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Spring 2011 www.enuk.net

Raising the bar in solid wall insulation

environmentalbuild spring 2011 


 environmentalbuild spring 2011


Cover Story

Climate Energy Solutions raise the bar in solid wall insulation read more on p4

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CONTENTS INSULATION 5

Why insulation is key to the UK’s carbon emissions target

THE WOOD RECYCLERS’ ASSOCIATION

9

7

Wood recycling sector looks forward to an exciting future

7

Biomass at Christmas

TRENCHLESS TECHNOLOGY 8

Trenchless technology - the future of construction

8

World’s first application of latest pipeline rehabilitation technology

GROUND SOURCE HEAT PUMPS 9

11

Tapping the earth’s stored energy with a ground source heat pump

THE NATIONAL SEWERAGE ASSOCIATION 10

Communication is a must – transfer of private drains & sewers

10

Raising standards in the sewerage industry

NEWS

Wayne Taylor Advertising Manager Tel: 0161 850 1678 Mob: 07739 113871 Email: wayne@dmmonline.co.uk

9

Landfill gas to cash

11

Hospital air conditioning powered by high efficiency natural gas engines

All other enquiries: Tel: 0161 850 1680 Fax: 0161 850 0918 Suite 2, 61 Lower Hillgate, Stockport SK1 3AW Copyright EnvironmentalBuild. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be copied, reproduced or transmitted in any form without prior permission of EnvironmentalBuild. Views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of the publisher. EVM

environmentalbuild spring 2011 


Climate Energy Solutions raise the bar in solid wall insulation e Climate Energy Solutions (CE Solutions) is a fully accredited insulation installer. Historically offering cavity and loft insulation, their exclusive UK distribution agreement with Wall–Reform® has enabled them to offer solid wall insulation using one of the best systems on the market. CE Solutions has always taken pride in their customer service by using experienced and qualified installers who are constantly praised for their workmanship and people skills. Not content with standard installer accreditations they moved forward gaining CHAS (Contractors Health & Safety) and the additional SAFE contractor accreditation which is recognised as the fastest growing health and safety assessment scheme in the UK. The decision to apply for the SAFE contractor accreditation was driven by the need for a uniform standard across the business. Managing Director, Phil McGrory commented “The work that we have been involved with from our start up in 2009 ranges from a one off domestic job to a nine storey block at Southend General Hospital. We felt that this would complement our existing CHAS accreditation and help to promote us to other nationwide businesses”. He continued, “The additional accreditation has enhanced the company’s ability to attract new contracts and shows our commitment to safety which will be viewed positively by insurers when the company liability policy is up for renewal.” John Kinge, Head of Risk at SAFE contractor, said “Major organisations can no longer run the risk of employing contractors who are not able to prove that they have sound health and safety policies. More companies need to understand the importance of adopting good risk management in the way that Climate Energy Solutions has done. The firm’s high standard has set an example, which hopefully will be followed by other companies within the sector.” CE Solutions also recently took the opportunity to create a 7 minute film with the Energy Saving Trust (EST) to be part of their, ‘How to…’ series of documentaries focusing on showcasing their solid wall offer. The interview and commercial presentations were screened on SKY in February and again March, with a potential audience of 22 million viewers, in over 9 million homes. The film is also available through the

BEFORE

Before and after the application of the Wall–Reform® system

 environmentalbuild spring 2011

Media Centre of their website at www.ce-solutions.org.uk. The film illustrates how the Wall–Reform® system works and the amazing number of finishes it comes in. Wall–Reform® is a 15mm solid wall render system that, when attached to a 60mm phenolic board, achieves a U-Value of less than 0.3 W\m².k which conforms to the latest Building Regulations. It is widely recognised as the best thermal plaster/render product available and it has been confirmed by many building control departments (LABC) that thermal products must be specified over non thermal to obtain the best standard technically, functionally and economically. Wall–Reform® has two full BBA certificates, one as a thermal plaster/ render and another as a remedial plaster following a damp course. It also helps reduce condensation and was specifically developed to improve the living conditions for those living in solid wall properties. However, it can be used wherever any wall is being plastered or rendered and will increase the thermal element even when applied at 10mm thickness. All C E Solutions’ thermal products have full EST, CESP and CERT approval. Phil McGrory felt that the creation and broadcasting of the documentary was a great opportunity to show the country they had solved the problem of solid walls insulation. He said, “We are now able to help people in traditionally harder to treat properties to save energy, money and the environment. I am also pleased to announce that we will be opening a training centre in Essex to complement the training offered by Wall Transform® in North Yorkshire. CE Solutions opened the first Solid Wall Training Academy in Braintree, Essex to train installers in the art of Wall–Reform® application. The purpose built centre is available to all accredited installers to ensure that Wall–Reform® is installed to the highest standards in accordance with BBA and their own stringent specifications. n • If you are interested in training or finding out more about purchasing Wall–Reform® contact Climate Energy Solutions on 0800 980 4749 or 01376 555999. Alternatively visit www.ce-solutions.org. uk or email sales@ce-solutions.org.uk

