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NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2020 COMPLIMENTARY

PA N D E M I C

Holidays

ANTI-RACISM 101 Stay-at-Home

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CONTENTS NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2020

30 ON THE COVER 20 PANDEMIC HOLIDAYS Finding

something to celebrate in anxious times.

12 Anti-Racism 101 Taking the first steps. 32 Stay-at-Home Fashion

ENTERTAINMENT & TRAVEL 9 LOCAL READS A regional

26 CONSTRUCTION: NOT JUST MEN AT WORK Area women are building

15 SPRING BREAK How to travel during a pandemic.

28 JOAN KOPACZ Building a practice with character, integrity and tenacity.

round-up of women authors.

WELLNESS 16 A HAZY SHADE OF WINTER

There are no rules!

How to fine-tune the moody blues.

34 2020 Holiday Gift Guide

COMMUNITY 11 BROOKE BURCH CUSTOM SEWING & ALTERATIONS A local

38 Time for Some Hair Love Meeting #hairgoals in Rochester.

IN EVERY ISSUE

7 From the Editor 36 Community Calendar 37 Advertisers Index

seamstress takes a moment to reflect ... but not long—orders are waiting.

careers in planning, preconstruction and administration.

35 NIKKI NILES Eliminating disparities in community services. HOME & GARDEN 23 SAVOR THE FLAVORS Celebrating holidays with food.

30 DREAM HAVEN Creating a cozy bedroom oasis.

18 AN AMISH SECRET Two assault survivors share their stories to help others.

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

How are we almost to winter? It simultaneously feels like two weeks and 13,689 days since last November. Remember those simple days of planning year-end holidays? For this issue we asked several local women to share their holiday traditions with us, and they each shared that there would be at least a little difference between how they normally spend their holidays and what they’re planning this year. One thing that won’t change for my family is the joy of the foods that we associate with the holidays. We celebrate Christmas, and the foods that I associate with that holiday include foods from my Norwegian heritage: lefse and krumkake (but not lutefisk!). One important tradition for me is cookie baking. My pantry fills up with flour, sugar and butter starting in mid-November to allow for holiday baking. There is something so comforting about the straightforward process of following a recipe on a chilly winter day. For our photoshoot for this issue’s food article, Alexandra Petrova of AB-Photography.us and I were invited into Deb Altchuler’s home to catch her making latkes, a recipe that she makes for her family when they gather for Hanukkah. She showed us her collection of menorahs and pictures from her travels to the Holy Land, and we got to try the fruits of her labor. Delicious! Check out her recipe on page 24. We had another fun photoshoot at the new Hotel Indigo downtown, where we got to catch a real-life model in action, modeling some local finds to spice up your at-home fashion (p. 32). We are unveiling two series in this issue: Construction: Not Just Men at Work (p. 26) and Anti-Racism 101 (p. 12). Over the next year, we will meet area women who work in all aspects of construction, and we will continue to power through the marathon that is effective anti-racism work. I have started reading "So You Want to Talk about Race," one of the books that is recommended in our introductory article, and I’d love for you to join me. I am writing this from Colorado, where I am vacationing with my sons and two of my BFFs and their families. This is the first plane trip I have taken since COVID-19. I was nervous about it, but I have felt very comfortable and safe everywhere we have gone. Read about planning a spring break trip on page 15 to plan your own vacation. How are you doing? Women have been disproportionately affected by job loss or difficulty in balancing their professional work with their responsibilities at home. We lost an icon, the Notorious RBG, who advocated for women's rights. It's a difficult time for all, and I hope that you will find a bit of joy and escape in these pages. Let's continue to spread kindness wherever we go.

ONLINE SURPRISES...

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IN THIS ISSUE... Fine tune the moody blues Create a cozy bedroom oasis Meet #hairgoals in Rochester

She/Her Learn more abou t Diwali, Kwanzaa and Hanukkah!

Take care of your mental health! We share tips and resources. Check out more pictures from our fashion photoshoot.

RWmagazine.com November/December 2020

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MEET THE CREW We asked our team "What's your favorite holiday food?" Here is what they had to say:

ISSUE 116, VOLUME 20, NUMBER 4 NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2020 PUBLISHER/EDITOR

Emily Watkins

Maka Boeve

Samantha Erickson

Rosei Skipper

Emily Watkins

My favorite holiday food is my mama’s slightly tart, lemony celery salad that she makes for the “healthy” Thanksgiving dish. It is non-traditional and green—therefore, no one is fighting for it—but I “pair” it with the sugar-loaded cranberry sauce and totally pig out.

Thanksgiving meal leftovers! That’s kind of cheating, but hear me out. Picture Black Friday at home, in your jammies (NOT out shopping with the masses). Layer a bowl with mashed potatoes, stuffing, turkey and cranberry sauce, maybe a drizzle of gravy. Warm the whole thing up and you have couchhanging perfection!

My favorite holiday food is my mom's stuffing. I grew up vegetarian so we didn't often have the "traditional" holiday foods, but veggie stuffing is so good! She always puts in plenty of extras like apples, walnuts and herbs. We eat it frequently during fall and winter.

I love the combination of turkey, stuffing and mashed potatoes. I don’t know why I don’t fix that meal more often throughout the year, because it is one of my favorites. Maybe I love it so much because it’s so laborintensive that it doesn’t make sense to make it very often!

WRITER

WRITER

SOCIAL MEDIA

PUBLISHER/EDITOR

Grace Menchaca

is a Winonabased writer who likes to ask questions while sipping on a latte. She grew up in the Rochester area and loves to recognize the leading ladies that make up the city.

Gina Dewink is an author and magazine editor living in Rochester with her husband and two children. Her books are available by order in local bookstores or on Amazon.

Samantha Erickson

is a pro organizer and interior designer with Rescued Room, the life-simplifying business serving Rochester and beyond. Catch her behind the scenes on social media as @theeverydaymae.

Nicole Andrews is

an advocate for equity in children's education and mental health rights. She is the school readiness coordinator for Rochester Public Schools preschool and serves on many boards and committees.

Terri Allred

was formerly the director of community engagement for the Women’s Shelter and Support Center. She is currently the SE regional coordinator for the Minnesota Council of Nonprofits.

Kate Brue Tessa Slisz

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Jen Jacobson

COPY EDITOR

Erin Gibbons

PHOTOGRAPHY

AB-Photography.us SOCIAL MEDIA

Rosei Skipper ASSISTANT

Thank you to this issue's contributing writers:

Maka Boeve, is the owner of WaveMaker Consulting, LLC and a freelance writer and educator based in Rochester.

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Karine Marsac

Ruth Morrey

is a mother of 3, and a PhD in Counseling/Health Psychology. She is a soccer coach and lifelong elite athlete as a two-time Olympic Marathon Trials runner, Division I soccer player and professional Ironman triathlete.

Rochester Women is published six times per year by 507 communications LLC, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 Subscriptions available for $24 per year (six issues). Send check to the address stated above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. Rochester Women assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2020 507 communications, LLC. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. Rochester Women magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials.

Sara Dingmann

is a Rochester native and is currently entering her senior year at the University of Missouri where she studies journalism.

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Trish Amundson

is a Rochesterarea freelance writer and farm wife with minor experience in picking rocks, baling hay and driving tractors.

Margo Stitch is a Rochester freelance writer and is delighted to share her interest and experience in food and wine. She notes that her culinary interest is rooted in her family upbringing.

Audrey Elegbede

is an educator, speaker, consultant and coach. She grew up in La Crosse, Wisconsin and moved to Rochester in 2017 with her husband and three children. She is a lover of travel, mindfulness and lifelong learning.

November/December 2020 RWmagazine.com

Kamela Jordan

grew up in Thailand as the daughter of evangelical Christian missionaries. She also spent two years in Israel after college. Rochester has been her home since 2002, and she currently works at Land-O-Dreams.

Angi Porter,

who grew up in Rochester and attended Howard University, is an attorney who works in the University of Minnesota Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, which investigates discrimination and harassment.

Alison Rentschler

is a writer and editor living in Rochester with her dog and cat. She’s always dreaming of or planning her future travels.

Printed in the U.S.A.

For more information or to advertise: 507-250-4593 emily@rwmagazine.com RWmagazine.com


LOCALREADS LOCAL READS

A REGIONAL ROUND-UP OF WOMEN AUTHORS BY GINA DEWINK

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We Survivors After disease and nuclear warfare decimate the world population, 17-year-old Nadia is sure she’s the last person left on Earth. Then she hears a voice on her radio and everything changes. But as she and her new companions unravel the mysteries surrounding their survival, they soon realize that it was no accident and they could be in grave danger. “We Survivors” is a young adult post-apocalyptic novel.

AUTHOR: L.J. Thomas (ljthomasbooks.com) Best thing about being an area author: The talented local writers of the Rochester MN Writing Group, who regularly meet up for critique or coffee!

Eve: A Novel In this mesmerizing debut novel, Elissa Elliott blends biblical tradition with recorded history to put a powerful new twist on the story of creation’s first family. Eve is brought to life in a way religion and myth have never allowed—as a wife, a mother and a woman. With stunning intimacy, Elliott boldly reimagines Eve’s journey before and after the banishment from Eden—‑her complex marriage to Adam, her troubled relationship with her daughters, and the tragedy that would overcome her sons, Cain and Abel. From a woman’s first awakening to a mother’s innermost hopes and fears, from moments of exquisite tenderness to a climax of shocking violence, Eve explores the very essence of love, womanhood, faith and humanity.

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BROOKE BURCH

CUSTOM SEWING & ALTERATIONS

A LOCAL SEAMSTRESS TAKES A MOMENT TO REFLECT ... BUT NOT FOR LONG—ORDERS ARE WAITING BY GRACE MENCHACA

WHEN ASKED WHAT INSPIRED HER TO START SEWING AS A PROFESSION, BROOKE BURCH REMARKS THAT NOTHING INSPIRED HER—SHE JUST KNEW. “Nobody introduced me to fashion design,” she notes. “I started sewing by hand when I was a child. My grandma saw that I liked sewing, so she got me a sewing machine.”

BEHIND THE STITCH

Burch was born in Charlotte, North Carolina but moved to the Rochester area when she was 3. During her younger years, she would cut clothes and sew them together as recycled fashion urch Brooke B projects. By college Burch’s sewing skills bloomed into opportunities that led her to New York City and London. Those hustle and bustle environments somehow reflect her work ethic perfectly. “I am a workaholic," she laughs. But since creating Brooke Burch Custom Sewing & Alterations, the laughter doesn't mean she’s joking. “I set my own hours, but usually I have errands to run in the morning. So, it could be anything like going to the bank, post office and then meeting up with my embroiderer for different projects. Then in the afternoon, once the school year has started, I have students come in for lessons. I have clients come in for fittings or pickups. And throughout the day I’m usually on the phone making appointments.” Just another booked and busy day for a seamstress on the rise.

