The Reigatian Magazine 2014

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T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

THE REIGATIAN 2014 WE REMEMBER

DAVID IVE – THE FIRST OLD REIGATIAN TO HAVE DIED IN THE GREAT WAR

FOUNDATION ACTIVITIES BUILDING ON OUR GLOBAL COMMUNITY

RECOLLECTIONS AND MEMORIES OF THE SCHOOL FROM THE OR COMMUNITY

CHANGING LIVES: 1675 BURSARY CAMPAIGN LAUNCHES AT MANSION HOUSE


Letting and Selling homes in Surrey and Sussex Reigate Grammar pupils Pat Bridges 1973 - 1980 Steve Muggridge 1976 - 1981 Sam Arnold 1998 - 2005 Reigate / Redhill 01737 771777 Horsham 01403 252100 www.woodlands-estates.co.uk


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

CONTENTS

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THE CHANGING LIVES CAMPAIGN

LAUNCHES AT MANSION HOUSE

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REUNION

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44

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EVENTS DURING 2014

FEATURES

WE HEAR FROM OR’S ABOUT THEIR LIVES AND ADVENTURES

SPORT

REPORTS ON OR TEAMS

NEWS

UPDATES IN BRIEF

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SUPPORT US

IN MANY DIFFERENT WAYS

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HENRY SMITH CLUB

THE FOUNDATION CONTINUES TO IMPART HIS SPIRIT

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FOUNDATION ACTIVITIES 2014 WAS A VERY BUSY YEAR

UNIVERSITY HONOURS 2014 DEGREE INFORMATION FROM RECENT GRADUATES

DEATHS & OBITUARIES FAREWELL TO OLD FRIENDS

PUBLICATIONS

LATEST OR RELEASES

RECOLLECTIONS & MEMORIES

REFLECTIONS ON LIFE AT SCHOOL

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

PHOTOGRAPHIC MEMORIES OF THE SCHOOL

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THE REIGATIAN NETWORK

RGS LONDON PROFESSIONALS AND OVERSEAS FRIENDS

Designed & produced by Haime & Butler Brand Design and Communication 020 7407 2141 haime-butler.com

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FOUNDATION OFFICE MEET THE TEAM

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WELCOME

FROM THE HEADMASTER Over the centuries since Reigate Grammar School was established in 1675 through the generosity of Henry Smith, acts of philanthropy have benefitted the school, its students and the wider community. 2014 recorded the school’s best ever A Level results with 94 per cent of grades rated A* to B, a 100 per cent pass rate for the 15th year running and students achieving more A* and A grades than every other grade put together. Access to an education such as this, which opens doors of opportunity for all, are made possible by the ongoing work of the RGS Foundation. Support for the Foundation continues to grow, allowing us to provide opportunities for talented students irrespective of financial means. The 1675 Bursary Fund has been able to support seven new 1675 Scholars to RGS this academic year; and the recent news that planning permission has been approved for the transformational £4million new centre of learning at Reigate Grammar School only cements our ability to provide the very best education for all the young people in our care, now and in the future. The Foundation has been particularly busy this year, with events every month, breaking only for the summer. The launch of the Changing Lives campaign at Mansion House marked the start of the year, which included lectures and talks by well-known Reigatians; lunches and dinners for reuniting year groups; charity events; and gatherings at home and overseas. I have been fortunate to attend most of these and have had the chance to get to know some of our older Reigatians as well as those who have recently graduated from university. Best wishes Shaun Fenton Headmaster

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FROM THE DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR

2014 – A YEAR FOR CHANGING LIVES “SOCIAL MOBILITY IS ONE OF THE KEY CHALLENGES OUR SOCIETY FACES IN THE 21ST CENTURY. REIGATE GRAMMAR SCHOOL HAS A LONG HISTORY OF PLAYING A CATALYTIC ROLE TO SUPPORT THIS IMPORTANT AGENDA IN ITS CATCHMENT AREA.” Sir Peter Gershon CBE, FREng (1966).

In January 2014, at the Mansion House in London, we publicly launched our Changing Lives campaign. The significance of the social mobility challenge facing this country and how RGS can respond was the theme. It is sad to think that we needed to establish the Child Poverty Act in 2010 and it is striking that at Ward (neighbourhood) level there are several areas within the Reigate region with child poverty figures above the national average of 1 in 5 children. True to our original Foundation and charitable status, we have a responsibility to our local communities to ensure that we continue to provide (through open-access) life-changing opportunities to those whose potential is far greater than their financial means. This is our commitment, our moral purpose and the reason why we established the 1675 Bursary Fund.

(L to R) Adam Rout, Ellis Clarke and Sir Colin Chandler

We were all moved by the inspirational words of Ellis Clarke (2013, front cover), the recipient of a life-changing bursary to RGS. Ellis said, “There is no gift for me that could have inspired as much gratitude as the bursary I received to study at RGS.” Ellis is currently studying English Literature at Cambridge University. With this call to action we have been thrilled by the response of our Reigatian community. Already, over £800k has been raised and we now have 11 pupils attending RGS. We are determined to build on this early success and create many more transformational opportunities for young children in need. The RGS Foundation exists to support the development of the school and promote the friendship of all Reigatians. Community

is central to our function and purpose. We connect, inform and engage through various communications, events and groups. This edition highlights the great range of network activities, reunions and social events that take place. A highlight would be the growth of our Reigate Grammar School Professionals group, now with over 1,000 members, which provides opportunities for our diverse and talented community to socialise and network whilst also providing a friendly forum for our young leavers to engage with experienced professionals who can offer support and valuable career advice. The growth of our overseas network has been impressive. I am thankful to those Reigatians that have stepped forward to become Overseas Ambassadors. The most recent launch was in Australia with over 40 Reigatians attending a super event in Sydney. By contrast, our established US group gathered at the Penn Club NYC in October, where Michael Lloyd (1986) explained the idea of a ‘Stakeholder Model’. Consequently, the first RGS American Friends Scholar, will be attending RGS in 2015. In a nutshell, social mobility at work through the collective spirit and passion of the Reigatian community. It doesn’t get much better!

The Chairman’s Amicable Dinner, held at the Reform Club, courtesy of Sir Colin Chandler, was a great success and we enjoyed the story-telling of Sir Keir Starmer (1981). It was my role to acquire a bow tie for Keir, but that’s a story for another time! We were also grateful to Keir for returning to RGS to speak to the sixth form as part of our Henry Smith Lecture series

that significantly enriches the educational experience of our students. This followed Sir Peter Gershon (1966), who gave his lecture earlier in the year and linked it to the announcement of the Gershon Scholars at RGS, i.e. Changing Lives opportunities at Sixth Form for students with a passion for Mathematics, Science and/or Engineering. As for RGS, the school is in very good shape under the inspirational leadership of Shaun Fenton. Academic results put us in the top 50 schools in the country. Excellence is being realised in a whole range of activities both inside and outside the classroom. The amazing gift of £4m from the Harrison family for the construction of a new Sixth Form and Learning Resource Centre was wonderful news as we look to our 350th anniversary and a shared vision for a well-resourced 21st Century school. Reigate Grammar School is enjoying support and investment at all levels and we have our community to thank for this. My thanks and appreciation go to everyone who has supported the Foundation throughout the year, including those offering contributions to this magazine. Alas, due to constraints, we are sometimes unable to include every piece.

Finally, I would like to thank John Rowlands (1973) for his outstanding research on those former pupils that lost their lives in the First World War, including David Ive who was the first Old Reigatian listed on our memorial, who fell at Ypres in 1914. We remember. Sean Davey Development Director

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CHANGING LIVES THE CHANGING LIVES CAMPAIGN LAUNCHES AT MANSION HOUSE

ELLIS CLARKE

BURSARY RECIPIENT RGS 2006–2013

The RGS Foundation’s ‘Changing Lives’ campaign was officially launched by Chairman Sir Colin Chandler at Mansion House on Wednesday 22 January. With an audience of almost 200 members of the Reigatian community, guests were particularly inspired by a short talk delivered by Ellis Clarke on how an RGS bursary had given her a life-changing opportunity that has recently resulted in a place at Cambridge University to read English Literature. Ellis is an Ambassador for the ‘Changing Lives’ campaign which aims to provide scholarships through the 1675 Bursary Fund to disadvantaged children from the local area. “I support the campaign because of the strong conviction I have that the very high standards of Reigate Grammar School in academic achievement, in cultural activities and sports, should be available to gifted children whose families cannot afford the fees which those standards command. This campaign deserves your support and all gifts are welcome, no matter what their size.” Sir Colin Chandler Chairman RGS Foundation

I HAVE ONLY MY SINCERE THANKS TO OFFER TO MICHAEL LLOYD IN RETURN FOR THE GIFT OF EDUCATION, AND THE PROMISE THAT I WILL ALWAYS STRIVE TO MAKE THE MOST OF THE OPPORTUNITIES THAT HAVE ARISEN AS A RESULT.

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RGS Headmaster, Shaun Fenton speaks


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Campaign targets THE CHANGING LIVES CAMPAIGN AIMS TO RAISE £1 MILLION TO HAVE A MINIMUM OF TWENTY ‘1675 SCHOLARS’ ATTENDING RGS BY 2016… WITH A LONGER TERM AIM TO BUILD THE FUND TO £4 MILLION BY 2025 TO MARK THE SCHOOL’S 350TH ANNIVERSARY.

One year on (as of January 2015)

£800k £1.6m 11

1675 BURSARY FUND

A good start.... actual

pledged

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SUPPORT US LEGACY GIVING WILL YOU REMEMBER RGS? When recollecting your school days, what do you remember most: a favourite teacher, sports matches, friends with whom you shared these formative years? A walk down memory lane can evoke many memories but have you considered remembering the future generations of students who will walk the same corridors you once did? The ‘Changing Lives’ Bursary Campaign aims to generate funds to offer talented boys and girls, from local families in need, an excellent education full of breadth and experience that will prepare them for society. We look to offer as many open-access places, based upon merit, as are financially viable, but we cannot do this alone and need your support. Leaving a legacy to RGS is one of the greatest gifts you can make in your lifetime. Every gift in every will makes a difference. If you would like to help and if the time is right to leave a gift in your will to remember RGS, we would very much welcome the opportunity to discuss this with you. Please contact us to discuss your wishes.

THE 1675 SOCIETY The 1675 Society was established in 2010 for those who wish to support the Foundation by remembering RGS in their will. A legacy would be a permanent testimony to your affection for the school and the values RGS holds. We like to honour and thank, during their lifetimes, all those who have chosen to remember RGS in their will and have established the 1675 Society, named in recognition of the school’s founding year, to do so. All those who leave a gift to the school are invited to become members of the 1675 Society and meet for the Society’s annual luncheon hosted by Shaun and Anna Fenton at 1 Chart Lane.

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“ I LEAVE MY LEGACY AS AN ACKNOWLEDGMENT OF THE BREADTH OF LEARNING AND THE PRIDE ENGENDERED IN RGS PLUS A LIFETIME OF FRIENDSHIP WITH SOME OF MY PEERS” Anonymous OR 1944

“Without doubt my time at RGS did change my life. Coming from a very poor but loving family, the 1944 Education Act granted me entrance giving me an excellent and rounded education, developing my potential and stimulating my ambition. My support of the Foundation is given with the hope of enabling promising young people with modest means to benefit in the way that I have. It is a cause dear to my heart and that of my wife.” Peter Clarke OR 1952

RGS FOUNDATION CUFFLINKS & TIES We are delighted to be able to offer RGS Foundation ties and cufflinks at a cost of £20 each, or £30 for both, plus p&p. Please contact us if you are interested in purchasing at: foundation@reigategrammar.org


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HENRY SMITH CLUB Henry Smith was born in Wandsworth in 1548. He was an alderman of a highly charitable disposition and worked as a city merchant. Throughout Henry’s lifetime he achieved considerable wealth through the acquisition of land and estates. His portfolio included manors in Southwick, Surrey, Gloucestershire, Kent and Sevenoaks among many others. With such an extensive portfolio and with no family to bequeath it to, Henry set up a succession of trusts to dispose of the rents and profits from his lands for charitable uses. Having reached an esteemed position in the city, Henry recognised the opportunities an education could provide and looked to use his affluence to help and assist the poor who lived in the counties within which he held his property and land.

WE ARE DELIGHTED TO ANNOUNCE THAT UP TO THE END OF 2014 WE HAD 20 COMMITTED HENRY SMITH CLUB MEMBERS, WITH MANY MORE WHO HAVE EXPRESSED AN INTEREST IN JOINING.

In 1627, Henry died and chose to be buried in the parish of his birthplace, Wandsworth. Within Wandsworth Parish Church is a monument of Henry, kneeling in alderman’s robes holding a skull in one hand. The panel below the monument records gifts of £1,000 from his estate to be given to several towns in Surrey, including Reigate. The reason Henry chose Reigate remains unclear, however Henry’s will declared that this gift was to be used for the relief of the poor and to educate the local children. Following Henry’s death, his legacy was kept by the Churchwardens of St Mary’s Church who, by consent of the parishioners, purchased land near the Church and built a free school to educate local poor boys in reading, writing and simple calculations in keeping with Henry’s wishes. Finally, in 1675, the school was founded and remains on its original site to this day. Henry’s philanthropic inclination to Reigate will remain unknown, however, Reigate Grammar School is eternally grateful for the benevolence shown by him. In honour of Henry and his generosity, the Foundation now continues to impart the spirit of Henry Smith by establishing the Henry Smith Club. Membership of the club contributes to bursarial support for current and future students of RGS and members will receive annual invitations to the Chairman’s Amicable dinner along with other benefits.

