG TURN MUSIC FESTIVAL

Dunlap & Seegar, P.a.............................................. 43 Empowered Wellness & Fitness Studio .................. 31

exploring how we receive messages from our higher self and spirit helpers, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

music from the early years to today, Sat. 7:30 p.m., Sun. 2 p.m.

Energyworks.......................................................... 27

11

21-22

Fagan Studios.......................................................... 9

13

23

Valentine's Day Art Market, Canvas and Chardonnay. Call for times. Raache Choirs Winter Serenade Concert, Trinity Lutheran Church, three choirs, audience sing-a-longs and special performances by choir individuals, 7-8:30 p.m.

Big Turn Music Festival,

Redwing, MN

Essence Skin Clinic................................................ 48 Foresight Bank....................................................... 43 Garden of Massage................................................ 39 Hair Studio 52........................................................ 16

Women's History Circle: Building the Way, Women in the Skilled Trades, History Center of Olmsted County, women working in welding, oil refining and carpentry will share their journeys, 2 p.m.

Home Federal........................................................ 16 Jacobson Plastic Surgery......................................... 4 JRK Medicals........................................................... 3 Kari's Nails............................................................ 16 Linda Gates........................................................... 36 Luxe Stone Gallery................................................. 34 Luya ..................................................................... 18

28-29

Grumpy Old Man Festival,

Wabasha, MN

16

Bleu Duck Sunday School: Cooking Fish and Pairing with Wine, Bleu Duck, 1-3 p.m.

20

Rochester Arborist Workshop, Rochester International Event Center, fundamentals for the modern arborist, featuring Richard Delaney and Dr. Eric North, 7:45 a.m.-6 p.m.

21

Century of Cinema, Lourdes High School, celebrating the evolution of film

28

Bear Creek Services’ Annual Wines of the World, Rochester International Event Center, a wide selection of 200+ craft beers, wines and spirits, 6-9 p.m.

Mayo Employees Federal Credit Union................... 30 Mr. Pizza North........................................................ 9 North Risk Partners................................................ 23 Olmsted Medical Center........................................... 2 OMC Sponsored...............................................20-21 Posh ..................................................................... 27 Premeir Banks....................................................... 12 Quality Overhead Door........................................... 36 Rochester Area Builders......................................... 34 Rochester Greeters................................................ 39 SEMVA.................................................................. 14 Shorewood Senior Campus................................... 41 Sister Seekers........................................................ 41

29

Hidden Treasures from the 19th Century, Christ United Methodist Church, masterpieces by not-so-known composers with guest cellist Laura Sewell, 7:30 p.m.

Slow Coast Spa..................................................... 47 The Hexum Companies.......................................... 45 Tyrol Ski & Sports................................................... 18 Visiting Angels....................................................... 41 Vitality Chiropractic................................................ 30 Winona Health....................................................... 39

RWmagazine.com January/February 2020

45


Winter Beauty

HOT PRODUCTS FOR COOL DAYS AND NIGHTS BY ELIZABETH HARRIS

ESSENCE SKIN CLINIC A must-have for winter! Essence Voluminous Resveratrol Dermal Repair keeps skin plump and hydrated. Packed with peptides and hyaluronic acid, this product can only be found at Essence Skin Clinic. The Glo Skin Beauty pressed base is a fullcoverage powder. What makes this product so great? It is made from minerals and contains vitamins A, C and E. It is also talc free, which helps to keep pores clear and makes it safe for anyone to use. A wide variety of shades can be found at Essence Skin Clinic.

POSH FACIAL ESTHETICS Another great winter product is IS Clinical Youth Intensive Creme. This powerful formula is clinically proven to hydrate skin for 24 hours and diminish the look of fine lines, loss of firmness and skin discoloration. Youth Intensive Creme can be found at Posh Facial Esthetics.

January/February 2020 RWmagazine.com

LASATA SALON AND SPA The Aveda Botanical Kinetics Intense Hydrating Masque is oil-free and full of moisture. A thin layer can be applied and left on overnight, or it can be used as a rinse-off masque in the morning. Either way, just as the title implies, your skin is left intensely hydrated. This product can be found at Lasata Salon and Spa.

Another great Aveda product is the Color Balm. It applies like a liquid lipstick but wears like a lip balm, leaving lips moisturized and soft. The best-selling color at Lasata Salon and Spa is the “Camellia Rose,” which is a great neutral nude/pink color that’s perfect for everyday wear.

HAIR STUDIO 52 & DAY SPA If you need a foundation that will last all day, this is it! BareMinerals BarePro Performance Wear Liquid Foundation, found at Hair Studio 52 & Day Spa, lasts for 14 hours. It also has SPF 20, which is extremely important, even in the winter months. Everyone needs some great eyeshadow, and Sigma Beauty Warm Neutrals Volume 2 is the perfect palette. It has a great variety of colors, and the warm tones are perfect for winter months. This, along with many other great Sigma beauty products, can be found at Posh Facial Esthetics.

46

Rochester skin care specialists recommend beauty items to keep your skin looking great through the winter months.

Jessica Amos, owner of Hair Studio 52 & Day Spa, says that Dermalogica Power Rich Age Smart has three formulas packed into one product to help keep skin firm and resilient. It can also be used as an eye cream to smooth, hydrate and brighten.


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Profile for Rochester Women Magazine

Rochester Women magazine JanFeb 2020  

Women's magazine in Rochester, MN

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