SEWING IN THE TIME OF CRISIS

Since the onset of COVID-19, Burch and her small team have made over 3200 customized face masks, each one as unique and well-made as the other. “A friend of mine is doing some pressing for me,” she explains. “I do the cutting, bring them to her and she presses them. I get them back and sew the masks.” However, small batches of those orders represent more than a face covering. With the increased attention on racial inequality and injustice in the country, the conversation and representation of Black Lives Matter caused an order surge for the business. “We’ve made probably over 250 Black Lives Matter masks, and the orders are still coming in,” she says. “I think people need to know there are Black professionals out here. They probably didn’t

Burch created a custom lace-up back for a dress. She has made over 3,200 masks since March 2020.

even know that some of the businesses around are owned by people of color. It’s shedding light on so many things in our community, and that can only benefit everyone.”

HOW SHE DOES IT

Among the business errands, client orders, face mask batches and classes, Burch knows a thing or two about how to manage her time and a business from home. “You need to be organized, open-minded and try to help your customer in every way possible.” Since launching five years ago, her customer loyalty still surprises her as new and old faces find the third-floor apartment business. Burch’s entrepreneurial spirit comes to light with each opportunity to thread a new order. “I am always thinking of new ideas to make things easier and better. I am also always willing to try something new and work with somebody that I haven’t worked with before.” She may be far from New York City, but Rochester has been a successful home base for her to raise her family and business. “I learned that I have a lot of community support I didn’t know I had,” she says. To learn more about Burch’s services, what she’s currently creating or how to start your first stitch, go to brookeburch.com. ◆ RWmagazine.com November/December 2020

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Anti-Racism 101 TAKING THE FIRST STEPS

BY NICOLE ANDREWS, AUDREY ELEGBEDE AND EMILY WATKINS

DOES HEARING “ANTIRACISM” RAISE YOUR HACKLES? Do you love everyone

equally and “not see color”? Have these beliefs been challenged lately? Because of the murders of Ahmaud Arbery, George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, among many others, people are speaking out and up, and many more are “getting woke” to some realities that they had previously ignored. If you identify as white, you may be feeling squirmy in the face of these challenges to previously held beliefs. It’s more comfortable to focus on problems and issues that affect us more obviously, especially in a year like this. Who has time to worry about racism when dealing with job loss and sick family members? It’s easy to slip into black-and-white, either/or thinking: “I have my own difficulties, so I don’t have time to deal with anything else.” “I’ve worked hard to get where I am today so I don’t have any sympathy for people who haven’t worked hard and don’t have as much as I do.” It’s more nuanced to embrace “and” thinking: “I have my own difficulties, and others have it much worse.” “I’ve worked hard to get where I am today, and I recognize that those with different skin color have to work much harder to get the same results.”

DEFINITIONS OF RACISM

“Racism” is defined in Merriam-Webster as: 1: a belief that race is a fundamental determinant of human traits and capacities and that racial differences produce an inherent superiority of a particular race. Also: behavior or attitudes that reflect and foster this belief: racial discrimination or prejudice. 2a: the systemic oppression of a racial group to the social, economic and political advantage of another. 2b: a political or social system founded on racism and designed to execute its principles.

There are obvious forms of racism, such as white hoods, blatantly unjust laws and cross burnings. These things still exist and are experienced by BIPOC and are relatively easy to speak out against. But racism takes many other, less obvious forms, including microaggressions, white privilege, white fragility and systemic inequalities. The first step is to acknowledge the problem. This involves being willing to step out of your comfort zone and listening to people who have different life experiences.

ANTI-RACISM WORK

Why should anti-racism work take center stage now? At a time where everything feels like it is meant to divide people, do we really need to delve into such a heavy and seemingly divisive topic? The simple answer is yes. Racism is embedded in the structure of our society. It affects health care, education, housing, relationships and politics. It’s the one thing we cannot escape because our government, laws and ideology were built to sustain it. As we near the end of a tumultuous year, we seek clarity and peace, and anti-racism work is a step in that direction. This work requires empathy and understanding without judgment or comparisons. If you experience fear, anger, disdain or any of the other negative emotions while doing anti-racism work, know that it is normal. Growth will happen by leaning into and being curious about the emotions and trying to get to the message behind them. Rochester Women Magazine is committed to lifting up the stories of women whose voices have not been heard and working to dismantle racism. If those seems like lofty goals, they are. And like all big jobs, many hands make light work. We need to gather as many friends as we can on this journey.

Andrews and her son, Patrick Modo. 12

November/December 2020 RWmagazine.com

To best explore this topic, Rochester Women Magazine will be inviting women who have knowledge about and lived experiences with active racism and who engage in anti-racist teachings and practices to provide their expertise. You will meet women who are confronting racist tropes, ideologies and practices in their daily lives in this interactive space. We want readers to become participants and contributors to learn from one another. First, we reached out to local women Nicole Andrews and Audrey Elegbede for their expertise. Each comes to the topic with a different set of experiences and narratives about being a woman in Rochester, and they will help outline an ongoing anthology that will guide us as we undertake the difficult work of learning about and dismantling racism.

MEET THE EXPERTS

Nicole Andrews is a dedicated advocate for children’s education and mental health rights. For over 13 years, Andrews has worked in early childhood education—as a mental health practitioner at Fernbrook Family Center, an early childhood teacher and director at various centers, the early childhood program


coordinator at Gage East Apartments and currently the school readiness supervisor for Rochester Public Schools. Andrews has worked with youth and families across the country in Southern California, Philadelphia, Atlanta and Rochester. Her passion and drive for community service began with volunteering at the transplant house in Rochester and over time has developed into a skillset that has led to her sitting on many boards including the United Way Olmsted County, Families First of Rochester and the Hope Fuse mentorship group. Her devotion to children and families who are in crisis or have experienced trauma is what led her to serve on Mayor Kim Norton’s task force on homelessness in Olmsted County and on the storytelling committee. Throughout the years Andrews has been motivated by personal and professional experiences, leading trainings on implicit bias, early childhood education needs and trauma-informed practices and working on critical consciousness and equity in schools. She continues to strive for equity and access for marginalized children and their families. Audrey Elegbede. PhD, CPC, ELI-MP, assistant professor of ethnic studies at Winona State University, holds a bachelor’s degree from University of Wisconsin– Madison, a master’s degree from Arizona State University and a doctorate in cultural anthropology from Brown University. She has over 20 years of experience in higher education, developing curriculum, holding leadership positions and presenting and publishing nationally and internationally on Critical Race Theory, intersectionality, social justice approaches and anti-oppression pedagogies. Her course on white privilege at University of Wisconsin–La Crosse was

Elegbede, second from right, says, “I want the world to be more welcoming and supportive, to embrace my husband and my children and to see them for the amazing people and the amazing contributions that they give.”

the first catalogued course on the subject within the University of Wisconsin system. Elegbede has taught courses on racial representation in media, social justice, anti-oppression engagement, white privilege and white supremacy, multiracial and multicultural identities, feminism and feminist theory and Islam in the U.S. She is also a disability advocate, a member of the Minnesota Department of Human Services Early Intensive Developmental and Behavioral Intervention Advisory Board, vice-president of the RT Autism Awareness Foundation in Rochester and board member on the Rochester Raiders adapted-athletic booster club. Elegbede has presented to health professionals, academics, educators and service professionals on issues of systemic racism, white privilege, health disparities, culturally responsive service provision, social justice advocacy and intersections of race and ability—particularly autism—for Mayo Clinic, Gundersen Health System, the Wisconsin Balance of State Continuum of Care, Viterbo University and the Chileda Institute, among others. Elegbede is also a certified professional coach with training in Core Energy

Leadership Coaching, COR.E Leadership Dynamics, COR.E Transitions Dynamics and the Energy Leadership Index Assessment (ELI). Elegbede has successfully coached medical professionals, business leaders, entrepreneurs, politicians, TedTalk speakers, educators, students, disability advocates and parents. ◆

ELEGBEDE RECOMMENDS THE FOLLOWING BOOKS AS GOOD INTRODUCTORY READS. “So You Want to Talk About Race” by Ijeoma Oluo

“How To Be an Anti-Racist” by Ibram X. Kendi

“Stamped From the Beginning” by Ibram X. Kendi

RWmagazine.com November/December 2020

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SPRING BREAK HOW TO TRAVEL DURING A PANDEMIC BY ALISON RENTSCHLER

YOU MAY HAVE VISIONS OF SUNNY OCEAN BEACHES OR FLIGHTS FAR AWAY FOR YOUR FAMILY DURING SPRING BREAK 2021. Many people

would like to escape Minnesota after a cold winter and sit on a beach with a book and a drink. But can you travel during the COVID-19 pandemic? And, if so, how can you travel safely?

PLANNING AHEAD

If you choose to travel during spring break 2021, research your options. Consider whether your destination can be reached by road trip or if flying makes more sense. Think about if you may want to travel closer to home this year. You might ask for advice from a travel professional. Sandy Haddick, owner and travel and vacation specialist at Dreams are Forever Travel in Rochester has helped people book travel for several years. She explains, “Planning early is key. People have to realize the world has changed.” She suggests making reservations as early as possible. When buying tickets or tours, Haddick suggests, “Read the fine print. Travel agents are more important now than ever. Make sure all tickets are refundable or changeable. The travel industry is a lot more flexible now.” “One thing that really helps people is that Delta, American and United are having a no change fee beginning in 2021,” notes Haddick. This means they won’t charge fees for ticket changes. Regarding travel changes, Haddick explains, “There’s always a risk, no matter if we are in pandemic or not.” She suggests that people purchase travel protection if they buy tickets for tours or flights and remember to be flexible. “There are so many unknowns,” she says.

TRAVELING DIFFERENTLY

“People need to have patience,” Haddick suggests. “Travel with the right frame of mind and understand things are going to change.” To learn about safety precautions and how airlines are following safety protocols, she recommends asking specific questions from your travel agent and the airline.

Safety precautions in airplanes might include wearing masks, seating passengers with some social distance, and loading passengers from the back of the plane to the front. Passengers may be given a pouch with a snack and water bottle, rather than flight attendants going through the cabin with a beverage cart. In airports, there are social distance reminders and sanitizer stations.

GET PLANNING!

