Page 1

New Airport Service. . . . . . . . . . . 18

2018 Essay Contest. . . . . . . . . . . 82

The Magic of Disney®. . . . . . . . 130

“THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY”

THE EDUCATION EDITION

Prescott LIVING

Back to School Coloring Contest In Every Edition:

The Interview: DR. FRANK AYERS ERAU Chancellor

PRESCOT TLIVINGMAG.COM

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P R E S COT T • P R E S COT T VA L L E Y • CHIN O VA L L E Y • D E W E Y- H U MB O L DT


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WOMEN IN BUSINESS As a female owned and managed publication, we appreciate and salute you! To showcase fellow female accomplishments, Prescott LIVING Magazine will be featuring a special section within our Leadership Edition: Women in Business. We encourage you to tell our readers about YOU, your accomplishments, successes and goals.

Professional Head Shot & Networking Event

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LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

PRE S COT T LI V ING

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New Airport Service . . . . . . . . . . 18

2018 Essay Contest . . . . . . . . . . . 82

Contents

The Magic of Disney® . . . . . . . . 130

“THE VOICE OF THE COMMUNITY”

THE EDUCATION EDITION

Late Summer 2018

THE EDUCATION EDITION

Features: Prescott LIVING

Back to School Coloring Contest In Every Edition:

Milestones 2018: A Year to Celebrate

The Interview: DR. FRANK AYERS

ERAU Chancellor

PRESCOT TLIVINGMAG.COM

$4.95 Complimentary • LATE SUMMER 2018

20

P R E S COT T • P R E S COT T VA L L E Y • CHIN O VA L L E Y • D E W E Y- H U MB O L DT

The LIVING Interview:

ABOUT THE COVER: The cover illustration was provided by artist Jacques Laliberte. When asked about the coloring page concept, Laliberte wrote, “A life-long lover of magazines, I’ve worked on most of our local ones over the past twenty years. I teach drawing and create marketing sketches for architects and builders. Thinking about this cover, the idea of letting readers add their own color was appealing!” Please see page 134 for information on submitting your coloring of the cover or one of the other coloring pages in this edition.

Dr. Frank Ayers

Chancellor of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott Campus

22

Special Section: Education

72

Special Section: Home & Garden

88

Economy, Finance & Business

Health, Happiness & Education

Travel, Dining & Entertainment

Business & Education – Ties That Can Bond a Community. . . . . . . 32

Out & About: Your Photos from Around Town. . . . . . . . . . . 50

The Magic of Disney® Thrills Adventure Lovers of All Ages.130

Rehabilitation of the Yavapai County Courthouse. . . . . . . . . . 34

Stay Safe in the Summer Heat. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Prescott LIVING Back to School Coloring Contest. . . . . . . . . . . . 134

Working Toward Building a Better Community Through Education. . . 38

Sexual Assault: Help is a Click Away. . . . . . . . . . 66

1914 Cactus Derby Race Puts Prescott on Map. . . . . . . . . . . . 136

PRE SCOT TLIVINGMAG .COM


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FINALLY! THE HONEST TRUTH BEHIND THE REVERSE MORTGAGE by Travis Schultz, Owner and Licensed Mortgage Broker, Smart Mortgage

A

re reverse mortgages not all they’re cracked up to be? Can they truly add the stability you need for financial planning and your retirement, or are they just another way to steal away your home, equity or inheritance? Since the product began back in 1989, local Prescott reverse mortgage expert Travis Schultz at Smart Mortgage says we may be surprised with the honest truth behind the reverse mortgage!

• No mortgage payments for life? – (True) As long as either spouse considers the property as his or her primary home, they can live there for life paying zero mortgage payments. • All applicants must be 62 years old or older – (False) Only one spouse needs to be 62 years old. The other spouse may be younger. • You must own your home outright – (False) You may already have an existing mortgage, which can be refinanced and paid off with a reverse mortgage. • The income or cash I receive is not taxable – (True) Any money you receive, whether monthly, a cash sum or in a home equity line is all nontaxable to do with as you wish. • You must have good credit and income for a reverse mortgage – (False) Since re-

verse mortgages do not require a mortgage payment, almost anyone with any type of credit and income may be eligible. Once into the reverse mortgage you are locked into it, permanently – (False) The reverse mortgage is simply a loan recorded against the property, just like every other mortgage. You retain full ownership, so at any time you can move, sell or refinance the property simply by paying off the mortgage balance. If I take out a reverse mortgage, I will leave nothing for my family – (False) Reverse mortgages have insurance automatically built in to protect the family. Most homes continue to increase in value over time, leaving even more equity for family. Even if property values decrease below what is owed, the family can acquire the property for 5% less than market value. You can only get a reverse mortgage on a one-unit home – (False) Smart Mortgage also allows reverse mortgages on manufactured homes, duplexes, triplexes, fourplexes, townhomes and condos, as long as one unit is considered your primary residence. My family will be responsible for the debt – (False) The reverse mortgage is a non-recourse loan, so if your value ever

MB-0908151 • NMLS: 168822 LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

falls below what you owe, your family will never have to pay the deficiency. • The government or lender will own my home – (False) The reverse mortgage is simply a lien recorded against the property, just like any other mortgage. The homeowner(s) remains on title and has full ownership. The owner(s) may also add other family members or place the home in a trust, so family automatically has ownership in the property and equity, as well. • You can purchase a home using a reverse mortgage – (True) Smart Mortgage allows you to purchase a primary home and the financed amount has no payments for life.

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PRE S COT T LI V ING

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A DV E RT I S E R I N D E X

PRE SCOT TLIVINGMAG .COM PUBLISHER Elaine Earle, CPA EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Bea Lueck PRESCOTT PIONEER WRITER Ray Newton SENIOR COPYWRITER & EDITOR Robin Layton ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES Loriann Rhodes David Truby CREATIVE DIRECTOR/GRAPHIC DESIGNER Tim Clarke SENIOR GRAPHIC DESIGNER Jake Pagano GRAPHIC DESIGNER Rebecca Bowen CUSTOMER SERVICE/AD TRAFFIC MANAGER Jo Wobser PUBLIC RELATIONS & MARKETING MANAGER Julie Turetzky COMMENTS & IDEAS editor@roxco.com CALENDAR INQUIRIES calendar@roxco.com • prescottlivingmag.com/calendar SUBSCRIPTIONS info@roxco.com • prescottlivingmag.com/copies ADVERTISING INQUIRIES info@roxco.com • prescottlivingmag.com/advertise 1129 Iron Springs Rd., Ste. 210 Prescott, AZ 86305 • 928.777.2397 Coming September 2018: 130 N. Granite St., Prescott, AZ Corporate Office: 442 W. Kortsen Rd, Ste 101 Casa Grande, AZ 85122 520.426.2074

Prescott LIVING is published by Raxx Direct Marketing. Editorial content is provided by affiliates of Raxx Direct Marketing, community members and local organizations. © 2018. All rights reserved. No part of this publication, including but not limited to editorial content, illustrations, graphics and photographic images, may be republished, reproduced or reprinted without the prior express written consent of the publisher. The publishers of Prescott LIVING assume no responsibility for errors or omissions of any advertisement beyond the actual cost of the advertisement. In no event shall the publishers be liable for any consequential damages in excess of the cost of the advertisement. Prescott LIVING shall not be liable for inaccuracies, errors, omissions, or damages from the use of information contained herein. Submitted articles do not reflect the opinions of the owners or management of Prescott LIVING Information contained within submitted articles had not been verified for accuracy and readers are responsible for forming their own PRE S opinions. COT T Real LI Vestate ING INGinformation • THE INTERV IE W 8 PRESCOT is as of 6-30-18 and is subject to current availability and pricing.

A1 Garage Door Replacement . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Ability Remodeling & Home Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Able & Ready Construction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Adult Care Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 All Natural Cosmetics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 All Seasons Retractables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Alzheimer’s Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Amazing Foot Spa . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 American Financial Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Arizona All Service Plumbing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Arizona Cowboy Poets Gathering Inc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Arrow Roofing Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Arrowhead Lodge Recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Artful Eye, Jewelry Design Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 B & B Maitre d’ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 99 Bardin Music Studio . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 BASIS.ed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Bella by Leah . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Blind Brothers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Bloomtree Realty - Elena Sanwick . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Bloomtree Realty - John Gorden PLLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 121 Boys & Girls Club of Central Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Broken Horn D Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Bucky’s & Yavapai Casinos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 Canyon Physical Therapy & Aquatic Rehabilitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Capital Canyon Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Capital Canyon Realty Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114 Carman Law Firm . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 68 CASA of Yavapai . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 Chino Valley Lioness . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 City of Prescott - Heritage Trail . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Cliff Castle Casino Hotel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Coldwell Banker Residential - Peter Fife . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Culver’s of Prescott Valley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Davinci Wealth - Jason Rheinfelder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Earthworks Garden Supply . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Elk Ridge Development . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 75 ERA Test, LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123 Farmers Insurance - Mike Knittle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Findlay Toyota Prescott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Forest Villas Hotel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Framers Market & Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Garden Brook Realty - DeDe Erceg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Garden Brook Realty - Wendi Roudybush . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Granite Creek Vineyards . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Guardian Landscape . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Headwaters Architecture PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Health & Healing Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Hepburn Capital Management . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Historic Palace Saloon and Restaurant LLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Homeowners Association Management Company . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 HomeSmart Fine Homes and Land - Corey Johannsen . . . . . . . . . . . 109 HomeSmart Fine Homes and Land - Joan Eaton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Humboldt Unified School District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 I Organize 4 You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 JT’s Septic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 KAZT - AZ TV Channel 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 KPPV Arizona’s Hometown Radio Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Laliberte . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Lance Murray Photography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Landshark Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Let’s Get Healthy 4 You . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Mandalay Homes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 117 THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


MCK Woodworks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Melinda M Martin, M.D. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35, 64 MORE MD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Mortimer Farms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Musgrove Drutz Kack & Flack PC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43 My Health Etc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Northern Arizona Pain Institutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Olsen’s for Healthy Animals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Osher Lifelong Learning Institutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Peak Painting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Phippen Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 PK BootMaker . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Ponderosa Hotel Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Prescott Center for the Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Prescott Chamber of Commerce . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36, 139 Prescott Farmers Market . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Prescott Landscaping Professionals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Prescott Media Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 Prescott Outpatient Surgical Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Prescott True Value Hardware . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Prescott Unified School District . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Prescott Western Heritage Foundation Inc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 Prescott Women’s Clinic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60, 145 Prestige Security Doors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 119 Raskin’s Jewelers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Realty Executives Northern AZ - Carol Reill . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 101 Realty Executives Northern AZ - Don Partch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 95 Realty Executives Northern AZ - Leonor Sebastia . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Realty Executives Northern AZ - Mary Jo Amos / Annie Miller . . . 104 Realty ONE Group - Donna Baade . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 124 Realty ONE Group Mountain Desert - Brett Ward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 115 Realty ONE Group Mountain Desert - Jill Hunsucker . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Realty ONE Group Mountain Desert Cindi LaSalle-Shanks . . . . . . . . 113 Renovations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Schutte & Hilgendorf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 SCORE #0532 Northern Arizona . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Scottsdale Plastic Surgery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Sharlot Hall Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Smart Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Smoki Museum - American Indian Art & Culture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 133 Sportsman’s Warehouse - Prescott . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 State Farm Insurance - Tracy Murr . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 TFC Estate & Doc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 The Natural Healing Garden . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 127 Tiensvold Shaffer Wenzels CPA’s PLLC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Touchmark at the Ranch . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 Trinity Christian School . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 86 Two Mamas’ Pizza . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Union Home Mortgage . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 103 Victory Wealth Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Voila Tour AZ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143 Watters Garden Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Wedbush Securities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 West USA Realty - Kelly Dwyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 West USA Realty - Ronnie DeBenedetta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 125 West USA Realty - The Norkus Group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 98 West USA Realty of Prescott - Pam Messenger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 129 Windermere RE Northern AZ - Terri Chase . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93, 96 Yavapai Big Brothers/Big Sisters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 Yavapai Cattle Growers Association . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 Yavapai College . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Yavapai College Performing Arts Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 Yavapai Humane Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Publisher’s Letter

THE RETURN OF BUSES, BOOKS AND BACKPACKS

A

ll too quickly, summer is fading and the school days of fall are coming into focus. The Earle family joined other Arizona parents and children in the search to find just the right backpacks, lunch bags and pairs of sneakers. In this edition, we honor the new school year with a section on returning to the Elaine Earle classroom, and we showcase what our youth love most about school in our Youth Essay Contest pages. Prescott Unified School District’s Superintendent Joe Howard shares some advice on preparing for the return to school, including how you can help the PUSD Family Resource Center provide supplies and aid to local families. As college students prepare to move back to campus, we talk to Embry-Riddle’s Chancellor Dr. Frank Ayers in the LIVING Interview. Dr. Ayers gives readers a peek into how he landed in Prescott after an important Air Force career. Just remember, you can still enjoy some time away over fall and winter breaks, so take a look at our ROX Travel feature on everything Disney® – including some special family cruises. We also list the Top 10 Day Trips from Prescott, so you can take the family away on the weekends for those much-needed breaks from school and work. Several area institutions are celebrating decadeslong anniversaries this year. We pay tribute to their longevity and service to Yavapai County by sharing their stories and events with you. Watch for our upcoming issues when we salute 40 Under 40, those local business people who are making a difference in their field and their community. As a female-owned and managed publication, we appreciate Women in Business and are saluting businesswomen with a special section and reception at Forest Villas Hotel. The October edition will also have an exciting, personal interview with Prescott personality Sandy Moss. Sandy will once again be taping her show at the event, and the women who attend will be on the cover of the next issue! Learn more at prescottlivingmag.com/upcoming. As always, enjoy! Elaine Earle Publisher, Prescott LIVING Magazine

S COT T LI V ING PUBLISHER ’ S LE T TER • PRE PRESCOT LIVING

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! o l l e H We’re ROX Media Group P

rescott LIVING Magazine is brought to you by ROX Media Group, a multimedia organization providing an annual portfolio of 3.6 million print copies of community, custom and travel publications throughout Arizona and in neighboring states. Our publications collectively reach millions of consumers who reside in or travel to Arizona every year, and bring engaging local content to the communities and marketing partners we serve.

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Featuring PrescottPrescott Valley- Chino Valley

Hwy 69, Suite 112

Some of our additional offerings include: • A full suite of creative services for any project • Custom publications created, designed, edited, printed and distributed • Digital media marketing services and website creation • Project management services

In addition to this publication you hold in your hand, ROX Media Group has been serving the Prescott area with our publications Quad-City Smart Shopper and TravelHost Arizona beginning in 2013 and we are also the proud publisher of the Visitor Guide – Greater Prescott Area, which is published for the City of Prescott Office of Tourism. We are honored to expand our relationship with your community through this bimonthly publication. You can visit us any time at our temporary local office, located at 1129 Iron Springs Road, as we renovate and prepare for the grand opening of our new building at 130 N. Granite St. in Prescott or call us at 928-777-2397.

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Since our founding in 2011, we have earned the respect of our readers and marketing partners through our dedication to high quality, local content and our understanding of the key informational needs that drive media consumption, messaging and interaction.

Elaine is an accomplished publisher and management professional with 20 years of experience as a Certified Public Accountant Elaine Earle and publisher of a Publisher diverse set of marketing products. Elaine and her team bring a “one firm” solution to clients. She has a passion for traveling and has been to over 35 countries.

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AZ-Shopper

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION •• LATE SUMMER 2018


Bea Lueck

Bea is the general manager and managing editor of ROX Media Group. She handles the various day-to-day activities necessary to take the publications from concept to print and distribution. She has over 22 years of experience in multiple advertising media, including print, direct mail, television and web.

General Manager & Managing Editor

Ray Newton

Contributing Writer

A veteran newspaperman, magazine and television reporter-editor, Ray also earned stripes at several universities, including Northern Arizona University, as a professor and administrator emeritus. Active throughout his adult years in several local, regional and national think-tank organizations, he’s a vocal advocate for giving back to communities where we live. Julie is a marketing professional with 20 years of experience working in client and agency settings. Julie has created and managed marketing strategies across many industries, designed to meet client objectives and stay within an established budget.

Julie Turetzky

Senior Graphic Designer

Loriann Rhodes Advertising Executive

Jo Wobser Customer Service/ Ad Traffic Manager

Creative Director

Katie Mayer Editor & Project Manager

Katie is an accomplished senior copywriter and editor with 12 years of experience working with everything from daily print newspapers to magazines and trade publications. She is also an award-winning journalist and guest lecturer at her Alma Mater, the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism and Mass Communication at Arizona State University. Robin has 28 years of journalism experience in newspapers and magazines. Currently the Marketing Director for Yavapai Big Brothers Big Sisters, she has lived in Prescott Valley with her husband for nearly four years.

Robin Layton Senior Copywriter & Editor

Public Relations & Marketing Manager

Jake Pagano

Tim Clarke

Tim is a digital design professional with more than 27 years of experience. Tim is responsible for all creative consulting, magazine design, print production and web development for ROX Media Group. He manages production for multiple publications as well as multiple Drupal and Wordpress sites for external clients.

Jake is an experienced and driven graphic designer whose creative design work can be found in dozens of consumer, travel and lifestyle publications throughout Arizona. Jake is currently responsible for a number of publications at ROX Media Group including Sun Health LiveWell, Glendale@PLAY and TravelHost Arizona. Loriann brings more than 10 years of media experience to ROX Media Group. Her background includes selling trade publications as well as consumer membership publications. As Account Executive, she represents Prescott LIVING Magazine, Quad-City Smart Shopper, TravelHost Arizona and the Visitor Guide – Greater Prescott Area and supports other ROX Media Group projects as needed. Jo joined the ROX Media Group team in March 2018 following a career in customer service spanning more than 20 years. This rewarding experience coupled with her skill sets as a graphic designer and photographer allow her to provide excellent service and guidance to the ROX Media Group advertising clients she serves every day.

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Rebecca Bowen Graphic Designer

David Truby Advertising Executive

Rebecca is a graphic designer with over five years of experience in the design and marketing industries. She has her associate’s degree in graphic design, and is currently pursuing her bachelor’s degree in communication. When she is not creating eye-catching visuals, she is enjoying hiking and other outdoor activities.

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Meet Our Team:

David is an accomplished sales manager who brings more than 20 years of industry experience. He has overseen sales divisions for some of the largest merchant services companies in the U.S., including Merchant Processing International and Complete Merchant Services. About five years ago, he began focusing exclusively on the sales of advertising.

1129 Iron Springs Road Prescott, Arizona 86305 928-460-2541 roxmediagroup.net PRE S COT T LI V ING

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VOICES of the Community

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Cindy Gresser Executive Director, The Smoki Museum Cindy is the Executive Director of The Smoki Museum. Currently, she also serves the City of Prescott as the Chair of the Art in Public Places Committee. She is involved in many community activities including The Rotary Club of Prescott, Prescott Area Arts and Humanities Council and the Prescott Corral of Westerners.

Frank Ayers

Sandy Griffis

Chancellor, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University Frank is the chancellor of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s Prescott campus and is responsible for leading more than 2,600 students and 400 employees. Prior to Embry-Riddle, then-Colonel Ayers served in the U.S. Air Force for 26 years. He has logged more than 6,000 flight hours in a variety of aircraft types.

Executive Director, Yavapai County Contractors Association Sandy is Executive Director of Yavapai County Contractors Association and has lived in the Prescott area for 21 years. Sandy has a bachelor’s degree in journalism and an MBA in business with a minor in music from San Diego State.

Martha Baden

Sheri L. Heiney

Manager, Public Services, Prescott Public Library Martha is Library Manager, public services, at Prescott Public Library. Still enjoying a lifelong love of connecting people with information they need and books they’ll love, she has worked in school or public libraries in four states over the last 20 years.

President/CEO, Prescott Chamber of Commerce Sheri was hired as the President/CEO of the Prescott Chamber of Commerce in January 2017. She moved to Arizona from Michigan and has over 23 years of chamber professional experience.

Tim Carter

Leslie Horton, MA, MCHES

School Superintendent, Yavapai County Education Service Agency Tim is a lifelong Arizonan, living in Prescott since 1979. He is in his 43rd year as an educator, serving as a teacher-coach, before serving as the Principal of Prescott High School for 12 years. He has served as the elected Yavapai County School Superintendent since 2005.

Director of Yavapai County Community Health Services, County Health Officer Leslie was appointed Director of Yavapai County Community Health Services of the public health department in March 2017. With 15 years of public health experience, Horton currently works to ensure the effective and efficient delivery of public health services throughout Yavapai County. She is a member of the MATFORCE and Northland Cares boards of directors.

Tim Diesch

Joe Howard

Marketing Specialist, Yavapai College Tim has worked in marketing, advertising and tourism promotion in Prescott since 2003. Clients served include the City of Prescott, Prescott Frontier Days and The World’s Oldest Rodeo, The Phippen Museum and Sharlot Hall Museum. Tim has worked to promote enrollment at Yavapai College for the past four years.

Superintendent, Prescott Unified School District A Prescott High School alum, Joe has been in the Prescott area for 30 years total. He started his teaching career in Chino Valley, then became the Principal at Prescott Mile High Middle School. He then served for five years as Assistant Superintendent. Joe is currently in his third year of superintendency and is focused on success for all students.

Dennis Gallagher

Nicole Kennedy

Founder and President, Prescott Western Heritage Foundation Dennis is the Founder and President of the Prescott Western Heritage Foundation, Inc., a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization, whose mission is to preserve and promote our Western heritage. He is also a Western artist/bronze sculptor and an active volunteer for numerous community events. He and his wife, MaryAnn, have been married 50 years and have resided in Prescott for 10 years.

Vice President of Development, Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Arizona Nicole is an Arizona native who spent her childhood in Prescott Valley. She married and spent 10 years living in various parts of the country, discovering with her husband that they wanted to return to Prescott to raise their son. Nicole is passionate about community, and recently launched Prescott Area Women Who Care, a local group dedicated to promoting the success of others. THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Ken Lain

Tom Reilly

Owner, Watters Garden Center Ken grew up in Prescott, attended Yavapai College and obtained his degrees from ASU. He married his college sweetheart Lisa Watters-Lain and has four children. His garden advice can be heard each week on the radio. Throughout the week, Ken can be found at Watters Garden Center.

President, CEO - Renovations, Your Complete Remodel Resource Both Architect and General Contractor, Tom has been designing and building in Prescott for the past 36 years. During this time, he has served on many committees, including Prescott City Council and Yavapai County Planning and Zoning Commission. Tom continues to serve through Prescott Frontier Rotary while renovating homes in the community.

Greg Mengarelli

Harvey Skoog

Mayor, City of Prescott Greg has lived in Prescott since 1995 and has been the Executive Director for United Christian Youth Camp for the past 23 years. He grew up in small, rural communities in Kansas and graduated from Kansas State University. He is active in community affairs.

Mayor, Prescott Valley Harvey served as Prescott Valley Mayor from 1993 to 1998, and was again elected in 2004. He was re-elected in 2005, 2009 and again in 2013. His current term expires in December 2018. He was most recently a tax accountant and business consultant and has served in many leadership roles on various industry and government boards.

Ray Newton

Marnie Uhl

Journalist and Professor-Administrator Emeritus, Northern Arizona University A veteran of mass media ranging from weekly and daily newspapers to directing writing workshops for the Reader’s Digest, from book editing to book writing — Ray has been there. He is a Professor-Administrator Emeritus from Northern Arizona University, now retired and residing in Prescott with his wife, Patty.

President & CEO Prescott Valley Chamber of Commerce Marnie has been the President/CEO since 2006 and successfully led the Chamber to a national accreditation through the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Federation. She was selected as Prescott Area Leadership’s Woman of the Year 2017 and serves on many professional and nonprofit boards. Marnie has been in the Chamber industry for 20 years.

Bill Otwell

Fred Veil

Principal of Otwell Associates Architects Bill is principal of Otwell Associates Architects, a firm specializing in historic preservation, solar and energy-efficient design and preservation of natural site features. Bill is a native Arizonan. After completion of his architectural degree in 1973, he moved to Prescott and began his career, working for a local architect and later as Assistant Director of Planning for the city. In 1979, he established his own architectural practice in Prescott.

Executive Director, Sharlot Hall Museum Fred is the Executive Director of the Sharlot Hall Museum. He is a Marine Corps veteran and former Sheriff of the Prescott Corral of Westerners International; he conceived and organized the Western History Symposium. He is a board member of the Arizona History Convention and member of the Tourism Advisory Committee for the City of Prescott.

Sheila Polk

Tori Ward

Yavapai County Attorney Sheila is a native Arizonan, who has served as the Yavapai Attorney for the last 17 years. A career prosecutor, Sheila chairs MATFORCE, the countywide substance abuse coalition, and is the driving stimulus behind the nationally renowned law enforcement course “What You Do Matters: Lessons from the Holocaust.”

ROX Travel, Cruise and Resort Specialist Victoria “Tori” is a cruise and resort specialist with a master’s degree in political science. She has completed more than 30 certification courses with the cruise and tour industry including the most advanced certification, Commodore, from Princess Cruise Lines. Tori is a member of the Cruise Lines International Association.

Prescott Parks & Rec Department • Samara Rice-Cummings, Recreation Services Administrative Specialist • Patti Crouse, Recreation Services Administrative Coordinator • Rick Hormann, Recreation Services Supervisor • Michelle Stacy-Schroeder, Recreation Services Coordinator • Kelly Tolbert, Recreation Services Coordinator

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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Submit your events online at prescottlivingmag.com AUGUST

3-5

Prescott Gem & Mineral Show/Sale - Prescott Valley Event Center 3201 N. Main St., Prescott Valley. Fri. & Sat. 9AM-5PM / Sun. 9AM-4PM. 15th Annual, over 60 vendors offering large variety of Gem & Mineral related products. $5 Adults, $4 Seniors, Vets, & Students. Under 12 free w/paid adult. Free Parking. prescottgemmineral.org

Guests $10 each. Contact 928-7781385 for more info.

4-5

44th Annual Prescott Antique Auto Club Watson Lake Show - 7:00 AM-4:00 PM - Watson Lake Park Highway 89, Prescott - Car show til 2:30 pm. Parts Exchange/Swap Meet & Raffle prizes both days. Food, KKLD on site, playground. Wristband admission only $5 per person for both days. 15 and under w/adult free admission. FREE PARKING. More info: www. paacaz.com

3

5th Annual Hold Your Horses! Opening Reception & Members’ Preview - 5:30 PM-7:30 PM - Phippen Art Museum 4701 Hwy 89 N., Prescott. Outstanding equine artwork.

4

Easy Grow Roses - Garden Class - 9:30 AM-10:30 AM - Watters Garden Center 1815 Iron Springs Rd., Prescott. Free to local gardeners. Visit wattersgardencenter.com/classes for more info.

Arts Center 1100 E. Sheldon St., Prescott. 31st annual event best in authentic Cowboy Poetry and Music. Reserved seating starts at $20 per ticket. Contact 928-713-6323 or azcowboypoets.org

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Western History Symposium 9:30 AM-8:30 PM - Sharlot Hall Museum 415 W. Gurley St., Prescott. Informative presentations on a variety of Western History. Free entry. Call 928-277-2002 or Visit www.sharlot. org for more info. Woof Down Lunch - 10:00 ! AM-3:00 PM - Yavapai County Courthouse Plaza 100 W. Gurley St., Prescott - Vendors; music; dog training demonstrations; raffles; contests; kid activities; adoptable dogs. $20 lunch tickets are available event. Call 928778-2924 for more info.

4

Square Dance & Line Dance 6:00 PM-9:00 PM - Yavapai County Courthouse Plaza, Prescott. Join in th fun. Visit mile-HiSquares.org for more info.

4

Tribute to the Eagles - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Prescott Center for the Arts 208 N. Marina, Prescott. Tickets $25. Visit www.pca-az.net/pca for more info or call 928-445-3286.

8 Thursdays,!3!–!6pm!at!Olsen’s!Grain! !

Saturdays,!7:30am!–!12pm!at!Yavapai!College! !

August!8:!2!–!5pm!at!Coyote!Springs!Elementary!School! September!17:!3!–!6pm!at!Stoneridge!Community!Center!

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Women in Business Luncheon - Prescott Chamber - 11:30 AM-1:15 PM - Marina Room @ Hassayampa Inn 122 E. Gurley St., Prescott. Reservations required $25/ member $35/non-member. Register online www.prescott.org.

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Mama Mia / Movies @ The Elks! - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center 117 E. Gurley St., Prescott. Contact 928-7562844 for more info. Admission is a cash donation of any amount.

9-11

Arizona Cowboy Poets Gathering - 7:00 PM9:00 PM - Yavapai College Performing

Coffee Connection - 10:30 AM - Beverly Brugman’s Home - 2100 Sequoia Dr., Prescott. A gathering for anyone new to the Prescott area. For more info, call Beverly at 928-308-9856. Slowhand - The Ultimate Eric Clapton Experience - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - The Elks Theater and Performing Arts Center 117 East Gurley St., Prescott. $22/$25. For more info contact 928-777-1370 or visit prescottelkstheater.com.

11-12

68th Annual Prescott Arts & Crafts Festival - 9:00 AM-5:00 PM - Yavapai County Courthouse Plaza, 120 S. Cortez St., Prescott. This event is free and open to the public. For more info call 928-445-2510 or visit mountainartistsguild.org.

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Herbs from Garden to Table / Garden Class - 9:30 AM-10:30 AM - Watters Garden Center 1815 Iron Springs Rd., Prescott. Free to local gardeners. Visit wattersgardencenter.com/classes for more info.

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Summer Wine at the Phippen - 2:00 PM-4:00 PM - Phippen Museum 4701 Hwy 89 North, Prescott. $10 per person; Reservations required at (928)7781385 or visit phippenartmuseum.org for more info.

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Mile High Brewfest 2018 4:00 PM-8:00 PM - Mile High Middle School Football Field 300 S. Granite St., Prescott. Tickets available at milehighbrewfest.com or call 928776-8686 for more info.


