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JULY/AUGUST 2019 COMPLIMENTARY

l u f i t u a e B &Strong JENNIFER LAWVER WOMEN WHO CRAFT (BEER) ROCHESTER

l l e T o t y Stor

EVERY MEAL HAS A

HIKING EL CAMINO RWmagazine.com


FOR YEARS NO ONE KNEW SHE HAD MAJOR DEPRESSION. Now, Kate is telling her story to help more people tell theirs.

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It’s time to talk about mental illness. Join the conversation during this groundbreaking exhibit and watch stories like Kate’s come to life. 001.GR.02 MM Credit Panel 26 x 72

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In the past few years, I’ve gone from not thinking about healthcare at all — to not thinking about much else. Between my kids and me, plus helping dad — it can feel overwhelming. But OMC makes it easy. Care for every member of my family, with convenient locations and hours — and some of the friendliest, most helpful staff I’ve ever met. For my family, OMC really is the total healthcare package.

- Sarah

The story of our patients is the story of us. Visit olmstedmedicalcenter.org or call 507.288.3443 to learn more about our services.

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July/August 2019 RWmagazine.com


COVER STORY

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BEAUTIFUL & STRONG JENNIFER LAWVER Redefining the face of the construction industry. BY LAURA ARCHBOLD PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELAINE PARDI

JULY/AUGUST 2019

COMMUNITY 8

ARLYN GAGNON A modern-day Renaissance woman.

BY LEANNA HAAG

11 THE PRACTICE OF SELF-COMPASSION “Through self-compassion, we become an inner ally instead of an inner enemy.”

BY TERRI ALLRED

14 THE GYPSY COWGIRLS

Roamin’ the land, riding fine horses.

BY KAY TESSUM

20

WE (WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS) AT THE TABLE Changing southeastern Minnesota's entrepreneurial ecosystem.

BY MELISSA MCNALLAN

38 ALIVE & WELL Experiencing the past through living history.

BY LEANNA HAAG

HOME AND GARDEN FOOD AND WINE (BEER THIS TIME)

23 WOMEN WHO CRAFT (BEER) – ROCHESTER Sipping and sharing our passion.

BY ABBEY SASS

27 STAGED TO SELL Eye appeal is buy appeal in real estate.

BY KRISTIE MOORE

28 ASK THE EXPERTS Elias Construction professionals share collective knowledge.

BY TRISH AMUNDSON

24 EVERY MEAL HAS A STORY TO TELL Connecting with the food we eat.

BY HEATHER WELLER

BEAUTY AND HEALTH 12 JRK MEDICALS Help for varicose veins.

BY HOLLY GALBUS

30 HEALING RHYTHMS Using music to help others and make a difference.

BY ALISON RENTSCHLER

33 HIKING THE CAMINO PORTUGUÉS My walk into “What’s next?”

BY CONNIE LARSON

34

LAURA WEISS HIKES ACROSS SPAIN Lessons learned from El Camino de Santiago.

BY JEN JACOBSON

IN EVERY ISSUE 7 FROM THE EDITOR 22 MARKETPLACE 36 CALENDAR EVENTS 37 ADVERTISERS INDEX

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MINDY JUNGE is the owner of Junge’s Flooring in Rochester.

She has worked in the industry for 20 years and her passion for flooring continues to grow. Mindy started her flooring career in 1999 working as a Commercial Project Manager for one of the top flooring companies in Minnesota.

The doors of Junge’s Flooring opened in January 2017. Mindy’s goal as a business owner is to offer a positive and rewarding work environment for her employees so that they can grow in the industry just like she did. At Junge’s Flooring everyone is family!

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FROM THE EDITOR

ISSUE 109, VOLUME 19, NUMBER 3 JULY/AUGUST 2019 PUBLISHER

Jorrie L. Johnson, MBA, PMP ® MARKETING ACCOUNT MANAGER

Nikki Kranebell

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Kate Brue Tessa Slisz

ASSISTANT EDITOR

Jen Jacobson

COPY EDITOR

Erin Gibbons PHOTOGRAPHY

Elaine Pardi Dawn Sanborn Photography COMMUNITY CALENDAR

Sara Albertelli

RochesterWomen is published six times per year by Women Communications, L.L.C., P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 Subscriptions available for $24 per year (six issues). Send check to the address above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. RochesterWomen assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2019 Women Communications, L.L.C. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. RochesterWomen magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials. Printed in the U.S.A. RochesterWomen is a member of the Minnesota Magazine & Publishing Association, Rochester Area Builders, Inc. and the Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce.

507-259-6362 • info@RWmagazine.com

Jorrie and Tiffany finish Winona's Trinona Triathalon strong.

Strength

At the end of January this year, my daughter Tiffany and I signed up for the Trinona triathlon. Throughout the winter we went to the Y for Strength Train Together and yoga classes. In the spring, she got a shiny, new silver Raleigh road bike from Bicycle Sports. We worked on our swimming, biking and running. We talked about our training and our goals. Finally, the big day came. We woke up early on Sunday morning, June 9, and anxiously drove over to Winona. Two by two, we entered the perfectly warm water in age waves for the one-quarter mile swim. Then, the 11-mile scenic bike route took us through rolling bluff country. Finally, we ran the 3.1-mile run half way around beautiful Lake Winona and we were done in under an hour and a half. Yes, we were tired afterward, but we are strong. Now, we are looking for our next triathlon, journey and destination. What is strength to you? Is it emotional strength? Does it mean you keep going when you are emotionally drained? Is it mental strength? Is it completing an education or professional goal? Is it physical strength? Strength is visible in many forms. Lindsey Vonn, a native Minnesotan and Olympic Alpine gold medalist, has a book out titled “Strong Is the New Beautiful: Embrace Your Natural Beauty, Eat Clean, and Harness Your Power” (2016). In the book, she gives lessons in strength, fitness, food and attitude. In this July/August 2019 issue of RochesterWomen magazine, meet beautiful and strong Jennifer Lawver, one woman who is redefining the face of the construction industry (page 17). She not only operates heavy equipment, she also develops property and serves on the Rochester Area Builders board of directors. Lawver takes care of her body through nutrition, exercise and body building. We continue our series on self-worth with an article about “The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook” and workshop (page 11). Practicing unconditional acceptance toward ourselves takes strength, particularly when we are in difficult situations. To have a stronger, healthier relationship with food and the community, read “Every Meal Has a Story to Tell” (page 24). Meet a few restauranteurs and find out how they use locally grown and produced food. It is my pleasure to announce that I have taken a project manager position with the City of Rochester to oversee women and minority owned business goals and workforce participation for Destination Medical Center projects. I am honored to have the opportunity to serve as a public employee. This means I will be changing my role at RochesterWomen magazine. You are beautiful, confident and worthy!

RWmagazine.com For advertising information: 507-254-7109

We want to hear from you! Send comments, suggestions, ideas or original recipes to: RochesterWomen Editor, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903-5986 or email: editor@RWmagazine.com. RWmagazine.com July/August 2019

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WOMEN IN ART

ARLYN GAGNON

A MODERN-DAY RENAISSANCE WOMAN BY LEANNA HAAG

ARLYN GAGNON IS NOT A TYPICAL 80-YEAR-OLD WOMAN.

Though she sports two titanium hips and partially titanium knees, Gagnon proudly guides tours for the sculpture museum she owns and operates in her Rochester home. The museum—which Gagnon co-designed—displays original bronze sculptures created by her husband, the late Charles Gagnon, whose works also reside in collections in Japan, Belgium, England, Germany and various places in the United States. Gagnon actively participates in the Rochester art community through her involvement in the Heart of the City project and her continued publication of educational art materials for children. SILENT VOICE Gagnon has dedicated her life to communicating with others through what she calls the “silent voice” of art. The first of her family to achieve a college degree, Gagnon pursued a career in art education; she attended graduate school at several universities across the country, including the Art Students’ League of New York City. Gagnon began her professional career by teaching college art. In 1963, Gagnon accepted a dual position as assistant director and director of the children’s art program at the Rochester Art Center, where she met her future husband. After their marriage and a time in Italy, the couple settled back in Rochester, where they pioneered an art therapy program with Rochester State Hospital. The program flourished under their care for 28 years. Gagnon’s work there led her to aid other organizations dedicated to serving mentally handicapped children and alcoholic Catholic priests through rehabilitative art.

AMBASSADOR OF WORLD PEACE Apart from her medical collaborations, Gagnon spent significant amounts of time in the studio creating artwork with her husband. “We worked together—as friends, as a team and as husband and wife,” says Gagnon. Gagnon was involved with the creation of her husband’s most famous local piece: the Peace Fountain. Commissioned by the City of Rochester in 1987, the fountain resides in the Peace Plaza (named by Gagnon herself). It features a column of doves joined at the wings and is suspended over a reflective basin. Together, the birds represent the 50 states, the seven continents and the past, present and future. Gagnon explains that the 12-foot height of the sculpture works to literally and figuratively uplift the viewer’s gaze. The fountain, along with its sister sculpture in Germany, is dedicated to world peace and inspires cooperation between the elements of old and new. 8

July/August 2019 RWmagazine.com

ADVOCATE FOR THE FUTURE According to Britton Jones, a Coen+Partners landscape architect developing the Heart of the City project, Gagnon expressed particular dissatisfaction with the restrictiveness of the fountain’s current layout. Jones says, “Especially in museum settings, you’re only meant to see (art and sculpture). You can’t touch them.” Gagnon desires something better for the Peace Fountain. Her belief in the power of tactile art inspired the design for a new column base and reflective pool that will enable visitors to touch the stone, water and bronze of the sculpture. Gagnon herself speaks in glowing terms about the new design, calling it a “magnificent” and “beautiful blend of old and new.” The renovation, she believes, will accentuate the healing qualities of the fountain and the peace it offers to observers. The healing message of art is one that Gagnon hopes to communicate to the Rochester community at the 30th-birthday celebration of the Peace Fountain in the Peace Plaza in June, when Heart of the City designs will be revealed. While she has engineered much of the Peace Fountain’s current success, Gagnon humbly recognizes those who have helped her reach her goals. “I am one woman, but I could not do any of this without the others in my life,” Gagnon says. Her gratitude echoes the self-transcending message that the Peace Fountain inspires and her own words confirm. “If any of us think beyond ourselves, those are good moments.” Leanna Haag is an intern writer for Rochester Women magazine and is a senior at St. Mary’s University Minnesota. The Gagnons pose in front of a newly-constructed Peace Fountain.