Henry Smith Club Membership Pin

If you wish to join the Henry Smith Club or discuss membership please contact: foundation@reigategrammar.org

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FOUNDATION ACTIVITIES HENRY SMITH LECTURE SIR KEIR STARMER

REIGATE CHARITY 7s 2014 SUNDAY 2 MARCH

FRIDAY 7 FEBRUARY

SUMMARY OF RESULTS: Boys Cup Winners Tonbridge School Plate Winners Hampton School Shield Winners St. Joseph’s College Bowl Winners Judd School Girls Cup Winners Worthing College Plate Winners Reigate Grammar School

Back in February, Sir Keir Starmer QC (class of 1981), returned to Reigate Grammar School to deliver The Henry Smith Lecture to students and staff. Sir Keir Starmer QC, former pupil and a contemporary of our last speaker Andrew Sullivan, was knighted by the Queen in the 2014 New Year’s Honours List. He is the author of European Human Rights Law (1999). Regarded as a progressive barrister he was named Human Rights Lawyer of the Year 2000. Appointed as Queen’s Counsel in 2002, named QC of the Year in the field of human rights and public law in 2007, served as Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) and the Head of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) from 2008 to 2013 and most recently has announced his intention to stand for Labour in this year’s general election.

ANNUAL FOUNDATION GOLF DAY FRIDAY 30 MAY

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After several months of rain and miserable weather it was a welcome change and relief to be able to enjoy a festival of sevens rugby, held at the Reigate Grammar School’s Hartswood Sports Ground. The Reigate Charity 7s, now well-established and regarded as one of the top school tournaments in the country, welcomed 32 boys’ and 10 girls’ U18 sevens teams on the day. In the Cup, Tonbridge School faced Epsom College in an epic final holding on in the final seconds to take a narrow victory 24-19. This was a thrilling match refereed by Chris White RFU, a veteran of over 50 iRB Tests. Hampton School was the more convincing winner over The Portsmouth Grammar School 26-5.

In the Girls’ competition there was a highly competitive encounter between Worthing College and Filton College. Having a particularly strong start Worthing finished impressive winners 26-5. In the Girls’ Plate competition there was delight for the home crowd as a determined Reigate Grammar School snatched victory 5-0 in a very tense final against a dogged Epsom College team. The Kukri Players of the Tournament were: Will Weston (Tonbridge School) and Caroline Hodgson (Worthing College). Presentations were made by Wasps and England star Joe Launchbury who played in this tournament several years earlier. Now an established charity event, over £3000 was raised on the day for the Aplastic Anaemia Trust and the RGS Foundation’s Changing Lives Campaign. As Joe remarked;

“This is a wonderful event. RGS remembers It is wonderful to see so many young players working so hard for their teams but also having fun. It has been a great day and very enjoyable.” Another successful day was held at Reigate Heath Golf Club at the now well-established Annual Foundation Golf Day. It was a fantastic day, helped by the dry and moderately sunny weather. The winning trophies were taken home by Dan Holt and John O’Toole. We would like to thank all our sponsors and prize contributors for this popular event, which helped us raise over £3,000 for the Changing Lives bursary campaign.


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HENRY SMITH LECTURE SIR PETER GERSHON MONDAY 16 JUNE

Following on from the success earlier in the year of the Henry Smith Lecture given by Sir Keir Starmer, it was the turn of OR Sir Peter Gershon (1966) in June to return to RGS. As Chairman of The National Grid and Tate & Lyle, Sir Peter returned to his old school to meet current students and provide an insight into the challenges of working in global industries today. He also identified himself as the man responsible for ‘ultimately keeping the kettles boiling during England’s World Cup matches’ and reflected on England’s 1966 World Cup win, the same year he left Reigate Grammar School. As he addressed the audience of Sixth Form students, Sir Peter said that his career had been an unexpected journey from the classrooms at Reigate Grammar School in the 1960’s to the boardrooms of global

industry: “I didn’t have a career plan at all but benefitted from the guidance of my school teachers and careers masters. I was the first in my family to attend university and I look back with thanks for the teachers who supported my path to Cambridge University and into my first job in computers. The broad education and resilience developed at Reigate Grammar gave me a firm foundation for the challenges of working life. I learnt that the most important thing is to ask ‘why’ and keep on asking until you get to the truth of a situation.” Reflecting on the global economy and industry today, Sir Peter outlined four main changes that have occurred since he left Reigate as a school boy. The first change identified was the rise of information technology. Sir Peter commented: “The first computer I programmed was the size of a room and had less computing power than the iPhones that sit in our pockets today.” Climate change, the rise of China as an economic powerhouse and the change in women’s role in society were also highlighted as major changes emerging in the last forty years. Sir Peter Gershon attended Reigate Grammar School from 1958– 1966. His career has spanned both the private and public sectors since he graduated in Mathematics at Cambridge University in 1969. After starting in the computer industry (1969–1986) he worked in the telecommunications industry (1987–1994) and then became the main board director of GEC plc in 1994 with responsibility for its £3.5 billion international aerospace & defence business. He joined the Civil Service in April 2000 as the first Chief Executive of the Office of Government Commerce (OGC).

THE CHAIRMAN’S AMICABLE DINNER WEDNESDAY 25 JUNE

The annual RGS Foundation Chairman’s Amicable Dinner to celebrate ‘1675 Founders Day’ was held at The Reform Club, Pall Mall, in the recently restored Library.

It was a memorable and outstanding occasion which celebrated our historic Foundation. Our host, Mark Elsey (Governor, Chairman of RGS London Professionals) was thrust into the limelight at the last minute (unfortunately Sir Colin Chandler was unable to attend due to a bug that he couldn’t quite shake off in time) and welcomed all guests including our honourable speaker Sir Keir Starmer KCB, QC (pictured left).

off at The Reform Club. Thankfully, there were no delays and Sir Keir was able to speak with passion and eloquence about the two words that described his time best at RGS; challenge and laughter. He also put into context the issue of social mobility in the local area and in particular the role of the Foundation, through the Changing Lives campaign.

Sir Keir left RGS in 1981. Having risen through the ranks of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) he became the fourteenth Director of Public Prosecutions (DPP) and Head of the Crown Prosecution Service in 2008 for a five year term. As DPP, Sir Keir was responsible for all criminal prosecutions in England and Wales. Sir Keir, in fact, is in so much demand that we nearly didn’t hear him speak at all. He was called, at the very last minute, to attend a meeting in Belfast which meant scheduling a taxi to pick him up at Heathrow and drop him 12


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FOUNDATION ACTIVITIES

RGS PROFESSIONALS CHARITY GOLF DAY THURSDAY 24 OCTOBER

Royal Ashdown Forest is a wonderful golf course, but tough. Therefore, I would like to compliment everyone who took on this challenging course, particularly as the weather was at times ‘interesting’! Four seasons in one day would be a fair description. As for the golf, we did see some excellent team scores on the day and a real competition for the top spot. In the end, it was Rapidata-Class Technology that took the spoils and were victorious. However, we should mention that Meldrums, last year’s winners, continued with their winning streak by taking the Yellow Ball Challenge!

Elsewhere, Jonathan Copp won the longest drive and RGS Bursar, Steve Douty, won the nearest to the pin competition. Finally, we would like to thank everyone involved with the day, particularly the staff at Royal Ashdown Forest who gave us such a special welcome and provided excellent food and hospitality. Your support with this event has provided much needed charitable income for the Changing Lives campaign that looks to provide transformational opportunities for talented children from disadvantaged backgrounds.

A CHALLENGING COURSE WITH EQUALLY CHALLENGING CONDITIONS – FOUR SEASONS IN ONE WOULD BE A FAIR DESCRIPTION!

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AN EVENING WITH MARK RAMPRAKASH

VARSITY GATHERING THURSDAY 11 DECEMBER

THURSDAY 16 OCTOBER

October saw cricketing legend Mark Ramprakash take centre stage in the Sixth Form Centre, recounting his career out in the middle and on the dance floor as winner of Strictly Come Dancing. The evening consisted of live music and singing from the excellent RGS Swing Band (including the Strictly Come Dancing music!) followed by a Q&A hosted by BBC Newsbeat reporter James Waterhouse. Not one to shy away from his opinions Mark took questions from the floor, gave a candid insight into his cricketing career, favourite players he shared the crease with and the issues that have plagued the England senior cricket team over the earlier part of the year. A fantastic evening was had by all, raising over £2,500 for the Changing Lives campaign. We even found out that Mark and Headmaster Shaun Fenton used to play in the same childhood football team – Belmont United!

In December the dark blue of Oxford University took the spoils in the 133rd Varsity match when they thrashed Cambridge, 43-6. The afternoon was enjoyed by over 30 members of the Reigatian Community who sampled the delightful car boot picnic and ‘winter warmers’ on offer in the shadow of the West Stand pre and post-match. Even though the temperature plummeted later in the afternoon, spirits were high and those with an allegiance to Oxford were kept warm revelling in the success of their victorious side.

REMEMBRANCE SERVICE TUESDAY 11 NOVEMBER

Led by Headmaster Shaun Fenton, the playground was bursting at the seams with teachers, pupils and VIP guests to commemorate those who made the greatest sacrifice of all. Particularly poignant as this year marked 100 years since the First World War. We were extremely lucky to have ORs Lieutenant Helen Oliphant and Major Dale Taft in attendance with the latter providing a moving reading on the steps before a packed silent playground. Following this service, an intimate group of guests, staff, students and parents went on to the memorial garden for the traditional wreath laying ceremony, led by the recently retired Peter Chesterton and featuring an ode from Lieutenant Helen Oliphant. Major Dale Taft RGS 1992–2000, Lieutenant Helen Oliphant RGS 1994–2001.

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THE REIGATIAN NETWORK RGS LONDON PROFESSIONALS The RGS London Professionals group was established by the Foundation in 2011 and aims to connect members of the Reigatian Community who have business in the London area. This includes parents, alumni and friends of RGS. Its primary purpose is to foster meaningful friendships and network support. Membership of the group is free with events being held throughout the year which offer excellent opportunities for socialising, connectivity and business networking. These events also provide learning platforms for everyone and help us to engage our London Professional community. If you are interested in joining the London Professionals group, please email your business details and a short career profile to foundation@reigategrammar.org and we will be delighted to welcome you to the group.

BARCLAYS GATHERING THURSDAY 24 APRIL

A huge thank you must go to Richard Caven (RGS 1983–1991) from Barclays who hosted the London Professionals Gathering at Canary Wharf. The evening was a huge success in the backdrop of sublime views across London. Those who attended were treated to talks from Malcolm Jones (Barclays and RGS parent) and Robert Cole (RGS 1977–1984) who gave an account of his time at RGS and his career path to his current position of Assistant Editor at Reuters Breakingviews, via Hull and the Independent!

E&Y CITY BREAKFAST

John O’Connell RGS 1991–1998

WEDNESDAY 24 SEPTEMBER

Amid the backdrop of glorious views across Tower Bridge and The Tower of London, the RGS London Professionals City Breakfast took place in early September at Ernst & Young’s newly refurbished 9th floor conference suite – a magnificent venue. A huge thanks must go to John O’Connell (Director EY, OR 1998) for hosting the event, along with keynote speaker Ken Williamson (Senior Partner EY) for his thought provoking talk on Board Effectiveness and the different social styles required at board level to help facilitate success.

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OVERSEAS FRIENDS OF RGS HONG KONG FRIENDS HONG KONG GATHERING TUESDAY 25 MARCH

Zafran, a bar restaurant in Central Hong Kong, was the perfect venue for the second Hong Kong Gathering held for the friends of RGS. On the night, over 20 of the wider Reigatian community attended, including old boys and girls, parents, staff and friends. There was plenty of banter, old school stories remembered and business cards exchanged. The venue choice was obvious when we discovered that James Ward (2005) was the young, dynamic manager! We are all very thankful to James for his excellent hospitality and support for the event. We are also grateful to James Daniels (1992) and Lawrence Webb (1977) for their support and encouragement to help make the Hong Kong friends group grow and develop.

James Daniels and Andrew Keith

IT WAS GOOD TO SEE A NUMBER OF NEW FACES ATTENDING, THOSE HAVING RECENTLY MOVED TO THE ISLAND SINGAPORE FRIENDS SINGAPORE GATHERING FRIDAY 20 JUNE

A number of Reigatians came together to enjoy a relaxed social evening at the Dallas Bar, Boat Quay. Huge thanks go to Ryan Younger (1991) for organising the venue and helping drive forward this important RGS ex-pat community in Singapore and SE Asia. With several ORs away on business, it was good to see a number of new faces attending having recently moved to the island. However, special mention should go to Steven Purser (1993) who made the trip from Bangkok to join us on the night. Sean Davey, Foundation Director, took the opportunity to give an update on recent developments at RGS, including the Changing Lives campaign. He also made a special presentation of a school plaque to Ryan Younger for his help and supportive role as the official OR Representative in Singapore. 16


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THE REIGATIAN NETWORK

AMERICAN FRIENDS NYC GATHERING THURSDAY 23 OCTOBER

CANADIAN FRIENDS VANCOUVER GATHERING SATURDAY 25 OCTOBER

A number of ORs based in Vancouver and the West Coast gathered for a social evening hosted by Matt Falkner (1982). As an off-shoot of our American Friends group, the Canadian & West Coast Friends of RGS has emerged as a social network group for the significant number of ORs in this region. This includes Washington State down to California. The Steamworks Inn in the Gastown District of Vancouver was an excellent venue for a warm, social evening. It was great to see Brian Matheson (1993) for the first time (brother Andy 1995 attended the NYC event a couple of days earlier), as well as Iain McLean (1974) who made the journey from Vancouver Island to join us. Meanwhile, a highlight was the appearance of a 1951/52 1st XV ‘colours’ cap owned by Peter Carpenter ’53! Matt Falkner (1982) and David Mycroft (1976) are keen to welcome any Reigatians in the region and those passing through. We have in the region of 40 ORs based on the West Coast and it would be great to connect.

