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JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014 COMPLIMENTARY

EXTRAORDINARY

ROCHESTER WOMEN 2014 awards W

THE POWER OF A WOMAN'S VOICE CELEBRATING DIVERSITY

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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


stArt tHe New YeAr iN A

stArt tHe New YeAr iN A BeAUtiFUl New HoMe

BeAUtiFUl New HoMe H i g H l A N d s At

l A N d s At H U NHdi g rH ed AC r e w o o d s H U N d r e d AC r e w o o d s rrooCCHHe e ss t etre r stArt ow wNNee CtHe Cl lUUBNew Bv ivlillAlYeAr tto gAeg e

iN A

BeAUtiFUl New HoMe

CoMMUNitY FeAtUres • Lot Pricing from the $20,000’s • Architecturally controlled neighborhood • Open to all qualified builders

— New Model UNder CoNstrUCtioN — ROAd SE H 2746 i g HSANd l A TRAP Nds At H UBuiltNby:d r e d AC r e w o o d s

Directions:

Beautifully designed 2-story located on a wooded lot for $339,900

From South Broadway – East on Hwy 14, 1.5 miles, south on Tee Time Rd SE

License #BC20147028 www.BuildInRochester.com Lee@BuildInRochester.com (507) 529-5176

roCHester towNe ClUB tHe villAge

Model HoMe loCAted At

tHe villAs

Model HoMe loCAted At

3306 TURNBERRY LANE SE

3834 EASTWOOd ROAd SE

Approx. 2,600 finished square feet, 4 Beds/4 Baths, Finished Basement – $299,900

2764 finished square feet, 3 Beds/3 Baths - $359,900

CoMMUNitY FeAtUres • On and off course lots starting in the $20,000’s • Architecturally controlled neighborhood • Open to all qualified builders Directions: From South Broadway – East on Hwy 14, south on 30th Ave SE, right on Turnberry Dr SE, left on Turnberry Lane SE to model. For information on this house, please contact Lee Fleming (507) 529-5176

CoMMUNitY FeAtUres • Main level living on a golf course setting • Association-maintained lifestyle • Home packages from the $280,000’s Directions: From South Browdway – East on Hwy 14, south on 30th Ave SE, continue onto Eastwood Rd SE to model.

License #BC20147028 www.BuildInRochester.com Lee@BuildInRochester.com (507) 529-5176

Build your new home with:

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3


COVER STORY Extraordinary Rochester Women Awards Six women who go the extra mile.

12 Community 24 Moments of Shared Learning Diversity Council and Rochester Civic Theatre hear the heartbeat of social change.

MAGAZINE

JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014

Cover photo by Dawn Sanborn Photography

52 More Than Blue Dealing with depression –one woman's journey. By Grace N. D’Merci

On the Lighter Side 62 Will’s Women The wagering, the wise, the witty and the wily. By John Sievers

By Debi Neville

Food & Wine 28 Go Do! Cooking classes offer inspiration for every season. By Jody Brown

32 Meaty Main Dishes Recipe favorites from former ERWA recipients. By Margo Stich

Healthy Living 54 New Olmsted Medical Center Facility Facility caters to regional athletes. By Jennifer Gangloff

Travel 58 Candlelit Night on the Ski Trails Winter road trip destinations in the Root River Valley. By Amanda Wingren

56 Shooting for High Goals The impact of Title IX on women's high school hockey in Rochester. By Pat Garry

31 Women & Wine Wine friends Georgette, Suzanne and Lucy By Jody Brown

Let's Get Personal 11 Grandma, Mom & Me Cell Phone Etiquette. By Mariah Mihm

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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

in every issue

From the Editor 7 In the Know 8 Marketplace 50 Community Calendar 60


SPECIAL HOME SECTION 38 – 51 Rochester Area Builders Home Show 39 How to Dress up Your Home with Kitchen and Bath Hardware By Debi Neville

Treat your makeup like jewelry for the face. Play with colors, shapes, structure—it can transform you.

—François Nars Jewelry is the obvious choice to

42 Remodelers Corner An old cabin on Lake Zumbro gets a new life. By Penny Marshall

individualize your style … as a key part of enhancing your natural, outer beauty with quality cosmetics, skin care and beautiful jewelry … all of which can be found at

About Face!

48 Building on Her Success Co-host of the PBS home improvement TV series “Hometime,” Miriam Johnson shares insights as a true do-it-yourselfer. By Trish Amundson

skin care products, cosmetics, fragrances, jewelry, and other accessories …

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RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

5


We’re building to better serve the healthcare needs of women.

The

Women’s Heal th Pavilion

Promise

In response to the growing healthcare needs of women in Southeastern Minnesota, Olmsted Medical Center is building for the future. The Women’s Health Pavilion is an 80,000-square-foot facility that will be located immediately to the west of OMC’s current hospital in Rochester. The facility will double the hospital’s size and will open to patients in late 2014. Watch for news of our opening! Women’s Health Pavilion entrance (rendering courtesy HGA)

N Existing Olmsted Medical Center Hospital NEW Building Addition

w w w. o l m s t e d m e d i c a l c e n t e r. o r g 4th Street SE


from the editor MAGAZINE ISSUE 79, VOLUME 14, NUMBER 6 JANUARY/FEBRUARY 2014 PUBLISHERS

Photo by Mike Hardwick Photography.

Jorrie L. Johnson, MBA Doug Solinger EDITOR

Mariah Mihm LAYOUT DESIGNER

Amy Liebl

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Brett Adams Molly Anderson, MLT Group Tommy Traxel, MLT Group COPY EDITORS

Ellington Miller Ashley Pikel Elisa Tally MARKETING ACCOUNT MANAGER

Deanne Breitenbach PHOTOGRAPHY

Dawn Sanborn Photography Fagan Studios Mike Hardwick Photography COMMUNITY RELATIONS

Daniella Mora-Balbo INTERN

Katlin Schmidt RochesterWomen is published six times per year by Women Communications, L.L.C., P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903 Subscriptions available for $18 per year (six issues). Send check to the address above. All unsolicited manuscripts must be accompanied by a self-addressed, stamped envelope. RochesterWomen assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials. ©2014 Women Communications, L.L.C. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission from the publisher. RochesterWomen magazine does not necessarily endorse the claims or contents of advertising or editorial materials. Printed in the U.S.A. RochesterWomen is a member of the Minnesota Magazine & Publishing Association, Rochester Area Builders, Inc. and the Rochester Area Chamber of Commerce.

507-529-5385 • info@RWmagazine.com RWmagazine.com For advertising information: 507-951-2413

Extraordinary RochesterWomen magazine women from left: Deanne Breitenbach, Dawn Sanborn, Jorrie Johnson, Mariah Mihm and Katlin Schmidt.

my life I have been surrounded by extraordinary women. Women who have been A llunwavering in their support of me, no matter what I am going through or in the

things I have chosen to do. I have learned strength and grace, courage and compassion. I have learned what it means to be a mother, a daughter, a sister, a friend and so much more. I wish I could share with you all of the women who have had such profound effect on my life, but I can't. I can only share my gratitude and my hope that I can pass on the gifts I have been given. This year marks the 11th anniversary of the Extraordinary RochesterWoman Awards. Through the years we have seen women who are making a difference in the Rochester area in big and small ways. All of them truly extraordinary. In addition to our five core categories, we have added a new one: Extraordinary Young Woman. I personally was amazed at the number of nominations we received this year. The judges commented, “There were so many good women who have made an impact in the community, from young women to highly experienced women,” each one finding personal and meaningful ways to give of their time and talents. In this issue you will find some new delights in addition to your favorites (Remodelers Corner and Food & Wine). We have changed up the wine column a bit, with the spunky Jody Brown at the helm. The staff wants to go explore all of the fun but sometimes hidden gem of activities in the area so we are headed out to “Go Do!” We hope you will go do, too! I mentioned the extraordinary women in my life, two of them are my mom and my grandma. We have great discussions so much of the time and RW wants to share a conversation with you! Check out “Grandma, Mom & Me” (page 11). We, as women share triumphs and tragedies, our heartache and challenges but many times there are still topics that are hard to talk about even with our most trusted confidants. Hopefully “Let's Get Personal” will let you feel that you are not alone. Happy New Year and may the extraordinary woman in you shine!

Mariah K. Mihm

Rochester Women magazine has done it

again! Congratulations to the extraordinary RW team on their Minnesota Magazine & Publishing Association(MMPA) Publishing Excellence Awards for Feature Design: Let's Do Brunch in the March/April 2013 issue.

We want to hear from you! Send comments, suggestions, ideas or original recipes to: RochesterWomen Editor, P.O. Box 5986, Rochester, MN 55903-5986 or email: editor@RWmagazine.com. RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

7


n the know in the know in the know in the know in the know in the know in the know BREAKING THE CHAINS OF MODERN DAY SLAVERY — PART 3: PROTECTING OUR CHILDREN The world is not always as it seems. Elizabeth Smart, Jaycee Dugard, Jacob Wetterling… these children came from “good” homes. All were abducted. Many children, from a wide variety of home environments get enslaved in the system of human sex trafficking through not only through force (abduction), but also through fraud and coercion. Come learn more how you can protect and empower your children, and help bring an end to this evil in our society.

“GIRL RISING” FILM Thurs., Jan. 9, 7 p.m. Rochester Public Library

PROTECTING OUR CHILDREN

2014 ROCHESTER

GO RED LUNCHEON

Wed., Feb. 12, 10 a.m., Rochester Event Center Heart disease kills more women than all forms of cancer combined. That is why it is so important to support research, education and advocacy. For 10 years, Go Red For Women has been making a difference. This year’s luncheon includes: heart health information, health screenings, silent auction, diva station and hear from survivor Renee Ticknor and Keynote speaker Sharon L. Mulvagh M.D. of Mayo Clinic. For more information call 278-7903 or goredforwomen.org.

A CHAIR AFFAIR

Sat., Jan. 11, 8 a.m. – noon, Assisi Heights Spirituality Center 

GALA. GLAM. GIVE.

ONE ACT PLAY COMPETITION

Sat., Feb. 22, Rochester Event Center Since 2002, A Chair Affair has raised money for the Boys & Girls Club of Rochester. It’s a fun, unique event of beautiful chairs, created by local and national artists to be auctioned off. Tickets available beginning mid January. For more information visit bgclubroch.org/a-chair-affair.

Fri., Jan. 31, 7 p.m. Lourdes High School Hosted by the Sisters of Saint Francis, Rochester, MN, and Co-sponsored by: AAUW-Rochester, MN; College of St. Teresa Alumnae; Minuteman Press; Rochester Convention and Visitors Bureau; Rochester Public Library and RochesterWomen magazine.

‘Safe Kids, Smart Parents’ BY MARLENE PETERSEN

A

lthough it is still a useful tool, “stranger danger” is not all there is to teach children about abduction, according to “Safe Kids, Smart Parents: What Parents Need to Know to Keep Their Children Safe.” This immensely informative and approachable book offers a wealth of real-world advice on keeping our children safe in an age of increasingly savvy predators and human trafficking. Even parents who consider themselves well versed in child safety will get a new education. Dr. Rebecca Bailey, a renowned family psychologist, renders a compelling instruction manual for parents, which adeptly walks readers through potentially dangerous circumstances that might appear harmless. The true strength of the book, however, is that Dr. Bailey draws a helpful line between problematic and paranoid and gives parents solutions for the situations she raises. She recognizes that we cannot ban our children from the internet, school or the mall to keep them safe. They must be allowed to live, but it must be done with an eye toward analyzing scenarios and people to assess their danger level. The advice she offers parents on how to accomplish this and how to teach those skills to their children, makes it a book every parent must read. For more information on “Safe Kids, Smart Parents,” and tips for protecting your children, be sure to attend the human trafficking awareness events at Assisi Heights.

