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FOREWORD Avril Doyle, MEP, on the excellent performance of Ireland in the European pharmaceuticals and chemicals market. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 SECTOR OVERVIEW Matt Moran, PharmaChemical Ireland, asks is the recent report from the Enterprise Strategy Group, a reality or a myth for the Irish pharmaceutical and chemical sector. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

10 BIOTECHNOLOGY The importance of the Irish Biotechnology Industry to the economy cannot be overstated, writes Marian Byron, Director, Irish Bio-Industry Association.. . . . . . 10 MEDICAL DEVICES If the Irish Medical Devices and Diagnostics sector is to continue to flourish, it must take steps to address the challenges of innovation, support for business and skills development.. . . 14

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BIOMED IRELAND BioMedIreland provides an all-island focal point for the health technology and biotechnology industries.. . . . . . . . . 18 COVER STORY Crannagh & Co. could be the one-stop answer to all your customs and international trade problems. . . . . . . . . . . . 20 PACKAGING Declan Bogan, Business Development Director at SteriPack Pharma, on the challenges and innovations in packaging pharmaceutical, chemical and medical products.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

EDUCATION Investing in the knowledge, skills and innovation capacity of the population will drive Ireland’s development in the global environment . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

TRACEABILITY Integrated traceability in the supply chain is the key to preventing counterfeit pharmaceuticals making it to the end user, according to Denis Coleman, GS1 Ireland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

REACH DIRECTIVE Dr Edel Healy, Senior Inspector, Health & Safety Authority, writes about the implications of the REACH Directive for the pharmaceutical and chemical sectors. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT Supply Chain Management in the pharmaceutical industry can enhance shareholder value, writes Edward Sweeney, Director of Learning at NITL. . . . . 33

LANGUAGE SERVICE PROVISION The importance of language service provision for the life sciences industry. . . . 54

COMPANY PROFILE: PLATE TEK ENGINEERING Plate Tek Engineering is a leading supplier of heat exchangers to the process industries across the island of Ireland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 RESEARCH & FUNDING Bioscience research in Ireland is in good hands with Science Foundation Ireland. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40

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RECRUITMENT A recent online survey into the jobs market in Ireland, from Berkeley Recruitment, had some very interesting results. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 LISTINGS Chemical Suppliers . . . . . . . . 57 General Suppliers . . . . . . . . . 59 Company Listings . . . . . . . . . 69 Useful Refernces . . . . . . . . . . 84 Irish Pharmachem 2007 gratefully acknowledges the assistance of PharmaChemical Ireland in the production of this publication. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this publication, but the publisher cannot accept responsibility for errors or omissions.


FOREWORD

IRISH AND EUROPEAN PHARMACHEM SECTOR LOOKS TO THE FUTURE

I

reland punches above its weight in the European pharmaceuticals and chemicals market. It is generally seen as a desirable location with a minimum of bureaucratic obstacles, an excellent educational system that facilitates family relocation and it is viewed as a country that signs up fully to the EU principle of free movement of labour. Furthermore, a major contributing factor to our foreign direct investment has been our benign tax environment. The Irish pharmaceutical and chemical industries have been principal contributors to the growth of our economy. 14 of the top 15 multinational companies have operations in Ireland, with more than €4.3 billion invested in the Irish economy by these industries in the past 6 years. Over 24,000 people are employed directly, and further 24,000 indirectly, with graduates making up more than 50% of the industry’s workforce.

Some of the latest developments in the European Union are detailed below.

CHEMICALS - REACH

To date, the regulation of chemicals has been very confusing and inefficient, with over 40 different directives largely independent of each other. That has now changed with the new European Chemicals Regulation (REACH), which was adopted in December 2006 and is one of the most comprehensive pieces of legislation ever enacted by the EU. REACH, an acronym for Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation of Chemicals, entered into force on June 1, 2007, and is due to be implemented EU-wide by 2008. Avril Doyle MEP, Member of the Environment, It will rationalise chemicals’ regulation Public Health and Food Safety and Industry, and will register chemicals which were Research and Energy Committees of the never previously assessed for their European Parliament. impact on human health. Importantly, REACH will be the authorisation procedure which will apply “to substances of PHARMACEUTICAL EXPORTS very high concern”, namely those substances which are persistent and bio-accumulative. This provision will encourage the development and marketing of safer alternatives In 2006, pharmaceutical exports exceeded €14.8m, making improving our health and environment, while at the same Ireland the largest net exporter of pharmaceuticals in the time boosting innovation in industry. world. We do not, however, operate in isolation but as part Enterprises which manufacture or import more than one of the wider European Single Market which has implicatonne of a chemical substance per year will be required to tions for industry, governments and consumers alike. register it in a central database administered by the new EU Since 1985, a score of European Union (EU) directives have Chemicals Agency. This Agency will provide IT tools and been adopted with the aim of achieving a single, EU-wide guidance, while Member States will offer helpdesk assismarket for pharmaceuticals. Today, this sector is extensively tance to companies. regulated, with the dual aim of protecting public health In Ireland, the agency responsible for REACH is the while completing a strong Single Market for pharmaceuHealth and Safety Authority. I hope, notwithstanding teething ticals. The European pharmaceuticals market is the largest problems and an initial start-up time, that when implementin the world, and now sets the international benchmark for ed successfully, REACH will be an effective regulatory tool production standards. that will encourage exciting research and innovation. At the same time, the European chemicals sector alone represents about two-thirds of the entire manufacturing trade surplus of the EU and accounts for 12% of the EU’s ADVANCED THERAPY MEDICINAL PRODUCTS manufacturing industries’ added value. Thus, any regulations in this sector are a very important and influential part Another recent development at European level is the of EU legislation. agreement on an Advanced Therapy Medicinal Product 3


FOREWORD can actually have an adverse effect, by provoking an increase in the use of unregulated substances.

Regulation, which promises European-wide access to a new generation of products and treatments. Europe will now have a harmonised legal framework in place for these innovative products, which could enter into force as early as January 2008. It will provide our scientific community, patients and industry with a predictable and clear legal framework to attract leading companies which research and develop these innovative therapies.

BETTER REGULATION While we must strive to ensure the highest level of consumer, environmental and animal health protection, legislation must be clear and practical, without sacrificing legal certainty, if we are to keep Europe competitive and innovative in a global market. On this point, I would like to highlight the ‘Better Regulation’ initiative currently being applied at European level, whereby all legislation is being reviewed to make sure it is both necessary and enforceable.

The new system will establish a single, centralised authorisation procedure through a new Committee on Advanced Therapies (CAT) at the European Medicines Agency in London. It will replace the current patchwork of differing standards in each EU Member State, which hampers research and development and hinders equal access for patients to innovative products.

MRL LEGISLATION In April 2007, the Commission published a new proposal for the establishment of maximum residue limits (MRLs) of pharmacologically active substances in foodstuffs of animal origin. I have been appointed European Parliament Rapporteur on this proposal and will present a report to my colleagues in the Parliament by the end of 2007. Under the codecision procedure, the European Parliament and the Council of Ministers have equal powers of decision in the European legislative process, so Members of the European Parliament can have a considerable collective influence on the outcome of legislation. The current legal framework for establishing MRLs has led to problems in the practice of veterinary medicine: the existing legislation is difficult to understand and has caused the availability of veterinary medicines to decrease to such an extent that it has adverse effects on public and animal health and animal welfare. The new legislation seeks to rectify these drawbacks by simplifying the existing legislation and ensuring consistency with international standards. It will also create a specific legal framework to set maximum residue limits for pharmacologically active substances not intended to be authorised as veterinary medicines, in particular for control purposes and for imported food. As with all pharmaceutical and chemicals legislation, excessive regulation that is overly burdened with administrative red tape and difficult to interpret in a practical sense,

One of the downsides of the European Single Market has been the plethora of legislation that has been generated to ensure all Member States are operating by the same market rules, with the same level of health and environmental protection. In the context of the Lisbon Strategy for growth and jobs, this Better Regulation policy aims to ensure that EU legislation is beneficial for citizens, industry and Europe as a whole, which is ultimately is the basic raison d’être of the European Union.

Avril Doyle MEP, Member of the Environment, Public Health and Food Safety and Industry, Research and Energy Committees of the European Parliament. 4


SECTOR OVERVIEW

AHEAD OF THE CURVE? Matt Moran, PharmaChemical Ireland, asks is the recent report from the Enterprise Strategy Group, a reality or a myth for the Irish pharmaceutical and chemical sector?

A ‘

head of the Curve’, the report produced by the IDA- PHARMACHEMICAL Enterprise Strategy Group, IRELAND SEMINAR the group assembled by An Tánaiste, Mary Harney TD to plot the For some time now, IDA Ireland future of the Irish Economy over the and PharmaChemical Ireland have next number of years, strongly reccollaborated in urging ommended that this country develop PharmaChem companies to its technological and applied research expand beyond their traditional and development capability to support manufacturing base and to the development of high value prodembrace high end manufacturing, ucts and services. such as biopharmaceuticals and to PharmaChemical Ireland, IBEC’s invest in development type activrepresentative body for the ities. PharmaChem manufacturing sector in In April of this year, they cothis country, strongly bought into the hosted their third workshop idea that R&D is key to the future designed to support this process. A prosperity of the sector: it has estabnumber of interesting and instruclished a Working Group dedicated to tive case studies reflected real eviencouraging its member companies to dence that companies are, in fact, invest in R&D activities here in embracing the concept of investing Ireland. in development activities, which Most stakeholders agree that are starting to move the Irish affilIreland will not be able to rely solely iates of some of the major pharma on its attractiveness as a manufacturplayers closer to the core of new ing base in the future. A rising cost Matt Moran, PharmaChemical Ireland. drug development. base and increasingly aggressive comFinbar Whyte of petition from the Far East will see to this. Most agree that GlaxoSmithKline in Cork described in detail how that if Ireland wishes to retain this base, which is currently worth company had used the ability of its local workforce to over €41.6 billion to this economy in exports, it will need convince the corporation to commence investment in a to build its R&D base. Most also agree that the key to doing number of product development functions, ranging from this will lie in leveraging the manufacturing base by support for manufacturing though development of pharenhancing process development and process optimisation maceutical technologies, right the way through to invest– the so-called D part of R&D. ing €13.7m in basic research into gastro-intestinal disAlthough it will be important to develop the basic eases, the latter in collaboration with the Science research base also, as this provides the driver for knowledge Foundation Ireland backed Alimentary Probiotic Centre creation, it will be the enhancement of process development at University College Cork. which will help to retain the sector in Ireland. The efforts of the company have been further rewarded by the announcement that the Cork site will manuUltimately, this will lead to the embedding of a knowlfacture the recently approved anti-cancer drug Tykerb edge base in this country, co-driven by company investment – this will entail an investment of €250m and the creation and the establishment of a world class research base. This of a further 150 high skilled jobs. is the aspiration anyway, but is there any evidence that this Merck Sharpe and Dohme described how they are in will in fact become a reality in this country? the process of investing in a new R&D centre at their Ballydine site in Co. Tipperary, which was established in 7


SECTOR OVERVIEW

1976. The new investment will involve two specific areas of activity. A research and development (R&D) centre will develop innovative platforms for the formulation of products used in late stage clinical trials. The new pharmaceutical manufacturing facility will enable the Ballydine plant to produce tablets and capsules for a number of new products in late stage clinical trials and for new products launched on the market. This investment of €100m will create 120 new positions over the next three years, including approximately 60 R&D positions. Wyeth Biopharma outlined their plans to expand their process development and pilot R&D laboratory facilities in Dublin. They will invest €24m, adding an additional 6,000 square metres of laboratory space. This will enable them to take early stage products from Wyeth’s Research and Development and bring them to laboratory scale. This will give the site competitive edge in the areas of process development and intellectual property. To date, Wyeth have invested €1.8 billion at the Grangecastle Facility, where 1,270 are currently employed. Wyeth already has a number of research collaborations with Dublin City University and the Conway Institute. Late last year, Eli-Lilly announced that they were to invest €400m in a brand new Biopharmaceutical Manufacturing Facility at their Kinsale site, which will employ an additional 200 people. All of the above, taken into account with the other announcements by Centocor and Amgen to establish biotech plants in Ireland, not to mention recent announcements by Gilead Life Sciences and Servier to significantly expand their operation here, provides ample evidence that the industry here is, in fact, converting the aspirations of the Enterprise Strategy Group into reality for the PharmaChem sector in this country.

WHAT

challenges. It is the view of PharmaChemical Ireland that the Government will need to remain focused on a couple of issues: • Ireland will need more scientists to work in these areas, hence the need for an ongoing focus on the promotion of careers in science. Also, there is an urgent need to implement the recommendations of the Task Force on Physical Sciences, including, for instance, the provision of adequately staffed teaching laboratories in every secondary school in the country.

ELSE NEEDS TO BE DONE ?

As the sector knows only too well, success brings its own • The existing regime of tax credits for R&D needs to be modified to reward ongoing investment in R&D, as opposed to once-off investment, which is favoured by the existing incremental scheme. • The tax free treatment of royalties flowing from Intellectual Property filed in this country is a significant incentive; under no circumstances should it be rolled back or watered down any further. Finally, PharmaChemical Ireland, in collaboration with the Parenteral Drugs Association (PDA) and the International Society for Pharmaceutical Engineering (ISPE) will host a conference entitled ‘Ireland at the Leading Edge: Innovative Pharmaceuticals and Biopharmaceuticals of the Future’. This is a ‘must attend event’, where leading regulators and industrialists will debate the future shape of the industry here. For more information, see www.pharamchemicalireland.ie. 8


BIOTECHNOLOGY

THE FUTURE’S ALREADY HERE

T

The importance of the Irish Biotechnology Industry to the Irish economy and Irish society as a whole, cannot be ignored, writes Marian Byron, Director, Irish Bio-Industry Association.

he importance of the Biotechnology industry is gaining greater recognition each year. Biotechnology is changing our relationship with the world around us. It is driving innovation in medicine, agriculture and industry. For example, international research based companies contribute to the quality of human life and life expectancy, with more than 250 million people worldwide benefiting from approved biotechnology-derived medicines and therapeutics to treat or prevent heart attack, multiple sclerosis, breast cancer, cystic fibrosis, leukemia and other conditions. The biotechnology industry is the industry of the future, with obvious benefits to the economy and society. Biotech-based industrial techniques consume less resources by using less energy and creating less waste. They also help the environment by reducing green-house gas emissions, providing biological substitutes for more harmful chemical processes and have the potential for alternative and renewable energy. It is a significant enabling technology in traditional manufacturing sectors and in the production of industrial goods, such as biodegradable polymers. Greater emphasis will be placed on converging technologies. The growing synergistic opportunities between pharmaceutical, medical devices, agriculture, food and ICT industry sectors and BioIndustry are becoming more and more apparent, with significant applications arising for developing improvements in processes and products. The wide extent and depth of potential influence Marian Byron, Director, Irish of this sector across the various areas (health, environBio-Industry Association.

ment, and agriculture and industry efficiency) is being recognised by Irish policy makers and government agencies, with the focus on the growing role of biotechnology as a key driver of innovation and growth in Ireland.

BIOTECHNOLOGY IRELAND

IN

Ireland has developed a world-class biotechnology and life sciences industry. Indeed, Ireland is recognised as an international leader in the development of innovative biotechnological healthcare research and products. Ireland has now nailed its colours to the mast in terms of its commitment to the growth and maintenance of this sector, as part of the long term economic strategy for the nation. Ireland has recognised that the field of biotechnology currently faces an era of opportunity greater than any in history - opportunity to bring about real solutions to enduring world health issues and opportunity to create new markets that make real contributions to shareholder value. A profile of the industry in Ireland can be obtained from a 2005 study carried by Critical I Limited based on data from 2003/4:

Companies Employees R&D employees R&D Spend Revenue

2004 49 4436 1839 €284m €707m

2003 42 2941 1080 €288m €961m

However, such facts and figures do not show up the success stories which are vital to highlight the innovative and entrepreneurial nature of this industry sector. Some of the more recent success stories span all areas of biotechnology application, including health, environment, and energy. These include an increasing number of both large multinational and smaller indigenous companies. 10


BIOTECHNOLOGY

THE FUTURE’S ALREADY HERE

T

The importance of the Irish Biotechnology Industry to the Irish economy and Irish society as a whole, cannot be ignored, writes Marian Byron, Director, Irish Bio-Industry Association.

he importance of the Biotechnology industry is gaining greater recognition each year. Biotechnology is changing our relationship with the world around us. It is driving innovation in medicine, agriculture and industry. For example, international research based companies contribute to the quality of human life and life expectancy, with more than 250 million people worldwide benefiting from approved biotechnology-derived medicines and therapeutics to treat or prevent heart attack, multiple sclerosis, breast cancer, cystic fibrosis, leukemia and other conditions. The biotechnology industry is the industry of the future, with obvious benefits to the economy and society. Biotech-based industrial techniques consume less resources by using less energy and creating less waste. They also help the environment by reducing green-house gas emissions, providing biological substitutes for more harmful chemical processes and have the potential for alternative and renewable energy. It is a significant enabling technology in traditional manufacturing sectors and in the production of industrial goods, such as biodegradable polymers. Greater emphasis will be placed on converging technologies. The growing synergistic opportunities between pharmaceutical, medical devices, agriculture, food and ICT industry sectors and BioIndustry are becoming more and more apparent, with significant applications arising for developing improvements in processes and products. The wide extent and depth of potential influence Marian Byron, Director, Irish of this sector across the various areas (health, environBio-Industry Association.

ment, and agriculture and industry efficiency) is being recognised by Irish policy makers and government agencies, with the focus on the growing role of biotechnology as a key driver of innovation and growth in Ireland.

BIOTECHNOLOGY IRELAND

IN

Ireland has developed a world-class biotechnology and life sciences industry. Indeed, Ireland is recognised as an international leader in the development of innovative biotechnological healthcare research and products. Ireland has now nailed its colours to the mast in terms of its commitment to the growth and maintenance of this sector, as part of the long term economic strategy for the nation. Ireland has recognised that the field of biotechnology currently faces an era of opportunity greater than any in history - opportunity to bring about real solutions to enduring world health issues and opportunity to create new markets that make real contributions to shareholder value. A profile of the industry in Ireland can be obtained from a 2005 study carried by Critical I Limited based on data from 2003/4:

Companies Employees R&D employees R&D Spend Revenue

2004 49 4436 1839 €284m €707m

2003 42 2941 1080 €288m €961m

However, such facts and figures do not show up the success stories which are vital to highlight the innovative and entrepreneurial nature of this industry sector. Some of the more recent success stories span all areas of biotechnology application, including health, environment, and energy. These include an increasing number of both large multinational and smaller indigenous companies. 10


BIOTECHNOLOGY

1. Wyeth, for production of a widely-used arthritis drug; 2. Merrion Biopharm for the development of oral drug delivery systems where conventional approaches have proven inadequate; 3. Elan in its utilisation of proprietary NanoCrystal Technology to develop oncology products; 4. Biotrin’s biomarker range of products for the detection of early organ damage; 5. Bedminster International’s biological process to convert biodegradable waste to a high quality biofuel; 6. Tridelta for the development of a series of sensors for use in the detection and monitoring of mastitis.

Biotechnology Companies Founded By Year 2002-2004 1999-2001 1994-1998 1989-1993 Before 1989

11 9 11 10 8

However, opportunities in the biotechnology arena are not without challenges for the Irish industry sector, which competes in a global marketplace full of competition and regulatory constraints. There are three areas where the industry sector needs to focus its attention 1. Innovative SMEs add value, from both economic and social standpoints. Ireland needs to amplify efforts in favour of research, increasing the number of innovative SMEs in the country, creating an increase in economic growth to benefit Ireland’s hi-tech industry in general and the biotechnology industry in particular.

BIOTECHNOLOGY COMPANY GROWTH Companies formed in 2004 (% of country total) Number of growing companies (more employees in 2004; includes companies founded in 2004)

In 2004, 22 (45%) of Ireland’s biotechnology companies were young, innovative companies. These are the companies which need to be nurtured and it is generally felt that action to be taken should include greater mobilisation of savings, and full implementation of the Young Innovative Company initiative in Ireland. The present tax incentive is not sufficient for biotech start-ups, due to the long time before profitability The European Commission published state aid rules in November 2006, backed by a communication on tax incentives, to stimulate R&D. The new rules recognise Young Innovative Company (YIC) status as an eligibility criterion for state aid. This will enable Member States who so wish to provide extra public funds like tax and other financial incentives to their young innovative biotechnology companies, without running into trouble with EU competition rules. In addition to the R&D tax incentives communication, these new EU rules enable governments to give extra incentives to companies that are less than 6 years old and spend 15% or more of their revenues on R&D. With effect from January 1, 2007, the EU rules,

3 (6%)

18 (37%)

Number of employees in growing companies (% of employees in country) 2,474 (56%) Employees in companies of (% of country’s employees): 5 years or less 6-10 years Over 15 years

191 (4%) 80 (4%) 4061 (92%)

R&D Staff in companies of: 5 years or less 6-10 years Over 15 years

129 80 1,629

12


BIOTECHNOLOGY

3. Growing and Fostering the Research Base One of the key elements which underpins and sustains the growth of the biotechnology sector is Ireland will be maintaining research capability, ensuring this is embedded within the different research institutions and industry, both indigenous and multinational. Research conducted in Ireland in the area of biotechnology has performed slightly above the world average. Funding for such research must be available and committed over the longer rather than short term, to ensure that it translates into marketable and needed products and creates investment opportunities. The focus must be on creating robust and sustainable research centres in Ireland, capable of competing with the best in the world.

which are not sector specific, benefit research, development and innovation across Europe. 2. People Skills (the main asset of the sector) The nature of the biotechnology industry requires a supply of trained Bio-Pharmacists, with industry relevant experience, to ensure its survival. This includes the supply of people with Bio Pharma experience for new companies. Existing companies should be actively encouraging the student of today to encompass the life sciences as subjects for long term career development: this is crucial for the sector, alongside a co-ordinated collaboration between industry, the training agencies, the IDA and third level institutions to provide the necessary skill sets for the work force.

The typical biotechnology company in Ireland (Financial data in €m) Age (years) Employees Revenue Research strength (personnel) Research strength R&D budget)

0-2

3-5

€0.20 5 €0.91

€0.6 9 €1.96

6-10 17 €1.76 7 €0.95

11-15 37 €10.94 13 €1.71

16+ 58 €9.60 14 €0.97

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MEDICAL DEVICES

FACING THE CHALLENGES AHEAD If the Irish Medical Devices and Diagnostics sector is to continue to flourish, it must take steps to address the challenges of innovation, support for business and skills development.