A special occasion, a special venue, a special crowd! In October a group of well over thirty ORs, students and staff gathered at the Penn Club in Midtown Manhattan for the annual American Friends of RGS (AFRGS) social. Having formally launched in the same venue two years earlier, the American Friends of RGS has developed into a very important social and business networking group that welcomes all Reigatians and friends who are either based in, visiting, or travelling through NYC. On this occasion we were joined by several of the current Lower Sixth and their staff who were on a History & Politics trip. Indeed, they were still buzzing about the informal lecture they received from Andrew Sullivan OR in Washington DC earlier in the week. Several had travelled from distant places to attend. Matt and Michelle Falkner had flown in from Vancouver whist Tim and Kloe Frith escaped the hurricane in Bermuda to join us. Also, it was wonderful to witness a 36 year reunion between two former classmates. Keith Holdaway, who had flown in from North Carolina with his wife Patricia, was able to spend much of the evening reminiscing and re-living playground antics with fellow OR Keith Dawson who has been based in the NYC area for over ten years with his wife Lisa. The last time these two guys met was on leaving the Grammar in 1978!

(L to R) Matt Falkner (1980), Elizabeth Dawson, Michelle Falkner, Keith Dawson (1978).

It was wonderful to see such a vibrant mix of Reigatians spanning so many generations, it was a great evening and the RGS Foundation is extremely grateful to Michael Lloyd OR who arranged the venue and spoke so passionately about his affinity and affection for his alma mater. He stressed the importance of connectivity and the bonds of friendship and brotherhood we all share. As President of the AFRGS, Michael is keen to grow the network and connectivity throughout the US as well as strengthen bonds with the Grammar. Michael is an advocate for the philanthropic work the Foundation does and is keen that the AFRGS look to support the Changing Lives social mobility initiative. The concept of a ‘collective’ approach to sponsor a child through RGS was well-received.

AUSTRALIAN FRIENDS SYDNEY GATHERING THURSDAY 27 NOVEMBER

A Thursday night in November in Sydney saw the first ever RGS Australian Friends Gathering take place at The Slip Inn in the heart of the City.

Peter Carpenter

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The evening was a roaring success with over 40 attendees making the journey from across Australia, including Perth, Melbourne, Brisbane and the remainder of Western Australia. It was fantastic to see members of the OR Community from every decade since the 1960’s trade stories and reflect on their happy years at RGS. With school photos (including some very dodgy haircuts), report cards from the archives and Pilgrim snippets on display, plenty of memories were reignited and it was heart-warming to see many ORs reconnect with old classmates with whom they had lost contact with. A huge thanks must go to Neil Brett and James O’Mahony for their assistance in organising the event. The talk of next year’s

Stephen Banfield (1989), Chris Smedley (1985) and Kevin Banfield (1991).

RGS Australian Friends Gathering is already gaining momentum as well as talk of regional get-togethers. Thank you to all those who made the tremendous effort to attend.


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

OVERSEAS AMBASSADORS As you have read over the last few pages, The Reigatian Community continues to spread further and wider around the globe. From New York to New Zealand, there are members of the community in most continents either working, with their families or enjoying a well-earned retirement. With this in mind, we are delighted to have appointed global RGS Overseas Ambassadors who are the point of contact for anyone wanting to join up with the existing established Reigatians in these far reaches. If you are living, travelling through or visiting any of these territories please email foundation@reigategrammar.org so that we can put you in touch with your local ambassador.

AMERICA: New York City Michael Lloyd

AUSTRALIA: Sydney Neil Brett

HONG KONG Lawrie Webb

Left RGS: 1986 Interests: Golf, fishing and field sports Family: Married to Jill with one daughter, Julia Career: Head of Trading

Left RGS: 1980 Interests: Music, speedway and rugby Family: Married to Simone with 4 daughters Career: Mortgage and Independent Financial Advisor

Left RGS: 1977 Interests: Open water swimming, rugby and running Family: Married to Vivien and three (mostly) grown up sons Career: Finance

AMERICA: Seattle David Mycroft

AUSTRALIA: Brisbane Chris Smedley

SINGAPORE Ryan Younger

Left RGS: 1976 Interests: Sailing, U19 County Rugby Coach Family: Married with two children aged 14 and 9 Career: Now retired

Left RGS: 1985 Interests: Real English Public Houses Family: Married to Sarah with 3 children Career: General Manager

Left RGS: 1991 Interests: Cold beverages Family: Married to Aileen and daughter Charlotte (1) Career: Oil industry

CANADA: Vancouver Matt Falkner

AUSTRALIA: Melbourne Raymond Buckett

UAE: Dubai Campbell Steedman

Left RGS: Interests: Family: Career:

Left RGS: 1966 Interests: Travelling, AFL and cricket Family: Partner Lorraine, 3 sons and 4 grandchildren Career: Pharmaceutical Industry

Relationship: Parent of Alumni Interests: Golf, dining and fine wines Family: Married to Sally, 2 children Career: Partner at White & Case with vast Middle Eastern experience

1980 Rugby, airlines Married to Michelle, 2 children Aviation Security

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T H E R E I G AT I A N 2 014

REUNION OLD REIGATIAN ANNUAL DINNER FRIDAY 7 FEBRUARY

The Annual Dinner for Old Reigatians was held at The Old Reigatians Rugby Football Club. During the drinks reception, guests were treated to musical entertainment on the club’s grand piano by two of our Reigate Grammar School pianists. A delicious three course meal followed. The Honoured Guest, Mr Peter Chesterton, then delivered a very moving speech on his 40 years at Reigate Grammar School charting the highs and lows during this period of time. Working with five different Headmasters, Peter has seen an enormous change in the school which, when he joined was a boys only state school. For the last ten years, Peter has worked as the school chaplain and has felt immensely privileged to work in this role alongside so many students and staff in a spiritual, listening and counselling capacity. Peter and his wife Heather have also enjoyed seeing their two sons, James and Mark enjoy a Reigate Grammar School education. (L to R) Mark Chesterton, Heather Chesterton, James Chesterton, Helen Chesterton, Peter Chesterton.

WEST COUNTRY GATHERING MONDAY 23 JUNE

This year’s West Country Gathering took place in Bristol on Monday 23 June at the magnificent SS Great Britain. In 1970, Great Britain was returned to the Bristol dry dock where she was built. Now listed as part of the National Historic Fleet, Core Collection, she is an award-winning visitor attraction – the perfect spot for our annual West Country Gathering.

SCOUT DIAMOND REUNION FRIDAY 7 MARCH

The 16th Reigate Scout Group was formed at the end of January 1954 and continued until a final summer camp in 1996. Since this time, ‘Old Scouts’ have continued the tradition of having a Reunion every five years. It was the ninth such gathering in March which celebrated the group’s sixtieth birthday. The event began in the Library, which, for about seventy years (and most of the life of the Scout Group), had been the Gym and Assembly Hall. After coffee and musical entertainment from some of our current students, the Headmaster, Mr Shaun Fenton, presented Robin Bligh (founder of the Scout Group and teacher at RGS from 1953–1994) with a painting of Reigate Grammar School. Tours of the school followed led by Sixth Form students. A convoy of cars then took everyone to the RGS Hartswood Pavilion for lunch and an opportunity to reminisce. 19

The get together started with Bob, our tour guide, in the glorious sunshine giving us a potted history of the ship. We then set sail on our tour and made our way down ‘below sea level’ to see the iron hull and continued the tour through to the upper deck. The highlight for many was listening to Bob’s stories in the ornamental dining saloon. He painted a vivid picture of what it would have been like all those years ago to be in the shoes of one of the 360 guests taking a seat at dinner. Lunch was then served next door, which provided an opportunity for all 30 members of the Reigatian Community in attendance to reminisce and exchange their many fond memories and traditions at RGS.


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GOLD REUNION: CLASS OF 1964 MONDAY 30 JUNE

This year’s Gold reunion took place in July in the Headmaster’s Garden. As this date coincided with the Art Exhibition at the school, guests were given a tour before lunch to see the wonderful pieces of artwork on display. In the afternoon the class of 1964 stayed on for a ‘Living History’ Event as part of the Summer Festival; where a small number of our Fourth Form pupils chatted with members of the Reigatian Community about their experiences at RGS. They were interested to hear about the contrast with today’s schooling in terms of discipline, subjects and aspirations. There was also some fantastic live music by the school band and the afternoon finished with a delightful cream tea.

RUGBY REUNION

SATURDAY 30 AUGUST In days gone by, there was a much anticipated and keenly fought annual rugby match between Reigate Grammar School 1st XV and the Old Reigatian Rugby Football Club 1st XV. It is not surprising that the Old Boys always won – well, not quite always. In the autumn term 1956, the score was 5-0 in favour of the school (in those days a converted try was worth five points). In August, five survivors from the winning team and two of their wives travelled from Stirling, Newark, Colchester, Shepperton and Norbury to meet at the Skimmington Castle on Reigate Heath in order to relive that day. One of those present, Rob Evans, appears to remember every scrum, every tackle and, in particular, every score. He recalls,

“A poor Old Reigatian throw to the back of their line out resulted in a loose ball which I kicked on, picked up, and fell over the try line to score. In damp conditions a difficult conversion with a wet leather ball was achieved by the late Howard Harries, who used Julian Holland as a placer. The superior discipline of the school side under the captaincy of David Branson, and our excellent fitness under the training of Welsh sports master Lewis, ensured we prevented the Old Reigatians from scoring and we won 5-0.” And how did those teenagers celebrate 58 years ago? After a halfpint of shandy, the team watched a double bill of horror films at the Majestic cinema!

Five survivors Back row (left to right): Eric Howman Rob Evans (try-scorer) Front row (left to right): David Hawkins David Branson (captain) Mike Poole

Reigate Grammar School 1st XV, 1956–57

GRADUATION LUNCH: CLASS OF 2010 SATURDAY 13 SEPTEMBER

On a warm Saturday in September we welcomed the Class of 2010 back to Hartswood for the annual Graduation Lunch. Approximately half the year group joined current and former staff in the pavilion for a drinks reception and buffet lunch. For many this was the first time they had been back to school since collecting their A Level results back in 2010. As they start out in their working lives, a number have joined the RGS Professionals group where for some, the network has provided exciting job opportunities. 20


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REUNION

‘CLASS OF 61’ SEVILLE GATHERING 25–29 SEPTEMBER

Following the Golden Reunion arranged by the school to mark the 50th anniversary of the departure from its hallowed halls of what was termed the ‘Class of 61’; several of those attending have continued to meet together on a regular monthly basis at a comfortably appointed pub in Redhill. Left to right: Alan Matthews John Streeter Erik Durrant Chris Gayford Ray Walker Colin Stephenson.

In addition to this enjoyable gathering an email group was established by which fellow members of the Class of 61 located in distant lands were able to remain in contact and exchange various anecdotes from their school days, in addition to their various opinions on the current state of the world in general as well as the Redhill and Reigate area in particular. A hard core of these members, together with their wives and partners, met over a long weekend last year in Madrid to mark the occasion of their 70th birthdays and enjoyed two magnificently organised traditional Spanish meals ably arranged by Alan Matthews who has himself lived in Madrid for many years. An account of the event, together with a photograph of those attending, appeared in the 2013 edition of the ‘The Reigatian’. 21

This year, to mark the 60th anniversary of their joining the school in September 1954, and over the last weekend of September, six members of the original Class of 61, once again accompanied by their female supervisors, travelled to Seville to attend another reunion similarly organised by Alan Matthews.

Alan and his wife for all that they had done to make the reunion in Seville so enjoyable for those who had attended from other European countries. A small token of our appreciation was also presented to Alan which he reluctantly accepted with a degree of personal embarrassment!

In accordance with what is now becoming something of a tradition, a corporate dinner was held on the first evening followed by a lunch the following day. Both events were held in traditional Spanish locations and in a style based on a relaxed serving over several hours of a variety of well-presented Spanish ‘tapas’ dishes, a sumptuous main course, and an attractively served dessert all accompanied by a selection of fine Spanish wines. During the course of the lunch Chris Gayford called for order and, in an eloquent and pleasant manner, thanked

There was also much free time for local sightseeing and, since the weather had proved particularly pleasant, all attending wore out much of their personal shoe leather exploring the various architectural and cultural delights of the ancient city. To be continued next year... John Streeter RGS 1954–1961.


