Page 1

WEDNESDAY OCTOBER 19 2016

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BRIGHT LIGHTS 12

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West Van community celebrates harvest season easo

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CapU volleyball Veteran Blues team ready for final shot NORTHSHORENEWS

LOCAL NEWS . LOCAL MATTERS . SINCE 1969

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Stalled transit talks slow Blue Buses Union declares overtime ban after bargaining breaks down

JANE SEYD jseyd@nsnews.com

Some bus riders in Caulfeild, Dundarave and those hoping to get home to West Vancouver from UBC or Capilano University found themselves cooling their heels at bus stops Monday and Tuesday as the first stage of a bus drivers’ strike hit the West Vancouver Blue Bus system.

Some buses on specific routes were either running late or were cancelled entirely both days as the union representing West Vancouver Blue Bus drivers and mechanics put an overtime ban in place as the first stage of job action following a breakdown in mediated bargaining talks. Several buses including those on routes between downtown Vancouver and Horseshoe Bay, Dundarave and Caulfeild, and those between West Vancouver and Capilano University and UBC were among those affected. “I’m very disappointed,” said West Vancouver Mayor Michael Smith. “We’re in the business of providing service to residents. One of the services they value is transit services. The union has seen fit to go on strike and use our citizens as a strategy. It’s completely unnecessary.” Mediated talks between the municipality and Amalgamated Transit Union Local 134 broke down on

Bus riders in West Vancouver wait at a busy stop at the Park Royal shopping centre Monday afternoon. Runs on some bus routes were cancelled Monday and Tuesday after unionized bus drivers and mechanics instituted an overtime ban when bargaining talks broke down. PHOTO CINDY GOODMAN Friday when mediator Grant McArthur booked out of talks because the two sides were too far apart. The union had served 72-hour strike notice prior to the Labour Day weekend in September after receiving a 100 per cent strike vote from its members. Job action had been on hold as long as mediated talks continued. The overtime ban means when a bus gets delayed and a driver might have to work longer to complete the route, that doesn’t happen, said Jeff

McDonald, spokesman for the district. If a driver calls in sick and another driver would have to work overtime to replace them, “they won’t do that either,” he added. The municipality is posting a list of impacted bus routes on its website. Both sides blamed the other for the breakdown in talks. Union spokesman Bill Tieleman said the dispute between the union and the

A SHINING EXAMPLE of

See Mayor page 7

City delays vote on LoLo BIA after counter-bid fails to stop motion MARIA SPITALE-LEISK mspitale-leisk@nnews.com

A proposed Lower Lonsdale business improvement area has earned enough support from landowners, but is still awaiting council’s blessing before it can go ahead.

City council opted Monday to defer the BIA decision, a motion made by Coun. Holly Back who requested staff report back with a clearer picture of how much the BIA levy would cost individual business owners. The deferral comes on the heels of a counter-petition that recorded opposition to the BIA from 31 per cent of

the area’s landowners – well short of the majority needed to defeat the proposal. The BIA has proposed a $500,000 annual operating budget set to be divided proportionally amongst property owners, which would likely be downloaded to tenants.

See Negative page 10

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north shore news nsnews.com

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nsnews.com north shore news

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

KEITH BALDREY: SOFTWOOD LUMBER DEAL A POLITICAL HOT POTATO PAGE 8

WEST VAN: BYELECTION

12 candidates vie for open seat on council BRENT RICHTER brichter@nsnews.com

A dozen candidates are vying for one open West Vancouver council seat in this November’s byelection.

BACK TO SCHOOL Paul Dangerfield receives applause from gathered politicians, dignitaries and faculty after being sworn in as Capilano University’s new president at an investiture ceremony at the BlueShore Financial Centre for the Performing Arts, Oct. 16. Dangerfield takes over the office from former president Kris Bulcroft. PHOTO CINDY GOODMAN

MP Beech shares message of pipeline opposition in Ottawa Constituents’ concerns aired to Liberal MPs as federal decision on TM project expansion nears JANE SEYD jseyd@nsnews.com

With the deadline for a federal government decision on the Kinder Morgan pipeline proposal looming in two months, Liberal MP Terry Beech has had his work cut out for him.

Beech’s riding of Burnaby North – Seymour is the eye of the political storm on the pipeline decision. “It’s one of the very biggest issues we’ll have to deal with, if not for the end of this year, for this mandate,” said Beech. “Obviously there’s a lot of passionate viewpoints.” Recent federal decisions, such as the one approving the Petronas LNG project on the north coast of B.C., have prompted speculation that

Ottawa may be signalling its willingness to approve large energy projects. But Beech refuses to speculate on whether he thinks the controversial pipeline project will go ahead. “I’ve been asked that question a lot. I refuse to answer it because a decision has not been made,” he said. “. . . The best thing I can be doing for my constituency is to be getting the facts in front of the right people so that an educated decision can be made.” “It’s my job to make sure the voices of Burnaby North - Seymour and the Lower Mainland are heard in Ottawa.” Beech said he’s spent the past several months creating custom information packages for members of cabinet and the Liberal