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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

HEARTS AND DIAMONDS SPECTACULAR: DINNER,

DIAMONDS, & DANCING

Sat., Feb. 1, 5:30 p.m., Somerby Golf Club, Byron A truly elegant, black tie affair benefiting the Ronald McDonald House of Rochester. Set in the lush landscape of Soberby Golf Club, enjoy and evening with dinner, diamonds, and dance. Enjoy and opportunity to meet with some of the guests of the Ronald McDonald House, win spectacular diamonds generously donated by Hight & Randall Personal Jewelers and so much more. For tickets and more information visit rmhmn.org.

LACE UP AGAINST BREAST CANCER Sat., Feb. 9, Mayo High School 8 a.m. Registration 9:30 a.m. Half Marathon and 2-person Half Marathon Relay start 10 a.m. 5K Run start 10:05 a.m. 2 mile run start Noon lunch, awards, speaker and more This year Lace Up Against Breast Cancer and Join the Journey are partnering together in the fight against breast cancer by raising funds, providing education and awareness in the Rochester community. Proceeds from this event go to Mayo Clinic breast cancer research. For more information contact runluabc@gmail.com or jointhejourney.us.


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“Girl Rising” Film Event – 7pm Rochester Public Library

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“Protecting Our Children” – 8am-Noon Assisi Heights

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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

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let's get personal

G randma, Mom & Me BY MARIAH K. MIHM

I

feel fortunate to have grown up around informed, opinionated women. Hear it straight from three generations: me (Mariah Mihm), 38, my mom, Debi Neville, 62, and my grandma Verna Kraft, 86.

CELL PHONE ETIQUETTE Mom: You mean because of… Grandma: Yes, because of texting and Facebook and email and the other technology that makes it easy not to talk to each other. Me: I use all of it, but I understand. There should be some sort of accepted etiquette. Mom: Isn’t it about using good manners and common sense? Grandma: Like so many things, it’s carried too far. It’s the cell phone usage in public that bugs me the most. Me: So what do you think cell phone limitations should be?

Me: I think it’s important to acknowledge the wait staff or checkout person. At least smile and say “hi” and “thank you” if you have to be on a call. It is just common courtesy. Also, I try to keep volume at a decent level. Mom: Public courtesy should still be a given; if you’re talking or texting, at least hold the door for someone, answer a ringing phone ASAP and keep it handy so you’re not digging in a pants pocket or purse. But I think cell phones or at least texting on them should be banned at the dinner table. Me: You’re looking at me when you say that. I know I am addicted to my phone, but I’m a talker. Grandma: I feel cell phones are wonderful, they have saved lives and lots of time, and they are convenient, but I like to talk with people, actually hear another voice.

Grandma: I don’t think two people having a meal in a restaurant should be texting or talking to someone else on their phone unless it’s an emergency. Talk to each other!

Mom: Mom, remember when we had party lines, everyone could listen in and you had to wait to use the phone until someone else was done?

Mom: I get irritated with that, too, but it does provide freedom to go places and do things and still be connected to work. That’s one of the biggest advantages I see.

Grandma: Yes, and long distance calls were so expensive.

Me: It’s very nice, I would even say necessary, for work. I can take care of a question in a timely manner even though I might not be sitting at my computer. Some business is even taken care of with a Facebook message. But I also enjoy staying in touch with friends. We text more often than call. Grandma: I have a cell phone for emergencies but use it only if I am away from home and have to get a message to someone. I don’t like receiving calls on it. I really dislike it if I’m in a store and I can hear someone’s conversations or if someone in a checkout line is distracted by the phone.

Me: Ugh! No privacy.

Me: Ha! Those first few bills after I moved to California were $300. Mom: Oh boy, remember the long cords on the phone so you could go around the corner into the bathroom for more privacy? Me: Shooing my little brother away. Grandma: Who would’ve thought that at the theater, church and at concerts that we’d be reminded to shut off our phone? Me: I get impatient if I have to wait for someone to reply to a text, and I’m surprised if someone other than mom or grandma calls! Grandma: It’s a convenience most of the time, but I don’t think it hurts to shut it off sometimes, too. Mom and Me: Agreed! RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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Photo courtesy of AMN Photography

Grandma: I have to admit I’m worried. I actually worry if the future generations will be able to communicate verbally, face to face.


Going the extra mile SIX ROCHESTER AREA WOMEN WHO KEEP ON GOING

O

ver the last 11 years, RochesterWomen has honored extraordinary women. Those who have given so much of themselves, in some way, to benefit our community. This year is no exception, from a young woman who, at age 5, gave her birthday gifts to the Ronald McDonald House, to a woman who makes sure a young male dancer has appropriate roles to showcase his love of dance. Each of our six winners truly goes the extra mile.

GOLD SPONSORS:

Garden of Massage

SILVER SPONSORS: C  rossings at Carnegie; Hunt’s Silver Lake Drug & Gift; Jim Sloan, Inc.; Premier Bank Rochester; Rochester League of Women Voters

BRONZE SPONSORS: W  edding Officiants Michelle Hurst & Ruth B. Bohlen 12

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


cover story

Rachel Goldsmith

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

EXTRAORDINARY YOUNG WOMAN J U D G ES ' C OM M E N TS :

e k li d ’ I e. iv g to n r o b s a w “Rachel !” 0 4 t a e k li is e sh t a h w e se to

H

er great-grandfather gave her the advice, “Put yourself aside and help the less fortunate and you’ll be the richest person in the world.” Rachel took that advice to heart. My husband and I knew when our daughter turned 5 that she had an enormous heart. She requested that, for her birthday party, her friends bring a gift suitable for donation to charity. When the party was finished she hand delivered the toys to the Ronald McDonald House. This was just the start of her phenomenal compassion and empathy. Rachel has constantly and consistently over the past 10 years given of herself to help others with a smile and without complaint. She has organized bake sales and coordinated numerous volunteers for many charitable organizations. She has assisted with the Gift of Life Transplant House run, sewn and donated over 30 tote bags for sick, less fortunate children and filled them with books and toys, and has worked with the American Cancer Society. She feeds the homeless through the Interfaith Hospitality Network. Her ideas and goals are endless and her sense of giving to others extraordinary. She strives for excellence in all she does, and she succeeds, all the while holding a 4.0 GPA. She stays active in church, works part time, and helps out at home. Like the Energizer Bunny, she keeps on going. She says she feels “a sense of greatness” when helping others— particularly children with cancer. Rachel has a soft heart for those who are struggling, witnessing her father’s cancer diagnosis in 2004, four classmates, a cousin, grandfather and close friend. Nominated by: Sharon Goldsmith, Rachel's mother

RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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J U D G ES ' C OM M E N TS :

“Sheila has impacted over 1,2 00 children in the community and I love the impact she has had on the young boy. She has helped him gain confidence in himself. ”

M

y son has performed in the past three Children’s Dance Theatre productions. As a parent of a young boy who loves to dance, I realized early on it can be difficult to find performance opportunities truly tailored to young boys. I was drawn to CDT as they provided roles specifically for boys. He was led by choreographers who knew how to teach boy dancers. Sheila Sullivan was instrumental in not only encouraging young male cast members but helping to make their roles truly masculine. As a parent volunteer, I became aware of all of Sheila’s talents and how tirelessly she works in sharing with CDT. She has volunteered for 11 years, and in 2014 she will have served as managing director for her seventh production. Sheila has also expanded opportunities for CDT with community outreach, including educational school programs, additional ensemble group performance opportunities and dance intensives for local youth led by professional dancers from Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa and New York. The value is certainly personal for our family, and the impact to our community is great. Due to her effort, last season more than 1,200 school children experienced “Alice in Wonderland” come to life through dance. Nominated by: Susan Bestgen­, parent volunteer with Children’s Dance Theatre

Sheila Sullivan EXTRAORDINARY ARTIST/MUSICIAN 14

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


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Call me at 507.281.4341 to get started.

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RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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Stephanie Kruger EXTRAORDINARY CAREGIVER J U D G ES ' C OM M E N TS :

sted in her ve in y ll a on rs pe is e ni a ph “Ste itment to m m co of l ve le h ig h a s a clients; she h ss. She ne si u b er h s nd ce ns a tr t a her clients th at her job is and h w d on ey b nd a e ov b a s goe giver.” re ca ry a in d or a tr ex n a er this makes h

S

tephanie Kruger is a very valued resource for our company, Vocational Rehabilitation Services, which assists disabled youth and adults in securing suitable employment, and our customers. One of my co-workers recently said to me, “Stephanie is far and away our most effective placement specialist.” Stephanie is always very thorough in her work and presents her services to our customers in a friendly and professional manner. She always takes the time to learn as much as possible about the clients’ employment aspirations while painting a realistic picture for them of the placement process. She is very thoughtful in her analysis of the job market and extremely effective in helping to provide the tools and strategies our customers need to become successfully employed. She often sits patiently with our customers for hours, laboriously sifting through job leads and personally transporting customers (many of whom do not have adequate transportation) to job sites to pick up and drop off applications. She does whatever it takes to foster successful outcomes. Stephanie takes it personally when she is unable to get someone hired within 90 days, regardless of the severity of the disability, but she is all smiles when she can share in someone’s success story.

Nominated by: Jeff Larson, Vocational Rehabilitation Services

16

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


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Keep your business growing! Reserve your ad space for RochesterWomen March/April issue by Friday, January 24th!

“ There are no great limits to growth because there are Magazine no limits on humanJan/Feb 2014 Rochester Women intelligence, imagination, and wonder.”

Rochester Visitor Please Read Carefully – Ronald Reagan

Deanne Breitenbach

This proof is submitted to ensure the accuracy of your order. We exercise reasonable care to avoid errors, but Marketing Account Manager the customer is responsible for the final decision with this order, and assumes full responsibility.

deanne@RWmagazine.com

Clearly mark any corrections. www.RWmagazine.com We are not responsible for errors not indicated at this time.507-282-0404 Author’s alterations may be chargeable after the second proof at a cost of $25 for each additional proof. Note: The color you view on your monitor or laser proof will not be exact to what we print. Color accuracy of laser proofs and PDF files are at the mercy of the medium.

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J U D G ES ' C OM M E N TS :

nifer was en J t a th d se es pr im ’m “I was able nd a ss ne si u b a p u g in rt a st e dealing il h w it g in nn ru e u in nt co to I have n. so er h h it w es su is e th h it w s about g in th d oo g ny a m so rd ea h er to go g ea m a I . fe a C ow b in a R there and support her.”

F

ive years ago Jennifer ( Jen) Richards and her husband, Jeremy Olson, both trained chefs, bought the Rainbow Cafe in Pine Island. Their vision was lofty, taking a small-town cafe into the world of a destination gourmet restaurant with a farm-to-table experience. The creativity, time and energy Jen has given to this endeavor is endless: long days and late nights, figuring out how to make the right cake for the perfect wedding and how to successfully set up a princess party for a 4-year-old. Not to mention finding the right beer and wine pairings for the day's meal and shopping the local farmers market for the perfect vegetables, finding the right farmer for the healthiest meat and cheese. All the while hiring and training staff, catering events, keeping the books...and raising a beautiful son with autism. Jen continues to manage her incredibly active life (even through a fractured ankle last year). She is determined to give her son the best life and opportunities possible and is determined to continue to enhance the restaurant to be the culinary experience she and her husband have dreamed of. Jen’s passion for her child and her culinary dream fill each day and only enhance her love of life. Nominated by: Mary Richards, Jennifer's mother

Jennifer Richards EXTRAORDINARY BUSINESSWOMAN 18

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


Thank you for helping us fill this plate by supporting Meals on Wheels.