Whether you plan a road trip or reserve airline tickets to a warm destination, take time to review the details, get travel protection and consider how and where you can travel safely. Then start planning your trip! ◆

TRENDS IN TRAVEL

Haddick explains, “Many people are taking driving vacations for a night or two. Lots have gone to the North Shore.” “Mexico has been great for an international destination,” explains Haddick. She says that the resorts in Cancun and the Riviera Maya have health screens and great customer service and are currently at low capacity. While many have been concerned about traveling, Haddick says, “My prediction is that as soon as they have a solid vaccine, then people will be willing to travel again.”

WHERE TO TAKE YOUR BREAK

Haddick says during spring break 2021, “People won’t be opposed to driving vacations.” She says popular destinations for people in our area may include the North Shore of Lake Superior, the Black Hills in South Dakota, Door County in Wisconsin and the Great Lakes. Even day trips can be a getaway. Consider visiting one of the many state parks in Minnesota. Or go to a nearby town and try out a restaurant you haven’t been to before. Visit a museum. Warm destinations will continue to be popular. “There will be a trend of people driving somewhere south,” Haddick predicts. “People can drive to warmer places such as Florida and South Carolina.” No matter your destination, Haddick suggests looking at apartment or house rental options at your destination, in addition to hotels and resorts.

RWmagazine.com November/December 2020

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A Hazy SHADE OF W inter

HOW TO FINE-TUNE THE MOODY BLUES BY MAKA BOEVE

FALL, WITH ITS CRISP AIR, SPICED LATTES AND BLAZES OF COLOR, HERALDS THE START OF A MAGICAL SEASON FOR SOME. For others, it is the beginning of

Danielle tries to go outside daily year-round. She emphasizes, “I need to get fresh air every day to feel alive, and sometimes that means being in nature at its worst.”

I GUESS THAT’S WHY THEY CALL IT THE BLUES

WHAT THE WORLD NEEDS NOW (IS LOVE)

long, noisy, weary, tension-filled times.

Anxiety, depression and feelings of helplessness and hopelessness are common during this time of year. On top of that, increasingly commercialized holidays cause pressure for many to try to achieve unrealistic expectations. Perfect gifts must be purchased. Family drama must be extinguished. Gourmet meals must be prepared. Elaborate decorations must be displayed. Social obligations must be met. Somewhere during the hustle and bustle, the wonderment gets lost. “I hated the holidays,” Danielle, a 57-year-old professional, confesses. “When the weather started to get cold, I felt an impending gloom coming on.” “Static” was the best way to describe the lack of emotion and the loss of interest in fun activities. For close to 30 years, Danielle struggled during the winter. She realized that she “could not be unproductive for half the year,” so she sought professional help to integrate coping strategies into her lifestyle. Dr. Amanda Ward is a licensed clinical psychologist at Olmsted Medical Center. “Some people do experience more ‘blue’ or sad moods in winter—generally this is not abnormal and doesn't necessarily mean that they have depression,” she says. “But, if they find their sad or depressed emotions last most of the day for more than two weeks, and they are finding it hard to take care of or engage in the key areas of their life, like their physical health, work or relationships, it might be time to seek some help.” Untreated depression can lead to serious health complications.

CHANGES IN LATITUDE, CHANGES IN ATTITUDE

Proximity to the equator seems to play a significant role in a condition called Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD). Primarily starting in autumn and lasting through winter, it’s estimated that seasonal depression occurs in 23 million people yearly—that’s 7% of the United States population. SAD generally seems to affect women and tends to get better with age. Michaela, a 32-year-old mother, was recently diagnosed with SAD. She says she struggled for many winters with getting up in the morning, functioning at work and juggling general life responsibilities. “This year it seems to be the social norm to hang out in pajamas,” Michaela laughs, “but I’m getting dressed. Treatment is helping, and I am learning to be positive and kind to myself.” Finland is ranked the happiest country in the world for the third year in a row according to the United Nations’ latest “World Happiness Report.” One factor is that their citizens embrace winter. They participate in various outdoor sports and events that celebrate the change of seasons. 16

November/December 2020 RWmagazine.com

This global pandemic has been one of the darkest and gloomiest times in recent history. Loneliness and isolation, especially in the high-risk and elderly population, have led to a plethora of mental health issues. Suicide rates are rising. Alcohol and drug usage are escalating. Unemployment, financial strain and hunger are harsh realities. Every day the news seems bleak. Before going into a dark hole, know there is always someone to talk to and somewhere to get help. Community resources include teachers, spiritual leaders, health care providers and life coaches. Equally critical is for everyone to reach out and comfort others, practice tolerance and find humanity again.

I WILL SURVIVE

“In addition to some of the standard treatment approaches for major depression, bright light (phototherapy) has been the most researched intervention,” says Dr. Ward. “Light therapy is generally thought to be one of the best treatments for seasonal depression. Increasing physical activity to include exercise and decreasing the time spent asleep, for those oversleeping, are also nonmedication treatments which show beneficial effects. Generally, those who are treated by a qualified professional with a


multimodal approach such as medication, exercise, sleep restriction and cognitive behavioral therapy tend to recover and have longer periods of symptom remission than those who do not.” Some additional strategies for coping with SAD include: • establishing a schedule to practice self-care • checking vitamin D levels • managing stress with yoga, meditation or exercise • getting into a routine, especially when working from home • planning ahead for fun winter projects, special movies or interesting books • disconnecting from the constant news stream • maintaining connections with family and friends A quick note on social media. It’s a great tool for staying in touch, especially in a time of social distancing, but generally it’s not the full story. Use caution when engaging with social media. 

LET’S WORK TOGETHER Crisis Response for Southeast Minnesota's suicide prevention hotline 844-crisis2 (844-274-7472) National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 800-273-8255

National Alliance on Mental Illness 800-950-NAMI (800-950-6264)

DON’T STOP BELIEVIN’

The year 2020 has delivered challenge after challenge for many. These hardships have also provided opportunities for much insight. One unique phenomenon of the COVID-19 crisis is that there seems to be a return to simpler times. People are forced to slow down and rethink their lives. There also seems to be a shift in prioritizing what is important. Michaela demonstrates people can find joy by adjusting their mindset. She and her daughter put together a playlist of happy, upbeat songs. Whenever it is blustery outside, they start rocking out. She shares, “We are horribly out of tune, but that’s fine with us.” ◆

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10/5/20 11:07 AM


A NAmish S E C R E T

TWO ASSAULT SURVIVORS SHARE THEIR STORIES TO HELP OTHERS BY SARA DINGMANN

THE AMISH ARE KNOWN FOR “PLAIN LIVING,” LEADING LIVES APART FROM MOST MODERN TECHNOLOGIES AND CONVENIENCES. STILL, LIKE ANY SOCIETY, PROBLEMS CAN BE FOUND UNDER THE SURFACE. Now, an open secret in some Amish

communities is becoming more well-known—one of rape, sexual assault and incest. Community members know the attackers and the victims, but some turn a blind eye and hide crimes when outsiders or the authorities come knocking. The sexual violence came to light after an investigation by journalist Sarah McClure that confirmed many cases of child sexual assault in Amish communities across the country. The article, published in “Cosmopolitan” in February, featured the experiences of many survivors, including Southeast Minnesota resident Lizzie Hershberger. Hershberger is an ex-member of the Amish community by Canton. She experienced sexual assault as child, and as a teen she was raped by her employer. All her abusers were a part of her community. She never spoke of the attacks until she was in her 40s.

SPEAKING OUT

“I was triggered by a local case, and I had children—teenagers at the time—so that’s really

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SISTER SUPPORT

Through the whole process, Hershberger’s sister Rachel Hawley was one of the few people from the Amish community who stood by and supported her, while the rest of the community sided with her abuser. Hershberger even received threats, leading both her and her sister to take up self-defense measures. Hawley was also assaulted by Amish community members as a child—something she didn’t share with her sister until three years ago. “I think we both sat there with our jaws dropped for a little bit,” Hawley says about when they realized they had both experienced sexual, emotional and physical abuse. The sisters are now committed to helping other survivors of assault from the Amish community. When Hershberger first filed a case against her abuser, she knew she wanted to volunteer for Victim Services. She had to wait until her case was over, and when she could start training, she recruited her sister to get trained too.

Photo courtesy of Chris Renteria.

Photo submitted by Rachel Hawley.

what triggered it,” Hershberger says. Being triggered led her to file a report against an Amish deacon who raped her when she was 14. He was her employer, 28 and married at the time. The local district attorney’s office charged him, and in 2019, he pled guilty to sexual crimes against a minor and was sentenced to 45 days in jail and 10 years of probation. “Many other cases don’t make it to court; my case is so rare that it made it that far,” Hershberger says. Filling a case against her abuser was never about the sentencing, it was to build a case to help others who might report similar abuse. Reporting the crime was also meant to let the Amish community know she was going to use her voice. Hershberger began writing her book, “Behind Blue Curtains,” around the same time she filed her report. She hopes it will be published this year. “I have talked, and that I can keep talking is what I want them to know,” Hershberger says.

Hawley and Hershberger are committed to helping survivors of assault in the Amish community.


As Hershberger’s case was publicized, both Hershberger and Hawley were being contacted by other Amish sexual assault victims seeking help. Both of them realized how much they needed the training to help victims.

HELPING THOSE LEFT BEHIND

The sisters were able to volunteer for Victim Services as soon as their training was completed in September. To further help Amish victims, Hershberger plans on becoming a certified interpreter in Pennsylvania Dutch, the Amish language. Many children are not able to speak anything except Pennsylvania Dutch, preventing them from talking about abuse with police or other outsiders. “The young children, especially women, even if they say they speak and understand English, they really don’t,” Hawley says. Amish children only go to school through the eighth grade, and there isn’t any sex education. Even if victims were able to speak English, they wouldn’t be able to describe the sexual assault. Hawley wants Amish children to be taught good

touch and bad touch, and for everyone, especially women and children, to know they have a voice to say no and report any abuse. The sisters want to see law enforcement holding local Amish leadership responsible for reporting cases when they know something. Both sisters attest that there is great motivation by the community to hide the crimes, especially when they involve incest.