F

or some years now, Ireland has provided the skills, infrastructure and corporate supports required by medical devices and diagnostics companies and entrepreneurs. Eight of the world's top ten companies have chosen Ireland as the base for one or more of their operations, while another 130-plus companies operate in this sector in Ireland. As well as the major medical devices companies themselves, a vibrant services industry has developed in support, providing world class contract manufacturing, design, packaging and sterilisation services to the companies operating here. The medical device product range is varied and includes diagnostic kits, orthopaedic implants, stents, pacemakers, contact lenses as well as many others. The sector employs over 24,000 people in Ireland, where exports of medical devices and diagnostics developed and manufactured here were valued at $8.5billion in 2005, an increase of 7.6% over 2004 and 167.6% higher than in 2001. Worldwide, this is a growing sector: indeed, the global market is currently worth over $184bn dollars and growing at more than 6% per annum.

mentioned above, has set a target to grow Business Expenditure on Research and Development from €1bn in 2003 to €2.5bn by 2013. With a budget of €8.2bn, allocated in the National Development Plan, this strategy should lift Ireland’s capacity to generate and exploit new knowledge to a new level.

KEY RECOMMENDATIONS The Irish Medical Devices Association (IMDA) has identified key recommendations to ensure continued sector development under the headings of innovation, support for business and skills development. This document was presented to both the Minister for Enterprise Trade and Employment and the CEOs of the State Development agencies, and is constantly being updated to reflect changes and developments. In parallel, IMDA works through its Board, working groups and partnership programmes to develop programmes to assist companies in the sector. One such initiative is the Medical Technology Council, which was established to increase linkages between industry, academia and the clinical community. The IMDA believes that true innovation in medical technology will only be achieved if all three groups worth together effectively, as evidenced by their ‘Vision to 2020’. The Medical Technology Council works by supporting programmes, developing ideas and generating linkages between the three groups and Government agencies. The Cross Sector clinical Trials taskforce (led by IMDA and supported by other members of the Council) launched a report in November 2006 entitled ‘Enhanced Clinical Trials Infrastructure Required to Benefit Public Health’. According to the IMDA, a number of its recommendations have already been implemented, while others are actively being considered. The Council also supports the establishment of an All Island Fourth Level Graduate School for the medical devices and diagnostics industry. This high skills school,

GOVERNMENT SUPPORT The Government has constantly reviewed and adapted supports for the medical devices industry, in a bid to ensure that they are effective and appropriate within a changing global environment, and regularly consults with industry and other key stakeholders to formulate its strategy in this regard. The 2007 Budget, alongside the recent National Development Plan, introduced a new Science Technology and Innovation Strategy, expanded the R&D Tax Credits scheme, launched significant new R&D programmes, doubled health research funding and extended the very positive Business Expansion Scheme. The Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation, 14


MEDICAL DEVICES

US Rule Change to Aid Irish Companies THE Irish Medical Devices Association (IMDA) has welcomed a rule change governing fees payable by Irish medical device and diagnostic companies launching new products in the US, which will deliver massive savings to small Irish R&D-focused companies and open up a range of new business opportunities. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has proposed that pre-market application fees exemptions, currently on offer to small US companies, will also now be made available to foreign-owned companies. The move follows a representation made by the IMDA via the European Commission last year and is set to be formally signed off in September of this year. Pre-market application fees are fees charged to medical devices and diagnostic companies each time they launch a new product onto the US market. Currently, small Irish companies are charged rates that apply to large multinational corporations, which involves a payment of $281,000 for the first product launch. The new rule will mean small companies, with less than $30m turnover, qualify for a total fees exemption for the first product launch and massively reduced fees for subsequent product launches. The proposed fee structure for 2008 will further benefit Irish indigenous enterprises. Commenting on the development, IMDA Director Sharon Higgins said, “The new fee structure is a major boost to small indigenous companies attempting to compete in a highly competitive market. The change should lead to increased sales and the growth of Irish enterprises.”

Pictured at the launch of the Cross Sectoral Clinical Trials Taskforce report, ‘Enhanced Clinical Trials Infrastructure Required to Benefit Public Health’ are clinical trial patient Dolores Byrne, examining her X Ray (right) with Dr Jim Egan, Consultant Respiratory Physician, Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Dublin; and Sharon Higgins, Director IBEC's Irish Medical Devices Association. The report calls on government to treble health research funding.

which would be created jointly by nine universities throughout the island of Ireland, alongside the IMDA, could be up and running as early as this September.

IMDA PROJECTS Other IMDA projects include: •

IMDA recently joined with Sustainable Energy Ireland (SEI) to devise a three-day Energy Efficiency Programme, aimed at medium to large energy users, pursuing best practice energy management. Topics covered include proven energy management techniques, energy saving opportunities, technologies specific to the sector.

industry operator standards directed at measuring operator competence and job specific skills. Operatives who complete the training may proceed to further technical qualifications (certificates, diplomas, degrees).

To upskill people already working in the sector, as well as attracting those currently in full-time education, the IMDA has launched a number of initiatives. These include the 'Medical Technologies Future Leaders Programme', a new, modular, training programme for middle managers, as well as Imagine, a magazine for schools, which promotes jobs in the sector. A new website to provide on-going information to students and teachers on current/future skills needs in the sector is currently under development.

IMDA is introducing an Annual Awards programme in 2007, aimed at promoting and rewarding excellence in innovation, manufacturing and skills amongst member companies. In addition to the prestige of winning the overall award, the winning entry will receive a substantial education bursary.

IMDA is currently in discussions with appropriate agencies to determine if the Small Business Innovation Research Model, currently in place in National Institutes of Health in the USA, could be employed in Ireland. This model allows companies to access research funding without having to work with an academic institution.

CHALLENGES While the Medical Devices and Diagnostic Sector continue to grow throughout Ireland, we have to be cognisant of the threat from low cost economies elsewhere. According to Pat Forristal, Chairman of the Irish Medical Devices Association (IMDA) and Vice President

IMDA in collaboration with FÁS have developed 15


MEDICAL DEVICES

of International Advanced Opperations for Stryker Orthopaedics, “Ireland has developed as a key international centre for manufacturing medical technology products by consistently proving that it offers the best return on investment. To continue to compete globally, it must adapt by offering better support to drive productivity, cost effectiveness and investment in R&D.” Support of manufacturing is critical, according to the IMDA Chairman, who maintains that success with R&D and supply chain management has only been possible because of Ireland’s strong productive manufacturing core. The IMDA has welcomed the Irish Government’s recently announced High Level Manufacturing Group in support of manufacturing here. Rising energy costs are also a major concern, with Pat Forristal claiming Irish energy costs are now “significantly out of line with international competitors” and calling on Government “to act quickly and decisively to minimise the negative impact of rising energy costs”.

DEMAND FOR GRADUATES INCREASES THE demand for graduates in the medical devices and diagnostics sector is set to increase in the coming years, according to a recent survey carried out by the IMDA and Trinity College Dublin. The survey indicates that this sector will need increases of 64% PhDs, 36% MScs and 13% primary science and engineering degrees by 2011. One of the key objectives outlined in the IMDA statement of strategy 2004-2007 is to ensure an adequate supply of skilled and adaptable employees to meet the sector’s growing needs and, therefore, the declining interest in science and engineering among second and third level students is a growing concern. In an effort to promote the sector among young people, IMDA, in January of this year launched a new careers magazine, ‘Imagine’, which has been circulated to every second and third level school in the country, providing an insight into some of the exciting career opportunities open to science and engineering graduates in the sector today. The response to the magazine has been overwhelmingly positive and IMDA are now in the process of developing a website, which will include and extend information in the magazine and will make information more accessible for students.

RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURE Forristal also welcomed the recently published report, commissioned by HEA/Forfás, on ‘Irish Industry Views on Investment in Research Infrastructure in Irish Higher Education’ and called for its implementation as soon as possible. “Key areas strongly supported by IMDA include the value of an industry-led research model, in which investment is orientated so as to complement sectoral strengths,” he noted. “Joint research centres which co-locate industry and academic researchers should be further developed, as should joint industry-based research centres. An emphasis on the full utilisation of all research assets available in Ireland is important; both Government-funded research infrastructure and the infrastructure available within companies. This requires more than the recruitment of people from industry but a transformation of the culture of fiscal and asset management which can only come about under a new governance model.” Upskilling the workforce at all levels is also vital, notes Forristal, and requires investment to ensure that an adequate stream of skilled personnel is available to satisfy the future requirements of the industry.

Pictured in CBS School Westland Row Dublin at Irish Medical Devices Association’s launch of ‘Imagine’, a new magazine sponsored by FÁS to promote careers in the sector and highlight job opportunities were students, Reese Alexander and Sarah Doyle, with Kathriona Devereux, presenter of RTE 2’s TV science series, ‘Scope’, and Sinead Keogh, IMDA Executive, (right) working on ‘Promis’, a surgical simulator for teaching surgeons keyhole surgery.

About the IMDA THE Irish Medical Devices Association (IMDA) is the business association within IBEC for the Medical Devices and Diagnostics sector. Currently, IMDA has 80 members, located throughout the island of Ireland. IMDA is a proactive membership organisation. Its broad focus is to promote and support an environment that encourages the sustainable development and profitable growth of our multinational and indigenous medical device and diagnostic companies.

WORLD CLASS MEDICAL TECNOLOGIES SECTOR “Ireland has a real opportunity,” he summarises, “to develop (per Vision 2020) an integrated Irish medical technologies sector that is recognised as a world-class centre of medical education and research; a medical technologies sec-

16


MEDICAL DEVICES

LEADERSHIP PROGRAM FOR MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY SECTOR. THE Irish Medical Devices Association’s (IMDA), Human Resources Development Working Group, in cooperation with FÁS, developed and piloted an accredited Leadership Development Programme during late 2006 and early 2007. Modules covered during the 8 day programme included Personal Development & Leadership; Strategy; Clinical/Anatomy; Innovation; Marketing; Finance; Employment Law and Regulatory Affairs. A second pilot will be run during the final months of 2007. For further information contact Sinead.keogh@ibec.ie

fore undreamed of areas of R&D and marketing – fantastic news for the industry, its employees and the Irish economy as a whole.”

tor possessing world-leading interdisciplinary medical education and research networks; and on-going generation of commercially viable innovations in convergent medical technologies. “The fact that we are a relatively small nation with huge capabilities within industry, academia and our medical community, gives us a unique opportunity for inter-disciplinary collaboration,” Forristal continues. “Ireland can and will play an exciting role in this new dynamic. Our companies are already making very significant moves into the hereto-

NANOMEDICINE – AN OPPORTUNITY FOR IRELAND? IMDA, Intel, Forfas, EI, IDA and SFI jointly hosted a Nanotechnology workshop recently to discuss and agree actions on the rise of Nanotechnology and its importance to Medical Devices and Diagnostics. 35 people attended the workshop and agreed key actions that will enable IMDA to generate a formal position on the proposal to develop a Nanofab and the overall value to Ireland Inc. of identifying it as a key opportunity which the Government should support financially. The Nanofab Working Group is currently working on developing a submission for funding under the Competency Programme.

Pictured are Prof. Brian MacCraith, Director, Biomedical Diagnostics Institute; Sharon Higgins, Director, IMDA; Leonard Hobbs, Intel (The nanofab consortium), at a Nanotechnology in Medical Devices and Diagnostics Workshop in Intel earlier this year.

17


BIOTECHNOLOGY

BIOMEDIRELAND MAKES ITS MARK Since its initiation in May 2004, BioMedIreland provides an all-Ireland focal point for the biotechnology sector.

B

Funding, Training and Research programme databases. With similar user-interfaces to the companies’ database, will allow users to quickly and easily view and access, in summary fashion, upto-date information on the various programmes available in these areas.

ioMedIreland, representing a strategic partnership between InterTradeIreland, the Irish BioIndustry Association (IBIA), the Irish Medical Devices Association (IMDA) and BioBusiness NI, is an allisland programme for the health technology and biotechnology industries. Initiated in May 2004, BioMedIreland provides an all-island focal point for the sector, working to increase North-South cooperation, improve networking and the sharing of knowledge and models of best practice.

FUNCTIONAL PAPERS These include a series of papers covering the areas of Quality Assurance & Regulatory Affairs, Innovation and Supply Chain Management. The papers included in this document provide insightful perspectives on these areas, which have been identified as key to business development in the sector. They have been prepared to provide information for a range of business stakeholders and to act as a point of reference for current best practice. Copies are available free of charge via the trade association websites.

BIOMEDIRELAND PROGRAMME GOALS • Provide a forum for mutual learning, knowledge transfer and networking activities; • Provide the first all-island economic impact study for the sector; • Identify and roll out models of best practice; • Provide strategic benchmarking both internally and externally to the island; • Provide an all-island focal point for the sector and facilitate the global promotion of health technology and biotechnology companies based on the island.

ECONOMIC IMPACT STUDY BioMedIreland recently carried out its first all-island, industry wide survey. With over 30,000 employed in the sector, 10 of the top 12 multinational companies located here, and a significant and growing indigenous sector, the industry represents a significant and growing portion of the all-island economy.

The current strategic focus is in the following four key areas: 1. Networking, Education and Knowledge Dissemination. 2. Innovation and Commercialisation. 3. Profiling and Benchmarking of Sector. 4. Market and Trade Opportunities.

CHALLENGES Significant challenges face the sector, if it is to maintain its current healthy position. Rising business costs present a very real threat and certain key trends, which have been widely discussed in other media, have been validated. In particular, the costs of labour, energy, infrastructure, and difficulties with funding and access to capital have been identified as the top issues facing all companies. To meet these threats and to secure the future for the sector, companies have identified Innovation, Collaboration, R&D, Sales & Marketing and Market Development as the key opportunities and areas for focus. Manufacturing remains the cornerstone for continued success. The challenges facing the manufacturing base are very significant and innovative measures must be identified and implemented to ensure that Ireland remains an attractive and cost-efficient location for manufacturing companies to operate. Copies of the report are available free of charge via the trade association websites.

BioMedIreland’s products and services include: informational support tools; functional papers; and an economic impact study.

INFORMATIONAL SUPPORT TOOLS BioMedIreland has developed the first all-island database of companies in the sector. Containing information on over 180 companies, access and usage is free to all and free of charge. Users may add or modify their company details, using the facility provided in the interface. Initially launched in CD-ROM format, over 1,000 copies of the database have been distributed. Additional content & functionality has since been developed, and the database is now available on-line via InterTradeIreland and the trade association’s websites. Further innovation, in the form of an interactive ‘flash’ map facility, which enables the user to view the companies via an interactive map of Ireland, is nearing completion and will be made available via the websites. Using this visual interface, the presence and importance of the sector is very striking. Additional tools are also under construction, in the form of

BIOMEDIRELAND NETWORK DEVELOPMENT & EVENTS BioMedIreland co-ordinates a series of networking, business partnering and educational activities and events. 18


BIOTECHNOLOGY

InterTradeIreland, the Trade and Business Development body established under the Belfast Agreement to enhance the global competitiveness of the all-island economy, has introduced a significant and wide-ranging number of funding programmes. In conjunction with these programmes, BioMedIreland has successfully promoted and facilitated a number of collaborative North-South projects. Business partners have been alerted to the opportunities available through a variety of mechanisms, and project schemes are underway in a number of arenas. Additional collaborative opportunities continue to be introduced by InterTradeIreland and further information can be obtained by contacting either of the BioMedIreland project managers (details right). In the current programme of events, BioMedIreland has announced the ‘BioMed Central Series’. Building on the success of the ‘BioMed Central 2006’ conference held in Belfast, a series of business-partnering events will bring together leading practitioners from the academic, business and clinical communities throughout the island of Ireland. Focused on increasing business linkages, the events will be based on the core theme of commercialisation, and will feature pre-arranged one-to-one and group meetings to enable participants to meet potential partners and identify collaborative activities and projects. This format has proved to be a highly popular and effective way of getting to meet the ‘movers and shakers’ within the sector, and assisting companies and individuals to make the contacts that make a difference.

Contact Details Brian Anderson Project Manager

Mark Cooney Project Manager

The Innovation Centre Confederation House Northern Ireland Science Park 84/86 Lower Baggot St Queen’s Road, Dublin 2 Queen’s Island Belfast BT3 9DT Tel: +44 28 9073 7949 Tel: +353 1 605 1666 Mobile: +44 7730 811 899 Mobile: +353 87 219 7614 Email: brian@biobusinessni.org Email: mark.cooney@ibec.ie Further information, and registration details for these events is available through the trade association websites.

Irish Medical Devices Association www.imda.ie Irish BioIndustry Association www.ibia.ie BioBusiness NI www.biobusinessni.org InterTradeIreland www.InterTradeIreland.com

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COVER STORY

CRANNAGH & CO.: THE PANACEA TO YOUR CUSTOMS AND TRADE PROBLEMS Crannagh & Co. could be the one-stop answer to all your customs and international trade problems.

T

he challenges, costs and risks facing the PharmaChem industry today are at an all time high, with returns on investment facing erosion through many outside factors, including:

• Costs of getting drugs to market and the huge investment in R&D; • Threats to security, public health and profits through counterfeit goods entering the supply chain; • Increasing costs of compliance; • Risks of acquisition; • “Block-buster” products coming off patent. In this environment, can a review of your trade compliance, duty costs and supply chain security benefit shareholder value? The answer is a resounding ‘Yes’, according to Fred Hassan, CEO of Schering-Plough: “In our industry, you are dealing with not only increasing globalisation but also the increasing influence of political agendas, legal issues, regulatory matters…CEOs must have the ability to tune into widely different issues and have peripheral vision…If there is one common thread in this evolution it’s the ability to manage complexity.“(Source: Great Expectations, NGP Europe).

Crannagh Directors Michelle and Carol Lynch.

SECURITY

IN THE

SUPPLY CHAIN

Security and visibility in the supply chain is the most important issue on a company’s agenda with the E-Pedigree system, RTID, Drug Safety and the increasing prevalence of Counterfeit Goods. You should endeavour to secure your supply chain, and by extension your standing in the industry, against litigation, while simultaneously protecting your shareholder value. New EU Regulations are tightening up security, given the increasing perceived threat of a global trade incident in the movement of container traffic. Compliance with the new Regulations and the new “Authorised Economic Operator” (AEO) status being introduced will be vital from January 1, 2008.

AEO CERTIFICATION AEO is a certification, which, if granted, gives you the status of being secure, reliable and verifiable operators in the international supply chain. There is increasing concern to validate and secure container traffic being shipped internationally or within Europe. The US authorities have led a move towards audited controls on the safety and security of those operating in the supply chain and US companies have over-whelming signed up to this through the C-TPAT programme. This

The headquarters of Crannagh & Co. are located in Belturbet, Co. Cavan.

20


COVER STORY

secure supply chain concept is now being introduced into European Law through the AEO security regulations. The Revenue Commissioners have advised that the holder of an AEO certificate will be subjected to fewer physical and document based controls, and customs will focus their resources on those outside the AEO network. Your containers will be unlikely to get stopped at the borders for risk assessment and control once you are an AEO. As companies sign up to the certification, the numbers who are likely to deal with non-AEO operators are likely to dwindle, as the costs in monitoring the supply chain become too high. Many US corporations have already indicated that they will refuse to deal with any companies who do not have AEO certification in the same way as they impose C-TPAT requirements on their US suppliers. If you are a US subsidiary, an Irish company with US plants or you are currently trading with the US or plan to in the future, there will be ‘downward pressure’ to become compliant. Finally, it will be unacceptable for companies operating internationally to fail to be AEO compliant. Many of your competitors are already in the process of preparing for certification: therefore, you should start now “Our AEO team conduct in-house AEO workshops, together with managing project teams, to secure AEO certification from January 1, next year,” notes Carol Lynch, MD, Crannagh & Co. “Together with the Irish Exporters Association and the Institute of Trade, we are also holding workshops across Ireland to prepare companies for this essential status.” (See the enclosed leaflet for more information on these workshops.)

Pictured on the Crannagh 3 are Lorna Guckian, Carol Lynch and Leanne McPhillips.

jurisdictions,” notes Carol Lynch. “We work with a large number of the major PharmaChem global companies and can alleviate your trade headaches. We know your trade issues are often urgent and require priority attention. In this respect, we have a range of dedicated specialists with expertise in the areas listed above and in this we are unique in being able to match your business/trade issue with an experienced and knowledgeable consultant.”

PLANNING

A

TAKE-OVER

“If you are planning a company take-over, you should be very aware of significant hidden liabilities,” notes Carol Lynch. The costs of take-overs today are huge and reflect the industry focus on ‘growth through acquisition’. “However, in the competitive nature and high pressure deadlines associated with such deals, it is critical to ensure that your due-diligence work takes account of potential customs liability, trade litigation, and security risks,” she explains. While you may not consider these priorities in terms of the number of areas that need to be reviewed and the tight deadlines for same, failure to include these areas can result in significant liability transferring to the company at a later stage, something no-one will be keen to have on their plate.

REDUCING COSTS AEO certification is not the only service offered by Crannagh & Co., however.This boutique firm focuses on international and European customs and trade law, import/export taxes, excise duties, audits and disclosures, appeals, export licensing, AEO, ISA and C-TPAT, together with project management for set-ups. “Our network of experts across the EU, the US and Asia can advise you on your import/export issues in any of these

Getting the right advice on international taxes and laws could help your products get to market quicker and cheaper.

21


COVER STORY

TRADE REGULATIONS Not every company can afford in-house trade lawyers, regulation experts and the like. However, new legislation hits the table every day, with Crannagh MD Carol Lynch noting how “the EU Commission is notorious for its bureaucracy in this regard!“ She cites the recent REACH directive and the WTO agreement on TRIPS as two prime examples. In terms of exporters, the Pharmachem industry is often confronted with numerous non-tariff barriers and obstacles, including (as recently identified by the EU Commission): • Complex standards and technical regulations; • Weak Intellectual Property Right protection; • Unnecessary, burdensome or costly testing, registration, licensing and certification procedures. All of these barriers have an impact on cost effectiveness throughout the PharmaChem industry. For instance, are you affected by the costs of bringing a drug to market or facing a money-spinning blockbuster drug soon coming off patent?

Lorna Guckian and Carol Lynch, Crannagh & Co. MD, at the company’s headquarters in Cavan.

• You pay customs duty on manufacture of pharmaceutical and chemical goods. • You pay customs duties on import of capital equipment for new set ups. • You are a supplier being forced into taking responsibility for importing goods on consignment and facing new Customs and VAT registration issues.