THANK YOU! JANUARY’S MEALS ON WHEELS SPONSOR: ROCHESTER ATHLETIC CLUB

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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


Mary Hanson EXTRAORDINARY VOLUNTEER J U D G ES ' C OM M E N TS :

t n' s e o d d n a t lo a s e “Mary do ovides r p e h S . n r u t e r in expect a lot eed.” n le p o e p t a h t h c u o the personal t

V

olunteering is not always an easy job, and so many times the contributions go unrecognized. Mary Hanson proves volunteering is making a difference in the lives of so many people. We are lucky to have her in our community. For Mary, a day isn’t complete if she hasn’t accomplished something for someone else. When she joined the Rochester Senior Center, she probably didn’t know what she was getting herself into. Center members realized early on that Mary was a leader. She leads the center’s quilting group, and because of her leadership she has helped countless people in need receive a new quilt to keep them warm. Mary has also worked with the Crisis Nursery, other non-profits, and the school district. If you have purchased something from the St. Francis rummage sale, Mary has probably had her hands on it. She also is the volunteer chair for the Rochester Senior Center’s annual rummage sale and last year helped raise almost $10,000 for the center. She has also kept Mayo Clinic’s standards of excellence by being a welcoming presence to the patients and visitors through their volunteer program. As a former health field professional Mary understands just how important it is to make someone feel comfortable, no matter the reason for the visit to the clinic. The community is fortunate to have someone like Mary who shares her time, talents and experience. She is helping to teach new generations the importance of giving and helping others. Nominated by: Rachel Peterson, former marketing and volunteer coordinator at Rochester Senior Center

RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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J U D G ES ' C OM M E N TS :

ochester R n o t c a p im n a d a h s “ Chrisanne ha in the s w o sh y g er en er H in many ways. ogram. r p E IF L e th f o th w o r impressive g for the r te et b es v li y n a m e d a She has m y. seniors in the communit ”

I

have participated in a number of volunteer organizations in my life, but I have never served on a board with a staff director as enthusiastic, thoughtful, collaborative and sensitive as Chrisanne Pieper. As the RCTC Senior Program Director of LIFE (Learning is ForEver), she works with board members to create an academic enrichment program for older adults that stands above other similar programs in the state. Chrisanne combines the warmth of friendship with the professionalism and creativity needed to manage a large and varied education program. Her “let’s try it and see what happens” attitude is what has made the program’s growth such a success. She understands the complex need for mental stimulation and socialization people require for healthy aging. With her guidance, LIFE provides the opportunities to keep older minds sharp and provides a sense of belonging and staying connected. In her work at RCTC, she generally has a work-study student to help her, but Chrisanne sees this as an opportunity to mentor them. She is a positive role model for the students, and they respect her. Chrisanne also manages the successful Rochester school district’s Adult Enrichment Program. She annually blends the two programs for several very successful theater and concert trips to the Twin Cities. Perhaps her core strength to the programs she leads is her passion for the needs of older adults. Chrisanne recognizes what today’s active and inquisitive older adults want and can do. Nominated by: Priscilla Russell­who serves on LIFE board with Chrisanne

Chrisanne Pieper EXTRAORDINARY OVERALL 22

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


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Sign up for Classes Starting in January! For the youngest students: Music Tots and Move with Me Starts Jan. 7. No registration fee! For children: Angelina Ballerina, Creative Movement, Dance Discovery. Enroll by Jan. 8 and receive $10 off your registration fee! For Adults: Adult Ballet, Barre Sculpt, Adult Tap Begins Jan. 6. Your first class is fREE! Photo: Teresa Smerud

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www.AllegroDanceMusic.com RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

23


community

Moments of Shared Learning Diversity Council Rochester and Civic Theatre hear the heartbeat of social change BY DEBI NEVILLE

W

Photos courtesy of Rochester Civic Theatre and the Diversity Council

hen the Diversity Council of Rochester and Rochester Civic Theatre partnered five years ago, their main goal was “Celebrating Diversity and Inclusivity in honor of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.” The long list of events that has been presented has received overwhelming support from both presenters and participants. Fundamentally, the partnership has lead to looking at injustice from a theatric point of view. The goal is to sustain a welcoming attitude to all people, keeping that in mind when making decisions for the Rochester community. Gregory Stavrou, Executive Director of RCT says, “We asked several focus groups for input on future programming. We also raised the question, ‘how are we doing?’ Many ideas were floated and the decision was made to highlight women's inclusiveness. It was also suggested we expand the conversation and events.” According to Hollybeth Anderson, Rochester Civic Theatre’s Committee Outreach Chair, “We are continuing to broaden our programming to be effective in our outreach. In 2014 the celebration and programs will run January through March with the theme ‘The Power of a Woman’s Voice’.” An analogy Stavrou used to explain the decision to concentrate on women’s issues was that of a garden. “When looking back, a lot of weeds have been pulled, but the garden is only as good as the soil; it’s time to fertilize and work on the soil.” “It’s time to celebrate women and refocus on issues. It means more than adopting male models for the organization where they work; it means more than providing services for victims of sexual exploitation or physical and mental abuse. That means listening to women, not telling them what they should do,” says Stavrou.

WOMEN ON WEDNESDAYS JAN. 15, 29 & FEB. 12, 5:30 – 7 P.M. Stavrou is very excited about an event, called Sponsored by: Women on Wednesdays, a series of three facilitated discussions covering issues related to incarcerated women, support for women in abusive or challenging relationships, and contemporary women in visual, performing and literary arts. “The conversations will revolve around how we, in Rochester, have evolved when it comes to major issues. A variety of people have been invited to join in,” says Stavrou. Extending the inclusiveness concept to the county jail, Stavrou, along with help from Stacy Sinner from Olmsted County Corrections, is embarking on a seven-month project with incarcerated women. “They have amazing resiliency,” he says.

I HAVE THE RIGHT TO SPEAK UP JAN. 11 THROUGH FEB. 2

“How to Be A Korean Woman” by Sun Mee Chomet from Celebrating Diversity and Inclusivity 2013 24

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

Inspiration for this event was taken from Malala Yousafza, the girl in Pakistan shot for speaking out in favor of education for women, who said, “I have the right of education. I have the right to play. I have the right to sing…I have the right to speak up.” Jean Marvin, a member of the Rochester Civic Theatre Outreach Committee, says, “We are taking part of her quote as our theme and have asked area women to share a story about a time in their life when they said or did something that was important to them or someone else.


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A time when being a woman didn’t keep them from making a difference, when the voice of another woman had an impact.” Stories and photos of about 20 women from many walks of life, ages and diverse backgrounds will be displayed in the theatre lobby. Photographer Ann Eldredge of Tangible Moments studio worked on the project. “She has certainly done a wonderful job of presenting the beauty of each of these women,” Marvin says.

THE POWER OF A WOMAN’S VOICE… AMPLIFIED — FEB. 22, 7:30 P.M. A sequence of inspirational performance pieces will exemplify the concept of multi-faceted art and its influence on women in the Rochester area. “People learn in different ways. We are hoping to produce a major impact by providing a sequence of beauty: hearing a poet read her work, an expression of self though dance and the performance of music,” says Stavrou.

90 DAYS OF ENTERTAINMENT AND EDUCATION Spanning a period of three months, “The Power of a Woman’s Voice” begins with a concert January 11 at 7:30 p.m. by Annie Mack who brings her story and vocal artistry to the stage, then the 6th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Student Poetry Contest on January 22 from 2 to 4 p.m. The Diversity Council Annual Celebration at the Rochester Art Center on January 23 at 5:30 p.m., and ends with

Winners for the 2013 Martin Luther King, Jr. Student Poetry Contest.

Etta…Tell Mama, March 23 at 7:30 p.m. a dramatic biographical musical about Etta James performed by Thomasina Petrus. Recognizing that change is slow and believing that concepts must be reinforced frequently, Rochester Civic Theatre and the Diversity Council are allocating their energy to keep the dialogue going as the need to hear women’s stories becomes the underlying thread in the conversation. Debi Neville is a Rochester freelance writer who remembers the first whispers of “Women’s Liberation.”

A Sampling of the Voices to be Heard LILLIAN STEWART, Secondary paraprofessional in the Rochester Public Schools asks herself: Who am I? I am many things, but for about seven hours a day, I am a surrogate mom—or at least that’s how it feels. Am I making a difference? I’d like to think I am, but only time will tell.

REGINA MUSTAFA, Stay-at-home mom: I guess I’ve always been a typical, in-your-face East Coast girl. But when I began to question the Catholic/Christian beliefs with which I was raised and decided to embrace Islam, a religion I felt to be the Truth, I was no longer praised but shunned. 26

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

ELIZABETH FRANKEL, High school student: I don’t blog for myself. I don’t blog for fame. Heck, I don’t even blog for my résumé. I blog because this world can be pretty messed up, and blogging is my chance to shine a little bit of light onto a canvas of negativity.

Sponsors for the events are Think Mutual Bank and RochesterWomen magazine. Funding made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a grant from the Southeastern Minnesota Arts Council thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts & cultural heritage fund.


Caring for your loved one with memory loss. Balancing the demands of life can be challenging. Caring for a loved one with memory loss may be overwhelming. At Cottagewood Senior Communities, we understand and are here to assist you and provide peace of mind during this difficult transition. To learn more about our Memory Care Community or to schedule a tour, please call 507-286-8528.

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RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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food & wine

GO do! Cooking classes offer inspiration for every season BY JODY BROWN PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

Go Do!

is a new column centered on fun (and sometimes little-known) activities to do as a group or as an individual in Rochester and the surrounding area. RochesterWomen will seek out these opportunities, try them out, and let you know how you can also Go Do! Cooking classes are a great way to stay inspired after the rush of the holiday season. They’re a creative date idea, a fun activity for gathering friends together, or a great way to bond with family. Classes are typically offered in the evenings on a per-class basis, so you don’t have to commit to weeks of lessons, and many classes include dinner. Whether you love to cook or tend to be timid in the kitchen, there seems to be a class out there for women and men alike, at any skill level.

VARIETY IS THE SPICE OF LIFE As cooking classes gain popularity in Rochester, the variety of classes is expanding. Some classes are taught by local restaurant chefs or even area enthusiasts eager to share the preparation of their traditional ethnic foods. Other classes feature company representatives who travel to Rochester to demonstrate new culinary gadgets on the market. Cook’s Pantry (cookspantryrochester.com) and The People’s Food Coop (pfc.coop) have both built state-of-the-art kitchens in their Rochester stores and feature classes with local chefs teaching personal recipes. Cook’s Pantry also offers knife skills and sharpening classes. Rochester Community Education (rochesterce.org) is still accepting participants for January classes instructing artisan bread baking, the making of Indian delicacies and scone making. The Winter 28

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

Jorrie Johnson, Mariah Mihm, Tracy Will, Karen Snyder and Jody Brown with Rochester Women magazine participated in a cooking class at Cook's Pantry.