AUGUST

SEPTEMBER

August – September 2018 AUGUST (continued)

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Walt Richardson, Blaine Long w/ Rosas del Ray - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center 117 E. Gurley St., Prescott. Contact 928-777-1370 or visit prescottelkstheater.com for more info. Be sure to catch this special night of music!

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Prescott LIVING Magazine’s Women in Business Event 4:00 PM-8:00 PM - Forest Villas Hotel 3645 Lee Cir., Prescott. Professional Headshot & Networking night to be featured in the next issue. 928-7772397 or info@roxco.com for more info.

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Out of Africa / Movies @ The Elks! - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Elks Theater 117 E. Gurley St., Prescott. Admission is a cash donation of any amount. All proceeds go to support The Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center’s community outreach programs. Call 928-777-1370 for info.

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Beat The Heat Swap Meet 9:00 AM-1:00 PM - Liberty Traditional School 3300 N. Lake Valley Rd., Prescott Valley - Annual swap meet for model train enthusiasts. Admission $5, under 12 FREE. Refreshments available.

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Western Collectibles & Firearms Gun Show - 9:00 AM - Prescott Valley Event Center 3201 N. Main St., Prescott Valley. Sat. 9:00AM-5:00PM, Sun. 9:00AM-3:00PM. Tickets $10. Buy a ticket Saturday and get in free Sunday.

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Mountain Spirit Healing & Educational Center Rummage Sale - Mountain Spirit Co-Op 107 N. Cortez St., Prescott. Sat. 10AM-5PM, Sun. 11AM-3PM. Proceeds to benefit the organization of offer sliding scale scholarships to qualified low-income participants in the Quad City area. Still accepting donations of gently used items! Contact 928-4585577 for more info.

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Sharlot’s WineFest - 4:00 PM-7:00 PM - Sharlot Hall Museum 415 W. Gurley St., Prescott. Premier wine-tasting event of the year. Tickets $55. Call 928-277-2015 or visit www.sharlot.org for more info. The BRIEFING with Sean Spicer - 7:00 PM - Yavapai College Performing Arts Center 1100 E Sheldon St., Prescott. Tickets online at www.YPAC.com or at the Box Office: (928) 776-2000. Presented by Republican Women of Prescott.

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Farm to Table Dinner / Local Food at it’s Finest! - 4:00 PM-8:00 PM - Holiday Courtyard 150 S. Montezuma St., Prescott. Early bird tickets $85. General tickets $95. Call 928-713-1227 or visit prescottfarmersmarket.org for more info.

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An Evening with JD Souther - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center 117 E. Gurley St., Prescott. Contact 928-777-1370 or visit prescottelkstheater.com for more info. The JD Souther concert originally scheduled for July has been rescheduled. Those of you holding tickets for the July concert need do nothing (but show up).

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Top Gun / Movies @ The Elks! - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Elks Theater 117 E. Gurley St., Prescott. Admission is a cash donation of any amount. All proceeds go to support The Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center’s community outreach programs. Call 928-777-1370 for info.

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Voila Tour in Prescott - “The French Connection-Up Close & Personal” - 5:00 PM-7:00 PM - Mountain Artists Guild 228 N. Alarcon, Prescott. Tickets are $15 and can be obtained at www. mountainartistsguild.org or in person at our gallery.

40th Town Prescott Valley Celebration - Civic Center 7501 Civic Cir., Prescott Valley. All day events for the whole family. Email gloria@pvchamber.org for info.

Yavapai College 50th Anniversary Celebration - 7:00 AM-9:00 PM - Yavapai College Prescott Campus 1100 E Sheldon St., Prescott. Visit 50th.yc.edu for a full schedule of events.

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Granite Mountain Jewelry Artists’ 4th Annual Jewelry Show and Sale - 10:00 AM-4:00 PM - Historic St. Michael Hotel Ballroom - 205 W. Gurley St., Prescott. Meet the artists, shop for unique jewelry & accessories win a free door prize. Free admission. More info visit granitemountainjewelryartists. weebly.com

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Art on 6th Street - 10:00 AM-4:00 PM - 697 6th St., Prescott - Multiple Artist Open Studios – Buy direct from the Artists! Experience the latest works of art by local Artists. Follow on Facebook: “arton6thstreet” or call 928-899-8845

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Elvis - The ‘68 Comeback Special - 7:00 PM-9:30 PM - Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center 117 E. Gurley St., Prescott. Contact 928-777-1370 or visit prescottelkstheater.com for more info. Tickets $22/$25.

EnduroCross - Indoor OffRoad Motorcycle Racing - 7:30 PM-10:00 PM - Prescott Valley Event Center 3201 N. Main St., Prescott Valley. Tickets start at $15. Visit endurocross.com for more info. Arizona Philharmonic Inaugural Concert - Currents 5:00 PM - Yavapai College Performing Arts Center 1100 E Sheldon St., Prescott. Tickets online at www.YPAC. com or at the Box Office: (928) 7762000. For more info visit AZPhil.org.

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Zoo by Moonlight - 8:00 PM-9:30 PM - Heritage Park Zoo 1403 Heritage Park Rd., Prescott. Members are $4, non-members are $6 and under 3 our Free. Visit heritageparkzoo.org for more info.

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Prescott Voila Tour-”The French Connection” Kickoff - 5:00 PM7:00 PM - Mountain Artists Guild 228 N. Alarcon, Prescott. Tickets are $15 and can be obtained at www.mountainartistsguild. org or in person at our gallery.

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Voila Tour - A Unique French-American Live Music Experience - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Elks Theatre and Performing Arts Center 117 E. Gurley St., Prescott. Tickets from $23-$75. Contact 928-777-1370 or visit prescottelkstheater.com for more info.

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"Bringing Something New into the World Through Creative Service" 2015 Will Rogers Award winner bestowed by The Academy of Western Artists

(928) 442-1213 www.pkbootmaker.com Prescott National Forest in the Arizona Territory 17


THE PRESCOTT Stories by Ray Newton

• PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LLEY • CHINO VA LLEY • DEWEY-HUMBOLDT • PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LLEY • CHINO V

Prescott airport gets new airline service

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nited Express (SkyWest) Airlines will begin service out of the Prescott Municipal Airport in the fall. The U.S. Dept. of Transportation issued the order July 16, stating that “SkyWest Airlines, Inc., operating as United Express (SkyWest) … will provide Prescott with 12 weekly round trips to Denver International Airport (DEN) and Los Angeles International Airport (LAX).” City council members voted unanimously July 3 to accept the recommendation of the Prescott Airport Advisory Committee and the Prescott Airport Director Robin Sobotta and her staff that SkyWest be asked to provide commercial air service to Central and Northern Arizona passengers. The service will see 50-passenger regional jet service to Denver and Los Angeles. In a press release from the City of Prescott, the mayors of both Prescott and Prescott Valley praised the selection of SkyWest as a new carrier for Essential Air Service (EAS). The area has been without commercial air service since March 26, when Great Lakes Airlines unexpectedly canceled service at the local airport. Prescott Mayor Greg Mengarelli said, “SkyWest will provide our citizens and our entire region with a reliable, comfortable and convenient way to fly anywhere in the world from Prescott Municipal Airport.” Prescott Valley Mayor Harvey Skoog echoed Mengarelli. “Our leadership wholeheartedly sup-

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ports the selection of SkyWest Airlines. It has a solid reputation of providing reliable air service to communities across the country. I am certain it will support the needs of the entire region.” Selection of SkyWest as the preferred carrier followed a 30-minute analytical PowerPoint presentation by Sobotta. She presented specific details from seven commercial carriers that had applied to provide EAS to the area. Those proposals came from Advanced Air, ADI/California Pacific Airlines, Boutique Air, Key Lime Air, Mokulele Airlines, Silver Airways and SkyWest. Only three proposals would have provided service with jet aircraft. In her analysis, Sobotta included specific details such as • si z e of a i rc r a f t (wh ic h ranged from nine-passenger propeller-driven planes to 50-passenger jet aircraft). • frequency of flights. • types and kinds of reservation systems. • code-sharing capabilit y (ticketing relationships with major carriers). She then summarized what she viewed as strengths and weaknesses for each proposal. At one point, it was speculated that airfare from Prescott to either of the two destinations could be as low as $87. It also was noted that a recent study of passenger preferences for desired destinations cited the two which SkyWest would fly to —

Pleased with Prescott City Council approval of the motion that SkyWest Airline be recommended to provide Essential Air Service to Prescott Municipal Airport, (from left) ERAU Chancellor Frank Ayers, Prescott Airport Director Robin Sobotta, Assistant Airport Director Jessi Baker and Prescott Mayor Greg Mengarelli posed before the tally board that just moments before had shown unanimous city council approval of the motion.

No. 1 being Denver; and No. 2 being Los Angeles. A potential critical future factor would be the number of annual enplanements — boarding of individual passengers. If fewer than 10,000 people annually are emplaned, the federal subsidy is $150,000. However, if more than 10,000 board, the subsidy jumps to $1 million annually. Several council members said they easily could envision more than 10,000 persons annually flying from the municipal airport (also known as Ernest A. Love Field). They noted that not having to fight traffic, parking and terminal congestion at Sky Harbor International Airport in Phoenix would appeal to people from throughout Central and Northern Arizona. Sobotta initially presented her analysis to the Airport Advisory Committee. It accepted her report and members unani-

mously recommended the SkyWest proposal be forwarded to the city council. Sobotta then repeated her presentation before the city council in a public session with several community members present. It was noted during both presentations that Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University recently signed a multi-year partnership to provide aviation and aeronautical support to SkyWest. Audience member ERAU Chancellor Frank Ayers affirmed that he earlier had met with executives from SkyWest to complete the complex agreement. SkyWest is based in St. George, Utah. The airline has more than 13,000 aviation professionals who operate more than 2,400 daily flights that help connect passengers to 245 destinations across North America. It has a fleet of 443 aircraft.

Read more news on page 60 & 68...

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


PIONEER

Visit PrescottLivingMag.com for Up-to-date Local News from Prescott LIVING Magazine

VA LLEY • DEWEY-HUMBOLDT • PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LLEY • CHINO VA LLEY • DEWEY-HUMBOLDT • PR ESCOT T •

Arizona Downs new name for reopened racetrack

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fter more than 10 years of inaction, the former Yavapai Downs reopened July 13 as Arizona Downs. A representative for the new owners said, “Friday the 13th was our lucky day. We brought simulcasting and year-round horseracing entertainment to horseracing and sports fans.” Ann McGovern, general manager for Arizona Downs, explained that more than $2 million was spent in renovating facilities in anticipation of the grand opening. She explained, “We totally replaced the entire 90,000 square foot grandstand roof with a stateof-the-art heat-reflecting cover. Our customers, in total comfort, are able to watch and wager on races from throughout the U.S. We remodeled completely the north end of the first floor, enclosing and converting it to a simulcast room which has more than 40 TVs that receive racing information from as many as 24 tracks around the country. We’ve new tote machines and granite program booths and new flooring. The new seating and tables, accessible through a hand-carved main entrance door with a lifesize bas-relief of a racehorse — really attractive.” Simulcasting will be offered seven days a week, with doors opening at 9 a.m. Customers will be able to view professional and

Continued on page 68...

Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey praised leaders in the Quad City area for continuing efforts to support existing and attract new business and industry to the region.

Governor pleased with Arizona economy

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raising local and reg ional commun it y and business leaders for their efforts in supporting existing businesses, Gov. Doug Ducey told a crowd of 200 at a Touchmark breakfast meeting that he was pleased with the upward turn of the economy this past several months. Ducey said Arizona had suffered severely during the Great Recession of 2007 and 2008. At the retirement resort meeting in Prescott, he said that at one time, Arizona was $1 billion in the red. In contrast, the state is now on solid economic ground and anticipates continuing fiscal advances.

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Specifically, Ducey mentioned growth in the following: • Arizona population — 200,000 new residents, and one of fastest growing states in country. • 160,000 private sector jobs created. • Unemployment rate down by 2.2 percent. • Relocation of more than 300 companies to Arizona. Ducey specifically mentioned several new industries that relocated in Yavapai County, noting that Superior Industries, Vinyl Visons, RESA Wear and Signs Plus were among them. “I applaud mayors Greg Mengarelli and Harvey Skoog

from Prescott and Prescott Va l le y for t hei r agg ressive advocacy for continuing business and economic growth and for their ongoing quest for better jobs for young people in the region,” Ducey said. Ducey, who is running for a second term as governor, said several major challenges are ahead. Among those are protecting Arizona water rights, securing even more support for all levels of public education, and finding ways to assure border security and safety. The break fast meeting was hosted by the Prescott Chamber of Commerce and its membership. PRE S COT T LI V ING

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Special Section:

2018: A YEAR TO CELEBRATE Local institutions reach milestones by Robin Layton

Lon•gev•i•ty, noun, long existence or service.

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n 2018, “longevity” best describes the Quad Cities, with many establishments celebrating multi-decade anniversaries.

Prescott Airport The 35th busiest airport in the nation and the fifth busiest in Arizona turns 90 years old this year. The Ernest A. Love Field, also known as the Prescott Municipal Airport, boasts five flight training schools on site and is home to the U.S. Forest Service Tanker base. The airport was dedicated in 1928 and is stretched over 760-acres, at an elevation of 5,045 feet. The airport staff will be celebrating this milestone during the ERAU celebration in October.

Sharlot Hall Museum “T h e M o t h e r of Arizona Museums” turned 90 in June, with a community celebration to mark the special year. In 1928, founder “Sharlot Hall completed preliminary restoration of the old log building that had been Arizona’s first Territorial Capitol and home to its early governors. It was Monday, June 11, when she opened the doors to the Gubernatorial Mansion Museum and welcomed her first guest,” states the museum website, sharlot.org.

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Monday, June 11, 2018, was declared tion by sharing anecdotes from their “Sharlot Hall Day” and saw many lives that involve the hospital.” The children’s activities throughout the center is gathering video interviews, When neighbors care for neighbors, campus led by volunteers and Living stories and images for the YRMC the years fly by. History interpreters. Visitors created Memory Catcher project to honor the a “Community Quilt” to be hung on anniversary. Visit YRMC HealthConcampus. The exhibits were open and nect (yrmchealthconnect.org/memodrawings were held to reward visitors ry-catcher) to explore YRMC’s history with annual museum memberships. as told by the community. See an article on the museum on page 140. Join YRMC in celebrating 75 years of not-for-profit, community-based healthcare. Thank you for supporting YRMC.

YRMC turns 75

On March 1, 1943, Prescott Community Hospital – now Yavapai Regional Medical Center (YRMC) – opened its doors to care for patients. By 9 p.m. on that date, Florence Yount, MD, had delivered the first baby born at the new hospital, according to yrmc.org. “In 1964, the hospital relocated to its current location on Willow Creek Road and changed its name to Yavapai Community Hospital. The hospital underwent another name change in 1984, becoming Yavapai Regional Medical Center. The rapid growth of Prescott Valley helped spur another important milestone for the community: the opening of YRMC East in 2006,” according to yrmc.org. “YRMC’s 75th anniversary celebration theme ‘Yesterday – Today – Tomorrow’ highlights the meaning of community-based, not-for-profit healthcare. YRMC is giving people the opportunity to join this conversaYRMC.org

YRMCHealthConnect.org

The image of Prescott Community Hospital is from Sharlot Hall Museum Library and Archives.

Yavapai College

Yavapai College turns 50 this year. It all started with a list of reasons from Dr. R.A. Perry to Mrs. Merle (Opal) Allen, Prescott PTA President, on why the time was right to form a junior college in the county. The rest is history. Being born from a caring community, Yavapai College continues to give back to its home by sharing the Performing Arts Center, art gallery, sculpture garden, OLLI, College for Kids and non-credit classes. Students can choose from six locations, dozens of degrees and certificates, as well as many sports options. Anniversary celebrations are taking place from August to November at all locations and include: A performance by Jay Leno, guest appearance by Soledad O’Brien, food trucks, carnivals, live music, free cooking classes, health fair, fun run, block party and more. “Some of you will learn for the first

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Yavapai College dedication ceremony, Oct. 19, 1976

EXPLORE. FLY. DESIGN. BUILD. PREDICT. PROTECT. No. 1 in Aeronautical/Aerospace Engineering *As ranked by U.S. News & World Report Nation’s 1st College of Security and Intelligence 11-time National Champion Flight Team beginnings 97% Job Placement Rate

time about our humble and our transformation into the college that you see today. For others, the pictures and words may evoke meanprescott.erau.edu ingful memories. We hopeGet here! that our historical reflection will inspire you to expect even more of your college as we continue to enrich the quality of life for all county residents,” Dr. Penny Wills said in a message on the college’s special anniversary website section, 50th.yc.edu. See page 27 for more information on the events.

Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University

Embry-Riddle’s Prescott Campus — A mile high in the Bradshaw Mountains of central Arizona where flying conditions are pristine and the land’s natural beauty is spectacular. There’s peacefulness here. But just listen and you’ll hear the buzz of remote-controlled planes students are flying at RSP Field; or the roar of a new turbine engine prototype that students are testing in one of our massive wind tunnels. National Geographic named Prescott one of America’s best adventure towns, with some of the best mountain biking in the country.

Prescott Recreation Department National Trails Day falls annually on the first Saturday in June and this year marked the 50th anniversary of efforts to preserve much of the country’s natural beauty. According to the Prescott Recreation Department, “Prescott Peavine National Recreation Trail was constructed during the infancy of the Mile High Trail System, in the late 1990’s. Prior to its construction, the system totaled only two and a half miles in length. Adding 5.2 miles to the system, the Peavine Trail is by far the City’s most visited trail with over 70,000 visits annually. The Peavine Trail officially opened in time for National Trails day in June of 1999.” See an article on National Trails Day on page 30.

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This year marks Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s 40th year at the Prescott campus. According to an article by ERAU’s Jason Kadah, Embry-Riddle’s Western campus opened for the 19781979 school year with 240 students and only two majors offered (aeronautical science and aeronautics). Today, 2,650 students are enrolled in 26 majors. Although the university has its roots in aviation/aeronautics, other programs such as forensic biology, wildlife science, safety science, cyber security, space physics and simulation science attract the best and brightest students from all 50 states and 38 countries. “The life of a university should be woven into the life of the community in which it resides, and so we welcome all to join us as we look forward to the next 40 amazing years here in Prescott,” Chancellor Dr. Frank Ayers said. The university is celebrating with many events, including OctoberWest that runs October 5 to 7. The university is partnering with Prescott to stage a large airshow. Ayers said, “We’re actually partnering with the 90th anniversary of the airport and the 40th anniversary of the university. So we have the airshow performers, Matt Chapman, the Embry airshow pilot. We also have a Friday night ERAU alumni gathering to celebrate with

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

PHOTO COURTESY OF YAVAPAI COLLEGE

fireworks.” Check out Prescott Living’s interview with Ayers beginning on page 22 for more on the anniversary plans.

Prescott Valley Celebrates 40 Years Glassford Hill, quietly towering over Prescott Valley has produced archeological evidence of early man dating to 800 A.D. According to pvaz.net, Indian villages were settled around Glassford Hill in 1400. In 1582, Spanish explorers were in this vicinity as evidenced by the signs of Spanish mining efforts in nearby Badger Springs. In the early 1900’s the area was homesteaded by the Fain family. In 1966, Prescott Valley was founded, and it was incorporated in 1978 with a population of 1,520. Growing rapidly over 40 years, Prescott Valley now has more than 45,000 residents. The town has planned an entire celebratory year to mark this milestone. Events started at the New Year’s Eve celebration and continued to a March festival. May’s Prescott Valley Days was followed by a day of July 4th fun. In August, the town is featuring the 40th Anniversary Pinnacle Weekend event. It all wraps up in October with Gold Fever Days. See page 28 for more on the anniversary plans. 1978 - 2018

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THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


The LIVING Interview

Dr. Frank Ayers CHANCELLOR OF PRESCOTT’S ERAU CAMPUS Interview by Ray Newton

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s Chancellor of the Prescott campus of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) Dr. Frank Ayers is responsible for full oversight of academic, operational and professional activities. He provides strategic direction for a complex multi-layered organization, which ultimately is a part of an even larger university system. Since 2009, Ayers has guided campus administration. During those years, the campus has experienced unprecedented growth in all aspects: student enrollment at both undergraduate and graduate levels; program and curricular expansion in departments, schools and colleges; significant increases in faculty and staff; several new buildings; substantive renovation and remodeling of existing structures; acquisition of the latest in technologically advanced resources; and transformation of the university into an internationally renowned and respected institution. The Virginia native earned his bachelor’s degree at Virginia Polytechnic Institute, where he also was commissioned as an Air Force officer. For 26 years, Ayers served in the U.S. Air Force — as a B-52 pilot, as commander of a B-52 Training Squadron, as Support Group Commander and as Chief of Joint Military Education Policy at the Pentagon. He has logged more than 6,500 flight hours in a variety of aircraft. Ayers later earned a master’s degree from ERAU and a doctorate from Nova Southeastern University. He also is a graduate of Harvard University Senior Leaders in Government program and the University of Southern California’s Aviation Safety course. He began his professorial and administrative career at the ERAU Daytona Beach campus, where he was chair of the Flight Training Program. It was from there that he was assigned to the Prescott campus. Ayers and his wife Debbie have been married for 43 years. Debbie, also an Air Force officer and pilot, came from an Ohio family but was born in Puerto Rico, where her parents were stationed at a military base. The Ayers have two married sons, Mike and Clif.

PRESCOTT LIVING: Dr. Ayers, you’ve been head administrator at Embry-Riddle for the past nine years. You’re leading the Prescott campus into its 40th anniversary. Let’s reflect about Embry. You’re part of a larger university organization; can you tell us what that is? DR. FRANK AYERS: Certainly. In 1925, John Paul Riddle and T. Higbee Embry created the Embry-Riddle company in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1966, our first president, Jack Hunt, decided to create the very successful three campus structure we have today. It was a training company for military pilots

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

and others. The first Embry Riddle Campus was in Miami. In 1966, he moved the Miami campus to Daytona Beach. In 1972, he founded what would become the Worldwide Campus at Fort Rucker, Ala. Then in 1978, in response to the growth of the Eastern campus in Daytona Beach, he planted the Western residential campus in Prescott. We have a three-campus system with a university president of the whole system, Dr. P. Barry Butler. Then there’s a chancellor at the worldwide campus, a chancellor at Prescott, and a provost in Florida who func-

tions roughly as the chancellor in Florida. PRESCOTT LIVING: How large was the Prescott campus when you arrived in 2009? DR. FRANK AYERS: We had about 1,670 students. This past fall, we had 2,660 students. What I’m most proud of is that the quality of those students has increased. We have the brightest student body in the state of Arizona – brightest student body across many universities. It’s just an amazing group of young people. PRESCOTT LIVING: When you arrived, how big was the university staff? DR. FRANK AYERS: In 2009, we had about 300 people serving about 1,670 students. Now we have about 400 staff and faculty serving nearly 2,700 students. We intentionally have a very lean administrative structure. Rather than spend our dollars on administration, we spend money on our outstanding students, faculty and staff. PRESCOTT LIVING: How has the male-to-female ratio changed? DR. FRANK AYERS: Between 2011 and 2018, female enrollments have increased from 17 percent of the student population to over 25 percent this year. And we’ve made real strides in that area. We were just at graduation. The Ed King Service Award winner and our two Chancellor’s winners were all bright young ladies. Young women just do amazingly well here in the STEM education programs. Our goal is to attract the brightest young people into STEM careers (science, technology, engineering and math). PRESCOTT LIVING: How many degree programs did you have when you arrived? DR. FRANK AYERS: In 2009, we had 16-degree programs. Now we have 26. We then had one master’s degree. Originally we offered one master’s degree program and now we have three. Our latest master’s degree will be in

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The LIVING Interview (continued)

Frank and Debbie with students in Seattle

cybersecurity intelligence. PRESCOTT LIVING: You were applauded recently as a university as having the best ROTC program in the nation. Tell us about that. DR. FRANK AYERS: We’re very pleased. We’re the second smallest campus in the United States to offer Air Force ROTC and currently we have about the fourth largest detachment in the country. Last year, they were named the best large detachment in the country, essentially the best ROTC detachment. This year I think they were No. 2. What you see in all this is a commitment to excellence. And Air Force ROTC really leads the way in that. We consistently get the largest number of inschool scholarships in the country and the highest number of pilot slots. So think about the percentage of odds of a student coming here and getting an ROTC scholarship and becoming an Air Force pilot. It is significant.

CAMPUS CHANGES

PRESCOTT LIVING: What major changes have occurred since you arrived? DR. FRANK AYERS: We’ve grown both in facilities and buildings and in academic structure. I think our proudest moment is the day four years ago when we created the nation’s first

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and only College of Security Intelligence. We will finish our second new residence hall this fall. So that adds 500 beds to the campus. Last fall, we completed a science, technology, engineering, and math building. It contains the Jim and Linda Lee Planetarium, which is one of only three planetariums in Arizona and the only one in Northern Arizona. We have also completely renovated all our athletic facilities. Our talented facilities team renovated five structures into a single outstanding athletic center. Along the way I think the largest growth is in handson education. Our goal is that we would have 100 percent of our students do what’s called a “Capstone Project.” That means before you graduate, you have to do a large team project. All our engineers do now. A significant number of aviation and security students do. All our students are involved in hands-on research. That’s what they’re focused on is, is having hands-on learning. You don’t just sit in a classroom and read a book. You go build a rocket. You go build a satellite. You do a variety of things. And the results are amazing. We launched the University’s first satellite this fall, with another on the way in 2019-2020, and our undergraduate students participated in

gravitational-wave research that contributed to the lead researchers from MIT and Cal Tech earning the Nobel Prize. PRESCOTT LIVING: The 40th anniversary is rapidly approaching for the Prescott campus. What plans are in place? DR. FRANK AYERS: We have a big OctoberWest celebration planned, our version of homecoming, set for Oct. 5-7. We are again partnering with the City of Prescott on a communitywide airshow on Saturday. Additionally, we are celebrating the 90th anniversary of the airport and the 40th anniversary of the University at the same time. We have Matt Chapman, the Embry air-show pilot, and several other national level aerobatic performers coming to perform. We also have a Friday night ERAU alumni/student gathering to celebrate the 40th with fireworks to cap off the evening. During the academic year, we are sponsoring many different events to remind people of our heritage. It’s been an amazing 40 years. But it’s all really about the next 40. It’s nice to celebrate the past but it’s about where we’re going. That’s what we’re really focusing on, so it ought to be an opportunity to invite the community, especially for the airshow. Come on out celebrate our 40th anniversary. PRESCOTT LIVING: Let’s shift gears. Tell us about costs and affordability.

COLLEGE COSTS

DR. FRANK AYERS: Our financial impact on the community is significant in jobs, community outreach, and the many students

Frank with Ray Newton

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


who are such great employees in Prescott and Prescott Valley while they work their way through school. For our part, we have really made strides to make college more affordable for our students. We’ve dramatically increased what we call our internally funded scholarships. It’s a discount off of their tuition, based on academic merit. At the same time, we have kept our tuition increases low, significantly lower than many state institutions, while we have significantly increased the amount of money we use to attract bright students here. We use athletic scholarships, too, to bring bright students here. Our athletes are stars on the field and in the classroom. They study fields such as space physics, engineering and the sciences. PRESCOTT LIVING: A major concern in higher education is the ballooning student debt. How do you help students control that? DR. FRANK AYERS: As I said, we control the cost of the education. If you look at the fairly dramatic increase in the internally funded scholarships, that’s just a discount off tuition. The university has taken pains to keep tuition increases low and increase the amount of financial support we provide. PRESCOTT LIVING: How does Embry-Riddle recruit students? DR. FRANK AYERS: We have an outstanding Dean of Enrollment Management, Bryan Dougherty. He’s a local gentleman who attended Northern Arizona University. Bryan has been in the community his whole life and understands Prescott and Embry Riddle. He has a wonderful staff that recruits around the world; and across the nation. Our top five recruiting states are California first, then Arizona, then Washington, Colorado, and Texas. We have live-in recruiters in Texas, Illinois, California, Washington, and Colorado. This school’s not for everybody. We’re looking for the best and brightest students. We find that a student who wants the career that we offer, has a high GPA, has the high SAT score, and has great leadership and participation experiences in high school. We go to the career fairs and the college fairs and we do print advertising. We do mailers. We certainly contact people so they know who we are. It’s a great process. And we get the best students. We’re a national and international university. PRESCOTT LIVING: You attract a large cohort of

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Frank at ERAU flightline

international students. DR. FRANK AYERS: Yeah, we certainly do. Over 8 percent of our campus is international. I think the national percentage is about 4 percent. And, again, we look for the best and brightest from around the world. So our international recruiters travel to Asia, Africa. We have a wonderful group of students from Mexico. There’s a huge demand for engineering in Mexico and Europe.

GROWTH

PRESCOTT LIVING: When I arrived in Prescott 22 years ago, Embry-Riddle had the reputation locally of being, “Well, that’s where they train pilots.” How has that changed and why? DR. FRANK AYERS: Pilot training is about 450 to 500 students out of the 2,700. Since 2000, engineering has grown to about 1,100 students. The College of Security Intelligence is another 500 students. The variety of other degrees — business, space physics, the sciences — account for the rest. Embry-Riddle has changed because I think we realized along the way that it was more than just a flight school. It is a STEM school. All degrees we offer are science degrees. However,

through all that, we still train the best future commercial pilots in the nation. One other significant point, we do not offer a degree program that doesn’t lead to good careers and jobs. We don’t just open them because someone wants to open one. In fact, of four or five new degree programs that are proposed, we very rarely approve more than one or two. Degrees must lead to a profitable lifetime career. We’re very focused on that. The university here was named the No. 1 university in Arizona for return on investment and career placement. Other schools in that list are Ivy League or universities like Stanford or Columbia. We’re not those folks yet, but it’s nice to be in that company. Return on investment measures how much you pay to go to school, and how much it paid you back later in life. That’s why we’ve diversified. Now, we will always be an outstanding aviation and aerospace school. We will always teach pilots and engineers. We’re the best at it in the world. By offering more STEM degree programs, “We have so much more.” PRESCOTT LIVING: What I find remarkable: The faculty here trains students, teaches stu-

continued on page 64...