SUPPORT FROM THE OUTSIDE

Laura Southerland, program director for Victim Services of Dodge, Fillmore and Olmsted counties, knows they have to work harder to build trust to help the Amish community. “We recognize that in any community that is a bit more closed, it is going to take time to build trust,” Southerland says. Advocates will make more home visits than with other victims, because of the lack of phone or internet access and not being able to make a trip out to their offices. Southerland emphasizes that Victim Services is there to assist victims with counseling, education about legal operations, crisis intervention and support through legal proceedings. They meet every victim at whatever level they need them and never start with assumptions. Since the Amish may not have access to the internet, many hear about Victim Services through wordof-mouth or are referred by another program. HOW TO HELP People can help any victims of assault or other crimes by knowing how to connect them to Victim Services. For Olmsted county, the main office number is 507-328-7270. You can also call on someone’s behalf to learn how to connect them. “Be vigilant and report something if you really think something is going on. And have it investigated,” Hershberger says. If you or someone you know is the victim of sexual assault, rape, sex-trafficking, abuse or other violent crimes, a 24/7 Victim Service crisis line is available at 507-289-0636. ◆

RW MAGAZINE JANUARY FEBRUARY ISSUE Dig into health disparities Create a winter outdoor oasis Learn about Project Legacy Celebrate... Black History Month Chinese New Year

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PA N D E M I C

Holidays

FINDING SOMETHING TO CELEBRATE IN ANXIOUS TIMES BY KAMELA JORDAN | PHOTOGRAPHY BY AB-PHOTOGRAPHY.US

CHRISTMAS LIGHTS, DIWALI LAMPS, HANUKKAH MENORAHS, KWANZAA AND ADVENT CANDLES— AS THE DAYS GROW SHORTER, THE HOLIDAYS BRING A LITTLE EXTRA LIGHT INTO OUR LIVES. This

Photos courtesy of Ganga Gopalkrishnan.

year the gathering darkness feels especially potent. We need some extra light right now.

From left to right - Ganga Gopalkrishnan, Anushka Kollengode (daughter), Akhil Kollengode (son) and Anantha Kollengode (husband).

The rest of the day is spent enjoying music, creating traditional rangoli designs in front of the house, lighting the Diwali lamps and, of course, eating. In India, each family makes their own specialties to share with neighbors and relatives, and Gopalkrishnan has continued that tradition here in Rochester, sharing Indian treats with coworkers and neighbors. Gopalkrishnan’s family also participates in the puja (worship ceremony) at Hindu Samaj Temple, praying to the goddess Lakshmi for a prosperous new year, as well as in the celebration sponsored by Rochester Vidhyalaya, where partiers dance to Bollywood hits until midnight. With both community events likely to be cancelled this year, family celebrations take on greater importance. “It won’t be the same without the community,” says Gopalkrishnan, “but the spirit of the festival is the victory of light over darkness. I really hope this will bring hope for the end of the pandemic, for light for a new year.”

FAMILY

NEW BEGINNINGS

"Diwali" in the Hindi language is literally the "Festival of Lights." Ganga Gopalkrishnan celebrates by waking her family before dawn for an oil bath—rubbing sesame oil into the skin, then rinsing off with a hot shower. The moisturizing oil bath heralds the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter. By the time the sun rises, everyone is dressed in new clothes ready for a fresh start. 20

November/December 2020 RWmagazine.com

As the daughter of missionaries, Jeannie Byer grew up attending boarding school in Egypt, seeing her parents in South Sudan only during the summers and extended family only every five years. So she especially appreciates being able to gather the whole family together for holidays. Every Thanksgiving, she invites her six children, their in-laws, their in-laws’ in-laws, nieces and nephews, refugees and friends for a giant potluck feast at her church. “Family is so valuable to me,” she says. “When everybody gets together, you’re so thankful for everybody to be there.” This year the big celebration will have to wait. Byer and some of her family members have already had COVID-19, so they understand the need for caution.

Jeannie Byer

Even as she misses the opportunity to gather everyone together, she still finds reason to give thanks. “It does take something away. But I’m still thankful that all the kids are healthy, that they all like each other, that we continue to be a close family.”

HOME

Asian Food Store on 7th Street NW is a holiday shopping hub for Rochester women from Vietnam, China, Laos, Korea and everywhere in between. From cheap, fresh herbs to moon cakes, the overflowing aisles hold all the essentials for their family traditions. Sovanna Meth, a Cambodian immigrant who opened the store with her husband in 1996, celebrates the Chinese holidays of her husband’s heritage, like the Harvest Moon Festival and Lunar New Year, as well as American holidays like Thanksgiving and Christmas.


Photo courtesy of Sovanna Meth.

Meth's husband with his siblings

Running a small business keeps her too busy for three sets of holidays, so the Cambodian celebrations of her childhood have fallen by the wayside, but she doesn’t miss them anymore. “I live here longer than I live in my country,” she says. “I feel I am at home here.” “I love Christmas here,” she says, her eyes lighting up. “Everything is so bright, so light, so much energy when the holiday’s coming.” American holidays are one of the threads that have woven her into the fabric of life in Rochester. On New Year’s Eve, which looms larger in Asia where it isn’t overshadowed by Christmas, the holidays of East and West overlap. Meth’s extended family gathers together for a big meal and spends the day together playing cards or watching television. Since their celebration is limited to the small group of relatives who live locally, they don't plan to change anything this year. “Family is still family,“ she says.

REST

Amy Lindstrom’s family holiday traditions originated as a scheduling trick. Her father’s Swedish family hosted a big Christmas Eve celebration every year, so the December 6 Sinterklaas celebration of her mother’s Dutch heritage provided an opportunity to gather the other side of the family. The Dutch Christmas holiday honors St. Nicholas and his legendary generosity (although the accompanying tradition of St. Nick’s servant in blackface was dropped by the Lindstroms like a hot potato). Children put out wooden shoes instead of stockings and wake up to find small gifts waiting inside.

Part of the Lindstrom tradition was going to a thrift store and competing to see who could spend the least on gifts. “It was really more about the family being together and having fun and laughing than about the actual gifts.” The Swedish Christmas Eve celebrations of her childhood fell by the wayside as older generations passed away, and Amy’s siblings have family traditions of their own now. “As a single adult without children, my holidays look very different.” As director of the Rochester Symphony Orchestra and Chorale and a professional violinist, Lindstrom’s holiday seasons are normally crammed with concerts. “The meaning of the holiday can get lost in the busyness of my profession,” she says. “There have been years where I’m alone on Christmas, and I feel lonely, but at the same time I’m super relieved to have a break.”

Amy Lindstrom

This year most concerts are cancelled, and a large family gathering is unlikely due to her mother’s high-risk health condition and her siblings’ medical professions, but she looks forward to a quieter holiday. “I wonder how early is too early to set up a Christmas tree?” she found herself thinking in September. “I could really use some brightening to the gloom.”

COMMUNITY

Hanukkah, which celebrates the miraculous provision of lamp oil for the rededication of the Jewish temple, is also called the Festival

Chana Greene

of Lights. Chana Greene’s family celebrates at home with all the typical Jewish traditions: oil-rich foods like potato latkes and donuts, singing and eight nights of candle-lighting, gifts and spinning a dreidel for the chocolate coins. But for Greene, who works at the Chabad of Southern Minnesota, a Jewish outreach center on 2nd Street, the community celebrations are just as important. The annual menorah lighting in the Peace Plaza draws as many as 200 people each year, and smaller events bring Hanukkah to various corners of the community. This year, of course, everything is different. The menorahs will still be lit in the Peace Plaza and in front of the Chabad center, but the celebrations will go virtual. A plan is also in the works for a menorah car parade, in which participants will drive around downtown with magnetic menorah on top of their cars and pass out treats. Although the celebrations will look different, the essence of the holiday hasn’t changed. “Whenever I think of light,” says Greene, “I think of how whenever you take a candle to light another candle, yours does not diminish. The world especially right now can feel very dark. When you share the light, goodness and kindness, you make the world a brighter place.” Family, heritage, community, faith—in a time of global pandemic, the way we celebrate changes, but the things we celebrate remain the same, and each of us reaches for the light. Happy holidays, Rochester women! ◆ RWmagazine.com November/December 2020

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Savor F lavors THE

CELEBRATING HOLIDAYS WITH FOOD BY MARGO STITCH | PHOTOGRAPHY BY AB-PHOTOGRAPHY.US

AS THE END OF THE CALENDAR YEAR DRAWS NEAR, A VARIETY OF HOLIDAYS AND CELEBRATIONS SERVE TO NOURISH BODY, MIND AND SOUL. AS DAYS GET SHORTER AND WEATHER GETS COLDER, WE SEEK WAYS TO LIGHT THE DARKNESS, AND WE TYPICALLY GATHER TOGETHER TO SHARE MEALS AND WARMTH. MANY HOLIDAYS, MANY TRADITIONS

“Any time people get together, food is involved,” says Deb Altchuler, of Rochester. Foods traditionally eaten during Hanukkah focus on things fried in oil as a symbol of the miracle when the oil of the menorah, in the ransacked Second Temple of Jerusalem, stayed aflame for eight days even though there was only enough oil for one day. Favorites include latkes (fried potato pancakes, recipe follows) and sufganiyot (a deep-fried doughnut filled with jam or jelly and sprinkled with sugar). When serving these, Altchuler strives “to make the rest of the meal healthy.” Often, she serves beef tenderloin or beef steak as well

as brisket, which is commonly served in Jewish households during Hanukkah. During Kwanzaa, there appears to be few “rules” about what to serve. Soul food and coastal dishes of the Atlantic rim, with traceable roots to Africa or African-Americans, are prepared, often including groundnut or chicken stews and bean or spiced rice dishes. Fruits and vegetables, symbolizing the bounty of the harvest, are common including okra, yams, squash, sweet potatoes and bananas. As I reflect on the main dishes my mother would serve on Christmas Day, beef roast or ham with sweet potato-based side dishes were well liked in our household. My mother’s Sherried Sweet Potato Casserole was one such recipe (recipe follows).

BEVERAGE PAIRINGS

Hosting a holiday open house isn’t complete without a beverage, especially for those “adult-only” evening gatherings. To this day I remember, as a minor, taking a glass of Mom’s famous Mock Pink Champagne (recipe follows) up to my bedroom, lighting a candle and relaxing to music. To offer a non-alcoholic beverage, she often served this tableside as well, particularly when the holiday meal was centered around ham. Note: When pairing wine with ham, consider a dry Riesling, dry or off-dry Rose, Beaujolais or young Zinfandel. Whether it is a meal shared, food to nourish the body, or rituals and the warmth of candlelight to support mind and soul, may the love between family and friends be with all this holiday season.