Leanne McPhillips, part of the team at Crannagh & Co. helping to organise the AEO workshops (see insert for more details).

“As costs increase and profitability is impacted, the need to look at opportunities for savings wherever possible increases exponentially,” notes Carol. “We advise our clients on numerous ways to use customs and trade law to reduce costs and save on payment on taxes in the supply chain.” According to Carol, these massive savings are to be found, in particular, in cases where: • You import a new active ingredient not yet listed for duty free treatment under the WTO’s Pharmaceutical Agreements. If you are at pre-registration, this should be looked at well in advance to save millions of lost duty. • Your products should currently be on the list for duty free treatment but you aren’t aware it exists or how to get on? • You may be listed for a 0% duty rate by the EU Commission – do you know how?

Crannagh & Co. are experts in international customs and trade laws.

22


PA C K A G I N G

PACKAGING IN THE HEALTHCARE SECTOR Declan Bogan, Business Development Director at SteriPack Pharma, on the challenges and innovations in packaging pharmaceutical, chemical and medical products.

T

he healthcare sector includes diverse areas such as biotechnology, combination products, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, nutritional supplements, medical devices drug delivery and nanotechnology. The commonality is that all end users expect their products to be safe, genuine, easy to use and store, and to arrive undamaged with a significant shelf life. The major trend facing the industry is an increasing level of expectation for performance at a reduced level of cost.

THE PERFECT PACK How do we determine the perfect pack for a medicinal product? Packaging plays a key role in ensuring product performance. Properly packaged medical devices or pharmaceuticals must pose little risk to individuals handling them, even if the product is biohazardous. The fundamental of packaging, throughout the lifetime of a product, is that it provides the following basic functionality: • Protection • Containment • Presentation • Identification • Information • Convenience • Patient Compliance • Disposal

Properly packaged medical devices or pharmaceuticals must pose little risk to individuals handling them, even if the product is biohazardous.

intelligence, product and packaging materials knowledge, team effort, project management, communication, and awareness, in line with regulatory requirements. Materials are challenged, stability determined, environmental considerations confirmed, and product impact negated. The general areas also to consider for the packaging-product impact include the following: • What is the impact on the active ingredients or components? • Is there increased degradation? • How long do the preservatives or anti-oxidants last? • Any change to organoleptic properties? • Any modification to general appearance of dimensions? • Is there increase in microbial load? • Is the product still pharmacologically active? • Do the delivery systems still work? • Do the packs and the closures still operate as intended?

THE PACKAGING COMPROMISE The considerations of packaging for a product are dictated by a number of factors outlined in table 2.1 on page 24. These are a series of trade-offs determined by a number of factors. It is the responsibility of R&D, procurement, production, marketing & sales, engineering, quality, regulatory and, of course, suppliers to create the solution. It must be a holistic approach, project managed to gain the best result. The packaging solution is ultimately challenged through risk management, robust design, leading to rigorous testing and validation. Getting the right pack for the right product takes time,

PACKAGING MATERIALS This article does not intend to outline all properties of the packaging used by companies and why one would choose one over the other. The solution lies with the product and 23


PA C K A G I N G

Table 2.1 Packaging considerations PRODUCT TYPE

Liquid, solid, semi-solid, gas, device, composite, multi-layered; Chemical nature (e.g. pH); Sterile vs non-sterile; Single or multiple use; Moisture / heat / light sensitivity; Fragility.

THE MARKET

Size & location; Physician vs self administered; Legal & regulatory needs; Available infrastructure; Timeframe of use.

THE VALUE OF THE PRODUCT

Ethical; OTC; Sales price; Convenience; New / existing presentation.

ADDING VALUE

Can the pack add value? Can it aid in compliance?

THE CAPABILITY OF THE MANUFACTURING AND PACKAGING SITE

Existing equipment or investment; Ability to handle materials; Warehousing; Production lines availability for trials; Materials availability and any special needs; Local suppliers; Import restrictions; Multiple sites issues.

PRIMARY AND SECONDARY PACK

R&D involvement; Single vs multiple use; Dose forms; Secondary choice.

DISTRIBUTION

How will it be transported? Where does it need to get to? What is best way to transport it? Quantities; Environmental control (heat, light, barrier, moisture).

ENVIRONMENTAL ISSUES

Market restrictions; Legislation; EC Directive on packaging waste; Methods of pack disposal; Hospital waste; Counterfeiting. understanding of the processes and facilitates the management of change and the implementation of continuous improvement.

the pack. The choice of packaging materials for the potential solution will most likely be within the list on page 27.

QUALITY SYSTEMS The regulators view the pack and the product as one item i.e. the pack affects the product and the product the pack. The pack and supplier are part of the regulatory submission. Packaging is only changed with careful consideration and agreement with the regulator. The quality system is built by technical experts to ensure system control, and protection and qualification for each operation. These must be clearly defined and documented, minProduct security starts from raw imising the risk of contmaterial sourcing, component amination, cross-contamconversion, through to warehousination and mix-ups. This ing, production and distribution. level of detail promotes

FACILITIES There are many different types of packaging facilities. The ISPE have recently developed a packaging, labelling and warehousing operations (PACLAW) Packaging plays a key role in baseline guide. The ensuring product performance. PACLAW guide interprets the applicable standards and gives recommendations on how to design and maintain such a facility, complex or simple. Facility set-ups, HVAC requirements, security and segregation will vary as requirements dictate. 24


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PA C K A G I N G

Choice of Packaging Materials Glass

Ampoules/bottles, syringes, vials/Type I,III, Amber, flint, coloured.

Metals

Used for solid dosage formats like tubes , capsules for aerosals, cans, closures, valves and for tubes.

Plastics

Containers, closures, labels.

Flexibles

Foils, Films and laminates; Blisters, sachets, barrier pouches and overwraps.

Devices

Multi-materials, plastics.

Fibre based (paper)

Labels, leaflets, cartons, outers, bags.

Rubber

Plugs / seals.

Companies may run multiple products in their facilities, designed for quick turnaround and line clearance without the risk of product exposure or mix-ups. Companies are now employing risk management, along with lean thinking, into setting up their facility to reduce costs, future proofing, and aid in reducing the validation effort.

Counterfeiting can result in the fraudulent absence of an active ingredient, incorrect product, relabelled out-ofdate or parallel imported product, or a trade mark abuse. It is estimated that 10% of drugs in the first world are counterfeited and increasing by 13% year-on-year and that by 2010, $75bn will be generated in illegal business along with the unknown fatalities. A large proportion of the world’s counterfeit medicines originate in Asia and end up in the US and EU. Between 1998 and 2004, there was 1000% increase in seizures of counterfeit prescription drugs in the EU. The people involved are highly organised criminal gangs and one man bands. By combining overt, covert and forensic packaging authentication technologies, companies can help consumers authenticate products at the point of purchase, whilst enabling clients, the Government, or inspectors to unequivocally determine a product’s pedigree in the field. Packaging authentication features can be incorporated into: • Packaging substrates; • SMART labels; • Ink selection; • Laminates; • Closures; • Adhesives; • Tear tapes; • Wrapping aterials; • Material inclusions; • Holograms; • Labels, foil printed; • Radio Frequency Identification RFID; • Micro-taggants; • Micro-barcodes; • Laser-responsive micro-images; • Chemical forensic coding; • Supply chain verification procedure.

PRODUCT SECURITY Product security starts from raw material sourcing, component conversion, through to warehousing, production and distribution. At all stages within the life cycle of a product, companies must avoid rogue product, theft, and control and trace product. Tracking of product is a GMP requirement as well as a business need: it helps ensure security and aids in patient administration.

Getting the right pack for the right product takes time, intelligence, product and packaging materials knowledge, team effort, project management, communication, and awareness, in line with regulatory requirements.

27


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PA C K A G I N G

SOLUTIONS?

WHY THE INCREASE IN COUNTERFEITING?

• Better counterfeiting technology, including improved technology to make labelling, packaging and products that appear real but are not; • Better organised, more effective criminal groups attracted by financial opportunities; • The online sale of prescription drugs by unlicensed pharmacies and/or foreign websites; • Opportunities for introducing foreign-made counterfeit and unapproved drugs into large and rapidly growing import flows; • Weak spots in the domestic wholesale drug distribution chain, including some wholesalers who acquire most of their inventory from secondary sources, do not maintain effective due diligence efforts on these sources and ignore warning signs indicative of illegal or unethical behaviour.

• Secure the product and packaging; • Secure the movement of drugs through the supply chain; • Secure business transactions; • Ensure appropriate regulatory oversight and enforcement; • Increase penalties; • Heighten vigilance and awareness; • International co-operation.

The agreed consensus for any anti-counterfeiting solution is as follows: • Small • Complex • Adaptable • Dynamic • Fully traceable to company database

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Dr Declan Bogan (db@steripack.ie) is Business Development Director at SteriPack Pharma. Declan has been working in the life sciences industry since completing his PhD at DCU in 1996. Declan has worked in a variety of roles, both in Ireland and Internationally, for a variety of life sciences companies directly and as a consultant in the sector. SteriPack is a specialist provider of clean-room manufactured packaging, contract packaging, supply chain management services, and packaging development to the medical device and pharmaceutical sectors. They supply to over 250 companies globally, offering a diversified range of services to support clients’ specific needs. Based in Clara, Co. Offaly, SteriPack operate a 7500 m2 facility; encompassing Grade D (Class 100K) classified areas with ancillary preparation rooms, offices, warehousing and support staff. SteriPack operates under ISO 9001:2000, ISO 13485:2003, and EU GMP Manufacturing License. For more information, contact: SteriPack Ltd., Kilbeggan Rd., Clara, Co. Offaly, Ireland. Tel: +353 57 9331888. Fax:+353 57 9331887. Web: www.steripack.ie. E-mail:pharma@steripack.ie.

FUTURE

TRENDS

So where is packaging for the life sciences headed? The following is a list of some of the drivers within the industry. It is by no means exhaustive, yet gives an indication of some of the ongoing challenges. Each topic could require its own article. • Standardisation of Dosage forms across the globe (e.g. blisters vs bottles); • New “intelligent” delivery systems; • Barrier properties; • Regulations and new legislation; • Environmental concerns; • Waste reduction, reduce, recycle, re-use, legislation; • Security / anti-counterfeiting technology; • Security foils; • SMART labelling / packaging; • Printable RFID; • Technology applications / transfers; • Late stage customisation; • Packaging technology (aseptic filling); • Testing methodology improvements; • New challenges to meet; • Removing materials from supply chain; • Materials development; • New sterilisation methods. • Lean – Production changes/demands • Plastic replacing glass • Improving patient compliance • Transfer of information (e.g. artwork).

29


TRACEABILITY

LIFTING THE FOG ON THE PHARMACHEM SUPPLY CHAIN

P

harmaceuticals play a vital role in all our lives. They are also a multi-billion euro business, employing thousands of hardworking staff. However, how pharmaceuticals get from the manufacturing plants to the final consumer is somewhat clouded in mystery. Manufacturers forward their products to wholesalers (or distributors) who may forward them to other wholesalers (who may actually trade among themselves) before they eventually find their way to the patient. Increased consolidation and globalisation by the main pharmaceutical manufacturers means that there is an increased likelihood that products will have to travel through more “links” in the supply chain before reaching their final destination. Recent years have seen a dramatic increase in the availability of counterfeit medication. Counterfeit products are finding their way into mainstream supply chains and ending up in high street (and hospital) pharmacies, which are putting patients at risk. Counterfeit products in legitimate supply chains stem from lack of integrated traceability over the entire chain. Integrated traceability means that it is possible to validate product authenticity at any point in the chain, thereby trapping and preventing counterfeits leaking into the supply channels. At a recent meeting with representatives of the Irish PharmaChem industry, GS1 Ireland gave a presentation on how the use of GS1 Global Standards for automatic data capture could increase visibility for manufacturers through their supply chains, thus assisting product and production management, as well as helping to fight the counterfeiting threat. This presentation was met with a stunned silence, with one delegate asking, “Do you mean that if we apply GS1 standards and barcodes, we will not have to suddenly change our production schedules to cope with increases or decreases in demand, we will

Integrated traceability in the supply chain is the key to preventing counterfeit pharmaceuticals making it to the end user, according to Denis Coleman, Manager – Business Development, GS1 Ireland.

reduce (or eliminate) stock writeoffs and obsolescence, and we will be able to see where our products are as they move through the supply chain?”. The simple answer to these questions is ‘yes’.

TRACK & TRACE

A key requirement for any supply chain is the ability of the various supply chain partners to “see” what is going on with regard to the products in question. This is done through the use of Unique Product Identification using GS1 number banks and encoding them in technologies such as Barcoding and RFID. Both Bar codes and RFID are terms that are familiar to most people, even to the point of taking them for granted. However, few in the Pharmaceutical industry appear to really understand how such technologies can work for them. For over 30 years, the retail sector has been using unique product identification and bar-coding to efficiently move products through the supply chain. The data captured every time a bar-code is scanned helps all involved in the supply chain to see what is happening to the product and where it is happening. Pharmaceutical manufacturers have traceability systems in place for their internal processes. However, many of these are proprietary systems that will not work outside the parameters of the facility itself. The use of bar codes to track product through the wider supply chain is haphazard at best, despite the fact that a recent survey showed that approximately 93% of pharmaceuticals contain a bar code (and therefore a unique product ID). EPEDIGREE

There are increasing calls for all forms of medication to be fully traceable from the manufacturer to the end user. In the US, the FDA began what they termed a “chain of custody” procedure, 30


TRACEABILITY

where product had to be physically signed off at each stage of the supply chain. This was a slow and cumbersome task, which was prone to abuse. Using GS1 standards, numbering and data carriers such as RFID and 2D bar codes, it is possible for the same procedure to be followed electronically. This process builds a pedigree for each product and the electronic formatting has become known as ePedigree. The process works as follows: 1. When the manufacturer produces the product, a unique GS1 number is allocated to it. This can be a standard code for a 2D (Datamatrix) bar code or an Electronic Product Code (EPC) in the case of RFID. Note that the bar code (or EPC) code would also carry a manufacturer ID. 2. While the product is physically transported to the Wholesaler (or the next stage in the supply chain), an electronic message detailing the contents of the shipment is sent via a secure internet link to the wholesaler. This message can be verified by the wholesaler with regard to the source, description and mode of transport for the product. It means that by the time the product arrives at the wholesaler, they have confirmed the authenticity of the product and can accept the delivery into their system. 3. On receipt of the product, the wholesaler will add their details to the pedigree information and the increased information will accompany the product when it moves on to the next stage. 4. Again as the product physically leaves the Wholesaler, the information is electronically sent to the next link in the supply chain. Again, the details can be verified so that when the product arrives it can be safely accepted. This process continues until the product arrives at the final destination. 5. By the time the product arrives at the final destination, its e-Pedigree will contain all the information regarding the entire route it took to get from the manufacturer to the pharmacy.

in the form of bar codes (or more recently RFID) to track products through the supply chain has been helping manufacturers in the FMCG sector to plan requirements and production, as well as reduce inventory of both finished produce and packaging, thereby cutting costs. The same potential exists for pharmaceutical manufacturers. If a pharmaceutical producer has the ability to monitor his products throughout the supply chain, then he will be able to match production and supply to actual demand. This is only possible through the use of GS1 Global Standards and Unique Numbering systems.

CONCLUSION The increase in consolidation and globalisation, coupled with the increasing threat from counterfeit medication, has highlighted the need for visibility throughout the pharmaceutical supply chain. Also, the cost benefits that can be achieved in the management of production and inventory control through this increased visibility cannot be ignored. However, the key to achieving this visibility is the adoption of GS1 standards for numbering and data capture. Most pharmaceutical manufacturers already have bar coding and traceability systems in place in their facilities, but these are proprietary and will not work in the wider community (no guarantee that their numbering system is globally unique). Integration of supply chain systems can only come about through the use of globally unique numbering and standards. The solution is there, all it needs is adoption.

The key to an e-Pedigree system from the GS1 perspective is the need for all parties in the supply chain to integrate their systems with one another. This can only be possible if everyone in the chain follows the same rules and standards, i.e. Global Standards. e-Pedigree also allows the manufacturer to monitor the product as it moves through the supply chain. This is done through the use of the unique product identification number. Such information can help pharmaceutical manufacturers to manage their production schedules to meet actual demand rather than forecasted demand.

ABOUT GS1 GS1 is a neutral, not-for-profit organisation dedicated to the design and implementation of global standards and solutions to improve the efficiency and visibility in supply chains. GS1 is driven by more than a million companies, who execute more than five billion transactions a day with the GS1 System of Standards. This makes it the most widely used supply chain standards system in the world.

IMPROVING PRODUCT MANAGEMENT It is time for pharmaceutical manufacturers to use the technologies that are available as a tool for production management and planning. Using unique product identification 31


S U P P LY C H A I N M A N A G E M E N T

GAINING COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE THROUGH YOUR SUPPLY CHAIN

T

Supply Chain Management in the Pharmaceutical industry is the key to further enhancing shareholder value, writes Edward Sweeney, Director of Learning at the National Institute for Transport and Logistics (NITL).

he international pharmaceutical business environment continues to develop at a rapid rate. Increasing interactions between economies, particularly between North America, Europe and Asia, has raised many important issues regarding transport infrastructure, logistics and broader supply chain management (SCM). Ireland is a key global location for the pharmaceutical industry. Currently, 13 of the top fifteen 15 companies in the world have substantial operations in Ireland, with 6 out of 10 and 12 out of 25 of the world’s top selling drugs produced here. The majority of products are manufactured for global markets. It must be recognised that any product is delivered to the ultimate customer through a complex interaction of several companies on the way. The manufacturer’s ability to give the customer what they want, when they want it, at the price and quality that they want, is not just determined by the efficiency and effectiveness of the manufacturer’s own operation. Inefficiencies anywhere in the supply chain will reduce the chances of the manufacturer successfully competing against other suppliers.

potential to simultaneously improve customer service levels and to reduce supply chain costs. These factors have sharpened the focus on the need for improvements in all aspects of supply chain performance. In relation to the pharma sector in Ireland, there is evidence that SCM concepts are being more widely embraced.

DEFINING SCM NITL defines Supply Chain Management in terms of Four Fundamentals, all of which are vital to the continuing profitability of the companies in all parts of the pharmaceutical supply chain. Fundamental One relates to the overall objectives of SCM. These are concerned with: • Meeting or exceeding customer service requirements in the market; and • Optimising total supply chain costs and investment. Both are self evidently important. Traditionally, supply chain costs (as a proportion of total cost base) have been lower in the pharma industry than in others, resulting in a lower focus on SCM. However, as with all other aspects of the industry, downward pressure now exists on supply chain costs (such as purchasing costs, production costs, transport costs and customer service costs). Simultaneously, customer service requirements are becoming more and more demanding. Fundamental 2, relating to SCM philosophy, recognises that a supply chain is only as strong as its weakest link. This is as true in the pharma industry as it is in any industry. It requires that raw material suppliers, distributors, manufacturers, retailers and others, work together in new and innovative ways. It further requires that barriers between internal functions and activities are tackled.

COMPETITIVE ADVANTAGE Without a proper focus on total supply chain management, therefore, a company will never achieve true competitive advantage. The increasingly international nature of markets and companies has resulted in many companies becoming part of large and complex global supply chains. In addition, the potential benefits associated with emerging electronic commerce technologies provide the 33


S U P P LY C H A I N M A N A G E M E N T

performance indicators (KPI’s) because what gets measured gets done! This is based on documented evidence of SCM ‘best practice’ and allies with the author’s experience in a range of sectors. Whilst pockets of excellence undoubtedly exist in Ireland generally and in the Pharma industry specifically, it is clear that there is significant room for improvement.

CONCLUSION The changing dynamics of the sector globally have resulted in a situation where the effective management of pharma supply chains is becoming increasingly regarded as a major source of competitive advantage. In short, The potential exists to significantly enhance shareholder value through the adoption of SCM thinking the potential exists across the industry to significantly enhance Fundamental 3 is concerned with the efficient and shareholder value through the adoption of SCM thinking. effective management of material, money and information The regulatory environment in which the industry flows throughout the supply chain. The latter (i.e. manoperates brings its own particular challenges but these are agement of information flows) is of particular importance. not insurmountable – rather, they require that creative SCM Significant investment in information and communicastrategies be developed, and then executed superbly, with tions technology (ICT) in the pharma industry in recent strong attention to detail. NITL’s ongoing research is conyears bears testament to this. tinuing to monitor the rate of development of SCM capaFundamental 4 requires companies, particularly in an bility in the sector. environment where outsourcing of supply chain functionality has become more common, to re-appraise both interBOUT THE UTHOR nal and external customer/supplier relationships.

A

CHARACTERISTICS

OF

SCM EXCELLENCE

A

Edward Sweeney is Director of Learning at the National Institute for Transport and Logistics (NITL), based at the Dublin Institute of Technology (DIT). NITL was established in 1998 as Ireland’s ‘Centre of Excellence’ in supply chain management. Since then, it has provided a range of education, training, consultancy and research supports to companies in Ireland and abroad. At NITL, Edward is responsible for the development and implementation of the integrated supply chain management (SCM) development programmes and carries out research and consultancy work on behalf of NITL client companies. He is an engineer by background and has worked and lectured in over 20 countries in Europe, North America and Asia. His work has been widely published and he is a regular contributor to business and academic conferences and seminars throughout the world.

So what are the characteristics of SCM in evidence in companies that might be regarded as world class? ‘World Class’ in this context means companies that have been successful in tough, competitive international markets over a sustained period of time. It is impossible to develop an exhaustive list of the characteristics of SCM excellence, but the following four elements appear to be of critical importance for most companies in most sectors: • Identification and measurement of customer service because customer service ‘sets the spec’ for supply chain design; • Integration of supply chain activities and information because many supply chain NVAs are caused by fragmented supply chain configurations; • SCM is a senior management function because SCM is a strategic activity; • Establishment and measurement of supply chain key 35


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E : P L A T E T E K E N G I N E E R I N G

THE ONE-STOP SHOP FOR HEAT EXCHANGERS PlateTek Engineering is a leading supplier of heat exchangers to the process industries across the island of Ireland.