“The class was a fun opportunity to sample some terrific food and get a few tips and tricks from a pro that I hope will help me improve my own cooking. I'm looking forward to going back and learning more.” — TRACY WILL Course Catalog published in early January will offer classes on raw foods, tea, dining etiquette and cooking classes designed for parents and children together. Price per class can range from $25-$60 per person, depending on the cost of provided ingredients and whether or not dinner is included.

A NEW STORE WITH A TWIST Cook’s Pantry, Rochester’s new culinary store, offers cooking classes a couple times per month. Located on 16th Street in the plaza south of Apache Mall, the classes are taught in the commercial kitchen located right inside the store. Holly Mangelsen, originally from Stewartville, owns Cook’s Pantry with her husband, Jake. The Mangelsens also own Tesora Restaurant, Acorn Pantry and the Chattering Squirrel coffee café, all in Siren, Wis. “My life is full of the culinary experience,” laughs Holly. “It’s my way of bringing people back to the table, where so many memories are made. My mom had a passion for cooking and was a real caregiver through food,”

This was fun and very informative, even for the 'not so inclined to cook' person." — DAWN SANBORN

Holly says. “There are gadgets at Cook’s Pantry that I know she would have loved, which is why I stock them.”

FOOD POETRY Holly calls upon Tesora’s executive chef and co-owner Jon Dykeman to teach some of the classes offered at Cook’s Pantry. Rochester Women attended his class on truffle-scented risotto, an Italian rice dish served at Tesora. The chef ’s kindness, generosity of spirit and humor was appreciated when answering our various questions on rice, lavender, fresh versus canned vegetables and the importance of eye-appealing food. “The eyes eat first,” says Chef Dykeman. “That’s why presentation is so important. It may be good food, but if it looks terrible, no one will want to eat it.” Throughout the class, we laughed and repeated his taglines: “Cooking is layering,” and “Taste at every step, but season at the end.” We quickly learned that when he discusses food, Chef Dykeman speaks with love the same way that Holly talks about her mother’s passion. And the risotto was so good we started plotting a road trip to Tesora in Siren, Wis.

GET INSPIRED Nothing inspires better than spending time with people who truly love what they do and are willing to impart their knowledge to others. Allow yourself a little inspiration this winter, with friends, family, or even on your own, by signing up for the cooking class of your choice. But be forewarned: You might have some delicious fun while you Go Do! Jody Brown is a freelance writer living in Rochester


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Rochester Youth Soccer Association (RYSA) Keeping soccer fun and instilling a lifelong passion for the game!

Offering Year Round Soccer for players age 5-18 Upcoming programs include: Wine tasting tickets only $25 in advance, $30 at the door For advance tickets contact Jorrie Johnson 507-259-6362 jorrie@RWmagazine.com

at Barlow Plaza 1151 Northwest Civic Center Drive, Rochester

Kindergarten Kicks – May & August sessions Spring Recreation soccer for grades 1-12 Spring/Summer Competitive (travel) Soccer for U09-U17 players Registration opening soon for summer camps

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For more information or to register online, visit our website www.rysa.org or call us at 507-280-7584. RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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51st Annual

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at the Olmsted County Fairgrounds Hours Friday, March 14 Saturday, March 15 Sunday, March 16

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Great food, great service, great times!

Limited exhibitor space available Call 507-286-1010 for information or email terry.lee@townsquaremedia.com 1643 North Broadway (River Center Plaza) Rochester, MN • 507-252-8800 www.glynnerspub.com

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Scratch-made dishes that fill you up and keep you coming back for more. 7 1st Ave SW • Downtown Rochester • 507.280.6232 • victoriasmn.com Located in the Kahler Grand Hotel • Connected to the downtown skyway/subway system 30

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


food & wine

Women &Wine WINE FRIENDS GEORGETTE, SUZANNE AND LUCY

BY JODY BROWN PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

W

e all have ‘em, that friend that we consider to be a total wine snob, who turns up her nose at anything pink in her glass. We all have that friend who is new to wine, won’t drink anything red, and wants to add sugar to her glass. And the rest of us sit somewhere in between, liking some wines, shying away from others, yet we’ll allow ourselves to experiment. So what happens when you put these women around the table together with a little wine and cheese mixed in? Hilarity, that’s what.

MEET MY FRIENDS Meet my friends Georgette, Suzanne, and Lucy, friends new and old, and wine drinkers. Georgette is a self-admitted wine snob, who has been known to choose her vacations based on the best wine regions in the world. Suzanne is just discovering wine, branching out from her fruity martinis. (Suzanne is wine kryptonite to Georgette.) Lucy loves a good glass of wine, even though she considers herself fairly new to it. Yet put a pint of beer in front of her and listen to her get all poetic on its barley, hops, and spice combo. And I’m somewhere in the middle. I know exactly what I like in a wine (big, bold, spicy), yet I’m trying to grow beyond this point to appreciate subtler wines. So when RochesterWomen asked me to write a new wine column, I immediately thought of roping in my friends. Sure, I serve great wine for a living. And because of my job, I get to try the best of the best. But wine is a living, breathing thing. I could sit in a leather wingback chair and slowly sip pinot noir and tell you what I think about it. Or, I could get my friends involved around a table of food and wine and see what uncorks. We’ll even visit some local wineries and tell you what we think. I’ll write about our experiences, discoveries, and the camaraderie that happens when women get together over wine.

GATHERING AROUND THE TABLE Our first order of business was to gather around Georgette’s table over the holidays and discuss why there are so many different kinds of wines. Georgette said, “Because there are so many different kinds of grapes and climates in the world, that’s why. Some grapes grow better in hot weather, others prefer a cooler season. Some need a lot of water. Others can survive in terrible soil and not much water. The combinations go on and on.” And Lucy jumped in and declared, “It’s food’s fault. There are so many great foods out there, and it seems this wine goes better with this, and that wine goes better with that… I want red wine with

Jody Bro wn chocolate but I like white wine with a fruit salad.” Suzanne chimed in, “I’m going back to climate. I like sweet wine…” This brought a reaction from the rest of us, something like, “We know already!” and Lucy tossed a popcorn kernel at Suzanne. “But,” Suzanne said, deflecting the popcorn, “I find I like wine slightly less sweet if I’m outside on a hot day or sitting in front of the fireplace in the winter.” Each of my friends makes a valid point. There are thousands of different types of wine grapes—perhaps as many as 10,000 if you count all the hybrid grapes out there. And wine will taste differently depending on the food you eat with it and even your own body temperature. But, gathered around Georgette’s table with Suzanne, Lucy, and yours truly, a simple answer popped up: No two wine drinkers are exactly alike. We like to think that there’s a wine out there for everyone. Jody Brown is a freelance writer in Rochester and a server at Söntés Restaurant. She is the author of Upside Down Kingdom. RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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Meaty

food & wine

Main Dishes

Recipe Favorites of Former Extraordinary RochesterWomen Award Recipients

R

ochesterWomen magazine has featured women who have made a difference in our community. We are delighted to have four past ERWA recipients contribute a favorite recipe and share its story.

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BY MARGO STICH PHOTOGRAPHY BY DAWN SANBORN PHOTOGRAPHY

RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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Women of Destiny Breakfast

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Breakfast: Fri - Sun 8am Lunch Mon - Sun from 11am Dinner Tues - Sat 120 Elton Hills Drive NW (Next to Dunn Bros) 285.2516

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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


Melissa Brinkman ERWA winner 2009

Favorite cookbooks come from many sources. For Melissa, one such book was compiled by a family member then gifted to contributing friends and family. What makes this collection even more special is that each book was individually constructed in a scrapbook format, with the recipes handwritten. The cookbook holds a special place in Melissa’s heart and kitchen.

Pork Tenderloin 3-4 pork tenderloins 2 jars (4 ½ oz. each) peach or apricot jam 1/3 cup ketchup 1/3 cup vinegar 1/2 cup brown sugar 2 tsp. ginger 2 Tbsp. soy sauce Salt, black pepper and garlic salt, to taste Set tenderloins on rack in baking pan. Combine the remaining ingredients in a saucepan. Bring to a boil then pour sauce over the tenderloins. Bake at 350 degrees, uncovered, for 1 ½ hours. Wine and/or beer recommendation: Estancia Pinot Noir or Alaskan Amber.

Laurie Helmers ERWA winner 2007

Residing within Laurie’s recipe box is this favorite which goes back 30 some years. When drawn to the kitchen to prepare the stew, she is reminded of the original recipe which came from a cookbook she received as a newlywed. While the book is no longer in her possession, the card represents years of enjoyment over a dish modified to suit personal taste.

Cider Stew 2 Tbsp. flour 2 tsp. salt 1/4 tsp. black pepper 1/4 tsp. thyme 2 lbs. beef stew meat 3 Tbsp. cooking oil 2 cup apple cider 1/2 cup water

2 Tbsp. vinegar 4 carrots, quartered 3 potatoes, peeled and quartered 2 small yellow onions, sliced 2 ribs celery, sliced 1 apple, peeled, cored and chopped (Laurie prefers a tart apple)

Combine flour and seasonings. Toss with beef to coat. Brown meat in hot oil in a dutch oven. Stir in cider, water and vinegar. Bring to a boil; reduce heat and simmer 2 hours. Add veggies and apple and cook until tender (about 30 minutes). Wine and/or beer recommendation: Blackstone Merlot or Sam Adams Boston Lager. RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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Aileen Williams ERWA winner 2005

In sharing her recipe for Veal Casserole, Aileen notes, this was something she often made “in the era of casseroles.” She describes this dish as being similar to Indian Biryani, but without the work and spices.  

Veal Casserole 1 Tbsp. oil or butter 1 large onion, diced 1 cup celery 1 tsp. diced garlic 2 lb. chicken, pork or veal steak, cubed 1 c an (4 oz.) mushrooms (liquid and pieces)

1 can (10 ¾ oz.) chicken rice soup 1 can (10 ¾ oz.) mushroom soup 1 large onion, diced            1 can water 1/2 cup broken cashew nuts

Heat the oil and butter in a frying pan. Add the onion, celery and garlic; sauté until limp. Add meat and brown. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Combine this mixture with remaining ingredients, except cashew nuts. Bake at 325º for 1 hour. Remove from oven. Sprinkle broken cashews on top. Bake an additional 30 min. Yield 8 servings. Pork or chicken may be substituted for veal. Wine and/or beer recommendation: Wente Morning Fog Chardonnay or Shells Pils.

Mary Amundsen ERWA winner 2004

Childhood memories usually include recipes one grew up with. Mary often served this dish to her active, growing family, after growing up on it herself. She reflects the origins of the dish probably derived from the need to use up the Easter or Christmas ham. Mary recalls her mother clamping the hand cranked meat grinder on the edge of the counter. As most modern counters aren't constructed to use such old-style grinders, Mary eventually revised the recipe to use diced ham. 

Ham Spaghetti 1/2 package (1 lb.) spaghetti 1 lb. smoked ham 2 large onions, diced 1 can (15 oz.) tomatoes 1/4-1/2 lb. cheddar cheese, shredded

Food writer Margo Stich would like to thank the past EWRA recipients for all they do, adding from the poem in Aileen’s kitchen “the most visible creators are those artists whose medium is life itself.”

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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

Cook spaghetti, following package directions. Brown ham in skillet then add onions to sauté slightly. Add tomatoes.  Bring to a boil then add cheese. Combine all ingredients; place in a lightly greased casserole. Bake in 350 degree oven for about 20 minutes. Wine and/or beer recommendation: Red Rock Merlot or New Castle.