AFTER


Why insulation is key to the UK’s carbon emissions target

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With homes producing over a quarter of the UK’s carbon emissions, the onus on reducing their carbon footprint has never been greater for householders and it is a priority Government issue too. The way a building is constructed, insulated, ventilated and the type of fuel used, all contribute to its carbon emissions. It is a worrying fact that, for over half of all homes in the UK, a significant proportion of the money spent on energy is literally being thrown out of the window as a result of inadequate levels of insulation, with around 50% of the heat being lost through the roof and walls. The National Insulation Association (NIA) is a not for profit organisation representing over 90% of the home insulation industry in the UK. As a membership organisation, it actively supports the Government’s accelerated programme for insulation and its intention to raise awareness not only of the amount of CO2 lost through inadequate insulation, but also the amount of money that householders can save by having their homes properly insulated.

Before (left) and after the application of Envirowall’s Envirobrick external render system announced in June last year will focus on whole house eco-makeovers. However, SWI will have to increase dramatically if the Government is to hit its target by 2020. In fact, at a recent seminar held by the NIA, an industry expert stated that: “A figure of 200,000 properties per year would have to be completed if the Government is to hit its target by 2020.” More and more individuals are now starting to recognise the advantages of SWI and there are many cost-effective solutions available.

Solid Wall Insulation

The Solutions

The UK’s housing stock is estimated at approximately 24.5 million dwellings and 36% are made up of non-cavity wall construction – solid brick, solid stone, pre1944 timber frame and non-traditional, i.e. concrete, construction. These types of buildings lose more heat and energy than any other type of construction – a worrying fact when it is estimated that around seven million properties with solid walls have little or no insulation. While many local authorities, housing associations, private landlords and home owners have been concentrating on filling cavities to achieve their carbon savings, improving the thermal efficiency of solid-wall properties has largely been ignored. This is primarily because the solutions are deemed to be more expensive and cause greater disruption, hence the reason that these types of dwellings are referred to as ‘Hard to treat Homes’. This is not actually correct, they are not hard to treat, just more expensive to insulate compared to cavity wall insulation and loft insulation. However the subsequent energy savings are significantly higher. Improving the thermal efficiency of solid wall properties is therefore an area which has massive potential for the future, particularly as little work has been carried out to date. Around 25,000 properties a year currently receive solid wall insulation (SWI) and the Government’s new ‘Green Deal Scheme’

Solid walls can be insulated with either External Wall Insulation (EWI) or Internal Wall Insulation (IWI) and either option will greatly increase comfort, while also reducing energy bills and the associated environmental impact. IWI typically consists of either dry lining in the form of flexible thermal linings (commonly known as thermal wallpaper), laminated insulating plasterboard (known as thermal board) or a built-up system using fibrous insulation such as mineral wool held in place using a studwork frame. Flexible thermal linings come on a roll and are applied like wallpaper and, with some at only 10mm thick, will not cause significant disruption during installation. These products can be applied to ceilings as well as walls and provide a solution for properties without a loft space as well as those with solid walls. It can also be applied to the underside of floorboards in a cellar/ basement. It is applied with a special adhesive using a roller or a brush and can be easily cut to size using wallpaper shears or scissors. Once the product has been applied it can be painted, papered or even tiled. These products are only applied to the exterior facing interior walls of the property. Another solution is laminated insulated plasterboard which normally replaces existing lath and plaster and is fixed directly to the