T H E M AG A Z I N E F O R T H E R E I G AT I A N C O M M U N I T Y

2015 EVENTS 2015 FOUNDATION EVENTS Event

Venue

Date

RGS Charity 7s

Hartswood

1 March 2015

21st Reunion for leavers of ’93–’94

Sixth Form Centre

7 March 2015

RGS London Professionals Event

Royal Academy of Engineering

12 March 2015

Hong Kong Friends of RGS Gathering

TBC

24 March 2015

OR Dinner

Hartswood

15 May 2015

Foundation Cricket Day

Hartswood

15 May 2015

Foundation Golf Day

Reigate Heath GC

29 May 2015

LATER IN 2015 Singapore Friends of RGS Gathering

June

Chairman’s Amicable Dinner

June

Gold Reunion

June

West Country Gathering

June

An Evening with…

July

Telethon July Graduation Lunch for the Class of 2011

September

RGS London Professionals Event

September

RGS Professionals Charity Golf Day

October

Silver Reunion

November

American Friends of RGS Gathering

November

Canadian Friends of RGS Gathering

November

Australian Friends of RGS Gathering

November

Henry Smith Club Dinner

December

Varsity Rugby Match

December

1675 Society Event

December

FURTHER INFORMATION For information on any of our events please email foundation@reigategrammar.org Or visit the website at reigategrammar.org/foundationhome

 @foundationRGS & Alumni at Reigate  Foundation Grammar School  Reigate Grammar School Professionals 22


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FEATURES

WW1 REIGATE GRAMMAR SCHOOL John Rowlands RGS 1966–1973

The school was a fee paying school at the time of the outbreak of WW1 though many attended on scholarships as can also be seen by the wide range of employments listed for the pupils’ fathers, from gardeners to brokers, doctors and lawyers. With the limited size of the school and the relatively limited travel opportunities most of the community of scholars lived within walking distance. This meant that as losses arose they were all heartfelt by the close and relatively small RGS community. The school had an active Officer Training Corps and this meant that many of the boys had basic military training whilst attending RGS. On joining up they were then naturally at an advantage in seeking commissions and many joined as officers, or soon became. This should remembered in the context that initially a junior officer had a life expectancy of around six weeks on the Western Front. In 1914 the school was shown as having 142 pupils, and the total number of past pupils who served was declared at 306 with 53 losing their life in service. This represents a loss of 17% and compares with schools such as Rugby who lost 21% of the 3244 who served or Sevenoaks who lost 10%. Of the fallen 27 were officers and 25 NCO’s and private soldiers. The youngest casualty was 18 at the time of his death and the oldest was 44. 23

The nature of the school and the OTC seems to have prevented any instances of underage attestation so well documented elsewhere in the country. Several of the older losses were among doctors who served in hospitals or dressing stations close to the front and fell victim to shelling while treating the wounded. If the national pattern was followed there were twice as many seriously wounded as killed and many of these can be tracked via the Pilgrim magazines of the time. In terms of regiments served the largest presence was in the local London Regiment and The Queen’s Royal West Surrey Regiment. Four were pioneer flyers with the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) or Royal Naval Air Service (RNAS), and the vast majority made their sacrifice in France and Belgium though there are individual cases recorded in India, Israel and Iraq. Only one of the 55 listed on the memorial has a grave in the UK, and interestingly it appears that one of those listed did not in fact die in WW1. In August 1914 the first activity the schoolboys may have noticed was the sudden departure of the school caretaker William English. William was a veteran of the Victorian Border Wars on the NW frontier of India between 1895 and 1905 and as a reservist immediately met the call to arms. He had also headed up the OTC as a result of his experience. Sadly he was to serve throughout the war only

to die of wounds in 1918 as a Prisoner of War in Germany. Of course the expectation that the war would be over by Xmas 1914 proved naive in the extreme, but interestingly the memorial only carries the name of one loss in 1914, that of David Ive who had left school in the Summer of 1912.


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WE REMEMBER... Name: Born: RGS: Died: Regiment:

David Ive was the first Old Reigatian on the Reigate Grammar School memorial to have died in The Great War. He died at the first battle of Ypres on 23 October 1914 only 10 weeks after the war started. He was born at West Kensington in 1894. His father was a civil engineer for the London County Council and in 1911 his family lived at “The Hermitage” which was a house at the top of Cronks Hill Reigate. David had at least two younger brothers. Unlike many of the ORs who succumbed he was already in the army when war was declared and died at the age of 20. He had left school in 1912 and joined the Royal West Surrey Regiment 3rd Battalion early in 1913. He was transferred to the 2nd Battalion when they returned from service in South Africa on 23 September 1914 and then benefitted from a single day’s leave on 25 September 1914 prior to embarkation for the front. On Sunday 4 October the 2nd Battalion which was training at Lyndhurst, Hampshire was ordered to march to Southampton and from there David’s D Company boarded the troop ship SS Turkoman on 4 October, but did not sail until 6 October when they proceeded to Zeebrugge. Following a few days in the Bruges area he was moved to Zonnebeke a short distance east of Ypres where he helped face the first assault of the Germans as they sought to take Ypres and then move onto the channel ports. He was therefore part of the “Old Contemptibles” of the original British Expeditionary Force. We know from the battalion war diary that he was killed by a shell on the west of the railway between the station and the level crossing near Zonnebeke. A tragic but not unusual story, a last day at home with friends at the end of September 1914, but then sadly dead within a month and only 18 days after arriving in

David Ive 1894 1902–1912 23 October 1914 Aged 20 2nd Lieutenant Queen’s Royal West Surrey

THEY SHALL NOT GROW OLD AS WE THAT ARE LEFT GROW OLD; AGE SHALL NOT WEARY THEM NOR THE YEARS CONDEMN; AT THE GOING DOWN OF THE SUN AND IN THE MORNING WE WILL REMEMBER THEM. Belgium, his frontline service less than a week. David was to be the first of over 50 Old Reigatians to make the ultimate sacrifice. The photo featured is the WW1 Memorial at RGS which has the 53 names of the individuals who fell during WW1. David Ive is also featured at the age of 14 in 1908 in his OTC uniform (Courtesy RGS Archive). Thanks must go to OR John Rowlands (1966–1973) who has meticulously compiled this information as part of a larger project investigating the 53 names on the WW1 Memorial at RGS.

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FEATURES

CHRIS CHOWN MALDIVES PILOT

CHRIS CHOWN

The Maldives is a north-south orientated island nation situated in the Indian Ocean, with the 2.2 square mile capital, Malé, located about 4° or 240 miles north of the equator. The approximately 1,200 islands of the Maldives make up only 1% of the country by area; water forms an incredible 99%. The average elevation of 1.5 metres makes the Maldives the lowest country in the world.

Trans Maldivian Airways (TMA) provides this service; with more than 45 De Havilland DHC-6 Twin Otter aircraft carrying almost 1 million passengers per year, TMA is both the world’s largest seaplane operator and largest Twin Otter operator. The majority of the 120,000 flights a year transport guests and staff to and from Ibrahim Nasir International Airport, near the capital Malé, to the approximately 60 resorts served by the airline; additional services are offered in the form of photo flights, charters, and Medevac (medical evacuation) flights.

This somewhat unique combination of topographical make-up of the Maldives, and its popularity as an unspoilt, inimitable holiday destination has meant that a seaplane operation is an essential service.

The daily operation is run from the TMA seaplane base next to the international airport, a short bus ride from the main airport terminal. The seaplane operation is a “daylight-only fair weather” operation which

DHC-6 First Officer, Trans Maldivian Airways (RGS 1997–2004)

25

runs throughout the year; the first flights of the day usually depart around 6.00am, and aircraft have to be back on the water at the very latest by a “grounding” time, which is typically between 6.00pm and 6.30pm. This operational arrangement means that flight crews can undertake a duty time that covers the whole flying day, and can typically operate around 14 sectors a day, with a regulatory maximum of eight hours flying in one day. Flight crew usually find out their schedule the evening before the day’s operation; however due to weather, passenger changes, new charter requests, late international flights, and a plethora of other factors, this schedule is liable to change – several times! The sector lengths vary from as short as three minutes to as long as over one hour. The number of


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sectors flown in a day combined with the short sector lengths can make for very busy days flying up and down the atolls of the Maldives! The main airport has specific demarcated water runways, however the islands don’t, and it is up to the flight crew to determine the most appropriate area and direction in which to land based on the wind, water conditions, sun, and other considerations. Most resort islands have either a fixed jetty platform at the island, or a floating platform located close to the island for docking the seaplane, from which passengers disembark onto a speedboat or local “dhoni” boat to reach the island. Some charter flights and Medevac flights are flown to islands which do not usually have a seaplane service, and so an absence of a docking platform means that a “beaching”

is required, which involves reversing the seaplane onto the beach and using ropes to secure the floats either to stakes bought for the purpose of beaching, or to any suitable pole or tree available on the beach – sometimes improvisation is required in seaplane flying! The length and number of sectors flown each day, the variation in scenarios met with different places flown to, and the operation of the seaplane, are amongst the aspects of the operation that make for a uniquely interesting flying experience!

More information can be found by searching “Maldives Water Aerodrome Documentary” on YouTube. 26


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FEATURES

MAX ON #EGGHEADS: STOP BEING A TWIT. Max Bruges (RGS 2006–2011)

I

t started – as most things do – as a joke. We’d done one or two pub quizzes as a team, and never performed particularly well. Turning up to the initial round of try-outs for Eggheads was a much more fun way to while away an afternoon, rather than a conscious decision to begin our careers as nationally renowned champions of general knowledge and superlative wisdom. How little we knew. The auditions took place in the Queens Hotel in Leeds, a few minutes’ walk from the university we all studied at. We unceremoniously bombed the trial quiz, losing out to a local assortment of pensioners and Asda sales executives; but we managed to steal some sandwiches from the annual Football League Managers’ Association meeting which was taking place in the conference room next door, so considered it a pretty decent afternoon on balance. Despite this inauspicious start, we were asked a few weeks later to make the journey up to Glasgow, the spiritual home of quizzing in the United Kingdom and the location of the Eggheads studios. Our specialties as a group were diverse: Christian is an unparalleled expert on the Nineties rave scene, whilst Nick’s knowledge of Karl Lagerfeld is uncanny. I myself took a more balanced approach, a passing familiarity with a wide range of topics, no doubt a legacy of the truly broad-ranging and well-rounded education one receives at Reigate Grammar. We were introduced, first of all, to the Eggheads themselves. Although mortal, their wisdom is almost palpable, but above all they are consummate professionals who remain 27

true to the quizzing ethos of courtesy and jollity. The line-up we faced was a classic one, featuring the formidable Judith (one of the first winners of Who Wants To Be A Millionaire) and a man known only as ‘Tremendous Knowledge Dave’. After wardrobe checks and a significant amount of time in the make-up chair, we were installed in the studio. The thing that is perhaps most striking about a television set is quite how much of it is held together by duct-tape and plywood. The only parts with any polish and smartness are those bits directly in the camera’s field of view: step to the side, and you’re in a mess of cardboard and cable detritus. With the ritual of audio tests completed, silence fell, and the man himself – Jeremy Vine – swooped in to take his place in the quizmaster’s chair. Effortlessly charming and ruthlessly efficient, one has to marvel at how he manages to conjure up small talk and banter with every Egghead and opposing team that comes on, even in the umpteenth series of the show. We got off to a very promising start: Nick managing to conquer Judith in Sports, and myself pipping Tremendous Knowledge Dave in our head-to-head round on Arts and Literature (never let it be said that an English Degree isn’t useful!). With the first part of the show completed, following a storming victory by Christian in sudden death overtime, our advantage was unbelievable: we had managed to defeat all but one of the Eggheads in head-to-head quizzing combat! Alas, our fortune ran out in the final stage of the game as we misplaced the Furneaux Islands off the South African coast, and thus we were beaten by the champions.

It was a fantastic day, regardless, and we did far better than we’d dared hope. Watching the episode as it was broadcast months later was a surreal experience, made all the stranger by the veritable storm of abuse and support that our appearance stirred on Twitter. In the words of one anonymous commentator: “Max on #Eggheads: stop being a twit”.


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FROM PILLAR TO POST Robert Cole (RGS 1977–1984)

A

llow me to present the Reigate Set, a shortlist of Royal Mail letter boxes, all from the Reigate area and all, in one way or another, special. Can you a) say where the pictures were taken b) name the monarchs here memorialised and c) explain why something is missing? In any search for a favourite-ever letter box, do not feel obliged to limit yourself to these five. There are 68 other letter boxes in the Reigate postal district (RH2) and another 115 in Redhill (RH1). Together they make up just 0.1628 percent of the nation’s 115,500 red breasted beauties. Pictured are boxes from each of the three main categories of box – pillar, wall and lamp. There is a ‘Ludlow’ wall box here as well which is a bit of a treat. With around 800 different types of box out there, there is no shortage of choice. Maybe the double aperture ‘oval’ Type C pillar floats your boat. Those with a modernist preference might chose a ‘capless’ Type K. The ‘Hovis’ lamps are nice. I’d be surprised if you plumped for a Tin Lizzy. But each to his or her own. The novelist Anthony Trollope, who was a General Post Office (GPO) official in Jersey, erected the first free-standing boxes in 1852. Since these Victorian beginnings, most letter boxes have carried the insignia, or cipher, of the monarch reigning at the time of placement. More than six in ten of the current estate of British letter boxes carry the EIIR mark of Queen Elizabeth or, in Scotland, a Scottish crown. Boxes from the reign of George V account for about 15 percent of the total. There are smaller numbers, in descending order, of boxes from the reigns of George VI, Victoria, and Edward VII. There are also 170 boxes surviving from the short 1936 reign of Edward VIII.

1859 was soon followed by the elegant hexagonal box with a cap decorated with acanthus leaves, designed by JW Penfold and first seen in 1866. Small lamp-post boxes were first introduced in 1896 for use in London squares and later in other areas, particularly rural locations. About two dozen contractors have been engaged to make letter boxes since 1852. The names – including Carron, WT Allen, Cochrane, Handyside, and McDowall Steven – are often embossed on the black foot section of pillars. Most boxes are cast iron, some are wood behind metal fascia, others are plastic. New steel pillar and lamp letter boxes are presently being produced, the latest twist in a tale of communications, urbanisation and design that has now served the posting public for upwards of 150 years. Oh, and if you find yourself wondering how I can tell the difference between a George V and George VI, or why the Victorian pillar box has no cipher, seek help at: LBSG.org Robert Cole is the media and publicity officer of the Letter Box Study Group. In his day job, he is a financial journalist for Reuters Breakingviews, the comment arm of the global news agency. He used to work for The Times. Quiz answers: a) Bonnys Road, Blackborough Road, Reigate Road, Nutley Lane, Raglan Road; b) Edward VII, George V, Elizabeth II, George VI, Victoria; c) An Edward VIII box is missing because there ain’t one in Reigate or Redhill. The nearest is in Coulsdon.