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SHOP HOP AUGUST 9 & 10

Northfield Yarn is always worth a visit, but we promise even more fun if you stop by during South West Yarnquest, Minnesota’s only scavenger-hunt-style shop hop. • Each shop will have an exclusive new color of hand-dyed yarn --plus a new custom pattern! • Participants can qualify to win a Grand Prize worth $125!

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SELF-WORTH

THE PRACTICE OF SELF-COMPASSION

“THROUGH SELF-COMPASSION, WE BECOME AN INNER ALLY INSTEAD OF AN INNER ENEMY.” - KRISTIN NEFF BY TERRI ALLRED

MANY OF US HAVE HEARD ABOUT SELF-CARE AS A SOLUTION TO OUR OVERWORKED, STRESSED-OUT LIVES. Entire

industries are devoted to promoting products and services to support us in our journey of self-care. While self-care is certainly important, there is a growing understanding that the practice of self-compassion can give us a greater ability to cope with life’s stressors. DEFINING SELF-COMPASSION

According to The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook, “Self-compassion involves treating yourself the way you would treat a friend who is having a hard time—even if your friend blew it or is feeling inadequate, or is just facing a tough life challenge.” The practice of self-compassion involves three core elements. First, self-kindness is the practice of being as kind and caring toward ourselves as we are toward others. Instead of judging or berating ourselves for mistakes or difficult feelings, we practice unconditional acceptance toward ourselves, particularly when we are in difficult situations. Second, recognizing a sense of common humanity is vital to self-compassion. Pain and suffering are shared human experiences, not unique to any individual. When we acknowledge that we are interconnected with others, moments of pain and suffering are transformed into opportunities for connection with others. The third element of self-compassion is mindfulness. “Mindfulness involves being aware of moment-to-moment experiences in a clear and balanced manner,” according to The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook. When we respond

to our own suffering with mindfulness, we create a moment when we are present with our pain to feel compassion for ourselves.

MINDFUL SELF-COMPASSION This past winter, Deb Newman, a retired psychiatrist and member of Compassionate Rochester, facilitated an eight-week discussion group to apply the principles she was learning from The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook. She will be one of the facilitators of a second discussion group offered at Assisi Heights Spirituality Center this fall. She explains, “When you’re talking about self-care, people generally think about it in terms of setting better boundaries and taking care of yourself (e.g., exercise, yoga, etc.). However, both of those fall outside what you do in the middle of the moment of distress. Self-compassion is in the moment—an immediate response to stress.” As a lifelong member of a helping profession, Newman was particularly struck with what she learned about the difference between empathy and compassion. An empathic response focuses on identifying with the feelings of the person who is suffering. A compassionate response focuses on holding space for the person who is suffering but not taking on that suffering as your own. This distinction is particularly important for those in helping professions who often suffer from empathy fatigue because of taking on too much of others’ suffering.

BECOME A COMPASSIONATE MEMBER OF OUR COMMUNITY Several years ago, Compassionate Rochester was formed to grow and promote a culture of compassion in our community. Catherine Ashton, the founder of Compassionate Rochester, shares, “Often, people will resonate with the idea of compassion and want to learn more about it. Their initial definition of compassion is often

focused on compassion for another. The practice of self-compassion is about a deep compassion for yourself. It becomes an awakening for a person so that they are better able to be a compassionate member of our community.”

PRACTICE SELF-COMPASSION Kristin Neff, author of The Mindful SelfCompassion Workbook, suggests this three-step contemplation to practice self-compassion: Place your hands on your heart and feel the warmth. Breathe deeply in and out. Speak these words to yourself: This is a moment of suffering. Suffering is a part of life. May I be kind to myself in this moment. May I give myself the compassion I need.

Facilitators and instructors: Paula Smith, Sister Marlys Jax, Deb Newman and Cathy Ashton

MINDFUL SELF-COMPASSION WORKSHOP If you want to learn more about self-compassion, you are invited to join a discussion about The Mindful Self-Compassion Workbook, held at Assisi Heights Spirituality Center on September 9, 16, 23, 30, and October 7, 14, 21, 28. Cost is $24 and pre-registration is suggested at rochesterfranciscan.org/spirituality-center. Terri Allred is the SE Regional Coordinator for the Minnesota Council for Nonprofits.

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WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS

JRK MEDICALS HELP FOR VARICOSE VEINS BY HOLLY GALBUS Founder and medical director of JRK Medicals, Dr. Henna Kalsi.

SUMMER IS HERE, A TIME TO TOSS OFF THE HEAVY WINTER WEAR AND DON SHORTS AND SUNDRESSES FOR A DAY OUT IN THE SUNSHINE. Unfortunately, for many, it can be a time of increased body

consciousness, including noticing varicose veins. They’re quite common—one in five adult Americans suffer from varicose veins, defined as enlarged, distended, bulging veins, typically on the legs and feet. Varicose veins affect an estimated 40% of women and 25% of men. Treatment options vary depending on the severity of the varicose veins, but for those whose veins are less prominent, commonly referred to as “spider veins” —the treatment can be relatively quick and simple. JRK MEDICALS

Dr. Henna Kalsi is the founder and medical director of JRK Medicals, a new vascular medicine clinic at 2633 Superior Drive NW in Rochester. In her practice, Kalsi treats varicose veins in an outpatient, non-surgical procedure. Prior to founding JRK Medicals, Kalsi completed fellowships in vascular medicine at Mayo Clinic and Cleveland Clinic. She served as a vascular medicine consultant in the Cardiovascular Medicine Department at Mayo Clinic in Rochester for 10 years. She and her team treat varicose veins as an office procedure, without the need for general anesthesia and requiring little recovery time. Kalsi begins a consultation by taking a detailed health history to determine what’s causing leg pain or other symptoms. She explains how a variety of reasons could cause swelling or pain in the legs, such as varicose veins, peripheral artery disease, lymphedema, arthritis or even problems with the thyroid or kidney. She then performs a complete physical exam, which may include an ultrasound. A discussion on a course of treatment follows the exam.

HOW VARICOSE VEINS DEVELOP

Varicose veins develop with weakened vein walls and faulty valves. Under a variety of circumstances, normally toned and elastic 12

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vein walls can become weak, allowing blood that should be moving toward your heart to flow backward. One-way valves in these veins—which open and enable blood to flow through on its way upward, then close to stop blood from flowing backward—can also fail to function properly. This allows blood to pool and pressure to build, which further weakens and damages the veins, causing them to become twisted, enlarged and painful. In addition, loss of calf-muscle pump function can affect blood return back to the heart.

COMMON PROCEDURES TO TREAT VARICOSE VEINS

For less severe varicose veins, Kalsi performs sclerotherapy. In this procedure, which takes about 20 minutes, veins are injected with a sclerosing solution that obliterates the lumen, or interior, of the vein. Most patients require two or three sessions, and touch-ups once a year may be needed. But, immediately after the procedure, most people may return to work and have no lifting restrictions. Larger veins are often treated with ultrasound-guided foam sclerotherapy. For more severe varicose veins, endovenous thermal ablation is performed. This procedure has replaced the traditional “vein stripping” of the past. The procedure takes approximately

45 minutes and doesn't require anesthesia, and patients are able to walk out of the office afterward. Most people require two to five days off from work to recover. Kalsi says the results of vein procedures done in her office can be immediate and are more than 95% effective. There is minimalto-no scarring. There may be slight swelling and minimal bruising around the treatment site, but once that subsides, you'll see a significant difference in the appearance of your legs. If you would like to explore less invasive options, a line of herbal supplements as well as compression stockings are available in the offices of JRK Medicals. For more information, or to schedule a consultation, email contact@ jrkmedicals.com or call 507-322-6900. Holly Galbus is a freelance writer and news reporter.


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COMMUNITY

Gypsy Cowgirls

ROAMIN’ THE LAND, RIDING FINE HORSES BY KAY TESSUM PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

FOR MANY YEARS WE WERE MOMS SUPPORTING OUR KIDS IN THE 4-H HORSE PROJECT. As it is in life, the kids moved on, but the

horses stayed. It was a pivotal moment for us—ride them or sell them. We chose to ride them. BECOMING THE GYPSY COWGIRLS Some of us had horseback riding experience. Some came from a farm background. One of us (me) had no experience at all. We started slowly with short rides around the area. As we grew braver, we started venturing out to new lands. This led us eventually to ride in 14

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South Dakota, Wyoming and many other places. We have now been riding together for over 25 years. As we got older and retired, with aged horses, we made another life-altering decision. Even though we continue to ride our horses locally, we decided to leave them at home and take on a new challenge. We would venture

out without our horses, ride new and beautiful lands, rent horses wherever we went and learn new things about our country, thus our name, Gypsy Cowgirls.