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Special Section: Milestones

CITY

SPEAK

REMEMBERING THE GRANITE MOUNTAIN HOTSHOTS WITH THE LEARNING AND TRIBUTE CENTER by Greg Mengarelli, Mayor, City of Prescott

A I urge all Prescott citizens to visit this center and learn more about our fallen heroes and the wildland firefighting service.

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PRE S COT T LI V ING

s Prescott residents for 24 years, my wife and I consider Prescott to be our home, and the folks who live here to be like family. Five years ago, on June 30, 2013, our entire family was devastated by the news that 19 young men lost their lives battling the Yarnell Hill fire. These brave men were part of the Granite Mountain Interagency Hotshot Crew, and they gave their lives protecting our community. As Prescott grieved, the nation and the world reached out to offer condolences and solidarity with our fire department. Literally thousands of items were sent to Prescott. Examples include T-shirts and flags signed by fire departments from Texas to France. Artists created unique pieces in tribute, such as paintings, sculptures and photography. Poetry and songs were written. Crosses and religious articles were made. Often, these items came in sets of 19 - one for each fallen hero. A team of dedicated volunteers worked diligently to create a public display at Hotel St. Michael using hundreds of these artifacts during the summer of 2014. Tens of thousands came to pay respects to our fallen 19 at this display. Meanwhile, an online record of the artifacts was created with the Prescott Public Library and the Arizona Memory Project, and still exists today. Eventually the display came down, and the artifacts were catalogued and stored in a City building for several years. In 2017, Fire Chief Dennis Light facilitated a group of family members and citizens who came together

to establish a new nonprofit group, with the mission to establish the GMIHC Learning and Tribute Center. This center will serve to not only help us remember our fallen heroes, but educate the public about wild land firefighting. City officials struck a deal with the Gateway Mall to store and display of some of the artifacts. The board and City are grateful to the mall owners for this generous donation of a prime retail space. For the longer term, the board would like to establish a stand-alone facility. The center opened at the mall on June 29, one day before the fifth anniversary of the tragedy. The center is staffed by volunteers, and members of the board. It is a moving and powerful display of the artifacts and other information about the Granite Mountain Hotshots. I urge all Prescott citizens to visit this center and learn more about our fallen heroes and the wildland firefighting service. I would also like to thank all of the volunteers and staff from the City, who managed, maintained and cared for these artifacts for the past five years. This type of community spirit is part of what makes me proud of our City. God bless our fallen heroes, their families, and all first responders in our community and around the world. For more information about the center, go to gmihc19.org to check hours or email info@gmihc19.org.

THE THEEDUCATION EDUCATIONEDITION EDITION •• LATE SUMMER 2018


YAVAPAI COLLEGE CELEBRATES 50 YEARS: 1968-2018

Join us for these upcoming events! SATURDAY, AUGUST 25 PRESCOTT CAMPUS 7am – 9pm: Fun Run, block party, live music, food, family-friendly games & activities, Jay Leno live. SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15 PRESCOTT VALLEY CENTER 10am – 4pm: YC’s Healthcare Education faculty and students will offer a day-long Health Fair with flu shots, diabetes testing and wellness checks, along with health exhibits and free food. YC 304-18

FREE and open to the public! Learn more at 50th.yc.edu

YAVAPAI COLLEGE CELEBRATES 50 YEARS: 1968-2018

Join us for these upcoming events!

TUE. SEPT. 25 • YCPAC, PRESCOTT CAMPUS 10 am: Inaugural Presidential Speaker Series with guest Soledad O’Brien. SAT. SEPT. 29 • CTEC 10am-3pm: Tech-savvy carnival, food trucks, free burgers, beer garden with robot bartenders, drone races, Kids Zone (with stomp rockets), & technically themed games. SAT. OCT. 20 • VERDE VALLEY CAMPUS 11am-8pm: live music, carnival, demos and more. SAT. OCT. 27 • CHINO VALLEY CENTER 10am-5pm: Partnering with Chino Valley’s Chamber of Commerce Fall Festival for hay rides, food trucks, corn maze, beer garden, horse and canine contests, demonstrations and more. SAT. NOV. 3 • SEDONA CENTER 10am-4pm: Free cooking classes, demos, food and more. YC 305-18

FREE and open to the public! Learn more at 50th.yc.edu


1978 - 2018

PRESCOTT VALLEY’S 40TH CELEBRATIONS CONTINUE INTO FALL by Heidi Dahms Foster, Communications Coordinator, Town of Prescott Valley

In September, plan to attend Patriot Week events to honor those lost on 9/11 and the 19 Granite Mountain Hotshot firefighters lost on June 30, 2013. Three thousand American flags and 19 Hotshot memorial flags will fly on the grounds of the Prescott Valley Civic Center.

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rescott Valley is nearly halfway through its year-long 40th anniversary celebration, and there’s much more excitement to come! In May, Prescott Valley Days featured a ruby anniversary celebration with a Wizard of Oz-themed parade, a Fiesta del Pueblo with Hispanic entertainment and food, a fire show, and a Ranch to Table dinner highlighting locally grown ingredients. The Town float earned first place in the civic category and a special Chairman’s Trophy, presented by the Early Bird Lions Club. Other anniversary events included Arbor Day in April, with a tree planting honoring longtime community member and former Mayor Carm Staker, and an appearance by the Central Arizona Honor Guard and Pipes & Drums. This was followed by a wildly successful kickoff to Summer Movies Under the Stars with a drive-in event showing the Wizard of Oz in the Event Center parking lot. June’s annual Woofstock pet adoption event on the Civic Center grounds, sponsored by Prescott Dog Magazine was in the works as of this printing. Prescott Valley Public Library’s first-ever Comic Con event, Fandomania, held in July, was expected to draw more than 1,000 people to the library, Civic Center and adjacent Northern Arizona University satellite campus. This exciting program for all ages combined comics, movies, books and gaming with local businesses, authors and artists to provide a day of exciting and unique workshops and activities.

In August, the month of incorporation, a spectacular celebration is on tap at the Prescott Valley Civic Center. (If you lived in the 70s, you might recognize some elements of these two days of fun!) Events will include Saturday stage entertainment by local children’s groups, bands and other live music, mariachi and ballet folklorico performances, a large car show, bouncy houses, a Hollywood Squares TV-style show sponsored by the PV Chamber of Commerce (the “squares” will be populated by some local “characters”) and an Antique Road Show-style event, sponsored by the PV Historical Society. The Sunday, Aug. 26, lineup will include a sponsored Cowboy Church service at the Theater on the Green, officiated by Pastor Ed Anthony, a local noted cowboy pastor. Bring a chair or blanket and settle on the lawn to enjoy toe-tapping country gospel music and an uplifting nondenominational message. Don’t miss this Sunday morning community event starting at 11. If you’re still in love, you might want to participate in the Wedding Vow Renewal ceremony right after the Cowboy Church. This event will be officiated by Prescott Valley’s own Magistrate Judge Keith Carson. If you are in love and can’t wait to tie the knot, you can even get married during this ceremony! Just contact the Yavapai County Clerk of Superior Court, obtain a license, bring your beau and show up! Join us at 1 p.m. on the lawn at Theater on the Green for an hour of rousing local gospel music from a variety of local groups, including country, bluegrass and

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Special Section: Milestones

Southern gospel, among others. Each of the weekend’s two days of fun will include plenty of food, with some gustatory delights supplied by area ethnic cooks. In September, plan to attend Patriot Week events to honor those lost on 9/11 and the 19 Granite Mountain Hotshot firefighters lost on June 30, 2013. Three thousand American flags and 19 Hotshot memorial flags will fly on the grounds of the Prescott Valley Civic Center. A 9/11 memorial ceremony and two free patriotic concerts are planned. Finally, Gold Fever Days at historical Fain Park in October will feature tours of the park’s mining display and vintage cavalry town site, nearby Indian ruins, live entertainment and gold panning. Prescott Valley’s Community Access Channel 56 is filming short historical vignettes of longtime residents sharing their memories of the community’s early years for use on social media. You can view these videos on the Town of Prescott Valley’s Facebook page. Watch the Facebook page, the website at pvaz.net and Twitter @prescottvly for updates and times of events, or call Prescott Valley Parks & Recreation at (928) 759-3090 for more information. For information on Fandomania, call Shelbie Marks at (928) 759-3038.

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Prescott Valley’s Community Access Channel 56 is filming short historical vignettes of longtime residents sharing their memories of the community’s early years for use on social media.

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Special Section: Milestones

COMMEMORATING A MILESTONE ON NATIONAL TRAILS DAY by Kelly Tolbert, Recreation Services Coordinator, Prescott Parks and Recreation

T

he City of Prescott now offers 100 miles of trails within the City limits for hiking, bicycling or horseback riding. Just in time for National Trails Day, the milestone was reached by the Over the Hill Gang while constructing a 0.2 mile section of trail within the recently purchased Storm Ranch open space parcel. National Trails Day falls annually on the first Saturday in June and this

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PRE S COT T LI VING V ING • SPECI A L SEC TION PRESCOT

year marked the 50th anniversary of our forefather’s efforts to preserve much of the natural beauty throughout the country. President Lyndon Johnson initiated what became known as The National Trails System Act of 1968 with his speech on the “Conservation and Preservation of Natural Beauty” in February 1965. In his speech, he requested that the Secretary of the Interior form a committee of legislators to collaborate on a cooperative program resulting in a report titled Trails for America. This report eventually became The National Trails System Act of 1968 with some slight differences, but essentially allowing for the designation of three different types of trails: National Scenic Trails, National Recreation Trails and Connecting and Side Trails. President Jimmy Carter later added National Historic Trails to the categories.

Locally, we have the Peavine Trail, which is designated as a National Recreation Trail. These types of trails are designated based on the criteria that they provide opportunities for outdoor recreation primarily in and around urban areas and have no minimal length requirement. The National Trails System Act is also significant in that it established the concept of railbanking, which allows for the popular rails-trails network across present day America. Prescott’s Peavine National Recreation Trail was constructed during the infancy of the Mile High Trail System, in the late 1990s. Prior to its construction, the system totaled only two and a half miles in length. Adding 5.2 miles to the system, the Peavine Trail is by far the City’s most visited trail, with over 70,000 visits annually. The Peavine Trail officially opened in time for National Trails day in June 1999. Gaining momentum from the newly-constructed Peavine, the City began construction on the Greenways Phase I, Willow Lake, Cottonwood Peninsula and Jan Alfano/Embry Riddle Trails, bringing the total mileage to 23.30 by the end of 2005. Demand for more trails also propelled expansion of the Mile High Trail System, as seen with the urban Greenways Trail.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Special Section: Milestones

Used primarily as a commuter trail, the Greenways connects downtown businesses with the Rodeo Grounds and the Centennial Trail that connects to neighborhoods including Forest Trails, Enchanted Canyon and Thumb Butte Recreation area. The benefits of having green infrastructure such as parks and trails go beyond offering an alternative mode of transportation. In fact, trails contribute to the local economy by increasing property values, reducing medical costs through preventative health care, and generating tax dollars. Outdoor recreation in America has been valued at $887 billion in spending, with about $201 billion directly from trail recreation. According to “The Outdoor Recreation Economy,” a publication produced by the outdoor industry in 2017, every year outdoor recreation generates $124.5 billion in federal, state and local tax revenue, with $28.3 billion from trail recreation. According to a Prescott Visitor survey conducted by Northern Arizona University in 2014-2015, about 40 percent of respondents cited hiking or walking trails as the top attraction. In addition to significantly contributing to the local economy, trail use can lead to improved quality of life. Research supports that hiking or walking can reduce obesity, diabetes, heart disease and improve overall mental health.

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Prescott’s trail system will continue to grow in the next several years with the completion of the Storm Ranch trails (6.25 miles) later this year, a connection from Constellation to Peavine, and eventually a trail to the top of Glassford Hill. As the City continues to increase in trail mileage, it is important to note the participants that have helped make this success possible: Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Prescott College, Yavapai College, Over the Hill Gang, Youth Conservation Corps, Yavapai Trails Association, Open Space Alliance, Greenways Committee, Prescott Alternative Transportation, Eagle Scouts, various church groups, various schools, Yavapai Big Brothers Big Sisters, Prescott Mountain Bike Alliance (PMBA), International Mountain Bike Alliance (IMBA), Bike Prescott, Back Country Horsemen, Granite Mountain Riders, Prescott Creeks, Prescott Trail Riders, Prescott Outings Club, Prescott National Forest, Granite Dells Foundation, Save the Dells, grants from ACF, CDGB, RTP, ISTEA, FHWA, ADOT, Arizona State Parks, Arizona Game and Fish Department (AZGFD), Arizona State Land Department, Bureau

of Land Management (BLM), various land donors, many businesses and private donors, the towns of Prescott Valley, Chino Valley, and Yavapai County, the Northern Arizona Veteran’s Administration (VA) and likely many more. For more information on how to volunteer with the Over the Hill Gang please visit: prescott-az.gov/ recreation-events/recreation-areas/ volunteer/trails-volunteers/ or for more information on the Mile High Trail system: prescotttrails.com.

S COT T LI V ING SPECI A L SEC TION • PRE PRESCOT VING

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Economy • Finance • Business

BUSINESS AND EDUCATION TIES THAT CAN BOND A COMMUNITY by Marnie Uhl, Prescott Valley Chamber of Commerce President and CEO

H

ow do we, as a business, ensure that a strong local economy will be perpetuated and sustainable in the future? Where is the future of our business leadership and entrepreneurs? Years ago, the Prescott Valley Chamber identified that in order to have a community with a strong and vibrant business climate investments must be made. One such investment was made in our education system and schools. The Chamber has been proactive in its support and engagement with our school and college districts; not only in providing services but creating an atmosphere of business collaboration and encouragement. Several programs have been designed to foster that relationship between business and education which has resulted in positive interaction and success. Each year, our schools welcome new teachers to the classrooms. In most cases they are new to the area, having come from other states or communities. We want them to start off on the right foot so we work with our businesses to make “welcome bags.” These bags are filled with items for the class-

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room that helps them get started; the basic necessities, paper, pens, clips, tissue, wipes, etc. The bags are then presented at the new teacher orientations at the schools and at the school district. This project has been extremely well received and supported. Approximately three years ago the Chamber partnered with the Humboldt Unified School District to sponsor a career fair. This career fair features business leaders in a variety of career path industries that present one-on-one to students at the high and middle school level. Students sign up for four of their interested fields and rotate among the different presenters during a half-day workshop session. Here they will find out what exactly they should be looking at studying if interested in a particular career or if they are not sure what they want to do, then here is their opportunity to learn about several opportunities. This program was suggested by a Chamber member Attorney Mark Kille and his involvement has helped with its continued success. Another program was designed to foster understanding between schools and business and that was the Adopt-a-School program.

Businesses “adopted” a school and were there to provide support, assistance, and a connection. Each business and school would determine what that “support” would look like. Some businesses rallied behind teacher/staff support with snacks, goodies and parties; others worked on cleanup and landscaping projects while others supported food drives or purchased much needed equipment. Money was never the driving force for support but rather making the connection that business and education work hand in hand for a stronger community. In addition, the Chamber provides scholarships for graduating seniors in the Prescott Valley area, its CEO was a founding member of the Humboldt Education Foundation and served as its first President and the Chamber also continues to be proactive in following legislation that would support and enable our schools to operate at optimum levels for our teachers and our children. The Prescott Valley Chamber is proud of its work with our education system and continues to look at opportunities for increased engagement between the business community, our schools and our kids. THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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YAVAPAI COUNTY COURTHOUSE P by William Otwell, FAIA

reservation and rehabilitation of historic structures requires vision, political will and significant resources. The rehabilitation of the Yavapai County Courthouse is an intriguing example of how the process can work to the advantage of our local community. The Courthouse, in its idyllic setting on the Plaza, is used daily by the court system, and up to 65 outdoor events each year are

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PRE S COT COTT T LI LIV VING ING • BIZ!

scheduled. Daily use of the Plaza grounds by the public is an important aspect of life in Prescott. Design and construction of the Courthouse was commissioned by the Yavapai County Board of Supervisors in 1915. A design competition was held and 26 design submittals were received. Architect William Bowman of Denver won the competition and the Courthouse was constructed for $250,000. As late as 1974,

the Courthouse was home to the entire county government, including the jail on the top floor. Today, the County government offices are housed in 55 buildings. The rehabilitation process was initiated in 2002, when the board of supervisors commissioned a Building Condition Assessment Report, prepared by Otwell Associates Architects. This report outlined the scope of work required to bring the building up to current standards for life safety, energy efficiency and occupant comfort. Six years later, the City of Prescott planning staff used the report as part of its submission to the American Planning Association’s inaugural “Top Ten Public Places in America” program. The Courthouse Plaza was listed in the top 10 along with Central Park in New York City, Union Station in Washington D.C., and the Santa Monica Pier in California.

In 2012, the board of supervisors commissioned a threeyear, $5.6 million rehabilitation. The heavy caseload of the courts did not allow for any down time, so all work was performed after hours and on weekends. The project was divided into three phases, with construction scheduled for summer months to provide for proper outside temperatures and daylight to perform the work. The rehabilitated Courthouse continues to house the 100 judges and staff of the court system, with all new energy efficient heating, cooling and lighting systems, restored windows, stabilized granite steps and a fully restored original courtroom. The project received a 2015 Governor’s Heritage Preservation Honor Award. The vision of the Yavapai County Board of Supervisors has been realized.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

PRE S COT T LI V ING

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WHY JOIN YOUR LOCAL CHAMBER OF COMMERCE?

For more information about the Prescott Chamber of Commerce and upcoming events and programs, please visit prescott.org or call us at (928) 445-2000 or (800) 266-7534 or stop by the Visitor Information Center at 117 W. Goodwin St., Prescott, AZ 86303.

by Sheri Heiney, President & CEO, Prescott Chamber of Commerce

A

re you a member of your local Chamber of Commerce? If not, what are you missing? Recently the Prescott Chamber of Commerce was voted by the Phoenix Business Journal as one of the Top Ten Chambers in Arizona with almost 900 members!

We’re No. 9! Chambers exist to serve their members and help them to be more successful. Chambers are supported by membership dues, which are usually based on the size of your business. Your dues are tax deductible as a business expense. Most businesses benefit in some way from membership, and small businesses often benefit dramatically from the power of joining together with their peers in this way. Here are some of the things local Chambers do for the business community, along with a few suggestions for getting the most

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PRE S COT PRES COTT T LI LIV VING ING • BIZ!

from your membership.

Networking For many of us, it’s important to be visible. Chambers sponsor social events and networking groups designed for members to meet and do business together. If your business depends on local-business generation, this is an opportunity you shouldn’t pass up. Even if your customer base is not local, the connections you make can be an invaluable source of local goods and services for your business needs. Also, check out your Chamber’s Ambassador Committee if you’d like to have a built-in opportunity to welcome and meet new members. Advertising When you’re a member, you’ll be listed in the Chamber directory, but your opportunities for promoting your business don’t stop there. Chambers have websites, newslet-

ters, newspapers, brochures, and more. They sell advertising in most of these, and only chamber members advertise. The costs are generally modest, and if your target market includes other Chamber members, the ROI can be fantastic.

Education Many Chambers really shine in this department. Training yourself and your staff can be expensive, but it’s important to keep up with new developments and continue improving everyone’s business skills. Chambers offer classes, workshops, and seminars, taught by member professionals, at a low cost to members. These professionals go out of their way to do a great job because their community reputation is at stake.

Referrals Businesses and residents new to a community frequently call

the local Chamber of Commerce for referrals for the goods and services they need. Guess what? If you’re not a member, Chamber staff can’t refer you. Take the time to get to know the staff of your local Chamber, and make sure they have the information they need to send business your way.

Volunteering Volunteering to serve on a Chamber committee that fits your interests or expertise creates leadership opportunities, helps you become better known in the community, and can help position you as an expert in your field. Every Chamber is different, and there may be other opportunities in yours not mentioned here. If you’re not already a member, I encourage you to find out more, and if you are a member, take another look at what your Chamber offers. You may be pleasantly surprised!

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


ART & HERITAGE OF THE AMERICAN WEST

PRESENTS THE 5TH ANNUAL

EXHIBITION & SALE

INCLUDING 44 ARTISTS CELEBRATING THE BEAUTY OF THAT GREAT ICON OF THE AMERICAN WEST…THE HORSE

AUGUST 4TH – SEPTEMBER 23RD, 2018 ★ PRESCOTT, ARIZONA FEATURED ARTIST – SHEILA COTTRELL – 2017 PEOPLE’S CHOICE AWARD WINNER

PREVIEW SALE & ARTIST RECEPTION – 5:30PM ON AUGUST 3RD, 2018 (MEMBERS FREE & GUESTS $10)

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LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

PRE S COT T LI V ING

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FINDLAY TOYOTA WORKING TOWARD BUILDING A BETTER COMMUNITY THROUGH EDUCATION by Brandon Ross, Marketing Director, Findlay Toyota of Prescott

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rescott, Arizona, is Everybody’s Hometown and because of this, the community is always growing. With growth comes need, and one of the needs that Findlay Toyota of Prescott tries to meet is the need for education. Through community events and fundraisers such as Stuff the Bus, the annual QuadCity High School Car Raffle, Findlay Toyota of Prescott Education Endowment Fund and with donations to the BASIS Prescott

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PRE S COT COTT T LI LIV VING ING • BIZ!

Teachers Fund, we strive to enrich the lives of students in our communities. The Quad-City High School Car Raffle has generated funds for clubs at Prescott High School, Bradshaw Mountain High School, Chino Valley High School and Mayer High School for several years. It provides the students with the ability to raise funds for the sports and clubs they are invested in. One lucky winner also gets a new Toyota, so it is truly a win-win. Every back-to-school season, the staff at Findlay Toyota of Prescott fills backpacks and literally stuffs a bus filled with school supplies for the Prescott Unified School District. The community easily matches our generosity with their support by dropping off school supplies at our store for pick up. We wouldn’t be able to have an impact if it wasn’t for the community backing us up along the way.

Each February we put $100 into the Findlay Toyota of Prescott Education Endowment Fund for every vehicle sold. From this fund we help Yavapai County schools with scholarships, supplies and other needs. It is just another way we get to say thank you for all the hard work that students, teachers and their families do to help our community grow. One of our newer fundraisers is to give back to the teachers within our community. This past winter we donated to the BASIS Prescott Teachers Fund. We find it very important to help those who give so much to our children and our future. We cannot say thank you enough for how generous you all have been in our first year in Prescott, Arizona. Thank you so much for letting us become a part of this wonderful community.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


ARE YOU ADEQUATELY PROTECTED FOR ALL STAGES OF YOUR LIFE? by Robin Layton None of us like to waste our money, so it’s worth your time to find an insurance professional you trust and discuss what you need to have insured, or not.

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any attractive things vie for our spending dollars: vehicles, vacations, clothes, furnishings, new technology. It’s easy to forget the need for good insurance coverage – until something drastic happens. Our insurance needs change as we age and it’s best to work with an expert to determine what you need. Working, single adults who rent have different needs than a married couple who owns their home, has a few children and is looking at retirement in a decade. If you are married, you should consider life insurance to protect

your spouse, children and the home you’ve invested in. Consider it a replacement of your salary should you pass away. Life insurance is either whole (also called universal) or term. With whole life insurance, your survivors get the death benefit, but also the policy’s cash value, with a guaranteed rate of investment return on a portion of the money that you pay. Term insurance pays a death benefit during a specified term. Have you retired, sold your home and are now renting in a retirement village? This means your children are most likely self-supporting and you

may possess sufficient financial assets at this point. Maybe you’ve outgrown your need for life insurance, especially if you’ve made pre-paid funeral arrangements. Go over your financial records with an insurance professional to determine where you can save money. At this stage, you should be carrying some type of long-term care policy. Such policies may cover: • Nursing home: Usually offers skilled health and personal care 24/7. • Assisted living: Housing and limited care designed for senior citizens

AFTER THE WILDFIRE

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t’s easy to breathe a sigh of relief after the wildfire that was raging so close to your home is extinguished. Unfortunately, the threat to your largest investment isn’t over. As explained by the Arizona Department of Insurance, “Wildfire alters the landscape in ways

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that increase water and mud runoff in burned areas. Under normal circumstances, the forest floor drains, dissipates and absorbs water effectively enough to reduce flooding downstream. Burned forest areas are more unstable and less able to hold water, collecting

downstream with increased velocity and often resulting in urban and flash flooding.” Most homeowners’ insurance policies do not cover flood damage, but most agents who sell homeowners’ insurance also can sell federal flood insurance policies.

Detailed information about the National Flood Insurance Program (NFIP) is available at FloodSmart.gov. Don’t wait until the storms hit after the fires, because it takes 30 days for an NFIP policy to go into effect after it’s purchased. Plan ahead.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


INSURANCE TERMS TO KNOW What is “replacement cost”? Replacement cost is the amount necessary to replace or rebuild your home or repair damages with materials of similar kind and quality without deducting for depreciation. What is “depreciation”? Depreciation is the decrease in the home’s value since the time it was built because of age or wear and tear.

who need some assistance with daily activities, but do not require a nursing home. • Adult day care services: Services outside the home that provide health, social and other support services in a supervised setting for adults. • Care at home: Someone who comes into the home to help with personal services such as bathing, grooming. Housework may also

be included. • Service coordination: Services provided by a licensed professional who assists with determining needs, finding services and arranging for care. None of us like to waste our money, so it’s worth your time to find an insurance professional you trust and discuss at each life stage what you need to have insured, or not.

What is “actual cash value”? Actual cash value usually means the sum of money required at the time of the loss to repair or replace the property destroyed, less an amount for depreciation. Actual cash value equals the replacement cost less depreciation. Most standard home insurance policies cover the contents of your home (i.e., personal belongings) on an actual cash value basis, but it is possible to purchase replacement cost. What is a “peril”? A peril is a condition that can cause a loss. Three examples are fire, windstorm and theft. Source: Arizona Department of Insurance

PREPARE NOW FOR A STORM EMERGENCY

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ith wildfire and monsoon seasons upon us, review your insurance policies. Make sure you know what is and is not covered. If you have questions, contact your insurance agent or insurer. Store electronic copies of your insurance policies with your home inventory and keep paper files in a safety deposit box. Make sure to have a copy of your policy declarations page

listing all of your coverages, as well as your insurance cards. Collect the 24-hour contact information for your insurance agent and insurer and enter it as a contact on your smartphone. Make a list that includes your policy numbers, insurer and insurance agent’s phone numbers, website addresses and mailing addresses. Also, check to see if the company or agent has an emergency information hotline. It is a good idea

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

to store this information — and your home inventory — in a waterproof, fireproof box or safe. If you evacuate your home, take this information with you. Protect Yourself from Fraud Home repair fraud is common after a major weather event. Get more than one bid from contractors and request at least three references. Ask for proof of necessary licenses, building permits, insurance and

bonding. Record the contractor’s license plate number and driver’s license number, and then check for any complaints with the Better Business Bureau. Finally, be wary of contractors who demand up-front payment for repairs. Ask for references and verify contractors are legitimate. Sources: FEMA, Arizona Department of Insurance and Floodsmart.gov

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PROTECTING YOUR PERSONAL ASSETS FROM BUSINESS DEBTS

Meet Two of Our Attorneys

INCORPORATE BEFORE IT’S TOO LATE: by Joel T. Fornara, Attorney, Musgrove Drutz Kack & Flack, PC

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here is no reason for a business owner to operate a business without the protection of a legal entity, such as a corporation or limited liability company (LLC). Whether you are an online retailer or are a “mom and pop” brick-and-mortar business, do not make the consequential mistake of being a sole proprietor. As a sole proprietor, there is no “corporate veil” separating you from your business. Instead, the business and the business owner are one and the same, and the owner is personally liable for all business debts. While this may not concern you now, a sole proprietorship can quickly turn into a financial nightmare if your business gets sued and has a judgment entered against it. Without the protection of a legal entity, many of your personal assets may be levied upon or garnished to satisfy the judgment against your business. Forming a corporation or LLC is a critical step

toward protecting your personal assets. In general, an Arizona business owner is not personally liable for the obligations of the business. Instead, a judgment creditor must overcome a very difficult legal hurdle known as “piercing the corporate veil” before it can attempt to collect on the owner’s personal assets. Whether a corporation or LLC is more suitable for your business depends on the individual aspects of your business. Our law firm represents a wide variety of businesses from startups to established companies. Call our office to schedule a consultation so that we can help you grow your business while protecting your personal assets. ATTORNEY JOEL T. FORNARA ADVISES LOCAL BUSINESSES AND REPRESENTS THEM IN THEIR TRANSACTIONAL AND LITIGATION NEEDS. MUSGROVE DRUTZ KACK & FLACK, PC IS A FULL-SERVICE LAW FIRM SERVING OUR COMMUNITY FOR MORE THAN 30 YEARS. FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE FIRM, GO TO MDKFLAW.COM.

Mark W. Drutz received his B.A. cum laude from the University of Kentucky and received his law degree from the University of Iowa College of Law in 1980. He has been a member of Musgrove Drutz Kack & Flack, PC since 1985. His practice is focused on litigation, that includes bodily injury, wrongful death, real estate and commercial cases. Mark appears in courts throughout Arizona, is a member of the Arizona Trial Lawyers Association and has been a member of the State Bar of Arizona since 1981. Jeffrey D. Gautreaux earned his Juris Doctor summa cum laude from the Universit y of Arizona College of Law, and his B.A. summa cum laude in Media Production from Hastings College in Hastings, Nebraska. His areas of focus at the firm are criminal defense, civil litigation and appeals. Jeffrey also handles real estate disputes and personal injury cases. He previously clerked for the Hon. Patricia K. Norris at the Arizona Court of Appeals. He is a member of the State Bar of Arizona, the Yavapai County Bar Association, and is admitted in the United States Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit. He also serves on the Board of Directors for the Prescott YMCA of Yavapai County and is President of the Board of Directors of the Forest Trails Homeowners Association.