MP for Burnaby North Seymour Terry Beech. caucus which examine the economic, environmental and political factors at play in the pipeline decision. Those are private documents, he said. “They allow me to expand on and more fully explain my position on the project,” he said. Among the analyses Beech is providing to his Liberal colleagues are examinations of some of the assumptions in various economic reports and a map of political support and opposition to the project along the route of the proposed

pipeline expansion. “To be an effective member of parliament it’s important that I frame these issues in terms of the issues that are important to each individual member of parliament and cabinet. So that’s what I’m doing,” he said. The local MP’s internal lobbying efforts come after many thousands of pages of reports on the project have been generated and public meetings of a special panel on the pipeline project were held this summer. Beech attended the meetings and made a presentation making it clear his constituents oppose the project. He’s also written a 12-page public report setting out what he sees as the key issues. “It’s a very complex issue,” he said. “Everybody wants a tweet-size remark about how I feel about the Trans Mountain pipeline project.” “I’ve really looked into

See Political page 7

The nomination period closed on Friday, officially starting the campaign to elect a replacement for former Coun. Michael Lewis, who died in August. When registered West Vancouver voters get their ballots on Saturday, Nov. 19, they’ll have their choice of: David Ayriss, Farzaneh Bamani, Joanna Baxter, Tom Dodd, Tara Haddad, Rosa Jafari, Jon Johnson, David A. Jones, Andy Krawczyk, Peter Lambur, Vernon Pahl and Carolanne Reynolds. The candidates’ names will appear on the ballot alphabetically. Twelve candidates in a midterm byelection is a deep field, given the municipal election in 2014 drew only 15 candidates for six council seats. That’s something of a paradox, as municipal elections generally, and byelections specifically, tend to have very low voter turnout, said Michael Markwick, a West Vancouver resident and Capilano University communications instructor. “The question is: will people actually reciprocate as voters and turn out?” he said. Only 27 per cent of estimated eligible West Vancouver electors showed up for the 2014 vote. A District of North Vancouver council byelection in 1991 drew just 12 per cent. “There’s this weird disconnect because everything we do with our day-to-day lives, from where we can park, to what we can do in our yard, to how we put our garbage out, is all affected by what municipal governments tell us to do,” he said. “It’s easier to go to the wine store than it is to go vote in the municipal polls.” People only tend to get involved in municipal politics when an issue impacts

On the ballot

David Ayriss Farzaneh Bamani Joanna Baxter Tom Dodd Tara Haddad Rosa Jafari Jon Johnson David A. Jones Andy Krawczyk Peter Lambur Vernon Pahl Carolanne Reynolds them in a hyperlocal way – “when it literally comes down to people’s backyards,” Markwick said. Having a likely small turnout means candidates would be wise to organize blocks of supporters to show up on Nov. 19 through their existing networks at churches, work and schools, he added. Despite just being one council seat up for grabs, Markwick said the byelection could be pivotal for West Vancouver in the long term, as the municipality faces big decisions about sustainability, emergency preparedness and the ongoing housing affordability crisis. According to West Vancouver’s demographic research, Markwick noted, in 20 years, children will make up just eight per cent of the municipality’s population. “Twenty years out from that, when those kids have families, what’s going to happen to the population of West Vancouver?” he asked. Two all-candidates meetings have been scheduled by community organizations already. The Ambleside and Dundarave Ratepayers’ Association will hold a meeting Wednesday, Nov. 2, at 7 p.m. at the West Vancouver Seniors’ Activity Centre activity room. The West Vancouver Chamber of Commerce has booked the Kay Meek Centre on Nov. 16 for a hustings starting at 7 p.m. Attendees must RSVP at info@westvanchamber.com. The budget for the byelection has not yet been finalized.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

NEWS | A5

north shore news nsnews.com

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The North Shore was bracing for a storm of grand proportions over the weekend but it turned out to be more of a tempest in a teacup.

The remnants of Typhoon Songda, a Category 4 typhoon that traversed the Pacific, landed Saturday but managed to miss most highly populated areas. “The storm ended up tracking about 30 kilometres west of the forecasted trajectory and so the impacts were shifted,” said Matt MacDonald, Environment Canada meteorologist. “I think the Lower Mainland and Victoria dodged a bullet, or at least the bull’s eye, in most regards.” The highest wind speed recorded locally was 97 kilometres per hour at Point Atkinson on Saturday evening. A weather station on Pam Rocks farther out on Howe Sound hit 111 kilometers per hour. The West Vancouver weather station picked up 97 millimeters of rain from Wednesday to Sunday. Mount Strachan’s station recorded more than double that, MacDonald said. “If nothing else, this is a good indication of the beginning of the storm season, the most active months for storms being November and December,” he said. Most of the damage done by high winds and rain happened in the first of a series of storms that blew in earlier in the week. Those led to some temporary school and trail closures, plugged catch basins, downed trees and branches blocking streets, power outages and at least one vehicle was crushed by a falling tree. Saturday’s storm was anticipated to be the worst of the three. The three local municipalities marshalled extra resources expecting a bigger wallop but found themselves largely overprepared Saturday, although that itself was something of a silver lining. “We responded to a variety (of incidents)

Come celebrate with us! Join us for our Grand Opening event.