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�ursday, January 30 6:30 – 8 p.m. at Söntés Learn about Old World wines (primarily produced in Europe) and New World wines from Tessa Leung, certified sommelier and owner of Söntés.

Only $10 per person! Reserve your glass today. www.luannb.com/upcoming-events luann@renewwomensretreat.com 507-951-1468

RWmagazine.com

519 1st Ave. SW downtown Rochester www.pfc.coop @pfccoop 507.289.9061 open daily 6 am–10 pm RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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35TH ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 7, 8 & 9, 2014

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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


MAYO CIVIC CENTER — WWW.ROCHESTERAREABUILDERS.COM

home

Add Sparkle to Your Home with Hardware Simple upgrades to make your kitchen and bath shine Color is showing up in unexpected places.

BY DEBI NEVILLE

I

f looking around your kitchen and bath makes you bored and tired, consider a change that can be easy and affordable. Start 2014 with a fresh new look by updating your faucets, towel bars and cabinetry hardware. Those choices offer a quick, easy and relatively inexpensive way to give both rooms an entirely new look.

EFFICIENCY, PERFORMANCE AND STYLE

Photos submitted by Gerhards, the Bath and Kitchen Showroom of First Supply.

You are not saving any money with those leaky, lime-encrusted faucets. Water-saving faucets give you increased efficiency and convenience. If the door and drawer handles on your cabinets have been on duty for 20 years, it’s time to retire them for a younger model. Towel bars get a good deal of use and can become loose and shaky.

DESIGN AND FUNCTION OPTIONS “We see many people opting for the urban loft look,” said Christina Jorgensen of Beyond Kitchens of Rochester. “It’s a sleeker, clean look that can make a dramatic difference.” She points out that oil-rubbed bronze and brushed chrome are among the most popular current choices. “They are retaining a lead but polished nickel and colors have a presence too.” Beyond Kitchens offers a number of tall spout faucets for the kitchen with a pull-out spray. “These seem to be the most desirable. Homeowners really like their convenience.” Renae Kasel of Gerhards, the Bath and Traditional elements made modern and fresh.

RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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35TH ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 7, 8 & 9, 2014

Kitchen Showroom of First Supply, says, “I ask clients to consider a single handle faucet for a bathroom used frequently by children. It’s much safer. Many dual handled faucets are chosen for the master bathroom in a more elegant style.”

CAREFUL CONSIDERATIONS

Clean and sleek suit this urban kitchen.

Oil-rubbed bronze continues to be popular.

First, begin with a look at your bank account and decide what you can comfortably afford. Second, consider where the existing holes are in your countertop for faucet replacement. If you have a two-handle faucet with soap dispenser and sprayer, it’s best to replace with the same unless you want to replace the counter top. The placement and position of cabinetry screw holes and brackets on the wall must also be taken into consideration. Measure accurately and make a quick diagram to use when shopping whether online or in the store. Third, blending finishes with existing doors and lighting is important for a smooth and attractive transition.

NEW OR TRADITIONAL Hands-free faucets have long been an accepted commercial faucet application and now are making their way into the residential market according to both sources. “It’s an upscale choice but I think it will become increasingly popular because of its convenience,” said Kasel. “We also show a variety of finishes such as a combination of polished nickel with black, white, cocoa brown or even red.” If the sleek new lines are just not up your alley, many styles are a new take on a tried and traditional design. Handcrafted, carved hardware can be ultra modern but also classic choices that fit in well with most home styles.

JEWELRY FOR THE ROOM Though faucets and hardware are necessities in the kitchen and bath, don’t overlook their importance in function and style. Look at them as beautiful accessories that add polish and pizzazz! Debi Neville is a writer who has learned it makes life easier to call on a professional rather than try to install plumbing on your own. 40

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


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3532 Hwy 63 South, Rochester RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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35TH ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 7, 8 & 9, 2014

home

An old cabin on Lake Zumbro gets a new life

Twisted bamboo flooring, a new staircase and wood beams give the main living room a modern cabin feel.

after

CONTRACTOR:

SUBCONTRACTORS:

HOMEOWNERS:

Kruger Electric Inc. Cozik Plumbing & Heating, LLC Earl Shultz Drywall, LLC Sinning Construction, LLC

Chladek Construction, LLC David and Sue Limpert

PROJECT:

PHOTOGRAPHY BY FAGAN STUDIOS

Second home gets a second chance

BY PENNY MARSHALL

Y

ou could call the redo of the Limperts 1926 home a remodel, or you could call it a resuscitation. The latter seems more fitting, since together with Brian Chladek Construction, the Limpert family has breathed new life into their second home nestled on nearby Lake Zumbro. “We weren’t really looking for a place but my husband Dave and son Phil like to hunt and fish. My son really wanted something that wasn’t too far away from Rochester,” explained Sue. The Limperts found and purchased the house in Spring 2012. After about a year, they determined they were basically just owning the property and really didn’t enjoy being there. “The place was tired and needed so much work,” said Sue. “I’d pretty much come here to visit, vacuum up the bugs and then leave.” In Spring 2013, the Limperts connected with Brian Chladek, owner of Chladek Construction, and began the systemic overhaul of 42

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

before their new, old abode. “At the first walk through, the Limperts had a list of need-be’s that included a new staircase from the main living area to the upstairs and updates to the kitchen and dirt floor basement,” said Brian.


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The YMCA has a solution for your family's health, tness, childcare and sports needs, and the solution is right down the street by historic Soldiers Field and Metropolitan Market Place. ROCHESTER AREA FAMILY Y 709 1st Avenue SW Rochester, MN 55902 507 287-2260 www.RochFamY.org

WE WISH YOU A HEALTHY 2014! JOIN US NEW YEAR’S DAY! COMMUNITY OPEN HOUSE 11:00AM-3:00PM

RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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35TH ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 7, 8 & 9, 2014

What’s on your business’ resolution list this year? Premier Bank Rochester Member FDIC

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Contact us today or visit us at the Rochester Area Builders Home Show February 7th-9th, 2014 – Booth #188 • 507-285-3718 kgillespie@premierbanks.com NMLS ID#: 509296 www.premierbanks.com 44

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

1615 N. Broadway (in the River Center Plaza) Rochester, MN • 507-226-8045 www.hankandpurls.com Open Monday – Saturday, 10-5; Extended hours Tues & Thurs until 8 p.m.


MAYO CIVIC CENTER — WWW.ROCHESTERAREABUILDERS.COM “Other than that, it was a work in progress. As we were demolishing, I’d come up with plans or ideas room by room trying to keep the aesthetics of a cabin yet assure that everything got the significant facelift it needed. The Limperts and I would discuss the changes and we’d go look at materials. She did a very nice job of putting products together.” The entire interior of the story-and-a-half dwelling was taken down to the studs, rewired, bathroom and kitchen replumbed and all new windows installed. Spray foam insulation was blown in the frame and then covered with drywall. A slanted ceiling and lack of head room required an additional staircase landing, resulting in a need to conceal extra steps that were protruding into the entryway ceiling. That gave “Brian The Builder,” as Sue calls him, the idea to create a barrel vaulted ceiling in the entryway to duplicate that design on the exterior front entry. “Brian had really good ideas and was very thorough. He also believes in doing things right the first time.” Initially, in the main living area there were two exposed beams in the ceiling. A third beam was added and at the suggestion of the Limpert’s son Ben, an electrician, lights were incorporated in each beam. Twisted bamboo flooring was installed throughout the main floor and carpeting was added to the upstairs. Brian explained that the footprint of the kitchen wasn’t really changed. “We removed a wall and added a header to support the opening between the kitchen and living room to the main floor area. We also put in new maple cupboards and laminate countertops.” One of the biggest improvements Sue cites is the bathroom. New fixtures seem to pop from the porcelain tile with mosaic accent border. A frosted glass window lets plenty of light into the new tub/shower area. The original kitchen footprint takes on a new look with updated maple cabinets and new countertop.

Repurposed barn wood adds warmth and texture to the ceiling.

before after

RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

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35TH ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 7, 8 & 9, 2014

A picturesque view of the Lake Zumbro.

The barrel vaulted ceiling adds unique character to the entryway.

When some barn wood became available to the Limperts, courtesy of the farm where their daughter-in-law Sarah grew up, they repurposed the lumber as a ceiling for the upstairs of the cabin. Dave and Phil planed the wood several times and then applied a natural sealer to the planks. They were also used for the upstairs window and base trim. Windows downstairs and the base are trimmed in flat stock cedar. Brian explained that it was a rather bold move to choose cedar for an interior finish; however, he chose kiln-dried cedar to prevent shrinkage. There were several tasks to accomplish in the basement. “The area was dilapidated with a dirt floor,” said Chladek. “We dug out the space in order to pour a footing as a barrier wall. Then, we framed up a support wall and poured a cement floor creating a finished area for a furnace room.” Multiple additions had been joined to the home and there wasn’t much support from below. Chladek stabilized the areas where those rooms had been added. The former exterior of the Limpert’s home was nondescript or as Sue described, “it looked flat and had no character.” Not anymore. Hardie Board prefinished siding and shakes, vinyl siding, veneered stone and pillars were used to create a welcoming intro with a Mission-style feel. In the back, a treatedlumber deck spans the exterior of the kitchen and living area. Finishing touches of paint by their daughter Emily and installation of light fixtures created by their son Joe completed the revival of the family retreat. “Now the cabin is very warm and comfortable,” Sue said. “We come out here and enjoy all the animals—the deer, rabbits, fox, geese, ducks and birds—and the beautiful view of the water. We don’t want to leave.” Penny Marshall is a freelance writer living in Rochester.

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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


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47


35TH ANNUAL ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW, FEBRUARY 7, 8 & 9, 2014

home

Building on her success Miriam Johnson, co-host of the PBS home improvement TV series "Hometime," a true do-it-yourselfer BY TRISH AMUNDSON PHOTOS COURTESY OF PBS

W

ith hands-on knowledge and experience, a hard hat and a well-stocked tool belt, Miriam Johnson is not just an actress portraying a home improvement expert—she’s the real deal. Growing up in Minnesota, she was encouraged by her parents early on to learn do-it-yourself skills, which have proven very useful in both her personal life and career. “I watched my dad tackle all kinds of projects, so it’s sort of in my blood. It always felt good to say that I did it all by myself,” she says. “In junior high, I installed a closet organization system. Then in college my mother gave me some how-to books and I started building furniture.” Previous work and success in the entertainment industry gave Johnson invaluable experience in front of the camera. Today she renovates her own home and is involved in new construction and renovation projects on “Hometime.” From bringing an outdated kitchen into the 21st century or improving curb appeal to gutting

an interior and repairing framing, Johnson and her crew provide step-by-step advice and demonstrations. She offers plenty of encouragement and empowers viewers to take on home projects by learning new skills that can be useful and save big bills. A true do-it-yourselfer, Miriam Johnson’s success at “Hometime” comes naturally. “I actually love hosting, because I can be myself,” she says.

—Jennifer Maass, Kitchen Concepts (Rochester Area Builders member)

Miriam Johnson of "Hometime" demonstrates a project. 48

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

Photos courtesy of PBS.

“Thanks to do-it-yourself TV shows, women are more interested in the actual building process and more knowledgeable about the choices they make.”