Wall boxes first appeared in 1857. In 1859 a national standard pillar design was inaugurated. This had its posting aperture positioned beneath a cap for greater protection from rainwater. The standardised design of 28


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FEATURES

HARRY NEWTON 1935–2014

H

arry Newton, founding Head Groundsman at Hartswood from 1982 until his retirement in the summer of 1999, died in hospital in Bolton on 22 December 2014, following complications arising out of an operation for the return of cancer. He was first diagnosed when still in harness at Hartswood almost exactly 23 years previously. Against his illness, as against so many other things, he fought a good fight. It is a groundsman’s prerogative to call a lawnmower a machine, and a spade a shovel, and Harry Newton did that in abundance and a Bolton accent at Hartswood for seventeen years, after joining the school as our first Head Groundsman at the brand new playing fields. My first acquaintance with him came upon going through the applications for the job with my father, who wasn’t a bad judge and whose opinions I much valued. “Only one man for the job”, said my dad. Thank goodness the people in Reigate agreed and in due course ‘H’ was indeed appointed. Thus it was that the stone who rolled – from Bolton via National Service, football with Cambridge City where he sustained his chronic knee injury, cricket at Sussex where, as a contemporary of John Snow, Ian Thomson, the Busses and the emerging Tony Greig, the young fast bowler played for the First XI less than might have been the case at other counties; via Holland, Sweden, Bolton again, a spell on the oil rigs and finally via Worksop College and time there as Head Groundsman – came to rest in Reigate. He began his tenure of our new grounds with a robust insistence on proper completion of the construction contract and proceeded to preside from his flat in the pavilion over the opening years of Hartswood’s life. If during that time his major projects were the acquisition of Northfield, the development there of our one-time golf course, and the installation of the first all-weather hockey pitch, he was the moving spirit behind the development and maintenance of all the facilities available at the ground by the time

29

he retired. Today, fifteen years on, some of those facilities face redevelopment, as the complex, like life, moves forward to meet changing demands: but the sum of Hartswood’s parts, from his own time and from later years, stand as lasting memorial to the man who began its creation. The stories, of course, are legion: of his legendary jousts with the Bursar’s Department in general and with Peter Turner in particular; of his single-handed all-night defence of the property at ‘The Battle of Hartswood’ in 1987, when all unannounced an acid house rave attended by thousands assembled next door in the Kiln Field; of Doug Ferguson from Jersey’s and my amazement at ‘H’ emerging, jacket askew one way, glasses askew the other, from the shed car park one Saturday at about 9am, following the previous night’s hen party at the Fox Revived at which both Doug and he had been honorary hens (don’t ask) and announced he was now off to bed (it was somewhere during this escapade that he was re-introduced to Joy Watson, not so long afterwards, to everyone’s delight, to become his wife); of his return from a midwinter holiday abroad, to see as he walked down the car park in the morning light most of the roof of his flat go flying past him in a January gale. A lot of people thought that Harry’s tales of his trips when young to India, and in particular of his close friendship with Ranjitsinjhi’s kinsman Sat, the Jam Saheb of Nawanagar, probably contained a substantial exaggeration allowance and a good deal of imagination.


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Opening of Hartswood in 1984

I never managed to make the journey to India with him, but my friend and fellow cricketer Stuart Francis did, and reported back that they had indeed landed in Jamnagar, gone and more or less banged on the palace gates, and had subsequently received the literally royal reception and hospitality which we all knew from the stories. India was a source of immense inspiration to my old friend.

And in true cartoon fashion, there was the small boy from another school, absorbed in pursuing with a piece of wood one of the pheasants who regularly came to Harry’s flat to be fed, blissfully unaware that he himself was being closely pursued by another piece of wood – in the hand of an irate ‘H’… It was never just pheasants. In Harry’s latter years at the ground cricketers were

I SUPPOSE THAT MY FRIEND HARRY AND I, ONE AN OXFORD-EDUCATED SOUTHERN AMATEUR, T’OTHER A PROFESSIONAL GRADUATE OF THE UNIVERSITY OF LIFE FROM UP NORTH, WERE BY DEFINITION CHALK AND CHEESE, BUT UNITED BY THE BOND OF CRICKET. Came a night at John Richley’s house in Reigate when with Victoria College on tour Harry joined me, the Richleys, and Ronald Youngs and Ward Jenner from Jersey. Ronald and Harry took up the cudgels about the Miners’ Strike; but the remarkable thing was that the right-leaning ‘H’ was assumed by the cut-glass Mr Youngs to be a Northern working-class socialist, while in the republican, pro-European, left-leaning Mr Youngs all ‘H’ could see was a toff. So the two of them spent two hours arguing, each from the opposite viewpoint from what the rest of us knew they genuinely believed. It was enthralling. The rest of us sat entranced. I don’t think any one of us uttered a word.

disconcerted by the alacrity with which the ducks queued up across the outfield for their five o’clock supper from the flat, while successive broods of wagtails were raised beneath the balcony, nests of moorhens were nurtured, the hares and deer were encouraged (less so, the rabbits, a source of constant irritation); while Harry and Joy took particular pride in the owls. Memorably, one of the white barn owls is captured fleetingly in a match video. The sanctity of Hartswood’s wildlife was a hallmark of the Newton years. Inevitably, from time to time things went wrong as well as right. Harry was essentially a Marmite figure and he certainly never

courted popularity – let alone feigned popularity. When things went wrong there could be friction, and like a nuclear reactor the friction could go critical. Treatment like a paid servant was never the way to draw the best from a professional who was resolutely not susceptible to fingers snapped at him, or to unreasonable demands. On the other hand, he was industry and helpfulness personified where accorded the proportion of respect which his position deserved, and which he rightly expected. Those who complained that all he ever did was for cricket seemed to me to be missing the salient point. Harry’s most significant good fight was also the most serious. His original spirited battle with colon cancer in the early nineties was handsomely won, and he was back on duty on that memorable 1992 May morning to see Simon Hygate score the School’s only First XI double hundred. A further brush with ill-health brought about his retirement twelve months earlier than anticipated, although it’s good to know now that as we dined together at the Old School House in Ockley on his final night in Surrey, there were fifteen more happy years in store for him and Joy. They moved to a new build just north of Bolton, comfortably within reach of Old Trafford for the summer and the Reebok in the winter, and took with them, among other gifts, the aerial view of the ground presented to him by the School; and Natasha Cryer’s painting of a match at Hartswood, which I commissioned on behalf of the School Cricket Club.

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Harry with the 1992 1st XI

It’s a personal regret that I visited so infrequently: although having driven from Reigate to Bolton for the first time I just had the chance to swallow a cup of tea before it was back at the wheel for a tour of what seemed like two dozen Bolton League cricket grounds. In a couple of days we also did most of the Forest of Bowland and a lot besides: I came back to Reigate for a rest. The second time I boxed clever and flew up to Manchester. It barely stopped raining for the duration, including for the match against West Brom on the Sunday at the Reebok for which we got eleventh-hour tickets: both teams were facing relegation (although Wanderers had been in Europe during the week) and the ground was only half full. After a fascinating tour of the town centre, punctuated by boyhood stories and hallmarked by a visit to the covered market to source Bury black pudding, we drove down south with Joy in that battleship-shaped Saab the following day. Limited though my exposure to it was, I saw sufficient to know that, even though Harry’s health worries never quite evaporated, life in retirement in Bolton was pretty good. An extraordinary coincidence allowed the two of us what turned out to be our final meeting. A couple of summers back I was umpiring the First XI at Hartswood against KCS Wimbledon and it was blowing a near-gale. Special heavy bails for this eventuality – the heavy bails supplied to me by ‘H’ himself, many years before – were in use. The bails had languished many a day deep in my bag. They were dry. Six overs into the second innings one of them took a direct hit from the ball and shattered. And so it was that when otherwise I’d have been out on the field for another three hours, I crossed 31

the boundary by the pavilion in search of a replacement just as an apparent mad woman broke from the crowd and hurled herself at me. Having reassured myself that this was neither terrorist attack, nor disgruntled opposition supporter, nor disaffected former pupil, I realised that it was Joy; and that H was standing behind her. That bail, given to me by H so many years before, had broken at the very moment Harry and Joy stopped at Hartswood en route from Bolton to Brighton. Had it not, I’d have missed them. That meeting was, of necessity, brief. As I say, it was also our last. Tell me that story’s not more than coincidence. Harry has a permanent memorial at the Sussex County Cricket Ground in Hove. A few years ago Sussex began an initiative to construct, on the steps up to the shop beneath the new southern stand, their own version of Hollywood Boulevard. Anyone wishing to be a sponsor could purchase and install there a paving stone bearing the name of their chosen Sussex cricketer. A number of former RGS players, and some members of my old cricket club, in which Harry always took an interest, raised the funds, and there the stone stands today, among the Dexters and Parkses and Langridges, and our own Nick Falkner and Will Beer. His daughter Jacqui and her family placed flowers there in the week following his death. I suppose that my friend Harry and I, one an Oxford-educated southern amateur, t’other a professional graduate of the University of Life from Up North, were by definition chalk and

cheese, but united by the bond of cricket. I like to think that we understood one another, and what each of us was trying to do. Certainly, we worked well together and appreciated each other’s company; and I never had a colleague whom I valued more. He became a firm friend, and a fount of wisdom and common sense. I learned more from him about the sport with which I’ve now had 50 years’ close involvement than I ever did from anybody else. He was a loyal supporter through difficult and often largely otherwise unsupported times for cricket at the School. More than that, his staunch presence and advice were important in keeping me going when things sometimes went awry in my many other areas of responsibility at the School in those days, while others chose to walk by on the other side. I spoke at his funeral this January, the Bolton rain once more teeming down outside on an afternoon when it was barely light. It was a small gathering, and not for the first time on the departure of a former colleague it occurred to me how someone whose life touched many may be bidden farewell by just a very few. So now, as a representative of the many, for the final time I thank my old friend Harry Newton for everything he did on the School’s behalf; and to Joy, to Harry’s sister Shirley and to Jacqui and Richard and their family, I express here too our collective, most sincere condolences at their great loss – in which Reigate Grammar School shares. David Jones (Master i/c Cricket 1975–2000)


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UNIVERSITY HONOURS 2014 If you would like us to include your University qualification in the next issue, please email foundation@reigategrammar.org

Dylan Baker Mathematics University of Bath BSc / 2:2 / 2013

James Day Classical Civilisation University of Leeds BA / 2:1 / 2014

David Hewitt Physics University of Oxford MPhys / 1st / 2014

Katie Manning Model Design and Model Effects University of Hertfordshire BA / 1st / 2014

Broadcast Journalism City University London MA / Merit / 2014

Matt Dinnage Geography Durham University MSci / 1st / 2014

Laura Higgins Newcastle University Media, Communication and Cultural Studies BA (Hons) / 1st / 2014

Ali Phillips Finance & Economics University of Cambridge MPhil / Pass / 2014

Michael Bass Pharmacology & Molecular Genetics King’s College London BSc (Joint Hons) / 2014 David Battersby Chemistry University of Bristol MChem / 1st / 2014 Tim Beasley Mechanical Engineering Imperial College MEng / 1st / 2014 Daisy Brown Law Queen Mary, University of London LLB / 2:1 / 2014 Laura Cain Adult Nursing University of Southampton BN / 1st / 2013 Sophia Cartmell Politics University of Exeter BA / 2:1 / 2014 Rachel Cossins Geography with Ocean Science Plymouth University BSc / 1st / 2014 Simon Cox PPE University of Warwick BA / 1st / 2014 Ingram Davidson History University of Cambridge 1st / 2014 Alice Day Sport, Physical Education and Coaching Science University of Birmingham BSc / 2:1 / 2014

Simon Dungate Philosophy and Theology Oriel College, University of Oxford BA / 2:1 / 2013 Hamish Elsey Economics Durham University BA / 2:1 / 2014 Nathaniel Farmer Sport and Exercise Psychology University of the West of England (UWE) MSc / Merit / 2014 Jamie Fawcett Politics and International Relations University of Southampton BSc / 1st / 2014 Theo Flack Chemistry University of Bristol MSc / 1st / 2014 Sam Fry Economics University of Warwick BSc / 2:1 / 2014 Eleanor Hanson Biochemistry Oxford University MSc / 2014 Will Hart Physics University of Warwick BSc MPhys (Hons) / 1st / 2014 Alex Hay University of York Environmental Science Bsc / 2:2 / 2014

Lucy Houlding University of Leeds Economics and French (Joint Honours) BA / 2:1 / 2014 Kate Howard Law with French Law and Language University of East Anglia LLB / 2:1 / 2014 Harriet Gibson Language & Literature in Education University of York BA / 2:1 / 2014 Alex Glass St. Andrews International Relations and Maths 2014 Will Irving Human Physiology University of Leeds BSc / 2:1 / 2014 Natalie Jones University of Bath Modern Languages and European Studies (French & Spanish) BA (Hons) / 1st / 2014 Lewis Kuhler Accounting and Finance Durham University BA (Hons) / 2:1 / 2014 Richard Larmont Ancient History University of Nottingham BA / 2:1 / 2014

Rebecca Rayson Biology University of Leeds BSc / 2:1 / 2014 Huw Roberts Motorsport Engineering Brunel University BEng/ 1st / 2014 Isla Stewart Childhood Studies University of Bristol BSc / 2:1 / 2014 Millie Tanner Music Durham BA BA / 2:1 / 2014 Matt Walker Economics with Hispanic Studies University of Nottingham BA (Hons) / 1st / 2014 George Wheeler Business Management University of Leeds BSc / 2:1 / 2014 Guy Wing History and Politics University of Sheffield BA / 2:1 / 2014 Emily Woollacott Physics and theoretical physics University of Nottingham BSc / 1st / 2014

Harry Lloyd-Gardner Chemistry University of Sheffield MChem / 2:1 / 2014 32


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IAIN ‘TJ’ McLEAN A NOTE FROM

IN VANCOUVER BC

‘LIFE IS FAR TOO SHORT TO WORK FOR BAD BOSSES – DON’T WORK SOMEWHERE WHERE YOU DON’T FEEL RESPECTED AND ALIGNED TO THE ETHOS AND OBJECTIVES OF MANAGEMENT.’