RWmagazine.com November/December 2020

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ALTCHULER FAMILY LATKES

5 medium Russet potatoes, thoroughly scrubbed 6 scallions, chopped, white and part of the green 3 Tbsp. all-purpose flour 2 eggs, beaten 1 tsp. salt Âź tsp. black pepper 2 tsp. dried parsley flakes, or 1-2 Tbsp. fresh, as desired Neutral oil for frying, such as canola

Finely grate the potatoes (a food processor with the fine shredding blade is recommended). Place the shredded potatoes in a towel, then twist both ends to extract as much liquid as you can. This is best done with two people, over the sink! Once dry, place the potatoes in a bowl. Add the rest of the ingredients. Stir by hand until all ingredients are well mixed through. (The potatoes may darken a little bit but this does not affect the flavor, or once fried, the appearance.) Pour about ½-inch of oil in a large skillet. Heat this until the oil is shimmering. Carefully drop rounded tablespoons of the mixture, or fuller measure as desired, into the oil (Be careful; the oil is hot!). Flatten the latkes slightly using a spatula or a large spoon. Brown on both sides then place on a rack, which has been set onto a sheet pan, or place onto paper towels laid atop sheets of newspaper. Allow latkes to drain thoroughly. Move the cooked warm latkes over to an oven-safe platter or cookie sheet and keep warm in a 175-degree oven. Serve with applesauce and/or sour cream. For an adult taste, garnish with smoked salmon.

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November/December 2020 RWmagazine.com


SHERRIED SWEET POTATO CASSEROLE 8 medium sweet potatoes or 3 (18-oz.) cans sweet potatoes 1 cup brown sugar 2 Tbsp. cornstarch ½ tsp. salt ½ tsp. shredded orange peel 2 cups orange juice ½ cup raisins 6 Tbsp. butter ½ cup dry sherry ¼ cup chopped walnuts For fresh potatoes, cook whole potatoes in boiling salted water just until tender. Drain. Once cool enough to handle, peel and cut potatoes lengthwise into ½-inch thick slices. For canned potatoes, cut large ones in half. Arrange potatoes in a buttered 9-by-13-inch baking dish. (Sprinkle a little salt over if using fresh potatoes.) Combine the brown sugar, cornstarch and salt in a 2-quart saucepan. Blend in the orange peel and juice; add raisins. Cook over medium heat until thick and bubbly; cook 1 minute more while stirring. Add remaining ingredients, stirring until butter is melted. Pour sauce over the potatoes. Bake at 350 degrees for 30 minutes or until potatoes are well glazed, basting occasionally. Note: For saucier potatoes, make half again as much glaze. Serves 8.

MOCK PINK CHAMPAGNE

1 cup sugar 1 cup water 1 cup grapefruit juice ½ cup orange juice ⅓ cup grenadine syrup 1-quart chilled ginger ale

Heat sugar and water together, stirring occasionally until sugar dissolves and mixture reaches boiling. Turn back to low boil and cook for 5 minutes. Remove from heat; cool. Add the juices then place in refrigerator to chill completely. At serving time add the grenadine and ginger ale. Stir slightly to incorporate all. Serve in champagne glasses, goblets or stemmed wine glasses. Makes about 3 pints.

WITH A SIDE OF

Candlelight

I was raised in a Christian family within a Jewish community, and when my family took drives during the holidays to look at holiday lights, we saw many houses with lit menorahs in the front windows. Most year-end holidays use some sort of candle lighting practice.

PARTAKE IN THE LIGHT

Altchuler has an impressive collection of menorahs, from those purchased on travels in the Middle East to one that she and her husband commissioned (it’s a Canada goose!). Each has eight candle holders with an additional spot for a ninth candle which is used to light the others as blessings are said or sung. On the first night one candle is lit, on the second night, two are lit, and so on, until all are lit on the eighth and final night of Hannukah

FEAST UPON THE COLOR

Kwanzaa is an African-based seven-day holiday. The word itself is derived from the Swahili phrase “matunda ya kwanza,” meaning “first fruits of the harvest.” During this time various colored candles are lit and placed in a kinara (candleholder). There is one black candle, representing the African people, three red, representing their struggle and three green representing the future and the hope that comes from their struggle. It has been noted that this holiday has a more spiritual basis than religious. Kwanzaa’s origins began in 1966 when Dr. Maulana Karenga, professor and chairman of Africana Studies at California State University, first created it in response to the “Watts Riots” in Los Angeles the year before. His hope was that this celebration, with its underlying principles, would prove a way to bring African Americans together as a community. Kwanzaa is a weeklong celebration, always observed December 26 through January 1.

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25


: N O I T C CONSTRU

NOT JUST MEN AT WORK

AREA WOMEN ARE BUILDING CAREERS IN PLANNING, PRECONSTRUCTION AND ADMINISTRATION BY TRISH AMUNDSON | PHOTOGRAPHY BY AB-PHOTOGRAPHY.US

THE WARM WEATHER IS GONE UNTIL SPRING, BUT THE HARD WORK OF CONSTRUCTION TRADESPEOPLE CONTINUES YEAR-ROUND. Across the city, residential and commercial

construction is booming, and many men—and women—are busy building the city, from architects and business development professionals to engineers and hard-hat crews. Rochester Women Magazine interviewed three women who play crucial roles in initiating construction projects throughout the community and promoting change to eliminate inequalities throughout the industry.

ADVOCATING FOR CHANGE

at a time. Women workers are growing in the construction sector and adding value to the workforce in new ways. The National Association of Women in Construction notes that, as of 2018, women working in construction account for 1.5% of the entire U.S. workforce. Females comprise only about 10% of the construction workforce, with approximately 9.7 million men

“Real change, enduring change, happens one step at a time,“ said late Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who advocated for women’s rights. Her legacy inspires women to continue the fight, including those who hold roles that are untraditional. Ginsburg and other trailblazers have fought for women’s equality, resulting in change that is happening one step

{

ALYSSA FORDHAM VAGT

{

Principal, Design Director, CRW architecture + design group

BACKGROUND: I went to John Marshall High School and, ultimately, the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee to follow architecture. I have a wonderful and supportive husband, 26

November/December 2020 RWmagazine.com

Brandon, who is also from Rochester, and two beautiful children—a 6-year-old daughter and an 8-year-old son. CAREER INSPIRATION: I provide design input on many different building types, while also leading our single-family residential projects and many multi-family and mixed-use residential developments. I enjoy the strategic compilation of space and form, thinking through the details of how the building and space will be perceived, what the occupant will experience and how to influence that experience for the better, in a way that helps reduce the negative impact on the environment and world around us.

compared to 971,000 women. Of all females in construction, 87% work in office positions and nearly 3% serve as tradespeople. Women are underrepresented in construction for reasons including discrimination and lack of advancement and support. The American Institute of Architects states that half of U.S. architectural students are women, but females only account for 17% of registered architects. Similarly, only 14% of civil engineers in the workforce are women, but 40% of females with engineering degrees never enter the workforce or drop out. Clearly, bigger steps are needed to support and encourage women in construction careers to be successful and close the gender gap.

OVERCOMING CHALLENGES: Stereotypes are associated with construction. There’s still room for improvement and a need for more women in the profession. The greater variety of perspectives and experiences influencing our buildings, spaces and communities, the richer, more thoughtful and inclusive those buildings and spaces become. MOTIVATION AND SUPPORT: The direct interaction with my clients is where I find the most satisfaction and reward. Mentorship programs and organizations like National Association of Women in Construction (NAWIC) offer education, support and networking to help women grow their careers and increase their chances for longevity and success. ENCOURAGING OTHERS: Construction can be a very rewarding industry. My advice for entering the industry is something my dad has always told me: “If you pursue a career that you love, you will never work a day in your life.”


{

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JULIE HERRERA-LEMLER

Project Assistant/Business Development Coordinator Braun Intertec Corporation

{ { VANESSA HINES Civil Engineer Widseth

completely thinking through a problem before deciding on a solution.

BACKGROUND: I grew up in San Jose, California, and moved to Rochester in 1998, where I now live with my husband, Brent, and my son Jayson. My son Julian lives in Minneapolis with his wife, Rachel, and my two grandcats. CAREER INSPIRATION: My construction career started when a neighbor encouraged me to apply for a job at the electricians’ union. Within the first month of working there, I felt at home. I have met a lot of very talented people: geotechnical engineers, field technicians, project managers, drillers and more. OVERCOMING CHALLENGES: There is occasional dismissal for women—or in my case a “double minority” for being Latina. But once you get to talking with people, they see you add value to the job, and they come around. MOTIVATION AND SUPPORT: The local NAWIC chapter is a bright spot in my career. It’s a group of ladies coming together, encouraging one another, raising money for scholarships, supporting other women in our community and encouraging kids to learn about the trades. Rochester Area Builders also is a huge supporter of tradeswomen. ENCOURAGING OTHERS: More people are learning that women bring a different perspective to the job. Employers are more willing to hire females for a variety of positions without the thought of “can she do the job like the guys can?” Of course, she can! Don’t let the low female-to-male ratio intimidate you. There is a reason that there are women on jobsites. Women are natural leaders, and there are many who would love to share their stories with you.

OVERCOMING CHALLENGES: I am fortunate enough to grow up in a generation that celebrates and challenges women to pursue a career path that has typically been male-dominated. In fact, I have the pleasure of working with some incredible women in this industry that have built me up and supported my goals. BACKGROUND: I was born and raised in the greater Seattle area, in Maple Valley. I attended Seattle University where I received a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering. My husband, Nate, and I moved to Minnesota in 2013. We live in Rochester with our Bullador (lab-bulldog mix), Griffey. I was in undergraduate during the recession. I took a free internship with the city of Tacoma because I wanted the experience. I was offered a full-time position after I graduated and worked as a water quality engineer with the city until I moved to Minnesota. CAREER INSPIRATION: I work closely with architects to design aspects of a project that reside outside the walls of a building. This includes things like utilities, sidewalks, parking lots and roads. I carefully consider how pedestrians and vehicles navigate a site, manage storm water and make sure everything meets local and state regulations. My dad is an engineer and always encouraged me to think critically about the world around me. I’ve always been curious about understanding how things work and

MOTIVATION AND SUPPORT: There are more women getting into this industry every year. I’m eager to see how the industry changes over my career. There have been times when I have been talked down to or spoken over because I wasn’t forceful enough. Over the years I’ve learned to stand up for my ideas and push back when someone tries to compromise a design decision. ENCOURAGING OTHERS: There have been great efforts to reach out to younger girls to educate them about the opportunities in the construction industry, with the hope that they will pursue a career in construction. There is so much opportunity to craft a career in the direction of your choosing. There are also so many wonderful people who just want to collaborate and come up with the best project possible. Everyone in this industry has the same goal—to build great projects, no matter the size or budget.