MAYO CIVIC CENTER — WWW.ROCHESTERAREABUILDERS.COM

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RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

49


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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

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Q & A with Miriam Johnson

Q: A:

Do you continue to expand your home renovation skills through different projects?  I’m constantly learning from working on the show and from my own projects. Most of the time, I’m learning new skills or honing existing skills out of necessity. The dryer won’t spin? I learned how to change the belt. I don’t claim to know everything about everything, but I’m always learning new things.   Describe some of your favorite or most interesting projects. I really loved redoing the kitchen and dining room in our own home. “Hometime” was involved with that, which made it fun; they were there to help. I could see up close how certain subcontractors work, but I also did a lot of my own work. I tiled the floor and the backsplash, helped install cabinets, installed custom paneling, drywalled and created our own maple countertops.

Q: A:

Q: A:

What are the advantages of doing a project yourself? Disadvantages? Obviously, the biggest advantage of doing things yourself is the ability to save money. The knowledge that you gain by tackling something yourself is also a big advantage, because it can not only save money in the future but can make future projects that much easier. Then there are always the bragging rights! A disadvantage is that you can get in over your head with a project that you don’t have the knowledge or the skill to complete. In some cases, you can get hurt. These are the times to use common sense, do research, don’t cut corners and don’t be afraid to call in a professional if you need help.

Q: A:

What are your favorite and least favorite aspects of this work? I love learning new things, seeing how things work or are assembled and watching the transformations from before to after take

place. My least favorite aspect about this work is that things don’t always go smoothly. A project that I think I can bang out in a day can take a few days. I’ve just got to be patient.   What kind of furniture do you create and build in your spare time?  Most of what I make has to do with what we need, such as an armoire for the TV, a bookcase for my daughter’s books and matching end tables for the bedroom. I have a running wish list of things that I would like to make when I have more time.   Do you have advice for women in deciding whether or not they should tackle a project or enlist the help of professionals? Always do some good, hard research on the project and then decide if it is something that you feel you could do. Do you have the right tools? Do you have enough time? Do you feel safe trying it? Ask around of friends, neighbors and family members, as they might offer tools or expertise. If you feel the project is not something you are comfortable trying, go with a professional. By observing and asking questions, you might gain the knowledge and confidence to try it on your own the next time.   In addition to “Hometime,” what resources do you recommend for aspiring do-ityourselfers? I use YouTube all the time to search for how-to videos, and the internet has a wealth of information. I do, however, still get out my how-to books and make trips to the library. In addition, you never know what knowledge your friends, neighbors and family members might have gained in their experiences that they could share with you. Don’t let those naysayers keep you from trying something just because they think you can’t do it!

Q: A: Q: A:

2014 ROCHESTER AREA BUILDERS HOME SHOW 35TH ANNUAL SHOW FEBRUARY 7-9, 2014 MAYO CIVIC CENTER Miriam Johnson, co-host of “Hometime,” will share her experiences in the PBS do-it-yourself home improvement TV series, including: •Short history of “Hometime” •Blooper reel from the show •Question and answer session For more information about the home show or services provided by construction professionals who are members of Rochester Area Builders, visit rochesterareabuilders.com.

Q: A:

Trish Amundson is a freelance writer.

Miriam Johnson with the PBS "Hometime" crew. RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

51


personal

More Than

Blue

Dealing With Depression — One Woman’s Journey BY GRACE N. D’MERCI

S

PhotoSpin® stock image

ad, tired, blue, frumpy…these are just a few of the words we use to describe that feeling we get when we’re having one of ‘those’ days. Usually a chat with a girlfriend and a little chunk of chocolate is enough to shake it. What happens when that day turns into weeks or months and you just can’t get out from under it? What do you do when it feels like your life is a weight pressing down on you with every step, making it more and more difficult to function, let alone enjoy it? That is what happened to me after a string of events shook the very foundation of the “perfect little life” I had attempted to build for myself. My marriage was falling apart, my kid’s lives were being affected by things that I couldn’t control and my faith had been shaken. After a while it became difficult to get up in the morning; things that I used to enjoy with abandon didn’t hold the verve they had before. Being around people sounded like a chore. Life wasn’t fun anymore and I began to not even care. It turns out I was not alone. According to the American Psychiatric Association depression affects nearly one in ten adults each year, with nearly twice as many of those affected being women. Think about that for just a minute…if you have 200 friends on Facebook it’s quite likely that close to 20 of them are suffering from depression. Based on a recent study by the Anxiety and Depression Association, almost half of them are also struggling with the exaggerated worry and tension associated with anxiety disorders. Despite the vast number of us that battle these demons, we still find it hard to say so and to ask for help. So what can you do when the clouds roll in and take up residence like an unwelcome stray? The answer to that is a little bit different for everyone but I’ll share what worked for me. I made two phone calls: one to my doctor and one to a therapist. Now I’m going to pause for a moment and share with you that asking for help is not my strong suit. I avoid it at all costs, preferring to “power through on my own”. On my list of things

52

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com


“I’ve shared my deepest hurts and found more forgiveness. I’ve shared my hopes and found even more hope for the future than I imagined possible.”

I’d really like to change about myself, this stubborn character trait is second only to my thighs. You can feel safe in assuming that neither of these first steps was easy for me. However, the pain of change finally became less than the pain of staying the same so I picked up the phone, made the appointments and took the steps needed in order for me to get better. The visit to my doctor resulted in the addition of some new medication and the elimination of some old ones. (It turns out the same hormone shifts that made us crazy when we were teenagers get another go at us later in life too. Isn’t it great being a girl?) The effects of these changes weren’t immediate, but they did start to kick in quickly enough to make the next step a little bit easier. The most amazing part of my recovery has been the process I’ve gone through with my therapist. She has helped me to navigate through the tangled web of beliefs and ideas that have been embedded into my mind. She made me do things like “check the facts” on my beliefs, provide the “evidence” regarding some toxic thought processes I used to hold, and then we examined them together. Most of all she insisted that I was completely worthy and lovable even when I could not find an ounce of this for myself. I’ve cried over losses I thought I’d already grieved for and found more closure. I’ve vented over injustices I have no control over and found more serenity. I’ve shared my deepest hurts and found more forgiveness. I’ve shared my hopes and found even more hope for the future than I imagined possible. I say all of that only to say this: you are not alone. There are angels all around you who will help you if you let them know you need help. So cash in your “phone-a-friend” cards, reach out and search within for the peace, serenity, forgiveness and hope that are still inside you somewhere. It is. I promise. Grace is a freelance writer in Rochester that prays you too will find peace.

If you or a loved one has a mental illness or addiction disorder, we understand your emotional struggle. Speaking with a professional really can help. Take the first step by calling us today.

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Therapy and Psychiatry Services RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

53


community

The OMC Sports Medicine and Athletic Performance facility.

A specialized training room with synthetic ice and hockey treadmill will help athletes reach their goals.

New Olmsted Medical Center Facility Sports medicine and athletic performance facility caters to regional athletes BY JENNIFER M. GANGLOFF • PHOTOGRAPHY BY MIKE HARDWICK PHOTOGRAPHY

A

new sports medicine and athletic performance facility in northwest Rochester combines medical services and intense personal training. The 15,000 square feet space boasts some of the best equipment and services available in southeast Minnesota. The facility brings together clinical services, rehabilitation services and athletic performance programming all under one roof. It features four exam rooms, a procedure room, a multipurpose area with a basketball court and a volleyball court, a turf area for running, golf, hitting and throwing; a resistance training area; and a hockey training room with a Blade hockey treadmill and synthetic ice. The center, which cost about $3.3 million to construct, fits in well with Olmsted Medical Center’s mission, says Lois Till-Tarara, vice president of clinic operations. “Over the years we’ve positioned ourselves to do more to keep our patients healthy and out of the emergency department,” she says. “We have a good opportunity to have a healthier community with this facility. It’s a very exciting and unique opportunity for Southeast Minnesota.”

ONE-STOP SHOP The OMC Sports Medicine and Athletic Performance facility had been championed by Dr. Matthew Thompson for several years. Thompson, OMC’s sports medicine physician, has a long history in sports and recognized the need for a facility in the region that would cater to athletes of all ages and abilities — and injuries. Thompson’s specialties include sports medicine and concussion management. He serves as the team doctor for Rochester Community and Technical College and the Milwaukee Brewers. In addition, Dr. Thompson has also worked with the U.S. Ski Team, U.S. Speed Skating, the St. Louis Rams and the Milwaukee Ballet. “It’s a one-stop shop for anyone who wants to enjoy a better quality of life,” Dr. Thompson says. “This is a medical facility that provides evidence-based programs with people who have medical backgrounds.” The new OMC Sports Medicine and Athletic Performance facility offers a wide range of services, whether you’re an injury-prone high school student or a casual athlete hoping to get back into shape. 54

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

Sports medicine includes treatment of acute injuries, concussions and musculoskeletal conditions. Rehabilitation includes sports physical therapy and injury prevention. Athletic performance programs encompass baseball and softball, golf enhancement, sports nutrition, hockey training, sports psychology, running, sports performance training, and fitness classes, such as Zumba® and boot camps. Till-Tarara says that one area of focus is teaching athletes how to avoid preventable injuries, especially in youngsters. “We see a lot of preventable injuries. It really does break our physicians’ hearts to see kids come in with a potential career-ending injury,” she says. For instance, OMC treats many young female athletes who have injured their anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), in sports like volleyball and dance. “A lot of injuries are preventable with the right training and conditioning,” Till-Tarara says.

CUSTOMIZED PROGRAMS BY EXPERTS The new facility is not a gym, where you join with a membership and work out every day. On the contrary, the Sports Medicine and Athletic Performance facility is intended to help athletes of all levels achieve specific goals through specialized programming, Dr. Thompson notes. Someone who wants to take up running to reduce their blood sugar and lose weight can get a tailored running program. Likewise, a hockey player who wants to skate faster, a baseball player who wants to refine their swing, and a basketball player who wants to work on their vertical jump, can all get customized programs at the OMC facility under the guidance of staff with medical expertise. The Sports Medicine and Athletic Performance facility, located at 5155 55th St. NW, is open to members of the public — you don’t need to be an OMC patient. Sports medicine clinical services and rehabilitation services are covered by most health insurance carriers. Athletic performance services are typically not covered by insurance. To register for athletic performance services, go to olmmed.org/ ortho-sportsmed or call 507-535-1977. Jennifer M. Gangloff is a freelance writer and editor in Rochester.


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healthy living

Shooting for high goals The impact of Title IX on women’s high school hockey

The popularity of women's hockey continues to grow.

BY PAT GARRY hanks to the pioneering women who paved the way, the face of hockey is looking much different these days. Countless numbers of girls can’t wait to lace up skates, throw on jerseys and go hard in the corners.

PLAY LIKE A GIRL There was a time when being the lone girl on a boys’ team was their only chance to play hockey. Even though there were some girls who could skate circles around most of the boys, they were cut, solely because of their gender. Perhaps even greater than the influx of Title IX legislation, this was sufficient motivation to prove naysayers wrong. For every player who broke new ground for future female hockey players, there now are thousands who say “thank you” when someone tells them they play like a girl. “Prior to Title IX, no opportunities existed for girls in the sport of hockey other than participating in the boys' program,” says former Rochester School District Athletic Director Gary Addington. Rochester started offering girls' hockey as soon as there was enough interest. 

TEAMING UP, STARTING EARLY “During my years in the athletic office, we had two teams and entered into cooperative sponsorships with Lourdes High School and other area schools to have enough players,” recalls Addington. The numbers issue was due largely to the lack of youth programs designed specifically for girls. Mike McCormack is the girls’ hockey director with the RYHA (Rochester Youth Hockey Association). “In the late ’90s most girls started playing hockey at about age 10.” Today, girls typically begin playing hockey around age 7. The GCL (Girls City League) is the base of the girls’ hockey development pyramid. “The program consists of youths aged 7-10. The kids learn the fundamentals of the game without the commitment of travel,” says McCormack.

