Page 1

LUX

SPECIAL LUXLIVE 2015 PREVIEW

OCTOBER 2015 | ISSUE 47 | www.luxreview.com

26 PAGES OF PRODUCT REVIEWS!

BEST OF THE BEST We reveal the standout projects and innovations shortlisted for the 2015 Lux Awards!

O STATUE OF LIBERTY O WORLD’S SMARTEST BUILDING O LIGHTING HACKS FOR A HEALTHIER OFFICE O IS CRI ON BORROWED TIME?

PLUS » 14-PAGE PREVIEW OF THE LIGHTING EVENT OF THE YEAR

2015 OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF


2015 18-19 November 2015 | ExCeL London

JUST KEEPS GETTING BIGGER…

THE BIGGEST AND BEST LIGHTING EVENT… LuxLive 2015 | ExCeL London | 18-19 November 2015 Contact: +44 (0)1905 724734


Regis ter fo the U r K’s g r ea light ing e test ven luxliv e.co. t uk

www.luxlive.co.uk

AND BETTER…

LuxLive 2015: O O O O

@Lux_Live for #LuxLive updates

more exhibitors new features free talks and demos late night opening and much more

Get the date in your diary now


style with performance

NOT ALL LUMINAIRES ARE CREATED EQUAL. Designed to set the heart racing. Or is that just us? | Introducing the new Zeppa

Find out more about ZEPPA please call 01992 474600 email light@dwwindsor.co.uk or visit us online

dwwindsor.com/zeppa


EDITOR’S COMMENT 05

Energise!

ROBERT BAIN EDITOR

T

ALAN TULLA TECHNICAL EDITOR

hese days, almost every new lighting product seems to hints at life-improving effects. One product description I read recently spoke of shifting from an ‘energising’ cool light to a ‘relaxing’ warm light. Elsewhere, I’ve seen blue light described as ‘calming’, ‘activating’ and ‘hazardous’. Presumably not all three at once. As most of you will know, such claims are based (loosely) on the fact that our brains are designed to track changes in the colour and brightness of light the day, to work out if it’s wakey time or sleepy time. But all this talk of ‘energising’ and ‘relaxing’ lights reminds me of something else: soap. Not long ago, while washing my hands in a hotel toilet, I found myself faced with four different coloured soaps. The orange one was ‘energising’, the green ‘relaxing’, the red ‘invigorating’, and so on. Now, I sincerely doubt that these claims for the effects of soap on my mood have much scientific basis. The effect of light on the body, on the other hand, is based on years of study of retinal ganglion cells, melatonin suppression and circadian rhythms. It’s proper science. Surely we can achieve more with this than the luminaire equivalent of nice-smelling soap? The problem is, we’re still rather hazy on what the science means in practice, and it’s a tough topic to research. The International Commission on Illumination recently sounded a note of caution over health claims for lighting products, saying that we still don’t understand enough about how light stimuli lead to non-visual responses – so tailoring products for particular effects is not yet possible. In other words, buyer beware. It’s all very well saying that a light is ‘energising’, but how much light do you need to get an effect? And for how long? Will the difference be worth the investment? How will it interact with other factors like coffee and sleep? And if it does work, is it even a good idea? But progress is being made, and you can hear the latest thinking on lighting and health in a number of presentations at this year’s LuxLive. In this edition of Lux we’ve set aside 14 pages to our preview of LuxLive, and hopefully we’ll see you there on 18-19 November. In the meantime, enjoy the issue.

MARK HALPER CONTRIBUTOR

RAY MOLONY PUBLISHER

GORDON ROUTLEDGE CONTRIBUTOR

LUX

SPECIAL LUXLIVE 2015 PREVIEW

OCTOBER 2015 | ISSUE 47 | www.luxreview.com

26 PAGES OF PRODUCT REVIEWS!

BEST OF THE BEST We reveal the standout projects and innovations shortlisted for the 2015 Lux Awards!

O STATUE OF LIBERTY O WORLD’S SMARTEST BUILDING O LIGHTING HACKS FOR A HEALTHIER OFFICE O IS CRI ON BORROWED TIME?

PLUS » 14-PAGE PREVIEW OF THE LIGHTING EVENT OF THE YEAR

2015 OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF

Robert Bain, Editor

Cover: Turn to page 50 for the Lux Awards shortlist

www.luxreview.com

Twitter @lux_magazine @luxreview

LinkedIn linkd.in/lightingtalk

OFFICIAL PUBLICATION OF

– Proud to be lighting geeks ROBERT BAIN Editor robert.bain@luxmagazine.co.uk 020 3283 4387

PETER ROWLEDGE Commercial director peter.rowledge@luxmagazine.co.uk 020 3283 4387 07740 110261

JAMES POUNTNEY Sector marketing specialist (OEM, controls, emergency) james.pountney@luxmagazine.co.uk 020 3283 4387

RAY MOLONY Publisher ray.molony@luxmagazine.co.uk 020 3283 4387 07834 990577

ROBERTA BONTEMPO Sector marketing specialist (retail, hospitality and leisure, residential) roberta.bontempo@luxmagazine.co.uk 020 3283 4387

MIRIAM HIER Events manager miriam.hier@luxmagazine.co.uk 07882 224682

ANDREW BOUSFIELD Sector marketing specialist (industrial, outdoor, transport) andrew.bousfield@luxmagazine.co.uk 07713 567290

YouTube youtube.com/luxmagazineuk

JUDY KENNY Art editor e: judy.kenny@luxmagazine.co.uk 020 3283 4387

media

Published by Revo Media Partners 3 More London Riverside London SE1 2RE Printed by Symbian Print Intelligence Calverley House, Dane Street Bishop’s Stortford, CM23 3BT, UK +44 (0) 1279 464455 ISSN 2045-7456 © Revo Media

The Lighting Industry Association Stafford Park 7 Telford, Shropshire TF3 3BQ info@thelia.org.uk 01952 290905 www.thelia.org.uk

No part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of the publishers. The opinions expressed in this publication are not the official views of the LIA. All rights reserved. Lux magazine is a controlled circulation magazine, available to selected executives with interests in lighting, who fall within the publisher’s terms of control. For those outside these terms, annual subscription is £70 including postage in the UK, EUR90 for the EU and US120 RoW. See www.luxreview.com for details.

JO JACKSON Marketing communications manager joj@thelia.org.uk

STEVE DAVIES Chief executive officer steved@thelia.org.uk

For LIA training courses please visit www.thelia.org.uk

www.luxreview.com


06 CONTENTS

65

70

5 Special Edition: LuxLive 2015 Preview Features

News and views News and analysis Your views Opinion Gordon Routledge Interview: Ivan Perre Interview: Haydn Young Batwing

12 22 24 28 32 34 146

15 THINGS WE LEARNED ABOUT LIGHTING IN 2015

NEW COLOUR RENDERING METRIC 8

Luxx takes stock of this year’s key lighting trends and developments

HUMAN-CENTRIC LIGHTING

LUXLIVE PREVIEW 12

Do lighting products really have all the health benefits they say they do?

SPY LIGHTS IN SHOPS How major retailers are using lighting to track you around their stores

The longevity of LED lighting is a big factor for us on the Tube” 32

www.luxreview.com

STATUE OF LIBERTY LI-FI ON THE PARIS METRO The transport network that wants to transmit internet through its light fittings. For real!

50

The full shortlist for this year’s Lux Awards has been revealed

PROJECT: HOTEL FOOTBALL, UK 16

This football-themed hotel in Manchester has an all-LED lighting scheme

18

PROJECT: MLM, UK

New LED light for the New York monument

36

Our 14-page preview of Europe’s biggest annual lighting event. Don’t miss it!

LUX AWARDS 14

20

A new metric has been developed for colour rendering – end of the line for CRI?

65

70

Office lighting with a difference

PROJECT: THE EDGE, NETHERLANDS This might just be the smartest building in the world – thanks to the lighting

75


CONTENTS 07

83

53 36

20 Hands on PROJECT: FERA, CLARIDGE’S

83 There are loads of clever little lighting touches at this high-end London restaurant

LIGHTING HACKS FOR HEALTHY OFFICES 90 Six ways you can make sure you’re at your brightest and most productive at work

LUXLIVE MIDDLE EAST PREVIEW

132

3 ways to light a kitchen diner 3 ways to control light in a corridor 3 ways to control light in a warehouse REVIEWED: LED GU10 lamps REVIEWED: luminaires for high temperatures

98 101 105 109 117

REVIEWED: underwater luminaires REVIEWED: illuminated bollards Upcoming events Jargonbuster

122 125 142 144

We’re bringing LuxLive to Abu Dhabi next year. Find out all about the exciting new show

LUX CONFERENCES 2016

136

Check out what’s on next year in Lux’s conference calendar

THE BAD LIGHTING AWARDS We’ve honored the best of the best, now let’s have a look at the worst of the worst

REVIEWED: Streetlights and floodlights for high temperatures

141

117 www.luxreview.com


08 LESSONS FROM 2015

15 1

2

things we learned about lighting in 2015 Where did 2015 go? As it whizzed past, we learned one or two things about lighting…

1

SUPERMARKET LIGHTS CAN NOW TRACK YOUR POSITION.

Don’t worry, it’s not as creepy as it sounds. Go to a branch of Target or Carrefour and download the store’s app, and it can use the lights to pinpoint your location (with way more accuracy than GPS), helping you find your way around and sending you targeted offers based on what you’re looking at. LED lights with specially programmed drivers modulate the light in a way that’s invisible to the human eye, but can be picked up by the forward-facing camera on a smartphone. Each light sends out a unique code, which your phone picks up and uses to work out exactly where you are. Carrefour has installed the system in a recently refurbished 7,800m2 hypermarket in Lille, France, and US retail giant Target is using a similar system in some of its stores.

2

A UK COMPANY HAS CREATED A GRAPHENE LIGHT BULB.

Graphene is the wonder material of the future – super light yet super strong, and an extraordinarily good conductor of heat and electricity. And Graphene Lighting, a company that grew out of the University of Manchester, is using it to make lamps.

3

www.luxreview.com

4

Graphene itself doesn’t give off any light, but it does improve conductivity and heat management, which means brighter LED lamps that last longer and use less electricity.

3

A TOWN IN TEXAS IS TAKING BACK THE NIGHT WITH NEW LIGHTING LAWS. Dripping Springs, Texas is fighting night-time light pollution by restricting the amount of lighting allowed on a lumens-per-acre basis. The town also requires shielding for all outdoor fittings so they don’t spill light into the sky, and fines violators. It’s one of a number of small towns in Texas that are taking steps to make sure the state’s majestic, twinkling night skies aren’t washed out by light pollution from cities like Houston and Austin.

4

CIRCADIAN LIGHTING IS NOW A REALITY IN SCHOOLS.

The idea of tuning the colour and brightness of light to keep people healthy and alert has been around for years. But apart from a few isolated trials, there have been few real-life examples. Now, it’s happening – at schools in the US and Norway. At the Ruby Van Meter School in Des Moines, Iowa, the

5


LESSONS FROM 2015 O9

fluorescent lighting has been replaced with a colour-changing LED scheme designed to improve wellbeing and help academic performance. The school follows the Kongsgardmoen primary school in Norway, which is also pioneering circadian lighting. Researchers will follow the results of the experiment closely to see if it can change schoolchildren’s behaviour and academic performance.

PARIS WANTS TO TURN THE LIGHTS ON ITS METRO INTO INTERNET TRANSMITTERS.

5

6

ONE BY ONE, SPORTS STADIUMS ARE GOING LED.

Last year, the stadiums of Chelsea and Southampton football clubs in England went LED. This year, Arsenal and Hull FC have followed, and in the US, the Super Bowl took place for the first time under LED light. Around the world, stadiums are embracing LED lighting because of its longlife, controllability, and compatibility with HDTV broadcasting.

STREETLIGHT SWITCHOFFS DON’T INCREASE CRIME AFTER ALL. That’s the verdict from two

7

universities, based on 14 years’ worth of data. The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, working with University College London, has declared that

6

BRITAIN’S TRAIN STATIONS ARE GETTING BLUE LIGHTS TO TRY AND REDUCE SUICIDES. Last

8

year, blue lights were installed at platforms at Gatwick Airport railway station after the worst year for suicides on the railway in the south of England. Now, Network Rail plans to install the lights at four more stations in Sussex, and is looking at ways of measuring their effects. But it’s still not clear why blue lights should have such an effect – some scientists point to a calming effect, but that’s just one of many theories. The idea of using blue lights came from Japan, where they have been fitted in a bid to reduce the number of suicides on Tokyo’s Yamanote Line. Incidents have fallen there since a peak in 2009 when the installation started.

THE PRACTICAL EFFECTS OF ‘CIRCADIAN’ LIGHTING STILL AREN’T PROVEN, SAY THE EXPERTS.

agreement that the non-visual effects of light exposure depend on the spectrum, intensity, duration, timing and temporal pattern of the light exposure. However, they also say that a lack of understanding of the link between the light stimulus and the resulting non-visual response ‘seems to make tailored light application for a desired lighting effect impossible’. In other words, a lot more research has to be done before firm recommendations can be made about so-called human-centric lighting. O More on page 12

LIGHTING CAN BOOST SALES… OR SOME PEOPLE CERTAINLY THINK SO. Lighting

10

manufacturer Zumtobel says a retailer in Germany saw its sales go up by about 12 per cent compared with another local store, after it installed a lighting scheme specially designed to appeal to the personality profile of its target customers. Fashion chain Gerry Weber changed the lighting in one

V

The Metro network recently installed a quarter of a million new LED lights, and now it’s considering using them to transmit data to commuters’ computers, phones and tablets using Li-Fi – an alternative to Wi-Fi that encodes data in light. If it goes ahead, it will be the first major application of the technology. Proponents of Li-Fi say it’s faster than Wi-Fi and will help to free up space on the crowded radio frequency spectrum, which Wi-Fi uses. O More on page 18

‘switching off streetlights at night does not increase car crashes and crime’. A research team studied the impact of turning off streetlights in England and Wales, where many local authorities have been darkening the streets from midnight until dawn in an effort to save on electricity bills. After studying data from 62 local authorities, the researchers said that people have nothing to worry about. ‘Local authorities can safely reduce streetlighting at night, saving energy costs and reducing carbon emissions,’ the team said.

10

9

If someone’s selling you a lighting product that they claim will have a particular nonvisual effect, take it with a pinch of salt. The International Commission on Illumination said in a statement that knowledge in this field is still ‘premature’, but that ‘observations in laboratory and application studies show beneficial effects on human health and performance’. There is general

7

9

8

www.luxreview.com


10 LESSONS FROM 2015

11

of its stores based on research indicating that certain personality types feel more comfortable – and are inclined to stay longer – under certain types of light. ‘After three months [with the new scheme], the store now confirms a 12 per cent sales increase on average – it jumps between 8 and 15 – compared with a control store eight kilometres away with the same sales volume and nearly the same client group,’ said Leif Escher, a product manager at Zumtobel.

12 EUROPE HAS DELAYED ITS BAN ON HALOGEN – BUT NOT BY AS LONG AS THE LIGHTING INDUSTRY WANTED. In April the

11

13

European Commission agreed with the lighting industry and voted to postpone a ban on halogen lamps until September 2018. It did not, however, extend the ban until 2020, which lighting industry body LightingEurope had lobbied for. The decision is sure to rankle newer, LED specialist companies who had argued against any extension. The commission had set the 2016 date back in 2009, giving the industry seven years to prepare for it. But the industry lobbied hard in recent months to delay the ban, saying that seven years was not long enough.

12 14

15

LEDS HASTEN THE ARRIVAL OF LONDON’S NIGHT TUBE.

If Transport for London ever gets round to delivering the Night Tube, Londoners will have LEDs to thank for it. Most Londoners are excited about the prospect of 24-hour service on the Tube on Fridays and Saturdays, but for London Underground, it presented a new problem: how do you carry out maintenance work if the trains don’t stop running? That’s where LEDs come in – because they last for years, they hardly need any maintenance at all. A major retrofit project began in 2011 to replace fluorescent lamps with LED tubes and now more LEDs are being introduced throughout the Tube, including in newly redeveloped stations such as Tottenham Court Road.

13

LEDS CAN NOW BEAT HALOGEN FOR COLOUR.

Going LED means compromising on colour quality, right? That was certainly the way things were when LEDs were the new kid on the block. Places that needed faithful colour rendering were reluctant to use

www.luxreview.com

LEDs because of perceived poor colour quality. Halogen was the gold standard for colour, and even if good-quality LEDs could hit a respectable colour rendering index (CRI) of 80 or so – fine for most everyday applications – halogen still had a clear edge. Now, that’s all changed. One by one, the big lighting companies have been fine-tuning the recipes of LEDs and phosphors they use, and the cutting-edge LED products of 2015 can not only match halogen for CRI, but can make colours more vivid and whites whiter. Xicato’s Vibrancy range of light modules is one such example, and other manufacturers are now coming up with rival products.

14

YOU CAN RUN LED LIGHTS FOR NO ENERGY AT ALL.

British inventor Malcolm Wright has come up with a way for LEDs to piggyback on the power used by other devices, so they can be run ‘for free’. It works by inserting a circuit in series with an AC mains-powered motor or other electrical load. The current requirement for the motor is passed directly through to the LEDs, resulting in a slight loss of power to the motor. However, at the same time, the LED circuit improves the power factor of the device, allowing that power to do more work. This frees up enough power to light up those LEDs. It’s not that the light doesn’t use any power – it’s more that it takes advantage of the imperfections of another circuit, to do a little bit of extra work with the power that’s already being provided. If your electricity bill is calculated using a watt meter (which is the case for most users), then this doesn’t cost you a thing.

SOME LOCAL RESIDENTS ARE RAISING THEIR OWN MONEY TO GET THEIR STREETLIGHTS BACK.

15

Residents in the Cumbrian town of Millom who lost their streetlights to budget cuts plan to raise the money themselves. The Cleator Street Action Group says it needs £3,000 for new lights, and that it faces security risks without them. ‘Copeland Council decided about two years ago that when the lights came to the end of their lives they were not going to replace them, and if we wanted them back, we would have to fund them ourselves,’ group member Donna Sproston told the North-West Evening Mail. The residents are holding fundraising events to help restore the lighting.


The choice for color has never been more black and white.

There are some lighting designs where optimal color isn’t just a luxury—it’s an absolute necessity. Luckily, our LUXEON Color LED Family is up to the challenge. With the broadest available spectrum of colors—from Far Red to Mint—and an unmatched quality of light, our portfolio of mid and high power color LEDs is the clear choice for the most color-dependent applications. When color really matters, look to LUXEON Color LEDs to make your boldest designs shine.

LUXEON Color LEDs • Ideal for architectural, entertainment and emergency vehicle applications • New form factors and consistent focal length produce best quality of light in the industry • Engineered to create a smoother image and eliminate the undesirable KDORH΍HFW

See more. lumileds.com/color

LUMILEDS ILLUMINATION LEDs LUXEON HIGH POWER LEDs • LUXEON MID POWER LEDs • LUXEON CoB LEDs • LUXEON COLOR LEDs • LUXEON UV LEDs • MATRIX PLATFORM

©2015 Lumileds Holding B.V. All Rights Reserved.


12 NEWS ANALYSIS

Analysis: The jury’s still out on human-centric lighting If someone’s selling you a lighting product that they say will have a particular non-visual effect, take it with a pinch of salt, says Lux’s technical editor Alan Tulla

T

he phrase ‘human-centric lighting’ seems to be everywhere nowadays. I have seen it used to describe everything from bathroom lights and adjustable desk lamps to installations in large hospital wards, multi-storey office blocks and streetlighting. Much of what is said about human-centric lighting is confusing and sometimes contradictory. Now, at last, some experts have given their initial opinion. And not just any experts, but the International Commission on Illumination (also known as the CIE) – the body that sets lighting standards globally, and whose recommendations are taken up by national and regional bodies and incorporated into their standards.

Proper light at the proper time After a conference in the UK last month, the CIE has issued a short statement titled ‘Non-visual effects of light – recommending proper light at the proper time’. These ‘nonvisual’ effects are the influence of light on our circadian rhythms, alertness, sleep patterns and so on. Although the CIE says that drawing conclusions based on knowledge in this field would be ‘premature’, it goes on to say that ‘observations in laboratory and application studies show beneficial effects on human health and performance’. There is general agreement that the non-visual effects of light exposure depend on the spectrum, intensity, duration, ral pattern xposure. , they also at a lack of erstanding the link etween the light stimulus and the resulting non-visual response seems make red light

www.luxreview.com

Pretty much everyone agrees that the right light is good for us and the wrong light is bad. Beyond that, things get a little fuzzy

application for a desired lighting effect impossible’. In other words, if someone’s selling a you a lighting product they say will have a particular non-visual effect, take what they say with a pinch of salt.

More guidance

‘‘

To give further guidance to interested parties, the CIE will be issuing two new publications. TN003 gives guidance on how to quantify the stimulus of nonvisual input in to the human photoreceptor system (including a ‘calculation toolbox’ to facilitate consistent results and allow comparisons with other research). TC 3-46 WD, on the other hand, focuses on identifying gaps in current knowledge. In summary, a lot more research has to be done before firm recommendations with quantitative values can be given about socalled human-centric lighting.

A lot more research has to be done before firm recommendations can be given about ‘humancentric lighting’”


Integrated Lighting Solutions

SPORT & EDUCATION

RAIL

INDUSTRIAL

AMENITY AREAS

STREET & INFRASTRUCTURE

WAREHOUSING AND LOGISTICS

+44 (0)1908 649292 | www.holophane.co.uk


14 NEWS ANALYSIS

Analysis: The ‘spy lights’ that are taking over supermarkets Retail giants Carrefour and Target are installing lights that communicate with customers’ phones to help them find products and send them targeted offers. Mark Halper reports

W

ill she or won’t she? She’s clutchin of Carrefour’s Terre d’Italia treats, a she could get a second for a total p of just €1.90. She might have missed the offer entirely, if not for the LED-based data waves that reached her smartphone. France’s Carrefour, one of the world’s three largest retailers, has found a new way to steer shoppers straight to discounts and products i its stores: using the lights in the shop’s ceiling The €84 billion ($93.4 billion) retailer is transmitting digital information from LED lum to customers’ smartphones using a technology called visible light communication (VLC) supplied by Philips. The system is similar to one pioneered by US retailer Target. Both Carrefour and Target are in The main the vanguard of a retail movement benefit for our to harness LEDs as not only a source of efficient, long-lasting customers is that light, but as an information when they arrive technology tool that delivers in the shop, they valuable, personalised information to shoppers on store premises. can find all the The lights make invisible products they modulations in the light they choose” emit – invisible to the human eye, that is, but not to the frontfacing camera on a shoppers’ smartphone. Each luminaire sends a unique signature, and when the phone sees more than one of them, it can pinpoint its location to within 10cm – much more accurate than GPS. Until now, retailers have used Bluetooth-based ‘beacons’ in their shops to inform customers of offers based on their position. The appeal of a lighting-based system is that it covers your entire store in one fell swoop, and provides much more accurate location data – not just ‘this customer is nearby’ but ‘this customer is standing right in front of the Heinz baked beans, facing the shelf’. Carrefour has installed the system in a recently refurbished 7,800m2 ‘hypermarket’ in Lille, France, using 800 LED luminaires from Philips.

‘‘

www.luxreview.com

n now provide our customers at the EuraLille four with a new service, enabling them quickly search and locate their preferred promotions or detect all the promotions around them when they are in the store,’ said Céline Martin, director of commercial models and innovation for Carrefour hypermarkets in France. ‘The main benefits for our customers of this new application is that they can ompare a shopping list with promotions, and en they arrive in the shop they can find all the cts they choose.’ Because the technology is based on software installed on an LED luminaire’s driver, it’s not as expensive to install as you might think. Philips is planning to offer the technology as an optional feature on its luminaires that users can choose to activate or not. If they do want to use it, they pay a monthly fee. ‘For Carrefour, this is an opportunity to offer location-based services that will enhance the shopping experience, making it more interactive and personalised,’ added Marlene Tisse, retail lighting manager for Philips Lighting France. Technology like this is, of course, open to abuse, and raises privacy issues. But should we be concerned about things such as invasion of privacy? If you believe a recent poll of shoppers, the answer’s no. In-store location and its sibling technology, in-store interactive Maps, are above all else really ‘cool’, according to the ‘Creepy or Cool?’ survey of 1,000 people in the UK conducted by the firm RichRelevance, as reported by Retail Design World. It notes that ‘72 per cent of UK consumers find personalisation of product recommendations based on purchasing habits to be cool’, and that, ‘shoppers also welcome location-based personalisation in stores with 63 per cent giving that a cool rating’. The findings echo the results of a GE study that concluded that shoppers don’t mind sharing personal data through the lights, although GE might be inclined to say that, given that it is one of the purveyors of lighting-based in-store tracking systems, as are Philips, Acuity and others. The Creepy or Cool? verdicts also come from a group interested with a vested interest in seeing positive attitudes: RichRelevance describes itself as ‘the global leader in omnichannel personalisation’.


18

-1

9

2 er

01

5

|E

x

L Ce

D N A ST

No

ve

m

b

Lo

nd

on

3

H3

LIGHTING PROBLEMS SOLVED IN RECORD BREAKING TIMES. Dextra Group plc. are at the cutting edge of luminaire development and with seven subsidiary companies, all facets of the lighting industry are covered from rail to retail and everything along the way. With industry leading service levels, we not only offer bespoke and standard energy efficient lighting products, we offer them in record breaking times.

+44 (0)1747 858100 | dextragroup.co.uk


16 NEWS ANALYSIS

ENERGY SAVING

62%

www.luxreview.com


INTRODUCING

Visit Harvard at

NEW INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES as seen in Lux’s top 10 product innovations

HAVE A DRINK

STAND C6

WITH US AT THE END OF

DAY ONE

LUX THEATRE 1 10AM SOCIAL HOUSING How to make your 2D bulkheads brighter, smarter and cheaper to run. Britain’s housing estates and industrial sites are IXOORIWKRXVDQGVRI'EXONKHDGȴWWLQJVWKDW need to be regularly maintained. Andy Davies of Harvard EngineeringH[SODLQVKRZUHWURȴW solutions for bulkheads allow you to reap the EHQHȴWVRI/('VDQGVPDUWFRQWUROV

Lighting products, enlightening solutions

HLEDs

Call us on: +44 (0) 113 383 1000

|

Email: sales@HarvardEng.com

|

Visit: www.HarvardEng.com


18 NEWS ANALYSIS

Analysis: Paris Metro – the world’s first ‘Li-Fi’ installation? The transport network will soon have a quarter of a million new LED lights, and now it wants to use them to send data to passengers’ phones. Pourquoi pas?

T

he Paris Metro has recently installed a quarter of a million new LED lights. Now it’s looking at using them to transmit the internet to commuters’ computers, phones and tablets via an emerging technology known as Li-Fi, which transmits data wirelessly through light. The project manager for the Metro’s massive, ongoing LED upgrade has launched a feasibility study into Li-Fi. ‘It is true, we are starting a study on Li-Fi to define the potential costs and if the deployment would be interesting,’ Gil Riemenschneider told Lux, noting that he could say more in the future. Riemenschneider has been the project manager on the €11 million ($12 million) scheme to replace all of the 250,000 lights with LEDs at the 302 Metro stations and 66 commuter train stations on the city’s RER network. That project, funded by the French government’s RATP public transport group, is on target for completion by the middle of next year, Riemenschneider said. If it actually wraps up by then, it would be about six months ahead of the original 2017 target.