P

lateTek Engineering was founded in 1996 when John Mc Mahon, its founder and Managing Director, identified the need to offer companies in the pharmaceutical, chemical, brewing and dairy industries a complete service for heat exchangers. “At the time, I had worked in the process industries for many years and I saw the need to offer a service that process companies could rely on,” explains John McMahon. “When we set up the company, our emphasis was on taking the problem off the client’s hands and providing them with an immediate response and a complete service. Today, we not only supply heat exchangers but we also provide our customers with a full service for heat exchanger testing and repair. We also provide a service for vessel and spray dryer testing. Everything we do is driven by quality and we find customers coming back to us because of the quality service we provide.” Plate Tek’s product range includes: Plate Heat Exchangers; Shell & Tube Heat Exchangers; Brazed Heat Exchangers; and Specialist Heat Exchangers for the Pharmaceutical & Chemical Industries. PlateTek offers a range of services, including: - Testing and certification of Heat Exchangers; - Testing and certification of Spray Dryers; - Heat Exchanger Re-gasketing; - Heat Exchanger Refurbishment; - Heat Exchanger Re-building.

Customer service is one of the key selling points at PlateTek Engineering.

PlateTek’s focus on these specialist areas helps it to deliver not only the highest standards of service but also to minimise service charges and plant down-time. PlateTek boasts some of Ireland’s leading process clients in the pharmaceutical and chemical, dairy, food, beverage and brewing industries. It supplies Titan, Sacome and Fischer heat exchangers.

TITAN METAL FABRICATORS PlateTek has recently announced the launch of the Titan range of heat exchangers. Titan manufactures in Camarillo, California, and designs and fabricates highly corrosion resistant equipment for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. Its expertise lies in its reputation and proven ability to design and fabricate cost effective heat exchangers, using the reactive metals tantalum, zirconium, niobium and titanium: the heat exchangers made from these metals can be used with extremely corrosive fluids. Global competition, the cost of pharmaceutical products and the cost of downtime has demanded that heat exchangers be rugged, dependable and work all of the time. The cost of maintenance, spare parts and, above all, downtime can no longer be tolerated. Downtime means no product is being manufactured, which is the largest cost of all. Today’s heat exchangers must be: • contamination-proof; • corrosion-proof; • fully drainable;

PlateTek Engineering offer a complete service for Heat Exchangers from their base in Charleville, Co. Cork.

36


PlateTek Engineering is a leading supplier of heat exchangers to the process industries in the island of Ireland. Founded in 1996 Plate Tek not only supply heat exchangers but also provides its customer with a full service for heat exchanger testing, repair and certification. It also provides testing, repair and certification for tanks and spray dryers.

PlateTek’s Products: Plate Heat Exchangers Shell & Tube Heat Exchangers Brazed Heat Exchangers Specialist Heat Exchangers for the Pharmaceutical & Chemical Industries.

PlateTek’s Services: Testing and certification of Heat Exchangers. Testing and certification of Spray Dryer’s. Heat Exchanger Re-gasketing. Heat Exchanger Re-furbishment. Heat Exchanger Re-building.

PlateTek Engineering’s focus is on delivering not only the highest standards of service but also to minimise service charges and plant down-time.

For further information contact: PlateTek Engineering Ltd., IDA Industrial Estate, Kilmallock Road, Charleville, Co. Cork. Tel: 063 21277 Fax: 063 21280 Email: platetek@platetek.ie Web: www.platetek.ie


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E : P L A T E T E K E N G I N E E R I N G

Titan are leaders in the evolution of pharmaceutical condenser design for the pharmaceutical and chemical industries.

SACOME PRODUCTS PlateTek distributes a range of heat exchangers from Sacome, including stainless steel plain tube heat exchangers, stainless steel corrugated heat exchangers and hygenic corrugated heat exchangers. Sacome was established in 1978 in Cartagena (Spain), and its main activities are the design, manufacture and sale of tubular heat exchangers. Sacome heat exchangers have been specifically tailored for the pharmaceutical, chemical and food industries. Sacome designs and manufactures plain tube and corrugated tube heat exchangers using the most important heat transfer software in the market, so as to offer maximum efficiency and quality. The heat exchangers are highly recommended for the processing of low, medium, high viscosity and particulate products. The models are designed in different profiles and geometries, such as: • TF-20 Monotube • TFM-I Multitube (welded design) • TFM Multitube (tube-bundle that can be dismantled) • TF-40 Annular space (triple tube) • TFM-P Multipass • V series Steam-water heaters • CIP Heaters Multitube for CIP solutions

PlateTek Engineering is a one-stop shop for Heat Exchangers.

• compatible with silicone based heat transfer fluids; • rugged and maintenance free. Leading pharmaceutical companies worldwide using Tantalum in their operations with great success include: Abbott Laboratories, Aventis Pharmaceuticals, Bayer Corporation, Bristol Myres Squibb, Eli Lilly & Co., GlaxoSmithKline, Hoffman-LaRoche, Merck & Co., Novartis, Pfizer, Schering Plough, Yamanouchi Pharma.

The construction materials usually used for the manufacture are austenitic and superaustenitic stainless steel, carbon steel and titanium. Sacome designs all the different types of heat exchangers under international codes and its manufacturing facilities are certified according to ISO9001 and TUV. Many leading pharmaceutical companies worldwide use Sacome Shell & Tube Heat Exchangers.

HEAT EXCHANGER SERVICE PlateTek provides a complete service from site strip down to re-assembly and start-up. Plates to be cleaned and re-gasketed are removed to the company’s plant, where they are chemically cleaned before re-gasketing. A specially designed oven for curing is available if required. PlateTek deals with all brands of heat exchangers and has ready access to a range of different parts. PlateTek adopts an environmentally friendly attitude to its procedures. All effluent involved in cleaning and regasketing is disposed of under licence.

“As well as a full range of heat exchangers to suit all applications, we provide our customers a full service for heat exchanger testing and repair, using the latest technology.” 38


C O M PA N Y P R O F I L E : P L A T E T E K E N G I N E E R I N G

industries in Ireland for over 30 years, with major success, and have an excellent track record for reliability and heat transfer with their special combi-flow system of plates. PlateTek prides itself on its core attributes of: • Satisfying the needs and the expectations of its clients; • Using the highest quality international equipment available to deliver the highest standards of quality; • Introducing innovative solutions to plate heat exchanger needs; • Providing a prompt FOR FURTHER and efficient delivery INFORMATION, CONTACT: of its service; • Investing in human capital, as its knowl- PJ Greensmith edge and skills deter- PlateTek Engineering Ltd mine customer satis- IDA Industrial Estate faction; Kilmallock Road • Attending to the needs Charleville, of customers, regard- Co. Cork. l e s s o f t h e h e a t Tel: 063 21277 exchanger brand, to Fax: 063 21280 ensure total satisfac- Email: platetek@platetek.ie tion. Web: www.platetek.ie

PlateTek prides itself on quality testing and certification satisfying the needs and expectations of its clients.

THE FISCHER RANGE Also from PlateTek comes the Fischer range. Fischer have supplied heat exchangers to the brewing and food

Suppliers of a wide range of Laboratory Glasswashing Machines suitable for all Laboratory & Pharmaceutical applications. Fully programmable to suit individual requirements. I.Q.O.Q package also available.

Visit our showrooms at Broomhill Road, Dublin 24 or for further information please contact our commercial sales department Tel: 01 461 0710

Fax: 01 461 0797

Email: info@miele.ie 39

Web: www.miele.ie


RESEARCH & FUNDING

A SOLID FOUNDATION Bioscience research in Ireland is in good hands with Science Foundation Ireland’s selection of programmes, awards, grants, and co-operative efforts among education, Government, and industry.

T

he Irish pharmaceutical THE BIRTH OF SFI and bio pharmaceutical sector has experienced conSFI has been in existence since 2000 siderable growth in recent when it arose from the Technology years, reaching over €30 billion in Foresight Exercise, commissioned by export sales and representing around the Department of Enterprise Trade & 40% of all manufacturing exports Employment to explore areas where from the country. The sector is the Ireland could be competitive globally second largest contributor of corpoover the next couple of decades. The ration tax and employs over 24,000 Exercise – which involved workshops, people. But this success is not simply seminars, and visiting lecturers from due to the strength of our indigenous across the globe – took about a year to talent - it is also a consequence of complete and resulted in the establishsystems that nurture and maintain ment of the Foundation, which came to that talent, systems that help recruit focus on two sectors: ICT and BIO. international talent to the country: “Shortly after that report was namely, Science Foundation Ireland released, the government committed (SFI). monies to the establishment of SFI,” conT h a n k s t o S F I a n d i t s Dr Maurice Treacy, Director of Bioscience & tinues Dr Treacy. “We became a statuBIOsciences division (BIO), a mul- Bioengineering, Science Foundation Ireland. tory body in 2003: The Foundation titude of research areas have benefitreports to its board and operates within ed: neuroscience, agri-food, molecular and cell biology, an allocated budget every year - €170m microbiology, nanotechnology, immunology, and bioinin 2007. We are 100% Government-funded.” formatics/systems biology, amongst others. Under the Today, SFI is a key organisation in the implementation directorship of Dr Maurice Treacy, Director of Bioscience of the National Development Plan 2007-2013 (NDP) and & Bioengineering at the SFI BIO Division funds 125 the Strategy for Science Technology and Innovation research PI’s (principle investigators) and indirectly (SSTI) 2006-2013. A sum of €8.2 billion has been allocated employs hundreds of other life-science researchers. for scientific research under the NDP and SSTI, of which “Biosciences, which incorporates pharmachem, biotechSFI has responsibility to invest €1.4 billion. SFI will connology, the pharmaceutical sector, medical devices, diagnostics sector, etc., is a huge focus of our activity,” explains Dr Treacy. “Any of the research activity that we fund can be strategically linked to these industry sectors. Since the inception of SFI, €261m of research funding has been committed on the part of the biosciences directive. “In effect, that €261m stretches out to 125 different PI’s within the Irish academic space – and they effectively reach out to an additional 1000 researchers (graduate students, post-doctoral fellows, technicians, and others). While each of the PI’s are active in particular areas of research, we have identified areas of strength in Ireland, such as neuroscience, immunology, agri-food, molecular cell biology and chemistry.”

40


RESEARCH & FUNDING

tinue to invest in academic researchers and research teams who are likely to generate new knowledge, leading edge technologies and competitive enterprises.

THE IMPORTANCE

OF

R&D

But just how important is R&D to the pharmaceutical sector in Ireland? “It is vital,” Dr Treacy answers unequivocally. “Look at the amount of revenue spent on research. Typically, approximately 20% of annual revenue from the big pharmaceutical companies like GSK, Merck or Pfizer goes back into R&D. R&D is of huge importance in the sustainability of the industry and in the development of a pipeline for new and innovative products. As many of the blockbuster drugs often only have 10 years of protective sales and use by patients, manufacturers must constantly generate new and better products. This can only occur with sustained invested in research, and this can include investment and collaboration with academic researchers.” SFI’s funding involves a rigorous decision-making process, explains Dr Treacy. For example, The PI programme can allocate up to €5m over five years (€1m p.a). As a result, it is important that the process of investment is extremely thorough. “We use International Peers to assess the quality of the PI applications,” he explains. “These peers/experts are located across the globe (USA, Europe, Asia or Australia). We do not use Peers in Ireland in order to avoid any conflict of interests. International Peers are mainly found in academia but they are also in the private sector.” In-house SFI Programme Officers with specific expertise also work on each application and assess the Peer’s comments. “We bring our in-house expertise to bear on the comments and make the recommendation on whether to fund or not,” Dr Treacy continues. “We also ask strategic ques-

tions. How does this proposed research link to the embedded industries in Ireland? Even if it doesn’t link, how is it valuable for those sectors? How might companies in Ireland find this research useful?”

THE ALLOCATION

OF

FUNDING

Where is SFI funding allocated? In August 2006, GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) announced that it was establishing a research project into gastrointestinal diseases, in collaboration with Alimentary Pharmabiotic Centre (APC), an SFI-funded Centre (CSET) based in UCC. This project would be jointly supported by IDA Ireland and SFI, involving investment of up to €13.7m. Dr Treacy notes: “APC are researching the area of probiotics and functional foods and, arising from that research, Proctor & Gamble are now performing market research studies in preparation for the launch of a probiotic proactive medicine into the US market.” The rapid turnaround of APC’s research inot a potential product is unusual, but it is evidence of the importance of R&D. “We fund high quality fundamental research, applied research, and translation research.” Last year, €1.8m was awarded to the Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanostructures and Nanodevices (CRANN), Trinity College Dublin, in order to facilitate research, conducted in association with Hewlett Packard, in the field of carbon nanotube composites. A further €24m in funding awards were allocated to 158 researchers, spread across 11 third-level institutions, under the Research Frontiers Programme. This SFI programme supports “highquality, novel exploratory research in the third-level sector in fields embracing the biosciences, chemistry, earth sciences, mathematics and computer science, physics and engineering.”

EDUCATION Education is evidently an important area for SFI. “It is critical that if we want peo42


12 Lower Hatch St. Dublin 2 Ph: +353 1 6392928 Fx: +353 1 6392920 www.globalpharmanetworks.com sales@globalpharmanetworks.com Global Pharma Networks (GPN) is a unique consulting services organisation serving the Pharma, Biopharma and Medical Device industries. GPN uniqueness comes from the fact that all its lead consultants have worked directly in these industries at a senior level. This depth of experience means that our team is intimately aware of the issues and challenges facing organisations and managers from both a business and a compliance perspective. OUR STRATEGY GPN’s strategy is to leverage our collective knowledge to add value to client’s business by bringing in excess of 100 years pharma experience in Quality, Operational Performance and Business Management processes to providing solutions to our client’s business challenges. We combine this expertise with Lean, Six Sigma and Quality tools and techniques to identify and eliminate areas of poor performance and process/quality variability. Thus improving the profitability and value of the business APPROACH: Our approach to assignments is a hands-on partnership. We will work with client personnel to deliver improvements and assignment objectives. This approach allows us to transfer skills and knowledge to the client team thus making the changes sustainable. CORE COMPETENCIES: GPN consultants possess the following core competencies Production Operations Organisation Design and Development Supply Operations Quality & Compliance Systems Management Lean Six Sigma Operations HR Management Process & IT Validation Business Applications Implementation Automation Training Typical assignments are: • Business restructuring and cost/waste reduction ➠ reducing headcount & flattening structures • Undertaking reviews of supply and purchasing policies to ensure that supply and purchasing is aligned to minimise on site inventories • Move to vendor managed inventories • Develop and manage tech transfer programmes • Provision of interim operations managers • Assess operational performance through measuring overall equipment effectiveness ➠ raising utilisations and efficiencies • Implement performance improvement & batch documentation simplification programmes • Drive Non Right First Time programmes


GROWCORP GROUP LIMITED Growcorp is a leading integrated bioscience investment, advisory and incubation organisation, which delivers the resources to ensure success in the global marketplace. Growcorp was the first private company in Ireland with an investment fund targeted specifically at the bioscience sector (“The European Bioscience Fund I”). Growcorp invests in all stages and has led syndicates in excess of €20M to take businesses to product launch. Growcorp also has an incubator with an outstanding technological infrastructure in a state of the art technology centre in the Citywest Business Campus.

01 4661000

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RESEARCH & FUNDING

ple to be involved in research, we need to hook their attention early on in their school years or early careers/student lives,” says Dr Treacy. “We have several active programmes where we engage undergraduate students in research projects in collaboration with our funded PI’s (UREKAs). We bring science teachers and secondary teachers into the lab in a similar format, engaging them in cutting edge science so they might bring that knowledge back to their classroom (STARs). Our PI’s can also visit local schools to give lectures on their areas of research.” Ireland is now an exciting place to carry out research in the areas of bioscience and bioengineering. Disciplines that underpin the study of gene expression, DNA, RNA, genomics, protein synthesis and characterisation, protein signalling, chemistry, biosensors, drug delivery and bioremediation, are all underway in Ireland. These areas of research affect healthcare, diagnostics, pharmaceuticals, environmental management, agriculture, marine science, medical devices, consumer goods and food and drinks businesses. “Research is an interesting animal,” Dr Treacy continues. “It is an iterative process whereby scientists slowly but

steadily learn about their chosen topics, so their research hypotheses keep evolving and improving. That said, while the philosophy of scientific research per se has not changed greatly, the means and pace at which research is conducted today has. A lot of new technologies are now available, in genomics, proteomics etc, that has resulted in the rapid accumulation of research data. Researchers are faced with the challenge of how to best use these data to decide on the next most valuable experiment. Thus, research today depends hugely on computational power, so the sectors of BIO and ICT are truly converging in many ways. With all this technology development, it is clear that what physics was to the 20th century, biology will be to the 21st century, with the technology’s development playing a vital part in this revolution.”

STREAMLINED PROCESS The chronology of SFI’s formation may also be fortuitous: as many other countries across the Western world have similar funding agencies, not all have the SFI’s focus on BIO

GLOBAL PHARMA NETWORKS Global Pharma Networks (GPN) is a unique consulting services organisation serving the Pharma, Biopharma and Medical Device industries. GPN uniqueness comes from the fact that all its lead consultants have worked directly in these industries at a senior level. This depth of experience means that their team is intimately aware of the issues and challenges facing organisations and managers, from both a business and a compliance perspective. Strategy GPN’s strategy is to leverage their collective knowledge to add value to client’s business by bringing in excess of 100 years of pharma experience in Quality, Operational Performance and Business Management processes to providing solutions to their client’s business challenges. They combine this expertise with Lean, Six Sigma and Quality tools and techniques to identify and eliminate areas of poor performance and process/quality variability, thus improving the profitability and value of the business.

Approach Their approach to assignments is a hands-on partnership. They will work with client personnel to deliver improvements and assignment objectives. This approach allows GPN to transfer skills and knowledge to the client team, thus making the changes sustainable.

• • • •

Core Competencies: GPN consultants possess the following core competencies Production Operations Organisation Design and Development Supply Operations Quality & Compliance Systems Management Lean Six Sigma Operations HR Management Process & IT Validation Business Applications Implementation Automation Training Typical assignments are: • Business restructuring and cost/waste reduction: reducing headcount & flattening structures; • Undertaking reviews of supply and purchasing policies to ensure

45

• •

that supply and purchasing is aligned to minimise on site inventories; Move to vendor managed inventories; Develop and manage tech transfer programmes; Provision of interim operations managers; Assess operational performance through measuring overall equipment effectiveness: raising utilisations and efficiencies; Implement performance improvement & batch documentation simplification programmes; Drive Non Right First Time programmes.

For more information, contact: Global Pharma Networks 12 Lower Hatch St. Dublin 2 Ph: +353 1 6392928 Fx: +353 1 6392920 www.globalpharmanetworks.com


RESEARCH & FUNDING

and ICT, nor do they apply the same amount of rigour in coming to investment decisions. The SFI believe that in order to make correct funding decisions, they must keep the process streamlined from the outset. However, the Foundation does not shy away from looking elsewhere for inspiration. The US has been involved in biotech funding since the 1950s, from which the entire Biotechnology sector single-handedly grew. The pharma sector is principally based in the US, so the SFI has the opportunity to emulate the best practices while avoiding some of the bad ones. Has there been a noticeable improvement in Irish R&D since SFI’s inception? Dr Treacy believes so. “In regard to scientific outputs, the number of publications has not hugely increased, but the quality of the publications has improved greatly. You can assess that in the context of the citation index of different journals. Thus the quality of Irish research has gone up, the number of patent submissions has risen, and greater numbers of Irish researchers have been asked to attend prestigious international conferences and give keynote speeches.”

STRATEGY

FOR

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY INNOVATION

Government has committed €3.8 billion under that programme. Under the National Development Plan 2, €8.2 billion is committed under research-related activities. SFI is a component in a multi-component effort to focus Ireland on research and technologies so that our economy becomes an innovative-driven economy. We are focused on building our strengths and growing our numbers of researchers. The SFI strategy document aims to double the number of PhD students coming out of Irish universities by 2013, and significantly increase the number of research-active faculty members in Irish universities. There is also the sustained commitment to growing the infrastructure and critical mass of quality researchers that are active in Ireland.”

AND

The future is looking bright for SFI. In 2006, the Irish Government announced a new Strategy for Science, Technology and Innovation (SSTI) 2006-2013 that will increase funding for research over the next seven years. In order to become a global knowledge-based economy, the initiatives and programmes that have been put in place over the past six years must be accelerated. Such a Strategy can only help. Commenting on this commitment, Micheál Martin TD, Minister for Enterprise, Trade and Employment, said: “Ireland continues to become increasingly renowned internationally for the excellence of its scientific research, and is generating and using new knowledge for economic and social progress. We will continue to significantly grow our world-class research capabilities. This will be reflected in the numbers of researchers, levels of spending, support for knowledge transfer, the development of new sectoral programmes and a full range of other initiatives. The overall joined-up policy process and co-ordinated approach by all the research funding agencies provides a sound basis to achieve our overall national objectives.” The SFI will play a crucial role in the bioscience sector over the years ahead and has been galvanised by the recent appointment of Frank Gannon as SFI Director General. “We have sustained funding from the Government up until 2013 under the SSTI,” says Dr Treacy. “The

NETWORKING Significantly, the SFI’s role is more than just funding quality research; it is also charged with facilitating the networking amongst disparate areas of the industry and academia. “Researchers in the private sector often feel as though they are excluded from SFI programmes,” Dr Treacy notes. “However, SFI wants to engage actively with the private sector, to get the two sectors of academia and industry actively engaged and discussing research possibilities. We aim to highlight the cadre of quality researchers in Ireland to industry. We can also facilitate the selective and appropriate engagement with the universities.” Science Foundation Ireland, with its impressive levels of facilitation and funding, looks set to continue building a world-class scientific research community in Ireland. “Our remit is to grow the critical mass of quality research that is undertaken in Ireland,” concludes Dr Treacy. “By quality, I mean cutting edge… world class.”

46


E D U C AT I O N & R E S E A R C H

HEA PROGRAMME FOR RESEARCH IN THIRD LEVEL INSTITUTIONS Investing in the knowledge, skills and innovation capacity of the population will drive Ireland’s development in the global environment, according to Eileen O’Malley, Research Programmes, Higher Education Authority.

I

n 2007, following a decade and a half of substantial national growth, Ireland is identified as an economic success story and as a society with the self-confidence and maturity to address the challenge of sustaining economic and social progress over the challenging years ahead. Much of this success is directly attributable to the investments we have made in the past in education at all levels and in developing the nation’s stock of intellectual capital, particularly through the various initiatives to develop Ireland’s research capability. It is now widely acknowledged that the basis for future growth and prosperity is investment in the knowledge, skills and innovation capacity that will drive economic, social and cultural development in an increasingly competitive global environment.