IT’S IN MY BLOOD Seventh-grader Taylor Hodenfield plays in the RYHA program. “Hockey has taught me that hard work and 56

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

dedication pay off. I have also made some awesome friends along the way,” says Taylor. Hockey in their household is a family affair, according to Taylor’s mother, Kelly Van Galder. “Taylor has learned to be part of a team while developing confidence, determination and commitment.” Century High School sophomore Maddie O’Grady started playing hockey in the third grade. “I saw all of my brother’s equipment and thought it looked like fun, so I asked my parents if I could play too.” “Being on the ice is kind of like an escape from reality,” says Sue O’Grady, Maddie’s mother. “Hockey has made Maddie who she is today. It has taught her discipline, time management and how to be a team player.”

THE COUNTDOWN BEGINS  Century High School Activities Director Mark Kuisle recalls the girls’ inaugural program. “During the 1999–2000 seasons, the Minnesota State High School League (MSHSL) deemed that any Century girl who wished to play hockey could go back to the original attendance boundaries and participate at Mayo or John Marshall.” Bob Montrose, Rochester John Marshall/Lourdes girls’ head hockey coach, has been at the helm for four years. “There were limited girls-only programs as most youth mixed in with boys. Title IX opened doors and provided an open opportunity and a welcome mat for girls to play hockey.” Jeff Bolin is in his third year as Mayo Girls’ Varsity Hockey head coach. “The girls’ skills are much improved, thanks to the youth programs and seasonal camps and clinics which have been developed to instruct and support girls’ hockey.” Rochester Mayo High School Activities Director Jeff Whitney says Rochester girls’ hockey has always been competitive at the conference and state level. “Mayo High School has been Big 9 Conference Champions 10 times in the 17 years since 1996.” Pat Garry is a Rochester freelance writer and retired educator.

Through 2012, there were 166 high schools in Minnesota with a girls’ ice hockey team. www. whockey.com/ highschool/usa

NOTE FROM THE EDITOR: In our September/ October 2013 issue we first looked at the history and the impact that Title IX had on women’s sports at the high school level in Rochester. We will continue to highlight a specific sport and how Title IX is continuing to benefit Rochester women’s athletics.

Photo courtesy of Kelly Van Galder.

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travel

Candlelit Night on the Ski Trails Winter road trip to the Root River Valley BY AMANDA WINGREN

A

The Candlelight Ski and Chili Cook-Off in Preston, Minn. is set for January 18. The local Boy Scouts work with the DNR to light a section of the Harmony-Preston Valley State Trail for people to walk or ski on from 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. “There is a spectacular beauty that goes along with this event,” describes Kathy Dahl, tourism director of Preston. “It is another opportunity for outdoor enthusiasts to use the trails year-round. People love the river trail system here; these trails are really second to none.” The illuminated trail extends along a mile and a half, out and back, of the hills and valleys that trace the path of the Root River. Preston also offers a chili cook-off alongside the skiing, held in the lobby of

the Trailhead Inn & Suites from 5 –7 p.m. “We invite anyone to bring a crock of their best pot of chili and any fixings,” says Dahl. “Everyone is invited to come and sample the chili and vote for their favorite.” It’s a warm and bustling atmosphere in the lobby of the inn, where many of the locals bring and submit their favorite chili recipes, looking for the pride associated with being the year’s winner. All ages are welcome to participate. Visitors are welcome to ski the trails before or after the chili cook-off. “There is peace and quiet on the trails in the evening; it’s very tranquil,” describes Dahl. “All you hear is the swish of the skis and the crunch of the snow.” Combined with the light of the candles, it makes for a pretty special evening on the trail. If the weather proves too frightful to be on the trails, the chili cook-off will be held regardless. The event is free of charge, but a $6 DNR ski pass is required to be on the trail. For more information, call Trail Head at Preston 507-765-2153.

CANDLELIGHT SKI IN WHALAN

Chili challenge: tasting the goods. 58

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

“It’s a real neat, kind of old-time feeling,” says Larry Johnson, mayor of Whalan, a small city situated about 15 miles north of Preston, along the Root River Valley in southeast Minn. “We were the ones who started this

kind of event on the trail. It’s a neat effect, to ski through the woods by candlelight.” The Candlelight Ski is held on February 1, from 5–8 p.m. The Village of Whalan comes together to set and light candles along one mile of the trail, where people may ski or walk and enjoy the beauty of the woods in the evening, enjoy a homemade supper and then be on their way. A bonfire is set on either end of the trail and a casual, affordable soup supper is offered for all to enjoy. In past years the proceeds from the candlelit ski dinner have been donated to restoration of the small, two-story local town hall, which has just recently been completed. “It’s all people working together in a little community,” explains Johnson, describing the pride and heritage of the small city. “It’s been a cool way to get the town hall fixed up.” The event is well attended and draws in a blend of people looking to enjoy the unique experience of being out on the trails by candlelight, pulled together by the small-town charm of Whalan. The event is free of charge. Skis are available for rental at the Cedar Valley Resort. For more information call 507-467-9000. Amanda Wingren is a freelance writer living in Rochester.

Event photo courtesy of Traci Corson.

HOME-COOKED CHILI AND A CANDLELIT TRAIL

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s winter settles slowly in and we cozy into our long johns beside the fire, there’s nothing like the opportunity to escape the comfort of home and get back to nature. Two small towns settled in the Root River Valley offer their own renditions of candlelit ski runs to bring the community together in the crisp midwest air.


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ADVERTISERS INDEX About Face........................................................................................5 Allegro School of Dance........................................................... 23 American Heart Association Go Red For Women........... 55 Ameriprise Financial, Kari Douglas....................................... 15 Anew Aesthetic Medical Center............................................ 17 Autumn Ridge Church............................................................... 25 Awake My Stones........................................................................ 59 Bicycle Sports................................................................................ 15 Blades to Ballet............................................................................. 55 Boys & Girls Club of Rochester.............................................. 49 Budget Blinds................................................................................ 41 Buff & Coat Hardwood Floor Renewal................................. 43 Cascade Animal Medical Center........................................... 55 Chanhassen Dinner Theatres.................................................. 59 City Looks Salon & Spa.............................................................. 64 Comfort Home Health Care..................................................... 10 Coram Specialty Infusion.............................................................2 Cottagewood Senior Community........................................... 27 Creative Hardwood Floors, Inc................................................ 41 Dawn Sanborn Photography........................................ 34 & 44 DeGeus............................................................................................ 47 Dentistry for Children & Adolescents.................................. 19 Dunn Bros....................................................................................... 34 Essence Skin Clinic........................................................................9 Essential Massage....................................................................... 63 Excelsior Group LLC.......................................................................3 Family Service Rochester, Meals on Wheels..................... 19 First Alliance Credit Union....................................................... 47 First Steps Child Care....................................................................9 Garden of Massage.................................................................... 50 Glynners Pub.................................................................................. 30 Hair Studio 52................................................................................ 20 Hank & Purl’s................................................................................. 41 Heartman Insurance................................................................... 41 Hope Ranch................................................................................... 19 Intrigue Hair Salon....................................................................... 19 Jazzercize, Mary Ludwig........................................................... 55 KAAL................................................................................................ 29 Kadi Tiedi Photography............................................................. 25 King Orthodontics........................................................................ 23 Le Jardin.......................................................................................... 20 Love That Dress!........................................................................... 50 Luxury Bath.................................................................................... 41 Maplewood Homes..................................................................... 43 Mary Kay Cosmetics, Brenda Hahn...................................... 50 Mary Kay Cosmetics, Sara Vix................................................ 50 Mayo Employees Federal Credit Union............................... 41 MEB Resources............................................................................ 17 Mike Hardwick Photography................................................... 50 MLT Group...................................................................................... 44 Mon Petit......................................................................................... 50 Mr. Pizza North............................................................................. 37 Northern Lights & Furnishings............................................... 53 O’Brien & Wolf Law Offices...................................................... 25 Odyssey Resorts........................................................................... 59 Olmsted Medical Center..............................................................6 OMC Sports Medicine & Athletic Performance Facility.................................................................... 57 Pathways Psych Services.......................................................... 50 People’s Food Co-op................................................................... 37 Pine Needles.....................................................................................9 Premier Bank................................................................................. 44 Preston Tourism............................................................................ 59 Reiland’s Hair Clinic.................................................................... 49 Riverside Live! .............................................................................. 27 Rochester Area Builders Home Show................................. 38 Rochester Area Family Y........................................................... 43 Rochester Catholic Schools..................................................... 15 Rochester Greeters..................................................................... 50 Rochester Trolley & Tour Company, Chanhassen Dinner Theatres.................................................. 49 Rochester Youth Soccer Association R.Y.S.A. ................ 29 RT Austism Awareness Foundation Gala........................... 10 RTAAF Austism Gala................................................................... 10 Scanlon Nietz & Murch, LLC................................................... 50 Silhouette Shoppe....................................................................... 10 Sisters of Saint Francis............................................................... 10 Sola - Brittany Hair Studio 26................................................. 63 Sola - Gerry Lynn Studio 3....................................................... 63 Sola - Kayla M Studio 9............................................................. 63 Sola - Kayla Vandewalker......................................................... 63 Sola - Spa Casey.......................................................................... 63 Sola - The Hairport...................................................................... 63 Sola - Tina & Danielle................................................................ 63 Sola - Vanessa’s Hair Salon..................................................... 63 Sola Salons of Rochester.......................................................... 63 Step It Up!....................................................................................... 47 The Woods Fine Amish Furniture........................................... 20 Total Wellness Expo January 19............................................. 17 Townsquare Media Home Vacation & RV Show.............. 30 Transitions....................................................................................... 50 Treats & Treasures....................................................................... 29 United Way..................................................................................... 23 Victoria’s Ristorante & Wine Bar............................................ 30 Waseca Chamber......................................................................... 37 Wine Tasting Fundraiser for Century Senior Class Party 2014..................................... 29 Winona Radio................................................................................ 47 Women & Wine Wine Tasting ................................................. 37 Word of Life Church.................................................................... 34 Zumbro River Cafe...................................................................... 34 Zumbro Valley Mental Health Center.................................. 53

RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

59


Calendar Events Check out our Community Calendar online for additional listings at RWmagazine.com

Deadline for submitting events for RochesterWomen March/April 2014 issue is February 1, 2014. Complete form at rwmagazine.com/index.php/submit/submit-event. Events in purple are sponsored by RochesterWomen magazine. *(507 area code unless stated)

JANUARY January 4 Wedding Extravaganza, Mayo Civic Center, 9 am–3 pm, weddingxtravaganza.com January 4 Seven Course Dining Experience to benefit Rochester Civic Theatre, Johnny Mango’s Event Center, 6 pm, a night to wine and dine all the while supporting the Rochester Civic Theatre, reserve your chair and call 218-8401, rochestercivictheatre.org January 31 Breaking the Chains of Modern Day Slavery— Human Trafficking Awareness, Lourdes High School, 7–9 pm, One Act Play Competition, Juried competition with plays submitted from Century, Lourdes and John Marshall High Schools, $5 per person, rochesterfranciscan.org January 11 “Honk, Squeak, Scratch, Boom”, Mayo Civic Center, Rochester Symphony Orchestra & Chorale invites 4th– 6th grade students to try instruments under the guidance of professional musicians of the Rochester Symphony Orchestra, 9–11 am and 1–3 pm, no registration required, free of charge, rochestersymphony.org January 11 Celebrating Diversity and Inclusivity, Rochester Civic Theatre, 7:30 pm, Baptizing in the Blues— Annie Mack Concert, Enjoy local sensation Annie Mack live, tickets $12, rochestercivictheatre.org January 11 The Jazz Chamber: Paris to Buenos Aires, Christ United Methodist Church, Rochester Chamber Music Society, featuring Robert S.P. Gardner and friends, 7:30 pm, rochesterchambermusic.org January 11–February 28 “I Have the Right to Speak Up” Exhibition, Rochester Civic Theatre, “ I have the right to education. I have the right to play. I have the right to sing… I have the right to speak up.”–Malala Yousafza. On display in the lobby gallery will be photo portraits of Rochester women and stories about the journeys to find their voices, rochestercivictheatre.org