Li-Fi works by making invisible modulations to the light from a luminaire – invisible to the human eye, that is, but not to the camera on a smartphone, tablet or laptop. The same technology lies behind the positioning systems being used by retailers such as Carrefour and Target (see page 14), but here it is being used to send data, rather than just to pinpoint someone’s position. Proponents of Li-Fi say that it will add enormous capacity to wireless communications, because the visible light spectrum is 10,000 times larger than the radio frequency spectrum that Wi-Fi uses. Some also note that it will operate much faster than Wi-Fi, and that it will be useful in electromagnetic sensitive areas like hospital, airplanes and nuclear power plants. In one potential application, LED lights in toys could communicate with each other, making the toys interactive. On the downside, Li-Fi signals do not travel as far as Wi-Fi signals do.

Hugo Hebrard

OFind out how Li-Fi measures up to Wi-Fi in our special ‘Wi-Fi vs Li-Fi’ session at LuxLive in London on 19 November. Turn to page 38 for the full programme or head to... www.luxlive.co.uk Paris is studying the benefits of using so-called ‘Li-Fi’

www.luxreview.com


WHEN INTELLIGENCE COMES TO LIGHT www.trilux.com/livelink

Visit stand K34 at Lux Live for a demo


20 NEWS ANALYSIS

Analysis: Is this the end of the road for the colour-rendering index? The time-honored CRI metric could soon be replaced. Ray Molony reports

A

new way to measure colour rendering t could replace the traditional CRI metric has been unveiled – and has won the backing of the US government. If adopted, it’s set to be the biggest change in methodology in the lighting industry in a generation, spelling the end for the current colour rendering index (CRI), which has been used since the 1930s. In recent years, the CRI method has come under increased criticism for inability to accurately describe how well LEDs r colours (see box, below right). The new system has been developed by scientists for the respected Illuminating Engineering Society, and is known as TM-30. It’s based on a reference set of colour samples that is more representative of objects in the real world than the pastel samples used for the CRI method. The new method has won the backing of the US Department of Energy, which effectively means the end of the CRI method in the US. If the International Commission on Illumination (CIE) agrees to adopt the new method, it will become the global standard. But opinions on the new TM-30 metric are divided, and the industry could be heading for another of its periodic format wars. The CIE says it has ‘a strong intention to revise CRI’ and has two technical committees working on the problem, one developing a new colour-fidelity metric to update the CRI, and another investigating other aspects of colour quality for possible preference-related metrics. Additionally, many lighting manufacturers don’t welcome TM30. This week the Global Lighting Association, which represents 5,000 equipment makers, said it would support an additional colour quality metric ‘that represents a significant and meaningful improvement’ but only in conjunction with – rather than a replacement for – the existing CRI system. US LED module manufacturer Xicato, a supporter of TM-30, upped the ante by publishing the TM-30 results for its entire product range of XTM and XIM modules. ‘We’re very supportive of TM-30 overall and recognise the need for an improved metric system. Moving forward, we will include TM-30 in our education materials,’ CEO Menko de Roos told Lux. x Other senior industry executives sounded a more cautious note. Fred Bass, managing director of Neonlite International, the

www.luxreview.com

d owner of lamp maker Megaman, said it was o surprise’ that TM-30 had won the backing of he Department of Energy. ‘We are, without a doubt, in need of a better system for measuring colour rendering, because CRI measurement is known to be particularly poor when trying to develop comparisons across different lighting technologies,’ said Bass. ‘However, I for one would like to know more ut the new TM-30 colour rendering method and w it performs before welcoming it with open arms as the new panacea for all our colour-rendering ills. If it proves to be able to deliver “a single new meaningful metric for fidelity”, then I would definitely be in favour of replacing the current methodology and having a new CRI metric. ‘At present, legislation on statutory minimums for LED light quality isn’t fair – we don’t have a measurement system that is reliable enough to create a level playing field. However, if the CIE deems that the TM-30 colour-rendering method is robust enough to deliver a true measurement of light quality, then this would open the way for legislation on statutory minimums for LEDs.’ O The TM-30 method will be explored in a presentation at LuxLive 2015 in London in November. Turn to page 38 for the programme, and register for free at www.luxlive.co.uk

WHY HAS THE TIDE TURNED AGAINST CRI? It’s designed for incandescent. CRI was developed in the age of incandescent light sources, which produce light with an even spread of colours across the spectrum. But because LEDs are based on blue light combined with a (usually yellow) phosphor, their spectrum of colours is more uneven. CRI struggles to reflect this. It ignores deep red. The range of sample colours covered by CRI excludes certain hues, most importantly deep red – a crucial colour in applications such as hospitality, retail and healthcare. This is even more relevant in the age of LEDs, because they often render reds badly. CRI can’t pick up on this. Technology has moved on. To complicate things further, LED manufacturers including Xicato, Philips and GE are beginning to tune their LED light sources to produce effects such as cleaner whites or more vivid reds and blues. This means moving away from the traditional colour composition of incandescent sources, which CRI was designed to measure. The metric has no way of describing the performance of these new sources.


Perfectly Choreographed Dimming Now with higher lumens, 9mm LES >˜`>ÛiÀˆw>Lixä]äää…œÕÀÜ>ÀÀ>˜ÌÞ With smoother and deeper dimming, Xicato ® XIM outperforms systems with high-end standalone LED drivers. Over its i˜ÌˆÀi`ˆ““ˆ˜}À>˜}i]8“iiÌà £Çn™ÀiVœ““i˜`>̈œ˜Ã]iˆ“ˆ˜>̈˜}˜i}>̈Ûi…i>Ì…ivviVÌÃÀi>Ìi`̜yˆVŽiÀ°ÌˆÃ the only LED solution to achieve this. Combined with best in industry color consistency and purposely engineered light spectra, XIM provides simply the most beautiful lit effect. At the same time XIM is more affordable to implement and enables smaller `œÜ˜ˆ}…ÌœÀëœÌˆ}…ÌwÝÌÕÀið8½Ãœ˜‡Lœ>À`“ˆVÀœ«ÀœViÃÜÀÀi}ˆÃÌiÀÃœ«iÀ>̈œ˜>`>Ì> by the hour. This ensures a true 50,000 hour warranty on light output and color that V>˜LiÛiÀˆwi`œ˜̅i“œ`Տi° >Ži>˜Þë>Vi«iÀvœÀ“̜ˆÌÃvՏiÃÌÆëiVˆvÞ8ˆV>̜® XIM.

iÌiV̈v>ˆ}…ÌÜÕÀVi…>ÃyˆVŽiÀ° iÌ>, 8ˆV>̜ˆVŽiÀ7…ii ›8ˆV>̜ œˆVŽiÀ

œ˜Ì>VÌ\“>ÀŽï˜}J݈V>̜°Vœ“

xicato.com


22 YOUR VIEWS

HOT TOPICS ON

LEDs – KILL OR CURE? 36 comments and counting “Outlandish claims about LEDs – positive and negative – are harming our industry, causing huge confusion and inertia. As lighting professionals, we can collectively address this once we understand the motives and ask the right questions” David Mudd, Lux-TSI “The LED industry has distorted the facts so they can sell us bad lighting. They did the same thing with fluorescents and mercury. They said they were safe. I come from hitech industry. I know what a diode is. I know how a wafer is made. I know how they are packaged. I understand the processes. I see all these outrageous claims of 100 to 125lm per watt. Now they want to change the way CRI is measured for the LED industry. What is going on may not be in the best interest of the consumer. Until the lighting industry puts integrity in their business plan, things will not change” Richard W, RTM Ventures “I have no confusion or negativity at all, it’s very clear to me. I have been doing third-party testing for years! You are very foolish if you just rely on the manufacturer’s certification alone” Phil Neill, Luciliteled.com “Our industry really has no tests to prove anything more than what we are capable of doing in short runs within a perfect environmental lab condition. Proof is relative to these conditions, and these limitations are spelled out very carefully in the warranty’s fine print. The claim business is all about time. I can ask any other company in the world how their original lights installed in the field are doing, and 99 per cent of them don’t know – and don’t really care” Timothy Gravert, Caberra Systems

www.luxreview.com

THE NEW COLOUR RENDERING METHOD: THE REACTION ON TWITTER

DOES CIRCADIAN LIGHTING IN SCHOOLS ADD UP? 50 comments and counting “Congratulations, Norway. Good way to invest money. Ra >90 is what I think all classrooms deserve” Simas R, Gaudre “Can’t help feeling that we’re missing something here. Inevitably, given our professional environment we’re bound to see tuneable LED / human-centric lighting through the prism that Light Solves Everything – but we need to match this to the built environment, surely? Good daylighting design only comes from a decently-designed building, into which we can then add our appropriate lighting (in as non-invasive way as possible, as Clifton suggests). Ideally, we teach our kids in a field and then send them home once it gets dark (along with their parents, who’ve been working in the neighbouring field)” John Bullock, lighting designer “In effect, everything that we do inside a school building could be considered a compromise. The space where children (and the rest of us) learn has impact on who we become. Every space we’re in is continually influencing every aspect of who we are. Even a ‘visually and spatially challenging’ indoor space can only somewhat approximate the intricacies and variations of a dynamic, living outdoor space (as contrasted with a covered-in-concrete urban outdoor environment)” Alice Rose Seidlitz, Healthy Spaces Designer

In September, the US government gave its backing to a new way to measure colour rendering called TM-30, which could replace the established CRI metric. Here’s how people reacted on Twitter...

This goes to all the #lighting experts: what do you think about the TM-30 to replace the CRI? iGuzzini @iGuzzini It will need everyone to understand it and work together so designers & manufacturers compare apples with apples MJLIGHTING @MJLIGHTING Sooner TM30 data is available the better. We need to press manufacturers to provide it... Kevan Shaw @KevanShaw Good start, whether it covers all holes and ticks all boxes remains to seen Pontus Hammarbäck @p_hammarback About TM30 @ XicatoInc provides already TM30 values for their products Luxemozione.com @luxemozione We love the new measurement system Xicato @XicatoInc I’m tired even thinking about it Ian Fursland @ianfursie Follow Lux on Twitter: @luxreview CLARIFICATION

Join the discussion in our Lighting Talk group on LinkedIn! linkd.in/lightingtalk

“You are very foolish if you rely on the manufacturer’s certification alone”

In our article on Shenzhen Airport (pictured) in the Luxx outdoor, transport and industrial lighting special in June, we neglected to credit Speirs + Major as the lighting designers. Apologies to all concerned.


LUX LIVE LAUNCH P862 P862 is an LED luminaire that excels in optical performance, thermal management, compatibility and serviceability, bringing an uncompromised outcome of FGÃ¥DJFODZ  WFSTBUJMJUZ  GVUVSFQSPPGFE GPS BO PQUJNJTFE investment P862 has been designed to meet most demanding lighting requirements, being easy to install and maintain XJUIUPPMMFTTFOUSZBOEVQHSBEJOH*UDPNCJOFTMBUFTU-&% MJHIUTPVSDFXJUITUBUFPGUIFBSUEFTJHO BDIJFWJOHMPOHMJGF GPS CPUI -&%T BOE UIF ESJWFST 5IF JOTUBMMBUJPO JT TJNQMF BOEGBTU BOEUIFMVNJOBJSFJTFBTJMZVQHSBEBCMFPOTJUFJG SFRVJSFE P862

JTUIFVMUJNBUFTPMVUJPOUPSFQMBDFUSBEJUJPOBM)*% TPVSDFT #FJOH MJHIUXFJHIU  UIF MPX QSPÃ¥MF BQQFBSBODF allows the P862 to be safely installed on existing columns BOECSBDLFUT

Visit us at stand L14 to see out latest developments, our award winning luminaires and to discuss your exterior lighting requirements with our team who will be on hand to BOTXFSBMMZPVSRVFTUJPOT

PROUDLY DESIGNING AND MANUFACTURING IN THE UK

01920 860600 www.cuphosco.com enquiries@cuphosco.co.uk


24 OPINION

Opinion I’ve got you under my skin Want to make decent hotel lighting controls? You’ve got to get under people’s skin

SAM WOODWARD LUTRON

I

’m not sure if I should really admit this in public, but I’m a big fan of karaoke. I particularly like belting out the ‘oldies’, mostly classic songs from before my time. As it happens, global travel occasionally affords me an excuse to indulge this passion in places far from England, where I’m only embarrassing myself anonymously. In fact, as I write this piece, I’m in a hotel room in Shanghai, a city with a wide variety of suitable singing joints, and night is falling. Let me stress, I’m not referring to the seedier salons of downtown KTV – I prefer the ones with a live band who invite you to take the mic alongside them for some participation. Any readers familiar with Pudong will know that there are many places here that fit the bill. A particular favourite artist of mine is the Chairman of the Board, Frank Sinatra. With the reverb turned up high, it’s fun to croon through the night, singing such numbers as ‘I’ve got you, under my skin…’ Yet the hotel room I’m sitting in was most definitely not designed From the by someone who had ‘got under desk in this hotel my skin’ as a user of its lighting room I can see 11 controls. Confusion reigns. From the desk here I can see 11 different different wallmounted switches, wall-mounted switches of one kind or another, none of which are labelled, none of which are and none of which indicate which of the half-dozen circuits of lighting labelled” they might operate. With a mixture of wall lights, under-cabinet-lights, downlights, and bedside lights, achieving lights-out becomes quite a quest. And it’s not just in Shanghai that I find this problem. A few weeks ago I was staying in Johannesburg, and experienced a very similar challenge. It was a different hotel brand; five stars for the furnishings, but none for the lighting controls. There was no simple bedside ‘all off’ button, but rather an array of switches, some performing two-way operation, which all had to be in the correct positions to achieve whole-room darkness. These problems are entirely avoidable if you make the effort to get under your users’ skin. How are the controls going to work in

‘‘

real life? What does the person staying in the hotel room need? I urge readers to ask the following four key questions when selecting lighting controls for a hotel room: 1) Rather than using ‘normal’ switches, use keypads that are linked to a control system with the ability to control any zone in the room. And check: can the buttons be engraved, so that it’s obvious what they do? How easy is it going to be for guests to work out how to switch all the lights on and off? 2) Are the buttons illuminated, so that you can find them in the dark? Can the engraved text or icons indicating what the button does, be seen? A glowing keypad that shines in the night is essential to enable someone waking up in an unfamiliar room to find the controls. 3) But, can the illuminated buttons also be dimmed (automatically, of course) so that they’re not too bright when in a completely dark room? Whilst it’s important to be able to find the buttons, we don’t want them to be too bright for comfort! 4) Are the buttons big enough that they can be operated by guests who are old or infirm? Large tactile keys are essential. The lighting in a hotel room can do so much to set the atmosphere, to enhance enjoyment of the space and to give a feeling of cosy comfort, but the operation must always be simple. It really helps if the room designers can get under the skin of the guest in this way.

SAM WOODWARD is customer education leader for Europe and Africa at LUTRON

www.luxreview.com


EVOLUTION. THE TRIUMPH OF TECHNOLOGY ENERGY SAVINGS:

TRIUMPH ACTIVATE LEDCHROIC 8W LED Downlight with SWIFT connector

REDUCED ENERGY COSTS £401 / €557

True ACTIVATE Driver-On-Board (DOB) Mains Operated technology – providing dimmability, driver efficiency and reliability (no electrolytic capacitor)

Chip-On-Board (COB) for superb light output, high efficacy and long life

High lumen output of •640 lumens

Low power consumption of 8W

Low heat emissions

Efficacy of •80 luminaire lm/cctW to comply with Part L1 & L2 UK Building Regulations

Fire, acoustic and airflow tested in compliance with Parts B, C & E of UK Building Regulations

LEDCHROIC 38° or 60° optic

5 YRS

80 LmW

PART

65

PART

L1 L2

RATR8P03038-01 RATR8P04038-01 3000K 4000K Total Power (W): 8 8 Power Factor: >0.98 >0.98 Total Light Output (lm): 640 680 Beam Angle (deg): 38 38 Lux at 1m (lux): 1,140 1,190 CTT L100 (K): 3,000 4,000 CRI at L100: >80 >80 Efficacy (lm/cctW): 80 85 Lifetime L70 F10 (hrs): 50,000 50,000 Diameter (mm): 92 92 Height (mm): 98 98 Cut-out (mm): 70 70 Weight (kg): 0.34 0.34 IP: 65 65

ACCESSORIES: RATRTRIM-03 RATRTRIM-13 RATRLENS-60

Chrome Trim Brushed Chrome Trim 60° Ledchroic Lens

£36 / €50

REPLACEMENT LAMPS £65 / €90

£0 / €0 TOTAL SAVINGS £430 / €597

FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CONTACT YOUR LOCAL ROBUS STOCKIST OR GO TO WWW.LEDGROUPROBUS.COM


26 OPINION

Opinion

LANCE STEWART CREATIVE LIGHTING

PAUL JONES BEG

If the lighting’s this bad, what about the plane?

Consider this before you install controls

S

I

ales of LEDs are ballooning. The very suggestion that we use LEDs for almost any application seems to win out every time against any alternative light source. But is an LED solution always a worthy successor to the alternatives? Or are LEDs sometimes an upstart usurper put together by blind maniacs hell-bent on profit with little regard for best lighting practice? I mused on this while sitting aboard a plane in which the LEDs shone an insipid pale lavender colour – a shade rich in blue wavelengths that, according to Harvard Medical School, ‘seem to be the most disruptive at night’. Given that this was a relatively new plane and that I was only flying during daylight hours, I The LEDs were wondered whether this LED arranged with colour was deliberate. The cynic in me imagined that some clever butt-end shadow salesperson had pitched the colour gaps that you as ‘sky blue’, resulting in much could squeeze a head nodding and murmuring of approval by airline management hostess through” and their advertising executives. But I remain sceptical until further enlightened, because a similarly pale lavender also happens to be the common result of untuned white (what happens when RGB LED strips are run at 100 per cent intensity for all colours). Also, the LEDs were arrayed linearly close to the plane’s concave sides and overhead down the central spine. Just like linear fluorescents or neon, but with butt-end shadow gaps that you could have squeezed a hostess through. And, as if gaps between LED runs weren’t bad enough, the LEDs were also a tad dotty – due to inadequate diffusion. I have to say the plane was otherwise a well-made modern jetliner. Which was lucky, because if the rest of the plane had been put together as badly as the LED lighting arrangement, it would have suffered engine failure from misaligned parts and promptly gone down… …like a LED balloon.

‘‘

www.luxreview.com

t is estimated that about a third of energy consumed in commercial buildings, warehouses and factories is used inefficiently or unnecessarily – or both. Lighting control has been identified as an way to prevent this, but it is important that the right solution is implemented. Choose a system that fits the space Light fittings must be thoroughly evaluated to ensure lighting systems are tailored to the needs of individual spaces. The space and the application where the lighting controls are used must be considered too. This includes investigating the room’s use. Energy codes and building codes also have to be studied. Get the right occupancy sensors Care must be taken with LEDs to ensure occupancy sensors can cope with large inrush currents. There also have to be enough sensors to ensure coverage for the tasks being carried out. This will extend the life of the lighting and reduce maintenance costs. Focus on the end goal When we look at a new project, we ensure we provide the correct amount of light to the given space, increase light source efficiency and make sure the lights are turned on only when they are required. Consider new technology New technologies such as wireless smartphone controls mean it is easy to manage lighting and improve end user control. These Light quality kinds of systems are less expensive and employee to install than wired systems. comfort can be Remember that savings aren’t the only benefit It is true that the improved by main reason industry uses lighting adjusting light controls is to cut energy costs. But levels” there are many other benefits. The overall lighting quality and employee comfort can be improved by adjusting light levels in certain spaces. This can improve overall productivity. It can also be a valuable security measure. Work with a company you trust Whatever the lighting control requirements may be for industrial purposes, it is always recommended to choose a reputable and experienced company to ensure your requirements are properly met.

‘‘


28 OPINION GORDON ROUTLEDGE

Reality check How I narrowly escaped LED electrocution in the shower Lux’s publisher, Gordon Routledge, reports from a hotel bathroom in Amsterdam

D

Think before you grab o you know anyone who has lost an eye to a carelessly placed stick? This was most likely the worst case scenario presented to something live. Usuall you by your mother when growing up: ‘Be careful equipment near a bat with that, you’ll have someone’s eye out.’ shower has to have a The same was true when I studied electrical IP rating and metal equipment should be earthed to engineering; I remember learning about electrical trigger protection equipment if there is a fault. grid networks and having to work out what would So imagine my delight when, as I was in the happen in various scenarios. The worst case was shower halfway through a rendition of a Tony presented as a crane arm swinging round and Bennet number, the light bulb above the bath shorting out all circuits simultaneously. Obviously dropped out of the ceiling. a brown trouser moment for the crane driver, and Normally this wouldn’t be of too much concern, anyone within a three-mile radius gets treated but this one was a retrofitted LED GU10, with a metal to a spectacular but short-lived heatsink that cannot be connected lightning display. to earth. I hadn’t heard of the brand. Electrically, however, some sort The smeared printing of the CE mark Imagine my of protection device would operate didn’t inspire me with confidence to delight when, in quickly to protect the system and pop it back into the holder. the hotel shower, people attached to it. Apart, that It’s a brave person who grabs the is, from our metaphorical crane metal heatsink on a lit retrofit lamp. the light bulb driver, who is probably toast by Why? It’s all down to isolation – that above the bath the time the protection kicks in. is, the designed elements inside dropped out of Engineers and regulators pay the GU10 that under normal or fault lots of attention to worst case conditions prevent mains voltage the ceiling” scenarios when setting from appearing on the heatsink. With regulations and developing no earth connection to rely upon, the product standards. So real-life worst case product must have two barriers in case one fails. scenarios are very rare. If they do happen, This double insulation must remain viable for the it’s usually because someone has ignored life of the product, at end of life and when subjected them, or as a result of a tragic chain of to worst case power surges. A tricky job in a retrofit seemingly unpredictable events. lamp because space is critical, and heat must be Recently I stayed in one of the worst hotels conducted away from the LEDs. in the Netherlands – close to the venue I was So before you grab that lamp, think. Did the visiting according to the website, but the engineer who designed it turn up to the lecture at €30 taxi fare suggests otherwise. ‘Four stars.’ which worst case scenarios were discussed? Yes, you can see four stars through the holes in Think I’m over-egging it a bit? Well, trading the curtains. ‘Enjoy the local fruit and vegetable standards are picking up poor quality products all market.’’ Not when you’re trying to sleep and the time. A product safety tester at Which?? was they start clanking around at 5am setting up electrocuted in the lab by a lamp from a known stalls. ‘Get a snack at the bar.’’ If you like deep fried brand. Cree recently announced a recall of T8 LED prawns five ways served with mustard that is. retrofit fluorescent lamps not due to shock hazard, So what’s the worst possible scenario for but potential for fire risk. So be careful folks, and electrocution in your home or a hotel? Standing don’t touch lamps in the bath, or install LED tubes in a shower, inside a metal bath tub and touching near a box of fireworks.

‘‘

FOLLOW GORDON ON TWITTER @gordonroutledge AND JOIN US IN THE LIGHTING TALK GROUP ON LINKEDIN AT linkd.in/lightingtalk

www.luxreview.com


Aleda Adjustable : LED

Precise and Powerful Featuring a distinctive design, the Aleda Adjustable downlighter by Hacel adds an innovative dimension to accent lighting. Combining creativity with lighting class single point LED Modules, the luminaire, with a smooth and precise pan and tilt adjustment, hosts outstanding performance characteristics and energy efficiency. The Aleda is ideally suited to a wide range of applications, providing a lighting solution of the highest quality. Dynamic Design. Exceptional Engineering.

Our stunning new Fluent in Lighting Catalogue presents a dynamic range of architecturally inspired, class leading LED luminaires with superior perfomance. Request your high quality catalogue at marketing@hacel.co.uk or Download Now www.hacel.co.uk


® U K

C C T V

M A N U F A C T U R E R

Available on the

®

PRINCE ELECTRONIC SUPPLIES LTD 01268 272800

www.sasss.co.uk

EĂƟŽŶǁŝĚĞ ůĞĐƚƌŝĐĂů Θ^ĞĐƵƌŝƚLJ 01902 458237

FALCON

ELECTRICAL LTD

0151 6300000 www.mas-uk.co.uk

44121 2366999

sales@sndelectrical.co.uk

(44) 0161 839 2640

020 8586 1500

01752 601108

1132469001

www.falconelectrical.co.uk


® L E D

L I G H T I N G

® D L E

N G T I G H L I

ts oduc

Key Pr

2015

6

1

• 201

ise

mprom

ut Co

ability

Witho

Afford e

ramm

sing

Prog

s Licen

Philip

® enlightening your ideas

L E D

L I G H T I N G


32 WHAT I BELIEVE IVAN PERRE

‘‘

Zarina Holmes

Any new technology, such as LEDs, is under scrutiny, and we have to ensure there is sufficient light”

www.luxreview.com


WHAT I BELIEVE 33

Ivan Perre Electrical engineer, London Underground We have to know how products will perform I’m involved with lighting for Transport for London (TfL). I’m an engineer by day, but most of my work is in verification and testing of LED systems. I’ve researched in the field of photometry and how LED light is measured, and I have subsequently developed methods to more accurately determine LED lux levels. This means we can have greater confidence in the products we specify but also understand better how they perform in the field. It’s vital to choose the right supplier After a comprehensive consultation process with more than 80 lighting manufacturers and suppliers from across Europe and beyond, and a robust internal review, London Underground has prepared the technical specifications that will accompany its procurement of new lighting technology. These specs set out the minimum levels and other requirements acceptable for lighting products. Products that demonstrate the best whole-life costs and performance against the variables in the technical specifications are the most likely to be chosen for use on the network. We test products carefully Any new technology, such as LEDs, is under scrutiny and we have a responsibility to our customers to ensure there is sufficient light. The optical filters used in lux meters are designed to replicate the responsiveness of the human eye. This is characterised by the spectral responsivity of the lux meter, which is a bell-shaped curve. By using some tracing software, I am able to trace out the graph and convert it into data, which I can then extrapolate to get the values for each wavelength. Once this is done, I can simulate the given light and find out what the lux value would be, and then I can compare it with the ideal lux value. This process ensures we can collect accurate and important data, and specify the right products; but more importantly we can deliver a better service to our customers. We’re thinking outside the tunnel One of the challenges we face at the moment is implementing feature design more effectively. We are starting to change the way we think about the station environment, and in the future we want to use light in different ways to highlight certain areas, introduce contrast and create different atmospheres. This is especially important because we’re looking at retail opportunities, which have a number of other lighting design prerequisites. The new Night Tube service is a maintenance challenge One of the priorities for TfL is to reduce maintenance. This is becoming more important with the Night Tube, which is a round-

the-clock service on Fridays and Saturdays on the Jubilee, Victoria, and most of the Central, Northern and Piccadilly lines. This will significantly eat into our engineering hours, and we want to reduce the number of interventions required. The longevity of LED lighting is a big factor in assessing the suitability of new fittings, because they don’t need recommissioning as often. Stations must have a consistent look and feel One of the most important projects we’re undertaking at the moment is a series of substantial works across a number of stations to create an integrated look and feel between new and existing elements. We’re working with Crossrail to ensure there is a consistent feel between the two and not a contrast when you leave one service and enter another. Test schemes make a big difference We have a number of successful test schemes at TfL to reflect on, which invariably inform new projects. A couple of years ago we implemented the first LED column lighting on the underground at Wimbledon Park tube station, which was a turning point in upgrading lighting with huge energy and maintenance savings. Smart controls must be smarter One of the things we need at TfL is to be able to change the drivers once they’ve failed without the need to program them. When there is only a short hour shift, it’s difficult to go around recommissioning fittings if there’s a lot to do. We’re very keen on controls. With a new design idiom being developed for TfL, controls will become an imperative because we’ll have to control individual lights to provide different levels and different intensities. We’re harnessing the power of procurement I’m also involved in procurement of lighting technology and innovation in Europe through the Pro-Lite project. The project allows public sector authorities across Europe to pool resources so it’s easier to procure innovative technology and consolidate our procurement power. We have recently released the technical specifications that we’re going to use to go out for tender and we’re also in the process of finalising a whole-life cost model, so we can make like-for-like comparisons of light fittings. I’m excited about new lighting technologies I like the idea of using OLEDs although I’m not sure how we’d be able to use them in our material compliance. I also like the look of remote phosphor as it sounds like it’ll be a big step up in efficiency. O Interview: Scott Lang

www.luxreview.com


34 WHAT I BELIEVE HAYDN YOUNG

‘‘

John Debono

Simply turning lights off when not in use can have a huge impact on a company’s bottom line”

www.luxreview.com


WHAT I BELIEVE 35

Haydn Young Contracted energy manager, Travis Perkins We need to manage energy consumption I work for Travis Perkins as a contracted energy manager with the goal of reducing its total annual consumption and minimising its carbon emissions. To achieve these goals I implement various investment and communication strategies to drive down energy expenditure and reduce overall costs. So my job is to choose what we buy and manage that process.