I

left RGS in 1974, a year before the Tercentenary and all the changes that occurred with the move from Grammar School to Independent School. I was fortunate to join the school in the 5th year at a time when the school was on a record breaking rugby winning streak and managed to play the last six games of the 56 game sequence. Before that, I played the season in the 2nds under Alan Reid in his first year that scored over 1,000 points. The lessons learned in those RGS years were certainly formative in terms of teamwork, resilience and lifelong learning. In writing about my career I should really explain that it has three phases. I started in Mining, leaving school to work underground for what today would be regarded as a ‘gap year’ in the South African goldmines. At the time Howard Ballance was not impressed – he wanted me to “stay for a 3rd Year Sixth and play some more rugby”. Instead I studied Mining at Imperial and then spent 6 years in underground coal mining with Shell in England and Australia. I completed my early coal face training in the North East of England at mines that are now all gone – one pit head where I worked for a year now is a supermarket. I left the industry to go to Harvard Business School in the

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mid-80’s. This was an exciting time to do an MBA when management consultants were truly innovative and investment banks had yet to invent some of the concepts that caused so many problems in the 00’s. I took the technology management route into sales, then marketing, then operations before getting the “early-stage, venture funded” bug. I moved back to England briefly and after a short spell in Paris I finally moved to Vancouver in 1989. Since then I’ve been fortunate to be involved in several start-ups, some successful, some less so, in a range of industries from fuel cells to wind turbines and from software for healthcare staff scheduling to local government planning and licensing systems. I was drawn back in the mining industry, firstly through a board position with a company starting out on a 15 year journey to complete a Platinum Mine in South Africa and then lately through two technology companies creating software and most recently sensing solutions. About 7 years ago I took the first steps on the 3rd phase. My wife and I decided to complete a BA degree in Archaeology by Distance Learning from the University of Leicester. We did some great digs together and, through a client of mine, I was able to visit ancient gold mines in the eastern Egyptian desert. Indeed, now things have gone full circle and I’ve accepted a place in

the MPhil program in Egyptian Archaeology at Cambridge starting in October 2015 – maybe I could have taken a shorter route if I had listened to Mr Ballance. Of course, in writing a quick summary of a career I’d like to pass on some thoughts: The days of working for one employer for a career have largely long gone – the important thing is to keep building skills and experience that will be valuable in your next opportunity. Continuous growth and learning is what keeps you able to set your own path. Life is far too short to work for bad bosses – don’t work somewhere where you don’t feel respected and aligned to the ethos and objectives of management. If you can, take some risks with your career. Amazing things happen when you do. It’s very liberating. And finally – when travelling and working in interesting places, take time to ‘smell the roses’ (as my mother always used to say). The moments I remember are when I took some time and set my own agenda for a few hours and they are also when you are open to meeting new people. Iain McLean (RGS 1971–1974)


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This letter has been provided by Vince Robinson (RGS Staff 1988–2006) who was given it by his mother-in-law Mrs Evelyne Torn (nee Powell).

Evelyne was living in the Friends Meeting House next door to RGS, when they first met, her father was the caretaker. The photo of the two of them was taken in 1943.

She was engaged to M.M.M. Browne who was unfortunately killed a few days after D-Day in 1944. The letter is from the Army Chaplain informing Evelyne of his passing, and how they managed to recover what was still in his pockets “his diary, his identification booklet and your photograph” before burying him and giving him a brief service.

Evelyne celebrated her 90th birthday last year (on Remembrance Day) and still lives in Reigate. She has fond memories of growing up in Reigate and can still recall the RGS caretakers being blown down the steps to the boiler room when a bomb was dropped in the school playground!

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Evelyn Torn and Michael Browne – June 1943

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LAURIE REED

I

was born in Dulwich on 22 May 1936 and when I was three years old I moved with my parents to Coulsdon in order to be further away from London during the war years. I always maintained that I passed the entrance examination to Reigate Grammar School because I was able to answer the question “what was the colour of the bus you travelled on when you came for this interview?” That was the green bus number 414. Most of the time I journeyed to RGS on this bus unless I decided some days to cycle. I then cycled to school along the A23, sometimes hanging on the back of the 414 to help me get to school quicker – not to be recommended when I think about it now – and returned home by cycling up Reigate Hill to Chipstead and then on to Coulsdon. I was in Northdown House for five years from 1948 and from the beginning of my education enjoyed my sports more than the academic subjects. Each day started off with assembly, which was held in the school gym, now the library. The discipline was strict. You stood when a member of staff entered a room and addressed every teacher as ‘Sir’, except of course our only female teacher, Mrs Knight. Caps had to be worn at all times when you were in school uniform outside premises and ties correctly knotted. I remember one day, because I’d incorrectly 37

answered a question in class, the teacher twisted my hair with a piece of coke – I think he must have kept that in his pocket for such occasions. The teachers always wore their gowns and pupils were called by their surname. Our school uniform was stocked by the shop, Knights, which is still in the same location in Reigate. Food continued to be rationed after the war and I remember enjoying lunch which we ate in Annandale, a private house across the road from the school. I was a keen stamp collector and gave a talk about my collection of New Zealand Health stamps to members of the stamp club. I was lucky enough to have a relative in New Zealand who regularly sent me the up-to-date new issues. Obviously there was great austerity after the war but once we were taken to the Odeon cinema in Redhill to see the film Scott of the Antarctic. That was a treat. In those days we had a third of a pint of milk at morning break. I was included in the rugby, cricket and athletic teams, which included cross country running. In 1951 I became a member of South London Harriers athletic club and joined the Chipstead cricket club. In the lunch break I played basketball in the playground. The pupils did a six mile walk to Betchworth and back and I broke the

school record. We competed against various schools in Surrey at cross country. I held the school’s record for the one mile, and was a runner up in the All England Schools Mile championships which were held in Reading. I was a member of the school’s Combined Cadet Force and won the All England Two Mile race held in Uxbridge. Another interest of mine was using the rifle range in the school’s main building and this helped me in the future, as when I completed my National Service I was awarded cross rifles for being a top marksman. I left school to join the Australia and New Zealand Bank in 1953 where I worked until my retirement in 1988. My banking career was interrupted for two years when I was enlisted into the Royal Army Pay Corps in Devizes for a period of National Service. I remained there for the whole period in order to represent the army in numerous athletic events throughout the British Isles. I met athletes from different military forces who I competed against in later life. I was coached and encouraged by Gordon Pirie when I joined SLH. We trained a lot together over Farthing Downs and on Tooting Bec track. I trained hard both before and after work and in 1957 I won the Inter-Counties six mile track championship held at the White City. Four days later in the


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‘LIFE AS AN ATHLETE NOW IS VERY DIFFERENT. WHEN I COMPETED PEOPLE WORKED FULL TIME AND IT WAS PURELY AN AMATEUR SPORT...’

annual match between Cambridge University and the Amateur Athletics Association I set up a new ground record in the three mile event. In 1958 I was offered a track scholarship at Houston University in America but I declined as I was hoping to compete for Great Britain in the 1960 Rome Olympics, and besides I was out of action with a torn ligament in my groin for much of that year. Also in the year I was selected to compete in the Commonwealth Games in Cardiff but was unable to compete, again because of the injuries. When I recovered I was running good times and realised I had the possibility of making the Olympic team. I continued to train hard to reach my ultimate aim of being selected for either the 5,000 or 10,000 metres. I was rated eighth in the two miles, sixth in the three miles and seventh in the six miles in the world. In May of 1960 I won the 5,000 Olympic trial and ran in the AAA championships 3 miles at the White City. Unfortunately I only came third and as Gordon Pirie had previously been selected they only needed two more runners. I decided to try for the 1,500 metres. Having only run one fast mile at Motspur Park with a time of 4 mins. 0.1 secs. I had to win the final Olympic trial to get a place. My employers allowed me an

extra half hour on my lunch time to enable me to train. I used to run from the City to the West End to train in Hyde Park and return. Due to the British Olympic Association’s lack of funds I watched the opening ceremony of the games on the television here and flew out to Rome three days before the heats. Owing to the excessive heat in Rome no British athlete competing in a running event from 800 to 10,000 metres managed to get through the heats. They were not acclimatised and were very disillusioned seeing athletes from other countries having been there for a month beforehand. We were given 15 shillings (75 pence) a day for our expenses. I ran in the first heat which included Herb Elliott from Australia (he won the final in a world record) but unfortunately did not qualify for the final. Directly after the heat I returned to England and watched the closing ceremony on the television here. Even though I did not win a medal it was a great honour to participate. Two weeks after the Olympics I ran a 7 ½ mile cross country race on Farthing Downs where I managed to reverse the tables and beat Herb Elliott. Gordon Pirie was first, I came second and Herb was seventh. I met my future wife, Astrid, just after

Rome and I continued to run mainly for my club. I married in 1964 and have two children and two grandchildren. Later in my life I ran three London marathons in succession and on the last one, a month before my 50th birthday, I completed it in 2 hours 46.49 secs. For the training I used to run home from the City once a week which is 23 miles. Unfortunately I suffered various injuries after, decided to quit competitive running, and only ran to keep fit. Life as an athlete now is very different. When I competed people worked full time and it was purely an amateur sport, but I enjoyed my athletic career very much and competed internationally in Ireland, Scotland, France, Germany, Poland, Sweden and Guernsey. Maybe if I had not had the opportunities and encouragement from RGS my life would have followed another path. Those days seem many miles away now but I will never forget my five happy years there.

Laurie Reed (RGS 1948–1953) 38


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RECOLLECTIONS & MEMORIES

CRICKET 1ST XI 1968

Alan Ellis (OR 1967) answered the recent plea to send in photos from RGS school days and sent through a picture of the Cricket 1st XI from 1968. Alan commented that he hopes “all those pictured enjoy being reminded of their younger selves!” Standing L-R: Mr Alabaster, Tony Smith, Frank Winter, Dave Billing, Alan Ellis, Ian Kilford, Pete Segrove, Dennis Haynes Seated L-R: Davy Nicholson, John Cloke, Steve Arbury, Richard Mantell, Trevor Woods.

GRIFFITHS WELCH COMBINATION

The first name is Welsh and the second the name of a famous Welsh regiment but there is another connection. A new registrar in anaesthesia joined the department where I work in Peterborough & Stamford NHS trust. His name was Drew Welch and as the first day of emergency cases dragged out the conversation centred on where we had lived and been brought up. Drew is from Northampton, but said that he used to visit his grand parents in Redhill, Surrey, quite frequently. It then transpired that his dad, Brian had attended Reigate Grammar School from 1965 to 1972. I think this was the year that had a fantastic rugby team, with Neil Mantell, Mark Perryman and Trevor Burt. I watched all the first XV games from about 1968 to when I started at Reigate in 1972. Drew texted his dad and came back with a fantastic quote from my father, who taught him some rugby and physics. “Welch, you’ll never make a rugby player, you’re too weak and puny”, in a thick Rhondda accent. I understand that Brian was a stalwart of the Old Reigatian Association Football club for many years. Drew produced a photograph of Brian on an RAF Summer Camp, I have no idea where it was, but my father and Drew’s are in the photo. I have also included a photo of Drew and myself in an operating theatre, where I supervise him, although there is a lot of two-way traffic in medical education now, and Drew, who is an expert in pre-hospital medicine, has also taught me a few things. Richard Griffiths (RGS 1972–1979)

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1973 BAND PHOTO

This tremendous photo was sent to us by Jamie Robertson which he found whilst clearing out his attic. Jamie wrote, “This photo, I think, is from 1973 heading down the hill from school into town. I am in Drum Major role with hair sellotaped behind the collar. All the drums had been repainted by ourselves with new coats-of-arms ‘stickers’ supplied by my Dad via his contacts with the Royal Artillery. Our drum cleaning sessions on a Friday night before going out in public were legendary! We were the one school band invited to play at the Royal Tournament that year.” Jamie Robertson (RGS 1969–1973)

TONY HOPKINS

Memories of RGS In autumn 1943 I had hoped to become Conkers Champion but I came up against a Forty-niner which had been baked in a hot oven. As I did not have this facility at the digs I was in up the Cornfield Road, my Thirty-twoer was soon in pieces on the ground. All these years later the same chestnut trees near Chart Lane are still producing conkers for future champions. The Monday film show at RGS after school in the room at the bottom of the main staircase (now the current staff room) was always very enjoyable. Occasionally, I missed it when I was nabbed by a Senior Chorister to go to choir practice at Sunnyside or in St Mary’s Church. I well remember the cadets parading in the playground and although I was only nine, I hoped that the war would be over by the time I reached fourteen. I did subsequently do two years of National Service in the Royal Air Force between 1952–1954 when I was eighteen. Having recently celebrated my 80th birthday in Norwich with my family who came from far and wide I am aiming for the hundred and well beyond. Tony Hopkins (RGS 1943–1944)

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FROM THE ARCHIVES < Phil Drury and Dan Jackson

MEMORIES OF THE SCHOOL For all you Reigatians who have signed up to Facebook, there is now a Group set up to promote the archives and memories of the school. The group is called “Reigate Grammar School Archives” and its aim is to encourage anybody with information, photos, memories or anything with a connection to RGS to share it with other Reigatians and add factually to the history of the school.

t Far left: 1870_RGS from

St. Mary’s Church Tower. t Left: 1906_Science

laboratories.

t Left: 1916_RGS Officer

Training Corps.

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t c 1900_R.S. Ragg –

Headmaster 1899–1910.

I encourage all Reigatians with an interest in the history of the school to join and participate. Remember that the history of the school includes the time that you attended, even if you only left last year. You may think that the archive contains a lot of information from recent years, but this is not necessarily true. For example, we hold a lot of photographs taken about ten years ago, but they are of little value at present since they do not have anything to identify the events pictured, nor the people pictured! I hope that we can find people who can help identify the place, time and people in them. This is also an opportunity for you to add to the archive yourself if you have photographs, documents or just important memories of your time at school. I hope we can all add to our knowledge here of this important local institution, in which we have all played our part in some small way. Please take a look and get involved if you like what you see. Peter Burgess (RGS 1967–1974)

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

t Far left: 1957_CCF Annual

Inspection. t Left: 1958_RGS Hockey

2nd XI.

t Left: 1993_1st Form

Girls Admission.

t Left: 1965_Tiddlywinks

We go back in time and celebrate the victorious Prefects’ tiddlywinks team of 1965 who won the famous game against the County School (Girls) and received a mention in the Surrey Mirror.