A STABLE GROUP Over the years some cowgirls have come and gone, but our group remains “stable.” Our first ride was at Gettysburg National Monument. One of the cowgirls saw that the TV show “America by Horseback” was having a filmed ride there. We rode the battlefields of the north on a three-hour


COMMUNITY

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Gypsy Cowgirls: Kay Tessum, Jeri Schoonover, Mary Wellik, Jill Christy, Becky Hughes Borst and Audrey Lidke (not pictured: Dr Becky Bailey).

guided tour. We then rode the southern battlefields, another three-hour tour. Our second ride took us to Asheville, North Carolina, to ride at the famous Biltmore Estate. This was a beautiful rolling ride that took us right in front of the mansion. We also rode through Dupont Forest, the site of the filming of the movie “The Hunger Games.” We went to small, local craft museums and up to one of the trailheads of the Appalachian Trail. We spent one day at the beautiful Tryon International Equine Center. This is the location of the first FEI World Equestrian Games in the U.S., which was held last fall.

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA The criteria for choosing our destinations include good and safe horses, warm weather, lots of history and great food. We

often say to others, “We came for the horses, but we stayed for the food.” This spring we traveled with seven cowgirls to Tybee Island and Savannah, Georgia. We Call today to schedule your healing energy session! flew into Jacksonville, Florida and drove up Garden of Massage the Atlantic Coast to Tybee Island, stopping Rosemary Schliep, LMT along the way at Jekyll Island and St. Simons 507-358-6606 • GardenOfMassage.com Island. Our vacation rental was on the beach on Tybee Island, an area of about three square miles. Our horseback ride was scheduled for GardenOfMassage_JA19.indd 1 COME CELEBRATE 6/14/19 3:43 PM the next day on Daufuskie Island, a small island Women in Construction a 30-minute water-taxi ride away. Featured Guest Jennifer Lawver, owner of Daufuskie was settled by the Gullah, a group Earth, Road, Home (ERH) Developing, Inc. of freed slaves, after the Civil War. The terrain is varied, and the history is deep. Our riding stable was a short golf-cart ride away through Tuesday, moss-laden trees and gravel roads. Our original August 6th goal was to ride on the beach; however, due to it being turtle nesting season, we were 4-6 p.m. only allowed to go so close. We rode over Twigs Tavern two hours with our equine guide who was an & Grille environmental biology graduate. She narrated many facts and stories about the area. Later in Respond to let us know the week, we had a sea-horse adventure. you are GOING on the It is said, “You must go on adventures to Facebook event: find out where you truly belong.” I would add Celebrating Women one more thing to that statement: “Surround in Construction yourself with people who make you hungry for life, touch your heart and nourish your soul.” I would say this beautifully sums up our group. We are in the process of planning Sponsored by next year’s trip, so any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. Kay Tessum is a retired Rochester teacher. She is the mother of two and grandmother of three. She and her husband Steve live on a horse acreage near Rochester.

RWmagazine.com ! RWmagazine.com July/August 2019

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Recognizing Female Professionals in the Construction Industry From left to right: Leslie McGillivray-Rivas/WSB & Associates, Inc., Shelly Bahlmann/Rochester Area Builders, Inc., Rebekah Nielsen/Rochester Area Builders, Inc., Jennifer Lawver/ERH Developing, Inc., Hilary Stonelake-Curtis/Dunlap & Seeger PA, Alissa Moe/Cambria, Audra Bolduan/Rochester Area Builders, Inc.

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COVER STORY

l u f i t u a e B &Strong JENNIFER LAWVER

REDEFINING THE FACE OF THE CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY BY LAURA ARCHBOLD PHOTOGRAPHY BY ELAINE PARDI

IT’S BEEN SAID THAT TRUE BEAUTY CAN BE FOUND IN A WOMAN’S STRENGTH AND GOES BEYOND WHAT IS SEEN ON THE SURFACE. Jennifer

Lawver’s strength is undeniably beautiful, as her inner qualities of courage, tenacity and resilience radiate for the world to see.

A trailblazer, Lawver has been breaking ground and building the future in a predominantly male-dominated construction and development industry for over a decade. She has touched all facets of the industry—heavy machine operation, land purchasing, site design, home building and real estate sales. Lawver owns and operates ERH (Earth. Road. Home.) Developing, Inc., and with her husband she is developing Serenity Hills and Catalina Ridge properties. Lawver also serves on the Rochester Area Builders board of directors.

She’s comfortable on the construction site moving dirt or inside the city council chambers working with planning and zoning boards.

EARLY FOUNDATION SET THINGS IN MOTION Lawver’s interest in the construction industry can be traced back to her childhood growing up on a large fourth-generation family farm outside of Chatfield and Stewartville. Although she didn't realize it, being around large equipment and wide-open spaces allowed Lawver to have a sense of adventure that would become foundational. “I loved growing up on the farm. Being outside and exploring nature trails, catching crayfish and snapping turtles in the creeks and streams,” she beams. “It was so much fun. I wasn’t afraid to get my hands dirty.” Lawver has fond memories of driving large equipment like tractors and

combines. She also remembers scaling hundreds of feet into the air alongside gravity bins and climbing into corn silos. Attending Stewartville High School, Lawver did post-secondary coursework at Rochester Community and Technical College. Through her studies, she was exposed to the world of interior design, discovering she enjoyed it and had a natural talent for putting together different textures and layers. She received an associate’s degree in interior design and pursed a business degree at Saint Mary’s University. Lawver was introduced to her husband, Tobin, while working at Beetle’s Bar and Grill. He owned a business with crews digging, framing and building houses. They had a strong connection immediately and discovered similar interests including the love of being outdoors. “After dating for about a year, around Christmas time, he RWmagazine.com July/August 2019

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COVER STORY

After they married, Lawver got into the business and tried her hand at excavating and operating heavy equipment. It proved to be a fit as she had natural aptitude with great attention to detail, a sense of balance and peripheral awareness. “On the construction site there are so many moving parts. The 12- to 14-hour work days can be mentally exhausting. The bulldozer is one of the strongest and heaviest pieces of equipment in the industry, and it’s a dangerous job. You have to constantly be paying attention and have the highest level of alertness,” Lawver explains.

CREATING AWARENESS FOR DIVERSITY AND INCLUSION In a mostly male-dominated industry, Lawver has felt disrespected because she’s a woman. In the same breath, she’s quick to point out that adversity should be met head-on with resolve and confidence. “Although I can get frustrated, I’ve always tried to take emotions out of situations. I’m straight to the point, confident in my abilities and won’t back down when it comes to moving things forward,” she says. Despite some resistance, she’s also met champions along the way who have advocated on her behalf and have been open to collaboration. “I represent a change in the industry. If I’m not developing goodwill along the way, nothing will ever change. I love this community and am committed to helping it grow through collaboration and working together.” 18

July/August 2019 RWmagazine.com

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, nationwide, the need for construction workers and laborers is expected to grow faster than other industries through 2026. With Destination Medical Center in full swing, local construction will continue steadily into the foreseeable future. “It’s an exciting time to be in the industry. Corporations and federal and state government agencies all want to do business with disadvantaged companies. More women should get into this field,” says Lawver. She has dreams of one day starting a nonprofit to help with awareness and training.

Lawver took matters into her own hands and joined Northgate Fitness Club, where she enrolled in a weightloss program and began lifting weights. Her endurance and dedication paid off when she entered her first bodybuilding competition in 2017 and took first place in her class for bodybuilding. She continues to compete regionally, garnering more titles. The ripple effect of leading a healthy lifestyle has a broader reach as Lawver sees the impact on her family. “The other day my daughter asked what she should have for a healthy dinner. She went on to ask if chicken had protein and if broccoli was a healthy choice. She then said that she knows she shouldn’t eat candy if she hasn’t had something healthy first.”

STRENGTH FROM HER FAMILY AND A POSITIVE ATTITUDE

Photo by Kegan Stewart.

asked my dad for permission to marry me,” Lawver said. “My mom and dad are pretty old school, and it meant a lot to them to honor the tradition.”

BODYBUILDING OFFERS A SENSE OF MASTERY FOR NEW CHALLENGES Lawver makes time to take care of herself. She focuses on taking care of her body through nutrition, exercise and bodybuilding. Her driving force has been about personal achievement and determination that goes hand in hand with her overall outlook and perspective on life. When Lawver gave birth to her son Christian, she gained 80 pounds and had a hard time taking the weight off. Years later her daughter Emma was born, and she gained 50 pounds and the stubborn weight came back, in addition to having low energy. “I was in my late 20s and in the worst shape of my life. I just wasn’t happy with myself. When you’re unhappy with yourself, it makes everyone around you unhappy too,” Lawver explains.

Lawver is thankful that she found her life’s passion and calling at such a young age. She attributes her success to the strong foundation of support she had from her family. “My mother, when she was alive, was an amazing person. She was a very strong woman, outspoken and confident. Everybody who knew her loved her. I always felt her support and love. My father worked so hard and provided a solid foundation for our family. As a result, we could pursue our dreams and ambitions. Now as a parent, I reflect back and really appreciate my parents and upbringing as it allowed me to become the strong woman that I am today.” The future looks bright for Lawver as she continues to grow an inner strength that sends an empowering message to other women. “Women need to take care of themselves. It’s not selfish to take care of yourself and put some of your needs first. When you build yourself up first, you will know who you are and what you want out of life—you will find your purpose,” advises Lawver. Laura Archbold is the owner of Encore Public Relations, a communication, public relations and marketing consulting firm that crafts purpose-filled narratives that inspire, educate and unite to make the world a better place.


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COMMUNITY

WE

(WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS)

AT THE TABLE CHANGING SOUTHEASTERN MINNESOTA'S ENTREPRENEURIAL ECOSYSTEM BY MELISSA MCNALLAN

passion for women entrepreneurs,” explains Beech. “Little has been done to empower them. I didn’t have a lot of role models. I didn’t have a lot of people saying, come here let me show you how this is done.” Heather Holmes is a project manager for Journey to Growth, an economic development initiative with Rochester Area Economic Development, Inc. (RAEDI). She also runs her own marketing communications business, HH Solutions. Holmes used to call herself a solopreneur. “Some people feel that they are an entrepreneur, but are less recognized for their contributions because they are service-related, not product-related. I provide a service.” Holmes now identifies more as an entrepreneur.