We use solar power to reduce carbon emissions We’re working with landlords to install solar panels that further reduce energy consumption, but also reduce the overall carbon footprint. It’s important that the process evolves in this sequence – manage, mitigate, generate – because often people look at things in isolation, but the reason that the Wickes story works is that it benefits from a co-ordinated and sustained approach.

Lighting is a big deal Lighting is unique within my remit because it is often responsible for the greatest energy consumption in a building. For example at Wickes, the national DIY and building trade retailer, we discovered that 74 per cent of total energy expenditure across 230 stores was for lighting. So it’s essential to choose the right sources and fittings as well as other technologies that complement reductions.

You have to manage risks effectively Many clients have reservations about the initial capital outlay on new lighting systems, but it’s all about managing risk. The first step – training staff – is very low risk and low cost. The next step of implementing LEDs is a bit more costly although it provides a pretty solid return on investment and is a proven technology. Then once you have achieved confidence in the process, you can implement more ambitious schemes.

You have to get people on board The first thing we focus on is not using power unnecessarily. It doesn’t matter if lighting is good or terrible; if it’s there when it’s not needed, it’s waste. We provide training and a qualification in energy management to as many staff as possible. So far this year, we will have trained 1,200 store managers, deputy store managers and key stakeholders in energy management. Simple best-practice processes such as turning lights off when not in use can have a huge impact on a company’s bottom line. We measure out-of-hours consumption to determine established behaviours and then we can engage staff with online learning. Quite often, technology can make people less engaged and encourage lazy behaviour, but we have found that online courses result in positive behavioural change and a measurable reduction in energy consumption. LED systems save money Last year we implemented LEDs in six stores. We’ve completed another four this year and we’re looking to do a comprehensive nationwide rollout in the next two years. Although energy savings vary – depending on the size of the store and its use – we have seen overall savings from 45-60 per cent of total energy consumption as a direct result of implementing LED technology. It’s vital to engage employees Our strategy is to manage a store first, mitigate its energy consumption and then generate power. We call this the constant conversation because for this system to work effectively, I need employees to have a conversation about energy management. This creates interest and inevitably improves the way staff understand and manage their energy responsibilities in the workplace.

Good data informs good decisions To understand energy consumption, we measure lighting loads and complete a comprehensive data capture before and after we implement a new lighting system. What we’ve found is that by using LED systems, we’re able to reduce the number of fittings in quite a few stores, which further reduces consumption. We need smarter controls We use daylight and movement sensors to reduce light output depending upon the amount of natural light present, although in a retail environment this can be challenging. Unlit areas in large stores can look dark – especially in corners – which discourages movement through these spaces. Lighting suppliers have to understand the store Suppliers must know how lighting products are going to work and be used in an environment that has a range of products distributed over multiple levels of racking at different heights and a shop floor with customers walking around. When choosing fittings we always consider the reputation and quality of the fitting first because it has to look right. We must also consider the longevity of products as well as the ease of replacement and maintenance. Rollout and replicate The plan for the future is to take this story at Wickes that works and start to implement it into other businesses in the Travis Perkins Group. We’re confident we can tailor the key principles to each business and achieve the same savings. O Interview: Scott Lang

www.luxreview.com


36 LUXLIVE 2015

DON’T MISS Europe’s biggest annual lighting event

Once again, LuxLive is bringing the best in energy-saving lighting solutions and expertise to London in November. Don’t miss out!

DIARY DATES

Wednesday 18 November 2015 Thursday 19 November 2015

T

he latest lighting technology, the top experts and the best case studies wi all be at the biggest ever LuxLive, on 18-19 November at London’s ExCeL From Li-Fi to human-centric lighting and wireless controls, this year’s LuxLive is a festiv cutting-edge technology. Leading manufacturers who’ll be exhibiting this year include Zumtobel, iGuzzini, Holophane, Dextra, Aurora, Tamlite, Thorlux and Osram. Not only will LuxLive 2015 be the biggest ever, with more than 300 exhibitors, it’ll also feature more than 80 hours of free-to-attend talks, debates and panel discussions. LuxLive 2015 will be an unrivalled showcase of the best the industry can offer in terms of the latest technology, developments and expert thinking.

Learn and enjoy

300 exhibitors will be showing their latest kit at LuxLive

www.luxreview.com

The best way to learn is when you’re enjoying yourself. That’s our belief, and that’s why we like to explain lighting technology through demonstrations, discussions and debates. It’s our most ambitious programme yet of talks, case studies and debates. Tap into the latest thinking from more than 100 experts on the hottest lighting topics including the internet of things, energy-saving policy, circadian lighting, and the controversial new colour rendering metric.

Last year saw 7,000 people come through the doors of LuxLive


LUXLIVE 2015 37

2015

At the heart of LuxLive is the Lux Arena – a stunning theatre in-the-round which will have a series of interactive content hosted by some of most engaging and informed personalities on the lighting beat, including tech experts and team Lux. It’s a rolling programme, so whatever time you rock up to the Lux Arena, there’ll be something engaging and interactive that you’ll learn from (turn to page 38 for the programme). We’ve also got three more theatres off the show floor with presentations running all day, on all aspects of lighting applications and technology.

Something for everyone The programme will be streamed for all the key lighting sectors that are feeling the effects of LEDs: retail, hospitality, healthcare, education, commercial, transport and rail, streetlighting and industrial as well as technical streams and general industry update sessions. So whatever your interest, you’ll be able to gain insights from specialist experts. The programme is themed by different sectors each day – so the key presentations and debates on retail, hospitality, workplace and healthcare lighting, will happen on Wednesday 18 November, while the sessions on outdoor, transport or industrial lighting are on Thursday 19 November. LuxLive also plays host to the Society of Light &

Lighting’s Masterclass programme, the Young Lighter of the Year competition, and a host of meetings and events organised by partner organisations. LuxLive is taking place once again at the fantastic ExCeL centre, London’s most modern exhibition space. ExCeL boasts no fewer than seven on-site hostels with 1,400 rooms, all within a five-minute walk of the venue. It also has 3,700 secure on-site parking spaces and free Wi-Fi throughout. This year LuxLive joins forces with two other shows: Strategies In Light Europe, which focuses on the lighting supply chain, and lightspace dot london, focusing on architectural lighting, so there really is something for everyone. And best of all, it’s all FREE to attend!

IN OUR LUXLIVE PREVIEW... O Get a sneak peek of this year’s top product innovations on page 47 O See the shortlist for the Lux Awards on page 50 O Check out this year’s programme and plan your diary on page 38

O Register now for your FREE pass at luxlive.co.uk/register

www.luxreview.com


38 LUXLIVE 2015 PROGRAMME

2015

Wednesday 18 November THE

BAD

LIGHTING AWARDS

12.45pm Nest Labs’ Francois Girodolle joins our discussion on the internet of things

5.30pm Vote for the worst lighting schemes in Britain, in the first ever Bad Lighting Awards

11am Kate Wilkins and Sam Neuman talk us through their lighting design at Wahaca

explains how he’s saved millions of pounds on electricity bills, without compromising the look and feel.

ARENA

in association with

9.20am How much could Britain save by embracing low-energy lighting? Lux’s lighting economist Dave Tilley works out how much money could be saved across the UK by adopting the latest and most efficient lighting technology.

9.50am Experts answer your lighting questions Voltimum’s panel of lighting experts will answer questions on how to achieve great things with lighting.

10.50am WORKPLACE Panel discussion: Office lighting – Time to throw out the rule book? For too long, office lighting has slavishly followed the guidelines. Panel discussion with Iain Trent, editor of the British Council for Offices’ lighting guide; and lighting designers Sabine De Schutter, Michael Grubb and Neil Foster.

11.30am Cool Wall Which luminaire designs are achingly cool and which are a bit... meh? Our expert panel give their views.

12.10pm FUNDING Finding the funding for your lighting upgrade

1.50pm HOSPITALITY & LEISURE Panel discussion: When LED upgrades go bad Lighting is one of the easiest and quickest ways to slash energy bills in the hospitality sector. Independent energy professional Richard Felgate, designers Chad Rains and Sally Storey and Lux’s lighting economist Dave Tilley share their experience of how to do it right.

2.30pm EDUCATION Dealing with a sprawling university lighting estate: Tips from the experts Universities have sprawling campuses with old and new buildings. Our experts, including Alan Syme of Mitie and Dan Lister of Arup, tell you how manage them.

3.10pm HEALTHCARE Panel discussion: How can we make healthier lighting a reality in Britain’s hospitals? Tight budgets, a lack of guidance and complicated estates make using lighting to promote health and wellbeing difficult. Discussion with Professor Debra Skene of the University of Surrey, Alexandra Hammond of Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Foundation Trust, and Damian Oatway of Central Manchester NHS Trust.

3.50pm TECH Wi-Fi vs Li-Fi In this session, organised with the University of Strathclyde’s Intelligent Lighting Centre, we pit Wi-Fi against the alternative based on light. With Harald Haas and Geoff Archenhold of PureLiFi and Wi-Fi experts.

4.30pm Dragons’ Den

How can businesses overcome the upfront cost?With Myles McCarthy of the Carbon Trust, David Maxwell of Sustainable Development Capital and Stijn Broecker of Zumtobel’s services and contracting business.

Entrepreneurs present their weird and wonderful lighting innovations. We’ve got a hydrogen-powered outdoor light, the light with a tiny environmental footprint and even a light that runs on no energy at all.

12.45pm IOT The internet of things: should we believe the hype?

5.30pm The Bad Lighting Awards

The ‘internet of things’ is this year’s buzzphrase, but is it all hot air? With Francois Girodolle of Google’s Nest Labs, Akshay Thakur of Cisco and Simon Coombes of Gooee.

1.20pm RETAIL The secrets of Tesco’s massive LED rollout An exclusive presentation and interview with the team behind the UK’s biggest retail lighting rollout – nearly 1,500 shops. Matt Love, lighting manager at Tesco,

www.luxreview.com

Share pictures of the worst lighting you’ve seen. We’ll share the best – sorry, the worst – in this fun session and present awards to the winners, if they show up.

6.30pm Intelligent lighting

LUX THEATRE

LUX THEATRE 1

1

10am DESIGN BIM for beginners: Create better lighting with building information modelling Building information modelling is supposed to make it easy to design efficient, effective schemes and avoid unexpected problems. Independent lighting designer Adam Glatherine explains how lighting professionals can make the most of it.

10.30am LARGE ESTATES 10 things I wish I’d known before starting my LED rollout LED rollouts can reap big benefits – but getting them right isn’t easy. Richard Felgate, formerly energy manager for the company behind pub chains All Bar One and O’Neill’s, reveals the mistakes to avoid.

11am HOSPITALITY & LEISURE Case study: Wahaca Lighting designers Kate Wilkins and Sam Neuman reveal how lighting is boosting the brand of Mexican restaurant chain Wahaca.

11.30am HEALTHCARE LEDs and public health: The latest research John O’Hagan of Public Health England presents the findings of research on LED lighting funded by the Society of Light and Lighting and its implications for health. Including flicker, colour, and the influence of light on circadian rhythms.

12.30pm WORKPLACE Case study: Sainsbury’s Digital Lab The digital lab at Sainsbury’s London headquarters is home to the team that develops the supermarket’s online services. It’s a high-tech environment with futuristic lighting to match – Andrew Bissell of Cundall and Simon Waldron of Sainsbury’s talk us through it.

Our panel look at the possibilities presented by intelligent lighting. Introduced by Dietmar Zembrot, chief technical officer of Trilux.

1pm ENERGY How dynamic modelling can help you design great lighting that meets Part L requirements

7pm ARENA PARTY sponsored by Trilux

There are a number of ways to make sure you meet the


LUXLIVE 2015 39

1.30pm Learn how the new lighting for The Last Supper took inspiration from Da Vinci himself energy-efficiency requirements of Part L of the Building Regulations. Neil Foster of Couch Perry Wilkes explains how dynamic modelling can make it easy.

1.30pm HEALTHCARE Case study: Why one London hospital is investing £1 million in new lighting Guy’s and St Thomas’ NHS Trust, which runs three London hospitals, is investing more than £1 million in lighting that it hopes will save energy and improve health. Alexandra Hammond, the woman in charge of the project, explains.

11.30am Top lighting designer Paul Nulty reveals new research on lighting for cosmetics in retail

LUX THEATRE

LUX THEATRE 2

2

1pm David McNair explores how lighting can be used to improve care for dementia patients

TECH THEATRE

TECH THEATRE

9.30am HOSPITALITY & LEISURE Case study: The Britannia

9.30am Electrical Distributors Association meeting

Laura Mackay of MBLD on an LED-lit cruise ship.

Association meeting. Also open to non-members.

2pm HOSPITALITY & LEISURE How Da Vinci himself helped design the new lighting for The Last Supper

10am RETAIL Case study: Cancer Research UK

1pm HEALTHCARE Lighting and dementia: the latest thinking

Discover how a revolutionary LED lighting installation has transformed the way people see Leonardo Da Vinci’s The Last Supper – and how Da Vinci’s own feeling for light informed the design. With Piergiovanni Ceregioli of iGuzzini, the designer behind the scheme.

A cutting-edge lighting study from a UK school.

3pm RETAIL Case study Our expert speaker presents a fresh exemplar case study from the world of retail.

3.30pm EDUCATION How schools can grasp the energy-saving opportunity of lighting Schools in the UK can tap into funding opportunities to invest and reap the long-term benefits of energy-saving lighting. Colin Lawson of manufacturer Tamlite explains how, and why schools should grasp the opportunity.

4pm EDUCATION/LARGE ESTATES Case study: Manchester Metropolitan University Facility managers take note; this is the story of a university that ranked 91st on the league table of green universities, and was catapulted to the top. John Hindley, MMU’s head of environmental strategy, explains how it was done, and how lighting helped.

How lighting in a ‘boutique’ charity shop boosted sales.

10.30am EDUCATION Case study: Schools 11.30am RETAIL Flawless lighting for make-up counters Designer Paul Nulty on research with a cosmetics brand.

12pm TBA Case study Our expert presents a top lighting case study.

12.30pm WORKPLACE Creating healthy workplace lighting with controls With Ed Wilkes of Zumtobel.

1.30pm Controls for all budgets Expert Jeremy Turner on your controls options.

2pm WORKPLACE Esos: Get your energy use down With Myles McCarthy of the Carbon Trust.

2.30pm HEALTHCARE Case study: How to light for dementia With Daniel Stabenau of Trilux.

3pm HOSPITALITY Case study: Fera restaurant, Claridge’s With Katerina Chanioti of Lighting Design International.

3.30pm RETAIL Overcoming the barriers to lighting upgrades Andy Bolitho of the British Retail Consortium on LEDs.

4pm WORKPLACE Case study: Centrica Estates energy performance contract

CHECK www.luxlive.co.uk for programme updates!

Jennifer Neal of British Gas discusses the opportunities.

4.30pm Women In Lighting Group meeting Chaired by Helen Loomes.

An ILP session. David McNair, a fellow of the Institution of Lighting Professionals, says lighting designers could take the lead in the design of dementia care environments.

1.30pm OUTDOOR Could your lighting be disturbing bats? An ILP session. Jo Ferguson, built environment officer for the Bat Conservation Trust, explains how lighting can harm protected bat species.

2pm OUTDOOR SLL Masterclass: Lighting for public spaces Mike Simpson of Philips explains how technology is enabling lighting to transform public spaces.

2.30pm OUTDOOR SLL Masterclass: Lighting for architecture the outdoor environment Creating a comfortable and stimulating outdoor environment with the help of the SLL LG6 guide? Kevin Stubbs of Thorn explains.

3pm SLL Masterclass: Form and function in harmony – lighting the interior Helen Loomes of Trilux on adding to the dynamic appearance of a space using the new SLL LG6 guide.

3.30pm SLL Masterclass: The future of lighting is smart Roger Sexton of Xicato presents a vision of smart lighting, with two-way communication as a key element.

4pm RETAIL Workshop: The future of LED in retail Retailers and technology suppliers discuss how the latest cutting-edge lighting kit is going to transform the shopping experience.

www.luxreview.com


40 LUXLIVE 2015 PROGRAMME

2015

Thursday 19 November

12.30pm The DLR’s Paul Meenan discusses whether lighting standards are a help or hindrance in rail

3.10pm Transport expert Phil Edwards reveals his research on streetlight switch-offs and crime

LUX THEATRE

ARENA

in association with

9.30am Lux Awards: Where are they now? When we hand out Lux Awards, people often ask us how we know the winning projects will stand the test of time. So, with the Lux Awards in its fifth year, we decided it was an ideal opportunity to look back and see how some of the lighting schemes we honoured in the past are faring now.

10am INDUSTRIAL Panel discussion: Taking the pain out of maintaining industrial lighting Our expert panel discuss the challenge of maintaining lighting in industrial settings, and offer their top tips on how to do it.

10.30am Society of Light and Lighting Young Lighter of the Year: The final, and the Jean Heap Bursary update The four finalists for the title of SLL Young Lighter of the Year present their papers to a panel of distinguished judges. Topics include circadian lighting in offices and light poverty in the developing world. The winner will be announced at tonight’s Lux Awards. Feride Sener Yilmaz will also give her six-month update on her £2,000 Jean Heap Bursary award.

12.30pm TRANSPORT Panel discussion: Do regulations stifle good lighting design at railway stations? Lighting in the rail industry is tightly regulated – and rightly so. But do the regs sometimes stop designers producing truly great design? Our expert panel, including Paul Meenan of the DLR, Lee McCarthy of Designplan Lighting, Darren Ward of Dextra and rail expert Dave Burton, thrash it out.

1.10pm Lamps behaving badly – live! Ever tried dimming LEDs? It’s pretty hit and miss. Controls expert Jeremy Turner pulls together a mixed bag of light sources, dimmers and transformers, and connects them up before your eyes to see what happens.

www.luxreview.com

10.30am Government advisor Tony Howells gives the lowdown on new lighting procurement policy

LUX THEATRE 1

1

1.50pm OUTDOOR Panel discussion: Is smart streetlighting everything it’s cracked up to be?

10am SOCIAL HOUSING How to make your 2D bulkheads brighter, smarter and cheaper to run

The streetlights of the future won’t just be streetlights, apparently. They’ll also be communications nodes, with all manner of sensors and connectivity to support smart cities. But how big an impact is this really set to have? Our panel of experts, including Graham Colclough of the EU-backed ‘humble lamppost’ project and Iain Macrae of Thorn, thrash it out.

Britain’s housing estates and industrial sites are full of thousands of 2D bulkhead fittings that have to be maintained frequently. Andy Davies of Harvard Engineering explains how retrofit solutions for bulkheads let you reap the benefits of LEDs and smart controls.

2.30pm Tech demo: Six bits of kit we love this year The Lux team picks its favourite new bits of lighting kit from the past year and demos them live in the Lux Arena. Not to be missed!

3.10pm OUTDOOR Panel discussion: Does lighting cut crime? Manufacturers love to say their products will make us safer. But the latest evidence suggests otherwise. What’s the truth about lighting and crime? Phil Edwards, an expert on transport and health from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, whose research sparked the debate on the topic earlier this year, debates with other experts.

3.50pm Dragons’ Den In this ever-popular format, entrepreneurs present their weird and wonderful lighting innovations to LuxLive’s panel of dragons.

10.30am OUTDOOR/PROCUREMENT The government’s plan for procuring outdoor lighting: What you need to know The rapid rise of LED, and the grand product claims made by lighting manufacturers, can make life difficult for procurement staff – especially those in public bodies that have lost lighting expertise amid staff cuts. A new guide aims to help those in central government procurement pick the right outdoor lighting. In this session, find out how the guide can help you. And for manufacturers – learn what you need to do to keep winning those government contracts. Tony Howells of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills will be joined by Peter Hunt of the LIA, Joe Ernst-Herman of the Crown Commercial Service, Ian Borthwick of the IET and Gareth Pritchard of Highway Electrical.

11.30am TECH Lighting and the internet of things Phani Pandrangi of IoT business Kii explains the role that lighting will play.

CHECK www.luxlive.co.uk for programme updates!

2015


LUXLIVE 2015 41

12.30pm Learn how to make LED product warranties work for you, from lawyer Paul Stone

3.30pm LEDs and controls mean big savings for Northern Rail – Euan Hilton explains how

LUX THEATRE

2

12.30pm WARRANTIES Warranties on lighting products: How not to fall through the loopholes Warranties are important. But watch out: some warranties on LED lighting products are more about protecting the seller than the buyer. Top lawyer Paul Stone explains how to dodge the loopholes that can make your warranty worthless.

THEATRE 2

9.30am Connected lighting In the future, lighting will be intelligent and connected.

10am INDUSTRIAL Case study: Royal Mail

10.30am LEDs Driver-on-board LED modules

11.30am OUTDOOR How to upgrade your heritage lighting

1.30pm How to futureproof your spec

Learn how to bring your old fittings up to date with the latest technology while maintaining the ambience.

Andrew Bissell explains how the team at CundallLight4 planned ahead for the development of LED technology when designing lighting for a defence training camp in South Wales. Learn how to make sure you don’t lose out because of future changes in technology, and how to justify the initial cost.

12pm COMMERCIAL Putting a number on human-centric lighting

Andrew Cronin of Nualight presents a case study of innovative lighting in a multi-storey car park.

3.30pm OUTDOOR Case study: Streetlighting An exemplar case study of cutting-edge low-energy streetlighting.

4pm FINANCING/OUTDOOR Find the funding to upgrade your streetlights It’s estimated that Britain could save £77 million by upgrading all its streetlights to energy-saving LEDs. But how do you get the money? Iain Watson explains how the Green Investment Bank can help.

LIA Laboratories’ Mark Salt describes the Verified scheme.

10.30am OUTDOOR Case study: Westminster City Council

Our experts Kevin Dyas of Dyas Electrical and Stewart Weaver of Kingfisher Lighting present a case study of low-energy high-mast lighting at a major UK dock.

3pm INDUSTRIAL Case study: Q Park

9.30am TESTING Get your product claims verified 10am RECYCLING The WEEE regulations – are you up to date?

Dave Franks talks us through the central London council’s major LED lighting rollout.

Our expert speaker presents a standout industrial lighting case study.

TECH THEATRE

TECH THEATRE

The Royal Mail’s LED rollout with John Bradshaw, engineering and technical services manager.

1pm LARGE ESTATE/INDUSTRIAL Case study: High-mast lighting at a dock

2pm INDUSTRIAL Case study: Industrial lighting

1.30pm LED expert David Scott-Maxwell reveals five things we didn’t know about LEDs a year ago

Experts from the European Commission’s Lighting for People project, including Christian Cajochen of the University of Basel’s centre for chronobiology, describe how to measure and quantify lighting’s effect on the human body.

1.30pm TRANSPORT The changing tunnel lighting standards landscape John Rands of Designs for Lighting on current standards.

2pm RAIL Introducing the London Underground’s new design guide Presented by lighting designer Paul Nulty.

Recolight CEO Nigel Harvey on recycling. With Dr WenTao Kuang of Kosnic.

11am LEDs Quantum dots and colour Marl and Nanoco explain how to fine-tune LED light.

1pm GENERAL LEDs that beat halogen for colour With Simon Morrison, MD of Lumenpulse AlphaLED.

1.30pm LEDs 5 things we didn’t know about LEDs a year ago With David Scott-Maxwell of Forge Europa.

2pm CONTROLS The potential of Power over Ethernet Presented by Akshay Thakur of Cisco.

2.30pm EMERGENCY LIGHTING Do you know if your emergency lighting is compliant with the law? With David Wright of emergency lighting body ICEL.

3.30pm TECH Product lifetime: The data you need to ask for Make sure your LED products will last.

4pm TESTING Certification marks to build trust in LED Gareth Jones of Lux-TSI on complying with standards.

2.30pm OUTDOOR Case study: Blackburn streetlighting With James Huyton of Capita and Darwen Council.

3.30pm RAIL/TRANSPORT Case study: Rainhill Station Euan Hilton of Northern Rail on how smart LED lighting has saved energy and improved customer experience.

www.luxreview.com


Join the WEEE compliance scheme that sets the standard for the lighting industry We will take on all of your compliance obligations £

The Recolight WEEE compliance scheme takes care of your recycling obligations. Giving your customers access to the UK’s most comprehensive recycling service for WEEE lamps, LEDs and luminaires.

Charging is per lamps or luminaire put on market, which means you have no hidden costs and can accurately forecast what you will be charged each month.

To date we have managed the recycling of over 225 million lamps luminares and LEDs

www.recolight.co.uk

We operate as not for profit, maximising funds available to recycle.

0845 601 7749

stand n o s Join u 29

N


HIGHLIGHTS LUXLIVE 2015 43

LuxLive 2015...

10

2015

things not to miss!

Photo: Scott Akerman

With four theatres of talks, debates and demos, there’s loads going on at LuxLive. Here are just a few of the highlights

1

DOES LIGHTING REALLY CUT CRIME? LUX ARENA

3.10pm, Thursday 19 November Manufacturers love to claim that their lights will make us safer. But what’s the real truth about lighting and crime? Phil Edwards, an expert on transport and health from the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, whose research sparked a debate earlier this year, tackles the topic with lighting industry representatives.

2

THE LAST SUPPER – HOW IT WAS LIT LUX THEATRE 1

2pm, Wednesday 18 November Discover how a revolutionary LED lighting installation has transformed th way people see Leonardo Da Vinci’s Th Last Supper – and how Da Vinci’s own feeling for light informed the design.

3

BAD LIGHTING AWARDS LUX ARENA

5.30pm, Wednesday 18 November LuxLive is calling on lighting people to share pictures of the worst lighting you’ve seen. We want to see the most overlit, underlit, glary, shadowy, ugly, electrically unsound and just plain weird lighting installations that you’ve come across. We’ll share the best – sorry – the worst in this fun session THE and present the awards to the winners. If they show up, that is. PLUS: Don’t forget the real Lux Awards – on the evening of Thursday 19 November!

4

THE SECRETS OF TESCO’S MASSIVE LED ROLLOUT LUX ARENA

1.10pm, Wednesday 18 November An exclusive presentation and intervie with the team behind the UK’s bigges retail lighting rollout – covering nearly 1,500 shops. Matt Love, lighting manager at Tesco, explains how he’s achieved annual energy savings of 76 gigawatt-hours (yes, you read that right), saving the company millions of pounds, without compromising on the and feel of Tesco stores.

5

DISCOVER THE LATEST CUTTING-EDGE LIGHTING TECHNOLOGIES FOR RETAIL TECH THEATRE

4pm, Wednesday 18 November In this special workshop session we’ll be bringing together retailers and technology suppliers to discuss how the latest cuttingedge lighting kit is going to transform the shopping experience. Which technologies are hot and which are not? And what can the lighting industry to better help retailers?