This article is part of a series about women working in the construction trade and covering different phases of the construction process. Next issue: Women who work in the early stages of residential construction. RWmagazine.com November/December 2020

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Photo courtesy of Olive Juice Studios.

JOAN

KOPACZ

BUILDING A PRACTICE WITH CHARACTER, INTEGRITY AND TENACITY BY RUTH MORREY

IN 2007, A DREAM WAS BORN FROM JOAN KOPACZ’S NAPKIN DRAWING OF A WAGON WHEEL. The wheel’s central hub

represented Rochester, and its five spokes were rural satellite locations destined for specialized care in physical therapy. That pivotal night, Kopacz and Brian McQuilkin fleshed out critical core values and a shared vision that a robust team philosophy to patient care was paramount. McQuilkin reminisces, “Joan drew an organizational chart and asked where I envision myself. I chose a low role and she said, ‘Oh no, you are right here (at the top), running it with me.’” Fresh out of his doctorate program, McQuilkin became Kopacz’s equal. Thirteen years, 10 locations, a full complement of staff and 21 team therapists later, operations have well surpassed their initial dream. Together, they have built a rare culture of excellence. This is not your average clinic; this is a high-octane, compassionate and diversified family-style unit thriving on collaboration and learning.

ON EARLY DAYS

Kopacz was born in Kokomo, Indiana, and at age 5, her family relocated to Apple Valley, Minnesota. With humble means, the Kopacz family moved into “the ugly house on the block with 1970s flocked wallpaper and shag carpet.” Home improvement projects and fishing the St. Croix River dominated family free time. Kopacz and her older sister, Kelley, became integral assistants in transforming the home, room by room, year after year. Fixing, puzzle-solving and creative thinking were skills Kopacz learned young and practiced daily. Kopacz’s fiance, Chuck Ramsay, fondly recollects her rental of a commercial-grade jackhammer to break up concrete in their basement during a recent home project. Ramsay carried the heavy, cumbersome tool downstairs and asked Kopacz if a directions manual existed. She shook her head and softly replied, “Do you want me to do it?” No job is too daunting. For Ramsey and their four teenagers (Isaac, Evie, Maddie and Nick), Kopacz models an aptitude for tiling, electrical work, framing, painting and demolition, as well as how to be skillful and fully present while fishing—her true love. Walleye fishing, boating and water living on Lake

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Pepin are the practices that fill Kopacz’s soul and refresh her mind. “When fishing, I only think about fishing. That’s it.” She is also committed to lifelong learning, saying, “Whether it’s fishing or difficult shoulder rehabilitation—I love learning. I’m present. I’m a learning junkie.” As a child, Kopacz’s parents described her as free-spirited, happy, social, creative and tenacious. Asked where her tenacity comes from, Kopacz declares, “My dad.” She chokes up mid-interview to describe the straight-shooting business sense that her father (and business mentor) provides and admits that empathy and understanding are traits gifted by her mother. Coupled with inherited spirituality and family-first values, Kopacz’s industrious, yet compassionate leadership is a family blend.

ON LEADERSHIP

In 2008, Kopacz opened an American Express card with a $10,000 credit limit and Active PT was born. Penny pinching early on, Kopacz operated in a 14-by-14 business suite and traveled to second jobs in the Twin Cities to help pay the bills, all while raising a young family. Her first humble paycheck to herself arrived three years later. Business income was reinvested in the recruitment of people who would sustain the vision. Together, Kopacz and McQuilkin lead by knowing their teammates’ hearts, minds and spirits. The “cultural fit” hiring interview uses targeted questions to reveal character alignment with the practice’s core values. They know each team member’s personality profile and can name their “Love Language,” which helps them better understand how to best show appreciation and respect for each person. “Joan is a poised, but fearless leader,” describes team therapist Courtney Hilmanowski. “She believes in the team, and she pushes each of us to pursue our own passions. She believes anything is possible.” Hilmanowski believes Joan is the “steadfast foundation” that the team leans on. “In good times, and more turbulent times, Joan does not lose sight of our values and keeps our team together as family.”


McQuilkin and Kopacz greet the author at the finish line of a marathon pre-COVID.

Emily Rogers, finance director, states, “Joan is incredibly self-aware. She knows her own strengths and limitations and, with Brian, has formed a complementary team to maximize patient care and success. Joan enjoys helping people chase their dreams—even the dreams they didn't know they had. I wouldn’t be in a finance role without Joan.”

ON PATIENTS

ON TEAM CULTURE

Kopacz, McQuilkin and their colleagues agree that team culture is everything. They genuinely enjoy each other as people. “My advice to anyone who wants to live a more fulfilling life—surround yourself with people who are stronger, smarter and better than you. Just watch how your life will change.” Team picnics, team half marathons, happy hours, family invitations to her lake home

and Love Language insights create energy and camaraderie within the practice. Team therapist Jill Tacl states that she will never forget when Kopacz reached out with a touching personal note at a time when Tacl was adjusting to a new workload. “That meant the world to me.”

Kopacz believes in family, colleagues and patients in all they do. Through stories, she provides inspiration. Through education, she provides hope and patience. Through understanding and compassion, she walks alongside her patients, speaking their language as they traverse the phases of injury together. From devastation, to fear, to buy-in, to an ultimate return goal—whether an Ironman or daily mobility—she immerses herself in the challenging healing puzzles and finds her comfort there. She travels to races, waits by finish lines and becomes inspired by the same people she inspires to stay the path, stay process-focused and believe that anything is possible. ◆

Your ad could be here! Contact Emily at 507-250-4593 to get started.

CUSTOM CABINETRY SOLUTIONS • CREATIVE DESIGNS • CUTTING-EDGE KITCHENS AND BATHROOMS Offering Cabinetry, Interior Design Services, Floorplans + 3D Rendering & Project Management

Jessica Curry, CKD, Owner 507-799-0032 interiorsbyjcurry.com jcurry_square_ND20.indd 1

fl

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CREATING A COZY BEDROOM OASIS BY EMILY WATKINS

AS IT GETS COLDER, DO YOU DREAM OF SPENDING MORE TIME SNUGGLED UP IN YOUR BED, READING OR

WATCHING NETFLIX? HERE ARE SOME EASY WAYS TO CREATE

A COZY, RELAXING AND FUNCTIONAL BEDROOM.

AMBIANCE Quick fixes can include accessories, plants, artwork, lighting, textiles and window treatments. Paul Bennet, owner of Dwell Local in Zumbrota, recommends candles as one of the easiest and lowest-cost ways to add coziness. He says, “Even if you don’t burn them all the time, you get that nice scent in the room.” Bennett adds, “Plants are huge right now. If you don’t have a green thumb, there are great faux plants and wreaths.” And wall hangings can also dramatically change the feel and focal point of a room. He says, “Macrame is really big for wall hangings.” Dwell Local also carries locally made wood mosaics that make for dramatic wall art and even headboards.

LIGHTING Lighting is key, as well. Greg Gill at Northern Lights & Furnishings advises using “some type of general light from a decorative chandelier, ceiling light, recessed lights or a ceiling fan.” He adds, “Wall sconces will provide an interesting ambient light. Accent light can enhance the enjoyment of pictures. Task light is important for reading locations or desks.” Bennett’s opinion is that “Table and floor lamps are cozy and warm.” Choosing the right light bulb can have a big effect as well. Gill says, “With the new LED bulbs you can control the type of light a person feels most comfortable under. You can choose warm white, soft white and cool white.”

COMFORT Textiles are obviously an important way to change the feel and look of your room. Cotton sheets between 200 and 800 thread count are cool, crisp and breathable. Anything over that is too tightly 30

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woven and won’t breathe. If you like the feel of an old t-shirt, you might like jersey sheets, and of course flannel sheets feel cozy and warm on those really chilly nights. Add decorative pillows in your favorite colors and patterns. “Textures are really big right now,” says Bennett. “There are a lot of big nubby fabrics. Going into winter, you want to be bigger, cozier, fluffier.” Bennett carries Kantha recycled hand-stitched Indian sari pillows and throws, which is a “great way to bring in some color.” Rugs are another textile that can add warmth, color and style to your bedroom. Janelle Forliti of Carpet One describes an option that they have: “Pick any style of carpet and can have a custom rug made in the size and shape you want for about the same price as you’d find it in another store.”

VISUAL A fresh coat of paint can work wonders. Dan Harthan of Hirshfield’s says that greys “tend to stay popular.” Benjamin Moore First Light, the color of the year, is a pink with a beige background. When picking a color, Harthan says, “The biggest thing to consider are the other colors in the room. The way your eye picks up color depends on the colors around it.” He adds, “When you come to grab color


samples, even if you have a color in mind, still grab a bunch of colors around it, because lighting makes a big difference in how you see it.” Cheri Struve of Struve’s Paint says that a current trend is adding a wall of wallpaper behind your bed to “add more character.” Another way to express your personality, you can choose anything from classic floral to contemporary geometric shapes. Struve’s also carries many options for window coverings. Room darkening is popular when choosing cellular shades or roller shades that “come in a variety of fabrics and textures.” Their fabric department can create customized roman shades that can also be room darkening. “Side panels on window treatments add softness and absorb sound,” Struve adds. Heavier curtains will keep the cold out and the cozy in during colder weather, while also reflecting your style.

This high end remodel by J. Curry features a deep tub, a shower with glass and engineered stone walls, lots of storage, and polished nickel fixtures throughout. Photo by DM Creative Design.

DON’T FORGET THE BATH Jessica Curry of Interiors by J. Curry helps her clients step through the process of a remodel or addition of a master suite. She says about the bathroom, “The number one thing I ask first is if the homeowner wants to eliminate the tub in favor of a large walk-in shower.” If there’s space for both, that’s ideal, and Curry adds, “A deep soaker tub or bath with bubble therapy or Chroma therapy could be just what the doctor ordered. On the other hand, the way a larger shower can be designed and equipped with multiple shower heads, hand sprayers, a built-in bench, possible steam capacity and body sprays can often take the place of a tub.” Two important aspects that Curry makes sure to address are form and style. A full slab of quartz or granite as shown in this bath is not only dramatic and beautiful, but maintenance is very low. Colors, materials and textures create a feeling or mood in the room. Curry says, “We get to know our clients and what will make them happy being in there every day, from getting ready in the morning to rewinding at the end of the day. Storage is important, as are accessories and accessory placement. The color of metal reflects a homeowner’s style. For example, Curry says, “Polished nickel and rich polished metal gives an upscale appeal, whereas to reflect a farmhouse style, the client may opt for brushed pewter or matte black.”