"FUNDING SOURCES" FORUM

Dr. Christine Beech and Heather Holmes.

IT BEGAN WITH COFFEE AND A CONVERSATION AT DUNN BROTHERS COFFEE ON ELTON HILLS DRIVE NW.

Dr. Christine Beech had an idea for something new to provide Rochester’s evolving entrepreneurial ecosystem: an academically focused forum for women entrepreneurs. She wanted to run that idea by Heather Holmes. WOMEN BEHIND WE (WOMEN ENTREPRENEURS) FORUM Beech is the director of the Kabara Institute for Entrepreneurial Studies and a business professor at Saint Mary’s University of Minnesota. “I create connections between our students and the entrepreneurial ecosystem,” Beech says of her current work, 20

July/August 2019 RWmagazine.com

expressing the importance of the practitioner and scholar coming together. Entrepreneurship reaches beyond the academic for Beech. Prior to becoming an educator, she built up a business line that spun off when it reached $21 million. She also started a boutique consulting firm that she ran for 15 years. “I have a particular

Beech and Holmes planned their first WE Forum, “Funding Sources.” They planned an opportunity for women entrepreneurs to participate in tabletop discussions on the topic of funding and to join a research study on the funding of the women entrepreneurs in southeastern Minnesota. A panel of experts in venture capital, angel investing, revenue generation, lending and grants shared their thoughts on funding female entrepreneurship and offered tips for navigating the challenges of fundraising for female founders. More than 90 people signed up to attend the event held on January 22, 2019 at the Cascade Meadow Campus. Despite the weather and school closures, venture capitalists made the drive (from as far away as Minneapolis) to share their expertise, and approximately 50 women made it to the event that morning.


(Left to right) Melissa Brinkman, Christine Beech, Lisa Clarke, Kathleen Harrington, Heather Holmes, Mayor Kim Norton and Cindy Steinhauser.

BUSINESS PLANNING AND LEADERSHIP WORKSHOPS Following their first successful event, the duo hosted a business planning workshop in March 2019. In the workshop, Beech taught attendees how to use the Business Model Canvas, an interactive and simple tool for focusing on the nine building blocks of a business model. The goal was for attendees to walk away with their own business model for success. In April 2019, they held a panel called "WE Women in Leadership—Building on Your Strengths." Five panelists discussed everything from pervasive micromessaging and embracing power to the collisions between ambition and parenthood. Panelists included local leaders: CEO of Custom Alarm Melissa Brinkman; executive director of Destination Medical Center Economic Development Agency Lisa Clarke; Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce president Kathleen Harrington; mayor of Rochester Kim Norton, and community development director for City of Rochester Cindy Steinhauser. “They didn’t try to sugarcoat anything,” says Holmes, who moderated the event. “It felt like being inside an intimate conversation.” More than 100 women attended the April event. “More and more women are coming to the table,” Holmes observes. “We’re not going to wait anymore to be invited.”

WE FORUM IS FOR YOU “We were just going to do one,” says Holmes. “Then, the response was

phenomenal. That’s when we started to put together a series.” The series is comprised of alternating panels and workshops, with panels preceding workshops. The workshops relate to the prior panel discussion. “The workshops offer entrepreneurs the nuts and bolts they need to improve an aspect of their business,” says Beech. “It’s free education given in the hopes to fill in some knowledge gaps that entrepreneurs may have.” She points out that many entrepreneurs haven’t gone to business school. Instead, they’ve taken an idea or passion and built a business around it. “The workshops give real solid, usable skills that women can use for whatever path they’re on—however they identify themselves,” says Holmes. WE is for women going out on a gig, starting something new or evolving

their corporate work into a solo pursuit. Sometimes business people define themselves by what they practice, rather than as an entrepreneur. Beech and Holmes do not view entrepreneurs as limited to those with a high-growth technology, or a store front. “If we do that, we’ll miss the backbone of the economy,” says Beech. WE events are open to the public and not exclusive to women, though women entrepreneurs are the target audience. WE programming provides valuable content and encouragement women entrepreneurs need to help them take their businesses to the next level. Melissa McNallan is a freelance writer and blogs at 40fitnstylish.com.

UPCOMING WE FORUM EVENTS • July 18, 2019, Becoming Known—Effective Marketing Strategies for your Business A panel of experts who have taken businesses or themselves from unknown to known share what they know about becoming known. • September 19, 2019, Marketing with a Team of One— Promoting your Business without a Marketing Department A workshop on how to become more known will provide concrete tools for taking the next marketing steps. • October 17, 2019, Turning Challenges into Opportunities— Navigating Potholes on the Road to Success • November 2019, Date and programming has yet to be determined. • December 12, 2019, Evaluating your Business, Pivot or Fresh Start

RWmagazine.com July/August 2019

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September/October 2019 Issue will feature: • Rochester Area Builders Inc. Fall Showcase of Homes & Remodelers Tour • Home Building Contractors • Home Improvement Projects to Increase Value • Fall Porches • Farmers Market Produce • Retreats and Rentals from Red Wing to Winona Reserve your ad space for

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FOOD AND WINE

WOMEN WHO CRAFT (BEER) ROCHESTER SIPPING AND SHARING OUR PASSION BY ABBEY SASS

WOMEN WHO CRAFT (BEER)—ROCHESTER IS A SOCIAL GROUP CREATED FOR WOMEN TO EXPERIENCE CRAFT BEER IN A MORE PERSONAL WAY: CONNECTING WITH OTHERS WHO ARE ENTHUSIASTIC ABOUT CRAFT BEER AND EXPLORING THE PROCESS WITH EXCLUSIVE BEHIND-THE-SCENES OPPORTUNITIES. The group brings monthly events focusing on everything craft beer.

ORIGIN As a hops producer for local breweries, Abbey Sass is spearheading the Women Who Craft (Beer)—Rochester initiative to unite women interested in craft beer. Time and time again, Sass would meet women at various networking events who were excited to meet a woman involved in the craft beer industry and wanting to catch up over a pint. Sass decided to unite those pints and get all those ladies in one place to sip and share brewing knowledge. Sass believes that with appreciation comes passion, hence the educational portion to each monthly event, highlighting technical and cultural topics such as styles, the brewing process, historical movements, influencers, branding and ingredients, to list a few. With several women assuming leadership roles, the momentum is building to create a community of connected, knowledgeable craft beer drinkers.

MEETUPS A typical Women Who Craft (Beer)—Rochester meetup kicks off with a social hour from 5-6 p.m. When you arrive, check out the menu for seasonal tappings or ask the beertender for a recommendation and order a pint. With a Facebook community of a couple hundred women, you will probably bump into familiar faces, and if you don’t happen to know anyone, just find an open seat and introduce

yourself. Beer has a way of allowing people to come together and form new relationships. Women Who Craft (Beer)—Rochester likes to think of a brewery as the community’s living room, so expect to make many new friends. The educational portion follows from 6-7 p.m. and is all about building your “sipping knowledge.” For example, the inaugural meetup was hosted at Little Thistle Brewing Co., where attendees participated in a guided introductory beer tasting led by taproom manager and cicerone Nate Gustafson. Four styles were featured: IPA, Vienna lager, sour and Scottish ale. The educational portion provides an opportunity for women to explore craft beer right here in their own community. Women Who Craft (Beer)—Rochester met at LTS Brewing Company in June. They explored the brewery and tasted their tap brews. Meetup locations will change each month, allowing each business to showcase their brewery and current seasonal and unique tappings. By the end of this summer, Rochester will feature its own "six-pack" of breweries— Kinney Creek Brewery, LTS Brewing Company, Grand Rounds Brewpub, Little Thistle Brewing, Forager Brewery and Thesis Beer Project.

UPCOMING MEETUPS Women Who Craft (Beer)—Rochester will meet at Grand Rounds Brewpub in the back meeting

One of the first Women Who Craft (Beer) events was at Little Thistle Brewing.

room on Thursday, July 11, 2019. Be ready for a beautiful evening downtown. This meetup was conveniently planned in conjunction with Thursdays Downtown. On Monday, August 5, Civil Sass Hops in Chatfield will be hosting at their hops yard featuring Karst Brewing from Fountain. This outdoor meetup will be held from 6-8 p.m. Hops grow on an 18-foot trellis and will be loaded with aromatic cones ripe for harvest. This hops yard is located in the rolling hills of Bluff Country with a view overlooking the summer sunset. It would be comparable to overlooking the vineyards in Tuscany, just the Minnesota beer version.

JOIN AND STAY IN TOUCH In addition to the monthly meetups, the Women Who Craft (Beer)—Rochester Facebook and Instagram pages are used as a touchpoint for women to share upcoming craft beer events and news, vote on group decisions and build community by connecting with each other. Co-owner of local hops yard, Civil Sass Hops, and founder of Women Who Craft (Beer), Abbey Sass seeks to connect women with craft beer. RWmagazine.com July/August 2019

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FOOD AND WINE

l l e T o t y r o t S

EVERY MEAL HAS A

CONNECTING WITH THE FOOD WE EAT BY HEATHER WELLER PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

ONCE UPON A TIME, ALTHOUGH NOT SO LONG AGO, PEOPLE GATHERED TOGETHER TO SHARE MEALS PREPARED WITH FRESH INGREDIENTS FROM THEIR GARDENS, PASTURES, WOODS AND FIELDS. Each fresh ingredient had a story that detailed where the seeds, dairy, livestock and poultry originated. The experience that went into the harvest or collection of the food item was shared and discussed. Each meal was “served with a fresh side” of fellowship, feeling of connection, sense of pride and power of community. FOOD STORIES

Consumers today are inundated with media messages that focus on health, obesity epidemics and an uptick in the number of cancers and other maladies affecting our population. This means that many consumers 24

July/August 2019 RWmagazine.com

are craving the food and stories from long ago. They’re asking questions about where their food comes from, how it was grown and what nutritional value the food can provide for themselves and their families. Throughout the past few years, the idea of farm-to-table dining has become quite popular. There are several restaurants in Rochester committed to using ingredients sourced directly from local producers and farmers. They proudly serve the dishes with a heavy helping of the stories behind the ingredients.