THE NEXT STAGE

OF

skills and to encourage cooperation between researchers within and across the country’s institutions. The Minister for Education and Science, Mary Hanafin TD, announced in January 2007 that a further €190m is to be provided under Cycle 4 of PRTLI. The funding will be provided over the period 20072010 and it is expected that projects funded under PRTLI 4 will commence in Autumn 2007. As with previous cycles of the PRTLI, the investments made under Cycle 4 will build upon the co-operative and complementary progress between PRTLI, SFI ( Science Foundation Ireland), the Research Councils, the HRB ( Health Research Board), Enterprise Ireland, and other sectoral research funders, all striving to bring about a significant change and development in the research environment in Ireland.

DEVELOPMENT

SUCCESS

As we face into the next stage of development of our research infrastructure, it is very encouraging to reflect on what has already been achieved. In particular, it is important to focus on the significant investment of funds in research infrastructure since 1999, and the remarkable transformation of the Irish research landscape since that time. The Programme for Research in Third Level Institutions (PRTLI) was established in 1998 and the next cycle will continue to have a major impact on the research infrastructure of the higher-education sector. To date, some 1,700 researchers have been engaged in ground-breaking work across all thematic disciplines. The PRTLI aims to support a strategic and planned approach by third-level institutions to the long-term development of their research capabilities, consistent with their existing and developing research strengths and potential. The programme also seeks to enhance the quality and relevance of graduate output and

OF THE

PRTLI

The success of the PRTLI to date was recognised and endorsed in 2004 when an Impact Assessment of the Programme (‘Research Infrastructure in Ireland – Building for Tomorrow’) was carried out. The Assessment Committee stated that PRTLI was “the beginning of a major and most beneficial transformation of the research landscape of Ireland that will help to install an innovation driven economy.” The Assessment Committee also concluded that the PRTLI is on its way to meeting all of its objectives and it has had very positive impacts on institutional strategic planning, inter-institutional co-operation, and on the quality of research being produced in Ireland. The assessors also endorsed the essential link between research and teaching and learning, and considered the programme to be ‘ambitious and farsighted’. One of the most significant elements of the programme is that a large proportion of the new centres established under 47


E D U C AT I O N & R E S E A R C H

PRTLI involve inter-institutional collaboration, with 29.7% of programmatic funding awarded to collaborating institutions. This is an essential aspect of PRTLI, and makes unique the emphasis placed on collaboration and encouragement of institutions to focus on particular areas of research, collaborating to strengthen national performance.

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT Undoubtedly, it is crucial for the future economic and social development of this country that the gains made under the PRTLI and other national research programmes are consolidated and expanded. It is also recognised that while important advances have been made, gaps still remain in the provision of higher education and national research infrastructure.

CORE ELEMENTS

OF

HEA RESEARCH FUNDING

The core elements of the HEA’s funding of research are; • The combined teaching and education budget which provides the necessary floor for research funding (€130m approx. of combined grant in 2006 allocated to research). • The Programme for Research in Third-Level Institutions (PRTLI), which has allocated in excess of €600m since 1999. • The North–South Research Programme for Collaborative Research, launched in 2003. The Programme supports collaborative research and development between third-level institutions on the island. 21 cross-border projects have received funding under the National Development Plan for work to be carried out between 2003 and 2006. • The Cross-Border Programme for Research and Education contributing to Peace and Reconciliation is a joint initiative between the Department of Education and Science, Dublin and the Department for Employment and Learning, Northern Ireland and is managed by the HEA. Over €3m is shared between five projects in this programme.

For this reason, it is imperative that higher education institutions, in co-operation with the HEA and other funding agencies, continue to ambitiously strive toward the creation of a strong world-class higher level education and research system, which reflects and recognises the changing needs of Irish society. The success stemming from sustained investment in higher education-led research is largely thanks to unprecedented levels of financial support from the Irish Government under the National Development Plan and other initiatives. Increasingly, higher education is becoming the key player underpinning national innovation systems, with Cycle 4 of PRTLI, focused on the Government’s 2006–2013 Strategy for Science Technology and Innovation (SSTI). The HEA is committed to ensuring that this role is strengthened in the future and that the significant progress made to date will continue to serve as a solid foundation for maintaining the momentum into the future.

• The Fund for Digital Research, formerly the fund for collaborative research between Irish third-level institutions and Media Lab Europe, which is administered by the HEA on behalf of the Department of Communications, Marine and Natural Resources. Over €7m has been allocated to 42 projects since 2000. The fund preceded the establishment of a National Digital Research Facility, the formation of which commenced in 2005. • The Irish Aid sponsored programme for Programme of Strategic Co-operation between Irish Aid and Higher Education and Research Institutes, which promotes collaborative capacity building at institutions in Ireland and in Irish Aid target countries in support of the millennium development goals. The Irish Aid Programme will distribute some €12m up to 2011. 49


REACH DIRECTIVE

REACH DIRECTIVE TO IMPACT ON PHARMACHEM SECTOR Dr Edel Healy, Senior Inspector, Health & Safety Authority, writes about the implications of the REACH Directive for the Pharmaceutical and Chemical sectors.

H

aving come into force on June 1, 2007, the REACH (Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals) Regulation places new responsibilities and obligations on industry. REACH will require the registration, over a period of 11 years, of some 30,000 chemical substances in use today, a process which will help to fill information gaps on the hazards of substances and to identify appropriate risk management measures to ensure their safe use. The burden of proof will be on industry to generate the data required and to identify the measures needed to manage the risks. In addition, REACH will allow the further evaluation of substances where there are grounds of suspicion of risks, and includes an authorisation system for the use of substances of very high concern. The Authorisation system will strongly encourage companies to switch to safer alternatives. REACH will also enable more European-wide restrictions where unacceptable risks are detected. REACH requires a comprehensive flow of information about the uses, hazards and risks of substances in the industry supply chain. In the PharmaChemical supply chain, companies could play a number of roles under REACH (i.e. they may be manufacturers, importers, distributors, and/or downstream users). Furthermore, in REACH, a number of options have been included in the Regulation to promote R&D and innovation. In this article, I will outline the main tasks in REACH of immediate relevance to the PharmaChem sector, including details on: • Relevant Deadlines; • Registration; • Information in the Supply Chain; • Downstream User Obligations; • Further Information.

• June 1, 2007 – In force; • June 1, 2008 – European Central Agency operational and main titles apply; • June 1, 2008 – non-phase in substance registration; • June – Nov 2008: Pre-registration for phase-in substances; • June 1, 2009 – Restrictions in force; • June 1, 2009 – 1st Candidate List for Authorisation; • Nov 2010/June 2013/June 2018: Different registration deadlines for phase-in substances, depending on their tonnages and intrinsic properties.

REGISTRATION All companies who are potential registrants are advised to pre-register their substances in the six-month period from June 1 to November 30, 2008. This will allow companies to avail of the different registration deadlines outlined above. Failure to register will mean a company could have to register as of December 1, 2008. Potential registrants must submit information to the ECHA in order to pre-register. Such information will include: (a) name of the substance; (b) company contact details; and (c) envisaged deadline and anticipated tonnage band.

RELEVANT DEADLINES REACH entered force on June 1, 2007. One year later, the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) will be operational in Helsinki and the main provisions of REACH will apply. The key deadlines are: 50


REACH DIRECTIVE

1) Non-isolated intermediates: substances which, except for sampling, are not removed from the equipment where they are manufactured and used up are excluded from REACH altogether. 2) On site isolated intermediates that are used on the site of their production will have to be registered, but information requirements will be limited to that which the manufacturer holds or can obtain through the data-sharing provisions of REACH. These limited requirements apply, as long as the manufacturer confirms that the substance is only manufactured and used under strictly controlled conditions. 3) Isolated intermediates that are transported to and used on other sites will have lower information requirements than “normal� substances at the registration stage, but the requirements are greater than for on-site intermediates. They can be subject to evaluation.

By January 1, 2009, the Agency will publish on their website the list of substances that have been pre-registered, which will allow companies to identify potential parties to the Substance Information Exchange Forum (SIEF) for a particular substance. A SIEF is the forum envisaged for joint submission of same substance registrations among companies, and will consist of all potential registrants who have pre-registered the same substance. This will allow for the sharing of animal data and reduce costs for industry. The use of substances approved under parallel EU registration or authorisation schemes are exempt from most of the requirements of REACH. Medicinal products for human and veterinary use which fall within the scope and definition of EC Regulation 726/2004, EC Directive 2001/82/EC and EC Directive 2001/83/EC are exempt from the Registration, Information in the Supply Chain, Downstream User and Authorisation titles of REACH. Restrictions may still apply. However, when a substance is used for any purpose other than as the active final ingredient in a medicinal/veterinary product intended for the final user, it falls within the scope of REACH. New substances which have been notified under the existing Directive 67/548/EEC shall be deemed registered under REACH.

REDUCED REGISTRATION REQUIREMENTS IN R&D AND INNOVATION

INFORMATION

Registration Chemical Safety Assessment Evaluation C&L Authorisation Restriction

IN THE

SUPPLY CHAIN

The main instrument for communicating down the supply chain remains the Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Since June 1, 2007, REACH has introduced some formatting changes to the 16-section layout. An additional new requirement is to prepare a safety data sheet, where the substance is persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic (PBT) or very persistent and very bioaccumulative (vPvB) or if the substance is included in the candidate list for authorisation for reasons other than being a PBT, vPvB or classified as dangerous.

There are reduced registration requirements for some type of intermediates. Depending on the type of identified intermediates, different obligations and information requirements apply: NON-ISOLATED

ASSIST

Substances manufactured or imported for the purposes of product- or process-oriented R&D (PPORD) do not need to be fully registered for up to five years, renewable for a further five years (for substances used in medicinal products or not placed on the market, the maximum total exemption is 15 years). A PPORD application must be submitted to the ECHA. It should be noted that the REACH threshold for registration (1 tonne/year) is much higher than the current 10kg threshold for new substances. It is anticipated that Registration will be quicker than the current new chemical notification process, thus potentially reducing the time to market.

INTERMEDIATES

REACH TASKS

TO

INTERMEDIATE

ON-SITE ISOLATED INTERMEDIATE

No

Limited

Limited

No

No No No No No

Yes (>10T/yr) No Yes No Yes

Yes (>10T/yr) Yes Yes No Yes

No No No No Yes

52

TRANSPORTED ACTIVE PHARMACEUTICAL ISOLATED INTERMEDIATE INGREDIENT


REACH DIRECTIVE

There is also a duty to communicate up the supply chain to the next person or distributor if new information on hazardous properties comes to light or where the recommended risk management measures may be called into question.

FURTHER INFORMATION Companies need to start preparing for REACH now! The Health and Safety Authority have a list of steps to help Industry to prepare for REACH on their REACH website. www.reachright.ie If you have questions, contact the Health and Safety Authority REACH helpdesk on Lo call 1890 289 389 or email reachright@hsa.ie. Detailed guidance has been developed on the Registration of Intermediates and the PPORD process under Reach Implementation Project, RIP 3.1 and is available on the ECHA website which went live on June 1, 2007: http://ec.europa.eu/echa/ Throughout 2007, the Health & Safety Authority is running regional briefings and seminars for business to not only make them aware of REACH, but also to explain the steps they will need to take to comply. Full details, including booking forms are available on the HSA REACH website (www.reachright.ie).

DOWNSTREAM USER OBLIGATIONS REACH defines downstream users (DU) as users of chemical substances that are neither manufactured nor imported by the company itself. A distributor is not considered a downstream user. The DU can make the use of the chemical known to his manufacturer/importer, which will allow the manufacturer/importer to address it as an ‘identified use’ and incorporate it in the chemical safety assessment which he will be required to do. The DU must ensure that his use of the chemical is covered in the identified exposure scenarios that his supplier details in the safety data sheet and that he has the recommended safety precautions and risk management measures in place. If the DU chooses not to inform his supplier of his use of the chemical, then he will have to prepare his own chemical safety assessment and inform the European Chemicals Agency of this.

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UK lo-cal number: 0870 850 4831 53


L ANGUAGE SERVICE PROVISION

LOST IN TRANSLATION? Colleen Minnock, Director of Business Development for TransPerfect Translations in Dublin, on the importance of language service provision for the life sciences industry.

W

hile it is understood that globalisation is an essential part of the Irish pharmaceutical industry’s tremendous growth, with it come key issues that the life sciences sector must face in order to guarantee continued success in the everexpanding global pharmaceutical market. The global clinical trials industry is currently worth an estimated €13.5 billion, with Eastern Europe, Asia and Africa all presenting substantial new drug-naïve populations. One of the new challenges that comes with this expansion is the need to adhere to specific industry regulation in countries where English is not the official language.

LSPs with valuable experience in the clinical trials arena can make use of Computer Aided Translation (CAT) tools such as Translation Memory (TM). TM tools aid linguists by identifying previously translated units of text, which results in improved linguistic consistency, faster turnaround times for translations and reductions in costs. Individual Translation Memories can also be managed and shared from one central server location, which permits linguistic teams from various projects to access and leverage the same verbiage – whether they are based in Dublin, Mumbai or Beijing.

ACCURACY In this increasingly common situation, sourcing and managing language service provision becomes a crucial factor. In particular, the clinical trials process produces a wide range of documents, with Informed Consent Forms, Clinical Trial Protocols, Investigators’ Brochures and IVRS systems all requiring patient-friendly and scientifically accurate translations. It is imperative that the comprehensive and precise information in the source language be replicated both faithfully and with clinical accuracy in each target language. Keeping terminology consistent is one of the greatest hurdles facing CROs that are operating in the international marketplace. For instance, if one considers that information from the Trial Protocol will also be referenced in a variety of related documents throughout the trial, the effect of an “error carried forward” can be disastrous. Firms that do not manage their linguistic needs on a macro level, potentially open themselves up to major inconsistencies, and also fail to benefit from substantial efficiencies in the management of vital resources.

CULTURAL CONSULTING SERVICES The expansion of the global trials industry has also driven a rise in the number of pharmaceutical firms seeking cultural consulting services. Pharma organisations’ need to align marketing initiatives with the cultural norms of the target market means that modern LSPs have tended towards a more consultative role when operating within the life sciences industry. Selecting the correct colour scheme and iconography for the target culture can have a huge impact on any campaign, from patient recruitment materials through to drug marketing. Sustainable growth in the global marketplace greatly depends on a heightened understanding of these and other cultural aspects. Neglecting such issues will mean that firms fail to capitalise fully on the lengthy and painstaking groundwork performed during the clinical phases of a trial, whereas a timely and thoroughly researched marketing campaign will pay dividends long into the future.

SCIENTIFIC TERMINOLOGY When working on clinical trial documents, experienced linguists are often required not only to translate, but also to create suitable scientific terminology in the target language. For instance, it may be necessary to craft a suitable name for a new chemical compound produced during the trial process. With this in mind, the need to partner with a competent Language Service Provider (LSP) at the outset of a project becomes all the more apparent. Following this best practice principle ensures that all language-related requirements for clinical trials are managed via a top-down model and also guarantees that communications across the multilingual trial process are streamlined.

ABOUT

THE

AUTHOR

COLLEEN Minnock is the Director of Business Development for TransPerfect Translations in Dublin. She is responsible for client services in the life sciences arena as well as business development throughout Ireland.

54


RECRUITMENT

SURVEY POINTS TO REALISM IN JOBS MARKET

B

Fergal Brosnan, Director, Berkley Recruitment Group, reveals the findings of an online survey into the jobs market in Ireland, which had some very interesting results.

e r k l e y Recruitment Group has just completed a week long online survey, with the co-operation of random registered candidates, to ascertain the current market sentiment to both the jobs market and the economy in general. The survey was sent to over 25,000 people, with over 2,500 surveys completed. The survey had some very interesting results.

taken with the previous point, suggests that people are cautiously optimistic. There is more realism in the marketplace and less bullishness than was prevalent in the Celtic Tiger boom years.

• 51% favour career progression over money and job location combined when looking at motivators to move jobs. • 75% would go back to education full time in order to progress their careers.

Highlights: • 71% or respondents answered ‘yes’ or ‘maybe’, when asked if they would support a pay freeze if the government took action to freeze prices on all goods and services, which would bring a halt to most inflationary pressures. This highlights the fact that people are becoming less selfish and greedy in their attitude to jobs etc., and prepared to show realistic restraint with a long term goal of keeping the economy competitive.

• Overall, the findings highlight an extremely career focused workforce, showing realism and restraint.

WAGE RESTRAINT VS INFLATION In light of the recent inflationary pressures in Ireland which is impacting on our competitiveness, a question was posed to participants regarding wage restraint & product/services inflation. This would be similar to the Government’s restraint on Pubs & Bars a few years ago, where they put in place legislation to freeze the price of pints etc. However unlikely this scenario is, we asked would they take a pay freeze if the government took action to freeze all goods and services, which would bring a halt to most inflationary pressures. 71% of people nationwide said ‘Yes’ or ‘maybe’, while only 29% said ‘No’.

• 75% of the people felt there were enough/lots of opportunities, confidence in the jobs market. However, national figure (outside Dublin) were less confident, with 25% of respondents saying that the market was ‘weak’, as opposed to 13% from Dublin - reflective of recent job losses in the regions. • Only 9% overall worried about job security. This,

55


RECRUITMENT

JOB SECURITY

Results show that this key cross section of Irish Professionals are prepared to show restraint in order to keep the multinational employers in Ireland, whilst also giving the SME market some breathing space. This is an excellent positive finding for any new employers looking at Ireland, where our workforce are extremely conscious of our need to be competitive, and if extreme measures are needed, then the workforce will absorb it in order to preserve their careers.

Further to current negative sentiment about the long term security of jobs, we asked people, in light of recent job losses and new job announcements, how would they best describe their feelings about their job. Only 9% overall were worried about job security, with 91% ‘very happy’/’cautious’. Of this, 38% were ‘cautious’.

ABOUT

THE

AUTHORS

Berkley Recruitment Group has been operating for over 12 years in Ireland, with offices in Dublin and Cork. With Specialist divisions in the IT, Pharmaceutical and Sales & Marketing sectors, Berkley is a regular contributor to both National and International media as industry experts. With all staff coming from relevant industry backgrounds, Berkley offer a rare insight to both the specific industry sector and recruitment marketplace in general. For further information, please contact: Fergal Brosnan, Director, Berkley Recruitment Group. 087 8575103 / 01 -8724666 / 021 4559099. Email: fbrosnan@berkley.ie. Web: www.Berkley.ie

Manotherm Magnehelics Meters Matter

56

Manotherm Limited 4 Walkinstown Road, Dublin 12 Tel: 01-452 2355 Fax: 01-451 6919 Email: info@manotherm.ie Web: www.manotherm.ie Co. Down Tel: 028 4066 9936 Email: sales@manotherm.co.uk


CHEMICAL SUPPLIERS ACIDS & ALKALIS AGB Scientific Ltd Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Brockley Group Ltd Camida Ltd Carbon Group Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Enva Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Norman Lauder Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd Univar Ireland Limited

BIOCHEMICALS AGB Scientific Ltd Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Camida Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Fluorochem Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd

BIOCIDES AGB Scientific Ltd Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Camida Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland National Chemical Co. Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd Univar Ireland Limited

CATALYSTS AGB Scientific Ltd Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited

Camida Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd Univar Ireland Limited

CHIRAL COMPOUNDS BASF Ireland Limited Camida Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd

EXCIPIENTS Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Betco Marketing Limited Brockley Group Ltd Camida Ltd Carbon Group Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd Univar Ireland Limited

FINE CHEMICALS Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Camida Ltd Carbon Group Chemtek Sales Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Fluorochem Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd 57

GASES Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland National Chemical Co. Ltd

HETEROCYCLICS Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Camida Ltd Fluorochem Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd

INORGANIC CHEMICALS AGB Scientific Ltd Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Betco Marketing Limited Brockley Group Ltd Camida Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Enva Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd Univar Ireland Limited

L ABORATORY REAGEANTS AGB Scientific Ltd BASF Ireland Limited Dionex Ireland Ltd Enva Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Fluorochem Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd

MISC. CHEMICALS AGB Scientific Ltd Albion Chemicals

CHEMICAL SUPPLIERS

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 CHEMICAL SUPPLIERS

BASF Ireland Limited Betco Marketing Limited Camida Ltd Carbon Group Chemtek Sales Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Enva Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Norman Lauder Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd

OILS, FATS AND WAXES Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Brockley Group Ltd Carbon Group Chemtek Sales Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Enva Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland National Chemical Co. Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd P.K. Chemicals Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd

ORGANIC INTERMEDIATES AGB Scientific Ltd Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Betco Marketing Limited Camida Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd

Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Fluorochem Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd Univar Ireland Limited

ORGANOMETALLICS BASF Ireland Limited Camida Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland National Chemical Co. Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd

REAGENTS AGB Scientific Ltd BASF Ireland Limited Camida Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Norman Lauder Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd

SILANES BASF Ireland Limited Camida Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Fluorochem Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd

Notes

58

P.K. Chemicals Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd Univar Ireland Limited

SOLVENTS AGB Scientific Ltd Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Brockley Group Ltd Camida Ltd Carbon Group Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Enva Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Fluorochem Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd Soltec (Ireland) Ltd Univar Ireland Limited

SURFACTANTS Albion Chemicals BASF Ireland Limited Camida Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Corcoran Chemicals Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd National Chemical Co. Ltd Sigma-Aldrich Ireland Ltd Univar Ireland Limited


GENERAL SUPPLIERS ACCESS CONTROL Crannagh & Co. Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Siemens Limited

ACTUATORS ABB Ltd P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Crannagh & Co. Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Hanlon O’Grady & Co. Ltd Norgren Limited Pegler & Louden Ireland

AERATORS AGB Scientific Ltd Consolidated Pumps Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland

AGITATORS AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Kells Stainless Ltd Lianco Ltd Odenburg Engineering Ltd Pegler & Louden Ireland Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Wrentech Ltd

AIR FILTRATION/MONITORING /POLLUTION CONTROL AGB Scientific Ltd Bord na Mona Environmental Consultancy, Monitoring & Laboratory Services Crannagh & Co. Enva Ireland Limited Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Nederman Ltd Norgren Limited Pegler & Louden Ireland Sartorius Limited

ALARMS P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Crannagh & Co. Eurolec Instrumentation Ltd Siemens Limited

ANALYSIS SERVICES Anecto Bord na Mona Environmental Consultancy, Monitoring & Laboratory Services Cardinal Health Crannagh & Co.