DISCLAIMER: The materials in this article are for informational purposes only and not for the purpose of providing legal advice. You should contact your attorney to obtain legal advice with respect to any particular issue or problem. The opinions expressed in this article are the opinions of the individual author.

SHARON FLACK ELECTED TO SERVE ON STATE BAR BOARD OF GOVERNORS

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embers of the State Bar of Arizona in Yavapai County have elected Sharon M. Flack to serve as their representative on the Bar’s Board of Governors. Sharon is with the law firm of Musgrove Drutz Kack & Flack, PC in Prescott. Sharon has been involved with sev-

PRE S COT COTT T LI LIV VING ING • BIZ!

eral local, nonprofit, and volunteer organizations, including serving as Past President of the Yavapai County Bar Association and a consultant for the Federal District Courts Local Rules of Practice Committee. She is a member of the Navajo Nation Bar Association, Arizona Trial Lawyers Association, Prescott

Chamber of Commerce, Desert Harbor Doberman Rescue and has served on the Yavapai Big Brothers Big Sisters Board of Directors. For more information about the State Bar of Arizona and its Board of Governors visit azbar.org.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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Make sure your personal finances are ready for whatever life throws your way. Unexpected expenses today are too high to not plan ahead. With the help of a skilled financial planner, you can gain confidence that your personal finances are ready for a wider range of possible scenarios. With over 25 years of financial services experience, Parshalla Wood has helped investors find peace of mind and long-term financial well-being. Contact Par today for a complimentary portfolio review.

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THE MIKE KNITTLE AGENCY CAN PROVIDE ALL OF YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS The Farmers Insurance Mike Knittle Agency LLC is conveniently located in the Prescott Lakes Commerce Center between Willow and Watson lakes at 1945 Commerce Center Circle, Suite B, Prescott, Arizona, 86301. Call (928) 778-4640 or email mknittle@farmersagent.com.

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n early 2018 Mike Knittle acquired the agency from the Kunow family that owned and operated the agency for 40 years. Mike is a 26-year resident of the Prescott area in Yavapai County, originally from Seal Beach, Calif. Like many peo-

ple, Mike relocated for a better quality of life, the recreational opportunities, and the mild four seasons the Prescott area offers. Mike is a proud University of Southern California alumnus obtaining a bachelor’s of science degree in business administra-

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928.778.4640 Michael Knittle Your Local Agent Restrictions apply. Discounts may vary. Not available in all states. See your agent for details. companies. Visit farmers.com for a complete listing of companies. Not all insurers are authorized to provide insurance in all states. Coverage is not available in all states. Life Insurance issued by Farmers New World Life Insurance Company, 3003 77th Ave SE, Mercer Island, WA 98040.

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tion and was a member of the class of 1989. He worked in the financial, residential construction and law enforcement industries. As your local Farmers Insurance agent, the Mike Knittle Agency can provide coverage and protection for all the things important to you. We are a full line insurance agency providing insurance for personal homes and automobiles, recreational vehicles including motorhomes and travel trailers, motorcycles, ATVs, side-by-side UTVs, boats and personal watercraft, seasonal or second homes and manufactured or mobile homes, as well as renter’s insurance. A personal umbrella policy is a great addition to your insurance portfolio providing additional personal liability coverage for all your insurance policies. Probably the most important thing the Mike Knittle Agency and Farmers Insurance can insure for you is you. Life insurance is the most important insurance policy you can acquire for you and your family, and unfortunately, it is the product least purchased. Farmers Insurance offers a wide variety of life insurance options to fill every need and situation. Most people don’t plan to fail, but fail to plan, and providing the security and ensuring the well being of your family is an often overlooked area of our lives. Life insurance can help with final expenses,

providing educational opportunities for children and grandchildren, settle mortgage and other financial obligations, allow for the continuance of business and other enterprises, and leave an inheritance to beneficiaries. Statistics and surveys show family is the most important thing to most individuals and yet nearly half of the American population have no life insurance in place. The Farmers Insurance Mike Knittle Agency can provide commercial insurance coverage for most any type of business or industry situation in addition to workers compensation and all types of bonds. Whether you own a small business, a restaurant, are a contractor, engaged in a service trade, own and operate residential rentals, manufacturing, medical, professional services, etc., Farmers Insurance can provide coverage for most any business or commercial endeavor. In addition to providing insurance coverage, Farmers provides many value-added extras to our commercial clients to help them operate their businesses more efficiently and safely. The Farmers Insurance Mike Knittle Agency can be reached at (928) 778-4640 or feel free to drop by at 1945 Commerce Center Circle Suite B in Prescott, to discuss your situation and insurance needs.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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road, based on factors like your hen it comes to strategy session today age, current savings rate, expectbeing prepared for retirement, you ed retirement age and the lifestyle Investment Advisory Services offered through American Financial Investments LLC, a and receive your copy in the state of Arizona. Insurance products and tax services are offered through may not be as set you hope to have in retirement. American Financial Investments LLC and American Financial Security LLC are affi liated Investment Advisor Check our website for Registered more details. as you think. According to TIAA’s We can analyze your situation 2017 Lifetime Income Survey, and find potential shortfalls that fewer than half of Americans are you may have, as well as devise a aware of how much they have plan to help overcome them. saved for their golden years. It may seem stressful and overNow is the perfect time to sit whelming to look at your financThe Crossings, off Willow Creek Rd. down and analyze your current es, but you may find that you’re on Schedule a complimentary financial picture and see how it track, or that you need to up your today stacks up to where you hope to be game in orderstrategy to meetsession your goals. when you reach retirement. But Either way, it’s better to know Investment Advisory Services offered through American Financial Investments LLC, a Registered Investment Ad-visor and receive your copy in the state of Arizona. Insurance products and tax services are offered through American Financial Security LLC. where do you start? now because the older you get, the American Financial Investments LLC and American Financial Security LLC are affi liated companies. Check our website for more details. A good first step is to look at harder it is to catch up. Preparing what you have saved so far – this for retirement is an ongoing pro• Investment and Port includes anything in your 401(k), cess that requires thoughtful plan403(b) or an individual retirement ning and adjustments that may • Income & Hybrid Ann account (IRA) you might have. If have to be made along the way. The • Life Insurance Strate you haven’t started putting away right financial professional can money for retirement, it may be a evaluate your financial picture and • Personal and Busine Registered Investment Advisor good idea to start allocating some develop a plan tailored to you and of your income to one of these your goals to help you live more Watch our Video types of accounts. comfortably in retirement. “Color of The next step is to add up any Money” other assets you have, from your About Authors: Ronald StevensonCreek Rd. ThetheCrossings, offF.Willow house to other valuables like your & Barbara Clark Stevenson own AmeriSchedule a complimentary car or jewelry. 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All of these have to be taken mation, call 928-771-8368 or visit www. •• Guaranteed Lifetime Income Solutions Income & Hybrid Annuities lightly, however, since it may be AFSprescott.com 3112 Clearwater Dr., • Life Insurance Strategies too soon to know what some of Suite B, Prescott, AZ 86305. Life Insurance StrategiesTax Preparation •• Personal and Business those figures are in detail. • Personal and Business After you have tallied your net Advisory services are offered through Integrated Financial &Tax TaxPreparation Planning Registered Investment Advisor worth and have a good idea of American Financial Investments LLC a Regwhat you have saved, the next step istered Investment Advisor in Arizona. InWatch our Video is to compare this to your target surance products and services are offered “Color of retirement number. If you aren’t through American Financial Security, LLC. with Money” sure of how much you will need American Financial Investments LLC and The Crossings, off Willow Creek Rd. in retirement, we can help you! At American Financial Security, LLC are affiliAmerican Financial Investments, ated companies. American Financial InvestSundays at 9 am LLC, we are dedicated to providing ments LLC and American Financial Security, you with personalized financial LLC are not affiliated with or endorsed by the Serving the isory Services offered through American that Financial Investments LLC, a individRegistered Investment Ad-visor solutions fit your Social Security Administration, or any other Prescott area Arizona. Insurance products and tax services are offered through American Financial Security LLC. ual needs. We will help government agency. cial Investments LLC and American Financial Security LLC are affi liatedcalculate companies. since 2003 how much you will need down the

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LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

PRESSCOT COTT T LI V ING BIZ! • PRE

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Continued from Page 17

SEPTEMBER

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Faire on the Square Arts and Crafts Show - 9:00 AM-5:00 PM - Yavapai County Courthouse Plaza - Downtown 120 S. Cortez St., Prescott. Over 130 vendors, live music. Labor Day 9-3PM. Visit www.prescott. org for more info.

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Sweet Corn Festival - 10:00 AM-6:00 PM - Mortimer Farms 12907 E. State Route 169, Dewey, AZ 86327. Admission $15, children under 2 free. Includes a meal. For more info visit mortimerfarmsaz. com.

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Labor Day Harvest Festival - 12:00 PM-5:00 PM - Granite Creek Vineyards, 2515 Road 1 East, Chino Valley, AZ 86323. $10 Admission. $7 for club members. Free to anyone under 21. More info at 928636-2003 or www.granitecreekvineyards.com.

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Breakfast with the Animals: Black Bear 9:00 AM-10:30 AM - Heritage Park Zoo 1403 Heritage Park Rd., Prescott. Heritage Park Members are $20 for Adults and $10 for

children 12 and under. Non-members are $25 for adults and $15 for children 12 and under. Visit heritageparkzoo.org for more info.

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Great Gig in the Sky - Performing the music of Pink Floyd - 7:00 PM-9:00 PM - Prescott Valley Event Center 3201 N. Main St., Prescott Valley. Tickets start at $27. Visit prescottvalleyeventcenter.com for more info.

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United Way Campaign Kickoff - 5:00 PM-9:00 PM - Holiday Courtyard 150 S. Montezuma St., Prescott. Join us as we celebrate Thirty-ONE-derful years! Tickets $20 at the door. Visit yavapaiuw.org for more info.

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Prescott Walk to End Alzheimer’s - 7:30 AM-11:00 AM - Prescott Courthouse Square 100 W Gurley St., Prescott. No cost to walk. Raise $100 or more to receive the official 2018 Walk shirt benefits the Alzheimer’s Association’s care, support and research efforts. Visit alz.org/dsw for more info.

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Equifest - 8:30 AM-6:30 PM Prescott Rodeo Grounds 840 Rodeo Dr., Prescott. Olsen’s presents free, fun, family event! Shopping, food trucks, and live entertainment and much more! More info at olsensgrain.com.

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Yavapai College 50th Anniversary Celebration - 10:00 AM-2:00 PM - Yavapai College - Prescott Valley Campus 6955 Panther Path, Prescott Valley. Activities, games, food, music.

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Farm to Table - A Dining Experience - 5:30 PM-9:00 PM - Mortimer Farms 12907 AZ-169, Dewey, AZ 86327. Wine tasting, dinner and dancing presented by Prescott Chamber of Commerce, sponsored by Yavapai Regional Medical Center. RSVP by 9/7. prescott.org for more info.

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12th Annual Fall Gathering - 5:30 PM7:00 PM - Phippen Museum 4701 Hwy 89 North, Prescott. Commemorates the grand opening of the Museum in 1984. Call (928)778-1385 or visit phippenartmuseum.org for more info.

15 Hurry! Limited Seating Available!

Engelbert Humperdinck Monday, Sept. 24 @ 7:30 p.m. In his stunning musical career, Engelbert has sold more than 140 million records, received four Grammy nominations, a Golden Globe, and a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. Hear the voice that transcends time and still delights audiences today.

Tickets from $45 YAVAPAI COLLEGE PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 1100 E. Sheldon Street, Prescott 86301 (928) 776.2000 | www.YCPAC.com 48

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Red Molly Presented by: The Folk Sessions - 7:00 PM-9:30 PM - The Elks Theater and Performing Arts Center 117 East Gurley St., Prescott. $25/$40. For more info contact 928-777-1370 or visit prescottelkstheater.com.

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Prescott Highland Games and Celtic Faire - Watson Lake Park Highway 89, Prescott - Dancing, games, music, food and fun celebrating Scottish and Celtic heritage. Pet-friendly event. See website for details: www. prescotthighlandgames.com or call 928-7103630.

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Prescott Pops Picks - 3:00 PM Yavapai College Performing Arts Center 1100 E Sheldon Street, Prescott. Tickets Available Online at www.YCPAC.com or at the YCPAC Box Office: (928) 776-2000. Adults: $25, Youth (18 & Under): $5. More Info: www.PrescottPOPS.com.

21-23

Prescott Pow Wow - 3:00 PM-10:00 PM - Watson Lake Park 3101 N. State Route 89, Prescott. 12th Annual Intertribal Social powwow. Public is welcome. $5 parking fee per day. Call 928925-2846 for info.

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March for Babies - 7:30 AM-10:30 AM - Yavapai County Courthouse

Plaza Gurley St., Prescott. March of Dimes walk event to benefit Yavapai County’s BABIES! Call 928-713-3733 for info.

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Artisans in the Pines / Arts & Crafts Show - 9:00 AM-3:00 PM - The Mountain Club Clubhouse 910 W. Clubhouse Dr., Prescott. Showcasing local creations from a variety of artisans. Call 630-846-4986 for info.

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Agua Fria Festival - 9:00 AM-3:00 PM - Main St., Humboldt. 111th Year! Arizona’s oldest Street Festival. Admission $2 in advance or $3 on the day. Call 928-4999972 or visit aguafriafestival.com for info.

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11th Annual Antique Classic Car Show - 3:00 PM-6:00 PM - Chino Valley United Methodist Church 735 E Rd 1 South, Chino Valley. Admission free. Door prizes, BBQ dinner. donations accepted with proceeds to local charities. Call 928.899.8182 for info.

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1st Annual Hawaiian Luau - 4:00 PM7:00 PM - Memory Park Palomino Rd. & N. Road 1 W., Chino Valley. Thank you for supporting the CV Police Foundation. $15 per meal ticket.

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Wander the Wild - 2:30 PM-6:30 PM - Windmill House 1400 W. Rd. 4 N., Chino Valley. 10th annual live auction and dinner. Tickets $100 or $720 a table of 8. For more info visit highlandscenter.org or call 928-710-2383.

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Engelbert Humperdinck - 7:30 PM-9:30 PM - Yavapai College Performing Arts Center 1100 E Sheldon St., Prescott. Tickets online at www.YPAC.com or at the Box Office: (928) 776-2000. Tickets start at $45.

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Yavapai College’s 50th Anniversary Celebration - 11:00 AM-8:00 PM - Yavapai College - CTEC 220 Ruger Rd., Prescott. Food, games, contests. Visit 5oth. yc.edu for info.

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The Glenn Campbell Story - 7:00 PM-9:30 PM - The Elks Theater and Performing Arts Center 117 East Gurley St., Prescott. $22/$25. For more info contact 928-777-1370 or visit prescottelkstheater.com.

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The Phoenix Symphony in Prescott - 3:00 PM - Yavapai College Performing Arts Center 1100 E Sheldon St., Prescott. Tickets online at www.YPAC.com or at the Box Office: (928) 776-2000.

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FACIAL PLASTIC SURGERY CONSULTATIONS IN PRESCOTT

O

ver the past 20 years, medicine and surgery have become increasingly specialized. This is because the knowledge base is growing, technology is more diverse and surgical techniques are more specialized. For that reason, Dr. Paul Holden chose to specialize in cosmetic and reconstructive surgeries of the face. His advanced training places him in a select population of highly specialized surgeons, of whom there are fewer than 1,000 practicing in the U.S. and Canada. As a specialist, Dr. Holden has advanced training in the procedures for facial rejuvenation, such as facelift, neck-lift, eyelid-lift (blepharoplasty), brow-lift and facial-skin resurfacing. Additionally, Dr. Holden is an expert in reshaping and reconstructive procedures of the face such as rhinoplasty (nose), otoplasty (ears) and complex repairs of defects or scars from skin cancer surgery. Dr. Holden is an innovator in the field and has published research, as well as book chapters, on his specialty.

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Facial aging is generally considered to have three causes: increased laxity of the facial tissues, loss of volume in the upper face (sometimes combined with increased volume of the lower face and neck), and changes in skin quality (usually caused by the sun). To that end, it is important that the area of concern be treated properly. For the best results, laxity is treated by lifting and tightening of the tissues, volume issues are treated by adding volume to the upper face and removing it from the lower face and neck, and skin is usually resurfaced with a laser or chemical peel. As a specialist in this area, Dr. Holden gives an expert analysis of each face and helps the patient develop a customized approach to rejuvenation. It is Dr. Holden’s philosophy that balancing the areas of concern with the right treatments is the key to having the most natural, refreshed results. A natural look is the cornerstone of Dr. Holden’s practice. Dr. Holden takes an artistic approach to the reshaping procedures for the nose and ears. He is considered to be one of the top surgeons for rhinoplasty in Arizona, performing

both primary and reconstructive procedures across the spectrum of complexity. He has a reputation for helping patients experience the joy of facial harmony with a bedside manner that keeps them feeling comfortable. Facial surgery is almost always performed in an outpatient setting and can be done under local anesthesia or sedation administered by a board-certified anesthesiologist. The procedures usually require one to two weeks for recovery and are generally considered to have minimal or no pain. Dr. Holden noticed that many of his patients were coming from Prescott to meet him at his office in Scottsdale, so he decided to make it easier for Prescott patients to have a consultation. Now, patients can call and arrange an appointment with Dr. Holden without having to make the long journey to Scottsdale. Consultations are at no charge and usually take 30 to 60 minutes. Dr. Holden is seeing patients at Skin Restoration located on 720 N Montezuma, Prescott. Reach out to Scottsdale Plastic Surgery at (480) 787-5815.

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HEALTH AND HEALING CENTER: WHERE HEALTH IS OUR PRIORITY

W

e are excited to announce the relocation of the Health and Healing Center (formerly the Women’s Health and Healing Center) to 1237 N. Rhinestone Drive, Prescott, Arizona. The office is centrally located in the Quad Cities and can accommodate additional practitioners to enhance our integrative health care offerings. Very soon a massage/hydrotherapist is joining our staff, and in October, we’ll welcome an additional doctor specializing in alternative pain therapy. Dr. Cheryl Hamilton continues to welcome new patients to her cashbased practice because she does what naturopathic medical doctors do best – get people well so the doctor is no longer needed. We do not provide a “pill for the ill,” but rather teach patients how to work with the body to support its innate ability to heal itself with the least invasive, most effective therapies available.

As a specialist in natural medicine and an expert in preventive health care, Dr. Hamilton offers the best of both worlds, blending the latest medical science with modern complementary and alternative medicine while focusing on whole health, rather than disease management. Dr. Hamilton is one of the relatively few progressive doctors that are fully trained in science-based alternative therapies, including acupuncture; homeopathy; herbal, nutriceutical, and environmental medicine; multivitamin/mineral and chelation IV therapy; infra-red sauna and water-cure therapy; bio-identical hormone therapy; women’s medicine; infertility; gastrointestinal health; food sensitivity testing; pharmaceutical drug therapy; and prolotherapy, platelet rich plasma, and stem cell regenerative therapy. At the Health and Healing Center, we know the most important aspect of providing health care is listening to patients and spending enough time with them to really get

to know their concerns and needs. For more information about the Health and Healing Center, visit healthandhealing.center. Dr. Hamilton understands that it can be difficult to afford a cash-based practice so she established Choose Vibrant Living, a 501(c)(3) charitable organization dedicated to providing health care and health education for the prevention of chronic disease. To learn more, visit choosevibrantliving.org. Soon we’ll be offering classes on health improvement, chronic disease prevention and healthy cooking online and at the Health and Healing Center. If you are interested in attaining and maintaining vibrant health, this is the style of health care for you. If you want to truly experience health care with a holistic, personalized approach from your health care provider, then don’t hesitate to call the Health and Healing Center. We look forward to meeting you and wish you health and wellbeing.

Cheryl Hamilton, NMD, Practitioners and Staff w w w.hea l t handhea l i ng.cente r

1237 North Rhinestone Drive | Prescott, AZ 86301 | 928-515-2363 • Anti-Aging, Immune Regulation, and Health Enhancement With Multivitamin/mineral and Chelation IV Therapy, Food Sensitivity Testing, and Genetic Analysis • Detox, Weight Loss and Immune Regulation with Personal Infra-Red Sauna and Water-Cure (Hydrotherapy) • Nutrition and Healthy Cooking Classes • Weight Management and Diabetes Programs • Bio-identical Hormone Therapy • Women’s Medicine: Low Libido, PMS, PCOS, Infertility • Gastrointestinal Health and SIBO (Small Intestinal Bowel Overgrowth) • Natural Pain Control and Aesthetics with Acupuncture, Prolotherapy, Platelet Rich Plasma, and Stem Cell Regenerative Therapy

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STAY SAFE IN THE SUMMER HEAT

P

rescott summers can bring some beautiful, sun-filled days and with them some dangerously high temperatures. To prevent dehydration, heat exhaustion and heat stroke, there are steps people can follow to stay safe when it is hot outside.

You can prepare for extreme heat by: •

• • •

Stocking up on food, water and medicines so you don’t have to go out in the heat. Visit your doctor to check if changes are needed to your medicines during extreme heat. Storing medicines safely at the recommended temperature. Checking that your fan or airconditioner works well. Have your air-conditioner serviced if necessary. Looking at the things you can do to make your home cooler such as installing window coverings, shade cloths or external blinds on the sides of the house facing the sun.

Basic Tips to Staying Safe in the Summer Heat • • •

• • •

• • •

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Stay indoors in air conditioning as much as possible during the hottest hours of the day, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. If you do go outside, stay in the shade. If your home is not air-conditioned, spend at least two hours daily at an air-conditioned mall, library or other public place. Wear sunscreen outside along with loose-fitting, light-colored clothes that cover as much skin as possible. Drink water regularly even if you are not thirsty. Limit alcohol and sugary drinks, which speeds dehydration. Never leave children or pets alone in the car. HOT CARS CAN BE DEADLY. The inside temperature of the car can quickly reach 120 degrees. Avoid exertion during the hottest part of the day. Take a cool shower or bath. Make sure to leave plenty of water for your pets.

PRE S COT COTT T LI LIV VING ING • YOU!

by Leslie Horton, Yavapai County Community Health Services •

Be a good neighbor; check on the elderly and people with disabilities in your community who may need assistance keeping cool.

What Are the Symptoms of Heat-Related Illnesses? Heat exhaustion: Excessive heat can lead to sunburn, heat cramps, heat exhaustion and heat stroke. If someone is experiencing heat cramps in the legs or abdomen, get them to a cooler place, have them rest, lightly stretch the affected muscle, and replenish their fluids with a half a glass (about four ounces) of cool water every 15 minutes. If someone is exhibiting signs of heat exhaustion (cool, moist, pale or flushed skin, heavy sweating, headache, nausea, dizziness, weakness exhaustion), move them to a cooler place, remove or loosen tight clothing and spray the person with water or apply cool, wet cloths or towels to the skin. Fan the person. If they are conscious, give small amounts of cool water to drink. Make sure the person drinks slowly. Watch for changes in condition. If the person refuses water, vomits or begins to lose consciousness, call 911 or the local emergency number. Heat Stroke: Heat Stroke results from having an abnormally elevated body temperature. Whenever our body works out, it naturally generates heat, which usually escapes through the skin or through the evaporation of sweat. However, when you work out in extreme heat or humidity (or when you work out at a high intensity outside and do not hydrate yourself), the heat your body produces may not be able to dissipate well enough and your body temperature rises, sometimes up to 106°F or higher. How Do I Know it’s Heat stroke? Heat stroke symptoms can sometimes mimic those of a heart attack or other conditions. Often, an individual will experience signs of heat exhaustion before the condition escalates to heat stroke. Heat exhaustion symptoms include nausea, fatigue, headache, muscle cramps, dizziness, weakness and vomiting. Heat stroke symptoms include a high body temperature, the absence of sweating, red or flushed dry skin, rapid pulse, difficulty breathing, hallucinations, disorientation, agitation, seizure and/or coma.

Prevention: Avoid working out in hightemperature or humid environments. If you cannot avoid physical exertion in these environments, be sure to frequently hydrate yourself to help keep your body temperature down and take breaks as often as possible. Also, avoid drinking caffeine, alcohol or tea, as this may lead to dehydration. Treatment: Heat stroke is a medical emergency that can lead to brain or organ damage and even death. If you or someone around you is exhibiting symptoms of a heat stroke, immediately call 911. While you are waiting for emergency medical services, get the victim to a shady area, remove clothing, and apply cool or warm water to the skin, fan the victim to promote sweating, and place ice packs under the armpits and groin.

FIGHT THE BITE.

A •

• • •

s the weather heats up and mosquitoes become more active, you can help us Fight the Bite:

Use an insect repellent that contains DEET. Most repellents contain the active ingredient DEET and give you about five hours of mosquito protection depending on variables like perspiration, rubbing, temperature or an abundance of mosquitoes. Look for DEET products with a concentration of 35 percent or less; above 35 percent offers no meaningful additional protection. You may apply the repellent to clothing and uncovered skin. Avoid contact with your eyes, nose or lips. Ask your veterinarian about special repellents that can be applied to dogs.

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THE FACTS ABOUT OSTEOARTHRITIS by Robert J. Brownsberger, MD; Whitney James, MD; Dorian Lange, PharmD, of Northern Arizona Pain Institutes

O

steoarthritis is a form of arthritis caused by the inflammation, breakdown and eventual loss of cartilage in the joints. The cartilage wears down over time and the condition is sometimes also known as degenerative arthritis, degenerative joint disease and osteoarthrosis. Osteoarthritis is the most common joint disorder. Unlike some other forms of arthritis, osteoarthritis affects only joints and not internal organs. Here are some facts. Osteoarthritis is a common cause of joint damage, especially in the hands, hips, knees, lower back, and hands. Symptoms usually begin to appear in people after the age of 40 years, but it can also affect younger people after a traumatic injury. It is more likely to affect women than men after the age of 50 years. The symptoms

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progress slowly and contribute to workplace disability and reduced quality of life. The problem occurs when the body is not able to repair joint tissue in the usual way. A traumatic injury to a joint, for example, may undermine the body’s ability to repair properly. As a result, the damage to the affected joint persists and worsens, leading to symptoms of osteoarthritis. It can result from damage to cartilage, which is the protective surface that cushions the ends of bones in joints and allows the joints to move smoothly. The smooth surface of the cartilage becomes rough, causing irritation. As the cartilage starts to wear down, the bone in the joint rubs against another bone, causing pain. The bones start protruding, forming bony lumps called osteophytes, and the joints may become wobbly. The bones gradually thicken and

become broader, and the joints become stiffer, less mobile and painful. The knees, lower back, hands, hips, and neck are most commonly affected due to this problem, but osteoarthritis can occur in any joint. Stem cell injections can help with osteoarthritis. Our Regenerative Stem Cell injections are derived from an umbilical cord tissue/blood product that captures all the greatest regenerative properties of this otherwise discarded tissue. Our brand of stem cell injectables uses a proprietary method of isolating growth factors, cells and stem cells giving our patients the best possible benefits from a regenerative medicine product. Learn more at NorthernArizonaPainInstitute.com or call (928) 275-6998.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


OUR CHANCE TO BE THE

M I S S I N G L I N K BETWEEN VETERANS AND OUR COMMUNITY by Robert Milligan, General Manager, Prescott Media Center

D

id you know that 16 percent of the Yavapai County population is comprised of veterans? They’re one of the largest demographics in Prescott. And yet they’re also one of the few groups often disconnected with the community at large. Some veterans are bedridden or rarely leave their houses, and some are homeless. But, the one thing most of them have in common is despite the numerous organizations created solely to serve them, many don’t take

advantage of the services available because they either don’t know about these opportunities or don’t understand them. Well that’s about to change! Prescott Media Center, the local nonprofit public access channel since 1986, is creating a brand new channel on cable dedicated entirely to our local veterans. This channel will include veteran support services, veteran-to-veteran communication, public service announcements with topics ranging from PTSD trauma, suicide aware-

Prescott Media Center p r e s c o t t m e d i a c e n t e r. o r g 824 E Gurley St, Prescot t, A Z 863 01

Serving the local community t h r o u g h m e d i a s i n c e 19 8 6

ness, education, employment, everything a veteran may want or need from the community all in one centralized location, as well as relevant programming. This is a first of its kind, no other community has a channel created for and only featuring veterans. This is a project that involves the City of Prescott, the Prescott Chamber of Commerce, Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Yavapai College, Department of Veterans Affairs, the DAV, American Legion, VFW, New Horizons Disability Empowerment Center, among others, and is run by the Prescott Media Center. The Veterans Access Channel is something I’ve been wanting to bring to the Prescott community and greater area since I took over a year ago. It’s been something that we as a community have desired for years. And, if you are so inclined, it’s something that everyone can be a part of. This channel will need volunteers in front of and behind the camera, it will need businesses showing their support, it will need organizations contributing their content and services, and it will need the community to embrace it as has so many other wonderful projects over the last year. This is our chance to be that missing link between veterans and our community. Thanks. For information about the Veterans Access Channel and Prescott Media Center, visit prescottmediacenter.org or call us at (928) 445-0909, or stop by our office in the Grace Sparks Activity Center at 824 E. Gurley St., Prescott.