City worker Cameron Smith unplugs a storm drain Friday. PHOTO MIKE WAKEFIELD but we didn’t have a large number of windrelated damage, or trees down, wires down, that type of event,” said Brian Hutchinson, assistant chief with District of North Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services. Several days prior to the storm, all three North Shore fire department’s chiefs and assistant chiefs met to lay out plans on “how we were going to support each other regardless of where it landed,” Hutchinson said. “As much as the storm didn’t come to fruition, it was a really positive step forward in that we came together and put a plan in place that would have allowed us to have a really rapid and robust response if anything had occurred,” he said. “I bet there’s very few areas in the Lower Mainland that took that type of unified approach to the coming storm.”

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A6 |

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

NEWS | A7

north shore news nsnews.com

Mayor questions Political issues weighed: pollster union’s position From page 4

From page 1

district involves concessions to benefits being sought by the municipality. McDonald said that isn’t true. He said the municipality has offered a wages and benefits package comparable to that given to Coast Mountain bus drivers. He said the union has asked for the district to pay for a long-term disability plan that is not part of the Coast Mountain agreement. The district has rejected that as too expensive. Smith said the job action by bus drivers is frustrating. “We are committed to paying fair wages and benefits for all our employees, including transit workers,” he said. “We don’t have a problem with any of our other unions. Council is going to need to ask at some point why we continue to have a problem with just this one union and are there some alternatives we should be looking at.” The District of West Vancouver operates the local Blue Bus system under contract to TransLink, as part of a historical agreement between the parties. Buses in other parts of the Lower

Mainland are operated by the Coast Mountain Bus Co. According to a District of West Vancouver employee survey conducted in May and June this year, transit workers consistently rated their job satisfaction lower than employees of other municipal departments. Smith said he hasn’t heard what the problems are. “If transit workers have some issues, they should feel free to bring them up,” he said. “We’ve heard absolutely nothing.” Both sides said they are still hoping a deal can be worked out. “We are really trying not to go into anything that would disrupt service,” said Tieleman. “At some point you have no choice.” No further talks had been scheduled as of Tuesday afternoon. McDonald said the last contract offer put forward by the municipality remains the offer on the table. Tieleman said the union could meet as early as Wednesday to discuss further escalation in the strike action.

this project. I’ve really done the reading. . . I’ve read the end notes to the end notes.” “There’s not many MPs that have an issue that’s this big that’s happening this early,” he added. Beech is well aware of criticisms of the Liberal government – that they have reneged on promises to change the National Energy Board process and that communities would have to grant “social licence” to the project.

“I think there is definitely a robust discussion that is happening around both the definition of social licence and definition of national interest,” he said. “…That’s part of the debate and discussion that I’m sure is going to be happening around the cabinet table before a decision is made.” Mario Canseco, vicepresident of public affairs for Insights West pollsters said there are likely many political calculations being made in Ottawa ahead of the decision.

“As far as the electoral implications of this there are a lot of things at play,” he said. “I don’t think we have a lot of single issue voters.” In the case of Burnaby North - Seymour, however, “If that project goes through it’s going to be a tough situation for Mr. Beech,” he said. “It’s very hard for a party to make decisions that won’t affect any of their constituencies,” he added. “The musings coming out of Ottawa would seem they’re

Portfolio Management I Retirement & Estate Planning I Pension Evaluation I Insurance Reviews

going to say yes to this project.” If Trudeau and his government approve the pipeline, “It’ll be tougher for him to come back here and do the Grouse Grind again and try to paint himself as an environmental steward,” said Canseco. That may or may not be a big factor come the next federal election, he added. “When you’re looking at the supposed broken promises file there are ways to entice the public to look at things differently over time.”

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A8 | NEWS

nsnews.com north shore news

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

PUBLISHED BY NORTH SHORE NEWS A DIVISION OF LMP PUBLICATION LTD. PARTNERSHIP, 116-980 WEST 1ST ST., NORTH VANCOUVER, B.C. V7P 3N4. PETER KVARNSTROM, PUBLISHER. CANADIAN PUBLICATIONS MAIL SALES PRODUCT AGREEMENT NO. 40010186.

Ballot recital

T

hey’re off to the races in West Vancouver. A pack of 12 candidates have been nominated to run for one council seat up for grabs on Nov. 19. That so many candidates have declared is quite heartening. That’s almost as many as we had running in 2014’s general election. It’s nice as well to see some members of West Vancouver’s Persian community on the ballot. Despite making up a sizable portion of our local population, they have been under-represented in local government. We look forward to covering the all-candidates meetings and getting to better know each of these individuals. Those genuine about getting elected will have their websites online and be out door-knocking sooner rather than later. We’d ask that you too be ready to parse

which ones are serious contenders and which ones are in over their heads. Inevitably, there will be some making tempting but ultimately impractical promises. If they’re vowing to have Dom Pérignon trickling from our water fountains, make sure they can explain how local tax bills will be impacted. And don’t be shy to quiz them if they’re promising things that aren’t in municipal jurisdiction (Hint: a third crossing to Vancouver isn’t.) This byelection is a big opportunity that comes with big responsibility. West Vancouver’s council doesn’t have factions as such but split votes are fairly common. That means the person who occupies this seat could be a swing vote when it comes to big decisions. Let’s all make sure they’ve done their homework before they get there.

