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COMPLIMENTARY

APRIL 2019 | VOL. 10, ISSUE 4

Aging

the new face of

FEATURING:

THE NEW FACE OF FASHION

FUNCTONAL FITNESS #TRAINFORLIFE

Serving the Sandhills & Southern Piedmont

NAVIGATING CLINICAL TRIALS

APRIL 2019 |

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| OUTREACHNC.COM


It’s time to believe again in the power of music! SOUVENIR is the story of opera’s unforgettable Florence Foster Jenkins, an eccentric New York socialite who believes she is an enchanting coloratura soprano. She teams up with pianist Cosmé McMoon and begins to hold recitals at the Ritz Carlton, festooned in fabulous costumes. She becomes a sensation. Unfortunately, the truth is Mrs. Jenkins can’t sing… but there’s more than one way to get to Carnegie Hall!!! Based on the true story that became the Oscar nominated Meryl Streep/Hugh Grant film Florence Foster Jenkins, this tuneful comedy beguiles the hopeful artist that lives in us all.

a fantasia on the life of

Florence Foster Jenkins

May 9-12 Hannah Center Theatre Season Eight Sponsors

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The Magic of Music & Music Therapy Rachel Stewart Shell, MT-BC, a board certiďŹ ed and credentialed music therapist and owner of Birdsong Music Therapy, LLC, will explain what music therapy is and how it can be tranformative and effective with older adults.

Tuesday, April 9 | 6:30 PM | Doors Open at 6 PM SEVEN LAKES CHAPEL IN THE PINES 581 SEVEN LAKES DRIVE | WEST END

To register, please contact: 910.692.0683 or info@aosnc.com

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features CONTENTS

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52

30

42

32

46

36

52

ONC BOOK CLUB: The Little French Bistro: A Novel Review FUNCTIONAL FITNESS: Randall Sharpe: Training for the Game of Life

THE NEW FACE OF FASHION: Redefining Beauty

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NAVIGATING CLINICAL TRIALS: Tips and Advice from an ONC reader PHOTO ESSAY: The Bakehouse: A Journey Back in Time

CAROLINA CONVERSATIONS: Defying the Odds with Irene Russell


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CONTENTS

departments 22

10 12 14 16 18 20 22

ASK THE EXPERT: Being Observant Amy Natt, MS, CMC, CSA HEALTH COACHING: Technology Adoption Marcy Simpson, LCSW MENTAL WELLNESS: Aging with Grace Denise O’Donoghue

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26

24 26 28

EYE HEALTH: Clinical Trials in Vision Research Lisa Fulgham, Research Studies Coordinator TECH SAVVY: Six Senior-Friendly Apps Rachel Stewart EAT RIGHT: Age Defying Foods Laura Buxenbaum, MPH, RD, LDN

BODY HEALTH: Medical Donation, the "Gift of Self" FirstHealth of the Carolinas

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GREY MATTER PUZZLES Crossword, Word Search, Sudoku

DRIVIN' FOR LUNCH: Gold Nugget of a Diner Ray Linville

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OVER MY SHOULDER: Facing Aging Alone Ann Robson

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GENERATIONS: What is the most interesting thing you learned this week?

SCAM ALERT: Grandparent Scams Patty H. LePage COOKING SIMPLE: Asparagus & Cheddar Quiche Scott's Table

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Reader Letters

I so enjoyed the feature on Dale 'Sunshine' Frye. My granddaughter would be thrilled to learn to box. How can I reach Mr. Frye for more information? Pam Z.  Greetings, Pam! Dale Frye can be reached at sunshinestunts@yahoo.com or 910-639-9247.  

Your article on "Boxing with Sunshine" was simply great with wonderful photos. John C.  Thank you for featuring Burney's in Fayetteville. We made the trip, tried the glazed croissants and owe you one. They were great. We're going to try Aroma Cafe and Bakery next. Keep 'em coming!  Louis and Patricia S.  The article in February's issue on speed dating for seniors really struck a cord with me. My mother is in her seventies, and I know she is lonely. Thank you for writing about this issue and bringing it to light. I hope I get to see the documentary and maybe share it with my mother. In the least, I want to show her the article and hear her thoughts.  Mary R.  I was excited to read the article from the March issue entitled "Taking Flight: Local Pilots Pass on Their Passion." I would love to gift my husband flying lessons. Any ideas where I can do this?  Ramona T.  Hi Ramona! We all want flying lessons, too! While none of the pilots out at Derby are currently instructors (Maggie just gets to ride and soak it all in), Pinehurst Regional/Moore County Airport has information on flight lessons and training and can be reached at (910) 692-3212.

CORRECTIONS

In our Hidden Hometown Heroes feature, we interviewed Deputy David Schau. Schau is a School Resource Officer at Warren Williams Elementary Alternative School, which we referenced as simply Warren Williams Alternative School. We regret the mistake, and we love noting that Schau gets to spend his days making a difference in the lives of elementary-aged children. Also, on page 41, when Schau speaks of the good-natured 'teasing and razing' he sometimes experiences, he was referring to the ribbing he gets from his co-workers and not the students. Although if you ever enjoy dinner at the Phariss household, you may get the business from kiddos as well as adults. Good times. Our apologies for any confusion. APRIL 2019 |

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from the editor

Aging.

I’ve spent the past month looking up synonyms, antonyms, colloquial phrases and general descriptions to find a way to express this concept in a more positive light, with less baggage and a brighter outlook. The thesaurus is of little help. When I look up synonyms for aging I’m met with such words as crumbling, fading, fermenting, waning and declining. I don’t even want to include stale and slumping, yet they’re there too. But a few other words are hopeful, empowering and true. There are maturing, developing and mellowing, each of which brings with it another rabbit’s-hole-search that somehow gets even brighter.

Maturing leads us to blossoming, evolving and sweetening. Developing includes flourishing, expanding and prospering. Mellowing is perhaps the loveliest of all, with words like soothing, cultured and seasoned among the synonyms. I can get behind the idea that as I continue on this journey of life, I am sweetening, flourishing and growing ever-more cultured with the passing years. Life is, in many ways, sweeter in this stage, certainly soothing in its own right. As we grow seasoned and expand our horizons, we can choose to evolve and grow rather than wither and fade. This month we view the new face of aging from this perspective, redefining what aging means in a day when 50 is the new 20, when adventure awaits us all (regardless of mileage) and when society is embracing all shapes, colors, sizes and ages as beautiful, empowered and relevant. We explore the issue of navigating clinical trials from a reader who has been there, done that (p. 42), how the modeling/ marketing world is shifting to embrace models of all ages (p. 36), how functional and corrective exercise can help us make the most of our second half (p. 32), and how a local woman from Moore County hasn’t let age define what she can or can’t do (p. 52). We also dip into The Bakehouse and Cafe in Aberdeen for a lesson in proper bread baking and buttercream (p. 46). Gone is the notion that we are invisible because we have graying hair, lined faces or an extra bit of padding for the long winter. I’ll take heed of Coco Chanel’s famous words: “Nature gives you the face you have at twenty; it is up to you to merit the face you have at fifty.” Merit we shall,

“Nature gives you the face you have at twenty; it is up to you to merit the face you have at fifty.” - Coco Chanel 8

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Don’t miss out on getting your monthly copy of

Have it delivered right to you! Editor-in-Chief Amy Phariss | Editor@OutreachNC.com Creative Director Kim Gilley | The Village Printers

Subscribe today!

Receive 12 issues for only $26.99!

Creative & Graphic Designer Sarah McElroy | The Village Printers Ad Designers Stephanie Budd, Cyndi Fifield, Sarah McElroy Proofreader Kate Pomplun Photography Mollie Tobias, Morgan Masson Contributors Laura Buxenbaum, FirstHealth of the Carolinas, Lisa Fulghum, Patty LePage, Ray Linville, Denise O’Donoghue, Amy Natt, Crissy Neville, Amy Phariss, Ann Robson, Scott's Table, Marcy Simpson, Rachel Stewart, Publisher Amy Natt | AmyN@AgingOutreachServices.com Marketing & Public Relations Director Susan McKenzie | SusanM@AgingOutreachServices.com Circulation 910-692-0683 | info@OutreachNC.com OutreachNC PO Box 2478 | 676 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28388 910-692-9609 Office | 910-695-0766 Fax info@OutreachNC.com | www.OutreachNC.com OutreachNC is a publication of The entire contents of OutreachNC are copyrighted by Aging Outreach Services. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial, photographic or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. OutreachNC is published monthly on the first of each month.

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Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Robeson and Scotland Counties.

OutreachNC.com info@outreachnc.com 910-692-9609 or mail a check to: PO BOX 2478 Southern Pines, NC 28388 APRIL 2019 |

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advice

Our Aging Life Care ProfessionalsTM will answer any aging questions you may have.

Email us your questions! info@OutreachNC.com

ASK THE EXPERT

Being Observant by Amy Natt, MS, CMC, CSA

I recently came down to visit my dad and noticed that things around the house were a bit disheveled, and he did not seem to have much food in his refrigerator. He insists that he is perfectly happy living alone and taking care of things, but the stacks of mail have me concerned. What should we do?

Observations can be worth 1000 words. There is nothing more enlightening than spending a few days with a family member, to really find out how things are going. If you ask someone how they are, most people will say they are doing just fine. When it comes to an aging parent, they might just be telling you what you want to hear. He probably feels like he is doing fine and even if he wasn’t, he would not want to burden you. So, when you visit, make the most of it. Go in with your eyes wide open and look for any red flags that may indicate things are not as good as they seem on the surface. Here are a few indicators that increased support may be needed: 1. Mail and bills are left to pile up. The simple

act of opening and sorting mail becomes overwhelming. Managing a checking account can also become difficult to maintain. Look at a few statements: are bills being paid on time? Can he determine the difference between junk mail and real mail?

2. The house is cluttered or unkempt. This is

especially troubling if a parent has always been neat and orderly.

3. Food in the refrigerator is uneaten or spoiled. Shopping, cooking, and cleaning can

become too much trouble. A parent might eat just enough to get by, but suffer nutritionally. Losing weight can be another sign that a parent is not eating a nutritious diet. Try cooking and packaging meals, with instructions on how to heat them up. When you go back, see if they have been consumed.

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4. Signs of scorching on the bottoms of pots and pans. A result of short-term memory

loss, this is a dangerous sign that parents are forgetting about pots left on the stove, causing a fire hazard, and threatening both the individual’s and the surrounding neighbors’ safety.

5. The same clothing is worn over and over again and other personal hygiene issues. Doing laundry has become physically

challenging, particularly if the washing machine is not easily accessible. There may be a fear of falling in the tub or shower. Is shampoo and soap getting used? Or is it always the same bottle when you check?

6. Missed doctor’s appointments. Sometimes

this is simply a product of not having transportation and not knowing how to access ride options. It may also be an issue with shortterm memory or keeping information organized.

7. Repeated phone calls at odd hours. When

a parent telephones friends or family at odd hours, it may be a sign of memory loss, or a cry for help— a sign of depression or isolation. Arranging for a daily check-in phone call, or a regular volunteer visitor, could make all the difference.

8. Forgetting to take medication. A sign of

short-term memory loss or depression, this isn’t just a quality of life issue, but a real risk factor. Check the bottles, dates, and quantities; if allowed, talk to the pharmacist to see if refills are happening routinely.


9. Inappropriate behavior, clothing or speech. You

may hear about this from a neighbor, someone who has noticed that your dad is not dressing appropriately for the weather, for instance. That’s a sign that he might have something going on.

10. Symptoms of depression. A frequent problem

for many older people, who feel isolated and alone, depression causes marked changes in behavior and routine. Feelings of hopelessness or despair, lack of interest in once pleasurable activities, crying, listlessness, and not wanting to get dressed can all be indications of a problem.