PRESCOTT’S GRILL

Chef Christopher Rohe and sommelier Jenna Rohe have owned and operated Prescott's Grill for 14 years. About nine years ago, they were curious whether they could become self-sustainable and grow produce to be served from their menu. They started small, planting each seed individually by hand. After growing zucchini, radishes and quick-maturing vegetables, their garden quickly sprawled to five acres of fresh garden goodness.

In 2018, the garden hosted over 2,000 tomato plants. After 30 years in the restaurant industry, Chef Rohe recognizes that food trends come and go. As consumers often look to online shopping and convenience, he is confident that they will want to physically touch things once again and that the evolution back to understanding origins will return, especially with food items. Jenna says the interest has already occurred with wines. “People want to know where the ingredients are coming from. They like to know their food is coming from the farm, just a short drive away. They are seeking the stories.” As seasonality can present a challenge for growing produce in the Midwest, Chef Rohe recommends eating in season and encourages consumers to eat as much as possible when it’s fresh.

LA PETIT CAFE

Chef Deirdre Conroy of La Petit Cafe in Rochester has always been passionate


Opposite page: La Petit Cafe uses fresh, locally sourced ingredients. Left: Kristin of Pearson Organics with her fresh greens. Fiddlehead Coffee Co. gets a majority of their fresh produce from Pearson Organics.

about utilizing locally sourced food products whenever possible. As a long-time Rochester Farmers Market attendee and vendor, she developed strong connections with farmers and vendors and calls upon them for fresh, locally sourced ingredients. Additionally, Conroy has fostered relationships with local sources for fresh prawns and trout, and an herbal farmer that has crafted an exclusive Irish tea for La Petit Cafe. It’s imperative for Conroy to stay in constant communication with her sources to plan for the freshest availability of products on her menus. The suppliers have become an integral part of her restaurant and, ultimately, its success. “I could go on about the carbon footprint, but what I want to know is where the food came from and that it had a good life—that it had its best life. I think about where it’s from. A good product should not have more ingredients than you can count on one hand; and if I can’t pronounce it, I cannot eat it. Expect something different from something familiar,” Conroy says.

Do note that the ingredients aren’t the only locally sourced items you’ll find at La Petit Cafe. The dining tables were created using locally sourced wood, and Conroy boasts that her staff is also locally sourced.

FIDDLEHEAD COFFEE COMPANY

Fiddlehead Coffee Company in Rochester strives to drive a successful model of sustainability and service. Their non-negotiable priorities include consumers, earth and community. Owner Sarah Phelan has partnered with Kristin Pearson of Pearson Organics to provide the freshest ingredients for their menu. The two believe a successful commitment to the use of ingredients sourced directly from local producers boils down to relationships, supporting the small farm and investing in the community. They applaud the idea that partnering with local producers is instrumental in solving multiple social issues and believe this system is one that connects a community with fierce unity.

“A commitment to locally sourced foods isn’t just a fun idea—it’s healthier. The food tastes better and can be used to create more unique cuisine. The things most interesting to eat are harder to grow on a large scale. People need to become more aware of where their food is coming from,” says Phelan. Pearson recognizes the medical community’s focus on wellness and thinks that once people catch on to a healthier way of eating, it will be easy to continue. Phelan believes there’s a holistic aspect of being healthy and living well. She says that stories create holistic experiences. When something is locally sourced, the item is highlighted on the menu. “Stories give food more depth and flavor,” she says. “It’s nice to say, ‘This was grown by the farmer standing right over there.’”

AGAIN SOMEDAY

Someday, not so far away, the people of a Midwest community will gather together to enjoy meals prepared with fresh ingredients sourced directly from local producers. Each fresh ingredient will have a story that details where it originated. The experience that went into the harvest or collection of the food item will be shared and discussed. Each meal will be “served with a fresh side” of fellowship, feeling of connection, sense of pride and power of community. Heather Weller is a Licensed REALTOR® in MN with Gwaltney Group of RE/MAX Results.

RWmagazine.com July/August 2019

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HOME AND GARDEN

6

FOCUS SPOTS TURN ON PROSPECTIVE HOME BUYERS

STAGED TO SELL EYE APPEAL IS BUY APPEAL IN REAL ESTATE BY KRISTIE MOORE

EFFECTIVE HOME STAGING CAN HELP YOU SELL YOUR HOME FASTER, POSSIBLY FOR A HIGHER PRICE. In recent years, home stagers have become even more savvy and in-tune with what buyers want. WHAT IS HOME STAGING?

Home staging is the styling and furnishing of a property for sale (occupied or vacant) to enhance its attractiveness and highlight its positive features to potential buyers. Professional home stagers understand the art and strategies of preparing a home for sale. They work with the flow of a home, eliminate clutter, edit and arrange furniture and even assist in curb appeal. The seller can be as involved as they want, hiring help with needed improvements or taking the DIY approach, depending on their needs and budget. A vacant listing is when the property is empty and the staging company rents furniture and accessories to the homeowner or listing agent to enhance and “stage” how the home would optimally look when occupied. Kelly Harbal of KLHome Staging—located in Owatonna and servicing Southeast Minnesota—says, “Some people think that staging is only for higher-end properties, but really it’s for homes in any price range. When looking at comps (comparisons) for what a home should be priced at, home staging improves the property’s features and increases its desirability, often raising its value.”

HOW STAGING DIFFERS FROM INTERIOR DESIGN

While home staging is a type of home design, it is different from interior design. The difference lies in the target audience. “The goal of staging is to appeal to the masses,” says Emily Fleming, local Rochesterite and designer/stager at Emily Fleming Designs. “In keeping it neutral, it helps potential buyers see themselves in that space. Whereas home decorating or design is more personal, reflecting and focusing on the tastes of the homeowner.” Kari Michael from Kariel Staging—located in the Twin Cities and servicing Rochester—agrees. “The space should be kept neutral and minimal in showcasing personal items of the existing homeowner,” says Michael. “Staging is about selling square footage, paying special attention to making rooms appear as open and spacious as possible.”

PLAIN AND SIMPLE TRUTH

Our homes tend to be one of our greatest investments. They will always need maintenance and updating over time. Selling your home is going to take time, effort and likely some financial investment. However, you will get it back and then some on the back end if you do it right. A well-staged home lets the buyer walk in and go on a journey. In the end, it’s more about selling a lifestyle, or a picture of how life could be, than a piece of property. Kristie Moore is a certified professional home stager and stylist at Soul Purpose Home Solutions in Rochester, MN. www.soulpurposehome.com

1. CURB APPEAL Make sure the

front yard, sidewalk, front porch or step and front door are looking great. Trim up trees and shrubs, weed landscape, put flowerpots by the front door, make the windows sparkle and show how well-cared-for your property is.

2. DECLUTTER Lots of items in a

room (especially personal items), can be a major distraction for potential home buyers attempting to take in the features and imagine how they would live in the space. Take time to declutter.

3. A CLEAN SCENT Strong odors can trigger an emotional reaction. It is best to keep the home smelling minimally fragrant, fresh and clean. 4. LIGHTING Areas that are well-lit appear more spacious and photograph better. Brighter spaces seem happier in contrast to dimly-lit spaces. 5. NO STAINS AND DAMAGES The most cost-effective improvements you can make are a fresh coat of paint and thorough deep cleaning, top to bottom (including carpets), throughout the house.

6. NEUTRAL DECOR If your home has a very specific color palette or style, this can be a stumbling block to a potential buyer. Neutral colors are better. RWmagazine.com July/August 2019

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ASK THE EXPERTS

ASK THE EXPERTS ELIAS CONSTRUCTION PROFESSIONALS SHARE COLLECTIVE KNOWLEDGE BY TRISH AMUNDSON

Jessica Markley, interior designer, assists clients with project selections, researches options and makes recommendations. She helps cultivate and execute the client's desired vision for their project. Markley is also the company’s marketing manager. Bill Koetter, design and sales consultant, specializes in project design, such as kitchen layout and cabinetry—his role includes drawing plans for custom cabinetry. Koetter also creates proposals and helps clients navigate through the functionality of their space plans.

SHARING COLLECTIVE KNOWLEDGE Left to Right: Mickey Elias - Owner Elias Construction Jessica Markley - Interior Designer, Bill Koetter - Sales and Design Consultant

HOW CAN I MAKE MY KITCHEN MORE FUNCTIONAL? What’s hot and

what’s not in home design trends? How can I make my dream space a reality? Questions and decisions about home renovations can be overwhelming, but inquiries like these are what prompted informative and productive dialogue at Ask the Experts, a first-time event hosted by Byron-based Elias Construction, LLC. The open discussion about home remodeling took place at Cambria Gallery on April 23, 2019. EXPERIENCED SPECIALISTS

Mickey Elias, owner, oversees all aspects of Elias Construction, including creating proposals, drawing floor plans and managing project construction and subcontractors to ensure high-quality work and adherence to project schedules. 28

July/August 2019 RWmagazine.com

“Our team members have taken part in separate speaking engagements and presentations, each on our perspective areas of expertise,” says Elias. His company, known for organized and quality remodeling, specializes in mid- to large-scale remodels such as kitchens, basements, master suites and whole home remodels. “The idea behind Ask the Experts is to offer the audience all of our collective knowledge in one event,” Elias says. Attendees have access to tap team members who have specialized skills and know-how. “Bill's area of expertise is layout and cabinetry, Jessica's is interior design, and mine is logistics and technical-related.”

QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS The Elias professionals have successfully completed over 200 remodels—there is not much they haven’t seen or done. At Ask the Experts, they welcomed several attendees who could present their questions and get real, in-person answers. For example: Question: Is it possible to reconfigure my existing kitchen layout and add an island? Answer: “Islands are very popular and great for entertaining, but not every kitchen has the space to accommodate an island,” explains Markley. “Function should always

take prevalence over fashion, and part of our expertise includes helping our clients understand how their space can work best for their needs. This involves creative thinking and problem solving to create a space that is not only beautiful, but incredibly useful as well.” Question: I want my kitchen to be timeless. Will this design go out of style? Answer: “Home trends come in and go out of style over the years, so how can a homeowner be sure that their choices will stand the test of time? Investing in high-quality core elements, such as cabinetry, flooring and countertops, can go a long way in staying current,” says Markley. She points out that well-crafted kitchen features will not be subject to as much wear and tear, so replacement isn’t necessary for an extended period of time. “A neutral color palette, shaker style cabinetry and glass door inserts are elements that remain constantly favored throughout the years,” she adds. “The kitchen is often revered as the ‘heart of the home,’ so stay true to what speaks to your personal style and your family.”

EXPERT-INFORMED DECISIONS Elias Construction is planning their next Ask the Experts event for spring 2020. To learn more or to ask questions about your home renovation project, you are encouraged to visit their website eliasconstructionllc.com, email info@eliasconstructionllc.com or call 507-208-4490. The opportunity to ask remodeling questions of trusted and knowledgeable construction professionals will give you clarity and peace of mind. Elias Construction experts can provide useful advice and help you make remodeling decisions that you will never regret. Trish Amundson is a Rochester-area freelance writer.


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HEALTH AND WELLNESS

USING MUSIC TO HELP OTHERS AND MAKE A DIFFERENCE BY ALISON RENTSCHLER

HAVE YOU HEARD OF MUSIC THERAPY AND WONDERED WHAT IT’S ABOUT AND HOW IT HELPS PEOPLE? Christina Wood, owner of Healing Rhythms Music Therapy, describes, “Music therapy is using music as our tool to help people regardless of age or ability.” Wood says, “Music therapists use music to promote comfort and ease pain for individuals in the hospital or at end of life, help children maintain developmental skills, and help promote healthy coping skills.”

HOW IT STARTED

ABOUT HEALING RHYTHMS

Wood shares, “I chose to pursue a career path and degree in music therapy after personally witnessing the positive impact of music on my own grandparents as they aged.” Wood has bachelor's degrees in music therapy and music education and a Master of Arts in music therapy. Wood explains she started Healing Rhythms with the intent to increase access to high-quality music therapy services and empower people through music. Wood owned a business from 2006 to 2013 and rebranded her business to Healing Rhythms in 2013. Wood notes, “My goal was to create a cohesive strengths-based team approach to better serve our communities’ needs through music therapy.” “I feel blessed to combine my two passions of music and helping people in being an entrepreneur and small business owner to make a difference in the lives of people across our region,” Wood reflects.

Healing Rhythms provides individual therapy in their clinic in Rochester, which opened in 2017. Wood describes, “We primarily serve children and adults with disabilities. We also offer early childhood music groups, adaptive music lessons and drum circles.” The 10 board-certified music therapists serve 18 counties in greater southern Minnesota, Wood says. Wood notes that they partner with over 30 community organizations, such as hospitals, hospices, senior living communities, schools and non-profits. “We collaborate in bringing group and individual music therapy services to them.” “Our goal is rarely to teach music to our clients,” Wood explains. “Rather, music is the tool that we use to support our clients in reaching their goals. These goals may be pain management in the hospital, helping a child with autism to learn his or her address, or optimizing cognition for an individual with dementia.”

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July/August 2019 RWmagazine.com

MAKING AN IMPACT “Our team of board-certified music therapists is entrusted to be witness and hold sacred space through music for many of our clients at some of life's most fragile moments,” Wood explains. She notes these moments could be when a child is newly diagnosed with cancer, an adult is dealing with pain post-surgery and needs assistance with coping skills through music, or a family is holding vigil around their loved one at the end of life.

Destiny Boyum providing music therapy for Christina Wood's son Mark.

“Each of our therapists have countless stories we hold near and dear to our hearts where we have witnessed music therapy make a profound


Christina kneeling with kids. Christina providing medical music therapy with patient. All ages enjoy drumming circles.

impact on the lives of the patients and their loved ones,” Wood says. Wood remembers, “My own child was in the hospital, a place where I had worked for the past 11 years. But being on the other side was a humbling experience. Thanks to having one of my own music therapists on the unit, our son was able to better cope with being hospitalized and having an IV placed.” Wood also remembers being with grieving families at the bedside of patients as they took

their last breath. Wood says, “Supporting all of their needs through live patient-preferred music that creates a space for sharing memories about their loved one through laughter, music and tears is something I will always view as a positive result from music therapy.” Alison Rentschler is a writer and editor living in Rochester, Minn., who loves her animals and is always looking forward to her future travel plans.

UPCOMING EVENTS AND SESSIONS •Drum circle one Saturday a month at 7 pm–Open to anyone who would like to attend. No previous experience needed. •Early childhood music classes •Group ukulele classes •Individual therapy sessions Find out more at: www.healingrhythmsmt.com, Facebook @healingrhythmsmt.com, Instagram @healingrhythmsmusictherapyllc or Twitter @HRhythmsMusicTx

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TRAVEL

HIKING THE

CAMINO PORTUGUÉS MY WALK INTO “WHAT’S NEXT?” BY CONNIE LARSON

THE SPANISH NOUN "CAMINO" TRANSLATES AS "PATH" OR "JOURNEY". The

verb "caminar" is "to walk". That sums up my March 2019. I walked from Porto, Portugal to Santiago, Spain (280 km) following the Camino pilgrimage route.

INVITATION In 2013, I was invited to join a friend on her walk into retirement. Now in 2019, I, too, needed a transitional marker. After teaching French for 40 years, I needed my “What will I do next?” trek and time to ponder. Who will I be without a classroom? Is this the right timing? I needed time to ask big questions and time for those questions to rattle around in my brain. And so, my friend and I walked together once again.

ROUTE LESS TRAVELED The Portuguese coast is gorgeous. March is early for a hike; we were expecting rain and temperatures in the upper 50s so we packed accordingly. When an intense blue sky greeted us nearly every morning, we celebrated the weather minute by minute. A cool sea breeze kept us moving, and I felt gratitude and sunshine down deep in my bones. We followed a path that has been walked for centuries. Orange and lemon trees were heavy with fruit, cabbage and kale were in season and gardens were being fertilized with seaweed. This Portuguese route is less traveled, but still we met people from all nationalities, faiths and ages walking the same path for their own reasons. We recognized each other by our backpacks and our greeting “Bom caminho.” At the border into Spain we crossed the Minho

in a small fishing boat and turned inland towards Santiago. Our greeting changed to Spanish, “Buen camino.”

SIMPLICITY Packing for the hike forced me to evaluate my needs and prioritize the comforts. I packed two t-shirts, two pairs of pants, two pairs of socks. I had miniature everything—toothbrush, moleskin, etc. I asked: Do I need this, or is this just-incase? How much weight can I carry? Bottom line: I could carry 12 pounds. The clutter of everyday life disappeared. Our walking days were simple. We woke up, put on the same t-shirt, same shoes and started walking. When we stopped walking, we washed out our t-shirt, ate a wonderful meal (no scrimping on cuisine, we were by the sea), played cards, went to bed and started over the next day. Imagine unpacking three weeks later. My backpack was unloaded in three minutes and my stuffed closet looked ridiculous. Re-entering a complicated rhythm of multitasking and multiple hats (wife, mother, teacher, daughter and friend) made me feel awkward and clumsy. I longed to put my backpack back on with only enough room for one hat.

REFLECTION First choose shoes and then begin walking. These words—choice, walking, path, journey —are the same words often used for personal reflection. Is beginning a spiritual walk just as simple? St. Augustine wrote, “Go forth on your path, as it exists only through your walking.” Wise words even in a literal translation. My intention for meditation while walking rarely happened, and no big questions found answers. Instead I chatted with my walking

Larson on her hike along the Spanish Coast.

partners; we told jokes, shared stories and played word games while ignoring blisters and pushing up hills. However, now that I’m home, I’m finding metaphors that silently crept in through the soles of my shoes and into my heart. Acceptance, courage and wisdom were under my feet on gentle paths through eucalyptus forest, uneven cobblestone and steep uphill climbs. Am I paying attention to the paths I choose? Do I notice the markers along the way? Are my knees up to it? Is my heart in it? The physical path is becoming a reference for my life journey, and I love this connection. Keep it simple, just walk…every day. “Walking outside in the fresh air is better than trudging around inside your brain” (unknown author.) Connie Larson lives north of Rochester and loves riding horses, swimming and traveling. She is rediscovering her life path. RWmagazine.com July/August 2019

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TRAVEL

LAURA WEISS

HIKES ACROSS SPAIN LESSONS LEARNED FROM EL CAMINO DE SANTIAGO BY JEN JACOBSON

Diverse climates and landscapes mark Weiss' 36-day journey.