Softwood lumber deal a political hot potato

T

he B.C. economy keeps chugging along and leads all provinces in terms of performance, but there is a dark cloud on the horizon that may change all that. The one-year truce that followed the expiration of the nine-year softwood deal with the United States has ended and no new agreement is in sight. As a result, U.S. lumber companies are expected to quickly file lawsuits and B.C. lumber producers could face serious financial penalties come next March, when hefty duties will almost certainly be slapped on B.C. softwood shipments south of the border. Layoffs in the forest industry are more than likely, and the shutdown of mills could also occur. While B.C.’s forest industry has declined in terms of numbers and economic activity since say, the 1980s, it remains a vital component of

CONTACTUS

View from The Ledge Keith Baldrey the provincial economy. And while the softwood industry itself may seem like a remote thing to many who live in Metro Vancouver, it is a very real and vital part of the local economies of many communities throughout the Interior and the northern reaches of this province. This has been a longrunning dispute going back decades, and comes down to a central argument: how much

of a share of the U.S. market should Canadian lumber companies be entitled to? In recent years, Canada has enjoyed a share of about 30 to 33 per cent of the market, and the U.S. industry is said to be pushing for a permanent cap of about 22 per cent based on a quota system. Canadian softwood companies say that reduction is both unacceptable and unfair. In making its case, the U.S. industry argues Canadian lumber companies receive a de facto government subsidy because provincial governments charge too little to harvest timber on Crown land (U.S. producers harvest trees on privately owned land, and use an auction system that costs them more than what Canadian companies pay). International trade panels have consistently ruled in favour of Canada and B.C.’s counter-argument that it does

not use a subsidized system, but that matters little to the aggressive U.S. Lumber Coalition, the major industry lobbying group that simply won’t let this fight go. And if past action taken by U.S. lumber producers in this never-ending trade war is any indication, the financial penalties for Canadian companies could be substantial. For example, the last dispute ended in 2006 and for years before that the U.S. slapped an average 27 per cent tariff on Canadian softwood (which amounted to more than $5 billion during the length of that dispute). Talks are continuing for a new deal, but neither side is expressing optimism that something might be agreed on soon. Colouring the situation in a negative way is the fact that we are in a particularly nasty U.S. election campaign south of the border, where

protectionist feelings (which favours tariffs and duties on imports to protect local industries) are rampant within both major political parties. Both U.S. presidential candidates – Hilary Clinton and Donald Trump – have expressed everything from reservations to outright condemnation of trade deals, and that has no doubt played a role in the snail’s pace of progress at the negotiating table. If Clinton wins (a scenario suggested by recent polls, but who really knows?) it’s important to note that her Democratic Party is traditionally far more protectionist when it comes to trade than the Republican Party (in fact, B.C.’s worst enemies on this issue for years were Democratic senators and members of Congress). Of course, whichever party controls the house and the senate will likely have more

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impact on how softwood is dealt with than whoever is in the White House, but it’s easy to see that no matter what the election outcome it’s going to complicate things. In any event, that black cloud on that horizon should come clearly into sight when those duties kick in as early as next March, just before B.C. is headed into its own election campaign. That means there’s a chance the lack of a deal could become an issue in that election, although it’s far from clear if any of our main political parties will be hurt by it. Nevertheless, some of our regional communities had better brace for the kind of economic hit they haven’t seen for quite a while, especially while our overall economy has been doing so well. Keith Baldrey is chief political reporter for Global BC. Keith. Baldrey@globalnews.ca

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

NEWS | A9

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LETTERS TO THE EDITOR must include your name, full address and telephone number. Send your letters via e-mail to: editor@ nsnews.com. The North Shore News reserves the right to edit any and/or all letters based on length, clarity, legality and content. The News also reserves the right to publish any and/or all letters electronically.

A rendering distributed at a council workshop in March 2011 shows a building at 13th Street and Lonsdale Avenue compliant with the official community plan. IMAGE SUPPLIED

Tower proposal goes to public hearing Monday Dear Editor: Hollyburn Properties Ltd. held an open house and a town hall earlier this year for its proposed development of a market rental building at the corner of Lonsdale and 13th Street. Mayor and council (in a 4-3 vote) recently passed a resolution for the project to proceed to a public hearing. This was despite the fact that as reported by the city planner, “there is significant public concern with regard to the application.” Three councillors (Pam Bookham, Don Bell and Rod Clark) voted against the resolution, citing concerns with density, height, parking and traffic. The site was designated as a special study area for consideration of increased height in response to lobbying

by Hollyburn. As stated in the official community plan, such sites “are areas of the City that require in-depth study to resolve issues.” Where is the in-depth study? Will increased height for this location in fact provide any improvement in “defining the City Centre”? The city has offered to sell 22,186 square feet of density to Hollyburn for $1,996,758. There has been no justification provided for this increased density. Is the city being unduly influenced by the money in considering a 20 per cent higher density for this site? This has resulted in a proposal for a building at a height of 58 metres whereas the OCP maximum is 37 metres and with a density of 0.8 floor space ratio, or FSR, over the