BAD

LIGHTING AWARDS

www.luxreview.com


44 LUXLIVE 2015 HIGHLIGHTS

9

THE LATEST THINKING ON LIGHTING FOR DEMENTIA TECH THEATRE

1pm, Wednesday 18 November Lighting designers have a key role to play in designing environments to care for people with dementia. David McNair, a chartered lighting engineer and Fellow of the Institution of Lighting Professionals, reveals the latest thinking on how to create lighting schemes that support health and comfort. PLUS at 2.30pm, an exclusive case study from Trilux on using dementia lighting in practice

6

THE INTERNET OF THINGS – SHOULD WE BELIEVE THE HYPE? LUX ARENA

12.30pm, Wednesday 18 November The ‘internet of things’ is this year’s lighting buzzword. But is it about to transform the way that we use lighting, or is it all just hot air? François Girodolle of Google’s Nest Labs, Akshay Thakur of Cisco and Simon Coombes of Gooee debate the issue.

10

7

WI-FI vs LI-FI LUX ARENA

3.50pm, Wednesday 18 November LuxLive pits Wi-Fi against Li-Fi: the new alternative technology that transmits data through light. Which is best? Harald Haas of Li-Fi pioneer PureLiFi goes up against Wi-Fi experts.

HOW TO ACHIEVE FLAWLESS LIGHTING FOR MAKE-UP COUNTERS LUX THEATRE 2

8

10.30am, Wednesday 18 November One of the biggest headaches for cosmetic retailers is customers bringing things back because they don’t like the colour – and usually the lighting is to blame. Top lightin designer Paul Nulty reports on new researc conducted with a major global cosmetics brand, on how lighting can seal the deal.

www.luxreview.com

WARRANTIES: HOW NOT TO FALL THROUGH THE LOOPHOLES LUX THEATRE 1

12.30pm, Thursday 19 November Warranties are important. But watch out: some warranties on LED lighting products are more about protecting the seller than the buyer. Top lawyer Paul Stone explains how to dodge the loopholes that can make your warranty worthless.


10 1

NEW PRODUCTS LUXLIVE 2015 47

product innovations to look out for at LuxLive 2015

iGUZZINI’S TINY LASER DOWNLIGHT iGUZZINI, STAND P15

iGuzzini latest new product is the tiny Laser downlight. Ranging from just 17mm to 75mm in diameter, the Laser is designed to discreetly and elegantly illuminate retail, hospitality and residential applications. For visual comfort, glare is kept low with a unified glare rating (UGR) of less than 15. There’s even a warm-dim version that reproduces the dimming of a halogen source, bringing back the magic of the past when less light meant warmth and softness. And it’s available with fixed, adjustable or wallwasher optics. See it for yourself on iGuzzini’s stand, P15.

3

THE QUANTUM DOT LED LIGHT

2

THE TOUGH NEW FITTING FROM DEXTRA DEXTRA, STAND H33

4

HOLOPHANE’S NEW LED HIGH MAST LIGHT HOLOPHANE, STAND K14

Dextra’s new Torrent is a luminaire designed to last. It’s an LED solution capable of operating at up to 50°C, with an IP65 rating and smooth curved design minimising the risk of dirt accumulating. The Torrent is constructed with die-cast aluminium end caps and an extruded aluminium heatsink, with a high transmission opal diffuser. The LED source not only provides excellent energy efficiency but also eliminates glass and mercury from food environments minimising contamination risk in case of an accident. It’s ideal for food production areas. See Torrent and loads of other new products from Dextra at stand H33, right next to the Lux Arena.

Holophane’s new HMAO high-mast product uses glass refractor technology, with LEDs placed behind glass optical pods. For new and retrofit high-mast applications, it provides a complete lighting solution for the simplest or the most complex area lighting challenges. The specially engineered optical modules come with a full range of distribution options to meet the highest performance standards while delivering outstanding visibility and uniformity. The luminaire is available with lumen packages of 30,000, 44,000 and 58,000lm. Check it out for yourself, along with all of Holophane’s latest products, at stand K14.

V

Quantum dots just might be the next revolution in lighting. These tiny crystals of semiconductor material play the same role as phosphors in LED lighting – converting blue light to different colours. The difference is, quantum dots allow you to fine-tune the colour of light like never before. For applications where colour quality is crucial (retail, galleries, horticulture…), this changes everything. At LuxLive, Marl will be showing off the Orion QD, the first in a range of products it has developed in partnership with quantum dot specialist Nanoco. Come and see it for yourself at stand K26.

2015

www.luxreview.com


48 LUXLIVE 2015 NEW PRODUCTS

5

THE FLAT PANEL WITH 95 CRI (AND A FIVE-YEAR WARRANTY) AURORA LIGHTING, STAND K6

While most LED panels settle for a colour rendering index of 80 or so, Aurora’s latest panel boasts a super-high CRI of 95 – ideal for high-precision tasks and applications where colour quality is vital. Oh, and it comes with a five-year warranty. Come and see it for yourself at Aurora’s stand, K6.

7

BRAND NEW HIGH BAYS AND LOW BAYS FROM KOSNIC KOSNIC, STAND J6

Kosnic will be unveiling its new range of high and low bays at LuxLive. An ideal replacement for inefficient metal halide fittings, both luminaires are available in 100W, 150W and 200W models, delivering significant savings. Fitted with pre-anodised aluminium reflectors, they boast efficiency of up to 91lm/W and a long life of 40,000 hours. Come and see them at stand J6.

9

THE LATEST IN CONTROLS HAMILTON LITESTAT, STAND M18

Taking the first step to a smart home just got easier. Centre stage on Hamilton’s LuxLive stand will be the latest addition to its Mercury control system; the Mercury DK1 and the DK1E lighting control kits. An outof-the-box entry-level system, the kits contain everything needed to control four lighting circuits from a touchscreen control plate. The DK1E enables wireless control using an iPhone or iPad app. Come and try it at stand M18.

www.luxreview.com

6

THE SOLUTION FOR RETROFITTING BULKHEADS HARVARD ENGINEERING, STAND C6

Do you have bulkhead fittings that you’d like to make more efficient, more controllable, and longer-lasting? Control and light source specialist Harvard Engineering has designed an integrated LED driver and light engine solution for 2D bulkheads. It’s perfect for social housing. You will be able to see this product, and many more, on Harvard’s stand, C6.

8

BUILT-IN SENSORS FROM BEG BEG, STAND R57

Lighting control specialist BEG is launching its new range of fittings with built-in occupancy sensors at LuxLive. The new Luxomatic AL22 range uses the latest microwave technology so that the lights are only activated when motion is detected. Microwave sensors offer temperatureindependent motion detection with very short response times that can be built into the fitting. Come and see what BEG has on show at stand R57.

10

PLESSEY’S UK-MADE LEDS PLESSEY SEMICONDUCTOR, STAND E26

Meet the company that’s manufacturing LED chips in the UK. Plessey Semiconductor is using patented technology to create its unique GaN-on-Si LEDs – which are based on silicon, rather than the usual sapphire, thanks to technology developed at Cambridge University. Plessey says this is allowing them to unlock flexibilities in the manufacturing process and provide more bang for your LED buck. See the tech for yourself at stand E26.


STATE OF THE ART

DESIGN,

Find us on

STAND K26

MANUFACTURE & DISTRIBUTION

UK BASED ALL UNDER

ONE ROOF EXPERIENCE OVER

40 YEARS’ EXPERIENCE

it’s in our DNA With a special approach to LED design and manufacture from their unique base in the English Lake District, Marl has been rewriting the rulebook for innovation for over 42 years. The Marl DNA is made up of an innovative approach, high quality products and an agility of service that is synonymous with the best of UK engineering. With five world firsts over four decades so far, could working with Marl lead to the creation of the sixth?

Visit Marl and Nanoco at Lux Live 18th – 19th November for your chance to see CFQD® and LED technology together for the first time. Wednesday 18th Catch Marl and Nanoco at Strategies in Light, 2pm “Light People Like” Technology Issues and Trends Platinum Room 2, Level 3 Canapés and Drinks from 5pm Thursday 19th Catch us in the Tech Theatre, Lux Live, 11am “Quantum Dots and how they’ll revolutionise colour in lighting.”

www.leds.co.uk


50 LUX AWARDS 2015

Tailor-made for COB LEDS LOW COST RCOB LED DRIVERS – DESIGNED TO DRIVE HIGH POWER LEDS TAILOR-MADE FOR YOUR LED DIMMABLE OR CC OUTPUT PRESET CURRENTS FROM 350MA TO 1050MA IN 50MA STEPS OUTPUT VOLTAGE RANGE FROM 6V TO 44VDC

EASY TO INSTALL SINGLE-SIDE CONNECTION PRACTICAL SQUARE SHAPE

FULLY PROTECTED (OLP, SCP, OCP, OTP)

2015

The lighting industry’s biggest

PARTY T

his year’s Lux Awards is set to be a big one. More than 200 entries were received, so the panel of expert judges had a tough job picking out the brightest and best. Judging is now complete (turn the page for the shortlist) and the champagne is on ice ready for a glittering ceremony in London on Thursday 19 November, when the winners will be presented with their trophies. Hosting the night will be top comedian Ian Moore, a regular on BBC 5Live’s Fighting Talk and at the Comedy Store.

Hip venue And the venue for this year’s event Lux Awards is a star in its own right. The Troxy in East London is a hip former cinema and it will host 1,000 of the industry’s high rollers and big clients for a glamorous champagne reception, sumptuous five-course meal

w w w. r e c o m - l i g h t i n g . c o m

www.luxreview.com

After-show party in association with


LUX AWARDS 2015 51

The excitement is building for the fifth annual Lux Awards, at which the top achievers in the world of lighting will be honoured

THE LUX AWARDS 2015 JUDGES DR GIA KROEFF

Global sustainability manager, property, Rolls-Royce

ALAN RICHARDSON Group energy manager, Intu Retail Services

ELIZABETH THOMAS Public lighting manager, Walsall Council

EOIN BILLINGS

Billings Jackson Design

MICHAEL MORRISON

Independent lighting expert

MARK FLEMING

Engineering technical manager, Harrods

PETER BICKNELL

Senior engineering manager, Broadgate Estates

AHMED ABUBAKIR, Lighting design engineer, University of Bristol

LINDA SALAMOUN, Senior lighting designer, Buro Happold Lighting

BILL DICKSON,

and a visually stunning awards ceremony. There we’ll learn who will receive the lighting industry’s highest accolade: a Lux Award trophy. And if that wasn’t enough, the presentation ceremony is followed by the official after-party, sponsored by Lumenpulse AlphaLED. The party will feature a floor-filling seven-piece soul band, dance floor and late bar to 2am.

Serious purpose The serious purpose of the awards, organised by Lux and the Lighting Industry Association, is and reward both creativity and a commit sustainability among lighting professiona individuals. Crucially, the Lux Awards also recognise clients and end users who have used lighting in exceptional ways to improve their lit environment – and cut energy use. The awards take place on 19 Novembe – so you’d better move quickly if you wan ensure your place!

Energy and environment manager, Princess Alexandra Hospitals NHS Trust

PAUL KERRIGAN,

Lead electrical engineer, Crossrail

NEIL FOSTER,

Lighting principal, Couch Perry Wilkes Top comedian Ian Moore will host

ROBERT GREGG

Deputy electrical engineer, estates services, University of Oxford

ALAN TULLA Technical editor, Lux

GORDON ROUTLEDGE Publisher, Lux

ROBERT BAIN Editor, Lux

O www.luxawards.co.uk

www.luxreview.com


LUX AWARDS 2015 THE SHORTLIST 53

2015

2015

The shortlist

Here they are: the standout lighting project and products that have made the shortlist for the Lux Awards 2015. These are the schemes and innovations that the judges believe deserve a shot at winning a coveted Lux Award trophy. To ďŹ nd out who triumphs, join us at the Troxy in East London on Thursday 19 November!

www.luxreview.com


54 LUX AWARDS 2015 THE SHORTLIST

www.luxreview.com

2015


ERCO has reconsidered office lighting. The Skim downlight oval flood with LED replaces two conventional luminaires. With its elongated light distribution, the oval flood lens system enables energyefficient and better lighting of circulation zones and workplaces in the office. Perfect light efficiently calculated. www.erco.com/skim

E


56 LUX AWARDS 2015 THE SHORTLIST

www.luxreview.com

2015


making smart simple

™

The IoT Lighting Ecosystem

gateway

holiday cars chef friends

restaurant travelling olympics football accountant

engineer festival

computers

cats fashion driver london

beauty music teacher health

Join us at Lux Live Booth D25

Sales & Operations ops@gooee.com

Hardware hardware@gooee.com

Software software@gooee.com


58 LUX AWARDS 2015 THE SHORTLIST

www.luxreview.com

2015


Tailored Light We will work with you to create a unique look and feel for your environment

LIGHTING DESIGN SITE SURVEYS BESPOKE DESIGN FULL TURNKEY SOLUTION

As well as our own brands, our partners include:

R

GE imagination at work

3238LUX WK41 2015

Energy Saving Lamps

T: 01274 473400 F: 01274 473401 sales@europeanlampgroup.com


60 LUX AWARDS 2015 THE SHORTLIST

www.luxreview.com

2015


MOONS’ CP\CLKS LED Drivers Quick response

Flexible Configuration

Multiple Functions

The output current range:700mA-1050mA(configurable) Constant Current / 0-10V Dimming / Clock Dimming(CLKS) / PWM Dimming Permits optimum inventory management Easy to adjust the output current Reduce part numbers Quick response to your requirements

All your demand is our command SHANGHAI MOON’S AUTOMATION CONTROL CO.,LTD NO.168, Mingjia Road, Minbei Industrial Park Shanghai,201107,P.R.China Tel:+86(0)21 52634688 Fax:+86(0)21 62968695 Web:www.moonsindustries.com.cn


62 LUX AWARDS 2015 THE SHORTLIST

www.luxreview.com

2015


Luceco product installation guide: 1 Fit 2 Forget 3 Repeat in 25 years time

With Luceco LED Academy you’ll only need to change every 25 years. Offering zero maintenance and over 50% energy & CO2 savings; Luceco LED luminaires are the perfect cost saving replacement for linear fluorescent lighting.

50,000 HOURS

3 year

standard

WARRANTY

Long life LED luminaires www.luceco.uk

1 year

on site WARRANTY

LIGHTING POSSIBILITIES


Have you tried our new LED Savings Calculator?

www.integral-led.com/savingscalc

Fire Rated Downlights NEW

30 min

Fire Rated

Classic-look Glass GU10s NEW

60 min

Fire Rated

90 min

Fire Rated

F

I R E

Filament LED Lamps

High-quality focused light output

Award-winning Panels

NEW

ΖGHDOIRUFKDQGHOLHUVDQGZDOOOLJKWV

(Classic Glow GU10)

PRUHHɝFLHQWWKDQRWKHU/('3DQHOV

+44 (0) 208 451 8700

@integralLED

sales@integral-led.com

integralLED

integral-LED.com


PROJECT HOTEL FOOTBALL, MANCHESTER 65

Back of the

The LED scheme extends to the supporters’ bar (above) and the reception area

Robert Bain visits the football-themed hotel with an all-LED lighting scheme

NET I

V

f you were any closer to Old Trafford, you’d be on the pitch. The brand new Hotel Football, set up by ex-Manchester United stars Gary Neville and Ryan Giggs, stands right next door to the team’s famous ground. The £24 million football-themed hotel opened in February, with 130 rooms for visiting fans to stay when they come to see a match, as well as a restaurant and supporters’ bar that does a roaring trade on match days. It even has a rooftop football pitch – with great views of the Old Trafford stadium – that can be hired for special events. Architects AEW and property developer Zerum brought in British lighting manufacturer Luxonic to provide the all-LED lighting scheme for the hotel. Luxonic director Martyn Wherry says: ‘It’s quite a prestigious project for the Manchester area, so we were very keen to be involved with the designer

www.luxreview.com


66 PROJECTS HOTEL FOOTBALL, MANCHESTER

Dali controls let the facilities team set the mood in the bar and restaurant

and spent quite a lot of time working with them to make sure we could deliver what the client wanted.’ The resulting LED lighting scheme covers Hotel Football’s reception, restaurant, bar, function rooms, bedrooms and corridors. A Dali control system lets the facilit control lights remotely to set the mood monitor energy consumption. Although the advertised life of the L luminaires is 90,000 hours, the fittings are run at less than full power for muc of the time, and Luxonic expects them to last as long as 200,000 hours. The long life of the fittings mean the lighting installation is pretty much maintenance-free, and a self-testing sy takes the work out of keeping the eme lighting maintained too.

Emergency optics Luxonic’s 2W LED-EM emergency fittings are used throughout the building, with different optics for open areas and corridors, providing emergency lighting in all areas from a small number of light points. The hotel’s chief engineer Calum Morrison says: ‘Even though we have dimmer switches with setbacks on them, we can dim up and down within the settings. So we’re an efficient building.’ Luxonic director Ray Conboy says: ‘We’re very happy with the way the hotel’s turned out. As a Manchester United fan myself I’ll be very happy and proud to bring my children and clients to this hotel before we see the football.’

www.luxreview.com

WATCH LUX’S VIDEO ON THE HOTEL FOOTBALL LIGHTING PROJECT ON OUR YOUTUBE CHANNEL.

youtube.com/luxmagazineuk


Discover the future…

Aurora’s journey commenced when wall switches were used to turn on luminaires (Lighting 1.0).

Human Engagement Individual recognition, beneficial for home or building security management and consumer interaction within a retail store. Product & Asset Tracking Benefits retailers and FMCGs by tracking the product from the minute it’s produced or purchased to the time it is disposed of, giving 360° life cycle visibility.

Follow Aurora as we discover the future of Lighting 3.0

t nsu en m mer Engage

+

Co

+

Environmental Occupancy Energy

+

Illumination

+

Aurora’s brands have been optimised and streamlined in preparation for entry into smart environments. Microlights, the group’s UK-based specialist retail company, and its products will be integrated under the Aurora brand. Combined expertise and products under one brand enables a consolidated approach and a complete range to accommodate five sectors: residential, hospitality, retail, commercial and industrial. Presenting clients with a one-stop-shop lighting solution, Liteworks will offer services from lighting design to aftercare, including expert field based maintenance and support.

+

AURORA IS TRANSFORMING!

RESIDENTIAL

Lighting is the most ubiquitous element in the built environment. As an existing, essential infrastructure element, lighting systems can readily form the backbone of an intelligent network of endpoints.

The integration of Gooee’s smartenabling technology into Aurora branded products takes a step closer to the next generation of lighting Lighting 3.0.

Environmental Intelligence Services Energy management, predictive maintenance, LED performance and occupancy detection.

HOSPITALITY

Lighting 3.0 is the future of light’s single network, and Aurora is on a journey to turn the vision into a reality, delivering Value Beyond Illumination.

The Aurora Group is the first OEM manufacturer to sign a long-term licence agreement with Gooee.

With Lighting 3.0 and Gooee Inside™, Aurora will globally deploy a conscious, connected network of lighting endpoints. Interoperable and openly accessible with third party systems or as a standalone installation, the benefits fall into three key categories:

RETAIL

Machine learning algorithms will discover insights and deliver scheduling recommendations to the user via a rules engine to reduce costs and enhance their experience within a residential, hospitality, retail, commercial or industrial application.

Gooee is the world’s first ‘full stack’ interoperable ecosystem of hardware and software components that will enable any LED lighting company to add intelligence to its product range and connect it to the Internet of Things.

Through reinvention and futuristic design, Aurora progressed into Lighting 2.0 — integrated LED luminaires controlled by third party, on-premise solutions.

COMMERCIAL

A single, essential network that eliminates the need for additional occupancy sensing, control solutions, and energy management whilst providing ‘Everything as a Service’.

Understanding the requirements of developers, architects, large organisations and retailers, Aurora, at an early stage, identified the need for an interoperable, scaleable, smart ecosystem. Collaborating with best-inclass partners was fundamental to driving innovation beyond legacy architectural solutions.

INDUSTRIAL

Imagine a world where a single network of intelligent, conscious endpoints monitor, sense and engage with human behaviour in their built environments like never before.


Pick up your copy of Aurora Lighting 2016 from Booth K6 at LuxLive

visit auroralighting.com


70 PROJECT MLM, IPSWICH

N-LIGHT® EC

Trilux Lateralo suspended fittings are used in the reception area and the meeting rooms

A smarter approach to

emergency lighting The N-light EC panel is a server rack mounted central component for Mackwell emergency lighting systems that works in harmony with general lighting operating on a smart building platform – the panel powers, monitors and communicates via category cable without the need for additional wiring. •

Simple diagnostic live health status

>VYRZ^P[OHTP_LKJVUÄN\YH[PVUVM maintained and non-maintained devices

Wiring is simple via a plug-in category cable MVYMHZ[JVZ[LќLJ[P]LPUZ[HSSH[PVU

-\SS`JVUÄN\YHISL

Network capability

N-light EC – innovation realised

Office lighting with a Distinctive suspended fittings make this office lighting project by Trilux stand out

Mackwell UK Vigo Place, Aldridge, West Midlands WS9 8UG. England Tel. +44 (0) 1922 458 255 sales@mackwell.com www.mackwell.com

www.luxreview.com

MANUFACTURED IN

UK

In association with


PROJECT 71

DIFFERENCE A

in Ipswich, the company moved into the new space in July, with 120 people working across three floors of the five-storey building. MLM was familiar with Trilux’s fittings, having worked with the company on a number of projects. The efficiency of the Trilux fittings was the first thing that attracted MLM, when they realised they could achieve a great look in the office and at the same time save £8,000 a year on running costs. Trilux’s Arimo LED panels are used throughout the office, and various versions of the distinctive V

s head of the building services division at engineering consultancy MLM, it’s Bawden Burrows’ job to ensure his clients’ buildings are in tip-top shape. So when it came to fitting out the company’s own offices in a newly converted maltings in Ipswich, he knew it had to be good. Burrows turned to lighting manufacturer Trilux to supply efficient, long-lasting and high-quality LED lighting for the new office. Having outgrown its previous premises elsewhere

www.luxreview.com


72 PROJECT MLM, IPSWICH

‘‘

The suspended fittings light up and down, and are transparent when unlit

We’ve had quite a few comments from clients on the suspended fittings. They’re pretty impressive” Bawden Burrows, MLM Lateralo suspended fitting are used in the reception area and meeting rooms. The shallow depth of the Arimo luminaire made it a good choice because of limited space in the building’s ceiling voids. The Lateralo, meanwhile, is a super-thin direct/ indirect fitting that throws light down on to desks and up to the ceiling. Some versions of the Lateralo complete the look by providing power through the suspension cables, so no separate power cable is visible. But its most eye-catching feature is that, when it’s turned off, the panel is transparent.

The right light The fittings were also chosen to provide good uniformity of light from the building’s relatively low ceilings. Burrows says: ‘The ceilings are quite low, and we didn’t want the space to feel oppressive. So it was about getting the right lighting and the right feel to function well as an office, and I think that’s what these fittings do. With the dimming it creates the right level of light for the space.’ One of the factors driving the choice of low-energy LED lighting was the government’s new Esos scheme, under which big businesses like MLM have to track their energy use and identify ways to cut it. Burrows says: ‘We’ve got to audit our energy use, so anything we can do to improve that has got to be something we focus on. This is what we do for clients.’ And to keep energy use even lower, the whole office uses movement and daylight sensors to ensure light only goes where it’s needed, when it’s needed. The installation of the new lighting and controls went ‘incredibly smoothly’, Burrows said. Steve Sutton, lighting projects engineer at Trilux, says: ‘We were pleased to be asked to be involved. There’s nothing more gratifying than when your clients choose your light fittings to be in their own workplace. You can’t get a much better recommendation than that. And it’s not every day you come across such stringent design requirements.’ The lighting scheme helps MLM’s new home make the right impression. Burrows says: ‘We’ve had quite a few comments from clients on the suspended fittings. As you walk into the office, they’re pretty impressive.’

www.luxreview.com

Movement and daylight sensors ensure light only goes where it’s needed


PROJECTS 73

EW N

AN VOLUTION

IN LED LIGHTING BRINGING YOU A

T R U E R E T R O F I T S O LU T I O N

LED

70W

60W

50W

45W

40W

30W

20W

REPLACEMENTS FOR

OUR NEW GU 10 & MR16 RANGE • 3.6W  7. 5W • • 2700K  5000K • • 25,000 HOUR LIFESPAN •  Dimmable options available  Amazing prices, unbeatable value  All lamps are fully and compliant

NEXT WORKING DAY DELIVERY 5YEAR WARRANTY 30DAY RETURNS

Shallow Arimo luminaires make the most of the building’s shallow ceiling voids

See our fantastic product range

trade@ledhut.co.uk

trade.ledhut.co.uk

0161 655 0660

www.luxreview.com


PROJECT THE EDGE, AMSTERDAM 75

with a roof

T

Mark Halper reports from an office building in Amsterdam which might just be the smartest in the world – and it’s all thanks to cutting-edge lighting technology

Above: Deloitte’s European HQ in Amsterdam might just be the smartest building in the world

LEDs, Deloitte also designed a power over Ethernet (PoE) system for the 6,000 LED luminaires across the building’s 14 floors, eight of which Deloitte occupies. PoE is a two-birds-with-one-stone technology that routes electricity to low-voltage digital devices via the standard Ethernet cables that also feed those devices with data. Engineers and IT departments have used it for years for things like printers and voice-over-IP phones. Now, with the advent of LEDs, pioneers like Sluiters are beginning to use it for lighting, too. It’s a big reason why Sluiters likes to refer to The Edge as ‘a computer with roof.’

V

im Sluiters is one of the few lighting users in the world who can testify to the virtues of connecting both electricity and data to his LED luminaires via the same cables. That’s because he’s one of the few practitioners of ‘power over Ethernet’. Maybe even the only one. Sluiters is the property manager for Deloitte at the consulting giant’s European headquarters in Amsterdam. The company is housed in an environmentally heralded new building called The Edge, where Deloitte is the anchor tenant, and played a key role in the technical design. The Edge opened in November, deploying a cornucopia of sustainable building practices such as solar power, heat pumps, wireless charge pads for phones and tablets, rainwater capture, a ‘breathing’ atrium, even gym treadmills connected to electricity generators. And, of course, LED lighting. But not just any LED lighting. Not happy to simply reap the considerable energy-saving and maintenance benefits of low-power, long-lasting

www.luxreview.com


76 PROJECT THE EDGE, AMSTERDAM

Workers can dim the ceiling lights with a smartphone app. The phone receives location information from lights so it knows which ones to adjust

‘We’re not only making the most sustainable building in the world, we’re also making a really high-tech IT-driven technical building,’ Sluiters says. ‘When you made a building five or ten years ago, the old main contractor – the builder – was in the lead. But nowadays, more and more, technical firms like Cisco or Philips or Deloitte are in the lead doing the new developments for the building because of all the technology that’s integrated. It’s all about big data, the internet of things.’ And lighting over Ethernet plays a major role in that.