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

PRESSCOT COTT T LI V ING YOU! • PRE

59


THE PRESCOTT PIONEER

CONTINUED…

PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LL EY • CHINO VA LL EY • DE W EY-H UM BOLDT

Final report submitted by airport consultants

R

ecommendations about future development of the Prescott Municipal Airport submitted by Delta Airport Consultants will now go for review to the Prescott City Council. This action follows more than two years of intensive study and research by Douglas Sander and his team of airport development experts from Raleigh, N.C. They have a contract with the City of Prescott to assist in developing a realistic, flexible and sustainable development program to meet future aviation needs. Prescott Airport Director Robin Sobotta said it was important everyone realize the Airport Master Plan was simply that—a suggested plan, not a firm commitment

for immediate construction. “We want this plan to reflect community attitudes and citizen input,” she said. After the City Council members review the Airport Master Plan (AMP), it will be forwarded to the Federal Aviation Authority (FAA) for final scrutiny and possible action. Before he passed recommendations forward to the City Council, Sander summarized the fourth installment of the AMP to members of the public during a twohour open house at the Prescott Centennial Center on July 11. He used detailed charts and a PowerPoint program to illustrate his comments. More than 100 local residents, including several community

leaders, heard Sander describe what are considered as the three development phases. They include years 1 to 5; 6 to 10 and 11 to 20. The cost for each phase was estimated as: Phase One $33.6 million; Phase Two $80 million; Phase Three: $33 million. In each phase, the FAA would fund 90 percent or more of the cost, Sander said. Major recommendations included: • Expansion and lengthening of runways, especially primary Runway 3. It would be lengthened from 7,619 to 10,000 feet. • Relocation of some, and expansion and construction of, airport hangars. • Relocation of the air traffic control tower.

• Demolition of the existing terminal and construction of a new one. Sander said the AMP ultimately would have to move forward to the FAA for final approval of airport development plans. More details about the Airport Master Plan are available at airport.admin@prescott-az.com; or by calling (928) 777-1114.

Read more news on page 68...

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ARROWHEAD LODGE RECOVERY HELPS OLDER MEN FIND FREEDOM FROM ALCOHOLISM

N

ot so long ago, Prescott was known for its disproportionate number of sober living homes and treatment centers. Perhaps it was the milehigh climate or its hometown atmosphere. But lately, those statistics are changing. While the number nearly reached 200, today only about one-sixth survive. With that reduction, many of the abuses within the system that caused the demise of so many centers have vanished as well. The reason for their initial growth? People who are recovering can become zealous in their success and think they can get rich quickly. But being recovered does not make one a business owner. Many treatment programs went out of business when insurance companies were alerted to the enormous level of fraudulent billing practices. This followed the closing of hundreds of sober homes that were fed by the clients coming out of these unethical and, often unlicensed, treatment programs. Many entrepreneurs looking to cash in on the Prescott recovery industry have since gone, as Arizona has tightened regulations. What remains are the sober-living homes and treatment centers that have their residents’ best interests at heart and are trying to create the right environment for people to recover. Drug and alcohol rehab is about saving lives and creating strong and healthy families and communities. It is not about financial gain. Arrowhead Lodge Recovery is a stellar example of this approach. This recovery treatment center is gender-specific to men and is tucked away in a secluded location in

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the Ponderosa pines of the Prescott National Forest. This residential treatment center is licensed and accredited. The program at Arrowhead Lodge is designed to exclusively address problems related to men suffering from addiction and co-occurring disorders. Founded by Kenneth and Robyn Chance, this men’s rehab center was created in response to Ken’s personal life experience. The couple designed it to provide adult men a safe, comfortable and secure environment in which to learn, heal and grow. Their passion is for relieving the suffering of their clients. Kenneth Chance said, “It is proven when men live among others of similar life experience, and when they encounter kindred spirits as committed to recovery as they are themselves, they can feel more comfortable, share more openly, and address their deepest issues.” Robyn Chance says, “Our typical client is not typical. These men have endured decades of suffering while living with addiction. Our clients are 36 years old and just out of medical school and 83 years old with a long career in academia. They are tribal leaders, plumbing contractors, grandsons and grandfathers, husbands and sons. These men are suffering from chronic alcoholism or opioid addiction - and every story is different. Our team

are extreme professionals and we’re proud to be on the Arizona Medical Board’s preferred providers list. We also have a high staff-toclient ratio and are able to focus intensive therapy and attention on each man, and deliver truly individualized care.” The staff at Arrowhead Lodge Recovery includes a board-certified physician, a psychiatrist and a clinical psychologist. Additional staff include master’s level licensed therapists, an equine therapy coordinator, a doctor of divinity, a registered nurse, residential specialists, an addiction-oriented nutritionist and more. Kenneth Chance sums it up, “The secret to our success is no secret. We’ve operated under the utmost ethical standards from day one. We are dedicated to relieving generational addiction in our community in Prescott and throughout the United States.” To find out more about Arrowhead Lodge Recovery and its programs, visit arrowheadlodgerecovery.com or call (888) 654-2800.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 25 dents, for careers that currently don’t exist. DR. FRANK AYERS: It’s interesting. Because we’re private, and we’re nimble. When we see opportunities, we can move quickly. In the past, we’ve started a degree program within a year of seeing a trend. It takes time. And we’re always looking out for where the industry is going to be. Our motto is, we are not teaching our students about our past — but about their future. Because 75 to 80 percent of our professors have industry experience and are second career people like myself. We’ve been in the industry. We’ve been at Raytheon, Lockheed. We’ve been in the airlines. We can see what is coming along. And we have current contacts with people who tell us, so we can understand that. We go after trends, not after fads. We’re not going after the next “big thing.” We’re going after what we see as a long-term trend.

SATISFACTIONS & DISAPPOINTMENTS PRESCOTT LIVING: Your personal and professional thoughts. What’s been your biggest satisfaction since being here? DR. FRANK AYERS: My biggest satisfaction is seeing the faculty and staff have all the tools they need and having the brightest students in front of them. We tell the students the first day they arrive, “We don’t do satisfactory here. Excellence is our standard.” And, so, we see excellence. For example, this past week (May 2018) our award-winning Golden Eagles flight team won its 12th national championship. Five of the last seven years they’ve dominated this national competition. Our athletic teams have won their fourth Commissioner’s Cup in our conference. The Commissioner’s Cup signifies the top school out of the 12 conference universities and colleges.

Frank and Debbie

As I said previously, our students launched the University’s first rocket into space. Another student team recently completed a funded research project with a major aerospace company that’s going to result in four to six patents. Our students

continued on page 122...

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SEXUAL ASSAULT: HELP IS A CLICK AWAY by Sheila Polk, Yavapai County Attorney, and Jerald Monahan, Police Chief of Yavapai College

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his past year saw revelations of sexual harassment in several different arenas, including entertainment, news media, sports and politics. Some of what has been exposed are criminal acts, many of which were committed years ago. So why now? What has prompted so many to report past sexual misconduct behavior? The status and position of the sexual predator placed victims in a state of vulnerability, and many of the recently identified sexual offenders had the ability to impact their victims’ professional careers. Sometimes, however, victims are silent out of fear of not being believed. The victims of Daniel Holtzclaw, the Oklahoma City police officer rapist, were targeted because, as Prosecutor Lori McConnell put it, “He counted on the fact no one would believe them and no one would care.” Survivors of sexual violence faces many obstacles as they navigate life after the assault including feelings of confusion, abandonment, and not knowing where to turn. Decisions about what to do and when to do it are not made easily or quickly. It should be no surprise, and should even be expected, for survivors to delay making a police report. Negative reactions to a victim’s disclosure of sexual assault, including disbelief, anger and blame, cause additional trauma over and above the assault itself. These negative reactions may come from the very people the victim first turns to for support, such as friends and family members.

Start By Believing

The Start by Believing Campaign, a program of End Violence Against Women International (EVAWI), was launched in 2011. The goal is to communicate a message of support and understanding when responding to reports of sexual assault. The campaign encourages the listener to “start by believing,” to be supportive, to ask how you can help and to avoid “why” questions. Victims of sexual assault who experience a supportive 66

PRE S COT COTT T LI LIV VING ING • YOU!

and compassionate response, regardless of the criminal justice system outcome, have lower rates of post-traumatic stress than victims who experience secondary trauma in the form of disbelief and blame.

Seek Then Speak

A second tool was recently developed by EVAWI to help survivors navigate the confusion. Seek Then Speak is a digital aid to help victims gather information, make decisions, figure out what options are right for them, and get in touch with victim services in their area. The tool puts the victims in charge, allows them to remain anonymous, and assists them to report the assault to authorities when ready to do so. Seek Then Speak is available on your desktop, mobile phone, and even a landline. It is content rich in information about sexual violence, including the difference between sexual harassment and sexual assault. If you are the person to whom a victim reports, learn how to best help, what to say and what to avoid saying by visiting Start By Believing at startbybelieving.org and Seek Then Speak at seekthenspeak.org. If you are a victim of sexual misconduct, access Seek Then Speak in the privacy of your home computer or cell phone. Research what has happened, learn about sexual violence, discover your options and what to expect if you choose to disclose the incident. Seek then Speak also provides the name and contact

information for either law enforcement or victim advocacy for the jurisdiction where you live or where the assault occurred. Sexual assault continues to be one of the most under reported violent crimes in our nation. Whether you are a victim or the person to whom a victim reports, these tools help break the silence by assisting victims in feeling safe to report. Sheila Polk is in her 17th year as the elected Yavapai County Attorney. She has worked for 35 years in the criminal justice system in Arizona. She currently serves as chair for the Arizona Prosecuting Attorneys’ Advisory Council and chair for the Arizona Criminal Justice Commission. Jerald Monahan is the law enforcement liaison for the nonprofit End Violence Against Women International and the police chief of Yavapai College in Prescott, Arizona. He is a 39-year veteran public safety official in Arizona and a past president of the Arizona Association of Chiefs of Police.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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THE PRESCOTT PIONEER PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LL EY • CHINO VA LL EY • DE W EY-H UM BOLDT ARIZONA DOWNS..cont. from page 19 college sports, and at the same time, enjoy food and beverages on site, she said. McGovern was speaking for the new owners. They are J & J Equine Enterprises LLC, formed by Phoenix-based JACOR Partners Tom, Dave and Mike Auther and their partner Joe Jackson; along with longtime racetrack owner Corey Johnsen, who owns Kentucky Downs, a racetrack in Franklin, Kentucky. The new owners bought the bankrupt property in mid-January from owner Gary Miller for $3.2 million. The 120-acre property is on the eastern edge of Prescott Valley along Highway 89A. McGovern said the next step

in renovating is bringing back live racing, probably Memorial Day 2019. “Hooves likely will be pounding down the new track by the end of May 2019, ” she said. McGovern said the new owners expressed public appreciation to the Herbeveaux family, who were the owners and operators of the original Arizona Downs. “We believe this new name will tell the people of Central and Northern Arizona—and all the rest of Arizona—that we have a racetrack that benefits horsemen throughout the state. We’ll have year-round racing and wagering. With the resumption of summer racing, we’ll be creating local jobs and opportunities.” She continued, “A stronger, year-round circuit helps everyone

CONTINUED…

The recently renovated and renamed Arizona Downs opened for business July 13. The first floor of the newly roofed and repainted facility houses a large “simulcasting” and wagering room with 40 TVS for receiving racing and other sports events from around the nation.

in the industry — breeders, horse owners, trainers, jockeys and all the related workers it takes to stage a race in a quality facility.” The new owners noted that with an Arizona population of

more than 7 million and the Quad City and greater surrounding area population soon to reach 300,000, Arizona Downs should serve as a great attraction within Yavapai County.

‘Wander the Wild’ raises funds for Highlands Center

T

he 10th annual Wander the Wild Live Auction and Dinner is Sunday, Sept. 23, 2:30 to 6:30 p.m., at the Windmill House, 1400 W. Road 4 North, Chino Valley. Wander the Wild includes

live music, a social hour with local wines, appetizers and a gourmet dinner meal with wine service. The live auction features outdoor-related travel and adventure packages, educational field trips and nature

inspired works of art by local artists. The auction offers local, regional, national and international destinations. Tickets are $100 per person or $720 for a table of eight (a 10 percent discount) and are

available by calling the Highlands Center at (928) 776-9550. Visit highlandscenter.org or online registration is at wanderthewild18.evenbrite.com.

Read more news on page 116...

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THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


AREA COUPLE TACKLES ALZHEIMER’S TOGETHER by Amy Geissler, Northern Arizona Regional Director, Alzheimer’s Association

“I

think that there is sometimes just a lack of understanding of how all this works after a family member is diagnosed with Alzheimer’s. They’re not alone because I struggle to understand it all myself,” admits Bonny Lepore. Her husband Ron was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease earlier this year at 74. Ron is a Vietnam War veteran and avid football fan who enjoys volunteering his time at the Prescott VA. He also loves hiking. “It gives Bonny a break. I know that she’s got to do so many things that I can’t do,” Ron says. “I’ve always been very independent. I’ve always done it my way,” admits Ron. “It got really frustrating because Bonny’s helping me but I didn’t always know that.” “This is a tough subject but in a committed team, when your

original safety net has holes in it, you’ve got to do something,” Bonny points out. “The other guy’s got to come in there and patch it up.” Together, Ron and Bonny are ready to tackle what’s ahead. “It doesn’t bother me. I’m not afraid of it,” Ron says. “I know what’s going to happen and I’m going to enjoy what’s left.” Ron and Bonny live in Prescott Valley and were recently featured in a mini-documentary for the Alzheimer’s Association Desert Southwest Chapter called, “Voices of Alzheimer’s.” View the video at youtube.com/alzdsw. Join the fight to end Alzheimer’s and register for the Prescott Walk to End Alzheimer’s on Sept. 15 at the Courthouse Plaza. Learn more at prescottalzheimerswalk.org. You can also text “ALZWALK” to 51555.

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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Yavapai Cattle Growers volunteering to prepare the beef!

YAVAPAI CATTLE GROWERS ASSOCIATION 86TH ANNUAL CALF SALE & BBQ SEPT. 29 by Pamela Teskey

I

n 1935, Roy Hays invited the ranchers and families to bring their calves to his ranch in Peeples Valley where he would provide a barbecue while the calves were sold at auction. It is believed this was the first calf auction held in Arizona. As time passed, calves began being judged, with the rancher being recognized as having one of the top calves at the sale. At first, the barbecue was for ranchers and their families.

However, it wasn’t long before friends were invited, and then the public was included. With the Hays Ranch on SR 89, and just south of Prescott and north of Wickenburg, it was conveniently located and accessible to all parts of Yavapai County, as well as the rest of the state. It truly became a meeting place where the ranching community could interact with the general public and discuss the issues that, strangely enough, they had in common.

YCGA 86TH ANNUAL CALF SALE & BBQ SEPTEMBER 29TH, 2018 MAUGHAN RANCH WEST FORK PEEPLES VALLEY, AZ

The Hays Ranch supplied the beef and the wives of the contributing ranchers furnished the rest of the meal. After a few years, the Yavapai Cattle Growers Association furnished all the supplies and members volunteered their time to do the pit barbecue. The Yavapai Cowbelles also manned the serving tables and brought the desserts. Except for three years, it has been held at its original site of the Hays Ranch in Peeples Valley, now the Maughan Ranch West Fork. The annual tradition continues of presenting a check to the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association for at least $1,000. The Yavapai Cattle Growers Association is proud to continue this tradition in supporting the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. YCGA is the only cattlemen’s association in the country that has supported the National Organization for 86 years - a proud tradition for Yavapai County ranchers.

Yavapai Cattle Growers Association Calf Sale & BBQ Fun For The Whole Family

SATURDAY, SEPT. 29 Maughan Ranch West Fork, Peeples Valley, Arizona Gates Open: 8 am. Booths Open: 9 a.m. Mutton Busting: 10 a.m. BBQ served from: 12 to 1:30 p.m. Calf Sale starts at: 1:30 p.m. Yavapai Cowbelles’ Scholarship Quilt Drawing: 1:30 p.m.

Alan Kessler preparing the beef!

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PRE S COT COTT T LI LIV VING ING • YOU!

Hays Ranch Sign

Hazel and Roy Hays on their Golden Anniversary January 5, 1965

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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Special Section:

SCHOOL CHOICE CONSIDERATIONS

L

earning Style: Find a school that best fits your child’s learning style or interests. Knowing if you’re looking for a specific type of instructional program will help focus your search.

Programs: The school should have the types of programs (sports, art, music, etc.) that are the most meaningful to your child. Class Size: Class size and student teacher ratios can have an impact on student learning, this may be a factor to consider. On the other hand, small schools can also have their limitations to resources and programs. Grades Served: If grade

configuration is important to you and/ or your child then determine whether the school is a good match (K-6, K-8, etc.) for your expectations.

Performance: The state

annually grades all of Arizona’s public schools, district and charter. The letter grades, which range from A to F, can serve as a guide to how students perform on standardized tests.

Culture: Every campus has a

unique culture. Evaluate whether the school maintains a welcoming and safe environment, which should include high expectations for learning. Source: Arizona Charter Schools Association

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IT’S TIME TO GET YOUR CHILDREN READY FOR

SCHOOL DAZE! by Robin Layton

A

s children, we spend most of the year wishing for summer vacation to start. When it finally gets here, poof, it’s gone! As adults, we can definitely relate to summer fun disappearing in a blink. Suddenly, you have zero time to complete school clothes shopping, dental appointments and eye checkups. In Arizona, parents also have something else to consider … they have the bonus of being able to research and make school choices for their children. It’s time well spent to learn the differences between public, charter, private, online and homeschool options. For instance, according to Gov. Doug Ducey’s Office of Education, “Arizona state law allows students to apply for admission to any public school, based on available classroom space. The law requires that school districts develop policies regarding open enrollment that may include transportation and that the policies shall be posted on the district’s website and available to

the public upon request. Transportation is available for special education students.” So, if you live in one area, but work in another and you prefer the schools where you work, you can seek admission to that school district. Charter schools are defined by the Office of Education as “tuition free public schools that were established to provide additional choices to families for learning environments that would improve student achievement. Most public charter schools are operated independent of local school districts by either non-profit or for-profit entities, although school districts may also sponsor charter schools.” According to the Arizona Charter Schools Association, charters are public schools that must follow the open enrollment laws. So, a charter cannot turn away a child for low test scores or disabilities.

THE SUPE SAYS Prescott Unified School District Superintendent Joe Howard offers some advice for getting ready for the new school year: 1) Make sure you’ve had a great summer.  Whether that’s a staycation (what could be better than Prescott?) or some time away, that time together does more for our kids than you may know.  2)  A family culture of reading in the summer and throughout the school year is worth a million. Read to

your littles every single night. As they get more independent, help your kids to find a favorite series or author and tout reading as something that we do for ourselves. Make reading time the reward that it truly is. Model it by showing your own reading time and do something for yourself: create a consistent family reading time. 3)  Make school shopping fun, and it doesn’t have to cost a fortune. Start early so that it’s not time-crunched. Check out thrift stores, too, for clothes. 

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


The association does mention that many charter schools have waitlists and recommends checking deadlines and enrollment policies. If you prefer to send your child to a private school, assistance through scholarships maybe available. Most of them are based on financial need, but you can find the right one for your family through the many Arizona school tuition organizations. Learn more at education.azgovernor.gov/ edu/arizona-school-choice.

Online instruction is also available to meet the unique needs of your child. Arizona is a national leader in providing learning opportunities for its students, according to the Office of Education. To learn more, visit inacol.org. Arizona recognizes home schooling options and recommends visiting ade.az.gov/resources/hs.asp to contact your county officials about your area’s specific home schooling requirements.

GETTING CHILDREN READY TO FACE THE SCHOOL DAZE! Set up a bedtime and wake-up routine in advance. If you can, try starting these new routines about two weeks in advance of the first day.

Get to know the teachers. It’s hard during

all of the open houses, orientations and meet-and-greet options to spend quality one-on-one time with your kid’s teachers. If you can take a few minutes before or after school to chat one-on-one, everyone can benefit.

Plan healthy lunches and snacks. By

planning meals at home, you are more likely to make healthy choices for your children during the school day. Protein-rich snacks and lunches, with fruits and vegetables, and other yummy wholesome items will make sure your kids have the right brainpower and energy to tackle their school days.

Organize clothing. We’ve all been there – morning meltdown. Just what are they going to wear? Once you’ve donated the clothes your kids have outgrown, take a few more minutes to carefully organize what is left. From there you can decide what you need more of before school starts. Set up a central staging area in your home. The notoriously missing shoe, backpack, or

textbook…it always happens. By choosing a clutter-free area of the house as a central housing hub for all things schoolrelated, including lunches and more, you will save yourself precious time and frustration in the mornings.

Make the school supply shopping piece something fun and tie-in a nice dinner out or ice-cream stop with the outing. 4)  Create a family culture in which each night after school, you talk about the “good things” in your day and give “affirmations” to each other with compliments to all in the family. Put this in place during the summer so that it is habit during the busy times of the school year. Dinner is a great time.  5)  Create a “growth mindset” family culture. Growth mindset teaches us real life concepts like it’s OK to try new things and not be

good at them right away. It’s OK to fail if you are finding the lessons in it and getting better. It is not OK to beat yourself up every time you are not perfect. This blocks you from lessons that you could be learning. Growth mindset also talks about things like “effort” and “grit” rather than saying things like “you are smart.” Instead, say things like, “Wow, look what your hard work did for you. What an effort!”  (Keep in mind that this is coming from a 23-year educator who just watched his only two kids graduate from Prescott High School!)  Have a great school year!

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Update medical records. Provide teachers and school administrators with a complete list of any medical concerns or medications they will need to know about your child, including allergies. Also make sure all emergency contacts are updated and notified they are on the emergency call list. Talk about bullying. Approximately one in three children experience bullying at some point during their school career. By talking with your children, you can ensure they know how to properly treat their classmates, teachers and administrators. You can talk about when it is appropriate to speak up if they see bullying happening. And you can make absolutely sure your child knows you will support them if they come to you with information that they are being bullied.

Source: www.azed.gov/

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Special Section: Education

EDUCATION IS AT CENTER STAGE by Tim Carter, Yavapai County School Superintendent 

A

braham Lincoln said, “Upon the subject of education ... I can only say that I view it as the most important subject which we as a people may be engaged in.” I couldn’t agree more! Even though logical, thoughtful people know that education is the key to our collective and individual futures, and taxpayers will tell you their property tax bills reflect that schools are the recipient of a majority of their funding, many people think of education as an afterthought. One legislator said, “Oh yes, we do need to take care of that.” For the last several years polls, and individual voters, have said education is the highest priority. That is in part because study after study has shown Arizona ranked as, or very near, the lowest state in “per pupil funding.” In 2018, for the first time in recent memory, education funding took center stage at the Legislature. That is good news! Why? Teachers have been leaving the profession in record numbers for more lucrative jobs in the private sector. Many have left Arizona for higher salaries and benefits in neighboring states. The recruitment and retention of teachers and leaders is now our largest educational challenge. Many states, led by teachers, have seen an educational funding revolution. Arizona is no exception. Teachers using the mantra of “Red for Ed” demanded a serious look at education funding and a commitment to do better. The governor, amid significant political pressure, created his 20x2020 plan, working with the Legislature to add 20 percent to school budgets by 2020, with the clearly implied reason to raise teacher salaries. The newly passed budget, which the governor quickly signed, contains a 10 percent increase, with legislative enactments to add 5 percent each year for the next two years. With no promise of new revenue, there are still major concerns

74

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about the source of those funds. The general sense is that the promises were much too public and much too important not to be kept. This is certainly a good step forward, but it is relative to what other states do. Even in Arizona, some districts can pass over-ride elections and pay their teachers more, while the neighboring district may not be able to do the same. The reality is that public education has not recovered fully from the recession of 2008. This will remain a work in progress, but clear progress was made. School safety also remains at center stage. The governor and Legislature were not able to reach an agreement on a School Safety Plan, yet Yavapai County Sheriff Scott Mascher partnered with the Yavapai County Education Service Agency to host Listening Sessions in Prescott and Cottonwood. Agencies (schools, law enforcement, fire departments, emergency medical, media, courts, probation, mental health providers, etc.) came together to identify significant issues that impact school safety. At the center of the discussion was that local control should prevail, because each school is unique. By law, individual schools must have emergency management plans. Those plans should be created in partnership with local first responders, practiced in joint exercises, and then be debriefed to learn from the experience. Many people believe that “active shooters” are the biggest concern of schools. We found that the

concerns were much broader and include: mental health issues, facilities, fencing, pedestrian and traffic flow, professional development, inter-agency cooperation, communication strategies, external factors (e.g., a chemical spill), the need for school resource officers, and limited concerns about firearms. The primary and general elections are also at center stage. This year, candidates will need to be well versed in the details of education questions. Voters are now more discriminating on this topic. To say “I support education” isn’t enough. What does that mean, specifically? Candidates should be ready to discuss funding formulas, school choice, Empowerment Scholarship Accounts, local bond and over-ride elections, consolidation and unification, accountability, school labels, special education, student assessments, curriculum versus standards, and the list goes on. Please vote and make education a factor in how you rank candidates. Arizona is electing a U.S. senator, filling all of our congressional seats, a governor, secretary of state, treasurer, corporation commissioners, attorney general, superintendent of public instruction, 90 legislators (a senator and two representatives in each of 30 districts), and the members of community college and school district governing boards. Yes, each one of these people impact the education of our children. Lincoln was right. Thank you for supporting our children, our most precious resource of all. Former State Board of Education President Tim Carter, an educator of 45 years, has served as the elected Yavapai County School Superintendent since 2005. He can be reached at (928) 925-6560.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Prescott. Home to the best. 40 Years in Prescott Embry-Riddle has been an integral part of the Prescott community since its establishment in 1978, nearly 40 years ago. Ever since, Prescott and Embry-Riddle have become home to tomorrow’s leaders in aviation aerospace and established a reputation for excellence in the skies.

STEM Embry-Riddle’s new 52,000-square-foot STEM Education Center contains over 20 industry-grade laboratories, replete with innovative technological equipment unique to each STEM program the university offers.

1

No. The Community The $22 million center also includes the community-friendly Jim and Linda Lee Planetarium — the only Arizona planetarium north of Phoenix — capable of seating 125 students and visitors for captivating explorations into the farthest reaches of the universe in full 360-degree high definition.

embryriddle.edu

The Aerospace/Aeronautical/Astronomical Engineering Program at Embry-Riddle’s Prescott Campus ranks No. 1 in the nation among undergraduate institutions. 2018 U.S. News & World Report’s Best Colleges


Special Section: Education

YAVAPAI COLLEGE PAID INTERNSHIP LEADS PARTICIPANTS TO SKILLS, JOB SECURITY by Jennifer McCormack

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ust a couple of months ago, 31-year-old David Salter was unemployed and struggling — a self-described “blank slate” yearning for challenge and change. Today, as one of the first students in a Yavapai College internship program for Prescott-based orthotics company RESA Wear, he is about four weeks away from reaping the rewards of personal reinvention through workforce training. “I feel more accomplished doing this,” David said during a class break. “This is exactly what I wanted. It’s accelerated and you start working while you’re learning.” David pursues his academic studies in the areas of computer networking, 3D printing and electronics three

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days of the workweek at YC, and experiences on-the-job training with RESA the remaining two days. “This is technical and it’s physical. That is the perfect job for me,” said the intern who consistently earns As and Bs in his technology courses. “I’m learning things that most people don’t know about.” Nudged by his sister and brotherin-law in Prescott Valley, David answered the call for RESA interns in January. The firm is growing and seeks 300 trained workers over the next three years to respond to expanding market opportunities. Before being selected for the internship, he spent his days waiting for phone calls from an employment agency. A shoulder injury had cost him his warehouse job David Salter in California. The employment agency rarely called. David left California without looking back and is now about a month away from likely landing a full-time, $25-an-hour job with RESA. He hopes to become a technician traveling the country to troubleshoot

RESA’s 3D orthotics printing kiosks in Costco, Walmart and other retail stores. Recalling that his former warehouse job paid an hourly wage of just under $15, David said that while driving a forklift takes some skill, working for RESA is tapping his brain power — so much so, he said, that “I find myself sleeping soundly at night.” Along with the travel and technical challenges he foresees in his new career, David is looking forward to helping RESA customers get the custom orthotics they need to alleviate pain and increase mobility. “We are going to be helping people live out their daily lives,” he said. over-ride elections, consolidation and unification, accountability, school labels, special education, student assessments, curriculum versus standards, and the list goes on. Please vote and make education a factor in how you rank candidates. Arizona is electing a U.S. senator, filling all of our congressional seats, a governor, secretary of state, treasurer, corporation commissioners, attorney general, superintendent of public instruction, 90 legislators (a senator and two representatives in each of 30 districts), and the members of community college and school district governing boards. Yes, each one of these people impact the education of our children. Lincoln was right. Thank you for supporting our children, our most precious resource of all.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Special Section: Education L to R - Mark Frederick, Jennifer Edmonds, Craig Lefever

YAVAPAI COLLEGE “T STUDENT EDMONDS CREDITS FACULTY WITH PERSONAL RENEWAL by Tim Diesch

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

hey changed my life,” recalls Prescott Valley resident and Yavapai College student Jennifer Edmonds. “For the first time, I felt like I was worth an education.” Edmonds, now in her second semester at Yavapai College and pursuing an Associate of Applied Science degree in Social and Human Services, is grateful to YC’s General Equivalency Diploma (GED) program and the instructors who helped her take a big step in getting closer to her goal of becoming a substance abuse counselor. Edmonds did not arrive at her career choice lightly — she says that she ran away from home at around age 16. “I got into drugs, ran with the wrong crowd,” she says. “I was out there for about 16 years. But I got fed up with it. I was just tired of being tired.” She and her boyfriend moved to a different city, and the change in surroundings and the separation from her regular crowd helped get her on track. She has since enjoyed 11 years of sobriety. Edmonds credits the GED program not only with the means to move forward to a college academic track, but it kindled her excitement for learning as well. “The GED program got me interested in going forward with even more classes,” she says. “Taking these classes got me closer to

my goal and closer to what I want to do with my life. I’ll keep going until I get my associate degree.” Her newfound energy and commitment was only part of her formula for success — the instructors at Yavapai College supported her and helped her move forward. “Kate really helped me with math,” says Edmonds, referring to Yavapai College GED Instructional Specialist Kate Redmon. “I took my math test two times. The first I missed passing by two points, and the second I missed by only one. I was really struggling.” Kate’s dedication to help her break through was a big part of finally passing that test, Edmonds says. Edmonds also has high praise for her two main teachers, instructor Mark Frederick and Yavapai College Adult Basic Education Program Director Craig Lefever. “When I see them around on campus, they are friendly and interested, and they keep me going when things are rough.” “I felt that the quality I got with the GED program was the spur that moved me to enroll at YC for college courses,” Edmonds says. “Everyone involved, from the GED program to the classes I’m taking now, give you confidence and self-worth. They take the time to make you realize it for yourself. They stayed on me and gave me the support I needed to continue. They’re just amazing people.” S COT T LI V ING SPECI A L SEC TION • PRE PRESCOT VING

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Special Section: Education

PUSD FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER DONATIONS SOUGHT by Kelly Mattox, Director, Family Resource Center, PUSD & Rebecca Wood, VISTA, Family Resource Center, PUSD

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he Prescott Unified School District opened the Family Resource Center in 2016. Since then, the center moved to the new district office, stuffed hundreds of backpacks and provided ongoing services to over 500 students and families. “Students are so excited to be ready for school and the center is here to help all year long,” said Assistant Superintendent Mardi Reed. “Even teachers can reach out on behalf of students as the year progresses.” Started as a three-year AmeriCorps VISTA project, the center has bloomed into a community of support, with a mission of empowering students to succeed by providing resources to the whole family. “I don’t think there is a more generous community than Prescott anywhere, at least in regard to supporting our schools,” said Joe Howard, PUSD Superintendent. “The donation

Donations Needed: • • • • • • • • • • •

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of school supplies has always put support where it is needed in terms of helping kids and families that simply don’t have the resources.” As classrooms are modernizing, the needed supplies for students are ever-evolving. There is higher demand for such items as headphones, calculators and shared classroom supplies. “It can be a strain on the center to buy these items when we survive largely on community donations,” said Rebecca Wood, AmeriCorps VISTA, working for PUSD to oversee the center. “But we believe even if a supply goes to a classroom, it is also going to a kid.” The Family Resource Center is open throughout the summer to assist families getting ready for back to school. Call (928) 830-7658 to make an appointment. If you are interested in donating please call or stop by the PUSD office at 300 E.Gurley St.