OCP maximum of 4.0. We now are faced with an increase in height of seven storeys. The Hollyburn proposal does bring additional needed rental housing albeit at market rates to the city. However, this can and should be done consistent with the height and density restrictions contained in the OCP. The graphic above shows an OCP compliant building. Imagine another seven storeys on top. You decide. This is your city – it’s time to speak up. Attend the public hearing at 7:30 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 24 in council chamber at city hall, 141 West 14th St., North Vancouver. Council is scheduled to vote immediately after the hearing. Jim Nicholson North Vancouver

Turkey troubles? Nothing funnier Dear Editor: Re: Fowl Play Can Lead to Deadly Results, Oct. 16 Laugh All You Want by Andy Prest. I had a belly laugh reading the column re: Thanksgiving turkeys this morning in the North Shore News.

Q

Andy has a great way with words and can brighten up even a dull day like today. I was born during the war in England, of European heritage, and although we celebrate Thanksgiving in our family I have never ever

I head to the beach for some I stay bundled up by the fire, from storm watching. the comfort of my living room.

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A10 | NEWS

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

Negative petition process set by province From page 1

“And it is a concern for small business,” said Back, a former small business owner

herself. Back also asked for clarity as to why hotels within the BIA as well as Lonsdale Quay Market would pay at a rate 50 per cent lower than

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that charged other property owners – “because big businesses can afford it and small business can’t.” Lonsdale Quay merchants already pay a common area fee and hotels pay a two per cent tourism tax, explained the city’s business services manager Larry Orr. The BIA would collect $1$1.10 per $1,000 of assessed property value. The average landowner in LoLo, where the median assessment value is $430,000, would pay an annual levy of $440. A BIA’s main objective is for its members to collectively fund community enhancement projects and marketing campaigns through the levy. Council voted 4-3 in July to trigger a counter-petition, meaning 50 per cent of property owners within the BIA boundary – representing at least half the area’s land value – had to register their opposition to defeat the BIA. Owners had 30 days to respond to the petition which was mailed out to 323 Lower Lonsdale property owners in the middle of August. Coun. Don Bell had unsuccessfully pushed to delay the petition process until after Labour Day. The timing of the petition and the process itself has presented concerns for at least

Lower Lonsdale Business Improvement Area proponents show their support on their red shirts during Monday’s council meeting. PHOTO MARIA SPITALE-LEISK Calling council’s vote on the BIA a “dark day in North Vancouver,” Clark said the “bad process” was a negative petition slanted towards those in favour of a BIA. Clark went on to say he has “absolutely no confidence in the Lower Lonsdale Business Association,” the volunteer-run organization tasked with the BIA bid with funding from the city. “The reason being that they have already had $120,000 … and we have nothing to show for it,” said Clark. “In fact, we have two other failed attempts at a BIA. So, are they good stewards of money? Certainly not so far.”

three councillors – Bell, Pam Bookham and Rod Clark. Bell, while seeing the value in a merchants’ association, speaking from the perspective of being a one-time small business owner, reiterated that he was against the BIA petition because of the timing. September, said Bell, would have been a “fairer” month to hold the petition. Bookham agreed that August is a month when people generally aren’t available for business matters. “Sometimes, it does seem like a process can be rigged or at least can be designed to facilitate a particular outcome,” said Bookham.

Coun. Craig Keating said he’s glad to see the BIA come to fruition and praised the LoLo business community volunteers that “want to create something that has been proven a success” in cities across North America, B.C. and the Lower Mainland. Coun. Linda Buchanan said it’s a good time to tie the BIA bid in with other new projects in LoLo – The Shipyards, the North Vancouver Museum, and Polygon Gallery. Calling the BIA a divisive process, Buchanan said some LoLo business have been confused by people who are “really undermining this process.” Mayor Darrell Mussatto acknowledged that it has been a contentious issue for some, saying any frustration with the negative petition process should be directed to the province, which sets out the legislation. Speaking after the meeting, a disappointed LLBA president Bill Curtis said: “I am stunned at how misinformed council is and how long they have had an opportunity to get educated about it.” Clark was the only councillor opposed to the deferral motion, which carried 6-1. The BIA matter is expected to be back before council in a few weeks.

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A12 | COMMUNITY

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

BRIGHTLIGHTS! by Kevin Hill PumpkinFest Harvest Dance The harvest season was celebrated at the sixth annual PumpkinFest harvest community festival the weekend of Oct 1-2. Presented by the West Vancouver Community Centres Society, the event got underway on the Saturday evening with a Full Moon Harvest Dance (as shown here), in the West Vancouver Community Centre atrium. The dance was family friendly and included tons of children’s activities, a silent auction, food and refreshments, and live entertainment by Nearly Neil and the Solitary Band. The festivities continued the following day with the annual Harvest Festival, also presented at the centre, with activities ranging from a pumpkin patch to a petting corral and pony rides.