11. Changes in sleep habits. Is your dad sleeping more

or less than he has in the past? Is he up at odd hours or report being tired all the time?

12. Changes in social activities. Do you see evidence

of your dad participating in activities outside the house? Just saying he went to golf doesn’t mean it actually happened. Try to dig a little deeper without upsetting him.

You want to respect your dad’s privacy, while looking out for his best interest. Ask questions and listen. Ask if it is okay if you look around the house: • Look in refrigerator, freezer and drawers. • Look on top of furniture and countertops. Are dust and dirt signs that household tasks are becoming more difficult?

• Look through the mail. Has he forgotten to pay bills and answer correspondence? • Look at your dad’s appearance. Is clothing dirty and unkempt? • Look around the home. Are general repairs and maintenance needed? • Look at the yard. Is it maintained as it has been in the past? If you find that several of these items are becoming issues, make sure to discuss them with your dad and encourage him to talk to his doctor. Some things may be an easy fix, like bringing in someone to clean or do yard work. Others may be an indication that something is going on and should be assessed. Keep notes and try to have an open dialogue with him about your concerns and possible solutions. Remind him that staying on top of things and adding support as needed will help him remain safe at home and maximize independence.

Readers may send questions to Amy Natt, an Aging Life Care ProfessionalTM, certified senior advisor and CEO of Aging Outreach Services. She can be reached at amyn@agingoutreachservices.com .

• Look down at floors and stairways. Have shaky hands spilled drinks and food, becoming an issue?

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health

H E A LT H C O A C H I N G

Technology Adoption by Older Adults by Marcy Simpson, LCSW

Technology is a broad term that refers to equipment developed from applying scientific knowledge to improving the process of completing a task. We usually think of electronic or digital products or systems such as computers, cell phones, and the Internet. These are all examples of how making a phone call, typing a letter, or researching information have increased in complexity. Changes are occurring at breakneck speed and our social context has been impacted in many ways. Adopting these new products and systems is becoming necessary to function in everyday life as the changes become more pervasive in society. There is a common misperception that older adults are reluctant to embrace new technology. Because certain technologies are not currently utilized by older adults to the extent that younger adults engage, stereotypes of older adults being afraid, unwilling or unable to use technology have developed. There is also the concept of the “digital divide,” which refers to the gap between those who do and those who do not welcome technology. Access definitely plays a part in the level of interest. A person’s attitude and ability are two major predictors of technology use. Anxiety and low confidence are obstacles which can result from memory and cognitive issues, or changes in vision and fine motor skills that impact ease of navigation on a device such as a cell phone or remote control. With all of that being said, the majority of older adults actually perceive the benefits of technology as more positive than negative. Seniors download videos, communicate online through email and Facebook, and perform online searches for travel and health information. In fact, older adults are much more likely to research health-related questions than younger generations. Seniors also recognize the value in technology that benefits the goal of aging in place and maintaining their independence. Developments in medical alert systems, health tracking apps and devices, smart pillboxes, and 12

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personal emergency response systems all promote better management of health conditions and facilitate healthy living. As new advances in technology continue to emerge, applications have the potential to become increasingly complex and can seem overwhelming. Here are some strategies to address the tide of technological developments: • Accept where you are in the learning process. All of us have different levels of understanding and experience. It’s okay to not know what you don’t know yet! • Learn how to use the device. You may learn better by reading the instruction manual or by taking a class. Some learn best by hands-on/trial and error. • Resist the urge to give up! Break down the learning process into smaller steps or enlist the aid of an expert. • Practice your new skills. Be intentional about becoming familiar with how to operate the device. Remember that learning new skills exercises your brain. • Provide feedback to designers regarding “seniorfriendly” features. Technology can be viewed a tool that enhances our lives to provide greater flexibility and freedom. Older adults support new changes while recognizing their needs and use may be different.

Marcy Simpson, LCSW, is a Health Coach at Pinehurst Medical Clinic in Pinehurst and Sanford. She can be reached at 910-237-3347 or msimpson@pinehurstmedical.com.


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LEE AUDITORIUM, SOUTHERN PINES Wesley Schulz, conductor Brian Reagin, violin

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advice

M E N TA L W E L L N E S S

Aging with Grace: The Power of a Positive Attitude

by Denise O’Donoghue, Biblical Counselor It is no secret that people are living much longer these days and Skin - Wrinkles and loose skin come along with the aging feeling younger. We can thank advances in modern medicine process. Over the years, skin loses its natural moisture and for the extra years. Not only that, but most of the time, when elasticity and thins. Women should steer clear of cakey makeup I talk to people in their 50’s and 60’s, they tell me they feel and heavy powder, both of which deepen the appearance of more like they are still in their 40’s. Yet, outward appearances wrinkles. A good moisturizer and a pleasant smile will do can tell a different story. Several key areas of change include wonders in drawing the attention away from the outer wrinkles our hair, skin, and body shape. Rather than try to pretend to the warm heart inside. As we think about embracing our these differences don’t exist, the better option is to take charge. wrinkles, it is good to remember what one author has written, Embracing these changes positively can lead to a better mental “Wisdom resides in the wrinkles.” outlook on life. Body Shape - Body shape changes as we mature. One key area Hair - We all know hair has a tendency to lose its original is the mid-section. For men, the belly is the natural storage color and become either gray or white. This is caused by space for excess fat, thus a potbelly develops once they begin loss of pigmentation in hair follicles as we age. How early we to have less physical activity but continue consuming the same gray depends primarily on genetics. The age our parent or or more calories. Choosing proper dress can help camouflage grandparent began turning gray is an indication of what we can the mid-section. One helpful suggestion is to choose darkerexpect. I turned gray in my early 40’s and saw that same trait colored pants with a flat front along with suspenders to keep in my father as well as his siblings. I have chosen to embrace pants hitting at the waist rather than falling below the belly my gray hair (I prefer to call it silver), reminding myself of an causing it to look even larger. For a more casual look, a nicely old proverb, “Gray hair is a crown of splendor…”. I save lots fitting untucked shirt that covers the belly elongates the trunk of time and money by not coloring my hair. However, if you and minimizes the belly. prefer to color your hair, sticking with your natural color along The onset of menopause and decrease in estrogen changes the with some well-placed highlights can make you look as young body’s natural storage space from the hips, thighs, and arms as you feel. Men, this means avoiding the “shoe-polish” black to the stomach in women. Often the hips, thighs, and arms unless that was your natural color before graying. may actually become smaller while the size of the stomach Hair can also thin dramatically. With aging, the scalp simply produces fewer hairs. Some men will spread their remaining hair around (aka “the comb over”) to try and make their head look like it is still full of hair. This doesn’t fool anyone and actually ages you more. A better option may be to embrace the baldness. After all, many much younger men are striving for that look by actually shaving off the hair on their heads; you may have it naturally!

Women who had long, luxurious locks in their younger years may try to keep the same hairstyle as they age, but less hair can make it look scraggly and unkempt. Beauty experts say the best way for women to disguise thinning hair is to shorten the length and add layers. For both men and women, a good rule of thumb regarding changes to the hair is to choose hairstyles that enhance your looks rather than trying to hold on to the styles of your youth.

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increases. Women should choose clothing that takes focus off the mid-section, aiming for a higher dividing line with an empire waist fit, or a lower one such as offered with a drop waist feature that puts the seam at the hips rather than the mid-section. For both men and women, the best approach is to select clothing that is not too loose, not too tight, but rather fitted and flattering. As time marches on we can be certain that we will experience outward signs of our body’s aging process. For a healthy outlook on these changes, adjust to the circumstances and remember every gray hair, wrinkle and change in body appearance tell the story of your life. Denise O’Donoghue is a biblical counselor in Raleigh and a former professor for Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary. She is very blessed to have four living generations to share life with. You can reach Denise at mzdod@bellsouth.net


When You Are Old W. B. Yeats, 1865 - 1939

When you are old and grey and full of sleep, And nodding by the fire, take down this book, And slowly read, and dream of the soft look Your eyes had once, and of their shadows deep; How many loved your moments of glad grace, And loved your beauty with love false or true, But one man loved the pilgrim soul in you, And loved the sorrows of your changing face; And bending down beside the glowing bars, Murmur, a little sadly, how Love fled And paced upon the mountains overhead And hid his face amid a crowd of stars.

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health

B O D Y H E A LT H

Medical Donation: the literal “Gift of Self ” Local physician says, “Think about it.” by FirstHealth of the Carolinas

Every day, people make a gift to someone in need. It might be a meal or help with a chore. Many times, the gift is something more substantial. Moved by life experience and by the patients he treats in emergency departments at FirstHealth of the Carolinas, one local physician decided to make a very significant “medical donation.” The unusual gift changed at least one person’s life, and possibly saved it. “There probably isn’t a single shift at work that I don’t take care of a patient who needs or has some kind of transplant,” says Matthew Harmody, M.D., emergency medicine specialist with FirstHealth of the Carolinas. While there, Dr. Harmody often treats people with chronic kidney disease and who are on dialysis. And for those patients, he has a soft spot. “For years, I’d thought about donating a kidney, because my father died while waiting for a match for a kidney donation,” he says. “Seeing these patients in the emergency room and knowing that the need for kidneys is so great, I decided not to wait any longer. I wanted to donate a kidney while I was healthy and able to make the donation.” In September 2017, with the blessing of his wife, Susan, and two adult sons, Dr. Harmody travelled from their home in Southern Pines to UNC Chapel Hill for the surgery. He was 56, about the age that his own father died of renal (kidney) failure while on the transplant list. At that time, 1990, before the use of internet-based databases to speed sharing of medical information, matching organ donors and recipients was difficult. Today, transplant specialists use a national database to match organs. “Even with this technology, the wait for kidney transplant is long,” he says. Kidney donations can be from deceased donors or from living donors. The wait for a deceased donor kidney is often five years and could be twice that long, according to the National Kidney Foundation. During the wait, the patient is usually on dialysis three times every week, for almost 20 hours total. 16

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Every year, about 5,000 people die while on the waitlist for a deceased donor kidney, and about 4,000 become too sick for a transplant. Kidneys from living donors increase the potential pool of matches significantly. Further, living donor kidneys offer other benefits. Compared to deceased donor kidneys, benefits can include helping patients avoid the need for dialysis, quicker functioning of their new kidney, and longer overall survival. Dr. Harmody has not met the person who received his kidney, but he knows there’s a chance that his gift helped more than one person. In some living donor situations, a donor volunteers to help relative or friend, but is not a match. So using the donor database, specialists find a match from a stranger, like Dr. Harmody. Transplant specialists use the original donor’s kidney for another on the list, while the relative or friend receives the stranger’s donated kidney. This is called a chain, and longer ones can involve a dozen people. Dr. Harmody spent years considering this gift, and finally decided to do it last fall. He has no regrets. “I had two healthy kidneys. I didn’t want to miss an opportunity to make a difference for someone else, knowing that a donation could have helped my Dad,” he says. “Besides, donating did not end up being a big change in my life.” He returned to his active lifestyle just eight weeks after the surgery. “Active” might be an understatement, since one of Dr. Harmody’s hobbies is competing in adventure races and ultramarathons. These range from 24-hour foot races to 72-hour endurance courses that cover more than 100 miles, where competitors must even carry all their supplies. Though Dr. Harmody’s extreme “gift of self” was important to him, he knows such a donation isn’t for everyone. “I want to be an advocate for any type of medical donation,”


he says. “I want medical donations to have a positive impact on more people.” So in sharing his story, his goal is to encourage people to consider some type of medical donation.

2019

“It could be to donate a kidney,” he says. “But it could also be to donate a pint of blood, or check the ‘donor’ box on your driver’s license. I want people to think about it, and to act.” Matthew Harmody, M.D., MBA, is a board certified emergency medicine physician. He is president of Sandhills Emergency Physicians, medical director for FirstHealth Regional EMS System and medical director of the emergency departments at FirstHealth Moore Regional Hospital in Pinehurst and its Hoke campus. Dr. Harmody earned his medical degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine in Ohio and completed his residency at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

2019-2020

Sept. 23.