 Above: 1946_Old Reigatian Association Dinner.

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(Back row Ross Ellice, Tony Yeats, Bill Rawlinson, Alan Beasley, Terry Scott, Frank Edwards, Bill Avenell; front row Bernie Hawkins, Mike McBryde, Derek Appleton, Simon Makinson-Sanders, Andrew Baker).


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q 1977_Building of the Sports Hall.

q 2001_RGS Green Power Team.

t Left: 1982_Language Laboratory. p 1980_RGS musicians on D of E

t Left: 2001_Cast of Oliver.

float at Lord Mayor’s Show.

q 1994_1st Netball VII. t Left: 1992_Staff pram race.

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SPORT OLD REIGATIAN HOCKEY REPORT 2013–14 The 1ST X1 in Surrey Division 2 finished fifth out of twelve in 2013–14, a one place improvement over the previous year. This season they have had mixed results and at the end of January they are lying seventh. The 2ND XI under Dom Monteiro in Surrey Open league Division 2 finished third in 2013–14. This season they have won three out of twelve and are just above the relegation zone. The 3RD XI are near the bottom of division 5. Player numbers are down, which many clubs are finding. But we are seeing an encouraging number of juniors coming to the weekly training and are trying to start a ladies’ team. The Club again had a practice goal at the Borough Sports Festival in May and at the Fun Run in September. We have not yet managed to progress closer working with the School but we are hopeful this will come. The Club was saddened by the death of Danny Moss aged 50. He had played 267 times for the Club and scored 69 goals.

Training is free and all are welcome (see orhc.info for latest dates and times). If you are interested in joining or would like more information, please contact Rob Evans on 01737 823114.

Ian Whiteman (1953–1961)

OLD REIGATIAN NETBALL 2013–14 Last season was a challenging one for both Old Reigatians Netball teams in the Surrey Netball League. This was no surprise due to both teams gaining promotion the previous season.

The B TEAM had a number of changes to the squad at the start of the season and that took a little time to settle into the team. The B’s had some memorable wins, Woking Seymours B (25-15) and local team Redhill C (26-24).

The A TEAM had a mixed start to the season with a few valuable wins against teams Brads (35-25) and Grove House (22-20). With the season being interrupted a couple of times due to adverse weather conditions the team kept training and looking for ways to improve. The A’s finished the season on 6th place which allowed them to remain in Division 6.

We train at RGS every other Tuesday evening from 7:30pm – 9:00pm. We have a range of members, many who just come along to the training session for fitness and others who want to compete in the Surrey league and in the matches. If you or any of your friends from the Reigatian Community want to join a fun, sociable netball club then please get in touch with us by going to our new website oldreigatiansnetball.co.uk Pollyanna Grimstone

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RUGBY OLD REIGATIAN RFC SEASON 2013–14 It has been a very tough year for ORRFC. In the early hours of Saturday 28 June 2014 the clubhouse was seriously damaged as a result of an arson attack. Unbelievably a fortnight later in the early hours of Saturday 12 July 2014 a second arson attack inflicted further damage, on this occasion to the hitherto undamaged northern end. For our President Sir Peter Harrison, the sight of the damaged building must have been devastating following all the earlier trials and tribulations experienced in the planning and construction phases. However the vision of dozens of club members of all ages busily clearing up the debris and cleaning tables and chairs will have gladdened him and reassured him that the club is resilient and we will come back stronger. Since then we have had countless messages of support from rival rugby clubs, other sports clubs, members, local residents and businesses and as a result thus far we were able to fulfil most of the hirings and events that were already booked. In an incredible show of unity and hard work from numerous volunteers we had use of the changing rooms and a fully functioning kitchen and bar by the start of the playing season in September. In a season where the weather dampened our 1ST XV expectations after Christmas, a late rally brought us back up to 6th position in London 2SW, the same position as the season before. This probably reflected a fair position as we struggled with injuries and coping with wet grounds and facing heavier packs of forwards. We are pleased to see the good recovery being made by KJ Mushava from his serious neck injury and we look forward to seeing him around the Club again on a regular basis.

During the season, Ian Maslin handed over the leadership of the JUNIOR SECTION to Tim Jones and we thank Ian for his contribution to establishing and building the busy and vibrant group that exists today. We have more teams (nine) playing in Junior leagues and our players are being recognised at County level. The transition from junior to senior Rugby is improving and the Club has been active in working with Surrey RFU on the interface with School rugby and the place for Colts Rugby. The MINIS SECTION had another enjoyable and successful year, as the smiles and laughter evident on a Sunday morning will confirm. A highlight of the season was our hosting of the Surrey development festival with over 135 teams enjoying the day from 24 clubs across Surrey. Total player numbers were around 1,450. We were particularly pleased to have 16 teams from ORRFC with 165 players in total, a real credit to the Club. Our thanks are extended to Jason Smith and his team for the superb organisation once again. One of our objectives for the year was to progress the planned purchase of the 12 acre field located immediately to the west of our pitches. We held a fund raising evening hosted by rugby and sport commentator John Inverdale and have now completed the purchase of the field. The next step is to raise sufficient funds to ensure that the necessary works can be carried out to make them playable. David Forsyth, Chairman Old Reigatian RFC

Our thanks are due to the 1st XV management team; Jonny Hylton Head Coach who has made a tremendous contribution in his first year, Mark Chesterton as Captain and Ed Bartlett as Club Captain. The AXV and B1 XVS had similar encouraging seasons although both report they would benefit from more regular player availability. Our thanks to Alex Millican, Kevin Sheldrick and Peter Bakker for their leadership. Our UNDER 21s under Ben Carter competed strongly against larger Clubs such as Sutton & Epsom and Dorking and showed great promise for the future.

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NEWS QUEEN’S HONOURS LIST SIMON VIRLEY CB RGS 1979–1987 Congratulations go to Simon Virley who was listed in the Queen’s Birthday Honours for services to the UK Energy Supply and Energy Security.

ANIL PATEL MBE RGS 1995–2003 Former Head Boy Anil was awarded with an MBE in the New Year’s Honours list for services to British diplomacy. Congratulations Anil!

LORD COOPER OF WINDRUSH ANDREW COOPER RGS 1973–1982 Congratulations go to Andrew Cooper who was given the honour of a Barony of the United Kingdom for life by Her Majesty the Queen on 17th September 2014. Andrew recently served as the Prime Minister’s Director of Strategy at 10 Downing Street for more than two years and is looking forward to coming back to RGS in 2015 for a Henry Smith Lecture (diary permitting!)

SIR KEIR STARMER KCB RGS 1974 –1981 Congratulations to OR Keir as he was appointed Knight Commander of the Order of the Bath (KCB) in the 2014 New Year’s Honours list, for services to Law and Criminal Justice. Sir Keir also won the right to contest the Holborn and St Pancras seat for Labour in this year’s General Election. A busy year ahead!

JAMES KEELER RGS 1993–1998 Congratulations must go to James Keeler who was appointed as a Trustee of international development charity Transaid, which aims to improve people’s quality of life in the developing world by making transport more available and affordable. Here you can see James meeting the Patron of the Transaid charity, HRH The Princess Royal.

NEW HOCKEY CENTRE In September the RGS 1st XI lost 4-1 to Old Reigatian Hockey Club in a very competitive match on the new astroturf hockey pitch at Hartswood. In what was a very enjoyable occasion Shaun Fenton, Headmaster, welcomed the Old Reigatians and particular thanks go to Ian Whiteman OR (pictured far left) for his generous support with this project. The Hockey Centre is part of an on-going programme of improvements at Hartswood to boost sport at RGS.

ORs PLAY AT TWICKENHAM Congratulations to four ORs who played at Twickenham in June last year, winning the County Shield whilst playing for Surrey RFC. (L to R: Will Crow (2009), Ryan Jefferey (2010), Ross Grimstone (2008) and Will Bennett (2013) 47


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REIGATE’S PETER HARRISON FOUNDATION SUPPORTS MAJOR NEW CENTRE OF LEARNING AT RGS Reigate based charity, the Peter Harrison Foundation, has confirmed a £4million donation to support a new state of the art learning centre at the heart of the school campus. The new centre will host a university quality learning-resource centre and a large flagship library with learning zones and e-readers. A new Sixth Form Centre with café, study area and social facilities allowing students to study, learn and relax will be included in the building. The new facilities will enable increased technology-rich learning for students of all ages and will be surrounded by landscaped gardens. Plans for the centre have been created by award winning architect Cindy Walters, from firm Walters and Cohen, who has focused on creating a beautiful, innovative building with an environmentally sustainable design. RGS Headmaster, Shaun Fenton, said, “This major capital development will be transformational, adding to the superb facilities that help us deliver a first-class education for the children in our care. We are honoured that Sir Peter and his family trustees continue to be so supportive of Reigate Grammar School. I am humbled that their support will enable the school’s biggest ever capital building programme over the next few years.” The Foundation’s Chairman and Founder, local philanthropist Sir Peter Harrison KGCN CBE, commented, “The Trustees have all been very impressed by the vision of the Headmaster and Governors for the further development of Reigate Grammar School and by the quality of the designs chosen for the new centre itself. This new investment complements the Foundation’s longstanding support for the bursary scheme which has so far benefited 51 Harrison Scholars who would not otherwise have enjoyed the educational opportunities which this prestigious school can offer.” The Peter Harrison Foundation has supported local children through RGS since the year 2000 with financial and mentoring support. The original ‘Harrison Scholars’ have now graduated from top UK universities and are well established in their chosen careers. The Peter Harrison Foundation was founded by Sir Peter Harrison in 1999. As a keen and active sportsman throughout his life, Sir Peter believes that education and sport provide the key stepping stones to self-development, life choices, confidence and self-reliance. Sir Peter and the other family trustees wish to share his success to help provide

opportunities that develop young people’s self-potential through education and sport. The world famous Peter Harrison Planetarium at The Royal Observatory, Greenwich, opened by Her Majesty The Queen in 2007, the Scout Lodge for the Scouting Association at Gilwell Park and the Old Reigatians RFC’s new clubhouse in Reigate are prominent examples of national and local projects that have benefited from the support of the Peter Harrison Foundation.

‘I am thrilled that we have been able to gain the support of Sir Peter Harrison and the Harrison Foundation with this important project. Such generosity and philanthropic support will have a huge impact on the quality of teaching and learning at Reigate Grammar School for many years to come. Like a jewel, this building will be positioned at the centre of our site and celebrate the special relationship we have with the Harrison family.’ Sean Davey Development Director

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NEWS

CITIBANK VISIT On Thursday 6 March 2014 pupils and staff were hosted by Jan Skarbek (Class of 1989) at the London HQ of Citibank. Huge thanks go to Jan and his team for their outstanding hospitality and the opportunity for RGS students to experience an investment bank in action. Jan Skarbek (below) (RGS 1981–1989)

WASHINGTON DC HISTORY & POLITICS TRIP In October, current Lower Sixth Formers and staff went to visit Andrew Sullivan (RGS 1974–1981) the influential political US blogger and commentator and supporter of the Changing Lives Campaign. Andrew spoke to them about the prospects for each party in the upcoming mid-term elections (and was proved right on predictions) and was asked his thoughts on the 2016 presidential election.

CONGRATULATIONS TO RICHARD GRIFFITHS (RGS 1972–1979) who was recently awarded The Dudley Buxton Medal by the Royal College of Anaesthetists. Well done, Richard! And to MAX SJOBLOM (RGS 2002–2008) Max was recently appointed as Sales Manager at Lloret Fire & Security Ltd. Congratulations Max! 49

CONGRATULATIONS To OR Jonathan Knox (1999) who married Laura Docherty at St Katherine’s Church in Merstham on 13 September 2014. His best man was OR Steve Cobb (1999) and he was joined by OR Mark Ramsell (2000). A number of Old Reigatians were present at the reception in Newdigate. Jonathan is pictured here before setting off to the church with his father, Robert Knox, also an OR (RGS 1958–1965).


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STRAIGHT FLUSH EVENTS Entrepreneurial ORs Matt Burns and Max Callaghan (both RGS 2004–2011) have set up Straight Flush Events. This group of talented young professionals provide tailored and bespoke affordable events, catering for everything you need for a night to remember! If you would like to find out more please email: straightflushevents@outlook.com or check out the website sfevent.wix.com/straightflushevents

DAVID WALLIAMS – TV SET VISIT (RGS 1981–1989) Three lucky Sixth Form students visited OR David Walliams on the set of his latest top secret project to be launched in 2015. The best-selling author, actor and comedian took time out from his busy schedule to give the students an insight into TV production. They also were given the opportunity to meet with the director, sound engineers, cameramen, make-up, props and even had lunch with the cast and crew on the bus!

LAURA NICHOLSON (RGS 2004–2011) After graduating from Laine Theatre Arts, I was fortunate enough to be cast in the Broadway production of Chicago on board the biggest ship in the World – the Allure of the Seas. In September 2014, I got on a plane and began rehearsals in Florida for two months. Our director was in Chicago on Broadway for 20 years and is now a prominent figure on the circuit. All our creatives have worked with Bob Fosse personally and it was an incredible experience to be able to draw on their expertise. As well as Chicago, we perform in an aerial show called Blue Planet and so we embarked on intensive training on silks, hoop and harness work. When we finally got on board in November, we began installing the shows. The theatre is vast, holding an audience of 1,300 people, and opening night was like

nothing I’ve ever experienced. I was also cast as understudy for Matron Mama Morton which is an absolute honour and it’s been a great challenge, particularly when it comes to the vocal aspect of the character. The ship travels around the Eastern and Western Caribbean so I am currently spending my days off in Jamaica, Haiti, Mexico, the Bahamas and all sorts of exotic places. I have never seen so many palm trees in my life! I consider myself to be extremely lucky to have started a career in something I love so much. It almost doesn’t feel like work and I am loving every minute of it. If it hadn’t been for the constant support of my teachers, in particular Miss Branston and Mrs Scaglione, I doubt I would have even thought to put myself out there, so a massive thank you! And to anyone reading this; in the words of Jim Carrey, “you could fail at what you don’t want, so you might as well take a chance at doing what you love.”