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Please direct requests for event coverage to: emcphee@nsnews.com. For more Bright Lights photos, go to: nsnews.com/community/bright-lights

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Your North Shore Guide to life and style HOME & GARDEN 15 l PARENTING 19 l TASTE 29

Fall gardening

Thoughtful cleanup reduces workload

When tidying up the garden this fall, please take time to consider why you are doing specific tasks.

I always encourage leaving as much material as possible in the garden. I use many plants that are aimed at feeding birds, creating habitat for beneficial insects, and reducing the workload of the garden caregiver. As a result of this, many plants are best left standing until winter and, if we have a drier winter, possibly until the spring. Rudbeckia (black-eyed Susans) and Liatrus (blazing star) are an excellent seed source for birds as are many ornamental grasses, especially the North American natives. The people with raked clean, everythingtaken-away gardens, are missing out on one of the best parts of the winter garden: watching songbirds feasting on these fall treasures. Another way to create winter interest is to leave hydrangea flower heads. They look especially nice with snow on them, and are

Design In Nature Heather Schamehorn easier to prune in the spring due to forming buds on the stalk, which shout out “prune right here!” Many plants will self-seed if the heads are left on, so consider this if you want more or less of the plants you already have. Blazing star is a great plant for this, as the seeds that are left after the birds eat their fill easily start new plants, and their little bulblets make them especially easy to transplant. I have long been a fan of “chop and drop tidy up.” This method creates instant mulch in beds. I use long-handled shears to chop plants

into small pieces, starting at the top and working down. I leave the stalks about ankle high as a marker to help keep track of the location, leaving a clue for identification, protecting the plants from foot traffic, accidental digging and other garden perils. Having a mulch on the planting areas helps to reduce soil erosion and compaction, as well as create habitat for beneficial insects. I feel that the plant’s own material contains some of the nutrients they need. By creating your own mulch, you further reduce the carbon footprint of your garden by reducing the fuel needed to pick up and remove green waste, as well as buying and hauling back more material needed for mulch. Not to mention not having to haul and shovel wheelbarrow loads of mulch from a central drop-off spot sometimes far away and downhill from the planting areas. Some plants are better sent off site to be composted

See Lawn page 15

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A14 |

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

HOME & GARDEN | A15

north shore news nsnews.com

Lawn clippings a great mulch source

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From page 13 at very high temperatures with the weekly green waste. I send peony tops away to reduce the risk of botrytis (Botrytis paeoniae). Black walnut (Juglans nigra) leaves are also sent away as they have allelopathic properties due to juglone being exuded from all parts of the tree, including the leaves. If you find you are short of mulch materials, chances are you will be able to find a neighbour who has extra leaves. If you have a lawn, the clippings are a good mulch material if spread thinly on beds after each mowing and are allowed to dry out between applications. Heather Schamehorn is a certified residential landscape designer and consultant, educator, habitat and sustainability advocate and dog lover. perennialpleasures.ca

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and proper footwear is required. Learn the natural history and ecology of the oldgrowth forest. naturevancouver.ca PLANT MANAGEMENT SYMPOSIUM Invasive plant species and long-term plant management for the 76-acre wildlife sanctuary operated by the Wild Bird Trust

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See more page 17

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A16 |

nsnews.com north shore news

OPEN HOUSE

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

OPEN HOUSE Community Open House for Larson Bay Park

The District of West Vancouver is hosting an open house at the Gleneagles Clubhouse. Take a tour through the clubhouse and bring your ideas for new programs and community events. Drop-in activities for children will be available. Coffee and light refreshments provided. Saturday, October 22, 2016 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Larson Bay Park is one of a series of small but significant waterfront parks in West Vancouver. This park has been identified by the District for some improvements in 2017 and 2018. Before beginning work district staff would like community input about the following possibilities under consideration for this park: 1. 2. 3. 4.

proposed rearing pond at Larson Creek BC Hydro upgrade to Bowen Island power connection strategy for the removal of invasive plants in the park review park amenities » tennis court » trail system

Gleneagles Clubhouse, 6190 Marine Drive, West Vancouver

To share your ideas about Larson Bay Park, please join us at an open house:

For detailed information on the Gleneagles Clubhouse, go to westvancouver.ca/gleneaglesclubhouse

Gleneagles Golf Course Clubhouse, 6190 Marine Drive, West Vancouver

MORE INFORMATION:

Sue Ketler, Senior Manager of Community Services 604-925-7126

Thursday, October 27 4:30 – 7 p.m.