existing brick. Depending on the system, thermal boards can either be screwed or glued, using a dry wall adhesive, directly onto the brick work just like standard plaster board. It has the advantage that it can be installed room by room with the tenants in situ. It increases internal surface temperature within a room and also improves response to heating input when heated intermittently. It has the lowest thermal conductivity available and allows installation on damp surfaces without drying periods as it is hydrophobic. EWI comprises of an insulation layer fixed to the existing wall, with a protective render or decorative finish. Dry cladding offers a wide range of finishes such as timber panels, stone or clay tiles, brick slips (brick effect finish) or aluminium panels. EWI increases the thermal quality of the building – particularly relevant when refurbishing non-traditional housing. It also overcomes moisture and condensation issues and protects the existing building envelope. It can reduce heating bills by up to 25% as well as greatly improving the appearance of the building. EWI is a tried and tested method of upgrading the thermal performance and external appearance of existing properties which are literally transformed into warm, energy efficient and attractive homes and buildings. Improving appearance is of particular significance to many local authorities targeting housing projects in poorer areas. Adding EWI on a whole street basis will raise residents’ morale and give them a sense of pride in their community. There are many other benefits of EWI including the fact that no living space is lost. There is minimum disruption for the residents as the work can be carried out while they are in their homes and there is no risk of condensation within the property as it is moved to the outside of the system that is being put in place. Also there is minimal maintenance once installed. n

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 environmentalbuild spring 2011


Wood recycling sector looks forward to an exciting future

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As we in the UK move towards a more sustainable society we must re-use and recycle more and landfill less, say the Wood Recyclers’ Association (WRA) as it celebrates its 10th anniversary. As landfill taxes, landfill operator and haulage costs continue to rise, and packaging waste regulations become more stringent, the recycling of materials, including wood, assumes an everincreasing importance. The wood recycling sector therefore looks forward to an exciting future with enormous potential for expansion. Set up in 2001, the WRA now has 75 member companies and represents the interests of the wood recycling sector to the Government, the Environment Agency and other regulatory authorities in the UK. Meetings of the association are usually held quarterly and are open to all members. Subjects range from trade and potential markets, discussions with the Government’s Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) and packaging waste, through to regulatory, environmental and publicity issues. The WRA published the Wood Packaging Protocol to more accurately calculate the amount of packaging being processed. It has also produced the Wood Recyclers’ Code of Practice, designed to raise operational, quality, environmental and health and safety standards in the sector. The WRA is currently working with the Environment Agency and WRAP to develop a Quality Protocol for post-industrial wood. Once achieved, this Quality Protocol will define the point at which the wood which members process ceases to be a waste and becomes a product. In parallel with the Quality Protocol development, the WRA is working with WRAP and BSI to develop a publicly available specification – PAS111 – for post-industrial wood. These exciting projects promise to enhance considerably the status and quality of WRA members’ products. The WRA is a member of the Recycling Industries Alliance, an influential group of eight recycling trade associations set up in 1998 to lobby Government and the Environment Agency on a variety of major issues on behalf of member companies. n

Biomass at Christmas n

Christmas should be a time to sit back and relax with the family – but not for Kevin Thompson and the guys from the biomass-processing department of Cumbria based Thompsons Plant Hire Ltd. For them it was off to a damp and dreary Ayrshire and North Wales to provide holiday cover at both of the UPM CHP boilers and paper mills in Irvine and Shotton for the supply managers UPM Tilhill. The plants are powered by green energy, through a biomass-fueled power plant, which uses approximately 80 tons of processed biomass per hour. This is usually trucked in from outside, but over the Christmas period the company’s regular suppliers shut down, leaving Thompsons to step in and fill the gap by chipping and handling on site stocks of biomass. Maintaining production is no small job and requires not only the monster Morbark 4600XL Track Wood Hog but also a Morbark 5048 Drum Chipper. These machines are quite something to behold as they turn huge logs into wood chips in a matter of seconds. Between them, over the Christmas period, they managed to chew their way through 10,000 tons of logs at 25 tons per wagonload – that’s 800 wagons!

The Morbark 4600XL Track Wood Hog Thompsons were the first company in Europe to take delivery of a Morbark 4600XL Track Wood Hog. This massive machine is designed to work in the most inaccessible of locations. Usually found in a remote Scottish forest it has the capacity to produce up to 100 tons per hour of biomass from green brash wood and tree stumps. Once shredded into biomass it is loaded

onto Thompsons’ fleet of walking floor artic trailers ready for delivery to the client. q OBMtec, specialists in the field of recycling machines, wood chippers and stumpgrinders are importers of Morbark machines for the whole of Europe. For futher information visit www.obmtec-rte.com.