PLANNING AHEAD Dwell Local in Zumbrota carries Kantha recycled hand-stitched Indian sari pillows and throws.

FUNCTION If room allows, add an upholstered chair in a corner or some mud-painted furniture. And never underestimate the power of a new mattress, according to Elizabeth Timmerman of Rest Assured Mattresses. Not surprisingly, there are many things to consider when buying a mattress, and Timmerman says there are models with lots of “bells and whistles,” such as Bluetooth connectivity and a remote to turn on lights. You might also consider replacing your flooring. Forliti of Carpet One says that the most popular flooring type currently is luxury vinyl in different shades of grey. She advises asking the following questions when deciding what kind of flooring to go with: “Do you have pets? What kind of stain-resistance do you need? Do you want something plush or do you prefer something that doesn’t show vacuum lines or footprints?

One reason that people might want to remodel their master suite is for aging in place. Diane Quinn of Beyond Kitchens says the biggest consideration is safety. Things like high-rise toilets, floors aren’t overly glossy to prevent falls, and grab bars in key places are important. But to minimize the institutional-like feeling, there are ways to incorporate safety features that match your style. A zero-entry shower can prevent tripping or tubs with doors. The main complaint with that last is that a person has to be in the tub while filling and emptying the water, so it’s important to make sure that there are ways to keep the bathroom at a warm temperature. Making sure there is easy-to-access storage at a lower level with a bathtub to minimize the risk of something falling. Although it may not seem like you need these features now, it’s important to be “future aware,” says Quinn. And injuries can happen at any age. Rochester Women Magazine wishes you relaxation and sweet dreams. ◆ This zero-entry steam shower with a fold-down seat and grab-bar was part of a remodel designed by Dianne Quinn of Beyond Kitchens.

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n o i h s a F

STAY-AT-HOME

THERE ARE NO RULES!

BY SAMANTHA ERICKSON | PHOTOGRAPHY BY AB-PHOTOGRAPHY.US

SWEATER: On Track Boutique

PANTS: TerraLoco

choose to get ready these days, or not, is no measure of your value. How you want to feel in your clothing, now that’s important! So, go ahead, dress to impress yourself! Here are just a few trends that stylishly break all of the “rules.”

THIS YEAR, FASHION AND EVERYDAY STYLE AS WE KNOW IT HAS EVOLVED QUICKER THAN ANY OF US COULD HAVE IMAGINED. Tired of the same pajama pants day in and day out,

I set out to explore my personal style for a very new season of life. Through this unprecedented time (#buzzword, I know), I discovered the best fashion rule of them all—there are no rules! I have a difficult time with style guides that give you specifics like how many basic items you should own and any "must-haves" for your lifestyle. For instance, “You work in an office and want to be seen as professional—make sure you own a blazer!” While this approach can be helpful for some, it can also be detrimental to your wallet and confidence if these pieces aren’t authentic to your style. You are as worthy in sweatpants as you are in a suit. How you 32

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LEVEL UP WITH LOUNGEWEAR The way we dress impacts the way we feel, so it’s time to ditch those ratty sweats—even if your version of getting ready for the day simply involves switching from pajamas to loungewear. Taking the time to choose an outfit that you love and feel good in and that expresses your uniqueness is an act of self-care. Matching sets in luxe fabrics with unexpected patterns are an easy pick for hanging out at home and versatile enough to work into your everyday wardrobe. Most stores sell them as separates, so you can get different sizes in the top and bottom for a perfect fit! BUSINESS (EXTRA) CASUAL Whether you’re working from home or back to the office, most work environments feel totally different these days. Comfort is key here, so take some liberties with an updated take on traditional pieces. My favorite is an oversized blazer that feels polished enough for the office yet comfortable enough to throw on for a Zoom meeting from your couch—nobody will be the wiser that you didn’t actually put on pants! Speaking of, ponte pants are another 2020 main staple. Who doesn’t love leggings that are thick enough to wear as dress pants? Pair with a detailed blouse or cozy sweater if your workplace runs a bit chilly. GETTING SOCIAL, AT A DISTANCE Patio season is long gone, but the great outdoors is still one of your safest bets for socializing. Get layered up for hiking or tailgating with your favorites in arguably the


SET: Ama La Vita BLAZER: Ama La Vita

most popular trend of the year: athleisure. Athleisure is a hybrid style of workout, loungewear and everyday basics that will keep you feeling both cozy and put together for any outdoor activity. Invest in a jacket that will keep you warm without the bulk and a pair of shoes or boots that you can actually put some miles on—even if you don’t.

CARDIGAN: Real Deals

DENIM: Real Deals

We had a blast mixing and matching pieces from all of the categories to create looks that were stylish and comfortable! Shopping at local stores supports your local community and is the key to curating a one-of-a-kind look.

SET: On Track Boutique

THINK THRIFT Looking to snap up a few pieces with less impact on the earth and your wallet? Our local thrift and consignment stores are hidden gems. You can find anything from high-quality designer classics to the season’s latest trends. My most recent thrift haul included sweaters, boots, jackets and active leggings—all nearly brand new for around $100. As a bonus, bring in your unwanted pieces in for cash on the spot or store credit to refresh your wardrobe on a serious budget. The 2020 fashion scene has been an almost lawless land (I’m looking at you, Crocs), and 2021 looks to continue the trend. Have some fun exploring style on your own terms this season! ◆

LOCAL TRENDSPOTTING

Rochester experts weigh in on their most-shopped looks customers are loving. “Embracing all the comfy, cozy and easy to style pieces that can bring you from your Zoom meetings to running errands to dinner at your local favorite restaurant, and all things in between.” Ginger and Kennis, Ama La Vita (formerly Blades to Ballet) PSA: this Rochester boutique now carries big-city favorite brand Free People!

“Cozy is key this fall and winter. Whether you’re working from home or venturing outdoors, pieces from prAna, Oiselle and Smartwool are bound to keep you warm and active all winter long.” Tiffany, TerraLoco

“Double hoodies that are effortlessly cute and comfy at the same time, along with soft, oversized sweaters paired with a cute scarf or shawl.”

“Tie-dye matching jogger sets that make you feel good while going with the flow and chunky sweaters paired with the perfect everything pant while keeping it casual.”

Ashley, Real Deals on Home Decor

Brenda, On Track Boutique

Model bio: Justina Proue grew up in Shoreview, Minnesota but moved to Rochester to pursue a nursing career. In her spare time, Justina enjoys rock climbing, creative writing, playing piano and being the “cool aunt.” She looks forward to further developing her career, discovering new places and seeing what the future holds.

Thank you to Hotel Indigo for the use of one of their brand-new rooms for our photo shoot.

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2020 Holiday GIFT GUIDE Ageless Esthetics 2150 2nd Street SW Suite 120, Rochester 507-206-6217 agelessestheticsmedspamn.com Give the gift of glowing skin and confidence with anti-aging treatments like botox, filers, facials, coolsculpting, microneedling & peels that your special person will love! Gift certificates available!

Healing Touch Spa 10 E Center Street, Rochester 507-287-6162 healingtouch-rochester.com Give the gift of massage. $350 - Enjoy a 90-minute Massage with hot stones for two, plus time together afterward to share a fruit platter and champagne. We also offer gift certificates.

Dwell Local 290 S Main Street, Zumbrota 507-202-3815 dwelllocal.com Give local and handcrafted art, jewelry, candles, home decor and furniture. Find fun repurposed and vintage items that are one-of-a-kind.

Little Thistle 2031 14th Street NW, Rochester 507-226-8014 littlethistlebeer.com Give the gift of local beer! Get gift certificates, growlers, crowlers, howlers, apparel, glassware, and newly expanded Brewhouse Memberships for that beer lover in your life.

Tyrol Ski and Sports 1923 2nd St. SW, Rochester 507-288-1683 tyrolskishop.com Give winter outerwear, boots, sweaters, socks, hats, mittens, gloves & neck gaiters in a wide selection of brands for toddlers thru adult. Purchase or lease ski & snowboard equipment.

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Fifth District Eagles Cancer Telethon 507-358-4744 eaglescancertelethon.org Give a gift in someone’s name and support the research that gives hope for better detection, better treatments, better survival rates ‌ and ultimately a cure.

Luya Shoes 236 S Main Street, Zumbrota 507-732-5892 shopluya.com Find fine shoes and other things for that special someone, or give a gift card so she can enjoy the experience of picking out her own gift.

Wild Ginger 320 S Main Street, Zumbrota 507-732-4123 Give the special woman in your life fun and unique clothing or a gift card. Call us to set up a personal shopping experience for her.


Nikki Niles ELIMINATING DISPARITIES IN COMMUNITY SERVICES BY TERRI ALLRED

WHEN NIKKI NILES MOVED TO ROCHESTER EIGHT YEARS AGO, SHE IMMEDIATELY FELT LIKE SHE WAS MOVING HOME.

It reminded her of East Lansing, Michigan, her previous home. “Rochester has a small-town feel without being a small town,” Niles shares. Just like East Lansing, Niles appreciates the opportunities for families and the focus on increasing diversity in Rochester. Really, the only problem with Rochester is that Michigan State isn’t here. As a die-hard fan and alumna, she looks forward to being able to travel back for games.

INTO THE SPOTLIGHT

Niles recently moved into the local spotlight when she was hired as the Olmsted County Diversity, Equity and Community Outreach team coordinator. However, she has been serving our community prior to this high-profile position. She has worked as a probation officer and supervisor in our county since 2012 and even helped develop and oversee Olmsted County’s pre-trial services program.

EXPANDED SERVICES: A VISION INTO REALITY

Niles’ new position oversees three programs. The first, the pre-trial services program, evaluates people who have been arrested using a validated risk assessment tool to determine who is safe to release pending

criminal justice proceedings rather than hold in jail on bail. The bail system in Olmsted County, like many across the country, has traditionally held people who were arrested if they weren’t able to make bail, disproportionately affecting BIPOC and people of low socio-economic status. For people who can’t afford bail, this system created a host of problems, including lost connection with families, housing and jobs, prior to even being convicted of an alleged crime. “The new program takes the ability to afford bail out of the equation, thereby maximizing release, public safety and a return to court,” Niles explains. For the people who aren’t able to make bail because of financial limitations, it can mean the difference between maintaining their lives and losing everything. Niles also oversees a newly expanded Law Enforcement Liaison Team. One of her first tasks is to hire three additional social workers to join the community outreach worker who has been serving in this program for three years since it was established. The community outreach workers complement the work of law enforcement by bringing specialized training to help community members with mental health issues. With the expansion of the program, Niles hopes to also focus on chemical addition issues and homelessness/vagrancy, neither of which are really policing issues. When she was a patrol officer in Michigan, Niles says it would have been very helpful to have something like this to assist her.