If you are unable to attend, please visit westvancouver.ca/larsonbaypark for more information or to provide comment. MORE INFORMATION: 604-925-7130 or email parks@westvancouver.ca

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

HOME & GARDEN | A17

north shore news nsnews.com

EYE FOR DESIGN Canadian design personality Samantha Pynn meets with customers at Simons at Park Royal in celebration of the expansion of her Samantha Pynn for Simons collection, boasting a new set of home decor items for fall. The new collection includes bedding, bath and kitchen textiles in warm fall colours like navy, grey, gold and aubergine. Dining items showcased include the chevron tablecloth and matching napkins shown below. PHOTOS PAUL MCGRATH

GREEN GUIDE From page 15 MUSHROOM WALK LIGHTHOUSE PARK Meet at the upper kiosk at the parking lot to explore the fungi in the park with Dr. Kent Brothers Saturday, Oct. 29, 2-4 p.m.. at Lighthouse Park, West Vancouver. PLANTING AND MULCHING AT THE DALE PARK Meet at the corner of Water Lane and The Dale in West Vancouver, Oct. 29 and Nov. 5, 9 a.m.-noon

to help maintain the park. Wear sturdy footwear, old clothing and work gloves. LOUTET FARM GATE SALES Pick up farm-fresh produce from neighbourhood farmers and meet your neighbours Wednesdays from 4-6 p.m. and Saturdays from 10 a.m. to noon, through October, at Loutet Farm, East 14th Street at Rufus Avenue, North Vancouver. ediblegardenproject.com Compiled by Debbie Caldwell Email listings@nsnews.com

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A18 | HOME & GARDEN

nsnews.com north shore news

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

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Until Thursday, Oct. 20, customers can get up to a $10 instant rebate on select ENERGY STAR LED bulbs and $5 on lighting fixtures like ceiling mounts, chandeliers and floor lamps, according to a press release from BC Hydro. Customers can also save $3 on select lighting control systems like dimmers, timers and motion sensors. Lights are kept on for longer periods in the fall and winter months,

causing electricity use to rise. Making the switch to energy-efficient lighting products can help British Columbians offset the increasing energy demand during the colder and darker months of the year. ENERGY STAR LED bulbs and fixtures use at least 75 per cent less energy than incandescent lighting and can last up to 20 years. Residential lighting can account for up to 15 per cent of a household’s electricity use and simple actions like turning off unnecessary lights will help save on lighting costs. Consider: q Turning off unnecessary lights: Two 100-watt incandescent bulbs

switched off for two hours a day can save $12 over a year. % )!+ ,-!& $'*(,'#*" Turning off ceiling lights and using table lamps and track lighting in work and hobby areas, as well as kitchens, can save $6 a year. Since 2011, BC Hydro has provided instant rebates on more than 2.1 million energy-saving light bulbs, according to the statement. These bulbs have produced cumulative energy savings of 54 gigawatt hours, which is enough to power more than 5,000 homes in B.C. for a year. For more information on products with instant rebates and a list of participating retailers, visit powersmart.ca.

Organizations encouraged to grow local

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The British Columbia government is providing funding of up to $25,000 each for 10 communities, so they can work directly with their local residents to help them grow their own food.

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Grow Local BC, a pilot project, was recently introduced to Union of British Columbia Municipalities delegates in Victoria, according to a press release from the provincial Ministry of Agriculture. The goal of Grow Local BC is to provide a deeper connection between B.C. food, B.C. communities and the people who live in them. By encouraging British Columbians to grow their own fresh fruit and vegetables, they will help strengthen local food-supply security. Urban and semi-rural local government and community organizations are encouraged to apply. The funding can be used to build educational activities, including workshops, to encourage and support residents in growing

food at home and in their local community. The launch of Grow Local BC completes a commitment in the 2016 speech from the throne. Grow Local BC will further strengthen the value of the local agricultural sector among British Columbians, says Norm Letnick, minister of agriculture, in the statement. This pilot project will create a better understanding of how food crops are produced in our province and assist people in learning how best to grow their own food, he says. The Grow Local BC pilot project is managed through the Investment Agriculture Foundation. Applications can be submitted until Nov. 4. Funding decisions will be made in December and successful proponents will be notified by Jan. 31, 2017. Projects can begin on Feb. 1, 2017 and end no later than Dec. 31, 2018. For more information, visit iafbc.ca/funding-opportunities/ grow-local.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

PARENTING | A19

north shore news nsnews.com

Halloween outfits should be creative, not exploitative Abuse must not be glamorized, says exec

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Cluttering clothing racks alongside ghoul and superhero outfits are a type of costume better left alone this Halloween, according to Diane Sowden.

Sowden, who works to prevent sexual exploitation and human trafficking as executive director of the Children of the Street Society, is asking parents to avoid revealing costumes marketed to young girls. High hemlines and low necklines are common on girls’ costumes including nuns, ninjas, swashbucklers and even skeletons. “When it’s the female version of the costume, it’s sexy,” Sowden says. While the sexualizing of young girls is troubling, the trend is becoming more worrisome as younger children are increasingly well-versed in social media sites. “The costumes don’t stay just at the house party anymore,” Sowden says. “Because of technology now, those pictures … are shared on Facebook.” The possibility of a predator lurking on Instagram or Facebook is very real, Sowden says. Pimp and ho costumes – while sometimes cartoonish – are nonetheless glamorizing an ugly, abusive lifestyle, according to Sowden.