Ryley Osentoski, at 919-708-1639

FirstHealth Moore Regional Hospital partners with Carolina Donor Services to provide support for possible organ donation and to educate staff and the public of the vital need for organ donation. According to Lyn Austin, MSN, R.N., nursing professional development specialist at Moore Regional, “By being an organ donor, one person can save or improve the lives of up to 50 people.” “Many families say yes to donation because of conversations with loved ones about donation,” adds Austin. “Families take consolation knowing their loved one helped save so many other lives.” There are currently more than 114,000 people in the United States awaiting a lifesaving organ transplant, and, in 2018, Carolina Donor Services helped save the lives of more than 600 people through the gracious gift of donation. “Please consider registering yourself and engage in conversations with your family regarding your wishes,” says Austin.

How can you help? It is easy to register: · Join the registry at your nearest DMV office · Register yourself online at www.DonateLifeNC.org · If you have an iphone with iOS 10, you can register from your phone using the Health app APRIL 2019 |

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life

DRIVIN’ FOR LUNCH

A Small Town Needs a Gold Nugget of a Diner by Ray Linville

It takes a village to raise a child, according to an old African proverb. In the central Piedmont of our state, sometimes a business helps breathe life into a small town beset by store closings and economic downturns. Troy, a town in Montgomery County settled initially by Scottish immigrants in the early 1800s, was once thriving with textile and furniture manufacturing. Now it’s prospering again as it redevelops its downtown. Part of the town’s history is that gold nuggets were found in the streets when fill dirt from the gold mines of nearby Eldorado was brought in to develop the first roads. Today a gold nugget downtown is Crawford’s Diner, which was opened in mid-2018 by the husband-wife team of Jess Randall and Lydia Caroline Crawford (both go by their middle names). The first week “started off with a bang, and it hasn’t let up,” Caroline says. “The Lord’s been in here,” she adds, reflecting on the diner’s success as well as her strong faith. “How are y’all today?” Randall greets customers as they enter. Before sitting down, the couple stops to visit with people they know at nearby tables. Helen Dunn of nearby Biscoe and Dianne Thompson of Troy come frequently as much for the friendly staff as they do for the food. “I just love Kelly (Brewer, the manager and primary chef). I’ve known her forever. Everyone here is kind and good to us,” says Dunn, who has been to the diner about 10 times since it opened. “I just love meatloaf. It’s my favorite food,” she adds. Meatloaf is the special on Wednesdays. Specials vary by day and may include turkey and dressing, an open-faced roast beef sandwich, stew beef or chicken casserole.

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The signature item, however, is the Sasquatch Burger. Too much for me to order, it’s three huge patties and three slices of cheese, topped to your liking. Because the real Sasquatch is reportedly living nearby in Uwharrie National Forest, I’ll limit my sightings to only a burger. As my wife and I settled in for lunch, we felt like we were in a community center. People entering waved to others in the dining area and bantered with Randall. We arrived shortly after 11:30 a.m. to observe the lunch crowd as it arrived. Although a few customers ordered carryout, most came to eat inside. By about 12:30 p.m., the diner was almost full. My wife enjoyed the chicken salad and broccoli cheddar soup – both are homemade. The meatloaf I ordered reminded me of my childhood favorite. Sides, depending on the day, may include broccoli casserole, green beans, mashed potatoes, pinto beans, black-eyed peas, potato salad, stewed squash, lima beans and turnips. All soups are homemade as are the desserts, which may include strawberry cream pie, strawberry cake and coconut pie. An enticing dessert tower and ice cream counter tempt you as you enter. If you’re feeling adventuresome, deep-fried cheesecake may be on your bucket list. A dessert favorite of my family is persimmon pudding, which was available, so we ordered it. Randy and Pat Lankford of Robbins, about 30 minutes away, arrived for a first-time visit while we were there. Both were very pleased with their lunch. “We were just cruising Main Street when we spotted the diner,” she says. “We wanted to go someplace different for lunch and decided to check this place out,” he says. Another first-time visitor was Nancy Capel, who came with


her sister-in-law Julianne Capel, both of Troy. Julianne had visited on the first day the diner opened and has returned several times. “It’s always very good,” she says thinking about the food.

Last September, Troy celebrated the grand opening of an amphitheater in the heart of the business district. Town planners envision other improvements such as turning empty storefronts on North Main into a bookstore and a taproom. More redevelopment will continue to make this town sparkle as bright as the gold nuggets once found in its streets.

Nancy, however, is thinking about the building, which was vacant for a long time before the diner opened, when she says, “This new place is awesome.” When she moved to Troy decades ago, a business named Wimpy’s was serving hot dogs in the front section of the same space. “It was here for years, but women could not go in the back where there was a pool hall,” she says. As she reflected on the earlier days, Randall walked by and affirmed, “There was a time when women could not go back there,” as he pointed to the rear of the diner. The interior of the diner now shines, regardless of its checkered past. The tin ceiling and original brick walls have been painted a clean white and are joined together by a bright red molding. Charming sconces on the walls contribute to the décor including large overhead tubes for heating and air conditioning, adding an industrial feel. The Crawfords were fortunate in timing when they bought the building for the diner. They benefited from a new community development block grant established to expand economic opportunities as part of the downtown redevelopment program of Troy. The grant paid for improvements to bring the building up to code compliance, and the building was upgraded with new electric, gas and plumbing connections as well as a new roof.

Open Tuesday through Saturday, Crawford’s Diner is easy to find in Troy, although the town has two Main Streets: one running north-south; the other, east-west. The diner is on North Main three blocks north of the center of town. Call ahead (910-751-0975) if you want to know the daily selections. Got extra time? Check out Caroline’s Boutique and Gifts, a delightful shop next door to the diner and operated by Caroline. If you have an extra hour, also visit the creative studios of STARworks on Russell Drive in Star, only 10 minutes away on U.S. 220 Alternate. STARworks is an artscentered community that promotes educational programs and business ventures. Its studios are shared workspaces for residents and visiting artists and also host ceramics and glass workshops. Handcrafted wares are available for sale at the School House Gallery.

Ray Linville writes about local connections to Southern food, history and culture. He can be reached at linville910@gmail.com .

RD

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OutreachNC.com 19


advice

SCAM ALERT

Grandparent Scams by Patty H. LePage

Becoming a grandparent is one of the immeasurable joys of aging. You love your family fiercely and would do anything to protect them. Scammers know this about you and will use it to their advantage in imposter scams focused on pulling at your heart strings and relying on your desperation to help a family member in distress. Grandparent scams generally revolve around the scammer calling and posing as a family member in need or posing as an attorney representing the family member. The caller says your grandchild, or other loved one, is in serious trouble, such as a car accident or an arrest, and they need money fast. They tell you just enough detail to convince you that someone you love desperately needs your help. You are asked to wire money and to not tell anyone. Desperate to protect your loved one, you wire the money. You have just been scammed. If you, or someone you know, has been a victim of this type of scam, you are not alone. According to the FTC, in 2017, one in five people fell victim to imposter scams, resulting in losses totaling $328 million. Individuals over the age of 70 and those who have been scammed before are more likely to fall victim to this type of scam. Scammers sell victim lists much like telemarketers sell contact lists. They gather information from hacking your emails and from your social media sites like Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. Using these means, scammers can gather information about you and your family to use in their scams. If you or a family member are in one of these highrisk categories, you should take extra precautions to protect yourself or your loved ones.

So how do you avoid these types of scams? One of the most important things you can do is to remain calm. If you receive a call indicating that a family member is in trouble, your first instinct is to react. Try to slow down and think of ways to confirm that the call is real. Ask the caller questions that only your actual family member would know or hang up and call them at the number you have for them. You might be surprised when your loved one answers the phone, and everything is fine. You can also tighten up security on your email and social media accounts. If you are unsure how to change your settings, ask a trusted family member to help. Another dead giveaway these types of calls are a scam is the way they ask you to send them money. They will ask you to wire money, ship it to them, or give them a gift card with the information over the phone. Hospitals and law enforcement do not take payment by these methods. You can always take the information regarding who needs payment and then look up the number and call for yourself. If your loved one is truly in trouble, then you will be able to help them by paying the fine or bill directly to the institution. If you’re a victim of a grandparent scam or another form of fraud, report it to the FTC at ftc.gov/complaint or by calling 1-877-FTC-HELP.  Patty holds a Bachelor of Science from UMUC, a Master of Social Work from the University of Southern California and is pursuing her Doctorate in Business Administration at UMUC. She also holds an executive certificate in the Principles of Leading Transformational Nonprofits from the University of Notre Dame. 

Solutions for Your Home, Life and Business Come in today to talk with your Southern Pines Insurance team. 580 SW Broad Street | 910-692-5754 * Insurance products are underwritten by non-affiliated insurance companies.

products offered are not FDIC| insured, not bank insured, may lose value, not insured by any federal government agency, not a bank deposit. 20 Insurance OutreachNC.com APRIL 2019 First Bank Insurance Services is a proud member of the Independent Insurance Agents of North Carolina and a Trusted Choice.


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life

COOKING SIMPLE

Asparagus and Cheddar Quiche

This month’s Cooking Simple recipe comes from Southern Pines’ Scott’s Table. Focusing on local cuisine and sourcing produce and meats from North Carolina providers, Scott’s Table highlights the use of fresh, quality ingredients on every plate, whether it’s shrimp and grits or banana beignets with bourdon caramel sauce. This Asparagus and Cheddar Quiche is exactly the recipe for embracing spring and celebrating the simplicity of honest ingredients and a solid slosh of heavy cream.

Enjoy!

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Ingredients:

1 pie shell, 10”, frozen or homemade 2 ounces butter 1 onion, small diced 1 bunch asparagus, woody end removed, cut in ½” pieces 3 cloves garlic, minced 12 ounces heavy cream

3 eggs 1 T. Dijon mustard 3 T. green onion, chopped 1 T. salt 1 t. pepper 2 cups Cheddar cheese, shredded

Instructions

Preheat oven to 375 degrees. Poke pie crust with a fork and bake until lightly done, about 8 minutes. Remove from the oven and cool. Reduce oven temperature to 325 degrees. Heat butter over medium high heat. Add onions and asparagus and cook for 5 minutes. Add garlic and continue to cook until the asparagus is soft, about 3 minutes longer. Remove from heat and let cool. In a bowl, whisk the heavy cream, eggs, Dijon mustard, green onion, salt and pepper. Sprinkle a small layer of cheddar cheese in the bottom of the pie crust. Spoon the asparagus mixture into the pie crust. Pour in the egg mixture. Top with the remaining cheddar cheese. Bake until the eggs are set, about 30 to 40 minutes. Remove from the oven and let stand for a few minutes. Cut into desired serving size.

from farm to table Scott’s Table is all about quality, fresh ingredients being respected and handled carefully. Our dishes have been carefully crafted by Chef Scott and executed by his skilled team of professionals. Our pride shows in every plate we create. Our dedication and commitment to using the best of ingredients carries over into our dining rooms in the way we take care of each and every guest that comes to Scott’s Table. Pull up a chair and make yourself comfortable. We are glad you are here.