ANALYTICAL EQUIPMENT ABB Ltd AGB Scientific Ltd Caliper Life Sciences Chemtek Sales Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Dionex Ireland Ltd Endress & Hauser (Ireland) Ltd Enva Ireland Limited Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Pollution Control Systems Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Sartorius Limited Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

AUTOCLAVES

Intermec Ireland Ltd National Instruments Norgren Limited Quality Packaging Machinery Weber Labelling & Coding Zenith Technologies

BALANCES AGB Scientific Ltd P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Sartorius Limited Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

BARCODING/L ABELLING/ TRACEABILITY ADC Barcode Solutions Crannagh & Co. DGP Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GS1 Ireland Intermec Ireland Ltd Odenburg Engineering Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Sealpack Ltd Weber Labelling & Coding Zetes Blackbird

BARRIERS SAFETY

AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Kells Stainless Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

AUTOMATION ABB Ltd P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Caliper Life Sciences Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Eurotherm Ireland Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd 59

Crannagh & Co. Odenburg Engineering Ltd Siemens Limited Wrentech Ltd

BIOTECHNOLOGY Cardinal Health Crannagh & Co. Dionex Ireland Ltd FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Fisher Scientific Ireland GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Global Pharma Networks Norman Lauder Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd

GENERAL SUPPLIERS

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 GENERAL SUPPLIERS

Lianco Ltd Sartorius Limited Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd Zenith Technologies

BLENDERS Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Univar Ireland Limited Wrentech Ltd

BLOWERS Crannagh & Co. Lianco Ltd

BURSTING DISCS BS&B Safety Systems Ltd. (Bursting Discs) Crannagh & Co.

CABINETS AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Fisher Scientific Ireland Kells Stainless Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Logstrup (Ireland) Limited Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd

CAD Anecto Crannagh & Co. FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers

CALIBRATION ABB Ltd AGB Scientific Ltd Beamex Limited Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Endress & Hauser (Ireland) Ltd

Eurolec Instrumentation Ltd Eurotherm Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Sartorius Limited

CENTRIFUGES AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Engineering) Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Sartorius Limited Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

CHEMICAL CONSULTANTS Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co. Enva Ireland Limited Global Pharma Network TopChem Laboratories Ltd

CHROMOTOGRAPHY AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Dionex Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

CLEANROOMS AGB Scientific Ltd Beam Vacuum Systems Cardinal Health Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Miele Ireland Ltd Wrentech Ltd

CLEANING SERVICES/ EQUIPMENT AGB Scientific Ltd Beam Vacuum Systems Crannagh & Co. GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Miele Ireland Ltd Soltec (Ireland) Ltd Wrentech Ltd

COLD CHAIN PACKAGING Crannagh & Co. 60

Smurfit Kappa Ireland

COMPRESSED AIR/ COMPRESSORS Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Norgren Limited Pegler & Louden Ireland

COMPUTER SYSTEMS P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Crannagh & Co. Eurotherm Ireland Ltd Global Pharma Networks Intermec Ireland Ltd Sealpack Ltd Zenith Technologies

CONDENSORS Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Fisher Scientific Ireland Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd Hanlon O’Grady & Co. Ltd Kells Stainless Ltd Plate Tek Engineering Ltd

CONDITION MONITORING Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions National Instruments Plate Tek Engineering Ltd

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT Crannagh & Co.

CONVEYORS Crannagh & Co. Goulding Chemicals Ltd Lianco Ltd Odenburg Engineering Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Wrentech Ltd

COOLING SYSTEMS Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Dawson Rentals Irl. Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd


Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd Odenburg Engineering Ltd Plate Tek Engineering Ltd

DATA ACQUISITION P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Dionex Ireland Ltd Eurotherm Ireland Ltd Eurolec Instrumentation Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Global Pharma Networks GS1 Ireland Intermec Ireland Ltd National Instruments Siemens Limited Weber Labelling & Coding

DEHUMIDIFIERS Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Fisher Scientific Ireland

DESIGN Anecto Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Global Pharma Networks Persona Design Consultants Plate Tek Engineering Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery

DISPERSERS Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Lianco Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Wrentech Ltd

DISTILLATION Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Soltec (Ireland) Ltd Wrentech Ltd

DRAINS Crannagh & Co. Enva Ireland Limited

DRIERS

Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Siemens Limited Zenith Technologies

ELECTRONIC COMPONENTS

Crannagh & Co. Lianco Ltd

DRUMS/CONTAINERS Crannagh & Co. Curtec UK Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Industrial Packaging Ltd Interpac Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd

DRY ICE Crannagh & Co. Goulding Chemicals Ltd

EDUCATION & TRAINING Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Global Pharma Networks Hazchem Training Ltd Institute of Technology Sligo Odenburg Engineering Ltd

EFFLUENT MONITORING/ TREATMENT P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Bord na Mona Environmental Consultancy, Monitoring & Laboratory Services Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Enva Ireland Limited Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Pollution Control Systems Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Siemens Limited

ELECTRICAL ABB Ltd 61

ABB Ltd Crannagh & Co.

ENERGY EFFICIENCY/ MANAGEMENT ABB Ltd Bord na Mona Environmental Consultancy, Monitoring & Laboratory Services Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Eurotherm Ireland Ltd FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Siemens Limited Sustainable Energy Ireland Zenith Technologies

ENGINEERING SERVICES ABB Ltd Axium Process Ltd Berkley Pharmaceutical Chemtek Sales Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Eurotherm Ireland Ltd FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Institute of Technology Sligo Lianco Ltd MSL Engineering Ltd Odenburg Engineering Ltd Plate Tek Engineering Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Siemens Limited Zenith Technologies

ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES/ EQUIPMENT Bord na Mona Environmental Consultancy, Monitoring & Laboratory Services Crannagh & Co. Dionex Ireland Ltd Enva Ireland Limited

GENERAL SUPPLIERS

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 GENERAL SUPPLIERS

Environmental Protection Agency Eurolec Instrumentation Ltd FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers H.R. Holfeld (Engineering) Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Hydraulics) Ltd Institute of Technology Sligo Interpac Pollution Control Systems Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Soltec (Ireland) Ltd Veolia Environmental Services

EVAPORATORS Caliper Life Sciences Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Fisher Scientific Ireland GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd Kells Stainless Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd

EXPLOSION PROOFING BS&B Safety Systems Ltd. (Bursting Discs) Crannagh & Co.

EXTRUDERS Crannagh & Co. Lianco Ltd Wrentech Ltd

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Intermec Ireland Ltd

FANS Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Nederman Ltd

FILLING EQUIPMENT P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co.

Fisher Scientific Ireland Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Lianco Ltd Odenburg Engineering Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Wrentech Ltd

FILTERS Axium Process Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Enva Ireland Limited Fisher Scientific Ireland GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Engineering) Ltd Nederman Ltd Norgren Limited Sartorius Limited Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

Pegler & Louden Ireland Sartorius Limited Siemens Limited

FLUID HANDLING Chemtek Sales Ltd Consolidated Pumps Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Hanlon O’Grady & Co. Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Nederman Ltd Norgren Limited Quality Packaging Machinery Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Viking Pump (Europe) Ltd Wrentech Ltd

FUME CUPBOARDS

FILTRATION Axium Process Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co. Enva Ireland Limited Fisher Scientific Ireland GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Nederman Ltd Norgren Limited Sartorius Limited Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

FIRE DETECTION/ PREVENTION/PROTECTION Burgoyne Consultants Ltd Crannagh & Co. Siemens Limited

FLOW CONTROL P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Endress & Hauser (Ireland) Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Hanlon O’Grady & Co. Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Manotherm Ltd Norgren Limited 62

Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd

FURNACES Crannagh & Co. Eurotherm Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

GAS DETECTION Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

GAUGES P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Eurolec Instrumentation Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Manotherm Ltd Norgren Limited Pegler & Louden Ireland


GENERATORS Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland

GLASSWARE Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Johnsen & Jorgensen Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

GRINDING Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd

HAZARDOUS WASTE DISPOSAL/TREATMENT Crannagh & Co. Enva Ireland Limited Intermec Ireland Ltd Interpac Soltec (Ireland) Ltd Veolia Environmental Services

HEALTH & SAFETY/ FIRST AID Burgoyne Consultants Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Hazchem Training Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

HEAT EXCHANGERS Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd Hanlon O’Grady & Co. Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Engineering) Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Hydraulics) Ltd Lianco Ltd Manotherm Ltd Pegler & Louden Ireland Plate Tek Engineering Ltd Wrentech Ltd

HEATERS

Plate Tek Engineering Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery

Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Fisher Scientific Ireland GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Lianco Ltd

HOMOGENISERS Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Kells Stainless Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd

HOSES Crannagh & Co. Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Micro Industries Ireland

HUMIDITY/HUMIDIFIERS Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Dawson Rentals Irl. Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Manotherm Ltd

HYDRAULICS Crannagh & Co. Micro Industries Ireland

INCINERATION Crannagh & Co. Veolia Environmental Services

INCUBATORS Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

INSPECTION EQUIPMENT P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. 63

INSTRUMENTATION ABB Ltd Beamex Limited P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Caliper Life Sciences Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Dionex Ireland Ltd Endress & Hauser (Ireland) Ltd Eurolec Instrumentation Ltd Eurotherm Ireland Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Engineering) Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Manotherm Ltd Pegler & Louden Ireland Sartorius Limited Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Siemens Limited

IT ADC Barcode Solutions Crannagh & Co. Zetes Blackbird

INVESTMENT Crannagh & Co. Growcorp Group Ltd Higher Education Authority Science Foundation Ireland

L AB EQUIPMENT/SUPPLIES Caliper Life Sciences Chemtek Sales Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. DGP Ireland Ltd Dionex Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Miele Ireland Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Sartorius Limited Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Sealpack Ltd Wrentech Ltd

GENERAL SUPPLIERS

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 GENERAL SUPPLIERS

LEGAL/FINANCIAL/ INSURANCE Crannagh & Co.

LIFTS & HOISTS Crannagh & Co. Lianco Ltd Wrentech Ltd

MAINTENANCE P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Endress & Hauser (Ireland) Ltd Enva Ireland Limited Odenburg Engineering Ltd Plate Tek Engineering Ltd Sartorius Limited Wrentech Ltd

MATERIALS HANDLING/ FORKLIFTS/PALLET TRUCKS Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Henley Forklift Group Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Engineering) Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Hydraulics) Ltd Interpac Odenburg Engineering Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Toyota Industrial Equipment Wrentech Ltd

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SERVICES Crannagh & Co. MSL Engineering Ltd

METERS AGB Scientific Ltd P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Eurolec Instrumentation Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Manotherm Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

MECHANICAL & PROCESS ENGINEERING Crannagh & Co.

MICROSCOPES AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd

MILLING Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Fisher Scientific Ireland Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd

MIXERS

Interpac Johnsen & Jorgensen Ltd Norman Lauder Ltd Measom Freer New Era Packaging Ltd Odenburg Engineering Ltd Persona Design Consultants Primepac Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Smurfit Kappa Cork Smurfit Kappa Ireland Smurfit Kappa Packaging Solutions Cork Steripack Pharma Ltd Weber Labelling & Coding

PALLETS Complas Packaging Ltd Crannagh & Co. Interpac Smurfit Kappa Ireland Smurfit Kappa Packaging Solutions Cork Wrentech Ltd

PIPES

Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Fisher Scientific Ireland Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Kells Stainless Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd

NOISE/ODOUR CONTROL Bord na Mona Environmental Consultancy, Monitoring & Laboratory Services Crannagh & Co.

PACKAGING/DESIGN ADC Barcode Solutions Anecto Cardinal Health Complas Packaging Ltd Crannagh & Co. Curtec UK Ltd DGP Ireland Ltd GS1 Ireland Industrial Packaging Ltd 64

Axium Process Ltd BS&B Safety Systems Ltd (Bursting Discs) Crannagh & Co. Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Hydraulics) Ltd Smurfit Kappa Packaging Solutions Cork

PLUMBING Crannagh & Co. DGP Ireland Ltd

PNEUMATICS P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions DGP Ireland Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Norgren Limited Pegler & Louden Ireland

POLLUTION CONTROL ABB Ltd Bord na Mona Environmental Consultancy, Monitoring & Laboratory Services Crannagh & Co.


Enva Ireland Limited Intermec Ireland Ltd Pollution Control Systems Ltd

POWDER HANDLING AGB Scientific Ltd Burgoyne Consultants Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Lianco Ltd Nederman Ltd Odenburg Engineering Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Wrentech Ltd

POWER SUPPLY P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Crannagh & Co. Siemens Limited

PRESSURE MEASUREMENTS/ SWITCHES/VESSELS ABB Ltd P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd BS&B Safety Systems Ltd (Bursting Discs) Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Endress & Hauser (Ireland) Ltd Eurolec Instrumentation Ltd Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Graham Hart (Process Technology) Ltd Kells Stainless Ltd Manotherm Ltd Norgren Limited Siemens Limited

PROCESS CONTROL AGB Scientific Ltd Axium Process Ltd P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Bord na Mona Environmental Consultancy, Monitoring & Laboratory Services Burgoyne Consultants Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Eurolec Instrumentation Ltd Eurotherm Ireland Ltd

Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Engineering) Ltd Lianco Ltd Logstrup (Ireland) Limited Manotherm Ltd National Instruments Norgren Limited Pegler & Louden Ireland Pollution Control Systems Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Sartorius Limited Siemens Limited Zenith Technologies

PROCESS & MECHANICAL ENGINEERING CONTRACTORS Crannagh & Co. MSL Engineering Ltd

PROJECT MANAGEMENT ADC Barcode Solutions AGB Scientific Ltd Axium Process Ltd Cardinal Health Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Global Pharma Networks Odenburg Engineering Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Wrentech Ltd Zenith Technologies

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING/ APPARATUS Albion Chemicals Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland

PUMPS

Pegler & Louden Ireland Viking Pump (Europe) Ltd

REACTORS AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Intermec Ireland Ltd Kells Stainless Ltd

RECRUITMENT Berkley Pharmaceutical Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Global Pharma Networks ICDS Recruitment Consultants Manpower Ireland The RFT Group

R&D Crannagh & Co. FDT Consulting Engineers & Project Managers Institute of Technology Sligo Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd TopChem Laboratories Ltd

REFRIGERATION/FREEZING AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Dawson Rentals Irl. Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd

ROBOTICS Crannagh & Co. Odenburg Engineering Ltd

AGB Scientific Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Hydraulics) Ltd ITT Flygt Limited Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd 65

SCADA/DCS/MIS ABB Ltd P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Eurotherm Ireland Ltd Global Pharma Networks

GENERAL SUPPLIERS

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 GENERAL SUPPLIERS

National Instruments Siemens Limited Zenith Technologies

SCREENS Crannagh & Co. Lianco Ltd

SCRUBBERS Crannagh & Co.

SEALS & GASKETS Consolidated Pumps Ltd Crannagh & Co. Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd

SECURITY Crannagh & Co. Siemens Limited

SHOWERS AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co.

SIEVING AGB Scientific Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co. Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd

SOFTWARE ADC Barcode Solutions Crannagh & Co. Dionex Ireland Ltd Eurotherm Ireland Ltd Intermec Ireland Ltd Lianco Ltd National Instruments Siemens Limited Weber Labelling & Coding Zenith Technologies

SOLVENT RECOVERY/ SERVICES Crannagh & Co.

Pollution Control Systems Ltd Soltec (Ireland) Ltd Veolia Environmental Services

STAINLESS STEEL/FITTINGS AGB Scientific Ltd Axium Process Ltd Chemtek Sales Ltd Crannagh & Co. Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Interpac Micro Industries Ireland Norgren Limited Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd

Classic Technology Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Dawson Rentals Irl. Ltd DGP Ireland Ltd Endress & Hauser (Ireland) Ltd Eurolec Instrumentation Ltd Eurotherm Ireland Ltd Fisher Scientific Ireland GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Manotherm Ltd Siemens Limited Smurfit Kappa Packaging Solutions Cork Zenith Technologies

TESTING SERVICES

STEAM EQUIPMENT AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Manotherm Ltd

STORAGE/BUNDING Crannagh & Co. Industrial Packaging Ltd Johnston Logistics Ltd Kells Stainless Ltd Wrentech Ltd

TABLETING EQUIPMENT Crannagh & Co. Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Lianco Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Wrentech Ltd

TANKS

AGB Scientific Ltd Anecto P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Bord na Mona Environmental Consultancy, Monitoring & Laboratory Services Burgoyne Consultants Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Plate Tek Engineering Ltd

THERMAL IMAGING/ THERMOGRAPHY AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Manotherm Ltd

TOOLS Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions

TRANSPORT & LOGISTICS

Axium Process Ltd Celtic Forwarding Limited Crannagh & Co. Enva Ireland Limited Kells Stainless Ltd Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Wrentech Ltd

TEMPERATURE CONTROL AGB Scientific Ltd P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd 66

Anecto Celtic Forwarding Limited C & G Logistics Group Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions DGP Ireland Ltd Enva Ireland Limited Global Pharma Networks Johnston Logistics Ltd KWE (Ireland) Ltd Manotherm Ltd NITL Smurfit Kappa Packaging Solutions Cork


VACUUM SYSTEMS Beam Vacuum Systems Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Lianco Ltd Pollution Control Systems Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Wrentech Ltd

VALVES

VENTILATION AGB Scientific Ltd Crannagh & Co. Cross Technical Solutions Nederman Ltd

VISION SYSTEMS Crannagh & Co. National Instruments Quality Packaging Machinery

WAREHOUSE MANAGEMENT AGB Scientific Ltd Axium Process Ltd P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd BS&B Safety Systems Ltd (Bursting Discs) Crannagh & Co. Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd GEA Process Technologies Ireland Ltd Hanlon O’Grady & Co. Ltd H.R. Holfeld (Hydraulics) Ltd Lianco Ltd Manotherm Ltd Norgren Limited Pegler & Louden Ireland Schuf Valve Technology

VALIDATION Crannagh & Co.

ADC Barcode Solutions AGB Scientific Ltd Celtic Forwarding Limited Crannagh & Co. Dawson Rentals Irl. Ltd Eurotherm Ireland Ltd Global Pharma Networks Hazchem Training Ltd Intermec Ireland Ltd Johnston Logistics Ltd Manotherm Ltd Zetes Blackbird

WASTE MANAGEMENT/ BALERS/RECYCLING Bord na Mona Environmental Consultancy, Monitoring & Laboratory Services Celtic Forwarding Limited

Notes

67

Crannagh & Co. Enva Ireland Limited Industrial Packaging Ltd Interpac Quitmann O’Neill Packaging Ltd Soltec (Ireland) Ltd Veolia Environmental Services

WATER TREATMENT ABB Ltd AGB Scientific Ltd Classic Technology Ltd Consolidated Pumps Ltd Crannagh & Co. Flexachem Manufacturing Ltd Logstrup (Ireland) Limited Pegler & Louden Ireland Pollution Control Systems Ltd Siemens Limited Univar Ireland Limited

WEIGHING AGB Scientific Ltd P. J. Boner & Co. Ltd Crannagh & Co. Fisher Scientific Ireland Lennox Laboratory Supplies Ltd Odenburg Engineering Ltd Quality Packaging Machinery Sartorius Limited Scientific & Chemical Supplies Ltd Siemens Limited Wrentech Ltd

GENERAL SUPPLIERS

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


COMPANY LISTINGS A

Web: Contact:

ABB LTD Address:

Belgard Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 405 7300 Fax: (01) 405 7327 Email: marketing@ie.abb.com Web: www.abb.com Type of Business: Electrical Engineers. Contact: Marketing Associate: Monica Lambe

www.aicplastic pallets.com Charles O’Donovan Director

ASL Address:

ALBION CHEMICALS Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit 405, Greenogue Business Park, Rathcoole, Dublin 24. (01) 401 3500 (01) 405 3501 bill.maher@ albionchemicals.ie www.albion chemicals.co.uk General Manager: Bill Maher

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

ASTECH IRELAND LTD Address:

ALLCHEM INTERNATIONAL LTD ADC BARCODE SOLUTIONS Unit 1B, 11 Canal Bank, Parkwest Industrial Park, Nangor Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 620 9777 Fax: (01) 620 9722 Email: info@adcbarcode.com Web: www.adcbarcodesolutions.com Contact: Marketing Manager: Celine Wogan

Address:

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

ALPHA VISION DESIGN Address:

AGB SCIENTIFIC LTD Orion Business Campus, Northwest Business Park, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Tel: (01) 882 2222 Fax: (01) 882 2333 Email: info@agb.ie Web: www.agb.ie www.labshop.ie Type of Business: Lab supplier.