Low voltage

www.luxreview.com

Realm of the senses Each PoE-enabled luminaire includes four sensors: one each for detecting light levels, temperature and occupancy, plus an infrared sensor that serves as emergency control in the event of a power failure. Those sensors provide the foundation for detecting things like exactly how much and when to crank up the heating or air conditioning, or when to turn off or dim the lights. That can lead to considerable saving. Deloitte also expects to save about 10 per cent on cleaning bills, because information that travels back through the Ethernet will tell facilities managers that a room remained unoccupied during the day and thus does not require attention. Real-time information should also help Deloitte improve its space efficiency. But the sensors and the Ethernet system are just part of the basket of goodies that puts Deloitte and The Edge on the vanguard of digital lighting technology. Employees can control the lights and the heating levels in their area using apps on their smartphones or tablet computers. When they push a button to, say, brighten the lights, their action will turn up the levels on the ceiling luminaires only in their immediate vicinity, and not on all of the lights on their floor. The system knows which lights to adjust because the phones are in constant contact with the LEDs via a positioning technology based on so-called visible light communication (VLC). VLC allows LED lights to send data through invisible modulations

V

While data collection is a huge driver in LED PoE systems, half the reason for implementing the technology is even more basic: LEDs run on low voltage and thus do not require conventional electrical mains cables. The benefits can start with cost: by doubling up on the use of Ethernet cables, users can save a bundle in electrical wiring costs by eliminating more costly conventional mains wiring and installation. Jacques Letzelter, Philips office lighting segment leader, estimates that PoE slashes installation time by 50 per cent, and cuts overall installation costs by about 25 per cent. There are tradeoffs, though. PoE lighting comes with its own upfront costs. LEDs, for instance, are still more expensive than conventional light sources. And wiring them to Ethernet is not free. ‘Of course you have to spend some extra money to do a really new thing and a new system,’ says Sluiters, who declines to say how much Deloitte spent on its PoE system at The Edge, where it has

signed a 15-year lease with German owners Deka Immobilien. ‘But in daily operations during 15 years, at the end, it’s much cheaper because of the efficiency of the building.’ Which explains the other half of the reasoning behind routing Ethernet to light bulbs. Deloitte has established its LED luminaires as vital nodes in a building-wide information technology system that will monitor and react to conditions inside. The ‘computer with a roof’ cuts its own costs as it improves efficiencies on a variety of operations such as lighting, heating and cooling, cleaning, and even room usage, which can be a challenge in a flexible ‘hot-desk’ environment like this – where 2,400 full-time employees share 1,100 desks.


UKLED Filament Technology 329,:68;:1.6424-;.95;(::6;0:53-6:0;84;,3,31;8.:;87903834692 361960:51:68;29,+);#623!:;48.:7;;19602:5;4/7;29,+5;97:;-2955;84 19+);22;4%;4/7;58960970;796-:;97:;59++.37:;5/(58798:;&38.;;14687422:0 073 :75);:;9254;04;96;:14;928:76983 :;796-:;/536-;9;14++:7;5/(58798:)

UKLED Street Lights # ;6:&;587::8;23-.8;796-:;35;## ;7:-358:7:0;960;,96/%918/7:0; 36;4/7;# ;,96/%918/736-;%913238);8;:,+245;(730-:2/;;8.74/-.;9 (:5+4!:;2:65;84;1461:68798:;8.:;23-.8;36;8.:;1477:18;+291:5;960;9 4305 -297:);.:;796-:;14653585;4%;&*;"&*;"&*;$"&*;8.:;796-:;196;(: 5::6;98;8.:;/;3 :;5.4&;36;4 :,(:7)

For more information on these lamps, and our full range, call 0808 198 2844 Keep an eye out for our upcoming new website: www.ukled-ltd.co.uk Visit us on Stand C3

  *;#6385;;;;+:;4/78*;37792;68:769834692;/536:55;97!*;955:6092:; 490*;74,(474/-.*;37792;; ; :2;"$"$; $;$'';;;9;"$'';'';';;;:,932;36%4 /!2:0280)14)/!;;;  


78 PROJECT THE EDGE, AMSTERDAM

of the light they emit, which can be picked up by a smartphone’s camera. Each luminaire sends out a unique code, so a user’s phone can detect which lights are nearby, and thus which ones to adjust (similar technology is being used in shops by the likes of Carrefour and Target – see page 14). Likewise, when a user wants to dial up the air conditioning, the VLC-equipped lights establish the user’s location, and the ventilating system responds just in that area. Then, things get a little more complex, because the phones do not connect directly back to the LEDs. Rather, when a user’s command leaves the smartphone, it travels via Wi-Fi to a nearby hub, which then routes the command to the building’s lighting or heating controls via the wired networked system. In the case of lighting, the command travels back to the nearby ceiling luminaires over Ethernet, thus completing the VLC-originated circle with a final PoE connection. LED, VLC and PoE all wrapped up in one slick, ultra-digital, seamless modern lighting system. Can it really be that easy? ‘You have to work hard, especially because we are the first ones in the world to have this system installed,’ says Sluiters. It’s totally new for us, for Philips, for everybody. The trick is to get it in place, to get it properly working, and to get all the data out of it, to get all the things we promised each other. It’s hard work to get such a system working. But it works That’s the good news.’ The technology is successfull doing just about everything that Deloitte prescribed, says Sluiters. But as you’d expect with a first-of-its-kind system, there are kinks. For instance, the smartphone control system does not allow a user to outright turn off a luminaire, because that would disable the VLC (in

Above: Most of the building is occupied by Deloitte

Below: Sensors next to these LED lights keep an eye on motion, temperature and light levels, and include a backup infrared control

contrast, if the lights switch off because a room is empty and switch back on again when someone enters, the VLC will work). ‘We’re working on that,’ says Sluiters.

The future Sluiters would like to be able to provide even cleverer services and benefits by tapping into data on users’ phones – but before that happens, there are privacy concerns to overcome (see box). In another prediction, Sluiters says that suppliers such as Philips will start to offer intelligent lighting-based building management systems on a service basis, rather than as a product. Philips is already marketing VLC systems to retailers in that manner; office buildings will likely follow the same model. But for Deloitte, the future is now, in the form of PoE combined with VLC.

BEWARE BIG BROTHER Deloitte’s Tim Sluiters looks forward to being able to dip into users’ smartphones to better match up information about their own building use and habits with general building operations – in much the same way retailers would like to tie a customer’s shopping history and loyalty card information into the VLC and thus more intelligently ping and direct in-store shoppers to promotions of interest to them. ‘There’s one really big wish we have – that we can also use the personal data off the phone,’ says Sluiters. The current road block is not technological.

www.luxreview.com

‘We don’t allow this [because] there are privacy laws, and of course we obey them in Deloitte,’ he explains. ‘But when we are allowed to do so, then really interesting things [can] happen. Then the building and the lighting system can talk to you. You get active information from the building about how you use the building. For example, when you enter and your iPhone is saying “I see you have a meeting on the first floor”, and then it says “you are one hour early, so I’ve booked you a desk nearby the meeting room on the first floor, and by the way your colleagues are there there and there”’.

That’s a bit Big Brother, isn’t it? ‘That’s why there is a big discussion about privacy,’ allows Sluiters, who says that as with many cyber technologies, there’s always a potential ‘dark side’, and that it will be important to assure security that keeps out hackers. ‘We’ll use it only to make life simpler and easier in the building, and not for the big bosses to control you and looking at where your are,’ he says. At the moment, it’s moot, because as Sluiters notes, it is outlawed. ‘It will become mainstream, but we don’t know when’, he says.


Lighting solutions, trusted by professionals • GU10 - high efficacy up to 85lm/W

• Anti-glare AR111 mimicking the effect of traditional halogen

• High quality dichroic MR16 lamps to deliver a high quality beam without any noticeable heatsink

• Easy to install LED track lights for retail and museum lighting

• High quality LED tubes

• Flicker free LED panels

• Cost effective recessed downlights

• High quality recessed spotlights

www.verbatim.com


OPTIMISE YOUR SYSTEM COSTS tŽŶĚĞƌŝŶŐŝĨƚŚĞƌĞ͛ƐĂŶĂůƚĞƌŶĂƟǀĞƐŽůƵƟŽŶƚŽŽīƚŚĞƐŚĞůĨƐƚĂŶĚĂƌĚ>ůŝŐŚƚĞŶŐŝŶĞƐ͍ŽĞƐLJŽƵƌ ƉƌŽĚƵĐƚĚĞƐĞƌǀĞŵŽƌĞ͍ ŽŶ͛ƚĐŽŵƉƌŽŵŝƐĞLJŽƵƌƉƌŽĚƵĐƚďLJďƵŝůĚŝŶŐŝŶĐŽƐƚĂŶĚĨŽůůŽǁŝŶŐƚŚĞĐƌŽǁĚ͘^ƚĞƉĂǁĂLJĨƌŽŵŵĂŬŝŶŐ ĚŽĂŶĚƐĂLJŚĞůůŽƚŽĂĐƵƐƚŽŵ>ƐŽůƵƟŽŶĨƌŽŵ&ŽƌŐĞƵƌŽƉĂ͘ tĞƵŶĚĞƌƐƚĂŶĚƚŚĂƚĐƵƫŶŐŽƵƚƵŶŶĞĐĞƐƐĂƌLJĐŽƐƚŝƐ ĨƵŶĚĂŵĞŶƚĂůǁŚĞŶŝƚĐŽŵĞƐƚŽƉƌŽĚƵĐŝŶŐLJŽƵƌŽǁŶ ůŝŐŚƟŶŐƉƌŽĚƵĐƚ͘dŚĂƚ͛ƐǁŚLJǁĞŽƉƟŵŝƐĞLJŽƵƌ ƐLJƐƚĞŵĐŽƐƚƐ͕ĐƵƚŽƵƚĂĚĚŝƟŽŶĂůĐŽŵƉŽŶĞŶƚƐ͕ƐŝŵƉůŝĨLJ ƉƌŽĐƵƌĞŵĞŶƚĂŶĚŵĂŬĞLJŽƵƌůŝĨĞĞĂƐŝĞƌĂůŽŶŐƚŚĞǁĂLJ͘ tŝƚŚĂĐƵƐƚŽŵ>ůŝŐŚƚĞŶŐŝŶĞĂŶLJƚŚŝŶŐŝƐƉŽƐƐŝďůĞ͘ LJƐŝŵƉůLJŝŶĐŽƌƉŽƌĂƟŶŐLJŽƵƌŽǁŶďƌĂŶĚLJŽƵĐĂŶŵĂŬĞ ĂǀĞƌLJĐŽŶĮĚĞŶƚƐƚĂƚĞŵĞŶƚĂŶĚĚŝīĞƌĞŶƟĂƚĞLJŽƵƌƐĞůĨ ĨƌŽŵLJŽƵƌĐŽŵƉĞƟƟŽŶ͘dĂŬĞĂƐƚĞƉĨƵƌƚŚĞƌĂŶĚůĞƚƵƐ ŵĂŶƵĨĂĐƚƵƌĞĂƐŽůƵƟŽŶǁŚĞƌĞƐŝnjĞ͕ƐŚĂƉĞ͕ ĐŽŶŶĞĐƟŽŶ͕>ƚLJƉĞĂŶĚƉĞƌĨŽƌŵĂŶĐĞĂƌĞĂůů ĐĂƌĞĨƵůůLJ ĚĞƐŝŐŶĞĚ ƐƉĞĐŝĮĐĂůůLJ ĨŽƌ LJŽƵƌ ƉƌŽĚƵĐƚ ĂŶĚ LJŽƵ͛ǀĞŐŽƚƚŚĞƵůƟŵĂƚĞ>ƐŽůƵƟŽŶŵĞĞƟŶŐĂůůLJŽƵƌ ŽďũĞĐƟǀĞƐĂŶĚƉƌŽǀŝĚŝŶŐLJŽƵǁŝƚŚĞŶǀŝĂďůĞh^WƐ͘ LJǁŽƌŬŝŶŐǁŝƚŚLJŽƵĂŶĚƵŶĚĞƌƐƚĂŶĚŝŶŐLJŽƵƌƉƌŽĚƵĐƚ ǁĞ ĞǀĂůƵĂƚĞ Ăůů ƉŽƐƐŝďŝůŝƟĞƐ ƚŽ ŝŶĐƌĞĂƐĞ ĞĸĐŝĞŶĐŝĞƐ ĂŶĚƌĞĚƵĐĞŽǀĞƌĂůůƐLJƐƚĞŵĐŽƐƚƐ͘

/ŶƵŶĚĞƌƐƚĂŶĚŝŶŐƚŚĞŵĞĐŚĂŶŝĐƐ͕ƚŚĞƌŵĂů ĐŚĂƌĂĐƚĞƌŝƐƟĐƐ͕ŵĂƚĞƌŝĂůƐ͕ĂŶĚƉĞƌĨŽƌŵĂŶĐĞ ŽďũĞĐƟǀĞƐŽĨLJŽƵƌƉƌŽĚƵĐƚǁĞǁŝůůĞŶƐƵƌĞƚŚĂƚǁĞ ŽƉƟŵŝƐĞWŵĂƚĞƌŝĂůƐĂŶĚƐŝnjĞ͕ƐĞůĞĐƚƚŚĞďĞƐƚ> ĨŽƌ ƚŚĞ ũŽď ĂŶĚ ĚĞƐŝŐŶ ŽŶͲďŽĂƌĚ ĞůĞĐƚƌŽŶŝĐƐ͕ ǁĞ͛ůů ĞǀĞŶĚĞƐŝŐŶĂŶĚŵĂŶƵĨĂĐƚƵƌĞƚŚĞŽƉƟĐĂů ĂƌƌĂŶŐĞŵĞŶƚďĞĨŽƌĞƉƌĞĐŝƐŝŽŶĂƐƐĞŵďůŝŶŐƚŚĞ ĐŽŵƉůĞƚĞƐŽůƵƟŽŶ͘


KƵƌĐƵƐƚŽŵŽƉƟĐƐĞƌǀŝĐĞŝƐĂǀĞƌLJĞīĞĐƟǀĞǁĂLJƚŽ ƌĞĂůůLJƌĞĚƵĐĞƐLJƐƚĞŵĐŽƐƚƐĂŶĚŝŶĐƌĞĂƐĞĞĸĐŝĞŶĐŝĞƐ͘ LJŵĂŬŝŶŐďĞƩĞƌĂŶĚŵŽƌĞĞĸĐŝĞŶƚƵƐĞŽĨƚŚĞ ĞŵŝƩĞĚůŝŐŚƚLJŽƵĐĂŶƌĞĚƵĐĞƚŚĞŶƵŵďĞƌŽĨ>ƐLJŽƵ ŶĞĞĚ͕ǁŝƚŚŽƵƚŝŵƉĂĐƟŶŐŽŶƉĞƌĨŽƌŵĂŶĐĞ͕ĞĸĐĂĐLJŽƌ ůŝŐŚƚĚŝƐƚƌŝďƵƟŽŶ͘dŚĞŽƉƟĐĐĂŶĞǀĞŶďĞĐŽŵĞĂŶ ŝŶƚĞŐƌĂů ƉĂƌƚ ŽĨ LJŽƵƌ ƉƌŽĚƵĐƚ͕ ĨŽƌŵŝŶŐ ƉĂƌƚ ŽĨ ƚŚĞ ƐƚƌƵĐƚƵƌĞŽĨƚŚĞůƵŵŝŶĂŝƌĞ͕ŵŝŶŝŵŝƐŝŶŐŽƌŝŶĚĞĞĚ ĞůŝŵŝŶĂƟŶŐƚŚĞŶĞĞĚĨŽƌƐĞĂůŝŶŐŐĂƐŬĞƚƐ͘ ůůLJŽƵŶĞĞĚƚŽĚŽŝƐƚĞůůƵƐLJŽƵƌLJŽƵƌƌĞƋƵŝƌĞŵĞŶƚƐ ĂŶĚǁĞ͛ůůĚŽƚŚĞŚĂƌĚǁŽƌŬ͘ZĞĚƵĐĞLJŽƵƌĞīŽƌƚ͕ďŝůů ŽĨŵĂƚĞƌŝĂůƐĂŶĚĐŽƐƚƐǁŚŝůƐƚŝŶĐƌĞĂƐŝŶŐƉĞƌĨŽŵĂŶĐĞ͕ LJŽƵƌh^WƐĂŶĚLJŽƵƌƐĂůĞƐ͘ >Ğƚ&ŽƌŐĞƵƌŽƉĂŚĞůƉLJŽƵƐƚĂŶĚŽƵƚĨƌŽŵƚŚĞĐƌŽǁĚ͊

BOM BOM

REDUCE YOUR BOM SIGNIFICANTLY

CLEVER LIGHT SOLUTIONS +44 (0)1229 580000 sales@forge-europa.co.uk www.forge-europa.co.uk

£££££ REDUCE YOUR COSTS

REDUCE OPERATING TEMPERATURES

USP IMPROVE PERFORMANCE

IMPROVE EFFICIENCIES

GAIN A UNIQUE SELLING POINT

WE WILL OPTIMISE YOUR SYSTEM COSTS

- VISIT LUXLIVE STAND H5 TO FIND OUT HOW


Experience the fascination of light

Visit us at stand R39

selux.com


PROJECT FERA RESTAURANT, CLARIDGE’S, LONDON 83

lighting tricks that make this restaurant shine

There are clever little lighting effects all around the Lux Award-nominated Fera restaurant at London’s Claridge’s hotel – but not a fitting in sight. Katerina Chanioti is our guide V www.luxreview.com


84 PROJECT FERA RESTAURANT, CLARIDGE’S

T

he objective for the lighting at the new Fera restaurant at Claridge’s was to create an elegant, young and fresh interior in the double-height space. We wanted to respect the art deco glamour of the hotel by keeping obvious interventions to a minimum, which is why, although there’s light all around, you can hardly see any fittings. The scheme has been shortlisted for Hospitality and Leisure Lighting Project of the Year at this year’s Lux Awards (see page 53). We worked closely with interior designer Guy Oliver of Oliver Laws to celebrate the art deco styling in new ways, by concealing lights seamlessly into all the details for maximum visual impact, and by creating a scheme that could subtly change throughout the day. Here are 10 things we did to create the quintessential lighting effect at Fera.

2

1

THE ‘SECRET’ ENTRANCE The ‘secret’ entrance to Fera – off a corridor in Claridge’s

COOL AND WARM The journey into the restaurant begins when guests step through a small doorway from one of the corridors in Claridge’s. A tiny space – once used for storage – now provides the first impression of Fera. Surrounded by a red velvet curtain, the restaurant’s name Fera (Latin for wild), is projected on to the marble floor by a framing projector hidden in the ceiling. It’s the first indication of what’s happening inside.

3

RECLAIMED FITTINGS These fins used to decorate the restaurant walls – now they have a new life as diffusers

Light changes through the day to create the right mood

The rotunda’s ribbed glass entrance to the main restaurant is backlit by LED strip. The colour temperature of the strip is tuneable, so the light can shift from 3000K at lunchtime, when daylight is still coming through the windows, to a warm and intimate 2200K at night – an almost candle-like in quality.

www.luxreview.com

After the theatrical entrance, guests come into a stunning rotunda. The lighting here is focused on the historic gilded ceiling, using the old pencil-shaped fins that once decorated the walls throughout the restaurant, and have now been reused as diffusers to cover a light strip, creating a soft, diffuse glow around the perimeter. The only other light in the rotunda is a downlight set deep in the ceiling rose to pinspot the marble floor with the pattern that recalls the restaurant’s name.


One of the UK’s leading companies for PCB & LED assembly & electronic contact manufacturing

Whatever you throw at us

ace Surfunt mo

...we’ll deal with it Calmly. Efficiently. Successfully. You’ll enjoy working with PSL. Whatever challenge you XLVS[EXYW]SY´PP½RHXLEX[IVIWTSRH[MXLETSWMXMZI GERHSEXXMXYHIXLEXEP[E]WHIPMZIVWVIWYPXW Need PCBs from 50mm to 1.6 metres on a single board? 2STVSFPIQ¯MRJEGX[I[IVIXLI½VWX9/JEGMPMX] XSHSXLMW Require a bespoke box-build service in addition to basic board production? 7YVI¯ERH[IGERWLMTHMVIGXP]XS]SYVGYWXSQIV Want it all handled from one UK location, without compromising quality or price? =SY´ZIGSQIXSXLIVMKLXTPEGI

Visit us at LUX Live 2015 Stand D29

18 - 19 November 2015 |)\'IP0SRHSR

Visit www.printsys.co.uk or call 01438 311 211 to f ind out what we can do for your business

LE

PCBs

Ds

Dou b side le d

Big s rd a o B

Fle boa xi rds


86 PROJECT FERA RESTAURANT, CLARIDGE’S

4

5

OLD AND NEW An LED strip hidden beneath the shelf lights up the niche

Other elements that were reused in the main restaurant area are the gold-leaf-covered niches, which now glow thanks to a backlit shelf set into their base. Inside the shelf is a bare LED strip – the shelf’s mirrored edges conceal the dots, creating a homogeneous effect. The wall lights that frame the niches are another feature that has been refurbished and reused.

6

A BURST OF SUNLIGHT

LAYERS OF LIGHT Discreet lights under the banquettes create an intimate feel

The main restaurant area is double-height, but because it’s lit at multiple layers and levels, it still has an intimate atmosphere. One of the low-level lighting elements used is the glow underneath the banquettes.

7

DISCREET SPOTLIGHTS

The laylights are new – but based on the original ceiling designs in the venue

Hidden spots light each table individually

The drama of the double-height space is emphasised by the impressive backlit sunburst laylights. These use the same tuneable LED strips, again cooler during the day and warmer at night. Two separately controlled inner and outer rings of strip are used to give contrast and life to the skylight.

www.luxreview.com

Detailed within the beams behind what is disguised as dark grilles for ventilation are the remote-controlled pinspots that focus on each table, creating an intimate feeling in the restaurant while remaining completely concealed.


Straight lines surface, recessed or suspended in 4 modular lengths 600mm 900mm 1200mm 1500mm

angles to your custom specification

and dangles uplight or downlight

Linialite. An outstanding new modular LED opportunity for OEMs Available in 4 modular lengths and a choice of 6 optics, Linialite is an innovative new modular LED luminaire system designed to provide uninterrupted lines of light for commercial applications. Ensuring minimal visual impact with maximum lumen effectiveness, Linialite is made available in standard configurations or can be fabricated to ‘end customer’ design/specification.

4 modular lengths

Suspended, surface or recessed mounting

Energy efficient LEDs

Optional DALI dimming

Integral emergency versions (standard or self-test/DALI)

Linialite can be suspended, surface mounted or recessed, and the high levels of illumination are achieved by utilising the most up-to-date LEDs and advanced diffuser optics including opal, microprism, microlinear and micro louvre.

Another range of advanced LED luminaires for the specification market ...available only to OEMs!

01268 415828

www.jordanreflectors.co.uk

● Unique

‘any’ angle intersections

Uplighting ●

Choice of 6 optic diffusers


88 PROJECT FERA RESTAURANT, CLARIDGE’S

8

MAKING IRONWORK SPARKLE

9

INVISIBLE LIGHT

An invisible light source makes the brass rail glow

The tables closer to the windows are on a slightly raised level, separated from the rest of the restaurant area by intricate brass rails. These are given a sparkle thanks to localised lighting carefully detailed into them, bringing the scale to a human level. Again, the detailing conceals the source of the light completely.

10

The picture light can’t be seen, but the mural is beautifully lit

A special challenge was to light the gigantic eight by four metre mural by American artist Lynn Myers, which creates the background for the whole restaurant. It is cleverly lit with a large bespoke picture light, carefully positioned and finished to blend with the background finishes.

CREATING DRAMA WITH SHADOWS

OKATERINA CHANIOTI is a senior lighting designer at Lighting Design International. She’ll be speaking about the lighting for Fera at LuxLive on 18 November – turn to page 38 for the full programme. www.luxlive.co.uk

2015 Light and shadow play on the tree at the centre of Fera

Finally, in the centre of the restaurant is a real tree, another reminder of the origin of the restaurant’s theme. The tree is dramatically lit from above and below, throwing shadows on to the ceiling and floor, and creating a central focal point.

www.luxreview.com

Interior Design: Guy Oliver, Oliver Laws Photos: Derry Moore


90 HEALTHY WORKPLACES

6 The right lighting in an office can make all the difference – like in this Berlin office lit by Selux

www.luxreview.com

lighting hacks for healthier, more productive workplaces

I

n the summer, there’s light all around us – we take it for granted until those dark winter months come along. The sheer lack of sunlight can be depressing. Every year we experience this longing for summer, craving those long, bright days when we feel energetic and in a good mood. We’re well past the longest day of 2015, and the days are getting shorter. But the good news is that the right artificial lighting in your workplace can help you through. Good lighting creates pleasant working conditions in a functional and atmospheric way. Satisfaction and efficiency will improve if you make sure you have enough daylight intake and a well-lit office space. Plus, your productivity will be positively affected by well-designed illumination. Artificial lighting that does not just help you see, but also meets your biological lighting needs, is the future of office lighting.

Here are six lighting hacks to keep you healthy and alert through those dark winter days.

1

CREATE ATMOSPHERES WHERE YOUR IDEAS CAN DEVELOP

We’re all attracted to light, and there isn’t any other medium that has as big an influence on our bodies and minds as light. Both daylight and artificial light play a key role in our health and wellbeing. Increasingly, companies face the question of how they can improve staff wellbeing and create a dynamic, creative and motivating environment. The design of the office space plays a vital role, as evidenced by a study from Germany’s Fraunhofer Institute for Industrial Engineering. The research shows that in companies with a high standard of interior design, productivity can increase by up to 36 per cent. Who wouldn’t like to


ELP – Advanced Emergency Lighting Solutions

Style made practical! G

Luminaires

G

Conversion Equipment (LED and Fluorescent — including DALI versions)

G

Test Systems

G

LED products

G

G

Central Systems

Conversion Service to ICEL 1004

Emergency Lighting Products Limited Parbrook House, Gilmans Industrial Estate, Billingshurst, West Sussex, RH14 9EZ Tel: +44 1403 786601 Fax: +44 1403 786602 e-mail:sales@elp.uk.com

www.elp.uk.com

DALI


92 HEALTHY WORKPLACES

We constantly find ourselves surrounded by light. It is much more than just illumination. It inspires, attracts, enables communication, sets a mood, and has emotional qualities. When this knowledge transcends into our built environment, pleasant atmospheres are created. Think of a visit to a theatre, a restaurant, or nightclub. These experiences are shaped by light. Good lighting enhances the mood and desirability of spaces, consequently contributing to people’s sense of wellbeing. Every building and space expresses and communicates an identity, and sometimes also a corporate value. Good lighting should be a part of this, because what other component can enhance an atmosphere as much as light can?

OP

T

3

TIP

O Vertical surface illumination, preferably on large wall surfaces, is vital to create a sense of space and depth. It also gives a visual resting point for the eyes and adds a pleasant atmosphere to the working environment. Too often, office environments are insufficiently lit, not only from the perspective of biological lighting needs but also from an architectural one, where the room feels smaller due to inadequate lighting. The graph below shows how office workers assessed their working environments – showing which aspects are important to them and how satisfied they are with each aspect. As you can see, lighting is rated the most important of all the aspects mentioned, but there’s plenty of room for it to improve.

Create a mixture of different lighting. This will guarantee flexible change of light setting. Use illumination that supports a space’s identity

P

TO

TIP

Have a light for general illumination, a standing luminaire that uplights the ceiling and a desk light

FROM HOMO SAPIENS TO HOMO OFFICUNUS

In today’s world, we spend many hours working in biotopes – surroundings created by humans. Instead of trying to adapt ourselves to our creations, we should adapt these biotopes to our needs. Sufficient light is one of those needs. So how can you create a setting that increases your satisfaction and productivity? Here are a few guidelines: O Take the biological quality of lighting into account. Light synchronises the circadian rhythm. It influences our sleep-wake cycle and this has a big influence on our health and productivity. O Adapt the lighting to the daytime and season, as well as to the individual needs of the user.

GET THE BEST SPOT IN THE HOUSE

4

People really care about the lighting where they work – and think it could be a lot better

Are you based in a co-working space? And is there a flexible desk policy? Choosing the right spot in the house can go a long way. Pick a place with a lot of daylight. It is recommended that around three per cent daylight reaches a person’s working area. However, in most offices this is not the case. Daylight gives an emotional quality to a space and the possibility to look outside is an added bonus. If you can, choose a spot near the window. But make sure that there is sun shading to prevent harsh reflections on your computer screen.