There is always room at Scott ’s Table. TUES - SAT: 11 AM - 3 PM | FRI - SAT: 5 PM - 9 PM CLOSED: SUNDAYS AND MONDAYS

WE CATER! CONTACT US FOR MORE INFORMATION

311 SE Broad Street, Southern Pines, NC 28387 910-684-8126 For Reservations: 910-684-8126 chefscott@scottstable.com www.scottstable.com

SEARED SCALLOPS with brown butter sauteed ricotta gnocchi and roasted corn sauce

APRIL 2019 |

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health

E Y E H E A LT H

Clinical Trials in Vision Research

by Lisa Fulghum, Research Studies Coordinator, Carolina Eye Associates Clinical research studies find new ways to understand, treat or prevent eye disease and vision loss. These studies in vision research have led to new medicines and surgeries that have saved or improved sight for thousands of people. What is a clinical trial? Clinical trials are medical research studies in which people, also called human subjects, volunteer to participate. A clinical trial is used to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of an “intervention” to prevent, diagnose or treat an eye disease or disorder. Examples of interventions include: • drugs • biologics (e.g., vaccines, blood, cells) • devices • procedures (e.g., surgery) • delivery systems (e.g., telemedicine, face-to-face  interviews) • ways to change health-related behavior (e.g., diet, exercise) • treatment routines • prevention strategies • diagnostic tests After a treatment shows promise in the laboratory, it is tested in a study to determine if it will be beneficial for patients. The studies are controlled, allowing the researchers to compare the effects of a new treatment with those of another treatment. Four types, or phases, of clinical trials exist: Phase I clinical trials test a potential new treatment in a small number of volunteers to determine the best dosage and identify potential side effects. Phase II clinical trials test a potential new treatment in a larger number of volunteers to learn how the body responds to the treatment, the optimal dose of the treatment and how the treatment

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affects a certain eye condition. Phase III and IV clinical trials may include hundreds or thousands of volunteers around the country. These studies compare a new treatment with existing treatments or no treatment to determine if the new treatment works better, the same or not as well. Phase III clinical trials are conducted to get the new treatment approved by regulatory agencies. Phase IV clinical trials are conducted after approval to understand more about the treatment. The researcher in charge of a clinical trial is called the principal investigator. The person who makes the arrangements for your visits and explains how the study works is the research coordinator. All the doctors involved in the study follow a detailed treatment plan or study protocol. The protocol ensures that all participants are treated in a standard way. Eyes are one of many body parts that come in pairs. This feature gives researchers additional options when they design the study. If an eye condition affects both of your eyes, one eye might be placed in the treatment group for a study and the other may be in the control group. Generally, the eye that will be treated is randomly assigned. Clinical trials allow us to translate science into new therapies for our patients. Participation in clinical trials allows participants to play a more active role in their own health care, gain access to new research treatments before they are widely available and help others by contributing to medical research. Carolina Eye Associates participates in a number of clinical research studies. For more information on the clinical research program, contact Lisa Fulghum, Research Studies Coordinator, at (910) 255-2053.


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APRIL 2019 |


advice

T E C H S AV V Y

There’s an App For That: Six Senior-Friendly Apps By Rachel Stewart

Seniors are becoming more tech savvy, with four in 10 reportedly owning a smartphone according to a 2017 Pew Internet study. This number has nearly doubled over the course of four years. So it makes sense that with a greater reliance on mobile devices, more apps are built with senior needs in mind. Here’s a quick overview of six free apps for both iOS and android smartphones to consider downloading

1. AARP. Currently an AARP (American Association of Retired Persons) member? This app lets members access information and benefits in mere moments. Users can check out the latest local discounts or benefits, or find and register for upcoming events. The app also lets members manage their membership and messaging preferences through the simple interface. 2. Skype. Stay connected with loved ones via the Skype app. Users can video chat with just one person or multiple people via a chat group. This app also allows users to send photos or tag other users in the group text chat window. If an in-person visit feels too faraway, Skype can help users “see” family and friends as often as they like. 3. Medisafe. Having trouble keeping up with medications? The Medisafe app lets users import their current prescription list from their electronic health records and set alerts, cutting down on missed doses. Users can also monitor how well they’ve kept up with taking their medications and the app even compiles it in a handy pdf report users can share with their medical provider next time they have a check up. It even lets you manage multiple pill lists (for other family members) and sends refill reminders and coupons.

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4. Magnifying Glass with Flashlight. Aging-related vision issues can make it harder to read, but the Magnifying Glass with Flashlight app can help users comfortably read small print on restaurant menus, letters, or medication bottles. The flashlight function can help users find items in dimly lit areas or in an emergency if the power goes out. Both functions can be used at the same time, too. 5. Mint. Never fuss over misplacing a paper bank statement again. The Mint app allows users to safely and securely view their accounts on one screen and help them map current and past spending habits. These can be broken down by type of spending, such as mortgage, car, entertainment, and so on. The app even shows users if they are at risk of going over budget, and they can view their spending or budgets from the past month to see how they’re doing. 6. LibriVox. Tired of watching what’s on TV? Fire up the LibriVox app to find an audiobook to listen to while you cook dinner, relax, or try and drift off to sleep. The app contains books in the public domain that are read by volunteers. App users can search the catalogue by author, title, subject/genre, and language.


COSMETIC SURGERY According to the American Academy of Facial Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (AAFPRS) there has been a 60% increase in men and 30% increase in women electing to have cosmetic procedures since 2000. Men only account for about 13% of all cosmetic surgery and 8% of minimally invasive procedures according the American Society of Plastic Surgeons report (2017).

POPU

L AR

UN

Fillers & Fat Transfers

EDU

Otoplasty

BotoxÂŽ

OC

Rhinoplasty (Nose Job)

(ear correction)

E PR

(in cases of gynaecomastia)

IS

X

Male Breast Reduction

RES

Blepharoplasty

(Eyelid Surgery)

Hair Transplants

(up 20% from 2016)

Liposuction

CE

DU

RE

S

Skin Resurfacing

O W R POPUL A

M

’ N E

S

O R P

In 2017 there were a total of 1,662,550 cosmetic surgeries performed and 14,154,914 minimally invasive procedures (ASPS). There has been a 46% decrease in cosmetic surgeries since 2000, but an increase of 76% in minimally invasive procedures (ASPS). In 2017, Americans spent approximately $16.7 Billion on cosmetic procedures (ASPS). 2019 | OutreachNC.com 27 In 2017, there was a 2% increase in both cosmetic surgery and minimally invasive proceduresAPRIL for individuals over the age of 55.


health

E AT R I G H T

Age Defying Foods by Laura Buxenbaum, MPH, RD, LDN

As we age, we’re searching for anything that will help delay the process in some way- whether it is maintaining glowing skin, keeping our heart pumping strong or preserving bone and muscle strength. While there is no magic potion to delay aging, the good news is that eating the right foods might add years to your life—and life to your years. A diet high in nutrient-rich foods that include dairy, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains is the anti-aging prescription for glowing skin, a sharper mind, strong bones and a healthy heart. As a Registered Dietitian, I love sharing that the fountain of youth is as close as the refrigerator. Incorporate these foods into your daily diet to foster healthy aging and improve vitality throughout the years. · Fruits and Vegetables: You have heard it before: eat your fruits and vegetables. Eating at least five servings of fruits and vegetables each day is one of the best ways to defend against aging.  Not only are fruits and vegetables low in calories and high in fiber, but they are packed with vitamins A and C, which help maintain healthy skin, eyesight and even boost brain power. Fruits and vegetables are also packed with antioxidants, which protect against cell damage and help prevent chronic diseases including cancer, Alzheimer’s, heart disease and diabetes.     Reach for fruits and vegetables that are rich in color - dark green, blue and red. Berries are a great source of Vitamin C to keep skin smooth and wrinkle free.  Blueberries may reduce the effects of age-related diseases such as Alzheimer’s and dementia. Dark green leafy vegetables, such as spinach and kale, help keep vision sharp by protecting our eyes from the harmful effects of ultraviolet light.  Studies remain strong that a diet rich in vegetables can lower blood pressure and cholesterol, help prevent heart disease and protect against certain cancers. Tip: Stock up on frozen fruits and vegetables to ensure they are readily available. · Milk, Cheese and Yogurt: Dairy foods not only taste delicious, but they are packed with high-quality protein 28

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and essential anti-aging nutrients, including calcium and vitamin D. As we age, muscle mass decreases and with muscle loss comes a decrease in muscle strength, leading to falls and an overall decline in health. One way to support muscle maintenance is to consume highquality protein foods. These are foods that contain all nine essential amino acids that the body can’t make on its own, including leucine- an amino acid that triggers muscle building and repair. In addition, dairy foods also provide nutrients important in bone health including calcium and vitamin D. As we age, our risk for osteoporosis increases with an estimation that one in two women and one in four men will break a bone due to osteoporosis in their lifetime. Milk, cheese and yogurt are the main food source of calcium for most people in the US. Enjoying dairy foods throughout the lifespan can help ensure a lifetime of strong bones. Tip: Lactose Intolerant? Try lactose-free milk, which is real dairy milk, minus the lactose. Reach for yogurt that contains live and active cultures, which help the body digest the lactose and hard cheeses like cheddar, swiss and mozzarella, which are low in lactose. · Whole Grains: The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommend limiting the intake of refined (highly processed) grains and increasing whole grains to at least three servings a day. Whole grains are necessary because they contain all the naturally occurring nutrients of the grain seed and are typically higher in nutrients such as fiber, potassium, magnesium, B vitamins and vitamin E, all key nutrients in maintaining a healthy immune system, forming new cells and carrying oxygen in the blood. Additionally, whole grains contain dietary fiber, which not only fills us up but also plays a part in lowering risk of heart disease, stroke, obesity and Type 2 Diabetes. Hooray for fiber! Multiple studies have linked the consumption of whole grains to heart health, longevity and decreased risk of heart disease. One study, published in the American Heart Association’s journal Circulation, reported that


eating at least three servings of whole grains every day was associated with a 20 percent lower risk of death from all causes and a 25 percent lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease. Tip: For those that are gluten intolerant, there are many whole grain products, such as buckwheat, oatmeal, popcorn, brown and wild rice, and quinoa that can fit into a gluten-free diet. Look for the word “whole” at the

beginning of the ingredient list (whole oats, whole wheat flour, whole grain brown rice, etc.) to guarantee you are getting the most nutritious product. Healthy aging starts from the inside out. Filling your shopping cart with nutrient-rich foods, including dairy, fruits, vegetables, and whole grains, can help you lose weight, live longer, and look and feel younger.

BlueberryFlax Overnight Oats

Start your morning with this wholesome and filling age defying recipe that provides whole grains, dairy and antioxidant-rich blueberries in one jar! Prep-time: 10 min

Servings: 1

INGREDIENTS

· · · · · · · ·

1/2 cup low-fat milk (can use lactose free milk) 1/2 cup old-fashioned rolled oats 1/3 cup vanilla Greek yogurt 1/4 cup chopped almonds 1 tablespoon flax meal 1/8 teaspoon ground cardamom 1/2 cup blueberries 1 tablespoon honey

INSTRUCTIONS In small bowl or 12-ounce jar, combine first 6 ingredients (milk through cardamom), reserving 1 tablespoon of the chopped almonds for topping, and stir until well combined. Top with blueberries and chopped almonds. Cover and refrigerate overnight or at least 6 hours. Drizzle with honey just before serving. Laura Buxenbaum, MPH, RD, LDN is the Assistant Director of Food and Nutrition Outreach for The Dairy Alliance. She received her Master of Public Health at UNC Chapel Hill and has been working in dietetics for over 15 years. She can be reached at lbuxenbaum@thedairyalliance.com.

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APRIL 2019 |

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OutreachNC’s 2019

Book Club

This month we’re reading The Little French Bistro by Nina George, a novel about a 60-yearold woman in a dreadful marriage who embarks on a journey to find herself. We needed something on the light and airy side after last month’s exploration of health, wellness and death, and George’s novel sounded like just the thing. Here’s what we thought, how Jeeves feels about a novel set in France (he was worried it might be cliché) and whether or not we’re now booking flights to the French shore.