Address:

AIC PLASTIC PALLETS LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email:

The Woodlands, Carrigmore, Ballineen, Co. Cork. (023) 47333 (023) 47671 info@ aicplasticpallets.com

Broadway House, 21 Broadway, Maidenhead, Berkshire, SL6 INJ. (0044) 1753 443344 (0044) 1753 443345 info@allchem.co.uk www.allchem.co.uk A.M. Leigh Sales Director

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

22 Old Turnpike Road, Naas Road, Dublin 22. (01) 464 0332 (01) 464 3843 info@avd.ie www.avdpharma.com Niall Dorr Business Development

ANECTO Address:

Mervue Business Park, Co. Galway. Tel: (091) 757 404 Fax: (091) 757 387 Email: sales@anecto.com Web: www.anecto.com Type of Business: Dangerous goods packaging testing laboratory. Contact: Yvonne Kearney 69

275 King Henry’s Drive, New Addington, Croydon, Surrey, CRO OAE, England. (0044)1689 800799 (0044)1689 800405 info@aslltd.co.uk www.aslltd.co.uk Alex Mathie Sales & Marketing Manager

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit 47, Southern Cross Business Park, Boghall Road, Bray, Co. Wicklow. (01) 286 5303 (01) 286 5655 sales@astechireland.ie www.astechireland.ie Shay Vella Hancock Managing Director

ATC AUTOMATION LIMITED Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit B7, Centre Point Business Park, Oak Road, Dublin 12. (01) 460 7070 (01) 461 0771 automationsales@ atc.ie www.atc.ie Liam Prendergast Sales Manager

AXIUM PROCESS Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Hendy Industrial Estate, Hendy, Swansea, SA4 0XP (0044) 1792 883882 (0044) 1792 886049 info@axiumprocess.com www.axiumprocess.com Sales Manager: Jean Jones

B BAKU GLS LTD Address:

Wexford Road,

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

Rosslare Harbour Co. Wexford. (053) 916 1786 (053) 916 1789 leslie@bakugls.com www.bakugls.com Leslie Devereaux Operations Director

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

BCD ENGINEERING Address:

Railway Road, Charleville, Co. Cork (063) 30200 (063) 30201 richard.keays@ bcdgroup.ie www.bcdgroup.ie Richard Keays Group Engineering Sales

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

BEAM VACUUM SYSTEMS Address:

Opus Business Park, 35 Aughrim Road, Magherafelt, Co. Derry, BT45 6BB. Tel: (0044) 2879 632 424 Fax: (0044) 2879 632 425 Email: enquiries@ beamvacuums.ie Web: www.beamvacuums.ie Type of Business: Vacuum Solution Specialists. Contact: Senior Marketing Executive: Lisa McGonigle

P.J. BONER & CO. LTD INSTRUMENT & WEIGHTING SPECIALISTS Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

BORD NA MÓNA ENVIRONMENTAL CONSULTANCY, MONITORING & LABORATORY SERVICES Address:

BASF IRELAND LIMITED

BERKLEY PHARMACEUTICAL

Address: Business

Address:

Bracetown Park, Clonee, Co. Meath. (01) 825 5701 (01) 825 2038 karla.lawless@basf.com www.basf.com

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Type of Business: Contact:

Chemicals. In the first instance: Manager Internal /External Affairs: Karla Lawless

BEAMEX LIMITED Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Newtown Grange Farm Business Park, Desford Road, Newtown Unthank, Leicestershire LE9 9FL. (0044) 1455 821 920 (0044) 1455 821 923 beamex.ltd@ beamex.com www.beamex.com Sales & Service Director: Alex Maxfield

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Cork: Mill House, Carrigrohane, Co. Cork. Dublin: 509 The Capel Building, Mary’s Abbey, Dublin 7. (021) 455 9092 (01) 872 4665 (021) 455 9095 (01) 872 0904 pharma@berkley.ie www.berkley.ie Cork: Ruth Scanlan Dublin: Joanna Housto

BETCO MARKETING LIMITED Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Contact:

Mill House, Main Street, Carrigaline, Co. Cork. (021) 437 4360 (021) 437 4367 dhalpin@betco.ie Managing Director: Diarmuid Halpin

70

Unit 35, Western Parkway Business Centre, Ballymount Road, Dublin 12. (01) 450 5050 (01) 450 5183 info@pjboner.com www.pjboner.com Managing Director: Pat Boner

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Main Street, Newbridge, Co. Kildare (045) 439 000 (045) 434 207 environ@bnm.ie www.bnm.ie/ environmental Brand Manager: Karen Healy

BRIGHTWATER Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Dublin: 36 Merrion Square, Dublin 2. Cork: 49 South Mall, Co. Cork (01) 662 1000 (021) 422 1000 (01) 662 3900 (021) 422 4001 a.carty@brightwater.ie cork@brightwater.ie www.brightwater.ie Adrian Carty Manager Pharmaceutical

BROCKLEY GROUP LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Web:

1 Abbey Street, Howth, Co. Dublin. (01) 839 2016 (01) 839 2869 www.eirchem.com


Contact:

www.brockley.eu Sales Director: Pat Short

Tel: Fax: Email: Contact:

Coolock, Dublin 17 (01) 847 4122 (01) 847 4761 tonyjr@durcon.ie Tony Cameron Jr. Sales

Raheen Business Park, Raheen, Co. Limerick. Tel: (061) 484 700 Emergency Delivery: 086 241 0615 Fax: (061) 304 774 Email: patrick.murphy@bsb.ie Web: www.bsb.ie Type of Business: Pressure relief devices. Contact: Sales Dept.

Address: Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

55 Clontarf Road, Dublin 3. (01) 833 2091 (01) 833 2092 marketing@bcl.ie www.bcl.ie Operations Manager: Martin Concannon

CARDINAL HEALTH

C & G LOGISTICS GROUP

Address:

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Tower House, New Quay, Clonmel, Co. Tipperary. (052) 25455 (052) 25466 info@camida.com www.camida.com Company Secretary: Deirdre McGrath

CARBON GROUP Address:

C

CALIPER LIFE SCIENCES Address:

1 Wellfield, Preston Brook, Runcorn, Cheshire. Tel: (0044) 1928 711 448 Fax: (0044) 1928 791 228 Email: lydia.mcintyre@ caliperls.com Web: www.caliperls.com Type of Business: Laboratory Automation. Contact: Sales Manager Ireland: Simon Minchin

A. R. CAMERON LTD Address:

Malahide Road Industrial Park,

CELTIC FORWARDING LIMITED

Factory Cross, Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 437 8988 UK Local Lo-Call: (0044) 8708 504 831 Fax: (021) 437 8950 Email: cdeegan@indigo.ie sales@carbon.ie Web: www.carbon.ie Type of Business: Pharmachemicals. Contact: Area Sales Manager: Carol Deegan

Address:

Address:

BURGOYNE CONSULTANTS LTD

Peter Cunnane Managing Director

Dublin: Celtic House, 30 Marlborough Street, Dublin 1. Waterford: Belview Port, Slieverue, Waterford. Limerick: 2 Church Street, John’s Square, Co. Limerick. Tel: (01) 865 6000 (051) 851 821 (061) 467 969 Fax: (01) 874 6745 (051) 851 823 (061) 467 972 Email: info@celticfwd.ie Web: www.celticfwd.ie Type of Business: Shipping. Contact: Director: Finbarr Cleary Sales Manager: Gerald Kiernan Waterford: DGSA Tank Division Manager: Patty deCourcey

CAMIDA LTD BS&B SAFETY SYSTEMS LTD

Contact:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit 26, Cherry Orchard Industrial Estate, Dublin 10. (01) 620 0600 (01) 626 2815 diarmuid.wilson@ cardinal.com www.cardinal.com Sales Director PTS Ireland: Diarmuid Wilson

CASHELS ENGINEERING LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web:

Aghamore, Ballyhaunis, Co. Mayo (094) 963 0517 (094) 963 0214 sales@cashels.net www.cashels.net 71

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Westpoint Business Park, Navan Road, Mulhuddart, Dublin 15. (01) 820 8455 (01) 820 8457 info@cglogistics.ie www.cglogistics.ie General Manager/ Director : Patrick Wogan

CHARPAK MEDICAL Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

30 St. Peters Road, Huntingdon, Cambs. UK 0044 1480 434434 0044 1480 434545 sales@charpak.co.uk www.charpak medical.com Director: Paul Smith

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

CHEMTEK SALES LTD

CPI TECHNOLOGY LTD

Address:

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Estuary House, New Street, Malahide, Co. Dublin. (01) 845 3766/63 (01) 845 3172 sales@chemtek.ie www.chemtek.ie Director: David Shaw

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit 5, Link Road Business Park, Ballincollig, Co. Cork. (021) 487 4142 (021) 487 8764 info@cpitechnology.com www.cpitechnology.com Adrian Giltinan Managing Director

Tel: (0044) 2085 684 445 Fax: (0044) 2085 684 446 Email: curtec.uk@curtec.com Web: www.curtec.com Type of Business: Packaging Manufacturer. Contact: Eva Klotz

D

CLASSIC TECHNOLOGY LTD

DALKIA

Address:

Address:

Unit 4, Block B, Johnstown Manor, Johnstown, Naas, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 896 660 Fax: (045) 896 713 Email: info@classictechnology.ie Web: www.classictechnology.ie Type of Business: Instrumentation. Contact: Director/Sales: Patrick Kinsella

COMPLAS PACKAGING LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Naas Industrial Estate, Dublin Road, Naas, Co. Kildare. (045) 874 088/9 (045) 874 090 sales@complas.ie www.complas.ie Managing Director: Patrick Gregory

CRANNAGH & CO. Address: House,

3 Crannagh Old Clones Road, Beltubet, Co. Cavan. Tel: (049) 952 2789 Fax: (049) 952 2790 Email: info@crannaghtrade.eu carol.lynch@crannaghtrade.eu Web: www.crannaghtrade.eu Type of Business: International trade and customs consultants. Contact: Managing Director: Carol Lynch

CONSOLIDATED PUMPS LTD

CROSS TECHNICAL SOLUTIONS

Address:

Address:

Knockmeenagh Road, Newlands Cross, Clondalkin, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 459 3471 Fax: (01) 459 1093 Email: info@consolidatedpumps.com Web: www.consolidatedpumps.com Contact: Managing Director: RK Tolan

CORCORAN CHEMICALS LTD Address:

Kingsbridge House, 17-22 Parkgate St, Dublin 8. Tel: (01) 633 0400 Fax: (01) 679 3521 Email: abyrne@ corcoranchemicals.com Web: www.corcoranchemicals.com Contact: Managing Director: A. Byrne

Unit 22, Kilcarbery Business Park, Nangor Road, Clondalkin, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 405 6777 Fax: (01) 413 6932 Email: sales@crosstechnical solutions.ie Web: www.crosstechnical solutions.ie Type of Business: Specialist Refrigeration. Contact: Dave Killalea General Manager

CURTEC UK LTD Address:

75 Cannon Street, London, EC4 5BN. 72

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

145 Lakeview Drive, Airside Business Park, Swords, Co. Dublin (01) 870 1200 (01) 870 1201 info@dalkia.ie www.dalkia.ie Pat Gilroy Managing Director John Lambe Business Development Manager Jerome Aguesse General Manager

DAWSON RENTALS IRL. LTD Address:

Unit 20, Tougher Business Park, Newhall, Naas, Co. Kildare Tel: (045) 448 810 Fax: (045) 448 811 Email: info@dawsonrentalsireland.com Web: www.dawsonrentalsireland.com Contact: Director: Aidan McCauley

DGP IRELAND LTD Address:

1 Airways Technology Park, Kinsale Road, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 484 9082 Fax: (021) 484 9084 Email: rwalsh@dgpir.com Web: www.dgpir.com Type of Business: Packaging manufacturer. Contact: Product Development Manager: Richard Walsh


DIONEX IRELAND LTD

EUROTHERM IRELAND LTD

Address:

Address:

Unit 9A, Suite 3C, Plato Business Park, Damastown, Dublin 15. Tel: (01) 644 0064 Fax: (01) 885 1673 Email: ireland.info@dionex.com Web: www.dionex.com Type of Business: Scientific analytical equipment. Contact: Siobhan Curley

E

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web:

PO Box 3000, Johnstown Castle, Estate, Co. Wexford. (053) 916 0600 (053) 916 0699 info@epa.ie www.epa.ie

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit 5, Red Cow Business Park, Naas Road, Dublin 22. (01) 469 1800 (01) 469 1300 info@eurotherm.ie www.eurotherm.ie Area Engineer: Rory Lynch

F FASTNET RECRUITMENT

ESB INDEPENDENT ENERGY Address:

ENDRESS & HAUSER (IRELAND) LTD Address:

Clane Business Park, Clane, Co. Kildare. Tel: (045) 868 615 Fax: (045) 868 182 Email: info@ie.endress.com Web: www.endress.com Type of Business: Process automation solutions supplier. Contact: Sales Manager: Tony Donnelly

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

ENVA IRELAND LTD Address:

Tel:

Fax: Email:

Web: Contact:

Clonminam Industrial Estate, Portlaoise, Co. Laois. (057) 867 8643 Portlaoise: (057) 867 8600 Shannon: (061) 707 400 Cork: (021) 496 2554 (057) 867 8699 info@enva.ie abrohan@ atlasireland.ie www.enva.ie Marketing Manager: Anthony Brohan

Dublin: Woodford Business Park, Santry, Dublin 17. Belfast: 33 Clarendon Dock, Laganside, Belfast, BT1 38G. (01) 862 8300 (028) 9051 1246 (01) 862 8350 (028) 902 78400 info@esbie.ie www.esbie.ie Susan Whyte Marketing Manager Sean O’Loughlin Manager ROI Electricity Supply Bob Turley Manager NI Electricity Supply

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit M, Eastgate Village, Little Island, Co. Cork. (021) 450 9200 (021) 450 9095 jobs@fastnet recruitment.com www.fastnet recruitment.com Niamh O’Driscoll Managing Director

FDT CONSULTING ENGINEERS & PROJECT MANAGERS Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

First Floor, 170 Walkinstown Road, Dublin 12. (01) 429 1900 (01) 429 1901 info@fdt.ie www.fdt.ie Project Manager: Daragh Byrne Project Manager: Michael Clancy

EUROLEC INSTRUMENTATION LTD

FEHILY TIMONEY & COMPANY

Address:

Address:

Technology House, Cluan Enda, Dundalk, Co. Louth. Tel: (042) 933 3423 Fax: (042) 933 1758 Email: eurolec@esatclear.ie Web: www.eurolec-instruments.com Type of Business: Electronic instrumentation. Contact: Sales/Marketing Executive: Chris Mears 73

Tel: Fax:

Tel: Fax:

Cork: Core House, Pouladuff Road, Co. Cork. (021) 496 4133 (021) 496 4464 Dublin: 2nd Floor, Mill House, Ashtown Gate, Navan Road, Dublin 15. (01) 658 3500 (01) 658 3501

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

Email: Web: Contact:

info@fehilytimoney.ie www.fehilytimoney.ie John Lynch Principal

FIBRESTAR DRUMS LIMITED Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Redhouse Lane, Disley, Stockport Cheshire, SK12 2NW. (0044) 1663 764141 (0044) 1663 762967 sales@fibrestar.co.uk www.fibrestar.co.uk Sales Director: Frank Bedford

FISHER SCIENTIFIC IRELAND Address:

Suite 3, Plaza 212, Blanchardstown Corporate Park 2, Ballycoolin, Dublin 15. Tel: (01) 885 5854 Fax: (01) 899 1855 Email: fsie.sales@thermofisher.com Web: www.ie.fichersci.com Type of Business: Laboratory supplies.

FLEXACHEM MANUFACTURING LTD Address:

Donnybrook Commercial Centre, Douglas, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 463 6742 Fax: (021) 489 1297 Email: sales@flexachem.com Web: www.flexachem.com Type of Business: Manufacturer/ Distributor. Contact: Commercial Director: Agnes Mullins

FLUOROCHEM LTD Address:

Wesley St., Old Glossop, Derbyshire, SK13 7RY.

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

(0044) 1457 868921 (0044) 1457 869360 enquiries@ fluorochem.co.uk www.fluorochem.net Sales Director: Martin Woolley

G

GRAHAM HART (PROCESS TECHNOLOGY) LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Friars Ind. Estate, Bradford Road, Idle,Bradford, BD10 8SW, UK. (0044) 1274 617021 (0044) 1274 618614 sales@graham-hart.com www.graham-hart.com Sales Director: Stephen Hart

GROWCORP GROUP LTD GEA PROCESS TECHNOLOGIES IRELAND LIMITED Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Ash House, Lime Tree Avenue, Millennium Park, Naas, Co. Kildare. (045) 981 200 (045) 981 232 postbox@geapt.ie www.geapt.ie Business Development Manager: Adrian Field

GLOBAL PHARMA NETWORKS Address:

12 Lower Hatch Street, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 639 2928 Fax: (01) 639 2920 Email:sales@globalpharmanetworks.com Web: www.globalpharmanetworks.com Type of Business: Pharma operations consulting. Contact: Director: Mike McMahon

Address:

3015 Lake Drive, Citywest Business Campus, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 466 1000 Fax: (01) 466 1002 Email: grow@growcorp.net Web: www.growcorp.net Type of Business: Bioscience investor, advisor and business incubator. Contact: Chairman: Michael Donnelly

GS1 IRELAND Address: Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

GUNNEBO IRELAND LTD Address:

GOULDING CHEMICALS LTD Address:

Centre Park Road, Marina, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 491 1611 Fax: (021) 491 1660 Email: pollockm@gouldings.ie Web: www.gouldings.ie Type of Business: Chemical distributor. Contact: Manager Industrial Chemicals: Matt Pollock 74

The Nutley Building Merrion Road, Dublin 4. (01) 208 0660 (01) 208 0670 info@gs1ie.org www.gs1ie.org CEO: Jim Bracken

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Dublin: 601 Western Industrial Estate, Dublin 12. Cork: Unit 6, Celtic Park, Monaghan Road, Co. Cork. (01) 458 4836 (021) 432 0950 (01) 458 4835 (021) 432 0951 noel@gunnebolifting.com www.gunnebolifing.com Patrick Doyle Managing Director Noel Howard Director Darren Coffee Sales Manager


H HANLON O’GRADY & CO. LTD Address:

Victoria House, Beaumont Avenue, Churchtown, Dublin 14. Tel: (01) 295 1101 Fax: (01) 298 1790 Type of Business: Industrial valves & controls. Contact: General Manager: Pat Hanlon Office Manager: Rob Arnold

H.R. HOLFELD (ENGINEERING) LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Type of Business: Contact:

2-4 Merville Road, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin. (01) 288 7361 (01) 283 6293 engineering@holfeld.ie Steam Boiler Supplier. General Manager: Oliver Collier

HAZCHEM TRAINING LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

G10, Maynooth Business Campus, Maynooth, Co. Kildare. (01) 629 1800 (01) 629 1822 info@hazchem.ie www.hazchem.ie Office Manager: Michelle Cleere

HENLEY FORKLIFT GROUP LTD Address:

Henley Industrial Park, Killeen Road, Dublin 10. Tel: (01) 620 9200 Fax: (01) 626 5406 Email: henleysales@henley.ie mbyrne@henley.ie Web: www.henley.ie Type of Business: Forklifts. Specialists in Flameproof Forklift Trucks. Contact: Director: Brian O’Connell

HIGHER EDUCATION AUTHORITY Address:

Brooklawn House, Crampton Avenue, Shelbourne Road, Dublin 4. Tel: (01) 231 7100 Fax: (01) 231 7172 Email: info@hea.ie Web: www.hea.ie Type of Business: Government agency. Contact: Head of Research Programme: Dr. Eucharia Meehan

Web: www.icds.ie Type of Business: Recruitment Consultants. Contact: Recruitment Director: Anthony McLoughlin

INDUSTRIAL PACKAGING LTD Address:

Killarney Road, Bray, Co. Wicklow. Tel: (01) 286 4010 Fax: (01) 286 4015 Email: mail@industrialpackaging.ie Web: www.industrialpackaging.ie Type of Business: Manufacturer. Contact: Sales & Marketing Director: Norman Lee

INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY SLIGO H.R. HOLFELD (HYDRAULICS) LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Type of Business: Contact:

2-4 Merville Road, Stillorgan, Co. Dublin. (01) 288 7361 (01) 288 7380 pumps@holfeld.ie Process Pump Supplier. Business Development & Key Accounts: Emmet Connelly

I IAS INDUSTORE Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

1 Tollgate Close, Penarth Road, Cardiff, CF11 8UE. (0044) 2920 239000 (0044) 2920 239900 craig@industore.co.uk www.industore.co.uk Group Director: Craig Powell

ICDS RECRUITMENT CONSULTANTS Address: Tel: Fax: Email:

65 Lower Leeson Street, Dublin 2. (01) 676 3044 (01) 676 3155 info@icds.ie 75

Address: Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Ballinode, Co. Sligo. (071) 915 5222 (071) 916 0475 ilo@itsligo.ie www.itsligo.ie/admin/ industrial_liaison.html Industrial Liaison Manager: Rosemary O’Reilly

INTERMEC IRELAND LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

19/20, York Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. (01) 205 4200 (01) 205 4201 sales@intermec.ie www.intermec.ie General Manager: Joe Lynch

INTERPAC Address:

67E Heather Road, Sandyford Industrial Estate, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 294 0600 Fax: (01) 294 0602 Email: ian@interpac.ie Web: www.interpac.ie Type of Business: Packaging. Contact: Managing Director: Ian Sutton

ITT FLYGT LIMITED Address:

Dublin: 50 Broomhill Close, Airton Road, Tallaght,

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Dublin 24. Limerick: Unit G8, Eastway Business Park, Ballysimon Road, Co. Limerick. (01) 452 4444 (061) 423 993 (01) 452 4795 (061) 423 995 flygt.ireland@flygt.com flygtlimerick@flygt.com www.flygt.ie General Manager: Alison Kirwan

J JOHNSEN & JORGENSEN LTD Address:

Unit 8, Westpoint Enterprise Park, Clarence Avenue, Trafford Park, Manchester, M17 1QS. Tel: (0044) 1618 741930 Fax: (0044) 1618 741931 Email: mscott@jjpack.com Web: www.jjpack.com Type of Business: Bottle, jar & stopper suppliers. Contact: Sales Manager: Matthew Scott

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

(01) 456 9822 (01) 456 9825 sales@jva.ie www.jva.ie Managing Director: John Ryan

K KELLY SCIENTIFIC RESOURCES Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

21-22 Grafton Street, Dublin 2. (01) 679 3160 (01) 676 3166 ksrdublin@ kellyservices.ie www.kellyscientific.com Branch Manager: Jennifer Heaney Consultants: Lorraine Flanagan Kathy Burke Siobhan Murphy

Address:

Blackchurch Business Park, Rathcoole, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 401 3333 Fax: (01) 458 8015 Email: info@jol.ie Web: www.johnstonlogistics.ie Type of Business: Logistics & Distribution. Contact: Sales & Marketing Manager: Dermot Collins

JVA ANALYTICAL LTD Address:

Unit 1, Longmile Business Park, Longmile Road, Dublin 12.