YEARS AGO, ROCHESTER NATIVE LAURA WEISS FIRST HEARD ABOUT EL CAMINO DE SANTIAGO (“THE WAY OF ST. JAMES”)—A HIKING PILGRIMAGE SNAKING ACROSS SPAIN THAT ENDS IN THE CITY OF SANTIAGO DE COMPOSTELA. But it

wasn’t until 2018, knowing she was ready to leave her job and take on a new adventure, that she decided to use the trip to transition from one life stage to another. ON THE TRAIL Weiss began her journey on January 24, 2019, in the French city of Bayonne, near the France-Spain border. While many routes of the Camino are possible, she chose the Camino Frances (the “French Way”)—the most popular route, and a roughly 562-mile journey. Weiss walked for 36 days. She would depart a city or village in the morning and generally arrive in a new location between 1 and 5 p.m. There she would do chores— laundry, shop at the grocery store—and catch up on messages from family and friends, then go out to dinner with other pilgrims. At these villages, a “pilgrim’s meal” of bread, wine and multiple courses was often offered at a discounted rate. She spent her nights eating, laughing and sharing stories. 34

July/August 2019 RWmagazine.com

A SHARED EXPERIENCE The pilgrims were diverse, from people in lower 20s all the way to 60s and 70s. They were women and men, many solo, but some in groups, from vastly different backgrounds. “One thing that surprised me was how close I got to the people I walked with,” says Weiss. “The Camino nourishes conversation. I found myself opening up, and the people were vulnerable and respectful. We knew that we were all on our individual journeys.” Even with a language barrier, relationships developed. “Two people I walked with most of the way—one from France and one from Italy— spoke neither Spanish or English. By the end I felt very close to them because we had that shared experience. I didn’t need to know why they were walking the Camino, but I was a part of their story and they were a part of mine.”

SPACE AND GRATITUDE Walking full days through diverse terrain was challenging. Although it took 10 days for her feet to stop aching, Weiss persisted, eventually arriving at the traditional ending in Santiago de Compostela. In fact, she felt so good that she continued a few more days to the northwestern Spanish coast, which she says felt like her journey’s true ending. The trip proved to be the mental nourishment that Weiss sought. “I had just come from a very busy and challenging time in my life, and I just needed some space. The Camino was that space for me,” she says.

“Sometimes I thought I should be thinking about what I should do with the next stage of my life or processing what I last went through, but then I realized what I should do is stop thinking and just focus on my surroundings and conversations with people around me. ” Weiss says, “I felt extremely grateful to be able to have the physical health and the time in my life to do it, and I realize that not everyone is gifted to have that. I was so grateful for the things I was seeing, the way my body was supporting me, and the people I met.”

GO FOR IT While some people were surprised that Weiss was going on such a trip alone, she embraced the chance at traveling solo. “I think you have to be confident that you can do it, even if you’re anxious,” she says. “What helped me was research beforehand. I spent hours on online forums and Facebook groups connecting with people who’d done the trip.” She was careful to not get into any situation that made her nervous. “If I was walking through an area that seemed sketchy, I’d ask another pilgrim to join me.” “Go for it!” says Weiss with a smile. “Be safe, but don’t be afraid. And pack good shoes.” Jen Jacobson is a local writer and editor.


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CALENDAR EVENTS GATHERED BY SARA ALBERTELLI

Check out our Community Calendar online for additional listings at RWmagazine.com Events in purple are sponsored by RochesterWomen magazine. Deadline for submitting events for RochesterWomen September/October 2019 issue is July 31, 2019. Send events to calendar@RWmagazine.com *(507 area code unless stated)

JUNE

JUNE 25-AUGUST 4

Great River Shakespeare Festival, Winona, classes, plays, programs, and workshops for people of all ages and backgrounds, grsf.org

JUNE 30-JULY 21 Minnesota Beethoven Festival, Winona, Beethoven’s music in an environment of performance, discovery, and community, varying times, 474-9055, mnbeethovenfestival.org

JULY

JULY 1, 8, 15, 22 & 29

Zumba on the Plaza, free Zumba® on the Plaza (ZOTP) returns for its 7th season, 5:30 pm, facebook.com/events

JULY 2 Safe City Nights, Longfellow Elementary, join your neighbors and Rochester Police Department team for a night of free food and activities, 6-8 pm, rochestermn. gov/departments/police/safe-city-nights

JULY 4 Stewartville Summerfest 3 & 5 Mile Run, Florence Park, run to support local youth groups and high school cross-country teams, 8 am, rochestertrackclub.com

JULY 10-14 Winona County Fair, St. Charles, an annual celebration featuring attractions, food, and fun, 932-3074, winonacountyfair.com

JULY 11 History on the River Cruise: History of the Upper Mississippi River Refuge, Winona Levee, cruises are 90 minutes long with a program and sightseeing time, 7 pm, (800) 657-4972, visitwinona.com

JULY 12 100 Years in Paradise - Voices of Whitewater State Park, Whitewater State Park, learn about the history of the park and surrounding Whitewater Valley. 6-7 pm, dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks

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July/August 2019 RWmagazine.com

JULY 13 32nd Annual Dixieland Festival, Winona State University, featuring the Blue Ox Jazz Babies, Barbary Coast Dixieland Band, and more, 12:30-7 pm, (800) 657-4972, visitwinona.com

JULY 14 Down by the Riverside Concert Series Presents: 10,000 Maniacs, Mayo Park, the band that created the first wave of alternative rock will perform, 7 pm, 328-2200, rochestermn.gov

JULY 15-21 40th Annual Eyota Days, Eyota, activities for everyone to enjoy including tournaments, races, and more, 545-2135, eyota.govoffice.com

JULY 16 Safe City Nights, Ben Franklin Elementary, join your neighbors and Rochester Police Department team for a night of free food and activities, 6-8 pm, rochestermn. gov/departments/police/safe-city-nights

JULY 20 Spring Creek Motocross, Spring Creek Motocross Park, Pro National Round of the Lucas Oil AMA Motocross Championship, 11:30 am-5 pm, 753-2779, millvillemx.com

JULY 20 Rochester Women's Race 4 Mile, East Silver Lake Park, all women race including refreshments and door prizes, 8 am, rochestertrackclub.com

JULY 20 Rochester Garden and Flower Club Annual Garden Tour, RCTC Heintz Center SMART Gardens, six outstanding private gardens filled with ideas, art, and music, 9:30 am-4 pm, rgfc.org

JULY 20 46th Annual Stockholm Art Fair, Stockholm Village Park, original art and fine crafts will be exhibited come rain or shine, 10 am-5 pm, stockholmartfair.org

JULY 20-21 Living History Fair, History Center of Olmsted County, a weekend of educational activities from the 1800s for the whole family, Sat. 9 am-5 pm, Sun.10 am-4 pm, 282-9447, olmstedhistory.com

JULY 20-21 Cannon Falls Wine and Art Festival, Hannah’s Bend Park, free to the public, wine tasting tickets available, 11 am-5 pm, cannonfallswineandartfestival.com

JULY 22-28 Olmsted County Free Fair, Olmsted County Fairgrounds, exhibitors, competitors, entertainment, amusements on the mid-way, and fair food, varying times, 282-9862, olmstedcountyfair.com

JULY 23 Achieve 2019 Accountability Event, Forager Brewery, Rachel Watts presents her new book Habit Trackers, appetizers provided, 5-6:30 pm, facebook.com/pg/RWmagazine/events

JULY 24 Olmsted County Master Gardeners Tour, History Center of Olmsted County, tour with the master gardeners and enjoy six private gardens, 5-9 pm, 421-0573, rochestermntours.com

JULY 25 Singing Bowls in the Courtyard, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, an evening of captivating renewal in the presence of ageless bell sounds, 6-8 pm, 280-2195, rochesterfranciscan.org

JULY 26 Outdoor Drumming Circle and Fire Ceremony, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, draw your personal energy into a powerful unified communal prayer, 7-9 pm, 280-2195, rochesterfranciscan.org

JULY 26-27 Riverboat Days, WabashaKellogg, a festival of entertainment, food vendors, crafts, sports tournaments, and more, varying times, 565-4158, wabashamn.org

JULY 26-27 Les Miserables: School Edition, Mayo Civic Center, performed entirely by students and accompanied by the southeastern Minnesota youth orchestra, 7 pm, 216-9882, mayociviccenter.com

JULY 27 St. James Coffee Run, location TBD, 5K race on a road course bringing the faith community together, 8 am, rochestertrackclub.com


THANK YOU!

JULY 28

AUGUST 16-18

Down by the Riverside Concert Series: local country artist Debbiy Anothony, followed by Lindsay Ell, Mayo Park, named one of Huffington Post’s “Top Country Artists to Watch,” 7 pm, 328-2200, rochestermn.gov

Gold Rush, Olmsted County Fairgrounds, one of the top indooroutdoor antique destinations in the nation, varying times, 269-1473, iridescenthouse.com

JULY 29-AUGUST 1

AUGUST 17

ALLEGRO SCHOOL OF DANCE & MUSIC.......................22

Spring Valley Ag Days 6K, Willow Park, a point-to-point course along the Spring Valley paved trail, 8 am, rochestertrackclub.com

ALTRA FEDERAL CREDIT UNION........................................... 3 BICYCLE SPORTS......................................................................22

AUGUST 18

BUDGET BLINDS......................................................................29

Down by the Riverside Concert Series Presents: The Revolution, Mayo Park, Prince’s former band, an award-winning group of the 80’s genre, will perform, 7 pm, 328-2200, rochestermn.gov

CARPENTERS LOCAL 1382...................................................19

Mega Kids Camp 2019 “Fundamentals,” Century High School, children will learn important lessons in sports, creative arts, and bible studies, 8:45 am-12:30 pm, 289-4817, evangelum.org

JULY 30 Safe City Nights, Watson Field, join your neighbors and Rochester Police Department team for a night of free food and activities, 6-8 pm, rochestermn.gov/departments/ police/safe-city-nights