10 Thoughts on

The Little French Bistro: A Novel 1. For all the hope we had of digging into a book as light as a cotton top sheet on a Carolina summer morning, George’s novel begins with nothing other than a suicide attempt. We know. We weren’t prepared for that either. 2. George’s writing is sometimes a bit syrupy (Jeeves is smug as I write that) but also sometimes lovely, and in the end, she tells her story well, with the sort of believability that makes her heroine recognizable to many of us. 3. Sometimes....husbands get what they deserve, particularly if they’re named Lothar. 4. The main character of The Little French Bistro, Marianne, is in her early 60’s, which means she has a certain je ne sais quoi that comes with time, age and endurance. 5. The heart of George’s story, of Marianne’s story, is transformation, the shifts that happen when we change our thoughts, expectations or literal places of habitation. The author did a good job of allowing not only the setting to change and shift as we read but also the protagonist’s life, both internal and external. 6. As of this writing, plane tickets from RDU to Brittany are $1800. You may just see us all there, donning striped shirts and drinking strong coffee at an outdoor cafe. Most of us will be attempting to pull off classic red lipstick, of course. 7. The Little French Bistro is full of a cast of characters whom you will likely come to love. They struggle with the same life issues we all face, even Parkinson’s and dementia, and they also endure, as we all do, to continue living. 8. Jeeves gives this book 3 out of 5 stars. Though he enjoyed the scenic descriptions of the Breton coast and the colorful characters, he was left hangry more than once with all the writing about food. 30

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9. Nina George’s other novel, an international bestseller, is entitled The Little Paris Bookshop and will be an excellent follow-up if you love The Little French Bistro. 10. If you like novels of this nature, you may enjoy The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan, Eleanor Oliphant is Completely Fine by Gail Honeyman, and The Red Notebook by Antoine Laurain, which has a 4.5 star review on Amazon. That’s it for us this month. Next month, we’re looking forward to Nora Ephron’s I Remember Nothing: And Other Reflections. We love sharing books with everyone and anyone who’s got a review, comment, thought, critique or favorite quote to send along. Feel free to write to us at editor@ outreachnc.com and let us know your thoughts on Nina George’s novel.

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APRIL 2019 |

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FUNCTIONAL FITNESS:

Randall Sharpe Helps Clients Train for the Game of Life by Amy Phariss | Photography by: Mollie Tobias

“My job is help ‘broken’ people heal themselves.”

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W

When you walk into Randall Sharpe’s S.P.A.R.T.C. gym, located in Aberdeen and decidedly non-descript in nature, you might expect to see tough guys. The gym, outfitted with Muay Thai heavy bags, weight equipment and a handful of cardio machines tucked into a corner, is a place where men come to build themselves into...well... warriors. They’re the kind of people who workout with intense focus, never chatting amongst themselves, taking phone calls or hanging out at a water cooler. They’re instead laser-focused on one thing: building strength. But this doesn’t mean they’re lifting heavy weights, per se. They’re doing pull-ups, chin-ups and push-ups. They’re fighting, hitting bags and stretching. They’re not working out to look good; they’re working out because their jobs and their lives depend on their bodies being in top working condition. So it’s both surprising and unsurprising to find Lydia Gill, 76, preparing to push a weighted sled across the floor of this very gym, beneath an American flag, the only audible noise the heavy metal music coming from a speaker across the room. Lydia is focused, intent and working out as if her life depends on it because, in many ways it does. Six years ago, at the age of 70, she came to Sharpe to see if he could help her strengthen her body in the face of osteoporosis. Realizing the disease could seriously impact Lydia’s quality of life, she wasn’t about to go down without a fight, and Randall Sharpe, a Certified Personal Trainer, was the man recommended to help strengthen her body and mitigate the harm of progressive bone loss. Six years later, Lydia reports, “When I’m at the grocery store, and the bag lady asks if I need help out with my groceries, I say... well... no.” At 76, Lydia can now do exercises today she couldn’t do five years ago. She does squats, lunges and lifts weights. She walks over, around and on top of a balance beam, focusing on stability and posture throughout the entire workout. As she lowers herself into a squat and stands back up, she says, “I don’t need to use my hands to push off anymore when I stand up. I just stand up.” Lydia isn’t Randall’s only client, of course. Sharpe works primarily with people 50 years and over who are training for the game of life. Sharpe, who trends #trainforlife on social media, says, “I do mean that. Train for life. I’m not training college athletes. I’m training people to live.”

But what does #trainforlife really mean to an everyday person, an ‘average Joe’ who is getting in and out of a car each day, picking up bags of groceries or lifting grandkids into a swing? For another of Sharpe’s clients, Larry Allen, training for life using functional fitness means no longer being in pain. At 71, Allen feels stronger and better than he has in years. “I spent years driving to DC and back for work. Years. After all that driving and sitting, my hips and everything just totally locked up in a cocked position. Between Katie (a massage therapist who often recommends clients to Sharpe and vice versa) and Randy, there is a huge difference. I can do things now that I couldn’t do last October. I can walk better and move better. I play golf a lot. I’m starting to see a lot better motion in golf and see distance. But mainly, I don’t hurt like I used to.” Allen, who is 71, comes to see Sharpe several time a week and notes that if he were left to his own devices, he’d likely not workout much on his own. Sharpe, however, keeps them all coming back. As Allen says, “Randy makes it fun, and I enjoy feeling the changes going on.” Sharpe uses wit and humor throughout the workout, but he’s never unfocused or sloppy. Every movement his client makes catches his eye, and though he might joke or cut up with clients, he’s constantly encouraging them to tweak their posture or form to ensure proper alignment and use of the entire body as a unit rather than separate parts. As Sharpe says, “The body is a unit and we work the whole unit.” Sharpe gives cues throughout the workout as much to ensure proper physical form as he does to keep clients’ cognitive abilities sharp and engaged. Improving cognition is a large piece of the puzzle for Sharpe. “If the mind isn’t sharp, we’re going to have a hard time keeping the body sharp.” With this in mind, Sharpe’s workouts always include a cognitive element. Clients must remember which arm or leg to use during each rotation or set of exercises, and they’re often asked to repeat instructions or verbally work through a set as they physically move through it, engaging both body and brain in time. Lydia repeats, for example, the set of exercises Sharpe has laid out for her as she moves through them, “Pull up, step back, squat, tip-toes, step forward, trust fall....”

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“If I do my job correctly, I will be able to instill confidence and knowledge so clients can go on on their own.�

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She keeps going, moving through the workout, which Sharpe has created to become increasingly difficult both physically and mentally over the course of the half-hour. During his workout, Allen turns and looks at Sharpe before picking up a ball, saying, “I’m trying to figure out which arm.” Sharpe nods and lets Allen work through it before moving on. Sharpe’s focus on training for life is part of his training as a Corrective Exercise Specialist (CES), which means he’s certified to help correct muscle imbalances to improve performance, posture and the overall functioning of the entire body. For Sharpe, a former Competitive Mixed Martial Artist who suffered injury himself, this is key. He works in concert with physical therapists, massage therapists and other health professionals to provide clients with a multi-faceted approach to keeping their bodies, minds and spirits in optimum health for each client’s unique life. Sharpe notes, “I’m not their doctor. I’m not their neuro-PT. But if you work with those people and work together, you can get answers.” For Sharpe’s client Krista Snively, this means making her workouts more diverse and simply working with a trainer who can help her feel less alone in some of her own physical challenges. Snively says, “The biggest benefit with me was the first session when we walked, and he let me know I wasn’t the only person with the issues I have.” For Sharpe, it’s all about a positive attitude, building strength for daily life and the connection he has with his clients. He says, “If you can form a relationship with someone, you can train them.” That relationship is key to not just Sharpe’s success, but more importantly, to the success of his clients. Lydia Gill turns to me just before pushing the weighted sled and says, “Randy and I decided my 70’s were going to be my best decade yet.” With that, she lowers her gaze, steps forward and gets back to work. Seventy-six never felt so good. Randall Sharpe can be reached at spartcnc@yahoo.com. SPARTC's website is www.spartc.net.

What is Functional Fitness? According to WebMD, “Functional fitness exercises train your muscles to work together and prepare them for daily tasks by simulating common movements you might do at home, at work or in sports. While using various muscles in the upper and lower body at the same time, functional exercises also emphasize core stability.” Functional fitness often focuses on bodyweight exercises but might also include the use of props including weights (kettle balls, weighted balls, dumbbells), ropes, TRX bands and other equipment. This form of fitness engages the entire body and often uses exercises that require the body to move through different planes of motion, focusing on balance and posture to keep the body in alignment. Overall strength and stability are the focus of functional fitness, and trainers often work with clients who’ve completed rounds of physical therapy in conjunction with injury. Finally, functional fitness trainers focus on each individual’s circumstances and situation. Workouts are tailored to accommodate the specific needs of the client, which change and shift over time. Improving the quality of life based on each person’s abilities, goals and lifestyle is the primary intention behind the functional fitness movement.

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Fashion

The New Face of

by: Crissy Neville

The model in this photograph is Cumberland County Clerk of Court 36 Scales. OutreachNC.com | APRIL 2019 Lisa Photo credit: Matthew Wonderly


If your image of older women rouses visions of cardigan sweaters, slouchy slacks or thick-soled shoes, try instead a little black dress, skinny jeans, and stylish stilettos on for size. Whose size, you may ask? These days it’s women ranging from 50 to 90-something, from petite to plus-sized, and from all walks of life shedding such stereotypes to become the new face of fashion. The fall 2018 FashionSpot’s diversity report indicated that more women over age 50 were working the fashion mecca runways of New York, Paris, London, and Milan than in the past. According to the findings, “models over age 50 made up 0.2 percent of all castings” in 2018, and with 2017 reporting “the highest number for age diversity on record.” Statistics show even greater upward swings for trends in model size and ethnicity. Besides the catwalk, fashionably diverse women are increasingly found in print media and advertising and are most represented presently in social media.

And the new faces seem to be selling. From cosmetics and clothing brands to luxury cars and cruises, men and women aged 50+ with varied looks and demographics can be seen promoting all sorts of products and services and rocking the runway, all the while upsetting the proverbial fashion applecart. In Fayetteville, “Women of Power,” an array of women of varied ages, ethnicities, sizes, and achievements, were spotlighted at the annual An Affair to Remember formal wear store’s Prom Runway Extravaganza event, now in its eighth year. The precursor to the main attraction of young prom-wear and pageant-wear models, the Women of Power participants showcased formal gowns for special occasions while busting the glass ceiling of ageism. The scene was one of inclusivity with women of age and diversity sharing the stage with younger counterparts, the gray hair of maturity melding with the fairer colors of youth.

“Having the Women of Power in our fashion show has proven that beauty is ageless and comes in all shapes, sizes, and ethnicities.”

This is a change from years past. Not so long ago, models over the age of 30 were missing from the major markets and were considered finished in their careers, other than, of course, the exceptional supermodels who achieved timeless appeal. Plus-sized models were also a rarity, largely due to the far-reaching influence of the waif-like Twiggy era and the ever-present American fascination with the thin body type. Also on the former runway backburner were multi-cultural models and models of color. Thankfully, the camera lens has begun to shift.

Why the change? According to Teresa Womack, owner of A-List Modeling and Talent in Raleigh, the fashion industry has realized that all individuals have something to offer. “They are recognizing that people are equal and need to be equally represented. There’s more acceptance in fashion today for people of different ages and looks, different heights, and different sizes.”

An Affair to Remember store owner Kathy Jensen reflected on this segment of the show, which was added just last year to the line-up.

“Having the Women of Power in our fashion show has proven that beauty is ageless and comes in all shapes, sizes, and ethnicities. Each woman has so much to offer the fashion industry. Successful women are the role models to our younger women.” Sandhills Model and Talent Agency owner Jennifer Baker, also of Fayetteville, agrees. She employs diverse men and women in her agency as much as possible and says that “modeling is much more inclusive than in the past.” “It is more popular now to embrace your age, your size, and your appearance than in the past, so now we are seeing this on the runway,” she said. Baker likes it that older models are working longer and that newcomers are starting second and late-life careers in fashion.