OP

T

5

TIP

Take the window seat, north, east or west facing

LIGHT AGAINST THE BLUES

V

About 80 per cent of all information is taken in through our eyes. Until recently it was believed that our eyes used two kinds of photoreceptors – rods and cones – to receive light, but a decade ago, a third kind, called ganglion cells, was discovered. Unlike rods and cones, these cells do not contribute directly to our sight; they are nevertheless light dependent and help to regulate our circadian rhythm. So light is not just a prerequisite for seeing, but is also an important zeitgeberr (timer) and a regulator for our bodies. Data based on a study from Sedus together with research institute Hagstotz ITM

www.luxreview.com


Helvar lighting control solutions From the light source, to the system, to the user freeDim create your own personal lighting solution, which mimics daylight, saves energy and energises you at the same time.

freeDim

iDim Orbit a complete room lighting control solution in a single sensor using the latest technology. It’s more than just a stand-alone sensor! Visit us on stand number H29 For more information visit www.helvar.co.uk or email us at uksystemsales@helvar.com

ORBIT

connecting light to your space


94 HEALTHY WORKPLACES

‘‘

Daylight (10000K) and sunset (2000K)

Photo: Sabine De Schutter

In companies with a high standard of interior design, productivity can increase”

Unfortunately, we often don’t get the light intake we actually need, especially during the darker time of the year, resulting in the winter blues or seasonal affective disorder (SAD) – a type of depression linked to a lack of light. It leaves people feeling moody and lacking energy. Most people who suffer from SAD benefit from bright light treatment. Even in a workplace setting, light therapy makes people feel more awake and energized. It is found that an illumination that goes up to 2000 lux at the working area in the morning and the afternoon, reduces the physiological reaction of stress and gives an energising effect to the body. In comparison, most working areas are lit to a standard 500 lux. If you want to check the amount of lux at your desk, download a lux meter app. It’s not very precise, but it gives you an idea on how little light we actually have indoors. Not only is more light needed, but also the colour temperature of the lighting plays a role. The artificial lighting should correspond to the colour temperature of the daylight. At noon the sky’s colour is a very cool 10000K but at sunset it is a much warmer 2000K (see photos above). Additionally lighting should reflect indirectly into the eyes from large surfaces, such as walls and ceilings.

OP

T

6

TIP

Try to catch enough daylight at any time of the year. Go outside for a break, get off a stop earlier from the subway and walk the rest of the way to the office. You should have at least half an hour of daylight a day

LIGHT, COFFEE, ACTION!

A deadline and still a lot of work ahead, no time to sleep! Just as lighting can disrupt your sleeping pattern, it can also boost your activity.

www.luxreview.com

If you have already followed the above-mentioned advice for biologically effective lighting than you’re already on the right path. If you need to pull an allnighter, increase the light intensity and the quantity of bluish white light in the room. Almost done with your work? Change the setting to warm, low-intensity lighting to calm you down. You might also have experienced that when you work late on a computer or tablet it is difficult to sleep afterwards. The cause of this is the high blue content of the backlit screens. Blue light at night causes an out-of-phase circadian rhythm, and is a health hazard. So use this lighting hack consciously. There are some applications you can install that correlate the screen’s brightness and colour, to the daylight of your location. F.lux, for example (available at justgetflux.com), works on most systems, or the Twilight app (available in the Google Play Store) reduces the amount of blue lighting on your Android phone.

OP

T

TIP

Have different lamp types and colour temperatures at your working area. Warm light sources at your desk can be combined with indirect and general lighting with different colour temperatures, for example 3500K and 5000K

OSABINE DE SCHUTTER is a Berlin-based lighting architect with a background in interior design, who runs her own architectural lighting design studio. She’s also a former SLL Young Lighter of the Year. Twitter: @sabine_ds www.sabinedeschutter.com


HEALTHY WORKPLACES 91

Good lighting can make working environments more productive. Lighting designer Sabine De Schutter shares six tips to keep you healthy and alert through those dark winter days see their efďŹ ciency skyrocket? Additionally, comprehensive research from the Light Right Consortium came to the conclusion that light increases productivity. Only around 70 per cent of the interviewees stated that working at workstations with purely downward lighting was comfortable. In comparison, 91 per cent found a lighting atmosphere with direct/indirect lighting and a high quantity of vertical lit surfaces pleasing. Moreover, if the desk light is individually controllable, people feel motivated and work with greater accuracy.

TIP

2

Create a lighting atmosphere with direct and indirect lighting. Avoid having only downwards-directed illumination

LIGHT FOR PEOPLE, NOT JUST TASKS

V

Lighting is often just seen as a necessity to enable us to see, but in fact it has many more qualities than the obvious ones. We should move away from just thinking of lighting for tasks and focus on creating light settings Light sets the mood for people. Today, most people work indoors, and spends almost the entire day inside, in an unnaturally dark setting. Our light intake is responsible for sleeping and feeling well, and affects our productivity. When there is a lack of natural light to help us tell the time of day, then our circadian rhythm (body clock) loses its pace, with tiredness and listlessness as a result.

Photo: Vanessa Pedroso

P

TO

www.luxreview.com


98 DESIGN CLINIC

1

CLEANEST CEILING

ALAN TULLA TECHNICAL EDITOR

DESIGN CLINIC Three ways to light a kitchen diner In association with

Alan Tulla presents three alternative lighting installations

N

ewly-built houses and apartments are smaller than older ones. On the other hand, people continually accumulate more stuff, so space indoors See the luminaires featured is at a premium for us all. One result is here at jcc.co.uk that the kitchen area and eating area in modern houses are often combined. Older houses tended to have separate kitchens, but nowadays there is much more emphasis on shared spaces. To get the kitchen diner right, you need to think about both the function – preparing and cooking food – and the appearance so it looks good while you are eating. To quote William Morris, ‘Have nothing in your house that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful.’ That applies equally to the lighting. Turning to function first, putting luminaires only in the centre of the kitchen means that you will almost certainly be working in your own shadow. You need light over each work area and this may well mean extra lighting under the shelving. In my opinion, there’s no such thing as too much illumination when you are using a sharp knife or an electric blender. Kitchens also have to be clean, so you don’t want any dark corners. A lot of making it look good is down to your own personal choices, but there are some guidelines. It’s always a good idea to switch the cooking and dining area separately. In that way, the cooking area can be dark and ‘unseen’ while you are eating. If you have a high ceiling, lighting on top of cabinets shining upwards can reduce the number of downlights required and provide general background lighting. Lighting inside glass cabinets is a good way of providing a soft, O Head to www.luxreview.com for more of Alan’s Design Clinics

www.luxreview.com

Too many kitchens nowadays suffer from ‘ceiling acne’ where the whole ceiling is covered with a grid of downlights. They used to be halogen but have now been replaced by GU10 LEDs. One reason that people use so many lamps is that the beam was quite narrow, and so you needed a lot to achieve any sort of uniform illumination. JCC have cleverly got around this by using a more powerful downlight with a wider beam. The result is that far fewer are needed in a given size space than a conventional LED downlight. The FGLED10 emits 850lm and has a 60-degree beam. It is also fire-rated and has an ingress protection rating of IP65. The worktops under the cupboards use another clever product, the super-slim Skyblade. It’s less than 8mm thick and provides bags of light just where you need it. It is powered by edge-lit technology and is modular so you can connect multiple units from one driver.

TECH SPEC Luminaires Predominantly JCC FGLED10 and Skyblade Optical control Various Electrical load <7W/m2 Pros Uncluttered ceiling Cons We’ve added some spotlights for extra sparkle


DESIGN CLINIC 99

2

BROAD SPREAD

This is very different in appearance from the first option. Instead of downlights, we have used surface-mounted circular units from JCC’s RadiaLED range. These are different from conventional units because the LEDs are mounted around the edge of the luminaire and shine inwards and across rather than simply placing the LEDs behind a diffuser. The RadiaLED gives a broad spread of diffused light across the whole kitchen area. A whole range of finishes and wattages is available to suit most applications. As contrast, we have used narrow-angle Starspot track lights over the dining area to highlight the table and plants. Again, a whole range of wattages and beam widths is available.

3

CONTROLLED

As in the first option, we have used the wide-angle FGLED10 downlight but this time we have switched them separately so that the kitchen area is Off. So too, are the Skyblade under the cabinets. JCC has a wide range of ceramic decorative wall lights. These can be fitted with halogen, CFL or LED retrofit lamps. For the dining area, we have used Roma wall mounted uplights and so the ceiling is completely free of any luminaires. If you wished, this could allow space for a decorative pendant, a modern chandelier or single spotlight. Switching off the kitchen lights means there is much more emphasis on the dining area. We have made the kickboard lights blue for extra interest. These Charion LED lights are normally used outdoors but they can equally be used inside as a simple, energy efficient way of giving a ‘lift’ to the cupboards.

TECH SPEC Luminaires JCC RadiaLED Style plus Starspot tracklights Optical control Various Electrical load <11W/m2 Pros High level of background and spot lighting Cons Uses more energy than the first option

TECH SPEC Luminaires JCC FGLED10 plus Roma Optical control Various Electrical load <8W/m2 Pros Clear ceiling Cons You might want to add a pendant over the dining table

www.luxreview.com


DESIGN CLINIC 101

1

DAYLIGHT HARVESTING

ALAN TULLA TECHNICAL EDITOR

DESIGN CLINIC Three ways to control light in a corridor In association with

Alan Tulla cuts corridor energy consumption using controls alone

T

his Design Clinic shows you three ways you can save energy in an corridor without compromising the quality of the lighting. We are not altering See the luminaires the light distribution, or lowering the CRI featured in this article at or using super cool light sources. Instead, www.ex-or.com we are using simple retrofitted controls – you will have to do a bit of rewiring though. I’m not the only person whose mind goes a bit blank when confronted with terms like multiple universes, nodes, interoperability and protocols. The secret is to keep things simple. Whenever you install controls, you save energy. This, in itself, is a good thing. In most cases, you also save money. This is an added benefit but the amount you save depends on factors such as the location, the design, the way the space is used, the combination of controls and the dimmability of the light source. If you are a heavy user of electricity, you can often save extra money by reducing energy at peak times. Some supermarkets save on their maximum demand tariff by reducing the air conditioning, or cooling to the chiller cabinets, for short periods of time. Our corridor is 3m wide and 2.8m high. It is lit to 200 lux using dimmable LED downlights with a dished opal diffuser. There are offices on one side and windows on the other. The same luminaires are used throughout. Only the type of control used has been changed. In fact, it is possible to combine all three controls to get maximum savings. One final point that shoulc be mentioned is ease of setup.

This is one of the easiest control options to understand. Quite simply, when there is enough daylight to light the corridor, the luminaires are dimmed or switched off. In essence, a photocell sensor monitors the brightness and dims the luminaires as required. Strictly speaking, the sensor is actually reading the luminance of the floor – the light reflected off the floor into the photocell. The amount varies not only with the illumination, but also with the colour/reflectance of the floor. Ex-Or has a sensor that can be calibrated to a specific lux level. The settings will change depending on whether the windows face north, south, east or west. People don’t like seeing the light output of a luminaire changing rapidly, especially in offices. You should ensure the fade up and down is done slowly. Daylight can vary quite quickly and Ex-Or includes what it calls a passing cloud timer. Depending on the window layout, it is worth considering whether all the luminaires should be in the same group. Finally, watch out for shadows. I worked in an office where each luminaire had a sensor and, at a certain time of day, one of the luminaires switched

TECH SPEC Control type Daylight harvesting Arrangement Usually one per line of luminaires Energy saving Typically, a stand-alone daylight harvesting system will save 10%

O Head to www.luxreview.com for more of Alan’s Design Clinics

www.luxreview.com


102 DESIGN CLINIC

2

PIR

3

CORRIDOR HOLD

Controls can sometimes be difficult to illustrate in a static image. After all, if the lights were switched off because noone was there, the image would be black. This option uses PIR controls so the luminaires only operate when people are using the corridor. There is no daylight, so the luminaires are at 100 per cent output. A useful feature is that instead of completely switching off when the corridor is empty, the lighting can be dimmed to 10 per cent output, saving most of the energy but still providing some security. Not all PIR detectors are the same, and this unit incorporates a lens mask so you can ‘aim’ the detector so it doesn’t trigger unnecessarily. This is particularly useful in open plan offices where you can create a virtual corridor which only triggers when people are passing through. For long corridors, it is worth grouping the luminaires so they don’t all trigger long before people get there. If you have ever done a Leni calculation, you will know that it includes a figure for the quiescent power load of the sensors. This is also known as the parasitic load. The Ex-Or unit used here has a particularly low rating of just 150mW.

If you have to work late at the office, it can be a bit spooky after dark if you are the only one there. If it is a large, open plan office, a properly designed scheme can dim the remoter areas without totally switching them off. More sophisticated PIR sensors have a dual function of being an absence detector by day and a presence detector by night. The Ex-Or unit has micro and macro movement detection such that small movements are detected in a reduced zone and larger movement over a wider area. However, when you have finished work, you may enter a dark corridor, and this is where the ‘corridor hold’ or ‘pseudo occupancy’ function is useful. This links the corridor lighting to the offices so there is low illumination, say 10 or 20 per cent output, all the time the offices are occupied. This gives staff a feeling of security because they can see an illuminated route from their workstation to the end of the corridor. The illustration shows that the first two offices are occupied and the corridor lights are dimmed to 10 per cent. When staff enter the corridor, the lights switch to 100 per cent output. When the corridor is once again empty, timers will reduce the illumination in the corridor to its default level.

TECH SPEC

TECH SPEC

Control type PIR Arrangement Can be used individually or control a group of luminaires Energy saving Varies enormously but can be 25% or even more

Control type Corridor hold Arrangement Linked to office lighting Energy saving Savings compared with having the corridor lights on and increased security compared with corridor totally off

www.luxreview.com


Serious about MPCBs MPCB Production • UK Based experts in thermal PCB manufacturing • Technical advise regarding material selection • Short lead-times • Exclusive Chinese MPCB partner for high volumes Phone: +44 (0) 2392 243000 Email: info@spiritcircuits.com Web: spiritcircuits.com


DESIGN CLINIC 105

1

EVERYTHING AT FULL OUTPUT

ALAN TULLA TECHNICAL EDITOR

DESIGN CLINIC Controlling light in a warehouse In association with

Controls are the key to efficient warehouse lighting, says Alan Tulla

A

lmost by definition, a warehouse is a large area. If there are people See the luminaires working there (as opposed to featured in this article at being automated) it must be illuminated www.ex-or.com well, so energy consumption can be high. In essence, there are two types of warehouse: those with racking and those without. Some are large open areas where goods, often on pallets, are stored no more than, say, 1.5m high. It’s a good idea to install more, lower wattage luminaires with a wide light distribution. They are installed close together for good vertical illumination. The other type of warehouse, which is very common, uses racking, often to a high level, maybe 6-10m. Our warehouse uses a combination of both. EN 12464 says a continuously occupied space where little perception of detail is required should be lit to 200 lx. Manned gangways/aisles should be lit to 150 lx. The vertical illuminance on the racks should also be 200 lx. One of the biggest savings to be made is in unoccupied aisles. I went to a distribution centre for a major wholesaler that had dozens of aisles that were a good 30m long. At any one time, only about a quarter of the aisles were occupied. These guys knew their controls and had installed movement detectors at the ends and along the aisles. When the aisle was empty, the luminaires dimmed to 10 per cent. As soon as someone entered, the luminaires switched to full brightness. Outside the aisles, savings can be made by zoning so only occupied areas are illuminated to full output. Our warehouse is 25 x 50m and 14m to the apex. It is lit to 200 lux using three types of luminaire.

This gives a general view of the whole warehouse fully lit. Like many warehouses, several types of luminaire are used. Above the tall aisles, the luminaires have a narrow oval shape that distributes the light along the aisles but minimises it in the other axis to avoid hot spots. These can be fitted with individual LightSpot HD sensors to track movement along the aisle. Alternatively, you can group the sensors. They can be controlled by Dali or DSI signals. At the ends, a mask can be fitted on the sensor so movement in the open area doesn’t trigger the aisle lights. In the open area, mounted at the same height, are high bays with a symmetrical distribution. It’s worth noting that the Ex-Or sensor is available for different mounting heights from 2.5-16m. Finally, there is a low-level section that is used for heavy goods or those that have hard-to-read labels.

TECH SPEC Control type Hi-Bay PIR for high-level luminaires plus standard mount in low area Arrangement Individual in aisles, linked in open area Energy saving Biggest savings are in aisles

O Head to www.luxreview.com for more of Alan’s Design Clinics

www.luxreview.com


106 DESIGN CLINIC

2

SELECTIVE

Controls can sometimes be difficult to illustrate in a static picture. If the lights were switched off, you would see nothing. This option uses PIR controls so the luminaires only operate when people are using the aisles. Here, the tall aisles have been switched off because no-one is using them. The low area in the foreground is at full brightness. This is switched by the standard HD sensor. This covers an area approximately 10m in diameter. Ex-Or is proud of the optics in its products and this unit will detect large movement at the edges of the area – when someone enters the space, for example – but the central area, about 7m in diameter, will detect small movements such as staff entering data into a notepad. The HD unit contains 155 detection points, three times as many as some on the market. The foreground open area is at 100 per cent because it is still in use, but it would be worth zoning those luminaires at the edges, especially in a larger warehouse.

3

NIGHT SHIFT

This is the night shift. Only a few staff are working. There is no activity in the foreground, so the luminaires are dimmed to 10 per cent. This saves energy but also means there is some illumination for safety reasons and to give the staff a feeling of security. Elsewhere, the luminaires are off or at 10 per cent. The luminaires are at 100 per cent all along the working aisle because the angle of the detector high up picks up all the movement. A useful feature of the LightSpot HD detector is that you can link a master detector to three bus sensors. Look for QuickLink in the literature. This means that data such as occupancy and light levels can be shared between the sensors. Each detector has its own memory chip that contains particular settings such as illumination level, timing and switching frequency. These settings can be altered from ground level using the QuickSet Pro controller. This controller can also download the recorded data and upload it to a computer or energy-management software.

TECH SPEC

TECH SPEC

Control type Single PIR Arrangement Mounted centrally Energy saving Can be significant with intermittent use

Control type High-level PIR Arrangement Master plus bus sensor Energy saving The greatest savings come from switching off what isn’t needed

One final point that has to be mentioned is ease of setup. With some other suppliers, commissioning can be a pain and may even require an outside specialist. Ex-Or has devoted a lot of effort developing its QuickSet Pro handheld setup controller.

www.luxreview.com


Emergency Lighting CONFERENCE 2016

og

rap

Did you know you could be fined or imprisoned if it doesn’t comply with the rules?

Dave Thrower/Reds hift Ph ot

Do you know who is responsible for emergency lighting in your building? hy

Managing an emergency lighting network carries with it significant responsibilities: You’ve got to comply with the latest legislation and best practice, keep energy and maintenance low and not least, ensure your building’s occupants are safe at all times. Coop

And, as the ‘responsible person’ under the Fire Safety Act, it’s also down to you to manage the risk assessments, testing, maintenance and all the associated documentation.

er

Lux has teamed up with the Industry Committee on Emergency Lighting to bring you this special one-day conference, where you’ll learn: O The latest emergency lighting rules and regulations O What you need to do to comply O How to choose the right emergency lighting products This one-day event is suitable for estates managers, facilities managers, property managers, energy managers, consulting engineers, designers and manufacturers.

THURSDAY 25 FEBRUARY 2016 | CAVENDISH CONFERENCE CENTRE, LONDON Organised by

in association with

Sponsored by

www.emergencylightingconference.com


REVIEWS LED GU10 LAMPS 109

REVIEWED:

LED GU10 LAMPS Lux’s technical editor Alan Tulla gathers 11 of the best LED GU10s – including lamps from Sylvania, Osram and Megaman – and sends them off to the lab for some serious testing. Read on to find out which ones came out best

N

owadays, it’s nigh-on impossible to buy a luminaire from the DIY sheds or a high street retailer that doesn’t have a GU10 cap – 12W lamps seem to have had their day as far as the mass retailers are concerned. It isn’t difficult to match the light output of a 20 or 35W halogen GU10, so we have only tested LED lamps from manufacturers that claim their products are equivalent to a 50W halogen. The European DIM2 regulation says that to make this claim, the LED GU10 lamp must emit more than 345 lm in a 90-degree cone. The total lumen output, including light that falls outside this cone, may be considerably higher. Some of the lamps tested emit over 500 lm, so they would clearly be seen as an improvement if you retrofitted them in an existing installation of halogen GU10s (with the same beam width). Ask the experts We’ve asked several experts, and our understanding is that all products on the market today must conform to DIM2. But we regularly hear of lamps that don’t. The problem for Joe Public is that the packaging of some lamps doesn’t say whether the lumen output quoted is the total emitted or just the output in the 90-degree cone. Some quote both figures. Reputable manufacturers use phrases like ‘usable lumens’ or ‘90-degree cone’ so you know what you are buying. However,

‘‘

until all suppliers mark their packaging clearly, it is impossible for the purchaser to make reliable comparisons between the different products. No wonder people buy the cheapest or the one quoting the biggest lumen value. The situation is made worse because there is no effective policing of the market. This, in effect, benefits the poor quality, low-cost suppliers to the detriment of the manufacturers of goodquality lamps. One more thing One last point to make is that a 90-degree cone isn’t really what you would call a spotlight. For the non-trigonometrists among you, that’s a two-metre-wide illuminated patch from a lamp one metre away. If you are as confused as I am by all the test standards that cover LEDs, there is a useful summary on the LIA website. Look for Technical Statement TS01. It’s nine pages long and covers existing and proposed European and US regulations and guidance.

www.luxreview.com

V

Our understanding is that all products on the market today must conform to DIM2. But we regularly hear of lamps that don’t”

GU10s vary a lot in colour and beam shape


110 REVIEWS LED GU10 LAMPS

Reviewed: LED GU10 lamps power factor. The best was Osram at 0.88, and the poorest were the Aurora and Bell at 0.52. Why does this matter? Because it means you are drawing more current than might be apparent from just looking at the wattage. An electrician complained to me about this because he had to resize all his fuses in a (large) domestic house purely because of equipment with a poor power factor. Before you buy any lamps, you should check what the beam looks like. Some have coloured edges or don’t have a smooth gradation of light from the centre to the edge. We were pleased to see that, generally, the performance was as claimed by the manufacturers. We measured the total light output. Note that we tested just one lamp from each supplier. There are tolerances in manufacturing and the lamp you buy may not perform exactly as the one we tested. However, these lamps are made by the million; so it would be surprising if they varied that much. LIA LABORATORIES

Our testing was done at the independent LIA Laboratories in Telford. Thanks to all the staff at LIA Labs for their help!

lialab.org.uk

www.luxreview.com

Bell slightly undersells itself inasmuch as the packaging indicates 6W consumption whereas we measured only 4.65W. However, the power factor was 0.52 and the measured lumen output 358 lm, just above the minimum 345 lm allowed by DIM2. The colour-rendering index is Ra 82.

OUTPUT 358 lm POWER 4.7W EFFICACY 76 lm/W CCT 3073K CRI 82 POWER FACTOR 0.52

***

INTEGRAL LED 2700K, 7.5W

AURORA ENLITE 3000K, 5W

The Enlite is a new range of lamps. What really sets it apart from the other lamps we tested is the efficacy of 96 lm/W – almost 500 lm from 5W. It also has a 60-degree beam, wider than the others tested, which makes it much more useful for lighting areas where you want a general spread of light.

BRITISH ELECTRIC LAMPS 3000K, 6W

OUTPUT 493 lm POWER 5.1W EFFICACY 96 lm/W CCT 2979K CRI 82 POWER FACTOR 0.52

****

Integral’s 7.5W lamp performed almost exactly as claimed on the box. 7.4W versus the 7.5W claimed and 499 lm instead of 500 lm. That’s what you call tight manufacturing tolerances. The CRI was 80 and the measured power factor was 0.76, better than most. The packaging quotes both total lumens and those in a 90-degree beam.

OUTPUT 499 lm POWER 7.4W EFFICACY 67 lm/W CCT 2633K CRI 80 POWER FACTOR 0.76

****


112 REVIEWS LED GU10 LAMPS

Reviewed: LED GU10 lamps KOSNIC LED

This is a good little lamp. The manufacturer quotes both total and 90-degree lumens on the package, 480 lm and 450 lm respectively. In fact it’s an understatement because we measured a total of 505 lm. Our sample consumed was 5.6W, not 7W. Bearing in mind it is 2700K, the measured 90 lm/W is remarkable. The 38-degree beam has quite a soft edge.

MEGAMAN 2800K, 7W

OUTPUT 505 lm POWER 5.6W EFFICACY 90 lm/W CCT 2723K CRI 83 POWER FACTOR 0.53

***

OSRAM PARATHOM 2700K, 5.3W

As you would expect from Osram, this lamp performed almost exactly as stated on the box – 5.15W, 2688K, 355 lm against a stated 350 lm. The power factor, at 0.88, was the highest we tested, so the electricians won’t have to worry about fuse sizes. In a way, Osram undersells itself because it doesn’t quote total lumens on the box, so a non-specialist might think it doesn’t perform as well as the cheaper competition.

www.luxreview.com

This particular 7W lamp consumed eight per cent more power and emitted nine per cent less light than the packaging indicated. The CRI was a whisker over 80. The CCT was pretty much as claimed at 2879K – the figure quoted was 2800K. The power factor was a respectable 0.67.

OUTPUT 500 lm POWER 7.6W EFFICACY 66 lm/W CCT 2879K CRI 82 POWER FACTOR 0.67

***

PHILIPS MASTERLED SPOT 4000K, 5.5W

OUTPUT 355 lm POWER 5.2W EFFICACY 68 lm/W CCT 2688K CRI 81 POWER FACTOR 0.88

****

We tested the Master LEDspot MV, which is nominally a 5.5W unit. The measured wattage on the samples was 5.4W with a power factor of 0.66. This lamp performed slightly better than the claims on the packaging would suggest, with a lumen output that was 8 per cent higher. It also had an Ra of 86; which is more than most products of this type.

OUTPUT 417 lm POWER 5.4W EFFICACY 77 lm/W CCT 3890K CRI 86 POWER FACTOR 0.66

****


Visit Harvard at

STAND C6

-RLQXVIRUFRÎ?HH FRPHEDFNIRUWKHSDUW\ PXVLF

Lighting products, enlightening solutions

HLEDs

Call us on: +44 (0) 113 383 1000

|

Email: sales@HarvardEng.com

|

Visit: www.HarvardEng.com


114 REVIEWS LED GU10 LAMPS

Reviewed: LED GU10 lamps SORAA BRILLIANT 3000K, 7.5W

This lamp had the highest wattage, but it also had almost the highest lumen output and CRI. We tested the 10-degree narrow spot and this produces a clean beam with a defined centre. This lamp is one of the Brilliant series, with a CRI of 80+ (Soraa is known for its Vivid range, with CRIs above 95). There is a range of clip-on lenses and accessories that can change the beam width or colour temperature.

SYLVANIA 5W REFLED ES50

OUTPUT 503 lm POWER 7.7W EFFICACY 66 lm/W CCT 2834K CRI 85 POWER FACTOR 0.78

****

VERBATIM 2700K, 6W

The packaging says it is equivalent to a 57W lamp, but certainly the 465 lm output (in a 90-degree cone) means it easily betters a 50W halogen GU10. You can see from the table that the efficacy is one of the best we tested. Cooler lamps would be even more efficient than the 2700K version we tested.

www.luxreview.com

This is a really good lamp. As you would expect, all the information is on the box. The power factor is much better than claimed and was the second highest we tested. The total measured output was 413 lm and this bumps its efficacy to third best. A lot of effort has gone to making it look like a conventional halogen lamp. The front face sparkles when you switch it on. If you care about lighting, this is for you.