AUGUST AUGUST 3

Douglas Trail Race, Douglas Trail Parking Lot, Rochester Track Club Grand Prix race that covers 11 miles, 8 am, rochestertrackclub.com

AUGUST 3 Dogs Downtown, Peace Plaza, a canine-centric event that will have activities, games, performances, and more, 11 am-3 pm, 216-9882, downtownrochestermn.com

AUGUST 3-4 Becoming an Outdoors Family Weekend, Eagle Bluff Environmental Learning Center, a weekend of memories adventuring the outdoors while learning hands-on skills, Fri. 5-8 pm, Sat. 8 am-9 pm & Sun. 8 am-1 pm, 4672437, eagle-bluff.org

AUGUST 4, 11, 18 & 25 Whitewater State Park Centennial Event - Theater in the Park, Whitewater State Park, this play will be performed outdoors each Sunday afternoon in August in the meadow where the historical pageants were once held in the 1930s and 1940s, 4 - 5 pm, dnr.state.mn.us/state_parks/whitewater/ whitewater-state-parks-100th-anniversary.html

AUGUST 5, 12, 19 & 26 Zumba on the Plaza, free Zumba® on the Plaza (ZOTP) returns for its 7th season, 5:30 pm, facebook.com/events

AUGUST 10-11 Days of Yesteryear, History Center of Olmsted County, annual show featuring AllisChalmers, 8-9 am, 282-9447, olmstedhistory.com

AUGUST 11 Fossil Hunting in Fillmore County, Whispering Winds, tour fossil collections of ancient sea creatures and travel to various sites, 1-5 pm, 467-2437, eagle-bluff.org

AUGUST 14 Girls Becoming Women: Honoring the Path, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center, learn life skills including team building, etiquette, social boundaries, and more, 3:30-7 pm, 282-7441, rochesterfranciscan.org

AUGUST 24 Scheels Healthy Human Race 5K/Half Marathon, Soldiers Memorial Field, this year’s race is the 2019 RRCA Half Marathon Central Regional Championship, 7 am, 993-5902, healthyhumanrace.com

AUGUST 24 Walk to Defeat ALS, East Silver Lake Park, raise money for a cure, research, and to sustain care services, 8:30 am, (612) 455-8330, web.alsa.org

AUGUST 24 100 Years in Paradise Voices of Whitewater State Park, Whitewater State Park, learn about the history of the park and surrounding Whitewater Valley. 6-7 pm, dnr.state. mn.us/state_parks

to the advertisers who made RochesterWomen magazine July/August 2019 issue possible.

AMY LANTZ...............................................................................13

CARPET ONE.............................................................................40 CHANHASSEN DINNER THEATRES...................................39 COMMONWEAL THEATRE..................................................35 CREATIVE HARDWOOD FLOORS.......................................29 DAPPER SURFACES..................................................................29 DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY..................................13 DENTISTRY FOR CHILDREN & ADOLESCENTS, LTD.......26 DIVERSITY COUNCIL..............................................................35 DUNLAP & SEEGAR, P.A.........................................................30 ELIAS CONTRUCTION...........................................................29 ENERYWORKS..........................................................................13 FIRST ALLIANCE CREDIT UNION........................................16 FORESIGHT BANK...................................................................10 GARDEN OF MASSAGE........................................................15 HAIR STUDIO 52......................................................................10 HOME FEDERAL.......................................................................32 JRK MEDICALS..........................................................................13 JUNGE FLOORING................................................................... 6

AUGUST 20

KARI DOUGLAS, ECHELON WEALTH PARTNERS,

Safe City Nights, Harriet Bishop Elementary, join your neighbors and Rochester Police Department team for a night of free food and activities, 6-8 pm, rochestermn. gov/departments/police/safe-city-nights

AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES...................................... 6

AUGUST 30

MAYO FEDERAL CREDIT UNION........................................26

Pick up Rochester Women magazine September/October 2019 issue featuring Rochester Area Builders Inc., Fall Showcase of Homes and Remodelors Tour.

MINNESOTA WORKFORCE CENTER................................19

SEPTEMBER SEPTEMBER 14

9th Annual “We Won’t Stay Silent” Recovery 5K Walk/10K Run, Peace United Church of Christ, support Recovery is Happening and local members of the community battling addiction, 8 am-1 pm, 358-4761, recoveryishappening.org

SEPTEMBER 20-22 38th Annual Women and Spirituality Conference, Mayo Civic Center, multifaith gathering including workshops, discussions, exhibits, dialogue, discovery, and celebration, Fri. 5:30-8:30 pm, Sat. 8 am-5:30 pm, Sun. 8:30 am-5 pm, womenandspirituality.org

KEMPS.........................................................................................29 LUYA............................................................................................13 MADONNA TOWERS ...........................................................39

MR. PIZZA NORTH..................................................................26 NORTH RISK PARTNERS.........................................................22 NORTHFIELD YARN................................................................... 9 OLMSTED COUNTY HISTORY CENTER .............................. 9 OLMSTED MEDICAL CENTER................................................. 4 PROFILE BY SANFORD............................................................35 RENEW RETREAT......................................................................13 ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS, INC.....................................16 ROCHESTER ART CENTER, MIND MATTERS...................... 2 ROCHESTER FEED AND COUNTRY STORE......................16 ROCHESTER GREETERS..........................................................15 ROCHESTER INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT...........................32 RW ACHIEVE 2019 ACCOUNTABILITY EVENT...............39 SARGENT'S GARDENS...........................................................26 SEMVA.......................................................................................... 9 SQUASH BLOSSOM FARM..................................................... 9 TERRA LOCO.............................................................................35

RWmagazine.com July/August 2019

37


HERSTORY

&WELL

ALIVE

EXPERIENCING THE PAST THROUGH LIVING HISTORY BY LEANNA HAAG

LEARNING AND FUN: WHAT THE HISTORY CENTER OF OLMSTED COUNTY’S FIFTH ANNUAL LIVING HISTORY FAIR IS ALL ABOUT.

Boasting a past attendance of 2,100 guests, the event will take place from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on July 20 and from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on July 21 on the History Center grounds on West Circle Drive SW. The fair offers families a memorable way to learn about history as they interact with period exhibits, live actors and hands-on activities designed to recreate iconic moments from the Civil War era. ENCOUNTERING HISTORY In previous years, the Living History Fair spotlighted historical events from 1860 to 1863. To continue the chronological tradition, the theme for this year focuses on happenings in 1864. Educational Programs Director Aaron Saterdalen explains that “living historians” will provide a large percentage of the historical information about this era. These present-day, dedicated volunteers will reenact roles from the period, answer questions and offer people a highly enjoyable and educational peek into the past. “This is their hobby,” Saterdalen says of the demonstrators. “(This is) something they have been doing for many, many years—something 38

July/August 2019 RWmagazine.com

that they take time out of their day to do and at their own expense, as well.” The living historians will provide representations of both Confederate and Union infantry, artillery and cavalry. Visitors will have the opportunity to watch a mock battle and can also participate in an authentic military drill supervised by a drill sergeant. Other attractions include period crafts such as broom making and fiber arts, demonstrations on the use of vintage tools, an 1864-style baseball game performed by the Rooster Vintage Baseball Club and much more.

WOMEN AT WAR Saterdalen notes that several of the exhibits feature the contributions of Civil War women.

“They were very involved with the war, whether it was from the home standpoint or actually physically involved with it,” he says. Some women became nurses who aided doctors in caring for the sick and wounded streaming in from the battlefield. Others volunteered as part of the Soldiers’ Aid Society, which Saterdalen describes as an organization dedicated to providing basic supplies for soldiers. The members collected everything from knitted socks, shirts and food to simple pictures in order to send them to soldiers. “If (the women) weren’t involved with that,” the director continues, “then they were doing a lot of things on the home front—taking care of kids, taking care of the farm.” Living historians will represent the women of 1864. See depictions of female presence by visiting the quilter, laundress, Soldiers’ Aid Society and homefront log cabin exhibits.

Almost 95% of the fair takes place outdoors, so Saterdalen encourages families to bring whatever they need to make their visit as enjoyable and productive as possible. Suggestions include strollers for younger children, sunscreen or other protective gear, comfortable walking shoes and an umbrella in case of rain. More than anything, however, Saterdalen hopes that visitors bring open and willing minds. “(If visitors) come away with learning one or two things from their experience here, whether it’s through a hands-on experience or just by watching or seeing something, that would be a huge thing for what we are trying to accomplish out here.” Leanna Haag is an intern writer for Rochester Women magazine and is a senior at Saint Mary’s University Minnesota.

PLANNING A VISIT As Saterdalen confirms, the fair makes learning about history fun and easy for guests of all ages, and planning a visit is just as simple. After purchasing a $10 admission ticket for all visitors over age 12, you will be able to park near the History Fair site and ride a people-mover to a fair checkpoint. Once there, Saterdalen recommends obtaining a site brochure. “The area that we have out here is large,” he warns, but the brochure will contain all the initial information—from a schedule of events to a site map—that visitors need to know.

Top photo: 3rd Minnesota Civilian ladies aid society provided necessities for soldiers. Bottom photos: Living historians reenact scenes from Civil War battles.


RochesterWomenJulyAug2019.qxp_Layout 1 5/27/19 3:52 PM Page 1

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Jessica Fredrickson

952.934.1525 ChanhassenDT.com

Achieve 2019 Accountability Event

The Achieve event series is for the Rochester woman who is ready to design the life she loves. This event will include Rachel Watts book release, Habit Trackers.

Rachel Watts is a blogger and coach serving women looking to monetize their own blogs. Creative Planning with Personal and Professional Purpose

JOIN US Tuesday, July 23, 2019 5 PM – 6:30 PM Forager Brewery 1005 6th Street Northwest Rochester, MN 55901

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