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Photos from left to right: Rhonda Garrett, Kelsey Timas, Beth Wood, Vicky Andrews and Karen McDonald. Photo credit: Matthew Wonderly.

“I love it that I see more and more women come into this field after their kids are grown in order to pursue their own dreams. Their secret is confidence.”

Instagram. Almost all work now comes from there and these are not professional models either; they are regular women who have great style,” said Jacobson.

Claire Roberts, the owner of Claire Roberts Style and a personal stylist for Crabtree Valley Mall in Raleigh, sees the change as encouraging, and a result of not only attitude adjustments but also consumer supply and demand.

Great style like that of her mother, 84-year-old model Dorrie Jacobson, who joined the ranks of bloggers and social media style influencers four years ago after a 50-year hiatus from the start-up fashion career of her 20’s and early 30’s, is exactly what we’re seeing. The senior Jacobson was a runway model until the age of 25 and then became a Playboy Bunny, helping open Hugh Hefner’s first club. In her words, she soon “aged out” and next joined the Polaroid Company as a brand ambassador, followed by marriage and childbirth by age 32. This ended Jacobson’s stint in fashion until 2013 when, after complaining about not seeing any older women in fashion magazines or clothing represented she could wear, the Senior Style Bible blogger was born. She has gained a lot of attention recently for donning her old Playboy Bunny suit for the blog along with a lingerie collection to promote the blog’s message of body positivity at all ages.

“Finally, in recent years, the fashion world has started paying attention to underrepresented people and are now saying, you know, the majority of people buying our clothes are not all young white women with blonde hair and are not all twiggy-like either. So now we in the public are seeing models that are sizes 8 or 10 and up, and they are also different ages and ethnicities. This trend is really playing out now in the marketplace, too.”

“I love it that I see more and more women come into this field after their kids are grown in order to pursue their own dreams. Their secret is confidence.”

And nothing drives the marketplace in modern times more than social media. So, just when you think you have seen it all, along comes a savvy set of older women who are the new online ambassadors of the new face of aging. Instagram, according to Jodi Jacobson, creative director and photographer for the Senior Style Bible, is the go-to social media platform of choice for these fashionistas. The Senior Style Bible is one such Instagram blog.

“A lot of marketing dollars are moving away from traditional advertising and many brands are paying Instagram influencers instead, so on the whole, marketing strategies for selling have changed and gone to

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With an audience of ages from 18 to 80, the Las Vegas duo has racked up a total following of about 80,000 people - with 40,000 of those from Instagram and the rest logging into their Facebook, website and other social platforms. The mother-daughter pair set out to dispel the myth that older women were out of their prime and therefore should be out of the picture. Jodi Jacobson explained, “My mom wanted to show clothing for women over 50 that was cool and edgy,


ONC's cover model Dorrie Jacobson of Senior Style Bible. Photo credit: Jodi Jacobson.

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not dowdy and uninspiring like she had been seeing in the media. She launched the Senior Style Bible to fight this notion that older women don’t have style or allure anymore and should be age appropriate. Appropriateness is for the occasion only,” she said. “Fashion is about finding your signature style and wearing it well, no matter your age.” The Senior Style Bible is in good company with other creative innovators echoing the same refrain. Lynn Slater, the 64-yearold fashion guru of Accidental Icon Instagram fame, is a professor by day and model and blogger on the side. Jenny Kee, a 71-year-old Australian artist and knitwear designer, is another older model making waves. Sarah-Jane Adams, another model from Down Under, turned to Instagram to model the jewelry she makes and is now known both for her jewels and her face. Then there’s Helen Van Winkle as “Baddie Winkle,” who, according to Jacobson, is “more of a personality than a model” who promotes what older women are really like in a funfashion way popular with none other than teenagers. Iris Apfel is the 97-year-old fashion icon easily recognizable

for her “owl-eyed” glasses and eccentric style. Add Jan Correll, age 60, of the Silver is the New Blonde account to the short list along with Maye Musk, 70, a featured face of Harper’s Bazaar and Concept Korea. Isabella Rossellini is a 65-year-old image for the Lancome brand. Yasmin Le Bon is a 50-year-old model for top-brand Armani while Greece Ghanem, a 52-year-old personal trainer from Montreal with no background in modeling, is one who can now be found all over. The list goes on.

“Fashion is about finding your signature style and wearing it well, no matter your age.”

Many of these influencers got their start from photographer and author Ari Seth Cohen, creator of Advanced Style, a project according to his website, that is devoted “to capturing the sartorial savvy of the senior set.” He has a popular street-style blog, two books and a documentary capturing the fashion and wisdom of seniors like Slater and Jacobson. The fashion jet-set is changing, so take notice. The model on the runway or behind the camera today may be a size 2 or 22, male or female, professional or amateur, the girl next door or your own grandmother, and that’s good. A diverse scope better reflects our diverse world.

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NAVIGATING CLINICAL TRIALS

One OutreachNC Magazine reader and friend explains his journey into the world of clinical trials and offers tips for anyone traveling a similar road. by Amy Phariss 42

OutreachNC.com | APRIL 2019


On a quiet afternoon in late winter, a tall, slender man knocked on the door of my office, shook my hand and handed me a folder of information. All of it was related to the world of clinical trials. For the next hour, we discussed his own cancer diagnosis, his treatment and his ultimate decision to search for and pursue a clinical trial. During that hour, we discussed all matters of the clinical trial process including the initial feeling one has when faced with a diagnosis of cancer, how to go about researching and finding clinical trials and what it’s like to pack up, travel to another state and face a medical team tasked with assessing your eligibility for access to a potentially life-saving drug. The conversation left me informed, curious and humbled. I entered a new world, one that gave me a window into the experience of dealing with a life-threatening illness and facing the possibility that current drug therapy might fail to cure that illness. I am indebted to Mr. Coleman for his willingness to discuss an incredibly personal area of his life so that we all might better understand a process that is often confusing, opaque and difficult to manage. This interview has been edited for length. Amy Phariss: Can you tell me about your cancer diagnosis? Mr. Coleman: In December of 2013, I was diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), which is a form of cancer that affects the bone marrow and inhibits the production of mature blood cells in the bone marrow. I was treated with a first-line drug for this particular type of cancer. The doctor told me I had 6-12 months, which was of serious concern to me. AP: What was your first reaction when you were diagnosed? Mr. C.: That we were going to start on this drug and hope for the best. I was totally shocked when the doctor told me 6-12 months. I was anxious to proceed with my treatment. AP: What is a first-line drug, and how did you respond to that medication? Mr. C.: A first-line drug is the initial treatment for MDS. It’s the one generally accepted as the best treatment for a specific diagnosis. I went over four years on this drug before it became ineffective, which is determined by taking a sample of bone marrow and measuring the percent of cancer cells in the bone marrow.

AP: What happened when that happened? When the firstline drug became ineffective? Mr. C.: There is a second-line drug that is approved by the FDA. For my particular situation, only two drugs were approved by the FDA for treatment. I went 4.5 years on the first one, and I started the second one last July. I was hit very hard with the major symptom of fatigue, overall tiredness and low blood counts. This is the nature of that drug; it attacks the blood counts in your bone marrow as well as the cancer. My local doctor said, “I don’t think this drug is going to work for you, and I think you should go find a clinical trial. The best source of information will be the internet.” AP: What did you do? Did you begin searching the internet? Mr. C.: Well, I had my son help me. He works a full-time job and lives up north, but he was able to help me. He was a huge help. The major source that my son found for clinical trials online is the National Institutes of Health (NIH – www.nih. gov and www.clinicaltrials.gov). They have a huge database. You put in your information and the website searches for the clinical trial that will be adaptable for your situation. We learned that all of the major cancer centers conduct clinical trials. And many of these centers actually have clinical trial counselors, navigators who can answer questions and guide you through the process. We didn’t know that when we started searching, and that would have been helpful, to have a navigator. All you have to do is call a phone number and speak to somebody live, and they help you find a clinical trial. You don’t even have to be a patient at the facility, which is a wonderful service. AP: Once you found a trial, how did you go about taking the next steps? Mr. C.: Well, you can just call up the cancer center where the trial is being conducted, but I got a referral from my doctor. I had to fill out all kinds of application papers. The doctor had to sign off with medical records. AP: Where was the best location for a clinical trial? Mr. C.: In Houston, Texas at MD Anderson Cancer Center. AP: That’s far away. Did it take long for all of the paperwork and to make the appointments?

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ASK QUESTIONS · What is the main purpose of the study? Is it to study a new drug, to identify the cause of a disease, or to improve comfort and quality of life for chronically ill patients? · Why do researchers think the approach/ medication might be effective? · What are possible risks/benefits, both long and short term? · What kinds of therapies, procedures and/or tests are included during the trial? · What are the chances of a beneficial outcome? · What are the known side-effects of the treatment/drug and are these sideeffects permanent? · How long does the trial last? · Will enrolling in this clinical trial limit my ability to enroll in another? · Does this trial involve a ‘control group’ and the possibility of receiving a placebo? · What group does the study focus on? Is it specific to my condition or broader in scope? · What are the costs associated with the trial (medications, testing, lodging, travel, etc.)? · How much of the cost will I incur?

Mr. C.: The whole process took two weeks to gather the records and send them down there. They are very efficient and move very quickly at MD Anderson. I don’t know about other locations, but you don’t sit around and wait three months for an appointment. You have an appointment almost immediately. They consider that new patients coming to MD Anderson have an urgent situation. So, I made arrangements to go to Houston and be evaluated. It’s a long trip, and my son (who’d done all the research) went with me. AP: So, you didn’t just show up and join the trial? You had to be evaluated? Mr. C.: Yes. At MD Anderson I wasn’t being evaluated for a specific clinical trial. They take all of your particulars, and if they think a clinical trial is in order, they recommend one. They run a lot of tests that first day. They even took a bone marrow sample that day. They call all the testing ‘genetic mapping.’ The patient has to depend on the medical professionals for advice, on clinical trials and on cancer clinics, where you go to be evaluated. You can’t just pick it off the internet, so to speak. You can’t just decide you want to go close to home or something. You’ve got to be evaluated. They’re going to run tests, and then they’ll recommend what’s best for your specific type of cancer. AP: That sounds extensive and... expensive. Mr. C.: Absolutely. But Medicare covers a lot of it. The billing to Medicare for my evaluation was substantial. Medicare, which is my primary health insurance, and my secondary health insurance picked up the bill for that. But there is a cost to being part of a clinical trial. If you agree to enter the trial, the protocol for the trial requires that you come to the location for treatment. You cannot, for instance, farm the treatment to another hospital closer to your residence. The facility conducting the trial has to administer the drugs. They have to be sure that what you’re getting is what you’re supposed to get. So, if you have to go down there once a month, say for five days to have treatment, you’ve got to pay for it – the travel and expense of that. So the patient must have some financial means to participate in these trials. As you can imagine, it can get pretty expensive if you get into a trial and have to go regularly for treatment. AP: After the evaluation and trip, what was the conclusion? Mr. C.: After all the detailed testing, the conclusion was that I should continue on the second-line drug, evaluating that drug on a very specific schedule that they set up, at a specific dose that they recommended. They did not recommend a clinical trial at that

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time. They felt it was worth evaluating the second-line drug under their recommended dosage, which was different than what I’d previously been given. I have just completed the third cycle in their recommendation, and I’m scheduled to have the biopsy soon, which will tell if the drug has been effective. AP: What then? What if it had not been effective? Mr. C.: I’ll go back to M.D. Anderson because they made the initial recommendation on what to do. I assume they would recommend a clinical trial. It may be that they say, “Well, Mr. Coleman, you’ve evaluated the second-line drug and it was ineffective but we don’t see a clinical trial that would be a good fit.” My son found 42 clinical trials for my particular situation. So, there’s an awful lot out there. AP: Did you ever feel frustrated or overwhelmed by the process of identifying a clinical trial? Mr. C.: Not yet. There may be a day, but I’ve been very fortunate to have a good navigator in my son, and we’ve been fortunate to find other good navigators at MD Anderson. I’m sure if I’d tried to do all this myself, it would have been very frustrating. AP: Have you ever felt discouraged in this process? Mr. C.: Yes. I was expecting and hoping that I would get into the clinical trial and I would not have to continue with the particular drug I was taking. I felt, probably with no facts, that the clinical trial would be more beneficial. But I accepted their recommendation. But I’m hoping for a clinical trial because of the way this drug has treated me in terms of extreme fatigue and low blood counts. It just really hammered my system. It’s the nature of the drug; it’s the way that it works. You just have to compensate for it. Maybe a drug out of the clinical trial will be the same thing. Who knows? I think it’s great that the clinical trials are available as a treatment option. AP: Finally, Mr. C., is there anything you wish you’d known going into this process or could share with someone facing the same experience? Mr. C.: I wish I’d had the opportunity to talk with a clinical trial navigator to explain all the particulars that I’m relating today. You must be your own best advocate and be aggressive in seeking out the relevant information currently available for your specific type of cancer. Work with your doctor and other medical professionals to make the appropriate contacts in finding a navigator at cancer centers and hospitals. All top-rated cancer centers, major hospitals, and universities have clinical trial navigators available for consultation.