Band-Aids Calculators (basic and high-tech) Colored pencils (24 pack) Copy paper (plain and/or colored) Crayons (Crayola 24 pack) Dry erase markers (black and blue) Hand sanitizer Headphones Kleenex Ticonderoga pencils Walmart gift cards (these cover what is missing)

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I

HANNAH’S HEART

n December 2018, the Coalition for Compassion and Justice, in partnership with PUSD’s Family Resource Center, will be presenting “Hannah’s Heart” fundraiser. Set in Great Depression-era Prescott during the holiday season, “Hannah’s Heart” is a play based on the book of the same title written by local author Diane Iverson. The play will have three

performances and all proceeds will go toward the Little Tree House and PUSD’s Family Resource Center. The Family Resource Center acknowledges the unique barriers to quality, ongoing education that face low-income, homeless, or underserved families. All funds received by the center go directly back to providing ongoing programming and support for all PUSD families.

PUSD INDIAN EDUCATION PROGRAM

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ative families of the Prescott Unified School District are eligible for additional services for their Native students enrolled in the public school system. These services include tutoring, Native Family Nights, cultural education, field trips and regular parent committee meetings to stay informed. “It is important for us to have a space to come together and teach our children about our culture and traditions,” said Jess Kota, PUSD Indian Education Parent Committee Chair. “It is too often our

children learn the negative aspects of our community in the public eye, Indian Education is a space for us to learn all the positives so we can grow strong and confident in who we are as native people.” The Indian Education Program is supported by grant funding. The current program is overseen by Kelly Mattox, grant specialist with PUSD.   Mattox shares her vision, “My hope is to build and sustain PUSD’s Indian Education Program for students of all indigenous tribal affiliations, bridging gaps for learning and sharing.”

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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Students and families find inspiration at our Prescott Schools. Preschool through High school, we have a path for you.

Every Child, Every Day

New District Office now at 300 E. Gurley St., Prescott 86303 PrescottSchools.com

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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Special Section: Education

OLLI encourages discussion in the classroom

OLLI members discuss current events

OLLI is more than just learning, it is also about forming friendships

IN SEARCH OF LIFELONG LEARNERS by Ed Wisneski, Yavapai College Osher Lifelong Learning Institute

“C

uriosity is what separates us from the cabbages,” said two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning historian David McCullough. “It’s accelerative. The more we know, the more we want to know.” About 2,000 insatiably inquisitive adults in Yavapai County have found a resource for their curiosity, the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute (OLLI)

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at Yavapai College. Its mission is to provide lifelong learning and social interaction opportunities on the Prescott campus and through sister programs in Sedona and Cottonwood. Talent, experience and skills are shaped in a relaxed environment to explore new interests, discover latent abilities, engage in intellectual and cultural pursuits, and contribute to a rapidly changing multicultural and

OLLI offers Qi Gong every session

multigenerational society. OLLI was founded in 1993 by a group of people who wanted to see educational offerings that met the needs of retirees shorter than the typical 15-week semesters and without the time commitment of homework, papers, and tests. Supported by grants from the Bernard Osher Foundation, OLLI has grown to include programs at 120 colleges in all 50 states, including Arizona State and the University of Arizona. The Yavapai College OLLI is one of the most successful in the nation with a $2 million endowment, extremely diverse curriculum, robust membership and affordability. Whether it’s mastering watercolors, demystifying smartphones, disentangling viewpoints or unraveling your life memories to write your memoir, OLLI annually offers an intriguing cornucopia of 300 courses and workshops during five six-week sessions. Most meet once per week for two hours. OLLI also organizes social events and trips to Phoenix concerts, museums, and theater for hits such as “Beautiful,” “The Color Purple,” “Les Miserables” and “Hamilton” at the ASU Gammage auditorium, via luxury coach and meal. Bonnie Manko was two years from retirement when she heard of the OLLI program and knew it was something she’d weave into her schedule at retirement. Those two years passed, and two weeks prior to

her retirement, with the approval of her employer, Bonnie began taking classes at OLLI. OLLI maintains extremely low costs because it’s a peer-to-peer organization where members volunteer for every aspect of running the program, including facilitating all classes. Options include a $10 Try Me membership, plus a $30 fee for each class for the first-time member. Some facilitators are former teachers or college professors with doctorates. Others are published authors. Quite a few have experience and a professional background in their subjects. Chris Maxwell and husband Bill have been facilitating classes for years as well as enjoying classes themselves. Chris has facilitated a TED Talks class for several years and Bill has facilitated a travel class that incorporates his exquisite photos. Kelly Boryca, a longtime volunteer for the State Health Insurance Assistance Program (SHIP), helps OLLI members navigate the complexities of Medicare. Raymond Lee, a former judge in the Superior Court of Maricopa County, gave a one-day session, “Arizona Courts — You Be the Judge,” that filled a Yavapai College auditorium. “If you want to keep learning, find kindred spirits, have fun and wake up in the morning and look forward to the day, then OLLI is for you.” Lee said. For further information call 928-717-7834 or visit yc.edu/ prescottolli.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


The Susan J. Rheem Adult Day Center The best treasure in town!

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928-775-3563

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adultca reser vices.org LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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Special Section: Education

2018 ESSAY CONTEST

P

rescott-area students shared their best moments of the last school year with Prescott LIVING Magazine. The magazine’s 2018 Essay Contest asked, “What was your greatest moment in school?” Essay contestants received a family four-pack of Heritage Park Zoo tickets. Our school-aged writers will show you that children learn from experiences, not just from lessons. A fourth-grader decided her career goal of being an astronaut was attainable after she met a real one. Art class inspired a student to create a castle. A Highlands Nature Center field trip taught students to think like coyotes. Robotics sparked another student’s creativity, while a child’s first exposure to school involved an outdoor classroom that boasted dirt, trikes and a playhouse. Take a few minutes and read about their exciting experiences, in their own words:

Derik

5th Grade – Age 10 The first best moment in my school life is when I was voted in second on the run for class president. I was so impressed with myself. Even though I wasn’t class president I still was happy with myself. At boys and girls club the firemen came and showed us their tools such as, the Jaws of Life, and sprayed us with the hose. We also got to see the fire truck from the inside and out. That was a really fun experience in my life. We also go on field trips, and have parties because we earn it. My third best moment is when I met my friend Michael, but when we first met we didn’t like each other. At that time, I was new to my school when we first became friends. I was telling jokes and he joined in on telling jokes. We both told the most funny jokes and we talk so much. Although, in class we stay quiet, but that’s my third best moment in my school. My fourth best moment in my school life was when I met my friend Brock. My friend Brock and I used to hate each other, because I was friends with a boy he didn’t like. But, when we met again in third grade, we became really good friends. After that, he moved schools, but we were still friends. Those are the four best moments of my school life.

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Sergio

5th Grade – Age 10 At Taylor Hicks, I got three honor rolls, and I was proud of myself. It was a good year. We also had really nice teachers, and one of the teachers owned a turtle, corn snake, two geckoes and three bull snakes. My other teacher had no class pets, but was my home room teacher. At Boys & Girls Club, the firemen came to show us their tools, the Jaws of Life and they also sprayed us with the hose and we had a lot of fun. We also go on field trips, parties, and we have nice staff. We also we do fun activities and a lot of fun games. We do art, dodgeball, computer games and outside. Outside, we have a basketball court and have a garden where we grow mint, basil, rosemary, strawberry’s corn and squash. Also, I make a lot of friends. My friends are Noah, John, Ken, Levi and Derik. I met John at preschool when I still peed my pants, I met Levi at the Boys & Girls Club, I met Ken at the Boys & Girls Club too, I met Noah at Taylor Hicks and I met Derik at the Boys & Girls Club . You can make a lot of friends and have a lot of fun.

Addie Bauer

4th Grade Ever since I was a little girl, it has been my dream to become an astronaut. In fact, my favorite moment at school was meeting astronauts during space month at my school in Hawaii. That moment I knew that my dream job could really happen someday. Space month was a month long event at school, when we studied outer space. We did projects to help us learn more about planets, the moon, and the sun. On the last day of space month, our school principal surprised us by inviting two real live astronauts to visit the school. When the astronauts came to my classroom, they talked about what life is like on the International Space Station, they answered our questions, and they inspired us all. This was my most favorite moment in school. This made me want to be an astronaut even more, even though it is a lot of work to become one. Meeting real live astronauts made me realize that my dreams could someday come true.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Special Section: Education

Allison Binder

Kindergarten My name is Allison and I went to Discovery Gardens for PreK. The best thing about my school is the outdoor classroom. It has trikes, dirt, sand, and a playhouse that you can play with. I love the trikes because there is a big area to ride in so that I can go fast. Playing in the dirt is fun because there are toys, a little oven, and a little sink with nozzles, but they don’t really work. Every afternoon, we went out to the outdoor classroom, but sometimes we went to the field instead. It was so much fun.

Abbey Flood

2nd Grade At school I love to dance. At school I love to play because it’s fun. I love my friends like Emma because they are nice. At recess with Emma was the best because we have some talks about our families.

Taylor Hogan

Jillian Binder

3rd Grade My name is Jillian and I go to Taylor Hicks Elementary School. My favorite thing about my school is that we get to go to art class each week. My art teacher, Mrs. Dean, is AMAZING! She is so talented and she is very nice. She gave me an art kit. Just me. No one else in the whole school, but me. My most favorite thing she taught us how to draw is a castle. It was textured art. Mrs. Dean chose my castle to be displayed at the grand opening of the new Prescott Unified School district office. I love my castle and I love art so much. I also love art because the room is so organized and Mrs. Dean has every art supply to make anything you want to make. It is so much fun. I can’t wait for next year so I can go to art class again and see Mrs. Dean. She’s the best art teacher ever!

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

5th Grade This school year was the best! Although it was kind of the same thing everyday there were always those moments that made it different. My best moment this year was when me and my best friend made up. My best friend and I have been together since kindergarten. Over the years we grew closer and closer. But last year we kind of started driffed apart. This year we both joined track so we could be together but then the fighting started........ We both got all mad (I won’t get into it). Then we never hung out. We didn’t even talk to each other for like 2 months. Then we talked and we told each other why we were mad. It turns out we were mad about the same thing and just decided to forgive each other. Now we are really close and still in the summer keep in touch.

Zoe McCoy

5th Grade – Age 10 My name is Zoe and I go to Sacred Heart Catholic School. My greatest moment was when I was in second grade. The Joy Awards were coming up and we were voting on three people who we thought were the nicest. We turned in our paper to the teacher. The next week we went to mass, and at the end, we did the awards. When they got to my class they called my name. I was so shocked that I wanted to run out of the room. I slowly walked up to the front of the room. Mrs. Dickerson, the school principal, said congratulations and handed me a certificate. She handed out goodie bags to all the people who got certificates and dismissed us to our classes. My classmates walked up to me and said congrats. That was my favorite time at school. My favorite time at Boys and Girls Club was when I got camper off the week. Camper of the Week is when the kids in the Club get a special recognition for being helpful, kind to piers and willing to participate. At the Boys and Girls Club, we play games like dodgeball and hula-hoop contests. When I first came, I was thinking if I’ll be able to make some friends and will I be able to fit in with others? I made a lot of new friends. Three of their names are Tatum, Chris and Liana. A girl named Maya, Liana’s best friend, showed me around the club. She told me the names of the rooms. The multi, games room, art room, the teens room and the green room. I am in the ten and older group. We eat lunch outside at 11:30am. We have quiet time for a half hour and the tens go to the green room. I have had the best time at Boys and Girls Club. I hope I can come again next year.

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Special Section: Education

2018 ESSAY CONTEST (cont.)

2020

VISION 2020

·

·

RE-DEFINE RE-DESIGN RE-IMAGINE

Annabeth Roberts

RE-DEFINE RE-DESIGN RE-IMAGINE

2nd Grade – Age 7 My greatest moments of school was the genius party at the end of the school year. We worked really, really hard to get the genius party. We had to earn 400 genius points. I learned a lot and I had fun! To earn the points we had to point out special things that we studied. At the party we ate fruit by the foot and airheads.

Elsie Dominguez 1st Grade – Age 5

Liana Torosian

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5th Grade – Age 10 Hi, my name is Liana Torosian and I am 10 years old. I am going in to 5th grade to Granite Mountain. So, my best moment was when I was at Taylor Hicks Elementary School. Now, let me tell you about it. I was going into 4th grade, and I was very excited to see my friends again after two months. And, I bet they were very excited to see me too. I was kind of sad when I saw the people in my class, because I only had one friend from my class there. Her name was Alicia, so I just played with her all day, and so did this other girl named Shaylyn. But, I didn’t like Shaylyn at all and she didn’t like me either, but one day that all changed. When Shaylyn’s best friend forever Mckennah, moved away to California, she was very sad. But, I didn’t care. And one day we became best friends. We played together, laughed everyday together and we got in trouble togeth-

continued on page 86... THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Special Section: Education

IT’S GREAT TO BE A PRESCOTT BADGER by Joe Howard, Prescott Unified School District Superintendent

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fter returning from a beautiful vacation to Colorado this summer, I found myself feeling so lucky to live in Prescott. Like many of you, a break from work is always healthy, but the idea of coming back to the workplace after fishing trout streams can seem daunting. However, I actually find myself excited to come back to Prescott Unified School District (PUSD). It is because I love the community I work in, and the people I work with. I love being a Badger and watching kids experience all that Prescott schools have to offer. I had the privilege of graduating from Prescott High, many years ago, and just watched my twin boys walk across that same stage in May. I’m

proud of the experience that PUSD gave my kids and the opportunities that were opened for them. Not to mention that the ceremony was against the backdrop of Thumb Butte as the sun set over commencement, with thousands of Prescottonians and their families in the stadium. There is just nothing like it. What I am most proud of in our community school district is that we strive, as we have since before I was a student, to offer unlimited opportunities for students to find success in academics, music and fine arts, athletics, social opportunities, dances, science fairs, pep assemblies, spelling bees, field trips, robotics competitions, business opportunities, computer applications, debates, flag

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

raisings, ROTC and so much more. All of these, and more opportunities that I am forgetting to mention, are what makes it great to be a Badger. We are so proud to offer as many opportunities as possible for our students to experiment, to try new things and see if they fit. It is our hope for each of our students that they find their niche (or two, or three) as they learn about how to work hard, solve problems and find success. Public schools, if they are to find success, must be community schools. In Prescott, we enjoy a community support of our schools I would say cannot be beat in this world. Service organizations, churches, foundations, our municipality and county, and many other organizations, work hard to make sure they are a part of our schools. They make sure every child has what they need to succeed in our schools as they prepare to go out and serve in this community and beyond. I urge you to come and be a part of PUSD and find your own way to be a Badger, wherever you came from. Start out by taking in a Badger football game on a beautiful fall evening with a Thumb Butte sunset in the background. Consider joining our volunteer force (800 volunteers put in over 17,000 hours last year.) Come and see how you can help us to fulfill our vision and motto of serving “Every Child, Every Day.”

We are so proud to offer as many opportunities as possible for our students to experiment, to try new things and see if they fit.

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Special Section: Education

2018 ESSAY CONTEST (cont.) ...continued from page 84

‘03

Serving the Quad-Cities for Over 15 Years

Christ-Centered, Biblically Based Teaching

er, but the good kind of trouble. Nothing could stop us from being friends. We talked so much in class that the teacher had to separate us. We couldn’t talk to each other during class time anymore. We even went to Boys and Girls Club together. We were really happy, because we got to be together and play together every day, but that all changed too. We didn’t listen to the staff at Boys and Girls Club, and we messed around too much. That’s how good of friends we were. Apparently, we got separated at Boys and Girls Club too. So, she was in a different group than me, and I was very sad I couldn’t play with my BFF anymore. But, we got to play together sometimes. So, that’s how we met. My best day at school when we first became friends.

Sound & Proven Methods of Classical Education

Jonathan Zieran

4th Grade Humboldt Elementary School is a great school. I started attending school there last year. The teachers are very nice because they believe in second chances and speaking of second chances, many people don’t know, but Humboldt elementary has burned down two times. I got to be in the track team this year. My favorite part though, was joining LEGO Robotics club. In Lego robotics, I learned about programming and with my team went to the competition at Embry Riddle. It was a fun, unique experience that I will always remember.

Small Class Sizes & Caring Teachers

Johanna Zieran Scholarships Available to All Students

Over 120 High School Graduates to Date

2018-2019 NOW ENROLLING Apply Today! Trinity Christian School K-12 Classical Christian Education Contact us at 928.445.6306 www.trinitychristianaz.com 86

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1st Grade I attend Humboldt Elementary School. It is a small school filled with super nice teachers. They are smart and good at teaching the boys and girls. My greatest moment was a field trip to the Highlands Nature Center. My teacher, Ms. G took us there. I liked the trail walk because we did an activity that used our senses. We had to pretend to be a coyote. I liked building with the wood logs and sea shells. It’s fun to learn about nature.

Nadia Martinez

11th Grade (Dedicated to Mr. Ric Carter) Every school has something exceptional about it, whether it is the teachers, the academics, the extracurriculars, the students, or overall learning environment. Everyone’s school is different, but there are qualities that contribute to making it superior. My school, Canyon View Preparatory, is unique. In the time I have been attending I have been fortunate to have remarkable teachers; educators who go above and beyond for their students. I’ve been able to receive amazing academics, which has improved my abilities more continued on page 145... THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Special Section: Education

FOUR KEY FACTORS IN CHOOSING THE RIGHT SCHOOL FOR YOUR STUDENT

E

ach young learner is unique, and it is important to choose an educational program that accommodates your child’s personal needs and interests. Yet with so many school options, how do you decide which one is right for your student?

Mastering basic learning techniques:

The instruction students receive in their first few years at school forms the foundation for future academic endeavors, so when researching schools, consider the emphasis placed on proper learning techniques. • Does the curriculum reinforce content using multiple approaches? • Does the school support its students in developing connections between subjects?

Teaching academic accountability:

Students are required to juggle multiple assignments at once, so it is best to learn time management skills at an early age.

Pay attention to how the school promotes academic accountability such as daily or weekly planners or frequent progress reports.

Freedom to explore intellectual interests:

Students who are captivated by their coursework will retain knowledge and return to school each week eager to learn more. You can give your student an advantage by choosing a program that allows them to explore their intellectual passions.

College acceptance rates and scholarships: It is important to consider how the academic program will set them up for success in college. You should research each school’s college acceptance rate and the average scholarship dollars earned by graduates.

BASIS Charter Schools, Inc., operates the top-ranked public high schools in the nation. Learn more at enrollBASIS.com.

Educating tomorrow’s... Serving Grades K–12

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The BASIS Curriculum offers foundations in language, literacy, civics, history, science, movement, engineering, technology, math, Mandarin, performance arts, visual arts, and music.

Visit enrollBASIS.com to apply! LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

Scientists

CEOs S COT T LI V ING SPECI A L SEC TION • PRE PRESCOT VING

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Special Section:

GET THE KIDS INVOLVED!

Y

avapai County has eight 4-H Clubs. A club is an organized group of at least five members from three different families who meet regularly with adult volunteers or staff for a long-term, progressive series of educational experiences. The purpose of a 4-H club is to provide positive youth development opportunities to meet the needs of young people to experience belonging, mastery, independence and generosity — the Essential Elements — and to foster educational opportunities tied to the Land Grant University knowledge base. A club will: • Conduct a minimum of six regular club meetings per year. • Selects youth officers or youth leaders to provide leadership to the club. • Meet in any location — a home, community center, library, public housing site, school, after school program and/or many other places. • Is advised by adult staff or volunteers who been screened, certified and trained. To join: For membership information, contact us at email vasovski@email.arizona.edu or call (928) 445-6590 ext. 229. You will need to pay your program fee to the club leader and fill out any paperwork they may have for their club. Learn more at extension.arizona.edu/4h/yavapai.

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RAISE THAT BED & GIVE YOUR PLANTS A SAFE PLACE TO REST by Robin Layton

“H

ere comes Peter Cottontail, hoppin’ down the bunny trail.” And straight into your garden. Those carrots are looking pretty irresistible to Mr. Cottontail. But, if you put that garden in a raised box, with some wire fencing around the top of the box, Peter will need to visit your neighbor’s garden for those carrots. Raised beds aren’t new, but they are making a resurgence, especially for senior gardeners. Planting, hoeing and weeding can

make your back ache, strain your legs and make you dizzy from bending over. A raised bed can eliminate that discomfort. They are also perfect for growing a small plot of flowers and vegetables, providing decent drainage and there are less weeds to deal with. The bed can serve as a barrier for Peter, but also for slugs and snails. Some gardeners recommend using copper flashing to border your box to keep slugs and snails from reaching the box top.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


LE T ’S BUILD IT Jeff Schalau, Associate Agent, Agriculture & Natural Resources, University of Arizona Cooperative Extension, recommends making “sure you have enough raised bed area to rotate crops. For example, tomatoes, eggplant and peppers should not be grown in the same space year after year due to buildup of soil-borne disease organisms.” “Trellises, nets, cages, strings, and/or poles should be used to support twining plants and better utilize vertical space. I cage my tomatoes, trellis my pole beans

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

and cucumbers, and stake my eggplant and peppers. Keep in mind that using vertical space impacts the amount of light that reaches the ground. Plan accordingly by planting shade tolerant crops in these shadier areas. Shade tolerant crops include leafy vegetables and cruciferous crops like broccoli, kale, and cabbages.” A few ideas to plant in August include herbs like dill, basil and cilantro. Kale, lettuce, radishes, peas and onions are good August vegetables, as are beans, carrots and corn.

Materials: • Railroad ties • Precast stones • Cement blocks • Bricks • Wood pallets • Rock or stone you’ve collected • Store-bought premade kits Tips: • Wood needs to be rot-resistant or treated with a preservative. • Beds are generally 3- to 4-feet wide and can be as long as you prefer. • Place cascading plants in the front of the bed, with trellised plants in the back. PRE S COT T LI V ING

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Special Section: Home & Garden

Kelly and Jonathan rappelling into the Grand Canyon in Garden Creek Canyon.

Kelly and Jonathan in Cibecue Canyon.

Kelly and her mother, Leni, at a BOW camp where Kelly taught her how to rappel. Her mother also rafted part of the Grand Canyon at 70 years old with Kelly and Jonathan... 3 generations!

OUTDOOR CAMPS LED REALTOR TO HER TRUE PASSION

W

ilderness enthusiast and local Realtor, Kelly Dwyer, sits down and shares her passion for outdoor activities and how these activities enhanced her relationship with her son, Jonathan. Kelly travels throughout the Southwest seeking adventures such as canyoneering, whitewater rafting, climbing and backpacking. Kelly, an Arizona native, moved to Prescott in 2009. She dreamed of living in Prescott for many years and always wanted to be closer to a variety of outdoor activities with hopes that would allow her to be more involved in the outdoor community. She and her son settled into their home in Prescott, but she realized that after three years they were still not enjoying the outdoor activities as often as they hoped for. They enjoyed hiking and fishing, but they wanted more variety in their outdoor hobbies. Kelly saw an article in the local paper advertising a women’s overnight camp that focused on teaching a variety of wilderness activities to help women get more involved in the outdoor community. The camp, Becoming an Outdoors Woman (BOW) is organized by the Arizona Wildlife Federation (AWF) and offers a large variety of classes such as fly fishing, hunting and

gun safety, Dutch oven cooking, archery, geocaching, horseback riding, rappelling, kayaking and more. Kelly immediately saw this as the perfect opportunity to enhance her outdoor hobbies. She attended BOW camps in August 2011 and April 2012. She took a variety of classes during the three-day camps, including rappelling, fly-fishing, Dutch oven cooking, kayaking, stand-up paddle boarding, archery, and even a hunting class. After attending BOW, she bought a kayak and now regularly spends time enjoying the lakes in Prescott. But the class with the greatest impact on her life was rappelling. She fell in love with rappelling and immediately knew that her experience at BOW fulfilled exactly what she was looking for… new activities for her and her son to enjoy. Kelly’s new love of rappelling led her to canyoneering clubs she found online, like Arizona Rock & Canyon Adventures and Canyoneering Arizona. Canyoneering is the sport of exploring a canyon by engaging in rappelling, stemming, swimming and waterfall jumping. Kelly attended numerous group events hosted by the canyoneering clubs. She networked, took rappelling classes, attended rappelling practices and completed over 20

canyons throughout Arizona and Utah in the first year. Then, in May 2013, she achieved her goal to introduce her son to the sport of canyoneering! Over the next few years, Kelly and her son traveled throughout Arizona, Utah and Colorado, canyoneering. In April 2014, Kelly introduced Jonathan to whitewater rafting. Jonathan enjoys the activities his mother has introduced to him like canyoneering, climbing and backpacking … but his true love is whitewater rafting. Attending that first BOW camp had such a positive impact on Kelly’s life. The time she has spent with Jonathan rappelling, canyoneering and whitewater rafting has made their bond as mother and son so much stronger. They are more active in the Prescott outdoor community and they are both passionate about sharing their love of the outdoors. Since 2013, Kelly has volunteered as a rappelling instructor with Arizona Game and Fish and at the bi-annual BOW camps in Prescott. She hopes to inspire other women to spend more time outdoors. For more information about the BOW camp, call Kim Kreuzer at the Arizona Wildlife Federation at (480) 644-0077

To learn more, visit: azwildlife.org azwildlife.org/ht/d/sp/i/60573/pid/60573 facebook.com/Arizona-Becoming-an-Outdoors-Woman-295848287943 azrockandcanyon.com 360-adventures.com/canyoneering

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THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


BUILDING GREAT RELATIONSHIPS BUILDS GREAT PROJECTS

HEADWATERS ARCHITECTURE P. C. HEADWATERSARCH.COM INFO@HEADWATERSARCH.COM

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kellydwyer@westusa.com 231 N. Marina St. Prescott AZ, 86301

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ABOUT ME

Kelly was amazing to work with and so patient!! She is not only an excellent Realtor, she is a great resource for the area and became a caring friend! -Emily (5/2018) • • • •

The purchase or sale of your home is one of the largest and most personal financial transactions you will make… I look forward to working for YOU!

Prescott resident for over 10 years & Arizona native Over 10 years of extensive experience in the real estate and financial markets Bachelors Degree in Business Proven track record of delivering exceptional results representing buyers and sellers in the purchase or sale of their home.