RGS SCHOOL VISITS Last year we had many members of the OR Community from all around the globe revisit the school for a tour. It is always a joy to walk round and listen to all types of stories and recollections from time spent at RGS and to see the amazement in their faces as they encounter new buildings, vibrant school life and teachers who are still here! If you would like to arrange a tour of RGS, we will try our best to accommodate. Please email foundation@reigategrammar.org

Lynley Gloyne & Judith Broome (both previous Headmaster’s Secretaries).

Chris Smedley (1985) and his young family who travelled all the way from Brisbane. 50


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DEATHS & OBITUARIES

CHRIS SCOTT July 1949 – March 2014 (RGS 1960–1967) His early years saw summer holidays spent either at his grandparents’ house, called the Ruffs, in Bordon, Hants or with family down in Devon. His schooling started at Merstham Primary School, and through his fat allergy, he came home every day for lunch. Some people think Christopher was vegetarian for animal welfare, but he had an allergy to fats, which caused, in the case of chicken, a severe reaction, and put him in shock if eaten. Christopher passed his 11 plus, and started at RGS in 1960. He loved school and his passion was languages. Spanish, French and German being just some he mastered and spoke fluently. Right up to the end, when he was in the Royal Marsden Hospital any foreign nurse that he could engage in conversation he would. On leaving RGS he went to Ealing College of Higher Education, now known as the University of West London, and trained to be a teacher. He gained his qualifications and taught in a couple of schools, but left the profession and worked in WH Smith on Ealing Broadway for a few years before moving to Thanet. Chris worked for BT in Canterbury as a database programmer. He both acted and wrote plays for the Thanet one act play for several years. He would also play the guitar and the keyboard for which he wrote some of his own music.

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Chris would always have a book nearby, his bookcases are full and there are books in every room. He was very interested in world history, Egyptology, British history and the royal family. With all of this knowledge he was popular in local quiz teams and his trophies give account to years of success. He was also internationally respected in his research and analysis of ancestry records and census data. Unfortunately Chris had to take early retirement due to Menieres. He saw this as his chance to write and was soon publishing his work. Chris carried on his enjoyment of reading and walking, often at the same time. He was incredibly knowledgeable about the local area and he wrote and published the book The Ripper in Ramsgate. He is also the author of books including Would the real Mary Kelly? and the fictional adventure The Kingsword. Ill health led to a diagnosis of Leukaemia. Chris was always very positive about his treatment and the world class of the Royal Marsden doctors. He won his fight with cancer, however it left him weakened and tragically he never regained his strength. He was very complimentary about the people involved and he remained positive and supportive to his friends. He was passionate about animals and made regular donations to various charities. He will be remembered as a genuine, warm, generous, inspirational and lovely man.

ERIC BROOK 1 JANUARY 1922–1 JANUARY 2014 (RGS STAFF) A former RGS member of staff who taught Carpentry most of his working life, he made all the furniture in his home by hand. Eric passed away aged 92 on Thursday 1 January 2014.


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MALCOLM PENDRILL 1926–2014 (RGS 1937–1942)

TONY MICHAEL CLARKE 12 March 1933–18 February 2014 (RGS 1944–1999)

Born and brought up in Redhill, Malcolm emigrated to Australia with his wife, Phyllis, in 1952. While working for Kodak in Melbourne, he made a purchase which would change his life. His first serious camera! Homesick for the borough, the pair returned to Reigate in 1955, where they lived for the rest of their lives. Photography became Malcolm’s passion and in 1963 he started his own company. His skills were soon recognised by election to Fellowship of both the Royal Photographic Society and the Institute of Incorporated Photographers. As the business grew, Malcolm began to specialise in aerial and commercial photography and film making. He leaves a huge archive of aerial views of London and the South East. In the 1980s, Malcolm collaborated with his friends John Ferguson and Alan Ingram on two books of historic and contemporary photos of the borough, Memories of Yesterday and Reflections of Yesterday. Even in retirement he wasn’t idle, producing two films, Portrait of Reigate and Portrait of Dorking in his late 70s. A founder member and first chairman of the Pendrill Family History Society, Malcolm was proud of his heritage. He was descended from the Pendrills who had hidden Charles II up an oak tree after the Battle of Worcester in 1651. He even made a film about it, To Save a King. It also appealed to his wicked sense of humour that a subsequent ancestor had to flee to America after being involved in a failed plot against the monarchy in 1819! During his working life, Malcolm was an active member of Reigate Rotary Club and was also a local Neighbourhood Watch coordinator. His love of sailing also inspired him to become a fund raiser for the RNLI. With Phyllis’s deteriorating health, Malcolm gradually withdrew from these activities to care for her until she died in 1993. His later years were shared with Ellie Cunningham, with whom he found love and companionship until her death in 2007. Malcolm died peacefully on 17 May listening to his beloved Mozart, with his daughter, Christine, at his bedside.

Tony was born on 12 March 1933 and brought up in Reigate and attended Reigate Grammar School. After completing his National Service he joined the Royal Air Force and learned to fly in East Africa before returning to Royal Wootten Bassett to fly in and out of RAF Lyneham in Chippenham and during his time captained and flew Lord Mountbatten for six weeks on his round the world trip in one of 12 Comets, Sagittarius. He later worked for Dan Air flying passengers in and out of Europe before moving to the Middle East to Captain the Qatar Royal family’s aircraft. This was followed by time with Kuwait Airways and then he flew a self-made businessman around on his private 727 aeroplane for many years. Tony retired to Spain to live in Estepona where he has enjoyed the last 20 years. He passed away on 18 February 2014 after being diagnosed with cancer early in 2013. Tony leaves two daughters, two grandchildren and many friends behind. He meant so much to many people... the friendships forged in Spain over the past 20 years and also several old friends from southern England where he spent most of his life, to past work colleagues now living far and wide. He was loved by all who knew him – he was a good and private man, he was kind, respectful, sensitive, caring, generous, wise and above all always a gentleman. He lived for the moment and his glass was always half full. Despite the many health issues and sight loss he lived with and the subsequent challenges, he never grumbled or complained but accepted the situation and focused on the positives. He was a strong yet gentle man – much admired, respected and loved. He will be very much missed.

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NOTICE OF DEATHS 2014 Eric Brook (RGS Staff) died on 1 January 2014 Charles Davidson (RGS 1971–1975) died on 23 January 2014 Stephen Thomas Garrish (RGS 1942–1949) died on 11 February 2014 Tony Clarke (RGS 1944–1949) died in February 2014 MICHAEL GEORGE BULLEN 1933–2014 (RGS STAFF 1974–1994) Many generations of Old Reigatians will remember Michael Bullen who was Head of Mathematics at Reigate Grammar School for twenty years from 1974 until he retired in July 1994. Michael grew up in North London, where he was a pupil at Minchenden Grammar School in Southgate and he then went on to study for Parts I and II of the Mathematics Tripos at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge. Like many of his contemporaries, he decided to do his National Service before university, but because of long-standing problems with asthma, he was rejected by the RAF and the Royal Navy on medical grounds. However, the Army said that he was “far too well educated to be rejected”, so he eventually spent eighteen months on the Joint Services Russian Course at Cambridge, training to be a military interpreter with the Army Intelligence Corps. After completing his degree and a Postgraduate Certificate in Education at Cambridge, Michael spent ten happy and fulfilling years teaching Mathematics at Apsley Grammar School, which had been recently established to serve the growing new town of Hemel Hempstead. In 1970, Apsley became part of a large comprehensive school of 1400 pupils, where he continued to be in charge of the increasingly complex timetable. He always recalled with great pleasure his regular school trips to the Lake District during these years, and the personal satisfaction he felt on reaching the summit of England’s highest mountain, Scafell Pike! 53

In 1974, from a strong field of 150 applicants, Howard Ballance appointed Michael to the post of Head of Mathematics at Reigate. At that time reorganisation was in the air and there was considerable uncertainty about the future, but two years later this was resolved when the Grammar School once again became independent. Then in 1977, when Eric Coupland retired as Second Master, Michael was asked to take over responsibility for the school timetable. At that time, this also involved much of the work related to curriculum development which later became a part of the role of a newly created Director of Studies. During his years at Reigate, Michael built up and led an increasingly strong and successful Mathematics Department and he himself will be particularly remembered as a highly inspiring Sixth Form teacher. He retired in 1994 at the same time as two other stalwarts of the Common Room, Aubrey Scrase and Robin Bligh. Michael and his wife Liz never lost their life-long love of the Lake District and I shall long remember our last meeting when, together, we enjoyed the drive along Ullswater, over the Kirkstone Pass and back to the URC Conference Centre at Windermere where they were staying. He died on 21 November 2014 and we extend our heartfelt sympathy to Liz, their son, David and his family. John Hamlin RGS Headmaster 1982–1996

Christopher Scott (RGS 1960–1967) died in March 2014 Terrence Tipping (RGS 1947–1953) died in March 2014 Danny Nicholas Anthony Moss (RGS 1975–1982) died on 19 April 2014 Frank Piper (RGS Staff 1965–1984) died on 21 April 2014 Malcolm Pendrill (RGS 1937–1942) died on 17 May 2014 Dr Peter Venables (RGS 1939–1946) died in June 2014 Dennis Coomber (RGS 1947–1953) died on July 2013 Richard Hall (RGS 1959–1965) died on 8 August 2013 John Clifford Edwards (RGS 1951–58) died on 30 August 2014 Leonard Gordon Lockyear (RGS 1945–1951) died on 5 November 2014 Michael Bullen (RGS Staff 1974–1994) died on 21 November 2014 Harry Newton (RGS Staff 1982–99) died on 22 December 2014 Dr Anthony John Platts (RGS 1939–1946) died on 23 December 2014


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PUBLICATIONS DRIVE LIKE A REAL ENTREPRENEUR ROBERT FRITH (RGS 1966–1973)

AWFUL AUNTIE BY DAVID WALLIAMS (RGS 1981–1989) David Walliams released his seventh children’s book in September 2014. Awful Auntie tells the story of a girl named Stella whose Auntie has moved in to her house with her pet. This is the first (and currently only) of Walliams’ books not to include Raj the newsagent.

Are entrepreneurs born or self-made? Entrepreneurialism is on the rise: according to official figures the number of self-employed workers has risen by more than 600,000 since 2010. But how many of them will make a success of their new venture? While some may be self-assured and even brilliant at starting a venture or seeing an opportunity, will they be capable of developing a sustainable business on the back of it? Others may face a different issue – a good background of running a business but no experience of going it alone. It seems that only a minority have what it takes and just do it. Drive like a Real Entrepreneur aims to close the gap between the victorious few and those who lag far behind in the race for real business achievement. Drive digs deep into what makes a successful entrepreneur. Through a series of detailed questionnaires and surveys, Robert Frith, business consultant and chartered accountant, has gathered information from entrepreneurs from many business sectors, unearthing gems of advice on the strategies of those who have made it. ‘Over the years I have read hundreds of business books, this is one of the few I actually finished. As a serial entrepreneur, I found myself smiling and chuckling as aspects of my own personality were described’ says one testimonial. ‘We should all empathise with the entrepreneur. Entrepreneurialism is good, not bad,’ writes Robert. The practical approach and frontline experience which is evident throughout this book sets it far apart from others. Some of the subjects covered are the intelligence, luck and position of the entrepreneur. What makes some succeed and yet some unfortunately fail? Drive shows how behaviour and thinking are more important than skill set, qualifications and education. And behaviour and thinking can be changed...

WELLINGTON AND WATERLOO RUSS FOSTER (FORMER RGS STAFF 1985–1992) Following his more than 50 articles and papers either published or in the press to date, Russ’ latest book has been favourably reviewed by experts in the field and can be purchased on Amazon or borrowed from the RGS Library!

You can purchase Drive at real-entrepreneur.com and get a free bonus chapter: The End Game: Selling your business. Drive is an important investment for any business person, those who wish to start their own business, or students who are already planning to forge their own career path. Drive like a Real Entrepreneur is published by Filament Publishing Ltd and is available from all good book retailers at £15. ISBN 978-1-910125-49-6.

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FOUNDATION OFFICE

SEAN DAVEY Development Director spd@reigategrammar.org

HAZEL CORNICK Development Manager hkc@reigategrammar.org

JONNY HYLTON Development Executive jdh@reigategrammar.org

RUTH GLOVER Development Officer rag@reigategrammar.org

ALI MASSEY RGS Events Coordinator arm@reigategrammar.org

CLARE ADAMS Development Administrator cla@reigategrammar.org

Foundation Office Reigate Grammar School Reigate Road Reigate RH2 0QS 01737 222231 rgschanginglives.org reigategrammar.org/foundationhome

 @foundationRGS & Alumni at Reigate  Foundation Grammar School  Reigate Grammar School Professionals 55


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The Foundation Office exists to support the development of Reigate Grammar School and to foster the friendship and support of all Reigatians. The Reigatian community includes current and former pupils, parents, staff, governors and friends of the school – all, in fact, for whom the school is, or has been, an important part of their lives. Our future success depends upon the benevolence of the whole Reigatian community and we invite you to contribute with them and help to shape the future of our great School and its pupils. Registered Charity number 1081898.

Foundation Office Reigate Grammar School Reigate Road Reigate RH2 0QS 01737 222231 rgschanginglives.org reigategrammar.org/foundationhome

@foundationRGS