Address:

Oldcastle Road, Kells, Co. Meath Tel: (046) 924 1520 Fax: (046) 924 1528 Email: sales@ksl.ie Web: www.kellsstainless.com Type of Business: Stainless steel vessel manufacturing. Contact: Technical Sales Director: Dara Fay

L NORMAN LAUDER LTD. Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

2A Richview Office Park, Clonskeagh, Dublin 14. (01) 260 0442 (01) 260 0675 sales@nll.ie www.nll.ie Sales Manager: Julian Beatty

LENDAC DATA SYSTEMS LTD Address:

KWE (IRELAND) LIMITED Address:

JOHNSTON LOGISTICS LTD

KELLS STAINLESS LTD

Dublin: Unit 4 Horizon Logistics Park, New Naul Road, Harristown, Swords, Co. Dublin. Cork: Unit 4&5, South Ring West Business Park, Tramore Road, Co. Cork. Tel: (01) 823 9600 (021) 497 5722 Fax: (01) 836 1111 (021) 497 5727 Email: kwedub@ea.kwe.com kweork@ea.kwe.com Web: www.kwe.com Contact: Sales Manager: Karl O’Reilly

76

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit 6, Trinity Enterprise Centre, Pearse Street, Dublin 2. (01) 677 6133 (01) 671 0135 info@lendac.ie www.lendac.ie lrs.lendac.ie Don Lehane Joint Managing Director

LENNOX LABORATORY SUPPLIES LTD Address:

John F. Kennedy Drive, Naas Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 455 2201 Fax: (01) 450 7906 Email: sales@lennox.ie greg@lennox.ie Web: www.lennox.ie Type of Business: Laboratory suppliers. Contact: Director: Gregory Kearns


LIANCO Address: Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Type of Business:

Contact:

Rathclaren, Kilbrittain, Co. Cork (023) 49681 087 260 5447 (023) 49677 lianco@iol.ie www.lianco.net Powder drying, processing, conveying, and containment. Sales Director: Finbar Smith

Tel:

Fax:

Email: Web: Contact:

LOGSTRUP (IRELAND) LIMITED Address:

Dunmore Road, Tuam, Co. Galway. Tel: (093) 70900 Fax: (093) 70901 Email: info@logstrup.ie Web: www.logstrup.com Type of Business: Maunfacturing Contact: General Manager: Sean Mulryan

Address:

4 Walkinstown Road, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 452 2355 Fax: (01) 451 6919 Email: info@manotherm.ie Web: www.manothern.ie Type of Business: Distributors of Controls and Instrumentation. Contact: Director: R.C. Gilbert

MANPOWER IRELAND Address:

Dublin: 2nd Floor, 8 Harcourt Street, Dublin 2. Cork: Carbery House, 67-69 South Mall Co. Cork. Limerick: 1 Michael Street, Co. Limerick. Westmeath: 32 Austin Friars

MIELE IRELAND LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

MEASOM FREER Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

37-41 Chartwell Drive, Wigston, Leicestershire LE18 2FL, UK (0044) 1162 881588 (0044) 1162 813000 sales@measomfreer.co.uk www.measomfreer.co.uk Sales Director; Mark Freer

MICRO HYDRAULICS LTD/ MICRO INDUSTRIES IRELAND Address:

Dublin: Calor Complex, Longmile Road, Dublin 12. Cork: Unit 6/7 Cherrywood Business Park, Little Island, Co. Cork Tel: (01) 450 4322 Fax: (01) 450 5602 Email: info@microhydraulics.ie Web: www.microhydraulics.ie Type of Business: Sanitary hose, tube & accessories. Contact: Sales Representative: Ralph Fitzsimons Sales Representative: Dave O’Donavan 77

Broomhill Business Complex, Broomhill Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. (01) 461 0710 (01) 461 0797 info@miele.ie www.miele.ie Professional Sales Manager: Aidan Carey

MODULAR PANEL SYSTEMS Address:

M MANOTHERM LTD

Street, Mullingar, Co. Westmeath. (01) 645 5200 (021) 427 9733 (061) 312 230 (044) 933 1016 (01) 645 5299 (021) 427 9733 (061) 312 280 (044) 31018 scientificengineering@ manpower.ie www.manpower.ie Managing Director: Jason Kennedy Scientific Engineering Manager: Declan McGrath

Tel: Email: Web: Contact:

Cloone Road, Mohill, Co. Leitrim (071) 963 1162 info@modular.ie www.modular.ie Michael O’Donohoe

MSL ENGINEERING LTD Address:

Rushbrooke Industrial Park, Cobh, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 481 5806 Fax: (021) 481 2965 Email: info@mslengineering.ie Type of Business: Mechanical engineering contractors. Contact: Managing Director: Maurice McGrath

N NATIONAL CHEMICAL CO. LTD Address:

NCC House, 42 Lower Leeson St., Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 613 1400 Fax: (01) 634 0132 Email: info@ncc.ie Web: www.ncc.ie Type of Business: Distributor. Contact: Commercial Director: Rosanna Duignan

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

NORGREN LIMITED Address:

NATIONAL INSTRUMENTS Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Measurement House, Newbury Business Park, London Road, Newbury, Berkshire, RG14 2PS. (01) 867 4374 (01) 867 4375 info.ie@ni.com www.ni.com/ireland Sales Manager Ireland: Jeremy O’Sullivan

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

NEW ERA PACKAGING LTD Address:

Drogheda Industrial Estate, Donore Road, Drogheda, Co. Louth. Tel: (041) 987 5600 Fax: (041) 983 4481 Email: sales@newera.ie Web: www.newera.ie Type of Business: Label printing. Contact: Director: David Nevin Director: Peter Higgins

NITL Address: Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

17 Herbert Street, Dublin 2. (01) 669 0806 (01) 661 1943 edward.sweeney@dit.ie www.nitl.ie Director of Learning: Edward Sweeney

Web: Contact:

OBEECO LTD Address:

Unit 5B, Kilcoole Industrial Estate, Kilcoole, Co. Wicklow. Tel: (01) 287 6073 Fax: (01) 287 6819 Email: ciaran.wilkinson@ nederman.ie Web: www.nederman.ie Type of Business: Fume, Dust & Materials Handling. Contact: Country Manager: Ciaran Wilkinson

Tel: Fax: Email:

O

NEDERMAN LTD Address:

137 Slaney Close, Dublin Industrial Estate, Glasnevin, Dublin 11. (01) 830 0288 (01) 830 0082 enquiry@ie.norgren.com www.ienorgren.com Field Sales Manager : Dave Whelan Technical Sales Supervisor: John Lanney

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Annaville Avenue, Blackrock, Co. Dublin. (01) 278 2323 (01) 278 2374 sales@obeeco.ie www.obeeco.ie Marketing Co-ordinator: Aileen Cummins

Tel: Fax: Email:

Web: Contact:

OCON CHEMICALS LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Unit 5, South Cork Industrial Estate, Vicars Road, Pouladuff, Co. Cork. (021) 431 8555 (021) 431 8560 sales@oconchemicals.com www.oconchemicals.com Managing Director: Frank Mulcahy

ODENBERG ENGINEERING LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

2005 Orchard Avenue, Citywest Business Campus, Naas Road, Dublin 24. (01) 413 6200 (01) 457 0219 info@odenberg.com www.odenberg.ie Business Unit Manager: Jimmy Deane

P PEGLER & LOUDEN IRELAND A DIVISION OF BSS (IRELAND) LTD Address: Dublin: 78

301 South Circular Road, White Heather Industrial Estate, Dublin 8. (01) 416 5170 (01) 416 5175 jmelinn@pli.ie jgeraghty@pli.ie www.fcx-pli.com Joe Melinn John Geraghty Pat Kelly John Quinn Cork: South Link Park, Ballycurreen Road Grange, Co. Cork. (021) 497 7128 (021) 491 5213 Cork: p.obrien@pli.ie p.cronin@pli.ie www.fcx-pli.com Cork: Pat Cronin Pat O’Brien Colman Hesse

PERSONA DESIGN CONSULTANTS LTD Address:

Tel: Email: Web: Contact:

Persona House, 21 Carrickbrack Lawn, Sutton, Dublin 13. (01) 832 2724 087 255 2184 info@personadesign.ie www.personadesign.ie Lorraine Carter Adv. Dip. Des. Dit., IDI, ICAD

P.K. CHEMICALS LTD Address:

Unit 23, Sandyford Office Park, Blackthorn Avenue, Foxrock, Dublin 18. Tel: (01) 295 6977 Fax: (01) 295 8338 Email: info@pkchemicals.com Type of Business: Agent & distributor. Contact: Office Manager: Kathleen Reid


PLATE TEK ENGINEERING LTD Address:

IDA Industrial Estate, Kilmallock Road, Co. Cork. Tel: (063) 21277 Fax: (063) 21280 Email: platetek@platetek.ie Web: www.platetek.ie Type of Business: Heat exchangers, supply, testing and certification. Contact: General Manager: PJ Greensmith

Email: sales@primepacltd.com Web: www.primepacltd.com Type of Business: Manufacturer & supplier of plastic containers. Contact: Joint Director: John McGahon

PROSCON LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

PM GROUP Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Cork: Loughmahon Technology Park, Blackrock, Co. Cork. Dublin: Killakee House, Belgard Square, Tallaght, Dublin 24. (021) 435 8922 (01) 404 0700 (021) 435 8933 info@pmg.ie www.pmg.ie Billy O’Neill Paul Hallam Business Development

POLLUTION CONTROL SYSTEMS LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Raffeen House, Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork. (021) 437 4237 (021) 437 4236 info@pollution-control.ie www.biotector.com Managing Director: Martin Horan

PRIMEPAC LIMITED Address:

Tel: Fax:

Unit 2, Caulside Drive, Newpark Industrial Estate, Antrim, BT41 2DU. (0044) 2894 428 188 (0044) 2894 428 177

Rushbrooke Commercial Park, Cobh, Co. Cork. (021) 481 1802 (021) 481 1804 info@proscon.com www.proscon.com Michael Horkan Business Development Manager

PROSYS SAMPLING SYSTEMS LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Rosehill Business Centre, Midleton, Co. Cork. (021) 461 3890 (021) 461 3891 info@prosys.ie www.prosys.ie Michael McLoughlin Technical Manager

Q QUALITY PACKAGING MACHINERY Address:

Unit 12, Robinhood Business Park, Robinhood Road, Dublin 22. Tel: (01) 450 2421 Fax: (01) 450 2311 Email: enevin@qpm.iol.ie Web: www.qpm.ie Type of Business: Packaging & Inspection, Equipment & Materials. Contact: Eddie Nevin

Co. Galway. Tel: (09097) 41148/9 Fax: (09097) 41459 Email: sales@quitmannoneill.com Web: www.qonpack.com www.quitmannoneillpackaging.com Contact: General Manager: David O’Neill

R THE RFT GROUP Address:

6A Old Dunleary Road, Dun Laoghaire, Co. Dublin. Tel: (01) 230 2400 Email: jobs@rftgroup.ie Web: www.rftgroup.ie Type of Business: Recruitment Agency. Contact: Managing Director: Gerry Kennedy

S

SARTORIUS LIMITED Address:

Unit 41, The Business Centre, Stadium Business Park, Ballycoolin Road, Dublin 11. Tel: (01) 808 9050 Fax: (01) 808 9388 Email: info.ireland@ sartorius.com Web: www.sartorius.ie Type of Business: Laboratory & process technology provider. Sales & service of laboratory & process weighing equipment & filtration products. Contact: Mary Conlon

SCHUF VALVE TECHNOLOGY Address:

QUITMANN O’NEILL PACKAGING LTD Address:

St. Brendan’s Road, Portumna, 79

Tel: Fax: Email:

Lehenaghmore, Togher, Co. Cork. (021) 483 7000 (021) 483 7030 sales@schuf.ie

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007 C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

Web: Contact:

www.schuf.com Managing Director: Wolfgang Frank

SHELL CHEMICALS Address:

SCIENCE FOUNDATION IRELAND Address:

Wilton Park House, Wilton Place, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 607 3200 Fax: (01) 607 3201 Email: info@sfi.ie Web: www.sfi.ie Type of Business: Government funding agency for research. Contact: Communications & PR Manager: Alva O’Cleirigh

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

C/o Cork Bulk Storage Limited, Tivoli Industrial Estate, Co. Cork. (021) 491 8184 (021) 491 8184 mark.dalton@shell.com www.shell.com/chemicals Mark Dalton Solvents Sales Manager

SMURFIT KAPPA IRELAND Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

SMURFIT KAPPA PACKAGING SOLUTIONS CORK SIEMENS LIMITED

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Units 14-15, Barryscourt Business Park, Carrigtwohill, Co. Cork. (021) 488 2388 (021) 488 2389 cork@scichem.com www.scichem.com Branch Manager: John Molloy

Fitzwilliam Court, Leeson Close, Dublin 2. Tel: (01) 216 2000 Fax: (01) 216 2079 Email: industry.irl@siemens.com Web: www.siemens.ie Type of Business: Electrical engineering. Contact: Sales Engineer: Liam Cotter General Manager: Domhnall Carroll

Address:

Address:

SCIENTIFIC & CHEMICAL SUPPLIES LTD

Tel: Fax: Email: Contact:

Address:

SMURFIT KAPPA CORK

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Jamestown Industrial Centre, Jamestown Rd, Inchicore, Dublin 8 (01) 453 4387 (01) 453 2051 info@sealpack.ie www.sealpack.ie Alan Saul Production Barry Saul Marketing Joe Saul Sales

SHAW SCIENTIFIC LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Greenhills Industrial Estate, Walkinstown, Dublin 12. (01) 450 4077 (01) 450 4328 seamus@shawscientific.com www.shawscientific.com Seamus Amond

Sitecast Industrial Estate, Pouladuff, Co. Cork. Tel: (021) 496 2033 Fax: (021) 496 2051 Email: tom.hayes@ smurfitkappa.ie Type of Business: Packaging supplies. Contact: Regional Sales Manager: Tom Hayes

SIGMA-ALDRICH IRELAND LTD Address:

Airton Road, Tallaght, Dublin 24. Tel: (01) 404 1900 Fax: (01) 404 1910 Email: safcei@sial.com Web: www.safcsupplysolutions.com Contact: Kate Buggle

80

Bolands Industrial Estate, Mallow Road, Co. Cork. (021) 430 7122 (021) 430 7124 garrett.quinn@ smurfitkappa.ie Plant Manager: Garrett Quinn

SOLTEC (IRELAND) LTD

Address:

SEALPACK LTD

Ballymount Road, Walkinstown, Dublin 12. (01) 409 0000 (01) 456 4509 info@smurfitkappa.ie www.smurfitkappa.ie Marketing Manager: Daragh Wall

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Zone A, Mullingar Business Park, Mullingar, Co. Westmeath. (044) 933 5133 (044) 934 5248 michael@soltec.ie www.soltec.ie Michael Corcoran Managing Director

SOLV-ECHEM IRELAND LTD Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Great Island Ind. Park, Ballincollig, Co. Cork. (021) 487 7066 (021) 487 7070 tony@solvechem.com www.solvechem.com Tony Murray Director

STERIPACK PHARMA LTD Address:

Kilbeggan Road, Clara, Co. Offaly.


Tel: (057) 933 1888 Fax: (057) 933 1887 Email: sales@steripack.ie Web: www.steripack.ie Type of Business: Packaging Services. Contact: Business Development Director: Declan Bogan

SUSTAINABLE ENERGY IRELAND Glasnevin, Dublin 9 Tel: (01) 836 9080 Fax: (01) 837 2848 Email: info@sei.ie Web: www.sei.ie Type of Business: Energy Advice & Information.

Web: www.univar.ie Type of Business: Chemical Distribution. Contact: Marketing Manager: Frank McLaughlin

V

Z

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Ballymount Cross, Ballymount, Dublin 24. (01) 413 6500 (01) 413 6502 info@veolia.ie www.veolia.ie Ian Mangan

T TOPCHEM LABORATORIES LTD 70 Western Parkway Business Park, Ballymount Drive, Dublin 12. Tel: (01) 460 8818 Fax: (01) 450 4833 Email: sales@topchem.ie dwalsh@topchem.ie Web: www.topchem.ie Type of Business: Chemical Synthesis. Contact: Managing Director: Dr. Donal Coveney

(021) 483 2644 (021) 483 1363 smurray@wrentech.ie www.wrentech.ie Administrator: Siobhan Murray

VEOLIA ENVIRONMENTAL SERVICES

Address:

Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

VIKING PUMP (EUROPE) LTD Address:

R79, Shannon Industrial Estate, Shannon, Co. Clare. Tel: (061) 471 933 Fax: (061) 475 046 Email: cdaly@idexcorp.com Web: www.vikingpumpeurope.com Contact: Customer Service Administrator: Claire Daly

Zenith Technologies Address:

Portgate Business Park, Ringaskiddy, Co. Cork Tel: (021) 437 0200 Fax: (021) 437 0299 Email: kgargan@ zenithtechnologies.com Sales and Marketing Manager Web: www.zenithtechnologies.com Contact: CEO: Brendan O’Regan Support Services Manager: Joe Haugh Systems Integration Manager: Jim Lehane Consultancy Manager: Simon Sauter

W TOYOTA INDUSTRIAL EQUIPMENT Address: Tel: Fax: Web: Contact:

Killeen Road, Dublin 12. (01) 419 0200 (01) 419 0321 www.toyotaforklifts.ie Terry O’Reilly

U UNIVAR IRELAND LIMITED Address:

Tel: Email:

536 Grants Cresent, Greenogue Business Park, Rathcoole, Co. Dublin. (01) 401 9800 frank.mclaughlin@ univareurope.com

ZETES BLACKBIRD Address:

WEBER LABELLING & CODING Address:

Tel: Fax: Email: Web: Contact:

Kilcannon Industrial Estate, Old Dublin Road, Enniscorthy, Co. Wexford. (053) 923 3778 (053) 923 3284 weberireland@eircom.net www.webermarking.com Area Sales Manager: Richard Smith

WRENTECH LTD Address:

Wrentech House, Crosshaven Hill, Crosshaven, Co. Cork. 81

The National Technology Park, Plassey, Co. Limerick. Tel: (061) 333 188 (01) 822 5123 Fax: (061) 333 133 Email info@ie.zete.com Web: www.zetes.com/ie Type of Business: Systems Integrator of Supply Chain Automation and Inventory Managment Solutions and Services. Contact: Sales Manager: Barry Long

C O M PA N Y L I S T I N G S

IRISH PHARMACHEM 2007


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USEFUL REFERENCES

USEFUL REFERENCES ACADEMY OF MEDICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE Tel: (01) 677 5602 Fax: (01) 677 5652 E-mail: mail@amls.ie Web: www.amls.ie ADVISORY COUNCIL FOR SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION Tel: (01) 607 3162 Fax: (01) 607 3260 E-mail: sciencecouncil@forfas.ie Web: www.sciencecouncil.ie AN BORD PLEANALA Tel: (01) 858 8100 LoCall: 1890 275 175 Fax: (01) 872 2684 E-mail: bord@pleanala.ie Web: www.pleanala.ie BORD GAIS ENERGY SUPPLY Tel: (01) 602 1212 Fax: (01) 602 1462 24 Hour Emergency Tel: 1850 20 50 50 E-mail: info@bordgais.ie Web: www.bordgais.ie CHAMBERS IRELAND Tel: (01) 661 2888 Fax: (01) 661 2811 E-mail: info@chambers.ie Web: www.chambers.ie COMPANIES REGISTRATION OFFICE Tel: (01) 804 5200 Fax: (01) 804 5222 LoCall: 1890 220 226 E-mail: info@cro.ie Web: www.cro.ie DEPARTMENT OF ENTERPRISE, TRADE AND EMPLOYMENT Tel: (01) 6312121 LOCALL: 1890 220 222 Fax: (01) 6312827 E-mail: info@entemp.ie Web: www.entemp.ie DEPARTMENT OF THE ENVIRONMENT HERITAGE & LOCAL GOVERNMENT Tel: (01) 8882000 LoCall: 1890 20 20 21 E-mail: press-office@ environ.irlgov.ie Web: www.environ.ie

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY BOARD Emergencies CallSave: 1850 37 29 99 Web: www.esb.ie

HIGHER EDUCATION AUTHORITY Tel: (01) 231 7100 Fax: (01) 231 7172 E-mail: info@hea.ie Web: www.hea.ie

ENTERPRISE IRELAND Tel: (01) 8082000 Fax: (01) 8082020 E-mail: client.service@ enterprise-ireland.com www.enterprise-ireland.com

INSTITUTE OF CHEMISTRY OF IRELAND Tel: (01) 668 0866 E-mail: info@instituteofchemistry.org www.instituteofchemistry.org

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH OFFICERS ASSOCIATION Tel: (01) 276 1211 Fax: (01) 276 4665 E-mail: secretary@ehoa.ie Web: www.ehoa.ie

IRISH ASSOCIATION OF DISTRIBUTIVE TRADES Tel: (01) 288 7584 Fax: (01) 283 2206 IRISH BIOINDUSTRY ASSOCIATION Tel: (01) 605 1584 Fax: (01) 638 1584 E-mail: firstname.surname@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie/ibia

ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Tel: (053) 916 0600 Fax: (053) 916 0699 E-mail: info@epa.ie Web: www.epa.ie

PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY OF IRELAND Tel: (01) 218 4000 Fax: (01) 283 768

EUROPEAN FEDERATION OF BIOTECHNOLOGY www.biotechnologyireland.com FAS - Training & Employment Agency Tel: (01) 607 0500 Fax: (01) 607 0608 E-mail: info@fas.ie Web: www.fas.ie

IRISH CLEANROOM SOCIETY Tel: (01) 615 0358 Web: www.cleanrooms-ireland,ie

HEALTH AND SAFETY AUTHORITY Tel: 1890 289 389 E-mail: wcu@hsa.ie Web: www.hsa.ie

IRISH BUSINESS AND EMPLOYERS CONFEDERATION (IBEC) Tel: (01) 6051500 Fax: (01) 6381500 E-mail: info@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie

INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY (IDA) Tel: (01) 603 4000 Fax: (01) 603 4040 E-mail: idaireland@ida.ie Web: www.idaireland.com

IRISH COSMETICS, DETERGENT & ALLIED PRODUCTS ASSOCIATION Tel: (01) 6051624 Fax: (01) 6381624 E-mail: info@icda.ie Web: www.icda.ie

DEPARTMENT OF CHEMICAL ENGINEERS, UCD Tel: (01) 716 1825 Fax: (01) 716 1177

IRISH MEDICAL DEVICE ASSOCIATION Tel: (01) 6051529 E-mail: imda@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie/imda

HEALTH RESEARCH BOARD Tel: (01) 234 5000 Fax: (01) 661 2335 E-mail: hrb@hrb.ie Web: www.hrb.ie

84

IRISH MEDICINES BOARD Tel: (01) 6764971 Fax: (01) 6767836 E-mail: imb@imb.ie Web: www.imb.ie IRISH NATIONAL ACCREDITATION BOARD Tel: (01) 607 3003 Fax: (01) 607 3109 E-mail: inab@inab.ie Web: www.inab.ie IRISH PATENTS OFFICE Tel: (056) 7720111 E-mail: patlib@entemp.ie Web: www.patentsoffice.ie IRISH PHARMACEUTICAL UNION Tel: (01) 4936401 Fax: (01) 4936407 Web: www.ipu.ie MANDATE TRADE UNION Tel: (01) 8746321 Fax: (01) 8729581 E-mail: mandate@mandate.ie Web: www.mandate.ie NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR TRANSPORT AND LOGISTICS Tel: (01) 6690806 Fax: (01) 6611943 E-mail: nitl@dit.ie Web: www.nitl.ie PHARMACHEMICAL IRELAND Tel: (01) 6051584 Fax: (01) 6381584 E-mail: firstname.surname@ibec.ie Web: www.ibec.ie/ipcmf REPAK Tel: (01) 4670190 Fax: (01)4670197 E-mail: info@repak.ie Web: www.repak.ie SCIENCE FOUNDATION IRELAND Tel: (01) 6073201 Web: www.sfi.ie TEAGASC Tel: (01) 805 9500 Fax: (01) 805 9550 Web: www.teagasc.ie



Irish PharmaChem 2007