COVER THE COST Resources exist to assist people in covering the costs of clinical trials, including additional testing, travel, childcare costs and other expenses. Here are seven organizations providing support: 1. 21st Century Care – provides patients financial assistance for incidental expenses related to cancer treatments. www.21stcenturycare.org 2. CancerCare – offering limited financial assistance for cancer-related costs and co-pays. Oncology social workers available to assist in finding other resources. www.cancercare.org 3. PAN Foundation – using donations from private donors and corporations, PAN helps patients with out-of-pocket costs. www.panfoundation.org 4. Patient Advocate Foundation - provides support, information and funds (grants) for patients who meet financial and medical criteria. www. patientadvocate.org 5. Cancer Financial Assistance Coalition – a coalition of organizations helping cancer patients meet their financial challenges including direct medical costs, non-medical costs and daily living expenses. www.cancerfac.org 6. Cancer Finances – provides a toolkit for navigating finances before, during and after cancer treatment. www. cancerfinances.org 7. HealthWell Foundation – helping the uninsured/underinsured afford medical treatments for chronic or life-altering diseases. www.healthwellfoundation.org

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The Bakehouse: A Journey Back in Time Photo Essay by Morgan Masson

“Good food takes time.” - Martin Brunner

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On a regular Friday afternoon, we walked into Aberdeen’s The Bakehouse and Cafe, hoping to indulge in a piece of the bakery’s famous tiramisu or snag an individually-sized flourless chocolate cake. Little did we know we were in for an education in the art of baking, the beauty of quality and the power of time. The Bakehouse’s pastry expert Martin Brunner took us through the various kitchens of the bakery and cafe and, as we stuck our noses in bread dough starter and tasted legitimate baking chocolate, explained his philosophy of baking and how his methods have changed over time. Brunner, who was born and spent his early years in Austria, moved to the U.S. when he was 12 years old and followed in the family tradition of baking and pastry. After attending pastry school, Brunner continued working at the family business but began shifting his philosophy and baking style to return to the roots of his family’s baking heritage, which meant actually slowing down the baking process rather than accommodating the modern style of speeding up. Brunner says, “I found myself going back to the methods my grandfather used. It takes longer, but we accommodate for that.” This means his bakers let dough rise and ferment longer, which takes more time but yields a more traditional result. “We just get busy with other stuff during that time. We might make pastries while we wait. But allowing for that time is important.” In a world of fast-food (of all kinds), when bread and pastries are produced in bulk and as cheaply and quickly as possible, Brunner’s approach is novel. He tells us he no longer uses dough conditioners or mold inhibitors, both of which are

common in commercial bread production but which add extra ingredients many argue aren’t necessarily healthy or safe. Brunner says, “You can keep store-bought bread in your bread box for two weeks with no mold. That’s a problem.” The philosophy of slowing down and focus on quality extends to all of Brunner’s baking and artistry in the kitchen. From the traditional Italian buttercream frosting made in-house (with no shortening) to the chocolate used for cakes and pastries, Brunner believes in simple, true, honest ingredients, a passion for the art of baking and, above all, time. “Time – in everything. Good food takes time.” That time, passion and attention to detail yields the kind of results that keep this Aberdeen bakery filled with customers who happily return for loaves of freshly-baked bread, granola, pastries and, during the lunch hour, burgers, sandwiches and salads. Customer favorites include the 5-grain bread, the seeded sourdough and, of course, the tiramisu. The #1 bestselling pastry is the chocolate-covered eclair, and Brunner’s personal favorite is the peanut butter mousse dome. No matter what you try, be sure to have a seat, sip an espresso and take the time to savor each bite. The Bakehouse and Cafe is located at 120 North Poplar Street in Aberdeen, NC 28315. Hours of operation are Tuesday – Saturday from 8:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. and Sunday from 11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. The entire team (which is truly a family affair including Brunner’s father Kurt, wife Mireia and mother-in-law Dolores) can be reached at (910) 944-9204.

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“I decided to go back to the methods my grandfather used.”

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“You should eat food and use ingredients where everything on the label, you understand.� APRIL 2019 |

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Defying the Odds With Irene Russell by Crissy Neville, Photography by: Morgan Masson

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When looking for a woman redefining her age, one need look no further than Moore county local Irene Russell, the 72-year-old firecracker whose spunk, grit, and adventurous spirit tells much more about her than a birthday. Harkening the words of her mother who liked to call her “defiant,” Russell has, with and without intention, defied everything from birth order and injury, to social norms and age limits. The youngest child of Landon and Irene Hilliard of Virginia Beach, Virginia, Russell arrived in this world on September 18, 1946, as the apple of her daddy’s eye who wanted another baby after returning from World War II. Her mother, however, was not on board with the plan after having older children in the home already the ages of 8 and 10, who according to Russell, could “pour their own milk already.” Alas, the third and youngest Russell did arrive, “despite my mother’s wishes,” she said.

Now, my mother, she was something else. By the time I came along, though, there was not much discipline at home, and I had the gift of being the youngest child. My older brother and sister watched me a lot so I did whatever I wanted; I guess I still do. CN: And you are also an artist – a potter. Does your art reflect this same laissez-faire style? Tell me a little about your work. IR: About my style, I don’t know but I like being able to be creative and say I made it myself. That is me; I like being unique. As far as my work, well, my pottery is both functional and decorative. I make things such as serving pieces, ornaments, and beer glasses. And lots of bowls – I am a bowl freak. Each piece is one of a kind; I don’t make sets. I have been making and selling pottery since 1970, all from my home studio. I don’t sell in a store because I don’t need to.

“Life is too short, and I say, if you don’t enjoy something, then don’t do it.”

The relaxed Russell, along with her husband Mike, sat down with OutreachNC recently in her horsecountry home in Vass to reflect on this theme of defiance in her life. She has defied the odds as an artist, horsewoman, marathon runner and more. We talked about the positive side of this descriptor of her personality and life.

Crissy Neville: You don’t like the reference to defiance, a word your mother used to describe you. What are some words you would use to describe yourself? Irene Russell: Resilient, I guess; I have been through a lot. I am tough. And funny. Very funny. I don’t take life too seriously. Life is too short, and I say, if you don’t enjoy something, then don’t do it. I did hate that my mother said I was defiant, but I guess it is true. I do things my way. CN: You spoke about being the last child in your family, and perhaps one your mother did not exactly want. How did this early start affect the person you are today? IR: My father adored me; he thought I was funny as he**.

CN: You are from Virginia, so what brought you to North Carolina and Southern Pines? IR: I originally came to North Carolina for college. But first, when I was 18 years old I ran off and got married. I was a bad child. I was supposed to go to graduate school, but when I found my husband with my best friend I decided to come to Southern Pines and lick my wounds. I was coming down to foxhunt and ride in shows anyway and was commuting back and forth from Raleigh. I met (my second husband) Mike on a blind date for the hunt ball in 1970. We were married later that year and have been here ever since. CN: Was it love at first sight? Tell me about your family and home. IR: He** no, (laughing). But we both knew what we wanted and it was the horses. We were drawn together by our mutual interests - horses and fox hunting. But we have been married for 48 years. We have two perfect children and four grandchildren. Mike bought this farm in late 1972. We built the barn and lived above the barn for 20 years before building the house we are in now (just

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“They stopped the church service right then and there and they prayed for me and I promise you that is what saved my life.�

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across the field). We were the first horse farm on Lake Bay Road and had a riding school for years. It was Mike’s business but I worked there too, mucking stalls and taking the juniors foxhunting. CN: Mike is one of the Masters of the Hunt for Moore County Hounds. Does that make you a First Lady of the Hunt of sorts? IR: Oh no, I have my own life and do my own thing, though some wives of Masters in the past have been. It was a different time back then. Now I mostly follow most of the foxhunts on foot instead of horseback because I am on foot all the time anyway training for some race or another. I still ride; I have not completely stopped. I have often helped our Huntsman with hound puppies who need more individualized attention after birth. I make pots, volunteer, bake, garden, rescue dogs - a lot of different things. CN: It was a horse ride that led to a serious injury you had. Can you tell me about that? IR: I had a traumatic brain injury in 1998 after a horse fall that happened at a show I was practicing for. This woman, really a kid, on a pony ran right into me and the horse I borrowed that day, just as I was coming off a jump. I was hospitalized from June to August that year and I had to learn to walk and talk all over again. The original prognosis was for the worst. But in time, I fully recovered, got seven plates in my head, and bought that horse. CD: To what do you attribute your recovery? IR: I was a nurse at Moore Regional then and was due to work the day of my injury. The hospital called my nurse manager, Evelyn Dimps-Williams, who was at church that Sunday morning. They stopped the church service right then and there and they prayed for me and I promise you that is what saved my life. That and the phenomenal doctor and nursing care I received from my nurse friends who took time off from their own shifts to help nurse me. I had a great nursing career for 25 years. CN: Your recovery from your accident lead you to find a new passion in your life, running, is that right?

IR: Yes, it started with my friend Sue walking my a** around the front field of this house. My first race was in the year 2000, two years after the accident, at the age of 52. I also never wanted to be like so many of my patients, who were in poor shape and didn’t do anything. My daughter Landon lived in Chicago then and I decided to run the Chicago Marathon that year, just after competing in a half-marathon in Raleigh the month before. That was the most fun I had ever had and I have been doing it ever since. CN: How many races have you competed in now at age 72, twenty years later? Where have you raced? IR: Well over 400 to 500 races, with about 200 of those being marathons. I have been in the Chicago marathon 19 times, but also the Boston and Marine Corps marathons, also many in Virginia and North Carolina, and of course Disney. Then there was the Grandma’s Marathon in Duluth, Minnesota and the Flying Pig in Cincinnati; that one I did five times. Some are 5Ks or 10Ks, half and full marathons, but I have also done 24hour races and 50Ks, which are 31 miles. I walk, not run, fast, really fast, like a 14-minute mile in the races. The medals are fun, the people are fun and we talk and get to know each other. There’s a common thought: what’s said on the road, stays on the road. CN: Have you earned a lot of medals? IR: Of course, I usually win my age division, mainly because there is no one else in my age division. I mean, come on, there’s not that many old broads racing (laughing). CN: Your achievements are inspiring! Do you consider yourself an inspiration? IR: More like a role model, I hope, that says, “Get up off your a** people and get moving.” I want to see people get up, get moving and get outside. I come from good genes; my mother lived into her 90s and I have an aunt who is 94, but anyone can do what I do. After a race, if my name is called I ask the announcer to say my name and age; I want women to hear that we can do things, even if we are aging.