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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Special Section: Home & Garden

SKILLED TRADE WORKERS ARE IN HIGH DEMAND by Sandy Griffis, Executive Director, Yavapai County Contractors Association

P

eruse help wanted ads in our newspaper; scan job openings on any job search site, look at the “Hiring” signs on the back of our local construction vehicles and you will find hundreds of companies looking for construction industry workers. In the second quarter 2018 report, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce Commercial Construction Index said nine out of 10 contractors are concerned about the ongoing labor shortage, marking the fourth consecutive quarter that construction companies have expressed apprehension about being able to find enough qualified workers. In addition, 47-percent of contractors surveyed for the report expected their ability to find skilled workers to worsen in the next six months. Despite labor challenges, contractor confidence is high, with 96 percent reporting they expect the demand for commercial and

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residential construction services to increase in the next 12 months. Our local jurisdictional permit stats are an indication of the increase. The City of Prescott for the first six months of 2017 issued 151 single family home permits; the first six months of 2018, 188 single family permits were issued. The Town of Prescott Valley has experienced a similar increase. The first six months of 2017, the Town issued 246 single family permits and the first six months of 2018, 294 single family permits were issued. Chino Valley is also on a growth spurt with 55 single family permits during the first six months of 2017 and 96 single family for the first 6 months of 2018. I have said this before and I will make this statement again: Do you know that the construction industry is projected to grow 22 percent by 2022 and in some parts of the country wages have increased more than 10 percent since last year? Opportunity is on the doorstep for skilled trades. Locally, many of our construction firms are concerned about finding skilled tradespeople to keep up with demand. With the industry facing an aging workforce; hanging around 45 and up, with an insufficient pipeline of new workers and lost workers who moved on to other industries, with a tidal wave of retirement taking place over the next few years, and along with misperception about careers in the skilled trades, the construction industry labor shortage is going to grow. The construction industry is a lucrative career, it is rewarding both personally and financially, it is exciting, it is anything but dull, and it is an industry that will never disappear. How do we focus on changing public perception and raising awareness about careers in the skilled trades to open doors to more viable career options for young people graduating high school? YCCA and our members are working hard to close that gap through a combined effort of training and promoting construction as a viable career path. We are striving to build a diverse, job-ready work force equipped with hands-on

training and on-the-job experience. Four-year college degrees are not for everyone, but it doesn’t mean there are no other viable options to make a decent living. In fact, some specialized construction careers pay more than six figures, and in the skilled trades, one could start at the entry level and work their way up to owner of the company, all with training comparable to a four-year college degree. The workforce gap continues to rise maybe even skyrocket is the right word to use. Finding skilled trade workers is an enormous challenge facing our builders and subcontractors. It’s 2018 and students are burdened by loan debt that is higher than ever. The average student loan debt for the Class of 2017 graduates was $39,400, up 6 percent from 2016. The other scary statistic is that Americans owe over $1.48 trillion in student loan debt; spread out among about 44 million borrowers, that’s about $620 billion more than the total U.S. credit card debt. Nightly news stories talk about mounting college debt incurred by recent graduates who cannot find jobs that pay enough to start a life and pay off college loans. Yes, there is a “win-win” that addresses this scenario and that is: College students we have construction jobs for you! A career in the skilled trades, such as plumbing, carpentry or electrical work, was once viewed as a respected occupation. Today, young people entering the workforce are rarely encouraged by educators, parents and other mentors and influencers to consider a skilled trade’s career path. High school students are pushed into college, regardless of whether it’s appropriate for their personality, learning style, finances or employment goals. By looking at the building industry as offering lucrative, abundant and fulfilling professions, and by helping young people prepare to step into these jobs, we offer them viable careers that come with flexibility, no college debt and more importantly, long-term sustainability. THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Prescott Country Club Custom Home

3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Bathrooms, 2,575 SF â&#x20AC;˘ MLS# 1012659 â&#x20AC;˘ $468,000 Million dollar panoramic, breathtaking views! Move in ready, great location on quiet cul-de-sac in a highly desired area in Prescott Valley. Single level home includes den, great room, large 3 car garage, bonus storage shed. Open kitchen, new granite counters, upgraded stainless appliances + french door refrig, medium oak cabinetry, w/lazy susan shelving & slide out shelves, recessed lighting & sunny window, tiled flooring & dining area. Open great room w/custom media art niche, gorgeous stone fireplace. Master suite w/sitting area, french door to rear view patio. Master bath w/tile floors, marble vanity counters, bath & shower surrounds, oval jetted bath, enclosed shower & walk in closet. Rear patio w/panoramic Mingus Mtn views, perfect for morning sunrise, coffee or BBQ. Imagine the stars! Many more extras!

Terri Chase 914 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

928.925.9366

www.ChaseRealtyGroup.com Terri@ChaseRealtyGroup.com

Northern Arizona


Special Section: Home & Garden

READY FOR THANKSGIVING? by Tom Reilly, Renovations

Y

es, I said Thanksgiving…. My, how time flies. Wasn’t it just February? The passage of time is keenly felt by all of us, but particularly those of us who plan things. Be that planning a vacation, or, of course, a renovation. Remember the thoughts you had during last year’s holiday season about how you wanted to make this or that in the house better? Be it the master bath, converting an extra bedroom to a home theater, or just opening up that kitchen so you can talk to your guests while preparing a meal. Now is the time to start your plan. Make a bullet point list of the things you want the space to do or how you want it to function:

Things I want the space to do: •

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Want to be able to have my better half work in the kitchen without bumping into me.

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• •

Want to have more privacy for my home office. I really like the view from the master bedroom and I want to have a place to have a chair for us to read or just enjoy the view.

planning will yield a great project. Enjoy these summer days! Renovations is at 142 S. Alarcon St., Prescott (928) 445-8506 renovationsaz.com.

Things my space is not doing: •

The bedroom has no space for a chair or two. • The kitchen was designed for one skinny person. • The den/office is right near the front door and the TV room. At Renovations, we are currently planning projects that will be completed by Thanksgiving. We have found that the planning process for a remodeling project like a kitchen, major bath project, generally takes about four to six weeks. Then of course there is the permitting process. That can take an additional four weeks. Great

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Marie Larson 928-830-5228

Don Partch 928-830-9977

Cheryl Fernandez 928-362-0778 Awarded Top Sales Producers 2007-2017

Estancia de Prescott

Prescott Lakes

128 E. SOARING AVENUE Extraordinary Estancia home with gorgeous views. 5113 SF, 5 BR, 4 BA. $1,050,000 • MLS#1010416

1564 DONAMIRE CIRCLE Stunning custom home in The Estates TBC Sept 2018. 2553 SF, 4 BR, 3 BA. $695,900 • MLS#1013019

Haisley Homestead

1261 TANGLEWOOD ROAD Gorgeous home on double lot in the pines. 2717 SF, 3 BR, 3 BA. $545,000 • MLS#1011800

Prescott Lakes

Prescott Lakes

1052 VANTAGE POINT CIRCLE Beautiful craftsman style home with unobstructed views. 3025 SF, 3 BR, 3 BA. $790,000 • MLS#1012522

1567 DONAMIRE CIRCLE Wraparound porch plus amazing views! 3271 SF, 4 BR, 4 BA. $650,000 • MLS#1012500

Cliff Rose

1410 ST. CHARLES AVENUE Incredible views from this main level living home. 3436 SF, 4 BR, 3 BA. $499,000 • MLS#1011477

www.donpartch.com • donpartch@realtyexecutives.com “Call us today for a complimentary market analysis of your property.” ©AD DESIGNED BY HOMES & LAND MAGAZINE

1401 Prescott Lakes Parkway Prescott, AZ 86301


Amazing Stoneridge Golf & Mountain Views Here!

6 Bedrooms, 4 Bathrooms, 3,549 SF • MLS #1012434 • $619,000 Feels like a large resort home with upgrades everywhere! Includes great room, formal living & dining rooms, game room, loft/family room. Really nice open concept granite kitchen w/views, upgraded stainless appliances, granite butlers counter, big double door pantry. Tiled great room w/gorgeous floor to ceiling stacked stone cozy fireplace, sunny wall of windows w/breathtaking views, media niches & informal dining area. Spacious master bedroom, upgraded sunny sliding door to rear patio, recessed lighting, upgraded glass block walk-in shower, oval soaking tub, dual sinks, huge walk in closet, private toilet room. Gorgeous outdoor living, big covered patios, fire pits for the s’mores & starry nights. Fantastic area amenities & monthly activity calendar & clubs. Low HOA fees of only 175.26 quarterly, also pays the weekly trash service too! It’s good to live in Stoneridge!

Terri Chase 914 E. Gurley St. Prescott, AZ 86301

928.925.9366

www.ChaseRealtyGroup.com Terri@ChaseRealtyGroup.com

Northern Arizona


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LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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Vista Pines Estate For Sale in Prescott About the Architect: Mickey Muennig

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

About Vista Pines Estate

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

www.2775WVistaPinesTrl.com

LUXURY property specialists

Di Ann Norkus 928.710.0148 Di.LuxuryHomes@gmail.com

Cindy lamont 928.273.2228

Cindy.LuxuryHomes@gmail.com

Representing Properties of Distinction


Special Section: Home & Garden

FAMILY-RUN BUSINESS ASKS, “IS YOUR YARD READY TO FALL INTO AUTUMN?” by Tracey Horn, Helken & Horn Ad Agency

E

ven though summer heat and thunderstorms are on your mind, it is refreshing to know fall is just around the corner. Will your yard be ready for the seasonal change? It pays to rely on landscape professionals to make your home the envy of the neighborhood. The husband and wife team of Josh and Laura Crothers have the answer. As owners of Prescott Landscape Professionals, they offer some sage advice. “There are a few steps you can take to make it so,” Josh

says. “As our season transitions into the cooler temperatures of fall, be sure to adjust your irrigation controller to decrease the amount of water you use by a third and advance your start time. This way your landscape will use less water and you’ll minimize the potential for early morning freeze issues.” As fall arrives and the leaves change, Laura says the two often are asked, “Do my plants and trees still even need fertilizer?” She answers: “They do. Even though it seems like everything

Josh and Laura Crothers with children Grace and Matthew.

is soon getting ready for a long winter nap, your plants need food to be strong and hearty for the cold temperatures. We recommend a winter/fall type of fertilizer to feed your plants and trees.” Because of the beautifully unique climate in the highlands, residences feature everything from desert xeriscapes to alpine landscapes; each has its own unique needs. Prescott Landscape Professionals recommends you give them a call so they can put you on a fall fertilization program right for your particular needs. This locally-based, family-run business truly prides itself on being part of the community. Josh Crothers got his start here in the northland putting his horticultural degree to work as project manager for the Stone Ridge project, building the golf course, roads, parks and landscapes. He noticed a gap in

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the local market for small scale landscape maintenance and installations, so he and Laura started Prescott Landscape Professionals, formerly known as JC Clean Up, in 2010. “There’s nothing like enjoying the rewards of hard work and owning our own business. It’s a good lesson for our teenagers who occasionally help out.” Laura adds, “We’re proud to serve our community helping on projects like Kayla’s Hands Playground. And we are fortunate to have so many longtime customer relationships,” Josh says. The duo is also proud of their team of licensed landscaping professionals and consider them to be the best there is in the Prescott and Prescott Valley communities, maybe even in the state. To find out more about Prescott Landscape Professionals, visit prescottlandscapeprofessionals.com or call (928) 830-3480.

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***PENDING*** The housing market is in high demand. Call us now if you are ready to buy or sell a home!

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GARDENS THAT ATTRACT HUMMINGBIRDS AND BUTTERFLIES by Lisa Watters-Lain, Arizona’s garden gal, Watters Garden Center

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utterflies are some of the most beautiful and interesting creatures in the landscape. A butterfly garden is an easy way to see more butterflies and help them, since many local habitats have been lost to human activities like building homes and roads. It

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is easy to increase the number and variety of butterflies in your yard. Simply grow the plants butterflies like to feed on! Because so many butterflies snack on the same plants your hummingbirds enjoy, so much the list of preferred butterfly-attracting plants work equally well to bring more hummingbirds into the gardens. You win two-fold when actively drawing butterflies into your landscape. The butterfly garden is full of activity now through fall. Yellow sulphurs alight on coneflower, while burnt-orange skippers jostle with bumblebees on oregano and lavender. Monarchs, on their long journey to their winter grounds in Mexico, stop to rest and take nectar from asters and other late-blooming flowers. The

bright yellow blossoms of goldenrod are especially favored by swallowtails and painted ladies. A host of beneficial insects and birds looking for an insect meal snack through your gardens at the same time. Purple cone flower and globe thistle attract butterflies through September, forming handsome seed heads that eventually feed your birds. Autumn Joy Sedums draw butterflies to dusty-pink blossoms, which darken to form a dramatic accent in late fall and winter. Ornamental grasses often change color in the fall and form interesting seed heads. Skipper caterpillars feed on grasses and may spend winter at the base of the plants. Hot lips sage — This twotoned flower looks as though

garden fairies have dabbed each white bloom with raspberry lipstick so the dozens of flowers actually blow kisses in a mountain breeze. The flowers are utterly irresistible to local butterflies and a quick pick-meup for migrating hummingbirds. Here is the best part … javalina and rabbits find this knee-high perennial absolutely repugnant! There are so many colors to choose from that many gardeners collect them like some might collect roses or daylily. Available in several forms of red, pink, white and purple. Each is so hardy they naturalize once established. Hummingbirds ingest half their weight in food every day. Flowering plants provide the nectar, and tiny insects provide the

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Special Section: Home & Garden

protein busy hummingbirds need to keep going. Hummingbirds visit a large array of plants, but especially enjoy any plants that display a tubular shaped flower that is brightly colored. Strategically place a feeder surrounded by these suggested plants and enjoy as more and more humming visitors attend the banquet. Balboa Sunset Trumpet Vine is a local hummingbird all-time favorite. Clusters of deeper red 4-inch flowers cover the plant. Expect lightning-quick coverage up a trellis to mask old fences and sheds, or accent a beautiful courtyard wall. Hummingbirds find this stunning vine absolutely irresistible. Plant more Balboa Sunsets and you will have more hummingbirds, guaranteed. Diversity is the key to an active landscape full of humming-

bird antics and more butterflies at rest in your gardens. Provide them food and housing and the number of visitors to the garden grows each season. A detailed listing of local butterfly and hummingbird plants is available free for the asking to my garden readers. Simply ask for the garden guide titled “Plants that Attract Butterflies & Hummers” for a detailed list of local plants. Until next issue, I’ll be helping locals attract more butterflies here at Watters Garden Center. Lisa Watters-Lain can be found throughout the week at Watters Garden Center, 1815 W. Iron Springs Road in Prescott or contacted through her web site at WattersGardenCenter.com or FB.com/WattersGardenCenter.

BUTTERFLIES are MAGIC in the GARDEN

Attracting butterflies is easy with Watters butterfly plant collection. We know local plants, and we know the butterflies that love them. Your garden should be natural, safe and organic for people as well as butterflies! Attracting butterflies is easy with Watters butterfly plant collection. We know local plants, and we know the butterflies that Ken Lain love them. Your garden should be natural, safe and‘The organic for people as well Mountain Gardener’ as butterflies!

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Spring, Summer, Winter, Fall Prescott has the best of all! It would be my pleasure to assist you with the purchase of your dream home.

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LEE HOEKSTRA, REALTOR® 480.399.8626 • CapitalCanyonRealtyGroup@aol.com 2060 Golf Club Lane • Prescott, Arizona 86303

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“It would be my pleasure to help you find or sell your next house!” -Brett Ward Brett Ward REALTOR

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Wingspace: a unique opportunity for entrepreneurs

T

he grand opening of W i n g Sp a c e, a l a r g e business office complex, is providing enterprising young professionals with office space, equipment and resources that otherwise might not be accessible. Prescott Mayor Greg Mengarelli and several Prescott City Council members praised the spacious facility as “… another way of demonstrating that young entrepreneurs are welcome and wanted in the community.” Mengarelli gave founder Melanie Banayat a certificate to celebrate the opening. Mayor Pro Tem Billie Orr said, “As a City, Prescott welcome millennials and their creativity.”

Prescott Chamber of Commerce President and CEO Sheri Heiney said WingSpace was a welcomed new chamber member. WingSpace is the culmination of a longtime vision of founder Banayat. She said it took more than 18 months to find a central location that would lend itself to such a dissimilar mix of businesses that partner in co-sharing office space. Located at 371 Garden St., Suite A — just off Miller Valley Road — WingSpace will be open from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. However, members have 24-hour access to facilities, Banayat said. Those partnering in the diverse office range from writers, graphic designers, photogra-

Community leaders and founding members celebrated the grand opening of WingSpace with a ribbon cutting on June 7.

phers and videographers to life and health coaches, a real estate broker, a French teacher, a hypnotherapist and a CPA. Also partnering are the owners of alocal magazine, a brain-training firm, and some off-site remote workers who handle assignments for firms located outside the Quad City area. “It’s an eclectic group of talented people who have access to space and business resourc-

es,” Banayat said. Among those resources are individual offices, conferences rooms, some office furniture, telephone conferencing equipment, an upscale printer, Wi-Fi, and other items that will help the partners succeed in their business enterprises. For more information about WingSpace, contact Banayat at cowork@wingspace.biz; or call (928) 239-5646.

ERAU planetarium a popular regional destination

A

n unexpected consequence of the Jim and Linda Lee Planetarium is its appeal beyond just the campus and local community. It also is attracting thousands of visitors from throughout the country, and even some from the international community. Planetarium Director Eric Edelman said programs he and the planetarium staff are sharing free of charge to the public attracted more than 15,000 people in just the past si x months. In fact, staff members from Education USA offices within U.S. embassies around

116 PRE S COT T LI V ING

the world recently toured the campus so they could tell international students about ERAU and its facilities. Edelman said programs such as “Prescott Summer Night Sky” and “Back to the Moon” have attracted full houses almost every time they are presented. Most shows are on weekends, he noted. The technologically sophisticated facility will seat 116 in a 360-degree configuration where complex computer multimedia technology can create the virtual reality of the cosmos. The domed planetarium was

made possible through the generosity of Prescott philanthropists Jim and Linda Lee. It sits atop the recently opened STEM Center (science, technology, engineering and math) academic building. ERAU Chancellor Frank Ayers publicly praised the Lees, “I can’t say enough how much we appreciate the support of Jim and Linda Lee. Over the years, they have given of their time, talent and treasure for our great scholar athletes, the campus Board of Visitors, and now, the planetarium.” Originally from Texas but

Arizona residents for several decades, the Lees recently told Prescott Living Magazine, “the future of Prescott cannot be separated from the future of ERAU.” Over the years, the Lees have been instrumental in developing the Prescott Gateway Mall, the Ranch Residential area, and most recently, Touchmark at the Ranch adult retirement resort. Information about the planetarium and its programs is available on line at EDELMAN @erau.edu or frahera@erau.edu.

Read more news on page 118...

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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Dorn Homes dedicates Saddlewood Subdivision Your neighbor wants to sell her house and is asking for your recommendation. Out-of- town friends want to buy a retirement home or summer cabin here. Dad has to go into assisted living and needs to sell his place, but it’s outdated and full of stuff! Who do you trust to help the people you care for with all the details of their real estate transaction? Someone experienced, professional, levelheaded and organized, of course. What about compassionate? Or even fun?

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xecutives from Dorn Homes used the big scissors June 23 for a ribbon cutting at Prescott’s newest master-planned residential community. The Saddlewood subdivision is at Lone Elk Road, just north of Willow Creek Drive and Pioneer Parkway. The project is on acreage of a larger development project known as Deep Well Ranch owned by longtime area residents, the James Family. David Grounds, Dorn Homes owner and CEO, spoke after being introduced by Sanford Cohen, immediate past chair, Prescott Chamber of Commerce. Yavapai County Supervisor Craig Brown and Prescott Mayor Greg Mengarelli explained that the development is annexed into Prescott city limits. Mengarelli said because Deep Well Ranch is annexed into city limits, infrastructure, including water, is under control of the City. Dorn Homes is considered the region’s largest home builder and has been constructing homes for more than 50 years. The firm received national awards for “Green Home” architecture — innovative and energy efficient designs, quality construction and environmental sensitivity.

Grounds thanked county and community leaders for their support. He emphasized he envisioned the development as a master-planned community, with several options for home buyers. Buyers have a choice from nine floor plans, starting at $250,000 and increasing to slightly above $310,000. Plans range from 1,369 square feet to 2,118 square feet. All have two baths and two bedrooms. Others have two bedrooms and a den and some have three bedrooms. Three models are two-story. All have two-car garages. Grounds noted the home office for Dorn Homes is at 600 W. Gurley St. in downtown Prescott. However, the Saddlewood development has a sales office at its entrance. Dorn executive staff, the James family and several community leaders took part in the ribbon-cutting ceremony.

ERAU to host historic meeting with Israel cyber security delegation

H

istory will be made Friday, Aug. 10, when Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University (ERAU) hosts representatives from 21 Israeli cyber security companies for a day of meetings with experts from the ERAU College of Security and Intelligence. Israeli delegates will be joined by representatives from leading companies from throughout Arizona, such as Intel, Microsoft, Go-Daddy, American Express, Northup Grumman, Discover Card, and other major cyber security players, said a spokesperson. Arizona’s U.S. Rep. Paul Gosar is expected to join the group. “This is a statewide event, not just regional,” said James Robb, an economic develop-

ment consultant for the City of Prescott. “What’s more, it’s the first time Arizona as a state had ever participated in such an historic meeting.” ERAU is the home for the nation’s first College of Intelligence and Security. ERAU Chancellor Frank Ayers said of the meeting, “We are proud to be able to host this important event for our colleagues from the Israeli cyber delegation. Being involved in important events like this leads to opportunities for the greater Prescott community. It also lets our educational institutions forge productive business partnerships worldwide.” Lieb Bolel, President and CEO of Arizona Israel Technology Alliance, said, “With

Arizona a leading state in cybersecurity, a delegation of Israeli companies such as this could not come at a better time to see stronger relationships between Arizona and Israel. This sector will prosper through the synergies and mediums of innovation, talent and problem-solving some of the great cyber threats that we are presented with today.” Partnering with ERAU to sponsor the event are the City of Prescott and Yavapai College. Following the meeting, the Israeli delegation will leave for California, where delegates will meet with the government of Israel’s Economic Mission team.

Read more news on page 128...

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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Are you thinking about relocating to Prescott when you retire? Make sure you don’t end up with a beauty like this!

Contact John Gorden to schedule a guided tour of Prescott and its many beautiful subdivisions. Explore neighborhoods with amenities that match your lifestyle and meet your budget. Whether it’s downtown plaza living you seek, golf course communities, homes with a little bit of land or homes with million-dollar views, Prescott offers it. Let knowledgeable and experienced Realtor John Gorden help you find the home you’ve always imagined in beautiful Prescott.

Call 928-308-0101 or email PrescottsBestHomes@gmail.com

Check out the information available on these websites and schedule a tour today! w w w. I n s c r i p t i o n C a n y o n R e s i d e n t s . c o m w w w.T i m b e r R i d g e R e s i d e n t s . c o m w w w. A m e r i c a n R a n c h R e s i d e n t s . c o m w w w. F o r e s t Tr a i l s R e s i d e n t s . c o m w w w.W i l l i a m s o nVa l l e y R a n c h R e s i d e n t s . c o m w w w. P i n o n O a k s R e s i d e n t s . c o m w w w. C r o s s r o a d s R a n c h R e s i d e n t s . c o m w w w. P C C R e s i d e n t s . c o m

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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 64 are doing things that are just amazing. Again, the buildings are nice, the facilities are beautiful here. But it’s really what goes on in those buildings that’s amazing, and that’s what I get excited about. So that’s our biggest success — creating an environment where everyone can succeed. PRESCOTT LIVING: What’s your biggest challenge? DR. FRANK AYERS: Creating an environment where everyone can succeed (laughter). We’re always looking for opportunities to do better. I’ve never worked with a group of staff and faculty who are more committed to our students and our University than this wonderful group of colleagues. As a tenured professor, I am privileged to be a member of this great faculty. And as a chancellor, I am equally privileged to be a member of this great staff. I’m proud to be a member of both faculty and staff and having that group behind us. Keeping all of us moving forward — that’s our biggest challenge. But as you can see around you, we are up to it. PRESCOTT LIVING: Have you ever had any major disappointments? DR. FRANK AYERS: You know, no. I really haven’t. In fact, my wife Debbie and I haven’t had time to have disappointments. We are both so busy and engaged. Debbie’s involved in so much of campus life. She’s the hardest working unpaid person, I think, around here. I wouldn’t say everything is always been peaches and cream. We just have to keep positive and keep moving. All of us here, we tend to be thoughtful about what we do. Then we just do it. We want to be successful. As a campus, we do not try to copy others, rather, we try to build on our success in areas we understand. That sounds a little Pollyanna-ish, but you put good people together and it works.

ON THE COURT

PRESCOTT LIVING: Prior to your being here, the athletic program was minimal. Since your arrival, and with the recruitment of good coaches and some really excellent student-athletes, the intercollegiate program is attracting national caliber athletes. How did that happen? DR. FRANK AYERS: We call it doing athletics the right way. We’re using athletics to attract

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• THE INTERV IE W

YouTube where he shows you the different arcs that the three-point shot take: The one that is the most efficient, the one that has the least bounce out. He’s an amazing young man. A senior next year. Just a real standout on our basketball team and in the classroom.

U.S. AIR FORCE ROOTS

Frank in the cockpit

the brightest students. It used to be that for a student who wanted to study forensic biology and play softball, there was no place at Embry-Riddle. Now there is. We added both new academic and athletic programs that complement each other. Our theory is that if you get really bright athletes, they’ll do well. They will tell you they are great time managers. Turns out to be true. An example is a young lady who we attracted to our golf program. She was told by several NCAA Division I schools she couldn’t be an engineer and play golf at the same time. Well, she graduated here with honors in engineering, and was a four-time All-American at golf. Now she’s a flight test engineer at Edwards Air Force Base. That’s an Embry-Riddle athlete (laughter). And we like that. Four graduating seniors from our women’s volleyball team that dominated the conference this year — three are aerospace engineers and one a space physicist. A rocket scientist. And the volleyball team had a 30-win season and was ranked 23rd in the nation. That’s who we’re attracting to athletics. We won five conference championships this year. Amazingly enough, in a school that’s still 75 percent men, four of those championships were by women’s teams. PRESCOTT LIVING: I remember one anecdote you shared with me one time. The basketball player who developed the physics of shooting a basketball. Tell us about that, Frank. DR. FRANK AYERS: Yes, he will be a senior this year. In high school, his senior project was “The Physics of the Three-point Shot.” He had a video which used to be available on

PRESCOTT LIVING: Prior to your becoming a university professor-administrator, you had a very successful career in the US Air Force — 26 years. You enlisted in 1974. Tell us about your professional career as a pilot. DR. FRANK AYERS: Sure. My wife and I were both commissioned in the Air Force in 1974. In fact, Debbie was the first woman commissioned out of military school in the United States. PRESCOTT LIVING: The first? DR. FRANK AYERS: Yes, the first. We both attended Virginia Tech and were members of the corps of cadets in Blacksburg. Debbie joined the Air Force ROTC the first year it was open to women and was commissioned a military cadet in 1974. I went into the Air Force as a B-52 pilot and spent about 14-15 years as a B-52 instructor pilot in a variety of roles. Squadron commander, and instructor at the B-52 School House in Merced, Calif. I shifted over to become a deputy support group commander and then a support group commander at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas. At my last assignment, I was the director for joint military education at the Pentagon. So when I came to Embry-Riddle in 2000, I’d already run several large operations. I had a combat support group of 3,500 people that I managed; I have an aviation and education background. I came to the University to teach. I think all those experiences led me to think I might be able to do some more things at the University. I was the chair of the flight department of our Florida campus for about five years, and then was asked to Prescott. And this has simply been the best. PRESCOTT LIVING: Tell us about your career at the Pentagon and the FAA Industry Training Standards (FITS) program. DR. FRANK AYERS: They are two separate things. My career at the Pentagon — I was in charge of joint military education. So, I served as the accrediting body for joint mili-

continued on page 144... THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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BUILDING GREAT FUTURES by Nicole Kennedy, Vice President of Development, Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Arizona

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he Boys & Girls Clubs has a proud history of serving youth in communities nationwide since 1860. Founded originally as a Boys’ Club in Connecticut, it has grown tremendously, serving over four million boys and girls annually between more than 4,000 clubs. Locally, the Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Arizona serve youth in the Quad-cities, with clubs in Prescott, Prescott Valley and Chino Valley. Each day, our local clubs see almost 200 kids. One such Club kid is PJ, a member of our Prescott club. PJ loves attending the club so much that what he wants more than anything is to be a staff member. PJ’s favorite thing to do is help staff and other club kids. He even gives new members tours of the facility. There is rarely a day that he is not at the club, all smiles and ready for the day’s activities. Activities are as varied as our kids - whether cross-training in the gym, volunteering around town, or simply doing

PHOTOS BY BLUSHING CACTUS PHOTOGRAPHY

their homework. While each club kid has their own story, they all share the need to belong. Every child deserves to be part of a community where they are safe and surrounded by peers and adults who truly care about their future. That is the mission of the Boys & Girls Clubs, to serve all kids who need us most, helping them to reach their full potential along the way. The last thing we want to do is turn away a child in need. Yet, since 2016, both Prescott and Prescott Valley clubs have had a wait list, simply because of limited capacity. We live in one of the fastest growing towns in the area, and serve a community with limited options for after school programming. Gerald Szostak, Executive Director of our local clubs, explains, “Our organization has experienced significant growth in the last four years. The youth of our community deserve a first class facility that offers a safe environment for them to grow and thrive.”

Won’t you help us expand our services, so we can serve more kids in need? While we have a time-tested, national model to guide us in implementing life-changing programs, Boys & Girls Clubs of Central Arizona relies only on our local community to make these services a reality. Together with our community, we have plans to expand and enhance our existing facilities in Prescott and Prescott Valley. In Prescott Valley, the expansion of an 8,000-square-foot gym will be a community asset, providing a safe place for Boys & Girls Club kids, but will also act as a hub for community events, intramural sports and more. In Prescott, a playground will provide much needed space for children to get outside, learn and play. Both clubs will benefit from

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a remodel of the existing space — as both were originally designed as community adult centers, with vastly different space planning than what best fits the needs of children. You can help make a difference for the kids who are waiting to be part of a life-changing experience at Boys & Girls Clubs. Invest in building great futures for our youth by calling (928) 776-8686 or visiting bgccaz.org.

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THE PRESCOTT PIONEER PR ESCOT T • PR ESCOT T VA LL EY • CHINO VA LL EY • DE W EY-H UM BOLDT

CONTINUED…

Prescott Education Foundation funds new playground

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h e P r e s c o t t Un i f i e d School District Education Foundation (PUSDEF) granted $20,000 to Granite Mountain School for the construction of gaga ball pits and new playground equipment for fifth and sixth graders. It is the first time in its fiveyear history that the PUSDEF has given money to a school for a formal campus beautification project, said Krista Carman, foundation president. The application, called “Kids at Play — The Gift of Unstructured and Innovative Play,” was selected from among five submitted by Prescott school personnel to the PUSDEF board. Carman said a local home builder, Aspen Valley Homes, volunteered to help prepare the grounds for installation of the

ball pits and the playground equipment. Carman said the company will donate approximately one-half the cost of ground preparation. School principal Teresa Bruso told board members the playground equipment was desperately needed to encourage students to join in unstructured creative and imaginative play that had immense physical benefits. Gaga ball pits usually are op en-a i r, o c t ag on-sh ap e d fenced pits where children can play what commonly has been called dodgeball without fear of the ball going out of bounds. The application requested that three gaga pits be funded. Playground equipment will be installed adjacent to the pits. Since its founding as a 501(c) (3) charitable organization, the

Prescott Unified School District Superintendent Joe Howard and PUSD Education Foundation President Krista Carman were pleased the foundation could grant $20,000 to Granite Mountain School for construction of a contemporary playground for fifth- and sixth-grade students. The school was selected following intensive review of five applications by the Education Foundation board of directors.