BEST OVERALL

OUTPUT 413 lm POWER 5.2W EFFICACY 79 lm/W CCT 2768K CRI 82 POWER FACTOR 0.83

*****

V-TAC COB SPOTLIGHT

OUTPUT 465 lm POWER 5.6W EFFICACY 83 lm/W CCT 2697K CRI 82 POWER FACTOR 0.66

****

Although described as a spotlight, this lamp’s beam is 110 degrees, which could be misleading to the non-specialist – it would light from floor to ceiling from 1.5m. The manufacturer says the lamp is equivalent to a 50W GU10, but the 90-degree beam lumen figure isn’t on the box, so there is no way of knowing. We measured 423 lm and 5.4W rather than the 450 lm and 6W claimed.

TPUT 423 lm POWER 5.4W EFFICACY 78 lm/W CCT 2838K CRI 81 POWER FACTOR 0.55

**


SMART AND HIGH PERFORMANCE CAR PARK LIGHTING TITAN SERIES LED INDUSTRIAL LIGHTING

Search for Nualight Q-Park on YouTube to see Titan in Sheffield’s smart car park.

www.nualight.com


LED.COMMERCIAL

Kosnic’s ‘Faceted’ LED Downlight – ideal for decorative lighting applications. The Kosnic LED Commercial Downlight is available with a distinctive geometric ‘faceted’ white reflector and a recessed light source. A direct LED retrofit for widely used 3”, 4”, 6” and 8” fluorescent downlights, delivering up to 50% energy saving compared with a traditional fluorescent fitting. Plug & play emergency modules are available for all models ensuring that the lamp remains operational in the event of a power surge or a cut in supply.

SEE US AT LuxLive STAND J6 Visit www.kosnic.com or call 0845 838 6851 to find out more. Email sales@kosnic.com or call to use our FREE Project & Specification Service. ACCREDITED

SUPPLIER

DOWNLIGHT


REVIEWS HIGH-TEMPERATURE FLOODLIGHTS AND STREETLIGHTS 117

REVIEWED: HIGH-TEMPERATURE FLOODLIGHTS AND STREETLIGHTS After a day basking in the sun, a luminaire may not have time to cool down before it’s heated up again by its own light source. Alan Tulla looks at seven hardy floodlights and streetlights

In hot climates like that of Abu Dhabi, streetlights must be robust

T

his review is about luminaires that operate at an ambient temperature of 50ºC. Before you say it is never 50ºC at night, consider the temperature the body of the luminaire will be when it is first switched on – after it has been in direct sunlight all day. We looked at some of the best floodlights and streetlights for these conditions. The manufacturers all provided good, solid technical data to support their claims.

Have a checklist If you are specifying equipment to be used in these temperatures, there are several things you should check. One of the most basic is to get data sheets that show the luminaire is suitable operation at 50ºC. The light output of LEDs drops as the temperature increases. This reduction should be stated somewhere on the data sheet. Alternatively, some manufacturers limit the drive current (in effect, the wattage) for high ambient temperatures. This is quite common. There may be a reduction in the rated life. Again, this should be checked. The next would be to see if there are any case studies of identical or very similar luminaires in the same environment. Do remember the importance of wattage. A 10W streetlight may work fine but a 50W

V

Warm climes Unshaded metal, such as floodlights and streetlights, can reach very high temperatures during the day. A luminaire body temperature of 70ºC is commonplace in the summer in the Middle East. A professional engineer I spoke to has measured over 100ºC in Saudi Arabia. Night-time temperatures of 35-40ºC are common – I know, I’ve lived there. As the luminaire ‘cools’ in the evening air, the light source

switches on and generates heat, so there is only a very gradual reduction to the operating temperature.

www.luxreview.com


118 REVIEWS HIGH-TEMPERATURE FLOODLIGHTS AND STREETLIGHTS

Reviewed: High-temperature floodlights and streetlights version in the same body might not. Get a sample and use your professional judgement to decide whether there is a clear, unobstructed heat path from the back of the LED to the outside air. Large heatsinks are always a good sign but only if free air can flow over them. A heatsink in a sealed enclosure won’t cool nearly so well. Active cooling – a fan, for example – is a good way to remove heat. People I have spoken to are split as to how reliable fans are. Some say a motor is inherently less reliable and others ask: ‘When have you ever known a fan to fail?’ Finally, always take a good look at the driver and its position in the luminaire. Many people say the driver is the weakest link in the system. If you can mount the driver remotely and away from direct sunlight (not inside the column), it should run much cooler. Most LED drivers have a thermal sensor that will reduce the power to the LEDs if they get too hot.

‘‘

Get a sample and check whether there is a clear, unobstructed heat path from the back of the LED to the outside air”

CU PHOSCO FL800R

This floodlight has a series of LED modules that can be run at different outputs from 45 to over 500W. Each module has eight optical distribution options and a range of elevation angles. A useful feature is the large cowl on top that cuts off the light at five degrees below the horizontal. Its main application is for highmast lighting and the sales literature says the FL800R

DW WINDSOR ZEPPA

IGUZZINI WOW

This LED streetlight ranges in wattage from 7-144W so it can be used on 4-6m columns in small residential streets or on 8-12m columns for dual carriageways and motorways. There are three optical distributions, all designed for road lighting and car parks. The three body sizes can be either side-entry or post-top mounted and installation and

iGuzzini has a huge base in the Middle East. Product testing is also done locally. Unsurprisingly, they have several complete ranges of products suitable for the Middle Eastern weather. I chose the Wow streetlight because it is one of the few luminaires approved by Ashghal, the public works and roads authority in Qatar. This standard requires >100 lm/W at 52°C. The Wow is designed principally for residential and traffic route lighting. There are three power ratings and light output is in the range 14,000-17,000 lm. CRI is >70 and the standard CCT is 4000K. There are four

www.luxreview.com

maintenance are easy. This is important where work must be done quickly during lane or road closures. The CRI is >70 in the 4000K version and >80 in the 3000K version. The control gear is in a separate compartment from the LEDs and has a range of control options.

****

A good all-rounder

is suited for 10-50m mounting heights. The maximum delivered light output (at 25°C) is over 67,000 lumens. CRI is >70 and the standard CCT is 5700K. There is space in the gear box for a range of photocell, CMS (central management system), Dali and other control methods.

***** Powerful

road lighting optics and two for applications such as parking areas, roundabouts, public squares. The lantern can be tilted 20 degrees in either direction in five-degree steps.

****

Local approval


: only one track for all your lighting ideas.

ONETRACK® is A.A.G. Stucchi track lighting system based on EUROSTANDARD PLUS® platform. This system combines the functionalities of all the current systems in the market and makes the upgrade to controllable lighting systems possible at any time. This state-of-the-art platform makes ONETRACK® the best solution for controllable lighting and perfect for the application of wireless control, making installation easy at any time. The ONETRACK® system, thanks to the EUROSTANDARD PLUS® platform, allows easy and fast integration of wireless control in track lighting applications. Simply insert the specific adapter into the track and it carries the signal to all the lighting fixtures on it, without any wiring. Thanks to the partnership with and ONETRACK® can be integrated with different wireless control systems providing countless lighting scenarios and energy management solutions.

OneTrack® and EUROSTANDARD PLUS® are registered trademarks of A.A.G. Stucchi. For more info please go to www.aagstucchi.it

WWW.PLESSEYSEMICONDUCTORS.COM | ENQUIRIES@PLESSEYSEMI.COM | +44 1752 693000


120 REVIEWS HIGH-TEMPERATURE FLOODLIGHTS AND STREETLIGHTS

Reviewed: High-temperature floodlights and streetlights OSRAM SITECO FLOODLIGHT FL20

KINGFISHER AEC ITALO 1

This, also, is mainly designed for residential and minor traffic route lighting. There are several power ratings and light output is in the range 2,000-10,000 lm. CRI is >70 and the standard CCT is 4000K (3000 and 5700K are also available). There are six road lighting optics depending on the

proportions of the road relative to the column height. What I like about Kingfisher’s data sheet is that it gives correction factors for lumen output, life and power at different ambient temperatures.

****

Simple but does the job intended

PHILIPS SPEEDSTAR

There are already installations of this streetlight in Abu Dhabi. The SpeedStar is aimed at municipalities for energyefficient, functional, lowmaintenance streetlighting. It is said to be CO2 neutral. The LEDGINE driver and LED module is easily replaceable, so future increases in efficiency can be incorporated without changing the whole luminaire.

www.luxreview.com

Siteco is now part of Osram. Floodlight 20 comes in three variants: Micro is 3,000 lm and 29W; the Mini is 6,000-12,000 lm, 56-107W; and the large Midi 18,000-27,000 lm, 163-238W. Some of the optical distributions can be used for traffic route lighting, and the Midi can be used for sports lighting. The FL20 has two sections. One is the IP66 lighting module and the other is the driver section that

houses controls and the mounting brackets/clamps. CCT is from 30005000K with CRI from 70 to >80. The Basic version simply switches on and off. The Plus version can have a built-in factory preset and programmable timer for output reduction in two steps. It can also be integrated into existing digital control and CMS systems.

*****

The data is never in doubt

URBIS SCHREDER AMPERA

There are five road lighting optics and wattages from 27-256W with 16-80 LEDs. CCT ranges from 30005700K and CRI from 68-84. Output is from 2,400-28,700 lm (at 25°C). The driver is compatible with almost any control system.

****

A well-established name in streetlighting

The widespread use of LEDs means that a single luminaire design can contain a range of LED modules with different optical distributions. The Ampera is a good example of how a traditional HID roadlighting manufacturer can make the best use of the possibilities LEDs offer. There are three versions: the Mini, Midi and Maxi. The nominal LED flux

ranges from 1,000-31,000 lm in the Maxi. This represents about 10279W across the whole range. As well as the usual range of streetlighting optics, which cover anything from a cycle path to a motorway, the Ampera has an optic designed specifically for pedestrian crossings called the Zebra.

****

A well designed, modern streetlight


[ZENIGATA COB]

LED

Sharp ZENIGATA COB LEDs raise the bar for quality LED lighting that’s now even easier to design with Sharp’s integrated INTERMO modules. In addition to a broad range of fixed white LEDs, Sharp also supplies the tuneable white Tiger ZENIGATA

www.sharpleds.eu

[INTERMO MODULES]

(2,700 K–5,700 K). From tailored white LEDs for grocery stores and shops to natural toning LEDs that warm as they dim, Sharp’s LED technology platform excels in office, home, commercial, and outdoor lighting. E-mail us for details: sharpsde@sharp.eu


122 REVIEWS UNDERWATER LUMINAIRES

REVIEWED: UNDERWATER LUMINAIRES Lux takes a dip into the world of IP68-rated underwater luminiares, using a range of light source technologies, and reveals the best ones

T

hese luminaires are designed to survive underwater. When we say underwater, we’re not talking about puddles but deep pools of water where the equipment will function safely at a depth of three metres or more. I am using the word ‘pool’ to mean any underwater application such as dockyards, deep water features, aquariums, caves and industrial cooling. You’re probably looking for an ingress protection rating of IP68. You have to be careful when you read IP68 claims because the supplier must state the depth for which the luminaire is suitable. The test then sets out a procedure to confirm conformance. In principle, the IP68 test is meant to be more onerous than IP67, which uses a pressurised jet of water equivalent to submersion to a depth of a metre. However, it is possible to claim IP68 conformance at a shallower depth, so you should always ask to see the test certificate. Also, make sure the test was for a luminaire, not an enclosure. The first thing to consider is whether it is a marine or freshwater environment. Bronze luminaires have excellent thermal properties

with much better conductivity than stainless steel. However, bronze can be attacked by the chlorine used in freshwater pools. Conversely, freshwater pools don’t always contain chlorine and some of the other purification chemicals used will attack some grades of stainless steel. If you are using recessed luminaires, you should find out if they are ‘wet niche’ or ‘dry niche’. Wet niche means the luminaire is surrounded by cooling water. It must be fitted with a thermal cutout to stop it operating if the water level drops or the pool is drained. Dry niche luminaires are often larger so the heat from the lamp can be safely conducted away. Several manufacturers emphasised that the quality of the installation is critical to success. Get references from your contractor so you know they can do the work competently. Finally, don’t forget fibre-optic luminaires. Their big advantage is that the luminaire itself doesn’t have to be relamped or otherwise maintained. The projector containing the light source can be put in an easily accessible, dry location.

HOLOPHANE HYDREL

ROBLON FL500 AQUARIUS

The Hydrel M9700 is a recessed luminaire that accepts a range of lamps from 35 to 150W in metal halide and 70W high-pressure sodium. There are various lens and reflector options. It can be used to a depth of three metres and also in dry applications. The visible part of this luminaire can be stainless steel, bronze or aluminium. To accept a 150W lamp, the body has to be quite large to dissipate the heat. With underwater fittings, the surface temperature of the front glass can be a problem in public areas. Holophane has got around this by offering a double front

This product, available in the UK from Light Projects, uses fibre optics, so you don’t have to drain your pool just to change a lamp or do maintenance. The projector that directs light into the fibres, can be fitted in a dry, easily accessible space. This model from Roblon is rated IP65 so finding a location is easy. The other advantage of fibre optics is that there is no electricity at the luminaire. And they don’t heat up. It’s as safe as can be. Neither do the seals have any need to ‘breathe’. As such, it is much easier to make the luminaire leak-proof. The

www.luxreview.com

lens system. A layer of air ensures the front face of the luminaire remains relatively cool.

****

Powerful and well made

Aquarius unit will operate at depths of 10 metres. Some people think fibre optics are only good for sparkle and not for functional lighting. That’s true for poor quality suppliers but Roblon has software to calculate the output from the luminaires and the illumination that can be achieved.

***

There’s still a place for quality fibre optics


REVIEWS 123

We bring quality to light.

WIBRE 4.0282 SWIMMING POOL LIGHT

DISCOVERING

LIGHT

Wibre (represented in the UK by Architectural FX) is a specialist in underwater lighting – its lighting factory was founded in 1953. The company also makes underwater speakers and windows. It has a huge range, from surface-mount to recessed, and everything is made of 316 (V4A) grade stainless steel. One of the newer units is the 4.0282 (Wibre doesn’t go for memorable product names). This particular unit is suitable down to depths of five metres in saltwater applications. It can run at 35 or 62W in several different white CCTs and the RGB sample we had is rated at 110W.

Putting LEDs in the right light One feature that sets this apart from other units is that the lens has a combination of LED lenses. One group is 120 degrees so the beam will illuminate the bottom of the pool and swimmers. The other group is 30 degrees so it can illuminate right across the pool to the far side. There are plenty of other beam options.

****

Something for everyone

SSL solutions from the world leader in LED measurement Right from the start, we have been supporting the LED industries with our measurement equipment. You will also benefit from this expertise in the new Solid-State Lighting applications. Our solutions combine highly precise spectroradiometers and photometers with a complete family of goniometers and integrating spheres. Discover light with Instrument Systems. www.instrumentsystems.com/ssl

WE-EF ULC230 We-Ef has been making outdoor luminaires in Germany for over 50 years. The model we tested was the ULC230 medium-beam spotlight with a 20W metal halide lamp and built-in electronic gear. The complete underwater range includes 2W LED and 35W metal halide luminaires. In the same underwater family are 65W halogen models. This is a surface-mount unit – it rests on the bottom of the pool. Its solid construction means it operates happily up to 10m below the surface. The thick front lens resists impacts of IK10. This is a robust, compact

LGS 1000 Goniophotometer with new features product. It is only 170mm in diameter and 175mm deep, but it weighs over 6.5kg. The intensity of the 16-degree beam reduces uniformly from the centre and it has a nice, clean edge. Coloured filters, baffles and linear spreader lenses are also available.

light measurement

****

Compact and powerful

www.luxreview.com


Emergency lighting experts deliver stylish safety solutions? Absolutely. Emergi-Lite prides itself on being a leading life safety solutions provider delivering state-of-the-art systems and products covering emergency lighting, central battery systems and advanced monitoring safety systems. All designed to meet customer needs and the latest safety standards and industry regulations. www.emergi-lite.co.uk

LuxLive 2015 18-19 November 2015 ExCel London, Stand D34

Emergi-Lite Tel. +44 (0) 113 281 0600 Fax. +44 (0) 113 281 0601 E-mail: emergi-lite.sales@tnb.com


REVIEWS ILLUMINATED BOLLARDS 125

REVIEWED: ILLUMINATED BOLLARDS In our latest independent review, Lux’s technical editor Alan Tulla gives his verdict on 11 of the best new illuminated bollards

I

Keep it down Professional guidance on obtrusive light or on dark sky parks limits the amount of upward light that the luminaires can emit. If no upward light is allowed then, obviously, a 1m-high bollard can light people from the waist down only. One can argue that light is reflected upwards off the path and that people’s faces could be seen, but if the path is black asphalt, that’s an academic rather than practical argument. My personal view is that the benefit of some upward light and being able to see people clearly generally outweighs the constraint of zero ULOR. You must be able to argue your case, though. Minimising upward light emissions and still achieving wide

‘‘

Professional guidance on obtrusive light or on dark sky parks limits the amount of upward light that the bollards can emit”

ollards can blend in or ake a bold statement

spacing means you need properly designed optics. The bollards listed here are the best we could find. Super functionality isn’t always required. Sometimes you need a bollard that will blend in or maybe make a design statement. There are bollards nished in stone, wood and rusty Corten steel. There also some interesting shapes. price ranges are: £ <500, ££ 500-650, £££ >650.

V

n our latest independent review, we have concentrated on two types of bollard. Those with excellent optical performance and those with a special look or that are made from unusual materials. Some fall into both categories. What you won’t find in this review is a bog standard black bollard with concentric louvres on top. If you are lighting a path or maybe a small residential car park, economics dictates that you should space the bollards as far apart as possible. However, bollards are often used in environmentally sensitive areas where columns would not be acceptable. This is where design gets interesting.

AUBRILAMMARSHALLS NATTY 3 Aubrilam is a well-established maker of strong, durable, long-life wooden columns; some as high as 16m. They have recently launched a range of bollards called Natty. To retain structural integrity throughout the bollard’s life, the baseplate or root of the bollard is made from powder-coated galvanised steel. You can see from the photo that the bollard is a combination of the two. This particular unit is quite chunky – the wooden body measures 150 x 250mm in section. The lighting is provided by a Bega wall-mount luminaire that is recessed into the wooden body. This particular Bega model has vertical prisms that spread

the light over about 160 degrees laterally. There is also a fair amount of light projected forwards. PRICE £££

***

Real wood

www.luxreview.com


126 REVIEWS ILLUMINATED BOLLARDS

Reviewed: Illuminated bollards DESIGNPLAN TALOS POLLARE

DW WINDSOR PHAROLA

This unit is based on the successful Talos wall and polemount luminaire that lights paths and residential roads. It can be used at wide spacings and has good glare control with almost zero upward light. As you would expect from Designplan, it is as tough as they come – it is rated at IK16 and resists impacts of 150 joules. In essence, the bollard product range produces 1,400-2,500 lm from 15-21W. What’s really attractive about this bollard is the shape. The diecast aluminium head is rounded and sits on a slim, rectangular body. It is much lighter in

This may well be the slimmest bollard on the market, being less than 90mm in diameter. When it is installed outside, it almost disappears. The 12W LEDs are housed in the top, shining down, above a small frosted diffuser, but don’t be deceived, this unit performs surprisingly well. The peak intensity is emitted between 60 and 75 degrees, which means you can achieve wide spacings with good uniformity. The unit emits light through 360 degrees and a 180-degree light shield is available. The other aspect worth mentioning is that there is just

appearance than its construction and performance would suggest. It’s also good value. PRICE £

*****

Good value and great performance

www.luxreview.com

****

Surprisingly good for its size

HESS CITY ELEMENTS

ERCO MIDIPOLL This emits a lot of light; five times the amount of some other bollards. Mind you, the delivered efficacy is more than 115 lm/W so, at 27W, it only consumes a little more power than the other bollards under review. What’s more, all the Erco bollards are dark sky compliant – that is, they do not emit any upward light. Apart from dark sky parks and nature reserves, it means you can use them at airports, rural villages and anywhere where there can be no upward light emissions. The secret is the four prismed lenses set in the top, which give a symmetrical light distribution. It also has an interesting shape

enough upward light, 8 per cent ULOR, to illuminate people’s faces without wasting any more light than necessary. PRICE ££

in cross-section. The body is cylindrical, but it is cruciform in profile. Light is emitted from the four scalloped sections. This breaks up its rather monolithic form. PRICE £££

****

Zero upward light

Elements is the most recent addition to the Hess catalogue of exterior lighting and street furniture. It is so called because it is a modular range from which you choose each element of the base section, intermediate and upper lighting section to produce the luminaire you want. The basic bollard is rated at 17W with a symmetric or asymmetric light distribution. The light is emitted mainly in the 60-75-degree zone and there is almost no upward light. It can work in ambient temperatures up to 50°C. Hess is renowned for the fine finishes and attention to detail in its products. You won’t find any weld burrs or rough edges.

The other aspect that sets it apart is the range of options. Apart from a huge range of colours, it can even be fitted with a charger socket for an electric bicycle. PRICE £££

***

Finely finished and flexible


LUXOMATIC ® Intelligent B.E.G. AL22 Bulkhead with integrated sensor

IR-Adaptor for Smartphones

AL22

ƒ 3RO\FDUERQDWH,3ÀWWLQJZLWK OPRXWSXWDW: ƒ ,QWHJUDWHGZLUHOHVVFRPPXQLFDWLRQZLWKDOOOLJKWVLQWKHJURXS ƒ 3URJUDPDQGUHDGDOOWKHOLJKWGDWDXVLQJWKHB.E.G.6PDUWSKRQH$SSDQGDGDSWRU

www.beg-luxomat.com

0870 850 5412

Meet the New Members of the Family... A number of new arrays and highbay versions have been added to the Mini Hubble range. The 33Up Family has been extended to include 60° and Double Asymmetric beam angles.

Come and visit us... Stand C1

carclo-optics.com

sales@carclo-optics.com


128 REVIEWS ILLUMINATED BOLLARDS

Reviewed: Illuminated bollards HOLOPHANE DENVER ELITE

LOUIS POULSEN FLINDT

This bollard has an unusual shape: it is tri-lobe in profile. I don’t know of any others with this form. It also uses prisms, a Holophane speciality, to direct the light. We often forget that prisms and lenses are normally more efficient than reflectors at directing light. This combination means that you can choose the distribution that best suits your application. Most of the beam is emitted between 55 and 80 degrees, so you can achieve wide spacings between the bollards. About 10 per cent of the light is emitted upwards, so you get just enough on people’s faces without waste. A nice decorative touch

This bollard got its name from the designer, Christian Flindt. The shape is reminiscent of taking a slice from a wooden pencil as if you were sharpening it. However, the bollard itself is a lot more technologically sophisticated. The exposed elliptical surface also acts as a reflector, pushing out the light forward and downwards slightly. There are two 7W LED modules in the top that direct the light laterally for fairly wide spacings along a footpath. In plan, the distribution is slightly more than 180 degrees and you can adjust the modules 10 degrees In either direction for extra flexibility.

is the clear gasket between the body and top cap. This catches the light and gives a soft, glowing line around the top. PRICE £££

****

Three-way adaptable

PAVIOM APTUS

TRILUX SKEO

This was designed by Terence Woodgate and looks as if it has been carved from a single piece of solid steel. Placed in a landscape, this Corten steel bollard looks as if it has been there for centuries. It’s a matter of personal taste, but I like the complex, rich, varying colours of the steel. The Aptus has been designed for wayfinding and for highlighting vertical features such as trees or buildings. You can have a powerful, narrow-beam LED AR111 or 20W HIT-CE directed upwards and a soft, wider angle light shining down on to the ground. The corollary to this is that you don’t get much light emitted laterally. The Aptus is

The Skeo caught our eye because it is triangular in shape. It looks as if a solid tube of aluminium has had sections removed and these cut-outs are where the light is emitted. It gives an inner glow to the anthracite grey body. The other thing that makes this particular unit interesting is that it is RGB. You can achieve a whole range of colours and it would be ideal for pathways and open spaces around event centres. The standard bollard uses 16W 3000K white LEDs. It has quite a sharp cut-off, about 60 degrees, and almost zero upward light.

www.luxreview.com

not so much for functional path lighting as illuminating features and wayfinding in areas where appearance is as important as function. In the right setting, this would look perfect. PRICE £

****

Instantly blends in

PRICE ££

*****

Clever optics and beautiful design

PRICE £

***

Good for place-making


Turn-Key outdoor Linear LED lighting

Made to measure – Project support - Installation LEDtechnic bvba – Vliegplein 55F – B-9991 Maldegem (Belgium) – T +32 50 68 89 52 – F +32 50 68 69 64 info@ledtechnic.be - www.ledtechnic.be


130 REVIEWS ILLUMINATED BOLLARDS

Reviewed: Illuminated bollards TRINITY STONES

URBIS SCHREDER PHAROS

Most bollards are constructed from metal that has been painted. This bollard has an inner aluminium frame but is clad in 10mm-thick porcelain. This is available in different finishes such as marble and lapis lazuli. It means you can choose a stone finish to match the surroundings. You really need to look at the website to appreciate the range of cladding available. The shorter bollards, 600800mm, in the range use LED retrofit A-line lamps. A typical 1m-high bollard has a 15W COB source. A novel feature is that the outside is completely clear of

There are two versions of this 11W unit. One has an opal polycarbonate diffuser that gives a symmetrical light distribution. The beam is directed mainly at 50-60 degrees. Apart from a light shield that can be used to block the beam in certain directions, Urbis Schreder offers laser-cut stainless steel logos to give individuality or for advertising. You can see the clear lens version looks slightly ‘empty’. However, inside are some precision lensed LEDs that direct the beam at 75-80 degrees, so you can achieve wide spacings when lighting footpaths. Urbis says you can achieve over 8 lux (lighting class

fixings. To remove the door and gain access to the lamp and gear requires a heavy duty glass sucker lifter; not the sort of tool the average vandal has. PRICE £

***

Choose your stone cladding to suit the geography

P3) on a 2m-wide path with 12.5m spacings between the bollards. It weighs 22kg, more than twice as much as other bollards of a similar height. This may explain how it can be used in temperatures up to 55°C. PRICE £

***

Solidly engineered

THURSDAY 19 MAY 2016 | CAVENDISH CONFERENCE CENTRE, LONDON

Lighting for Rail CONFERENCE 2016

Learn how to specify cutting-edge lighting that complies with the rail regs At this special one-day conference, you’ll learn: O How to use lighting controls without compromising safety O How to create creative and innovative schemes – that comply

with the standards O Choosing the right LED products for your application

www.raillightingconference.com Organised by

www.luxreview.com

in association with


The next generation of lighting control systems has arrived CP Electronics, the leading lighting controls manufacturer in the UK, offers you the next generation of RAPID: a smarter, evolved and cutting-edge solution to meet the most complex lighting control scenarios. It has all the benefits you would expect from our fully addressable and networkable systems, plus more. ,QQRYDWLYHIHDWXUHVWREHQHĂ&#x20AC;WWKHVSHFLĂ&#x20AC;HU LQVWDOOHUDQGFOLHQWDOLNH â&#x20AC;˘ Modular design â&#x20AC;&#x201C; specify for CatA, expandable for CatB, from 8 to 12 outputs Â&#x2021; 0RYHH[SDQVLRQFRVWWRĂ&#x20AC;WRXWVWDJH â&#x20AC;˘ Mixed dimming and volt-free output options â&#x20AC;˘ Works with our patented Energy Measurement Technology

/LJKWLQJFRQWUROIRUWKHPRVWGHPDQGLQJDUHDV READY BIM

ED IN THE IGN U ES

    AR

WA R R A

NT

IG

N E D IN T HE

U

Contact us today or visit our website ZZZFSHOHFWURQLFVFRXN T: +44 (0)333 900 0671 or FRPPV#FSHOHFWURQLFVFRXN

K

ES

D

5

YE

Y

   

D

AR AR W RANT YE Y

K

5

BIM

R E A DY

FRQQHFWZLWKXV

T: +44 (0)7721 128 212 or GLVWULEXWRUV#FSHOHFWURQLFVFRXN


132 LUXLIVE MIDDLE EAST 2016

New Catalogue available from November! Celebrating 25 years

TO REQUEST A CATALOGUE PLEASE EMAIL SALES5@EMCOGROUP.CO.UK

5

YEAR WARRANTY

LED661 / LED662 c/w Philips driver PC Diffuser 34W / 40W Available in 4000K or 6000K

4TL533MW 33W 3000K, 3350lm CRI 90

4TL6014MW 25W 4000K, 2450lm CRI 90

ADNEC, Abu Dhabi, 13-14 April 2016

LBH5412DW 12W 4000K, 1110lm

WLED22BO 22W 4000K, 1500lm

LDL8114MW 33W 4000K, 2960lm CRI 90

EMCOGROUP OFFERS A RANGE OF COMMERCIAL, DOMESTIC AND INDUSTRIAL ELECTRICAL PRODUCTS TO SUIT A WIDE VARIETY OF APPLICATIONS.