Finally, Niles will supervise the Children of Incarcerated Parents Workgroup in Olmsted County. This program will address the needs of children who often experience bullying, anxiety and depression as a result of having an incarcerated parent. The program will also offer support to the guardians of those children. The vision of the program is to offer a holistic approach to support in school, at home and in the community. While the program is still under development, it will be an important part of helping to eliminate disparities in programming publicly delivered by community services.

ADDRESSING SYSTEMIC INEQUITIES

Niles envisions being able to address the systemic inequities, particularly for BIPOC members of our community. Often the initial call for help funnels people into the law enforcement system causing a noncriminal issue to snowball into something else. These programs will allow the criminal justice system to focus on issues related to crime. Ultimately, people will avoid being needlessly criminalized for public health, mental health or substance abuse problems. She also realizes that some of the reparative work requires outreach and connection in the community. “I don’t expect people to come to our doors,” she explains, “especially in a global pandemic. Instead we will educate the community about what is available and be present in neighborhoods that have been identified as impoverished or disparate based on race.” ◆

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November/December Events GATHERED BY ROSEI SKIPPER

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OCTOBER

Mercy to Mankind: A Collection of Masterpieces, Rochester Art Center, Somali-American artist and Rochester resident Ayub HajiOmar explores contemporary matters via the Quran. rochesterartcenter.org THROUGH MARCH 14

The Onward March of Suffrage, History Center of Olmsted County, Celebrate 100 years of Women’s Suffrage with this interactive exhibit. olmstedhistory. com. THROUGH DECEMBER 31

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You Are Here, Lanesboro Arts, Exhibition featuring the work from Twin Cities-based painter Sarah Nicole Knutson. lanesboroarts.org THROUGH DECEMBER 20.

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Achieving a Happy and Healthy Life with Parkinson’s Disease, Virtual, Learn healthy living strategies from local experts in rehabilitation, caregiver self-care and more for patient and supporter well-being in everyday life. exercisabilities.org 9 a.m. to 1:15 p.m.

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Experience the Magic of Lanesboro, Two Saturdays of holiday shopping, food, kids activities and more. lanesboro.com/events

A Christmas Carol, Rochester Repertory Theatre performs at the Rochester Civic Theatre, Using only five actors, this adaptation of the holiday classic brings some of Charles Dickens’ most beloved characters to life. rochesterrep.org/wp/ season/season37 THROUGH DECEMBER 13

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SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY. Shop small and support our local businesses!

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Beethoven String Quartet, Virtual, Celebrate the 250th birth anniversary of composer Ludwig van Beethoven with the Rochester Chamber Music Society. rochesterchambermusic.org

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Turkey Day Run 2020, Lanesboro Historical Museum, Run/walk 10.3 miles along the Root River Trail. Free with a donation for the Preston Food Shelf. fillmorecountyjournal.com/ turkey-day-run

DECEMBER

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United Way’s 15th Annual Power of the Purse, Virtual, Community fundraising event. uwolmsted.org/pop 11 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

NOVEMBER

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Day of the Dead Poets Slam, Virtual, Thirteen incredible poets read their original work and poems by immortal poets who have passed on. deadpoetslam.com 7-9 p.m.

MERCY TO MANKIND: A COLLECTION OF MASTERPIECES 36

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THANK YOU! WE COULDN'T DO IT WITHOUT OUR ADVERTISERS

Ageless Esthetics ...................................... 3

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It’s a Wonderful Life, Rochester Civic Theatre, Live and streaming options available, A beloved holiday classic comes to life as a 1940s radio broadcast. onthestage. com/rochester-civictheatre THROUGH DECEMBER 19

Ama la Vita ................................................. 9 Creative Hardwood Floors, Inc................. 10 Diversity Council....................................... 14 Dwell Local .............................................. 22 Fifth District Eagles Cancer Telethon ....... 40 Foresight Bank ........................................... 6 Gift Guide................................................. 34 Home Federal ............................................ 3 Interiors by J.Curry .................................. 29 Luya Shoes and Other Fine Things .......... 22 Mayo Employees Federal Credit Union ... 10 Melissa Adams-Goihl, Keller Williams ........ 9

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The Honky Tonk Angels Holiday Spectacular, Castle Community, This holiday sequel to The Honky Tonk Angels continues the comic escapades of three good ole country gals as they reunite for a Christmas show like none other. absolutetheatre.org/next THROUGH JANUARY 3

North Risk Partners .................................. 14 Northwest Dental Group ............................ 2 Olmsted Medical Center ............................ 4 Premier Bank Rochester .......................... 17 Project Legacy ......................................... 10 Rochester Civic Theatre Company ............ 6 Rochester International Airport RST ......... 14 Spark Children's Museum ........................ 17 Struve's Paint & Decorating ..................... 10 Visiting Angels ......................................... 22 Wild Ginger .............................................. 22

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Christmas in Rochester, Virtual, Join Rochester Chamber Music for some merry Christmas music. rochesterchambermusic.org

ROCHESTER WOMEN MAGAZINE SUPPORTS BBIPOC-OWNED BUSINESSES. GO TO

rochestermom.com/rochestermn/ guides/rochester-mn-blackminority-businesses

TO SEE A LIST AND TO ADD OTHER BUSINESSES. RWmagazine.com November/December 2020

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Time for Some some

HAIR LOVE MEETING #HAIRGOALS IN ROCHESTER BY ANGI PORTER

EVERY WOMAN HAS HER HAIR JOURNEY. Like tangled strands, the journey has its twists and turns, and sometimes difficulties abound. What products work best? What styles are most flattering? How do we address various hair challenges resulting from damage, aging or just from finding ourselves in a slump? HAIR AND CARE

Folashade Oloye, owner of Cashmere Lux Hair Salon, offers a centering first step. “Loving your hair starts with loving yourself, first and foremost,” she says. And loving ourselves often means embracing our hair and appreciating what it needs. Jessica Amos, owner of Hair Studio 52, urges women to come to terms with what they are willing to do for their hair and be realistic about what effort they are willing to put forth each day: “There are few women who can wake up and have beautiful hair.” In order to meet #HairGoals, Amos and Oloye emphasize that women must devote time and learn the necessary techniques to care for their specific head of hair. Caring for our hair is important. Whether we like it or not, our hair creates impressions in both our work and our private pursuits. “It’s your status, your professionalism. It just is,” Amos says. “You could put the clothes of a millionaire on your back, and they’re not going to look good if your hair doesn’t look good.”

hair care products, including growth oil that specifically helps alopecia. Oloye reminds women to prioritize their scalp when caring for their hair, and she wants women to be informed about the ingredients in the products they buy. “The best thing for highly textured hair is moisturizing and sulfate-free products,” she says. If you happen to be stuck in a rut, it may just be time to change your approach. “We all get stuck in our habits,” advises Amos. “I grew up in the 80s. We all know what hair looked like then! You have to do something different to get different results.” Amos and Oloye show us that Rochester stylists are here to help women reach a new and fabulous destination on their hair journey. ◆

BEYOND YOUTUBE TUTORIALS

So, how can we learn the best path to healthy, beautiful hair? For many 21st-century women, YouTube is our teacher, with its endless choice of tutorials on every hair topic from installing box braids to dying one’s hair. But according to Oloye, not even YouTube can replace the hair love experienced in person, from parent to child, friend to friend, stylist to client. Oloye and Amos are both strong proponents of learning from your friendly, local stylist. The right hair teacher can be one question away. “A really good thing to do is look at someone who has hair like you want, be realistic and find out who their stylist is,” advises Amos. Whether your hair is the coily, wavy or straight, there are stylists in Rochester’s increasingly diverse community who can advise you on ways to surmount hair challenges. “There are so many different hair textures—just like fabric,” Amos explains. Oloye notes that in Rochester, she has seen a particular demand for education around caring for curly, natural textures, and she offers one-on-one hair care lessons to parents whose children may have hair textures different from their own.

SOLUTIONS FOR EVERY HAIR MAVEN

Amos, whose specialty is thinning hair, explains that “one of the greatest emotional impacts is when women have thin hair. It can be a real emotional detriment.” Amos helps women to style their hair and camouflage their scalp so that thinning is not noticeable and they can feel empowered and confident. Oloye notes that many women experience the challenge of track-tension alopecia (hair loss resulting from habitually wearing styles that pull on the hair), and she has developed her own

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November/December 2020 RWmagazine.com

Folashade Oloye and Jessica Amos.

HELP FOR TAMING TRESSES

Cashmere Lux Hair Salon

1915 Greenview Place SW, Suite C, cashmereluxhairsalon.com

Hair Studio 52 2300 Superior Drive NW, Suite 3 hairstudio52.com


Safety first, Safety comes comes first, relaxation follows. relaxation follows.


67TH annual Eagles Cancer Telethon

TOGETHER WE WILL MAKE A DIFFERENCE

JANUARY 23, 2021 LIVE from the studios at KTTC! 2pm - 10pm

CANCER HAS NOT STOPPED, AND NEITHER WILL WE! 2020 has brought many changes to fundraising. Communities small and large have been hurt. The Eagles Cancer Telethon has seen many fundraisers canceled, or delayed due to COVID-19. This year large events have had to be canceled or postponed including the Fools Five Road Race, Lyle Area Cancer Auction, the Owatonna Cancer Auction and many others. Difficult decisions have had to be made that affect our volunteers and organizations that continue to offer amazing support in the fight against cancer. The telethon will go on, but not in the way that you have come to know and enjoy. Keeping our volunteers, donors and guests safe and well is important to us, so this year there will be no live auditions. Talent from past events will be broadcast during the event. Celebrate, honor and support all those affected by cancer via a virtual crowd zoom. Donations will also be scheduled via zoom as well as our interviews and check presentations. There are many changes, but our volunteers are up for the challenge. Look for other fundraising efforts with a new look, including an online auction. Stay tuned for more details! Please be patient as we work through these changes to make 2021 the best it can be. Feel free to reach out with any questions or to donate to the auction. Thank you for your continued support in the fight against cancer. Teresa and Mike Chapman and the Board of Directors of the Fifth District Eagles Cancer Telethon

www.eaglescancertelethon.org

Profile for Rochester Women Magazine

Rochester Women Magazine November/December 2020  

Rochester Women's Magazine

Rochester Women Magazine November/December 2020  

Rochester Women's Magazine

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