environmentalbuild spring 2011 


Trenchless technology - the future of construction e Trenchless technology is increasingly accepted worldwide as being more efficient, less disruptive, environmentally friendly and more cost effective than traditional methods. The UKSTT (United Kingdom Society for Trenchless Technology) is a registered charity involved in the development and promotion of trenchless techniques, sometimes termed no-dig techniques. Trenchless technology is the science of installing, repairing or renewing underground pipes, ducts and cables using techniques that minimise or eliminate the need for excavation. The use of such techniques can reduce environmental impact, social costs and at the same time provide economic alternatives to traditional open cut methods of installation, renewal or repair. The techniques themselves can be broken down into three areas: • Repair and Renovation – including cleaning, localised repair techniques and lining techniques. • Replacement – including pipebursting, pipe splitting, pipe eating and lead extraction & replacement systems • New Installation – including impact moling, pipe ramming, auger boring & thrust boring, pipe jacking, micro tunnelling, guided rod pushing, guided boring & directional drilling, rock boring, cable pulling and cable blow in systems. Essential to the success of such methods are training, thorough site survey, planning, material and equipment choice. The aims and objectives of UKSTT are: • To advance the science and practice of trenchless technology

• for the public benefit. • To promote education, training, • study and research in the science and practice. • To encourage the use of trenchless systems for the installation and • repair of underground pipelines, utilities and services. • To promote the location and mapping of underground services. • To encourage the development of new trenchless techniques. • To assist members to maintain and enhance their knowledge, skills • and capabilities in the field of trenchless technology. n

• For further information visit www.ukstt.org.uk.

World’s first application of latest pipeline rehabilitation technology

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Portland, in Dorset, recently saw the world’s first commercial application of the latest development in pipeline rehabilitation technology – the new Melt-In-Place Pipe (MIPP™) system, known as Aqualiner, was installed for Wessex Water by its main rehabilitation contracting partner OnSite Central Ltd. Whilst the project may not be the largest, it was significant for both Portland and Aqualiner Ltd. Using the latest ‘third generation’ commercial system, it was the first ever to be undertaken on a ‘paid for’ basis. The lining comprised the rehabilitation of just 23m of existing 225mm diameter clay sewer pipe which runs beneath Castle Road at between 1.5 and 2m deep. The work, scheduled to last one day working between manholes with a full traffic flow allowed alongside, would have taken 7-10 days of traditional open cut trenching with huge and unacceptable disruption. In the event, the lining installation process took just over 2 hours. The Aqualiner process, whilst similar to existing relining systems, differs in some significant aspects. It does not utilise resins or chemicals as part of the lining process, rather it uses a liner material which comprises a combination of glass fibres, for stiffness and strength, and thermoplastic polymer fibres which, after processing, becomes the matrix that surrounds the reinforcing fibres. This absence of chemicals in the liner process and its standard material content and strength means the Aqualiner system is not only suitable for installation in sewer systems but also pressure pipes, including potable water pipes. The process is even reversible. By heating the liner to the correct temperature the liner can be removed if required with all the materials being fully recyclable. n

 environmentalbuild spring 2011


Tapping the earth’s stored energy with a

ground source heat pump e

Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) are electrically powered systems that tap the stored energy of the greatest solar collector in existence – the earth. These systems use the earth’s relatively constant temperature to provide heating, cooling and hot water for homes and commercial buildings. Ground source heat pumps can be categorised as having closed or open loops, and those loops can be installed in three ways – horizontally, vertically or in a pond/lake. The type chosen depends on the available land areas and the soil and rock type at the installation site. These factors will help determine the most economical choice for installation of the ground loop. For closed loop systems, water or antifreeze solution is circulated through plastic pipes buried beneath the earth’s surface. During the winter, the fluid collects heat from the earth and carries it through the system and into the building. During the summer, the system reverses itself to cool the building by pulling heat from the building, carrying it through the system and placing it in the ground. This process creates free hot water in the summer and delivers substantial hot water savings in the winter. Open loop systems operate on the same principle as closed loop systems and can be installed where an adequate supply of suitable water is available and open discharge is feasible. Benefits similar to the closed loop system are obtained. n