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January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

January 12 and February 9 Meet the Gaelic Harp with Ann Heymann, Meet the master in all things Gaelic Harp! In partnership with Irish Fest, free admission, rochestercivictheatre.org January 15 Southern MN Mothers of Multiples, Meadow Lakes Senior Living Center, 7 pm, Come engage in a night of support, food and plenty of giveaways, Mothers of Multiples is a non-profit organization devoted to supporting families with twins, triplets, or more, 261-1410, somnmoms.org January 15 and 29, February 12 Women on Wednesdays, Rochester Civic Theatre, 5:30–7 pm, Join in on a dinner and thoughtful discussion about issues addressing the oppression and resiliency of women, free admission, reservations required, rochestercivictheatre.org January 16–19 The Occasional Shops at Lake City, Shop vintage, antiques, and more! 259-6038, lakecityoccasionalshops.com January 18 13th Annual “Wit, Wisdom and Wine”, Rochester Public Library, the proceeds support the mission and vision of the library foundation, 328-2343, rochesterpubliclibrary.org January 18–19 60th Annual Fifth District Eagles Cancer Telethon, Mayo Civic Center, attend the event in person or watch it live on KTTC to enjoy all the festivities, eaglescancertelethon.org January 19 Total Wellness Expo, Ramada Hotel, learn more about living a healthier, high-quality lifestyle, totalwellnessexpo.org January 20 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day Breakfast, Kahler Grand Hotel, Heritage Hall, 7:30–9:30 am, hosted by the Rochester Chamber of Commerce Foundation and the Rochester Branch of the NAACP, pre-registration required, for more details visit rochestermnchamber.com January 22–26 Frozen River Film Festival, Winona State University, enjoy a selection of documentary films created to engage, educate, and activate the community, frff.org January 23 Diversity Council Annual Celebration, Rochester Art Center, 5:30pm, public invitation to discover the recent works of the Diversity Council while enjoying entertainment, food, and fun, Free to everyone, RSVP to info@diversitycouncil.org by January 20, diversitycouncil.org


January 24 RT Autism Awareness Foundation presents: The 2014 Mending Minds “Gala for Autism”, Rochester International Event Center, silent/ live auctions, an elegant dinner, and more! Featuring Tom Wilson from Back to the Future, mendingmindsgala.org

February 8 “Cityscapes” Rochester Symphony Orchestra & Chorale, Lourdes High School Auditorium, Fine Arts Building, 2 pm & 7:30 pm, rochestersymphony.org

January 25 Street Beat, Mayo Civic Center, Presentation Hall, 7:30 pm, a theatrical explosion of rhythm, dance, and energy you won’t want to miss! Music ranging from African, Cuban, Latin to Jazz, tickets available at riversideconcerts.com

February 9 Lace Up Against Breast Cancer Half Marathon and 5K Run/ Walk, Mayo High School, half marathon, 9:30 am, 5K, 10 am, 2 mi. walk, immediately after 5K, proceeds benefit Mayo Clinic Breast Cancer Research, 284–9114, luabc.org

January 30–February 9 Rochester WinterFest XII, a fun filled events to promote wintertime activities and local non-profit organizations, for more information visit rochesterwinterfest.com

February 12 Go Red For Women Luncheon, Rochester International Event Center, 10 am, Come and join others to celebrate the 10th year of Go Red for Women and take a stand against heart disease in Women, rochestergoredforwomen.ahaevents.org

January 31–February 9 How I Became a Pirate, Rochester Civic Theatre, A Family Musical sure to stir your wildest imagination! Time varies, rochestercivictheatre.org

February 8 Go Red For Women Day, Apache Mall

FEBRUARY

February 15 “A Singing Valentine” Destination Romance, Rochester International Event Center, 6 pm, Join the Chorale Arts Ensemble in this annual benefit, concert, and auction including the most romantic silent auction of the year! 252–8427, choraleartsensemble.org

February 1 Frozen Goose Run, University Center Rochester Atrium, noon registration, 1 pm start time, 10k timed run or 5k fun run/ walk, benefits the Optimist Club Childhood Cancer Campaign, 282-9968, optimistclubrochestermn.org

February 15 Bear Creek Services Annual Wines of the World, Mayo Civic Center, 7–9:30 pm, featuring over 40 wine tasting stations, light appetizers, silent auctions and more, ( reduced ticket pricing before 2/12), 288–7195, bearcreekservices.org

February 1 Hearts and Diamonds Spectacular: A Ronald McDonald Benefit, Sumerby Golf Club, Enjoy a decadent evening of dinner, diamonds, and dancing, 252–2195, rmhmn.org

February 22 A Chair Affair: A Gala Benefit for the Boys and Girls Club, International Event Center, Rochester Art Center After Party, “Gala, Glam, Give”, achairaffair.org

February 6 Social Ice, Peace Plaza Downtown, 4–10 pm, the largest outdoor ice bar in the upper Midwest! Featuring music and drinks, free admission, benefits Rochester Downtown Alliance, 424-4744, rochesterwinterfest.com

February 22 “I Have the Right to Speak Up” 6th Annual Martin Luther King, Jr. Student Poetry Contest and Reception, Rochester Civic Theatre, 2–4 pm, an open event in celebrating the power of a woman’s voice along with sharing the accomplished works of young author’s, musical theatre favorites will be performed by an all female cast from the Rochester Civic Theatre, rochestercivictheatre.org

February 7 National Wear Red Day, A national day to wear red to raise awareness of the number one silent killer in women—heart disease, wear red, raise your voice, and take action for a healthier you, for more information visit goredforwomen.org/wearredday

February 22 The Power of A Women’s Voice… Amplified, Rochester Civic Theatre, 7:30 pm, everyone is welcome to enjoy a night filled with inspirational, celebratory poetry, song, and dance! Rochestercivictheatre.org

February 7–9 Rochester Area Builders 35th Annual Home Show, Mayo Civic Center, Fri, 3–8 pm; Sat, 9 am–6 pm; Sun, 11 am–4 pm, 282-7698, rochesterareabuilders.com

February 23 VOICES: Music of the Stage and Screen, Bethlehem Lutheran Church, featuring all Honors Choirs ensembles, 4 pm, 252–0505, honorschoirs.org

February 8 Polar Bear Plunge, Foster Arend Park, 1:30 pm plunge time, bring your coworkers, friends, or family to take the freezing plunge to benefit Special Olympics athletes, register online at plungemn.org

Pick up RochesterWomen March/April 2014 issue beginning March 1, 2014! MAGAZINE RWmagazine.com January/February 2014

61


on the lighter side

Words Players perform Shakespeare's " The Twelfth Night" during Rochesterfest 2013

The Wagerin g, The Wise , Th e W i t t y And Th e W i ly

Extraordinary Cleopatra Shakespeare should also be celebrated for his extraordinary heroines. Cleopatra, from “Antony and Cleopatra,” is at the center of this play’s five acts. Though remembered 62

January/February 2014 RWmagazine.com

for her undying love of Antony, ironically resulting in her serpentine suicide, I love Cleopatra because she wagers on fishing. After Cleopatra claims, “Tawny-finn’d fishes; my bended hook shall pierce,” her confidante Charmian reminisces about when Cleopatra “wager’d” on “angling” (II.v.11,16). Queenly betting on big fish might seem to be a faux pas, but Cleopatra fears not the unfashionable.

Dazzling Rosalind's Wisdom Cleopatra’s extraordinary wagering is topped by Rosalind’s wisdom. Rosalind, the dazzling star of “As You Like It,” leads by example, remaining loyal to friends and family even in exile. Besides demonstrating the wisdom required to reunite estranged relationships, Rosalind proclaims humorously profound maxims: “Time travels in divers paces with divers persons” (III.ii.308-309). For anyone like me, who’s been kept waiting by another’s sense of time, this oxymoronic utterance rings all too true.

Bard's Babe Beatrice Another of the Bard’s babes, Beatrice, a vivaciously self-confident beauty from “Much Ado About Nothing,” always has a witty repartee at the ready. I’m glad her wit is aimed elsewhere and can’t help but laugh when she tells her beau, “I wonder that you will still be talking, Signior Benedick. Nobody marks you” (I.i.116-117). Benedick makes Beatrice’s wit all too clear when he describes her: “She speaks poniards, and every word stabs” (II.i.254-55). Beatrice,

despite marrying Benedick, uses wit to clarify she is at least his equal if not his superior. When Beatrice marries Benedick, she jokes that she saves his life.

Portia's Wiles Save The Day Portia from “The Merchant of Venice,” administering her wiles like the antidote to some deadly malady, may be my favorite of Will’s women. She poses as a lawyer using her intelligence to thwart the vengeful Shylock. Portia saves her husband Bassiano’s friend Antonio from certain death resulting from the terms of a loan that “no power…can alter” (IV.i.218-19). Portia exposes the folly of following the law’s letter instead of its sentiment when she argues Antonio’s pound of flesh is inseparable from his blood: “This bond doth give thee here no jot of blood.” The words expressly are ‘a pound of flesh’” (IV.i.306-307). Though cutting out a pound of flesh leaves me puking, Portia’s wiles save the day. In Shakespeare’s day, because of concerns over the theater’s ability to corrupt women, all of these heroines would have been played by male actors. This shows that even in a society that undervalues women’s abilities, women are still an essential part of any story. Shakespeare’s women are so important, that even when literal women are banned from stage, women still must make an appearance. Cleopatra, Rosalind, Beatrice, and Portia all reveal the strength of Will’s women. John is a devoted husband and father. He has a doctorate degree in English literature.

Photos courtesy of Words Players Theatre.

he year 2014 is a special year because it includes the 450th anniversary of Shakespeare’s birth. Record keeping was unreliable in the Bard’s day, it is generally agreed he was born on April 23, 1564, so when his birthday rolls around, let’s party 1564 style. The party would be raucously unsavory, ensuring a good time. Based on moral concerns, Shakespearian public theatres were outlawed to Shoreditch, on London’s periphery. Nonetheless, these theatres included many diversions: food, drink, and “companionship.” They were also surrounded by unwholesome amusements like bear-baiting; tormenting tethered bears with pointy sticks and hurled rubbish. Our commemorative partying this year, due to the good folks at People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), might omit bear-baiting. We should celebrate the Bard’s birthday because he may be the most influential English author. His reach extends into modern movies, literature, sitcoms, and music (think Rush’s “Limelight”). Shakespeare’s brain also birthed vocabulary; who could negotiate daily life without saying “fashionable” or “puking”? The Oxford English Dictionary credits Shakespeare with both.

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January February 2014  

This is the first issue of the 2014 year! We celebrate six extraordinary women who go the extra mile in Rochester.

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