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“I want women to hear that we can do things, even if we are aging.”

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Get a better look at what life has to offer...

ASK THE EXPERT – Age with Success

Educational Series Sponsored by:

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April 11 at 2:30 p.m. Relocating, Downsizing, and Moving into a Senior Community Penny Lachance, Aging Life Care Professional, AOS Care Management May 9 at 2:30 p.m. End of Life Planning: What to Know and How to Plan Michelle Stinnett, Associate, Lorenz & Creed Law Firm RSVP to Elizabeth at 910.692.4928 or email at elizabeth.ragsdale@elmcroft.com APRIL 2019 |

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“ You are as young as your faith, as old as your doubt; as young as your self-confidence, as old as your fear; as young as your hope, as old as your despair. In the central place of every heart there is a recording chamber. So long as it receives messages of beauty, hope, cheer and courage, so long as you are young.� DOUGLAS MACARTHUR 58

OutreachNC.com | APRIL 2019


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Join us for a tour at Fox Hollow Senior Living and discover a full schedule of Lifestyle360 activities, chef-prepared meals offering flavor and flexibility, and exceptional senior living experiences. At Five Star, the possibilities are endless.

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GREY MATTER See Grey Matter Puzzle Answers on Page 62 Puzzle 16 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50)

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FRONT GREENHOUSE HUMIDITY HURRICANE LATITUDE LONGITUDE LOW MAP METEOROLOGY

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time (abbr.) 33. Churches have lots of them 35. Modern day “letter” 37. Della __, singer 38. Informed upon 40. Type of house 41. Folk singer DiFranco 42. A baglike structure in a plant or animal 44. Car mechanics group 45. Belonging to us 48. Pack neatly 50. Forming the bottom layer 52. How fast you’re going 53. Sea eagles 55. Cool! 56. Military mailbox 57. Type of lawyer 58. Type of monk 63. Respect due to an ancestor 65. Took to the sea 66. Members of a Semitic people 67. A way to march

16. Tellurium 18. Gateway (Arabic) 1. Often romantic 19. No (Scottish) composition 20. Greek prophetess 5. Lunar term 22. A team’s best pitcher 10. California mountain 23. Bard’s way of saying 12. Spiral staircase pillars 60 OutreachNC.com | APRIL 2019 “have” 14. “Heat” director

ACROSS

25. Indigenous group of the Philippines 26. Danish krone 27. Type of squad 28. Possesses 30. Part of the face 31. Very small amount of

6. Green veggie 7. Stiff bristles 8. Pass in Alps 9. Atomic #81 10. A sharp blow 11. Bears engage in it 13. Prevents progress 15. Young boy 17. A way to go on 18. Not good 21. A ballet enthusiast 23. Ad __ 24. Bar bill 27. A genus of badgers 29. “No __!” 32. Get off your feet 34. Franklin was one 35. Removed 36. Used to catch poachers 39. Hit lightly 40. Crony 43. Stroke 44. One who obtains pleasure by inflicting pain on others 46. __ the ante 47. Greek letter DOWN 49. “Wings” actor Steven 1. Political action committee 51. Unhappy 2. __kosh, near Lake 54. Hair-like structure Winnebago 59. Pick up 3. When you hope to get 60. Type of transportation there 61. Worn with a suit 4. Woman who followed 62. Something similar to Bacchus another already referred to 5. Cause to become 64. Farm state entangled


16 ANNUAL DEMENTIA & CAREGIVER SYMPOSIUM TH

TUESDAY, APRIL 16TH, 2019 8:00 A.M. - 4:00 P.M. DENNIS A. WICKER CIVIC & CONFERENCE CENTER 1801 NASH STREET SANFORD, NORTH CAROLINA 27330 The symposium is for family and professional caregivers as well as community members wanting to learn more. Discover current trends in dementia care, practical self-care suggestions, and information about legal issues and maintaining brain health. Education sessions, guest speakers, interactive resource tables, health screenings, Virtual Dementia Tours, Rock Steady Boxing, door prizes and more!

REGISTRATION 8:00 A.M. | PROGRAM STARTS 9:00 A.M. KEYNOTE ADDRESS BY DR. KAREN SULLIVAN, PINEHURST NEUROPSYCHOLOGY

LUNCH PROVIDED. REGISTRATION REQUIRED: Please Contact Lisa Levine at: (919) 832-3732 or llevine@DementiaNC.org | www.DementiaNC.org Family Caregivers, Clergy, Students & Volunteers: $10 | Professionals: $40 Continuing Education Contact Hrs. 4.5 For Questions or to schedule respite care, Please Contact: Holly Hight, Senior Center Caregiver Specialist at The Enrichment Center (919) 776-0501 ext. 2230 | hhight@leecountync.gov

PRESENTED BY: APRIL 2019 |

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GREY MATTER ANSWERS

CROSSWORD

WORD SEARCH Puzzle 13 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.45)

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FOR MORE INFORMATION: WWW.SOUTHERNPINES.BIZ 6 2 1 7 5 4 8 4 8 9 5 1 3 2 7 6

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APRIL 2019 |

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Started in 1983, NC Senior Games is a year-round health promotion & education program for North Carolinians aged 50 years & better. It is a holistic approach to body, mind, & spirit staying fit, while enjoying the company of friends, family, spectators & volunteers.

Open to Residents Age 50 & Better in Lee & Neighboring Counties

Registration: April 1-30 | Early Bird: April 1-20

Register online at jsolomon@leecountync.gov or pick up a registration form at Enrichment Center of Lee County | 1615 S. Third Street | Sanford The registration fee entitles each participant to opening reception, and entry into athletic events and/or SilverArts. Participants may enter as many events/categories as desired. Fee is waived for first-time participants.

Tuesday, May 14

5:30 PM – Opening Ceremonies | 6:15 PM – Performing Arts

May 1 – 31

SilverArts - Visual, Literary, and Heritage Arts Displays Enrichment Center of Lee County | 1615 S Third Street | Sanford Sponsored by:

64

OutreachNC.com | APRIL 2019 This program is sanctioned by NC Senior Games. NCSG is sponsored state wide by the NC Division of Aging.


life

OVER MY SHOULDER

Facing Aging Alone by Ann Robson

What exactly does “aging” mean? It seems to depend on an arbitrary number: 50. AARP will invite you to join them sometime around your 50th birthday. They still do that but have come to realize that 50 isn’t really ‘old’ any more. In an informal discussion at the NC AARP office, volunteers suggested that there is ‘new old’: 50-65; ‘middle old’: 66-80; ‘old old’: 81+. Recently, the American Society on Aging brought us new terms: ‘Solo Agers’ and ‘Orphan Elders’. A solo ager is someone who is living alone, probably never married, and has no children. An elder orphan may also be living alone, may be divorced or widowed, but has children. Having family that may be able to help an elder parent is the difference between the two. However, their needs as they age are similar. The help available is quite different. A safety net of a spouse, son or daughter who will pick up the caregiver mantle is not universally available. Often children will have moved away from where their parents live. Blended families present another set of problems as to who should be the one to help. The elder parent may resist outside help and that makes life difficult for all involved. In a caregiving class I used to teach, I was surprised to learn that many children who came to visit for a weekend, or a week, didn’t see the needs of their parent. The ASA reports that this problem of solo aging is likely to seriously affect the baby boomer generation. They are having fewer children and grandchildren. Sue Zeff Geber, who conducted the survey for ASA, pointed out that “In subtle and not so subtle ways, the baby boomers are a very different population cohort than we have ever seen before and many of them will not have family nearby, or at all.” Because both solo and orphan elders may have no one to take responsibility for power of attorney, medical power of

attorney, and all the legal things required should they not be able to conduct business on their own, they should have as much as possible assigned while they are still well. About 22 percent of older adults in the United States fall in to the solo or orphan group according to a 2016 study, reports Judith Graham in the Washington Post. She quoted Dr. Maria Torroella Carney, head of geriatric and palliative medicine at Northwell Hospital in New York: “What strikes me is how many of these elder orphans are woefully unprepared for aging.” We are unprepared because we are living longer and few in the generation that raised us had any words of wisdom for us. Many of us had left home by the time our parents started to have aches and pains, mobility issues, difficulties in most areas of their lives. The mantra “I don’t want to be a burden to my children” has been heard by us more than once. We are living longer than the generation before us. We’re pioneers in this thing called aging. It’s up to us to be responsible models and leave a trail for those coming after so the solo or orphan elder will know how to manage this thing called aging. No one says aging is easy but with careful planning aging can be a wonderful phase of life. We will all age differently but can be part of a thriving group of other elders. We don’t have to be solo or orphan elders when there are so many of us around.

Ann Robson is the author of “Over My Shoulder: Tales of Life and Death and Everything In Between.” She may be reached at overmyshoulder@charter.net .

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Generations

OutreachNC asked adults and children our April question. Share your answer on our Facebook page Facebook.com/OutreachNC.

WHAT IS THE MOST INTERESTING THING YOU'VE LEARNED THIS WEEK? The Harry Potter series contains 1,090,739 words. That’s a lot of writing! – Amy, 43

That my dog can’t have babies anymore. My mom said the vet did it. – Connor, 7

Not to flush a plastic farmer in the toilet. My dad didn’t like that. At all. – Gavin, 3

The world is getting older. Seriously. The whole world. By 2050, 2 billion people will be 60+. – David, 51

The world’s most polluted city is not Beijing but New Delhi, India. - Janice, 57

How to get a lost ribbon out of a pointe shoe. It’s not easy. – Maggie, 13

I learned more about my alphabet letters! – Jonah, 4

How to navigate traffic in the Sandhills on a rainy day. – Susan, 52

My White Chocolate Mocha has enough calories to be a meal. That kind of brought my Monday down a little, but I drank it anyway. It’s the best breakfast around. – Bob, 72

Bones are made of collagen. I asked my mom that, and she had to Google it. She said calcium. – Bobby, 12

To tie my shoes with bunny ears. – Timmy, 5

I heard there is an active volcano in Colorado. Never knew that. That’s pretty interesting. – Joe, 67

Left-handed people have better memories. I heard that the other day, and I’m left-handed, so I let my husband know that. He wasn’t as impressed. – Louise, 62

I learned about famous people like Susan B. Anthony and Helen Keller. And I got to teach other people about Helen Keller. – Elizabeth, 6

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Everyday Enrichment for Older Adults

“Mom’s really enjoying her visits to The Retreat. She looks forward to the activities and conversations with her new friends while I am at work.”

Schedule a Visit TODAY! Explore The Retreat’s variety of activities & events! www.SandhillsAdultDay.com 165 Shepherd Trail|Aberdeen, NC 28315 OutreachNC.com 910.722.1035 APRIL 2019 |

67


extraordinary people extraordinary care The board-certified ophthalmologists at Carolina Eye Associates are some of the most respected eye surgeons in the United States. But beyond their board certification, skills, medical school training and years of surgical experience, they are known for their compassion and dedication to each of their patients. From consultation and diagnosis to treatment and follow-up care, it’s our mission to deliver the highest quality eye care resulting in the best quality outcomes. It’s not just our goal, it’s our passion. We offer the latest in breakthrough surgeries that can provide life-changing improvements to the way you see the world. Extraordinary people. Extraordinary care.

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Albemarle ◼ Asheboro ◼ Cheraw ◼ Dunn ◼ Fayetteville ◼ Greensboro ◼ Laurinburg ◼ Rockingham ◼ Sanford ◼ Pinehurst/Southern Pines ◼ Wadesboro 68 OutreachNC.comLumberton | APRIL 2019

Profile for OutreachNC magazine

OutreachNC April 2019  

The New Face of Aging

OutreachNC April 2019  

The New Face of Aging