PUSDEF has granted more than $150,000 to grant applicants from various Prescott district schools, Carman said. “We wish we could grant more, for our various schools have significant needs

for external support,” she said. Those interested in more details about contributing to the PUSDEF can call (928) 717-3204 or email Future@PUSDEducationFoundation.com.

Three school districts receive donations

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hen school started in early August, hundreds of children received school supplies, including well-stocked backpacks because of a new program initiated by the Coalition for Compassion and Justice (CCJ) in partnership with the Yavapai County Food Bank (YCFB). This year was unlike previous years, when individual students received modest gifts of school supplies. Jessi Hans, CCJ executive director, explained, “We shifted our request for donations of school supplies and instead asked for donations of money. The reason—to leverage the money so that we could buy school items in bulk, and get bigger discounts, hence more supplies. It paid off. Instead of getting a few rulers and cray-

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CCJ Board Prescient Mary Bauer hands CCJ Executive Director Jessi Hans just a handful of the boxes of school supplies distributed at three different district schools.

ons and scissors, we ordered in bulk and got tremendous deals. More supplies meant more kids benefited.” CCJ Board President Mary Bauer said she was delighted at

the increased support CCJ could give to needy students. “We hope in the future to be able to include every school in every school district.” Also different this year,

three local school district administrators from — Chino Valley School District, Humboldt Unified School District and Prescott Unified School District — each identified a specific school to which donation would go. In Chino Valley, it was the high school. In Prescott Valley, it was Mountain View Elementary School. In Prescott, it was Lincoln Elementary School. Distribution of items was coordinated by Lynn Passfield from the YCFB. Hans emphasized that although the distribution deadline has passed, those who want to contribute funds to help purchase more school supplies can do so by contacting her. She can be reached at (928) 445-8382 or at jessi. hans@yavapaiccj.org.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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COURTESY WALT DISNE Y WO

RLD RESORT®

COURTESY WALT DISNEY WORLD RESORT®

DISNE Y WO COURTESY WALT

RLD RESORT®


Traveling • Dining • Entertainment

MAGIC OF DISNEY THRILLS ADVENTURE LOVERS OF ALL AGES ®

G

by Tori Ward, ROX Travel, Cruise and Resort Specialist rowing up in Florida our favorite summer activity was rafting and swimming at Rock Springs. The natural spring water was 68 degrees and my brother would only wade in to knee level with his arms crossed, before his lips started turning blue and he’d wade out goose-fleshed before trying again a few minutes later. I was more pragmatic and deployed the shock and awe technique of diving in immediately. My own sons grew up in Orlando after the Walt Disney World® Resort opened. The song from the It’s a Small World® Attraction was one of the first songs they knew all the words to and we measured rites of passage by how close they were to being tall enough to ride the Space Mountain® Attraction. Growing up in Florida our favorite summer activity was rafting and swimming at Rock Springs. The natural spring water was 68 degrees and my brother would only wade in to knee level with his arms crossed, before his lips started turning blue and he’d wade out goose-fleshed before trying again a few minutes later. I was more pragmatic and deployed the shock and awe technique of diving in immediately. My own sons grew up in Orlando after the Walt Disney World® Resort opened. The song from the It’s a Small World® Attraction was one of the first songs they knew all the words to and we measured rites of passage by how close they were to being tall enough to ride the Space Mountain® Attraction. The Walt Disney® Company has grown from two castle-centered parks on separate U.S. coasts to a global entertainment and vacation presence. With parks in Paris and several in Asia, children from around the world can experience the magic that has enchanted their American peers for over half a century. The Disneyland® Resort in Anaheim includes both the original theme park as well as Disney California Adventure® Park, an attraction that brings the stories of Disney’s Pixar® characters and their adventures to life. Two favorite water attractions that appeal to children of all ages includes the Epcot’s® The Seas with Nemo & Friends® Attraction, in the theme park, and the Under the Sea – Journey of the Little Mermaid, featuring Ariel at Disney California Adventure® Park. Currently, a three-day park hopper pass allows LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

unlimited admission to both attractions with the added incentive of a Magic Morning, one early morning admission before the parks open to the general public to enjoy shops, select attractions and restaurants. The Downtown Disney® Area provides guests a chance to recharge at one of the many restaurants offering both casual as well as fine dining experiences. Guests staying at one of the three park hotels are given restaurant reservation preference. One of the few times I was ever late for a college class was the day the Walt Disney World® Resort opened because I got tangled up in Orlando traffic. Things have certainly improved since then and the park really is a small planet that encompass four theme parks, two water parks and two restaurant and shopping areas; Disney Springs and Disney’s Boardwalk. The Magic Kingdom®, Epcot®, Animal Kingdom® and Disney’s Hollywood Studios® comprise the four theme parks within the resort. At the Epcot World® Showcase, guests can explore pavilions representing 11 countries with restaurants, shops and exhibits in each. The Epcot® trademark geodesic dome houses Mission: SPACE® Attraction, one of the many attractions representing science and technology. As an adult, I’ll admit that the Epcot® still holds enormous appeal. Mirroring her sister on the West Coast, the Walt Disney World® Resort also offers many special packages that allow guests to select options designed to incorporate as many days, parks and attractions as budget and time permits, including golf packages. Lodgings at the resort include 25 different styles of accommodations, from luxury to modest, including a campground. An hour away from the Florida resort, Port Canaveral is the homeport to Disney Dream and Disney Fantasy, cruise ships offering voyages from three to 14 days. On the West Coast, San Diego is the homeport for Disney Wonder with cruises from two to 14 days. And continuing to prove it’s a small world after all, Disney Magic sails to ports in Europe. The ability to combine a cruise and park vacation checks off many boxes for families trying to provide an experience that both children and adults will enjoy.

In 2005, the Walt Disney® Company added another vacation option for travelers who wanted to see more of the world than the teaser at Epcot®. Adventures by Disney® offers guided vacations to 37 destinations on six continents. From the Great Wall of China to the Great Barrier Reef in Australia, guests are accompanied by two Disney®-trained guides who take care of all the details - from arranging private tours of the Vatican Museum to backstage private events where guests are given VIP treatment that includes special activities for junior travelers. With so many options, it’s easy to become overwhelmed with all the choices offered by the Walt Disney® Company. Whether you have two days, or a month, and want to surprise your family with a vacation they will always remember, as an authorized Disney® travel agent, I would be happy to help you design a magical vacation that they will buzz about for light-years.

EXPERT TIPS: •

To stay cooler during the summer months, visit one of the water parks at the Walt Disney World® Resort during the day and one of the theme parks later in the afternoon. The water parks close at 5 p.m. the Magic Kingdom® Park is open until 11 p.m. every day except Sunday. Electing fast-pass at either resort allows a ticket holder to reduce wait time at three attractions per day and can be used by cell phone. Make priorities. Unless you are only going to one theme park, you won’t be able to see everything in two or three days. Even at a single theme park, it won’t be possible to do everything available. If you are taking small children, keep in mind you will be walking for miles each day. Stroller rentals are available at the parks if you don’t take your own. Just because your little one loves Mickey and the other Disney® characters on television don’t be surprised if they become shy or scared when faced with the real thing.

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TWICE-A-YEAR SMOKI AUCTION SHOWCASES RICH HISTORY OF NAVAJO WEAVING

by Cindy Gresser, Director of The Smoki Museum

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wice a year, The Smoki Museum of American Indian Art and Culture presents our Navajo Rug and Indian Art Auction. This wonderful sales event that supports our general operating fund was initiated about 22 years ago by Jeff Ogg and Bruce Burnham. Bruce remains our auctioneer. While providing income for the museum, these sales continue to introduce the traditions of Navajo weaving to the public. It is said that the Navajo people learned their fine weaving skills from the Pueblo people hundreds of years ago. When the Spanish introduced sheep in the 1500s, wool became the principle source of fiber for Navajo weaving. Before the Navajo were sent on the Long Walk, their herds were decimated by

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the U.S. military. After the Treaty of 1868 with the Navajo, each family was “sent home” with two sheep to resupply their herds. By the 1930s, their flocks had been re-established, but again, the U.S. government this time stepped in and killed most of their herds due to “overgrazing.” Prior to and during the 1800s, most weavings were utilitarian in nature: blankets for sleeping, blankets for wearing and floor mats. Designs, if any, were basic stripes, “whirling logs” and some regional patterns. By the 1920s, regional patterns were associated with where the rugs originated. Teec Nos Pos weavings had complicated borders and elaborate centers. Two Grey Hills weavings used only naturally dyed yarns, spun together to produce their subtle colors. Ganado rugs always have a red center background. Klagetohs are

much like Ganado, but always have a gray background. And so on … each regional rug could be identified. During the 1930s, when the sheep were virtually gone, traders to the Navajos knew that to keep the weaving traditions going through to the next generation, they had to have wool. They contacted Germantown, Pa., where some of the finest wool was being spun, and commercially dyed. These yarns were distributed to the weavers, and a new style was born. Germantown rugs and weavings have the distinctive, brightly colored yarns that were only produced with actual Germantown yarn. “Whirling Logs” seen in Navajo weavings are often shunned by the public, simply because of their design. Known to most of us born prior to or during World War II, we came to

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


THE NEXT AUCTION Sept. 14 & 15: Annual Fall Navajo Rug and Indian Art Auction! Mini auction at 5 p.m. on Sept. 14, followed by the main event on Sept. 15. Preview 9 to 11 a.m. Auction starts promptly at noon for authentic Indian art at the best prices in the Southwest. know them as swastikas. In fact, this is an ancient symbol, used by cultures all over the globe to represent many different things. However, for the Navajo, a swastika is a migration symbol, a symbol of good luck and good fortune. Whenever you see whirling logs on a Navajo rug, you can be pretty sure that it is old – it was made prior to 1940, when the Navajo and most Indian people, decided to not use that symbol because of the Nazi corruption. Navajo rugs and weaving have

a rich history, and an important story to tell us all. Younger Navajo weavers are stretching “traditional” boundaries every day. No longer can a rug be identified simply by its pattern. Weavers living in Klagetoh may choose to weave pictorials, or a Teec No Pos. Men are now weaving and creating designs of their own, representing their own journeys in life. Many different styles are now woven into a single rug as well. Always changing, always growing, the art form of traditional Navajo

LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

weaving will continue, as long as we continue to appreciate it. Not sure which rug or weaving you might want as an addition to your home? No worries, our auctioneers, Bruce and Virginia Burnham, of RB Burnham Trading Post of Sanders, and Hank and Vicky Blair of Totsoh Trading Post in Lukachukai, are all part of our auction team, along with The Smoki Museum volunteers and staff who can answer all of your questions at our previews.

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Prescott LIVING

Back to School Coloring Contest

Color the Cover or these pages and you could WIN! 4 WINNERS! Grand Prize: Out of Africa General Admission Tickets (2 adult, 2 child) Three sets available: Grand Canyon Deer Farm (2 adult, 2 child) 4 WINNERS WILL BE SELECTED BY THE EDITORIAL TEAM! Enter by emailing your coloring to info@roxco.com or posting on our Facebook page facebook.com/PrescottLivingMagazine

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• FUN!

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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1914 CACTUS DERBY RACE PUTS PRESCOTT ON MAP by Dennis Gallagher, Prescott Western Heritage Foundation, Inc. PHOTO COURTESY OF SHARLOT HALL MUSEUM ARCHIVES

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eritage F nH ou r e

Prescott Wes t

were surrounded by dozens of enquiring and enthusiastic fans, each eager for the first words from his lips, which were practically sealed by mud and muck.” The Arizona Republican was impressed with the new race stop: “Prescott has excellent accommodations for those that survive the grind of the two day’s racing.” Upon finishing, cars were immediately taken to the west side of the plaza to a roped enclosure. No one, including the owner, driver, or mechanic could enter before the race restarted. That was 9 a.m. on Nov. 11 and the drivers immediately took to the mountains over a winding road with almost continuous sharp turns and grades, but that was just the beginning. Due to a rainstorm the previous night, this last leg of the race was made over the worst roads and conditions on the entire course. In fact, four autos were unable to make it to Phoenix. “Seven Cars Of Eleven Leaving Here Make A Good Finish: Prescott Put On The Map,” the Journal-Miner headline crowed. “Looking like a heathen idol made of mud,” the story continued, “Barney Oldfield drove into the fairgrounds in Phoenix the winner of the 673-mile race” with a time of 23 hours, 1 minute, 36 seconds. In addition to his first-place medal, Oldfield pocketed $2,700.

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rom 1908 to 1914, the most grueling automobile endurance race in the United States originated in Los Angeles and ended in Phoenix. It was called the Cactus Derby. Through 1913, the route passed through San Diego and Yuma and was 596 miles. In 1914, however, the organizers changed the course, extending the length of the race by 132 miles and by adding a third day. This new course traveled through San Bernardino, Barstow, Needles, Kingman, Ash Fork and Prescott - finishing in Phoenix. With this new route, the second-to-last leg of the race would now finish in Prescott, bringing the city national attention. “There were sufficient hazards to be encountered which if not met properly would spell disaster to any machine,” The Arizona Republican reported. “Sharp turns, cross washes, ruts, rolling grades with an occasional ditch between them, all of which are negotiated without notice while touring, present a very different aspect at racing speed.” As the 11 racers headed south from Ash Fork, through Chino Valley, the Granite Dells and past Fort Whipple, hundreds lined Gurley Street in anticipation of the arrival of the Cactus Derby racers. The finish line for this leg of the race was at the northeast corner of West Gurley and Montezuma streets. The crowd watched excitedly as Barney Oldfield, one of the favorites, led the way into Prescott sporting a 48-minute lead. “As Oldfield swooped over the hill and neared the (finish), there was a mighty cheer from all who were in line,” the Journal-Miner reported. Oldfield and his mechanic, “looking like two huge mud geysers rather than men...

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Sources: Weekly Journal-Miner 11/18/1914; The Arizona Republican, 11/8/1914; Days Past. Please go to VisitWesternHeritageCenter.org and click the Did You Know? link on the Home page for additional fun facts.

PHOTO COURTESY OF BARNEY OLDFIELD COLLECTION

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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ACKER PARK HONORS ONE MAN’S WISH FOR PRESCOTT by Kelly Tolbert, Recreation Services Coordinator, Prescott Parks and Recreation

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ne of the most visited of all parks in the City of Prescott, Acker Park is just over 80 acres and provides visitors with a plethora of opportunities to enjoy the natural environment. With approximately 60,000 annual visitors, the park is the result of a generous donation to the City by J.S. Acker, a longtime business owner and resident. He bequeathed over 100 parcels of real estate to the City with the stipulation that

they be used for “promotion of music, especially for children.” Acker owned and operated a stationery and candy store on South Cortez Street and enjoyed the daily visits from school children.

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A prolific nonprofit group known as The Friends of J.S. Acker Memorial Park was officially organized in 1995 as a grass roots effort aimed at preserving the land for what was perceived as Acker’s intentions. Upon the 20th anniversary of The Friends of Acker, it was decided that many of the goals of the group had been accomplished through preserving the natural feature of the land, construction and maintenance of interpretive nature trails, as well as the addition of various recreation based activities. The group disbanded and an endowment fund was organized under the Arizona Community Foundation of Yavapai County, with the provision of cash reserves to continue providing for the maintenance of park amenities. Today, Acker Park offers an internationally known geocache, approximately three miles of hiking trails, excellent birding opportunities, educational experiences, a small playground and improved parking and restroom, all moments from downtown Prescott. Park benches and picnic tables are readily available, providing visitors with unique vistas of the surrounding mountain peaks. A small amphitheater is also on site, allowing for small performances or gatherings. Due to the vastness of the park, there are five entrances providing access from surrounding neighborhoods. The main entrance is on Virginia Street where

restrooms and informational kiosks are located, as well as the playground and amphitheater. Additional access points are from Penn and Eastwood streets, Autumn Breeze Road, Summer Field and Washington Street. The Summer Field entrance received approximately $20,000 in park improvements in late 2017 with a new picnic ramada and bronze memorial marker honoring the late Boyd and Rachel Tenney. This location is ideal for the memorial as it sits within proximity to where the family homestead used to be. Boyd Tenney served 20 years in the state Legislature as a representative, finishing up after nine terms as a senator. Acker Park is open daily at 7 a.m. and closes at sunset during winter or 10 p.m. during summer. Improved parking is at 421 S. Virginia St. More information can be found at prescott-az.gov/recreation-area/ acker-park or prescotttrails.com.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Located Locate ate tedd iin n Hi H Historic i toriic D ist Down Downtown ownttow own town Pr P Prescott res rescott 117 W. Goodwin St. Across from the Courhouse Plaza Membership - join today! Visitor Information Center - visit us! Special Events - year round! Calendar of Events - website and printed! Arizona’s Christmas City

Prescott Bluegrass Festival

Photos by Bob Shanks

Lakes and Hiking Trails

Arts & Crafts Show

World’s Oldest Rodeo

Photo by Miller Photo

Facebook.com/PrescottChamber

Prescott.org | 928-445-2000 | 800-266-7534


EXPANSION PLANS EXPOSE OPPORTUNITIES FOR BRINGING EXHIBITS UP-TO-DATE

by Fred Veil, Executive Director, Sharlot Hall Museum

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inety years ago, Sharlot M. Hall opened her museum in the “Old Governor’s Mansion.” Little did she realize that not only would her dream of preserving the heritage of Arizona live on, but that her idea would be embraced by future generations of Arizonans. The museum that bears her name has grown from a simple log-built mansion to a 4-acre campus with 11 exhibit buildings, six of which are historic. These buildings chronicle the lifestyles of “beasts” and humans that inhabited what is now Arizona’s Central Highlands, from prehistoric times to the early 20th century, and moving forward in time. One of the Museum’s more impressive exhibit buildings, the John and Helen Lawler Exhibit Center, is a key component of the museum and houses the Pre-History Wing. In its 9,000plus square feet are world-class

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displays, videos and diorama providing a time-travel-experience for visitors. From its eye-catching display of a 9,000-year-old skull found nearby and the bas relief wall of “beasts” – where visitors walk in the armpit of a mastodon – to the spectacular depiction of prehistoric hunter-gatherers in our area – these serve as a backdrop for the museum’s excellent fossil collection and many examples of material from the indigenous peoples who inhabited Arizona’s Central Plateau. The completing backdrop of the east wing Pre-History arena is the cultural impact of the Native Americans from the Clovis people to the Prescott Culture – a span of several millennia to about 1350 CE – that includes the “ancient ones” and the Hohokam influences on the peoples of the West Central Highlands. Explorers, mountain men, miners, merchants, military men, ranchers, and others will be added to create a rich tapestry of the region’s history with an emphasis on Arizona’s territorial days and into the post-statehood period of the 20th century.

Exhibit expansion is limited, however, by space and funding. The completion of the proposed new Education Center at the southeast corner of the museum campus will allow relocation of the Lawler’s theater and gallery, freeing the remaining space for planned exhibits. The two-story Education Center will include classrooms, a state-of-the-art multi-media auditorium, education offices, and presentation space currently housed in the Lawler. Efforts continue to complete funding for the Education Center construction and for exhibit expansion in the Lawler. For information on how you can help with paving the way to our future for either of these buildings, call the museum at (928) 445-3122 and ask for me, Fred Veil.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


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June 1-2 2019 2019 LATE SUMMER 2018 • THE EDUCATION EDITION

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Come See Our New Office in Downtown Prescott!

September Open House games and Ribbon-Cutting! , s ie it iv t c A prizes and s! for the kid

Thursday, September 20, 2018 NOON - 5PM

130 N. Granite St. â&#x20AC;˘ Prescott, AZ 86301 Prescott Chamber of Commerce Ribbon cutting 4-5PM

Kids Coloring Contest Bring your entry or color on-site! (see pages 134/135 for details)

Food and Refreshments provided by The Natural Healing Garden

Looking for a new pet? Yavapai Humane Society will be on hand with an assortment of pets available for adoption!


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LATE SUMMER 2018 â&#x20AC;¢ THE EDUCATION EDITION

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The LIVING Interview (continued) ...continued from page 122 tary education, encompassing joint warfare, at all the intermediate and senior service schools such as the Air War College. I was a “purple suit” as the saying goes, representing the Joint Staff. The FAA Industry Training Standards program (FITS) happened when I became a college professor. The FAA came to ERAU and said, “Is there a better way to do flight training?” The FITS program was an effort to put judgment and decision-making back into pilot flight training. And we did some empirical research on scenario-based training, instead of just maneuver-based training. Eventually we formed a team with faculty from three different universities in that project. The results are still being used today. That’s the best part. PRESCOTT LIVING: Along the way you earned degrees. DR. FRANK AYERS: Yes, I found ERAU in 1986. To be honest, the reason I earned a master’s degree is because the Air Force, at that time, said you had to have one to be promoted to a lieutenant colonel. I went back to school at our Worldwide campus at Merced and realized, “You know, it’s a pretty high-class operation.” When I retired from the Air Force, I decided to come to work for them. Once I had been at Embry-Riddle for about three years, I realized that if you’re at a university, the credential required is a doctoral degree. So, I ended up attending Nova Southeastern University in their higher education leadership program, again as a working adult, on weekends and online. PRESCOTT LIVING: When you left the Air Force, you could have gone anywhere. Why did you join the academic realm? DR. FRANK AYERS: I was at the Pentagon and I had the opportunity to stay there in Washington, wear a suit every day and commute to work for a defense contractor and spend time with my former colleagues. But my whole Air Force career was in teaching. I like working with young people. I like teaching. So I told the University I’ll do pretty much anything they ask as long as I get daily contact with students. I think to be a professor, to actively teach and mentor students is what I like to do. When you get to do what you like to do and it makes a difference in people’s lives, that’s not too bad.

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Frank and Debbie with ERAU Golf Team

FAMILY LIFE

PRESCOTT LIVING: You were very fortunate you met Debbie. Tell us about that. DR. FRANK AYERS: Well, she and I met at Virginia Tech. Earlier, we actually lived about a mile apart in Washington, D.C. suburbs, but a mile apart there is about a half million people. We met through Air Force ROTC. When the Air Force ROTC opened up to women, she actually was first to sign up and that’s how she was commissioned. So we were good friends for a couple years. Finally one day we said, well maybe since we’re such good friends, we should get married. And we did that. We both entered the Air Force and served together for five years. Then she got out of the Air Force. But we’ve always been together and always worked together on everything. Coming here, she’s involved in so much in the community and so much the life of the campus. You were at graduation this spring. When I introduced her, I think she got the biggest applause because so many of the students and parents know who she is. She really buys into what we’re doing here. You know, sometimes we’re the parents away from home. We take that seriously. We live on the campus so we go to everything. We go to all the games. We go to the different projects. We go to see what our young people do. I’m very fortunate. Debbie’s such a partner, and we’re a team. We always have been. PRESCOTT LIVING: How many years? DR. FRANK AYERS: 43 years of marriage. PRESCOTT LIVING: You’ve got children? DR. FRANK AYERS: Two boys, one 34 and one

37, two wonderful daughters-in-law, Stephanie and Stacey, and three grandchildren, Alice, Ava and Eli. Our youngest son Clif, just got married. Our older son Mike gets married in December. Clif just finished a tour in the Army, deployed to Afghanistan, he was an Army Ranger and served as an infantry officer in the 101st and 82nd Airborne. He works for Amazon now. Mike is a very much in-demand artist in Florida. They are both great and talented young men. PRESCOTT LIVING: Word on the street for a long, long time, you’re a pretty good guitar player. When did you start playing the guitar? DR. FRANK AYERS: I’ve been playing guitar since I was 11. I had a really great guitar teacher a gentleman named Courtney Nalls, who played with the Air Force band. He taught me jazz. And I just fell in love with jazz and improvisation. I’ve played every kind of music. Where I really got back into music was in the early ’80s. Deb and I participated in an event called the Walk to Emmaus. There was a lot of music associated with this weekend Via De Christo, “walk with Christ.” I got back into playing again. We now play at the Prescott United Methodist Church on Saturday nights. I have a great time with that. I get to go be the guitar player in a band once a week. Whatever music’s in front of us, I love playing — in groups and playing improvisational music. It’s a great relief from the dayto-day routine. I always kid people that I only play in church because the congregation will either applaud or pray for you! 

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Special Section: Education

2018 ESSAY CONTEST (cont.) ...continued from page 86 than ever. My teachers have strongly influenced me, due to taking time to get to know me personally, and have deeply cared. Several teachers offer their time before and after school. That shows they will do anything for students to be successful, even if it means staying late, and arriving early. Canyon View has a family feel to it. We are able to grow close with our teachers, and are able to look up to them as role models. As students graduate, our teachers are the first to say goodbye before students fly away to begin new chapters in their lives. To me that’s a great example of a family-like atmosphere. With just 140 students, regular opportunities occur for families to get together and participate in activities such as making Christmas ornaments, and doing team building activities. Our classes are minuscule, allowing the teachers to get to know each student, and have more one-on-one attention. This adds the family feel to our learning environment and is one of the

biggest reasons why I love Canyon View. Two teachers have made my experience extraordinary: Mr. Carter and Mrs. Short. Not only was time given to help me improve in Spanish and English, but they willingly mentored and helped me through several difficulties. Through their loving, caring, and compassionate personalities they drew me out of my shell. Another important aspect is the academics. As a college prep school, we are challenged to raise the bar, to never give up, to keep reaching for our goals, and to do the best we possibly can as individuals. With the help from our superior educators we are able to reach our goals. Our school’s motto is: “learners today, learners tomorrow.” I believe we never stop learning. When I started at Canyon View, I was behind, and had numerous academic struggles. By the end of my first year I was caught up. Now I am able to reach the proper academic level and reach higher than my set goals. A favorite part of academics for me is our annual educational competition: Achieve 3000.

We compete in comprehension by reading articles, answering questions, and receiving points for our work. At the end of the competition I received recognition for reading the most articles, getting the most points, which abundantly raised my lexile. It takes dedicated teachers to take time to make learning fun and still make it challenging. This school has contributed to help me grow a love for learning, and achieve many goals. I am proud we are an A-rated school. In conclusion, every school is different, whether it’s from the teachers, extracurriculars, the students, or academic success. Every school has qualities that could make it an excellent school, but my school, Canyon View Preparatory, is great in so many ways. Teachers not only inspire young minds to achieve academic success, they guide and shape who we will become, encouraging us to never stop learning. We are a family that is there for one another, who encourage one another, and who are learners today, and learners tomorrow together.

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PRESCOTT PUBLIC LIBRARY PRESENTS

YOUTH EVENTS

Lapsit Storytime Fridays, at 9:30 a.m. Bring your baby for some cozy active time on your lap. The storytime will last about 20 minutes, but you are invited to linger and play. Preschool Storytime Fridays at 10:30 a.m. 30 minutes of stories, songs and fingerplays especially for children, ages 3-5, and their grownups. Siblings are always welcome. Family Storytime Saturdays at 11 a.m. 20-30 minutes of stories, songs and activities for the whole family! Toddler Storytime Tuesdays at 10 a.m. 20-30 minutes of simple stories, songs and fingerplays with plenty of parent and child interaction. For toddlers and their grownups.

SUNDAY 1PM TO 5PM MONDAY 9AM TO 5PM TUESDAY 9AM TO 8PM WEDNESDAY 9AM TO 8PM COTT T LI LIV VING ING 146 PRE S COT

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Teen Books and Bites Tuesday, Aug. 7 at 4 p.m. Get ready to read! Learn about the book line-up this year and share some of your favorite reads. The first 10 teens to register will get a copy of the September book club choice. For teens, grades 7-12. Register online, at the Youth Desk or call 928-777-1537. Youth Book Clubs at the Library Prescott Public Library has book clubs for kids in kindergarten through high school! Beginning Aug. 1, youth can register for a book club suited to their age. Youth librarians strive to select a delightful variety of literature that will stimulate the joy of reading, broaden perspectives and build community among participants. Book clubs meet monthly, and every registered participant will receive his or her own copies of books to be discussed. The Friends of Prescott Public Library generously provide funding for these books.

THURSDAY 9AM TO 8PM FRIDAY 9AM TO 5PM SATURDAY 9AM TO 5PM

215 E GOODWIN STREET PRESCOTT, AZ 86303 928.777.1500 PRESCOTTLIBRARY.INFO

ADULT EVENTS

Modern Board Gaming Wednesday, Aug. 8, 22 and 29, 4 to 8 p.m.   Wednesday, Sept. 12 and 26, 4 to 8 p.m.   Play modern board games like Ticket to Ride and Splendor on the 2nd, 4th and 5th Wednesday of every month. Come to play any time between 4 to 8 p.m. This group is hosted by the Prescott Area Boardgamers and is open to anyone age 14 and older. Individuals 10-13 may participate if accompanied by an adult. Arizona Humanities Lecture: John Wesley Powell: Into the Great Unknown Thursday, Aug. 2 at 5 p.m. On May 24, 1869, John Wesley Powell set out with nine men, four boats and 10 months of rations on an adventure in the Grand Canyon, down the Colorado River. Chris Glenn and Sandy Sunseri will speak about this extraordinary journey. Arizona Humanities Lecture: Sheep Ranchers and Herders of Arizona Thursday, Sept. 6 at 5 p.m. Dr. Barbara Jaquay, a historical geographer, tells the story of the sheep industry in Arizona through personal family memoirs collected over several years. Programs presented with funding from the Friends of the Prescott Public Library.

THE EDUCATION EDITION • LATE SUMMER 2018


Prescott LIVING Magazine  

Late Summer 2018

Prescott LIVING Magazine  

Late Summer 2018