Landfill

e

Gas to Cash

Assessing the value of landfill gas and advising on its optimum use is one of the specialist services of landfill experts, Coventry based, Automatic Flare Systems (AFS). AFS uses its mobile flare skid for landfill gas pumping trials to analyse the quantity and composition of landfill gas. Mounted on the skid is a Geotech GA3000 static gas analyser. It monitors the untreated gases downstream from knockout pots before going onward to a flare. Managing director at AFS, Steve Willacy said, “We want continuous landfill gas monitoring and analysis and use a data logger to record the results from the gas analyser.” The data is auto downloaded to a web page so AFS can inspect it without going to site. At the end of the 12-week pumping trial AFS produces a site assessment report with daily gas readings, gas curves and an assessment of gas quality, type and volume. “We can then advise on how the gas can be best used for power generation, as vehicle fuel, converted to methanol or to biomethane to replace fossil-sourced natural gas – or if no value, how best to flare it. “We had been using another supplier’s gas analysis equipment for about ten years and had been talking to Geotech about them producing a static gas analyser which suited our operations. With input from us and others, Geotech developed the GA3000 using its existing proven equipment, technology and know how. The GA3000 is doing exactly what we need it to do,” said Steve Willacy. Since completing its latest pumping trial in Scotland the AFS mobile flare and analysis skid with its GA3000 been moved to Stornoway on the Isle of Lewis to carry out a pumping trial there. While the GA3000 is working away on a remote Scottish island and its data is being inspected in Coventry, AFS is taking delivery of its next, larger Geotech automated extraction monitoring system (AEMS) with six gas channels for six supply sources, for an export client. n • More from Geotech at: www.geotech.co.uk or from AFS at: www. afs-group.co.uk

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Communication is a must Transfer of private drains & sewers

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The transfer of private drains and sewers is now set for 1st October 2011 and the challenges to all sides of the industry remain immense in what will be the biggest shake up the industry has seen, according to the National Sewerage Association. There is still a tremendous amount of work to be undertaken by Government in finalising regulations and procedures and the clock is ticking. It will not only launch the water companies into relatively unknown territory, but the nature of the work, volume and need for prompt action will prove a test for Tier One contractors. We would look to all supervising officers acquiring an understanding of the processes involved (there are existing training courses) in order to avoid conflict between parties. The challenge is in providing an informed call centre, knowledge of the area and sufficient operational vehicles and manpower to provide a rapid response service. Ideally this would involve the myriad of small proven local contractors utilising their local experience. To have a matrix of local contractors instead of a cascading downward series of subcontractors would give control on standards and service. The use of computers to allocate and log work would make a payment structure viable – it has been done before. All sides of the industry need to be proactive and urgently participate in discussion with an open mind and to come up with innovative solutions to ensure that small companies, with well trained staff, can have a future and not be lost to the industry. Their experience is going to be vital to a smooth and invisible transfer. It will be in the industry’s best interest if rates are set at a realistic level to maintain a cost efficient standard of work with well maintained equipment. There is still a warning in the old adage that ‘if you pay peanuts you get monkeys’. This industry has striven to set standards in safety and quality of work – let us not renege on the precedent set. The lowest price can only be cost effective if all the criteria are met as laid down in the various, long established, model contract documents. Where work has to be repeated due to the contractor taking short cuts, or not having the necessary experience in a process, could result in the lowest tender, on evaluation, proving more expensive than other tenderers with a proven track record. For peace of mind, all the appropriate training should have been undertaken by staff currently working for the contractor before any tender is considered. At the recent meeting of the Private Sewer Forum, chaired by The Society of British Water and Wastewater Industries, it became even more obvious that communication is the key to a successful outcome. Those of us involved in the contracting side of the industry have

10 environmentalbuild spring 2011

been concerned about member companies working in the sector and how they can best ‘sell’ their services and skills to those who will be supervising the work in the future. It would be to the benefit of the Tier One contractors if they were seen to be proactive in setting up meetings, much as some water companies have, with interested providers to discuss the problems experienced in the private sector and how working in partnership might be of benefit. UK Drainage Protocol, who joined the meeting as guests, highlighted the lack of communication between local authorities and water companies following an online survey. They are unsure what their role will be post transfer and in the case of environmental threat, where they still have responsibility for resolution. Clarity of process is required as Section 59 notices for enforcement of repairs and recharging provisions will be repealed. The message of change still has to reach many of the small contractors working in the private drainage sector throughout the country. Trade magazines, Government initiatives and trade associations have been trying to get the message out for several years with limited success. The general public needs to be made aware of the change, where applicable, and what procedures will be in place. It can be seen how important communication is, and will be, in making the transfer of private drains and sewers a success. The tardiness in finalising the regulations and protocols for the transfer continues to hinder, in part, the communication process. Clarity of communication is required between the water companies and their support partners in local government and the operational processes and discussions need to take place now. n