Emcogroup Ltd Emco House, Units 8-10 Marshgate Drive, Hertford, Herts, SG13 7JY, United Kingdom www.emcogroup.co.uk / sales5@emcogroup.co.uk / TEL: 01992 582033 / FAX: 01992 582044

www.luxreview.com

www.luxlive.ae


LUXLIVE MIDDLE EAST 2016 133

2016

MIDDLE EAST

The lighting event the Middle East has been

WAITING FOR! I

t’s the most dynamic region in the world when it comes to lighting. And now, it’s getting the event it deserves. Following the massive success of LuxLive in the UK, the team behind the award-winning show are delighted to bring this unique and exciting lighting event to the Middle East in 2016. Taking place at the fantastic Abu Dhabi National Exhibition Centre on 13-14 April 2016, this is a mustattend show for anyone involved in the specification, installation and maintenance of lighting systems throughout the region. With over 4,000m2 of exhibition space, over 100 of the world’s leading lighting brands (including Trilux, Ruud, Soraa, CU Phosco, Ligman and many more), and over 3,000 key decision makers and specifiers from across the Middle East, LuxLive Middle East is set to be the most talked about lighting event ever staged in the GCC region. Don’t miss it!

O For more information, head to luxlive.ae O To find out about exhibiting and sponsorship opportunities, contact Peter Rowledge on peter.rowledge@luxreview.com or +44 (0) 7740 110 261

The world’s most exciting lighting show is coming to Abu Dhabi in April. Don’t miss LuxLive Middle East 2016!

INSIGHTFUL TALKS AND DEBATES The LuxLive Middle East 2016 programme of talks, debates and panel discussions will get to the heart of the key issues affecting lighting in t dynamic region. Tap into the latest thinking and hear from mor than 100 experts on lighting hot topics.

TOP EXHIBITORS Visit LuxLive Middle East and discover groundbreaking lighting kit from over 100 top brands. From energy-saving controls to dramatic architectural light fittings, whatever your interest lighting you’ll find it at LuxLive Middle East 2016.

www.luxreview.com


134 LUX AWARDS MIDDLE EAST 2016

YOU could be a winner at the Lux Awards Middle East Lux Awards Middle East 4.30pm – 6pm ADNEC, Abu Dhabi, Thursday 14 April 2016 luxlive.ae

The greatest lighting achievements in the Middle East region will be honored at this brand new awards night

A

The stunning Hyatt Capital Gate, where the party takes place

www.luxreview.com

s the Middle East gears up for huge events such as the 2020 Expo in Dubai and the 2022 World Cup in Qatar, it has become the most dynamic lighting market on the planet. To celebrate the best of what’s being achieved in lighting, we’re introducing a brand new awards scheme for the region, taking place alongside LuxLive Middle East. The Lux Awards Middle East takes place on Thursday 14 April, the second day of LuxLive Middle East, in the arena at the centre of the show floor. If you’ve worked on a standout lighting project in the GCC region, or launched an innovative product, get in touch for details on how to enter the awards. We’ll be recognising how smart, efficient, long-lasting lighting technology is making buildings and outdoor spaces in the region look great. After the awards presentation, join us for a celebration party in the stunning Hyatt Capital Gate, adjacent to the exhibition venue. We’ll soon be announcing the award categories, how to enter, and revealing our panel of distinguished judges. Stay tuned to luxlive.ae for more updates on this exciting new awards scheme for the region.

MIDDLE EAST

2016


Emergency Lighting CONFERENCE 2016

THURSDAY 25 FEBRUARY 2016 | CAVENDISH CONFERENCE CENTRE, LONDON

Do you know who is responsible for emergency lighting in your building? At this special one-day conference, you’ll learn: O The latest emergency lighting rules and regulations O What you need to do to comply O How to choose the right emergency lighting products

www.emergencylightingconference.com Organised by

Sponsored by

in association with

Lighting for Facilities Managers

CONFERENCE 2016

THURSDAY 19 MAY 2016 | CAVENDISH CONFERENCE CENTRE, LONDON

Harness the power of LED lighting and controls in your buildings At this special one-day conference, you’ll learn: O How to upgrade lighting with success – the mistakes to avoid O How to make sure you’re picking the right LED products O Making sure your installation will last O How lighting controls can save you bags of money on electricity

www.lightingforfacilitiesmanagers.com Organised by

in association with

www.luxreview.com


136 LUX CONFERENCES IN 2016

Don’t get caught out in an emergency

in association with

Do you know who’s responsible for the emergency lighting in your building? Did you know they could be fined or imprisoned if it doesn’t comply with the rules? Managing an emergency lighting network carries with it significant responsibilities: You’ve got to comply with the latest legislation and best practice, keep energy and maintenance low and not least, ensure your building’s occupants are safe at all times. And, as the ‘responsible person’ under the Fire Safety Act, it’s also down to you to manage the risk assessments, testing and paperwork.

Lux has teamed up with the Industry Committee on Emergency Lighting (ICEL) to bring you this special one-day conference, where you’ll learn: O The latest emergency lighting rules and regulations O What you need to do to comply O How to choose the right emergency lighting products To register for a free place, contact Charlie Ward at 020 3283 4387 or charlie.ward@luxreview.com.

Emergency Lighting Conference 2016 Emergency Lighting CONFERENCE 2016

CAVENDISH CONFERENCE CENTRE, LONDON, THURSDAY 25 FEBRUARY 2016

www.emergencylightingconference.com

Learn how LEDs and controls can transform your buildings

in association with

If you work in facilities management, you’ll know that lighting has undergone a revolution in the last few years, with the rise of LEDs and smart controls. It’s a tremendous opportunity to slash your energy and maintenance costs and create great buildings – but with LED there’s also the risk of picking the wrong products and making a right mess.

At this one-day conference, you’ll learn: O How to upgrade lighting with success – the mistakes to avoid O How to pick the right LED products O Making sure your installation will last O How controls can save you bags of money To register for a free place, contact Charlie Ward at 020 3283 4387 or charlie.ward@luxreview.com.

Lighting for Facilities Managers Conference 2016 Lighting for Facilities Managers

CONFERENCE 2016

www.luxreview.com

CAVENDISH CONFERENCE CENTRE, LONDON, THURSDAY 19 MAY 2016

www.lightingforfacilitiesmanagers.com


LUX CONFERENCES IN 2016 137

Specify the latest lighting kit with confidence The UK’s rail network is one of the largest and most diverse portfolios of lighting in the country – and it’s in the process of reinventing itself.

in association with

At this special one-day conference, you’ll learn: O How to use lighting controls without compromising safety O How to create creative and innovative schemes – that comply with the standards

O Choosing the right LED products for your application. This event is for engineers, designers, manufacturers, consultants and specifiers with responsibility for lighting. And best of all, it’s free to representatives of network operators and train operating companies. To register for a free place, contact Charlie Ward at 020 3283 4387 or charlie.ward@luxreview.com.

Lighting for Rail Conference 2016 CAVENDISH CONFERENCE CENTRE, LONDON, WEDNESDAY 22 JUNE 2016 Lighting for Rail CONFERENCE 2016

www.raillightingconference.com

Healthier, happier, more productive – all thanks to the right light Light is a drug. That’s what scientists are realising as research on how light affects the body and mind advances. By influencing our sleep-wake cycles, the right kind of light can make us work more effectively, recover more quickly from illness, and feel better. But how do you harness this knowledge in the real world?

At this one-day conference, you’ll learn: O The latest science on light and the body O How to apply this knowledge to improve outcomes in care homes, schools and offices O Products that harness light’s non-visual effects To register for a free place, contact Charlie Ward at 020 3283 4387 or charlie.ward@luxreview.com.

Lighting for Health and Wellbeing Conference 2016 Lighting for Health and Wellbeing

CONFERENCE 2016

CAVENDISH CONFERENCE CENTRE, LONDON, THURSDAY 22 SEPTEMBER 2016

www.lightingforhealthandwellbeing.com

www.luxreview.com


138 PRODUCT SHOWCASE

PRODUCT SHOWCASE

CHANNEL’S NEW ESTANTE RANGE The new Estante LED under-cupboard lighting range from Channel is available in 300mm and 500mm strip lengths. Each strip comes complete with adhesive strips and screws for fixing. A range of complimentary accessories are available for you to install your own bespoke under cupboard, shelf or cove lighting system. These include linear and corner connectors, lighting switches and PIR detectors. Using the latest LED technology Estante provides a comfortable light distribution and an ideal solution for workspace, task and accent lighting in either residential or commercial applications. channelsafety.co.uk

THE GOODLIGHT G5 – THE LED SOLUTION TO OUTDATED FLUORESCENTS LED Eco Lights has introduced its G5 LED luminaire as the 21st century replacement for inefficient fluorescent tubes. Designed and developed to meet the requirements of the most challenging commercial and industrial environments, the G5 combines versatility and cost effectiveness. The new model typically replaces standard twin fluorescent fittings that are beyond their useful lives. Available in two, four and five-foot lengths, the G5 provides‘instant illumination, super efficiency of 110lm/ W and an expected lifespan of 50,000 hours. It is covered by a comprehensive five-year guarantee. goodlight.co.uk

www.luxreview.com

DYNALUXX LAUNCHES HIGH LUMEN OUTPUT LUMINAIRES May sees the launch of a range of high quality tri-proof luminaires with polycarbonate body and stainless steel clips from Dynaluxx. Available in standard and emergency versions, with or without Hytronik motion sensors, offering a range of control from on/off sensors through tri-level (corridor function) dimming to daylight harvesting. The starting range consists of a 1200mm 20W (1670lm), 40W (3,200lm), 1500mm 28W (2,340lm) and 50W (4,100lm). All units come with a five-year guarantee. dynaluxx.co.uk

VIVA-CITY LED FROM KINGFISHER The new Viva-City LED street lantern from Kingfisher Lighting is based on a modular design which means the range builds in size and performance. Available in 35W, 65W, 100W, 165W and 230W the lumen packages increase from 3,325lm to 21,850lm. With an asymmetrical optic, and suitable for mounting either post-top or side-entry, Viva-City is a great all-round lantern suitable for car parks, urban environments, parks, pathways and streetlighting.

kingfisherlighting.com


LUX WEBINARS 139

LUX WEBINARS AUTUMN/WINTER

SERIES

Upcoming Lux

WEBINARS

Lux’s webinar series tackles some of the hottest topics in lighting. These one to two hour online events bring together a selection of speakers, and give participants the chance to put questions to the speakers directly. Hundreds of lighting professionals are attending Lux’s webinars already – join us! DESIGNING ROBUST LED STREETLIGHTING

POWER OVER ETHERNET 11 November

in association with

22 October 2015 LEDs have all sorts of benefits for streetlighting, but because they’re designed for low voltage, they’re vulnerable to damage from power surges and lightning. In this webinar, held in assocation with Osram, you’ll learn how to protect your lights, and how the latest technology can help slash your streetlighting energy bill.

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT WEEE

The latest hot technology that’s revolutionising lighting control, power over Ethernet lets you send data and power to your light fittings on the same cables. Our experts explain the technology, and how it can transform your lighting scheme.

LIGHTING FOR DEMENTIA 2 December

in association with

27 October Makers and users of lamps and luminaires have obligations under European law to handle recycling correctly. Our experts explain what the WEEE regs require, and how to make sure you comply.

A growing body of research shows how lighting can have a significant effect on the body and mind. And it’s particularly important when treating people with dementia. Our experts share the latest case studies on lighting for dementia and show how you can alleviate symptoms and keep patients calm.

TO REGISTER FOR ANY OF OUR WEBINARS, HEAD TO

LUXREVIEW.COM AND CLICK ON ‘WEBINARS’

www.luxreview.com


Y

AR

WA RR A

NT

D

5

ED IN THE IGN U ES

M

AD

E IN T H E U

K

The next generation of lighting control systems has arrived CP Electronics, the leading lighting controls manufacturer in the UK, offers you the next generation of RAPID: a smarter, evolved and cutting-edge solution to

Flexibility from CatA to CatB

meet the most complex lighting control scenarios. It has all the benefits you would expect from our fully addressable and networkable systems, plus more. ,QQRYDWLYHIHDWXUHVWREHQHĂ&#x20AC;WWKHVSHFLĂ&#x20AC;HULQVWDOOHUDQGFOLHQWDOLNH â&#x20AC;˘ Modular design â&#x20AC;&#x201C; specify for CatA, expandable for CatB, from 8 to 12 outputs Â&#x2021; 0RYHH[SDQVLRQFRVWWRĂ&#x20AC;WRXWVWDJH â&#x20AC;˘ Mixed dimming and volt-free output options â&#x20AC;˘ Works with our patented Energy Measurement Technology

Lighting control for the most demanding areas Call us today on +44 (0)333 900 0671 or visit our website www.cpelectronics.co.uk

B IM

RE ADY

BIM

R E ADY

K

Y

YE

AR AR W RANT

5

Fully addressable lighting control system

YE

Watch our RAPID introduction video at www.cpelectronics.co.uk/rapid

connect with us


BAD LIGHTING AWARDS 141

Introducing…

T

houghtless, ill-considered lighting is everywhere, and it’s ruining the exteriors and interiors of some great buildings. While the Lux Awards celebrate the best in lighting, we felt it was time to also highlight the worst. So Lux x is introducing the Bad Lighting Awards. Taking place at LuxLive on Wednesday 18 November, these awards will cast a badly aimed spotlight on retailers, restaurateurs and others who are getting it wrong with lighting, in the hopes that they’ll improve. Winners will receive the distinctive cracked light bulb trophy. Lux x is calling on the lighting world to nominate the worst lighting schemes you’ve seen. We want to see the most overlit, underlit, glary, shadowy, ugly, electrically unsound and just plain weird lighting installations. We’ll pick out the best – sorry, the worst, and present the awards to the winners. If they show up, that is. Anyone can nominate an entry by emailing ray.molony@luxreview.com or tweeting @luxreview. Head to luxlive.co.uk/bad-lighting-awards for more information.

THE

BAD

LIGHTING AWARDS

IN THE RUNNING FOR A BAD LIGHTING AWARD

Warm or cool lamps? Rackham’s department store in Yorkshire has gone for both!

Halogen, CFL, working, not working... Morden Tube station has used every variety of lamp in this vintage chandelier!

The colourful wagon wheel of destiny adorns the Coach and Horses pub. Time to drink up.

In case you’re wondering, no, this isn’t in line with the emergency lighting regulations.

Dear oh dear oh dear. Which came first, the luminaire or the wall?

Aaaagh! My eyes! Ripley’s Believe It or Not has gone all out with the colours on its facade.

You know what this shop in East London needs? More lamps.

I know – let’s make the pub green! Really?? Really??

www.luxreview.com


142 EVENTS

UPCOMING

EVENTS LuxLive 2015 18-19 November 2015

DON’T MEET US HERE

MISS

The UK’s biggest lighting show is back. The latest technology, best case studies and top experts will all be at LuxLive 2015. The programme covers lighting for retail, hospitality, healthcare, education, offices, transport, industrial and streetlighting. And it’s FREE to attend. This year the show takes place alongside Strategies in Light Europe, focusing on the lighting supply chain, and lightspace dot london, the new architectural lighting show. ExCeL, London, UK luxlive.co.uk | sileurope.com | lightspace.london

2015

HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL LIGHTING FAIR – AUTUMN EDITION 27-30 October 2015 Asia’s biggest lighting exhibition is back, covering indoor and outdoor lighting for the workplace, home, energy-saving solutions, accessories, parts, components, smart lighting, testing, certification and inspection. Exhibitors include NVC, Aurora and Neonlite (the company behind Megaman). If you’re coming this year, don’t miss Lux’s special seminar on the internet of things on Tuesday 27 October. Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, Hong Kong www.hktdc.com/fair/hklightingfairae-en EMERGENCY LIGHTING Emergency CONFERENCE 2016 Lighting CONFERENCE 2016 25 February 2016 Managing an emergency lighting network carries with it significant responsibilities: you’ve got to comply with the latest legislation and best practice, keep energy and maintenance low and not least, ensure your building’s occupants are safe at all times. Lux has teamed up with the Industry Committee on Emergency Lighting (ICEL) to bring you this special one-day conference, sponsored by P4, where you’ll learn the latest emergency lighting rules and regulations, what you need to do to comply and how to choose the right emergency lighting products. Cavendish Conference Centre, London, UK www.emergencylightingconference.com

www.luxreview.com

LIGHTING FOR FACILITIES for MANAGERS CONFERENCE 2016 Lighting Facilities Managers CONFERENCE 2016 19 May 2016 If you work in facilities management, you’ll know that lighting has undergone a revolution in the last few years with the rise of LEDs and smart controls. It’s a tremendous opportunity to slash your energy and maintenance costs and create great buildings – but with LED there’s also the risk of picking the wrong products and making a mess. At this special one-day conference, sponsored by Holophane and P4, you’ll learn how to upgrade lighting with success and how to make sure you’re picking the right products. Cavendish Conference Centre, London, UK www.lightingforfacilitiesmanagers.com LIGHTING FOR RAIL CONFERENCE 2016 Lighting for Rail CONFERENCE 2016 22 June 2016 At this special one-day conference, you’ll learn how to use lighting controls without compromising safety, how to create creative and innovative schemes – that comply with the standards and how to choose the right LED products for your application. This event, sponsored by Holophane, is for engineers, designers, manufacturers, consultants and specifiers with responsibility for lighting. And best of all, it’s free to representatives of network operators and train operating companies. Cavendish Conference Centre, London, UK www.raillightingconference.com

LIGHTING FOR HEALTH AND WELLBEING CONFERENCE 2016 Lighting for Health and Wellbeing CONFERENCE 2016 22 September 2016 Light is a drug. That’s what scientists are gradually realising as research on how light affects the body and mind advances. But how do you harness this in the real world? At this special one-day conference, you’ll learn the latest science on how light influences the body and how to apply this knowledge in care homes, schools and offices. Cavendish Conference Centre, London, UK www.lightingforhealthandwellbeing.com

LUXLIVE MIDDLE EAST 2016 13-14 APRIL 2016 ADNEC, Abu Dhabi, 2016 UAE MIDDLE EAST LuxLive Middle East is the lighting event the MEET US region has been waiting for. Following HERE the massive success of LuxLive in the UK, we are delighted to bring this unique and exciting lighting event to the Middle East in 2016. This is a must-attend show for anyone involved in the specification, installation and maintenance of lighting systems throughout the region. Exhibitors will include top brands such as Trilux, Ruud (which distributes Cree’s products in the region), Soraa, CU Phosco, Ligman and many more. www.luxlive.ae


Co-located with:

17 –19 November 2015 | ExCeL | London | U.K.

THE FUTURE

SHAPE OF

LIGHTING

HAVE YOU GOT YOUR PASSPORT TO EUROPE’S BIGGEST LED LIGHTING CONFERENCE? Why Pay more? The Total Access Pass gives you 22 hours of insightful and educational sessions worth £890 for just £700, if you register on or before 11 September! Secure your Total Access Pass by visiting www.sileurope.com

• Invest today in an intensive programme of high level conference sessions – gain rare access to many years of industry insight and knowledge in just three days • Gain competitive advantage by learning about the latest technology issues and market trends – from industry experts at the forefront of developments • A diverse range of topics covered in just three days including the business outlooks of major lighting companies, current design challenges and opportunities, and market trends such as smart lighting and impacts on health • A unique opportunity to see a world-class line up of industry experts together under one roof • Gain access to Strategies Unlimited’s latest research into the LED, lamp and luminaire and connected lighting markets, in addition to a 15% discount on any of the group’s market reports.

WWW.SILEUROPE.COM Owned and Produced by:

Presented by:

REGISTER NOW, SPACES ARE LIMITED. EARLY BIRD DEADLINE 11 SEPTEMBER 2015 Supported by:

Events:


144 JARGONBUSTER

LIGHTING

JARGON

People who work in lighting don’t half talk some gobbledygook. Here’s what they mean...

EXPLAINED

kWh The kilowatt-hour is a unit of energy equal to 1,000 watt-hours. That’s what a 1,000W device uses in one hour – or what a 1W device uses in 1,000 hours. It’s the unit that your electricity bill is counted in.

SON High-pressure sodium lamps (or SON lamps) are gas discharge lamps that use sodium in an excited state to produce light, and are often used for streetlighting. They produce a yellow light and have poor colour rendering. But they are efficient, often reaching about 100 lm/W. Higher-powered 600W versions can reach 150 lm/W.

IP RATING An IP (index of protection) rating tells you the amount of protection a luminaire or other piece of equipment has against things getting in – including dust, dirt and water as well as hands and fingers. For example, a fitting rated IP22 will prevent the insertion of fingers and will not be damaged if exposed to dripping water.

PIR Short for passive infrared. PIR sensors are electronic sensors that measure infrared light radiating from objects in their field of view. It can detect heat from objects that is undetectable by humans. PIR is one of the main technologies used for presence and absence detection, to turn lights on and off when people are or aren’t there.

CFL Popularly referred to as energysaving lamps, compact fluorescent lamps have a poor image because of perceived deficiencies in colour, power and the time it takes them to reach full output. But massive improvements have been made in all these areas thanks to substantial investment by the big lamp manufacturers.

CRI Short for colour-rendering index, CRI is the ability of a light source to show the colours of objects properly. Lamps with poor colour rendering will distort some colours, which may mean you end up with brown socks when you wanted green ones. The higher the CRI, on a 0-100 scale, the more accurately the lamp will show colours.

Luxreview.com The home of the lighting industry online www.luxreview.com


JARGONBUSTER 145

Pulse-width modulation PWM is a technique used to control the power supplied to electrical devices such as LEDs. The supply voltage (and current) is switched on and off many times per second, and the average power delivered to the load can be varied by changing the proportion of the time the voltage is on. This technique can be used to dim LEDs.

COLOUR TEMPERATURE Colour temperature describes whether a light source appears ‘warm’ or ‘cool’ – indicated by the correlated colour temperature (CCT). Lamps with a warm appearance have a CCT of 2700-3000K, and are considered appropriate for domestic settings; cooler lamps might be 4000K, and are used more often in offices and retail. The higher the colour temperature, the ‘cooler’ the appearance. Don’t ask.

GaN-on-GaN

Esos

GaN-on-GaN refers to LEDs made of gallium nitride (GaN) on a substrate also made of gallium nitride, rather than on the usual sapphire or silicon carbide substrate. Blue LED inventor Shuji Nakamura says GaN-on-GaN is the next generation of LED, offering greater efficiency and better colour.

The Energy Savings Opportunity Scheme (Esos) is the UK government’s latest attempt to encourage energy efficiency among big organisations. It requires that they regularly assess their energy consumption and consider measures to reduce it. But it doesn’t actually force them to do anything about it – that’s up to them.

HID lamps

Lux

Short for high-intensity discharge, HID lamps are a type of electrical gas discharge lamp that produces light by means of an electric arc between tungsten electrodes inside a transparent tube. HID lamps include mercury-vapour, quartz metal-halide, ceramic  metal halide, sodium-vapour and xenon short-arc lamps.

Lux is the international unit of illuminance – a measure of how much luminous flux (in lumens) is spread over a given area (in square metres). In other words, it tells you how much light is arriving at a surface. 1 lm/m2 equals 1 lx. Multiply an illuminance figure in lux by an amount of time in hours and you have a measure of exposure in lux hours – useful if you’re looking after delicate objects or surfaces that can’t be exposed to too much light.

CHECK OUT OUR BRAND NEW WEBSITE FOR ALL THE LATEST ON LIGHTING IN YOUR REGION AND YOUR SECTOR

www.luxreview.com www.luxreview.com


.%d

.%d

146 B BATWING ATWING TW WIN ING +%d

(%d

%d

(%d

+% %d

Contact Batwing at thebelfry@luxmagazine.co.uk

TOP 10 WEIRDEST WEIRDES EST LIGHTING PRODUCTS Batwing picks out the strangest lighting creations money can buy 2 THE SQUIRREL LIGHT For the princely sum of £550 you can get your paws on one of these stylish squirrel lights. The stuffed squirrel appears as if it’s running up your wall holding a lampshade. Just what every living room needs.

1 THE ANGRY LIGHT Don’t let your dog pee on this lamppost from Hubbell, which is designed to deter criminals. Cross an invisible line – known as a ‘geofence’ – and the light gets mad: it flashes, gives stern recorded-voice warnings and announces it’s switching on its video camera. Eek.

3 THE FLYING SQUIRREL LIGHT Not impressed by the squirrel light? OK then, check out this bad boy. It’s a flyingg squirrel light. Boom. Made by Japanese arts and crafts company Kiyata, this will lend any home that woodland feel.

4 THE FART LIGHT Terralux has unveiled the world’s firs light that can deal with farts. We’re not making this up. A built-in gas sensor detects if a bathroom is left ‘stinky’, and turns on the fan.

6 THE LIGHT-UP BOTTLE STOP The drinks business is enjoying a roaring trade thanks to the plethora of drinks-related LED products stumbling on to the market. The latest fad to hit the bars is this £10 light-up bottle stopper. Money to burn, anyone?

5 THE LIGHT-UP TOILET SEA This toilet seat is for those days when you feel a little blea and you can’t quite stand up straight (or even find the ligh switch in the bathroom). And if you’re having a sit down you might be lucky enough to get a heated derrière – for it seems the seat will have to act as its own heatsink.

7 THE ROYAL BABY LIGHT BULB What better way to celebrate the birth of the ninth in line to the throne than with an LED filament lamp? Dressed in gold with a frosty appearance, the ‘Charlotte’ is dimmable and energy efficient. Long may she reign – 30,000 hours, to be exact.

8 THE LED CRYSTAL

BURJ KHALIFA Subtlety and understatement are the watchwords for this light-up crystal recreation of the world’s tallest building, made by German chandelier makers Faustig.

9 THE HORSE WITH A LAMPSHADE ON ITS HEAD It’s a horse. With a lampshade on its head. Any questions?

www.luxreview.com

10 THE ARTICHOKE Imagine! A light shaped like an artichoke! How absurd! Aha ha ha ha ha!


Lux Special - LuxLive Preview  

The latest news, analysis, case studies and how-to guides on energy-efficient lighting, including the preview of the world's most exciting l...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you