Raising standards in the sewerage industry

e

The National Sewerage Association (NSA) has established its credentials within the sewerage industry, having been formed in 1996 to represent the interests of companies associated with the survey, operation, maintenance and renovation of sewers, drains and pipelines. The NSA has representatives on several standards committees and liaises with other trade bodies on subjects of mutual interest. Its members are generally engaged in the inspection and maintenance of drainage and sewerage systems working to nationally accepted standards. Some specialise whilst others provide a broader range of services. Members are expected to meet high criteria for staff training in the hostile environment in which they operate. Of critical importance are quality systems developed by members to ensure that reported data is to the highest possible standards. Reassessment criteria are being developed both for operatives and contractor members and these will be introduced so as to ensure that the high levels presently in place are upheld and improved. n


Hospital air conditioning powered by high efficiency natural gas engines

e

A state-of-the-art air conditioning system powered by high efficiency natural gas engines is providing low carbon cooling and heating at Scunthorpe General Hospital. The system uses seven Sanyo gas-powered heat pump (GHP) chillers to supply chilled water to air handling units serving a suite of operating theatres. It replaced two aging Trane chillers, based on hermetic scroll compressors running on the R22 refrigeration system. The internally located, ducted air-cooled machines, each originally rated at 165 kW, had been installed in 1991 and had become inefficient and expensive to run. Consultant Pick Everard carried out an evaluation of several possible replacement options, including a traditional electric chiller and compact turbo-based technology. Jeff Fleming, who headed the project for Pick Everard, said: “A key issue at the site was that there was no headroom on the electricity supply. Cooling loads had grown since the original chillers were installed, and replacing with a larger conventional electric chiller would have required a big investment in additional power supply. “The Sanyo gas-engine driven heat pumps supplied by Oceanair (UK) Ltd not only provided a way round the power problem, they are a highly energy efficient solution. Our studies showed that in terms of life-time costs, energy consumption and carbon emissions, they come out well ahead of comparable electric systems.” A further benefit of the Sanyo units, he says, is their low noise which makes them ideal for use in hospitals. Noise was likely to be a planning issue on the project, and the GHP units exceeded any potential restrictions. “They are exceptionally quiet in operation. You have to actually put your ear to the units to hear they are running at all,” he says. The seven GHP units, each with an output of 56kW, were chosen from the Sanyo range for their optimum efficiency in order to minimise the hospital’s liability under carbon reduction legislation. A further benefit of the multiple system is resilience compared with a single large chiller. If one unit is out of action, there is capacity to provide continuity of service. In the case of a conventional chiller installation, breakdown can cause disruption and affect cooling to the building. The power advantages of the GHP units extend to a much lower startup current than standard electric chillers. As the process mirrors ignition in a modern vehicle engine, a few dozen Amps are all that are required for start-up rather than several hundred Amps for an electric chiller. In winter, the heat pump cycle is reversed, providing high efficiency heating to operating theatres. As heating was previously supplied by inefficient steam heater batteries, this is saving significant additional

cost, Mr Fleming reports. Each chiller produces an additional 18kW of waste heat that can be harnessed for use in generating hot water for the hospital’s domestic supply. Each of the R410A chillers has its own separate refrigerant-to-water heat exchanger within the building, eliminating the presence of water on the roof and overcoming the need for trace heating, anti-freeze and water treatment chemicals. Mr Fleming says: “Another bonus with the Sanyo system is that we only used one system pump compared to conventional chillers that usually require an additional chiller shunt pump or heat rejection pumps, which have a significant electrical power requirement.” Servicing is highly economical, with engines requiring servicing every 10,500 hours, which equates to between two and three years. Jeff Fleming says: “The Sanyo GHP units provided a superb solution that perfectly meets the requirements of the project. The technical support from Oceanair has been excellent throughout. They are the experts when it comes to Sanyo GHP technology, and helped train the hospital engineers in commissioning and optimising the systems.” “I would have no hesitation in using the Sanyo GHP system again and look forward to working with the Oceanair team.” Tony Evanson of Oceanair UK Ltd said: “The project is a brilliant example of how a modern GHP system can deliver in all areas – efficiency, power, servicing, low noise and low cost of ownership over the lifetime of the plant. It makes the case for GHP loud and clear. It is a technology that, in the right application, simply can’t be beaten.” n

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