Parents should not enter costume shops this season, advises Sowden, who promotes making your own Halloween attire. PHOTO CINDY GOODMAN

“We would not have a domestic violence party because we know how devastating domestic violence is.” Much like a KKK costume would be deemed socially unacceptable, Sowden says any outfit that glamorizes the sex trade should be equally unacceptable. If a young teen or tween is interested in a sexy costume, Sowden encourages having a conversation that begins with a single question: “Why?” “I would have an un-emotional discussion about it, and you may even find out there’s underlying things,” she says. Children may unwittingly be buying into a concept of how women should look, or they may simply be after attention, according to Sowden. If it’s attention they’re after, the child should have some understanding of the dangers of being perceived as sexual at a young age, she says.

Human trafficking is a crime that sometimes relies on a victim being misinformed. By portraying pimps in a comical light, the costumes may end up contributing to a problem that creates thousands of victims every year, according to Sowden. As an antidote, Sowden suggests abandoning Halloween shops entirely. “I would encourage them to be creative and make costumes,” she says. By helping to make the costume, the child will be conscious of what they’re portraying and why they’re portraying it. Sowden has a happy memory of the Halloween when her family all dressed up as characters from The Wizard of Oz. “Halloween sometimes is scary and fun and creative, but we don’t need to sexualize our young girls through the process.”

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A20 | PARENTING

nsnews.com north shore news

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

Moving true story chronicles ‘garbage’ band Ada’s Violin by Susan Wood, Illus. by Sally Wern Comport, NY, Simon & Schuster, $23.99

Book Buzz Fran Ashdown

This non-fiction picture book, subtitled The Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay, explains how one man with a vision made a huge difference to children living in Cateura, Paraguay.

Cateura is a garbage dump for Paraguay’s capital,

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Asuncion, and one of the poorest slums in the entire country. The story focuses on Ada Rios, a young daughter of a ganchero or garbage picker who faced a life growing up in impoverished circumstances. Her life changed at the age of eleven when she met Favio Chavez, an environmental engineer, whose initial job in Cateura was to teach safety practices to the gancheros. Chavez, also a musician,

wondered what he could do for the town’s children and decided to offer free music classes. Ada’s grandma, aware of her granddaughter’s love of music, signed her up for a class. Chavez realized quickly that real musical instruments would soon be stolen and creatively devised instruments from the trash that surrounded the town. Oil drums, packing crates and even old paint cans became guitars, drums and

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flutes and an orchestra was born. Ada and her companions played outside in searing heat and occasional downpours and adhered to a strict schedule. By the time Ada was twelve her hard work and growing skills caused her to be named a first violinist. Thanks to the inspired teaching of Chavez, who eventually gave up his original job, the Orchestra was invited to play in many other countries and was even invited to tour with heavy metal band Metallica. Ada Rios was only sixteen years old at the time! Wood notes that there are now 25 instructors and 200 students in the Recycled Orchestra an incredible success story. She also indicates on her website that she plans to donate a portion of the proceeds from the book to the Orchestra Wood drew on information acquired from

interviewing both Ada Rios and Favio Chavez. She lists a number of informative websites and videos interested readers might want to investigate and gives further details about the difficulties Chavez encountered in establishing the Orchestra. Wood’s text is accompanied by Comport’s vibrant illustrations created through a technique of collage, acrylic paints, drawings and digital mediums. Her use of intense and glowing colours are most effective in evoking the tropical mood and setting. This is a lovely real-life story and a reminder that one person with a vision can change the world. Fran Ashdown was the children’s librarian at the Capilano Branch of the NV District Library. She took piano lessons as a child but hated the metronome. For info check your local libraries.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

| A21

north shore news nsnews.com

BLUE BUS STRIKE Setting the record straight. » The Amalgamated Transit Union, which represents West Vancouver Blue Bus workers, walked away from the bargaining table last week and began strike action this week. » The District of West Vancouver has not asked for any concessions from the transit union. We have offered a fair wage and benefits package. » The transit union’s decision to strike is unnecessary and will hurt all who depend on Blue Bus. » Residents can be assured that we are doing all we can to return to normal service. The District of West Vancouver is surprised and disappointed with the strike. We have been negotiating in good faith and believed an agreement was close. The District has been very clear with the transit union that it is prepared to provide employees with a settlement comparable to the recent Coast Mountain Bus Company agreement. This includes the same general wage increase as well as these improvements: • seniority accrual on sick leave • an increased shift differential • an increase to training instructor premiums • improvements to training time provisions • an increase to the uniform cleaning allowance. The District is also prepared to provide maintenance staff with an ongoing labour market adjustment as well as: • paid meal breaks for charge hands • double time for hours over ten hours • an increased tool allowance. The District remains hopeful an agreement can be reached but is concerned this is not possible when the transit union is holding on to so many proposals that would reduce its ability to operate efficiently to meet the needs of the public. Such proposals include no contracting out, elimination of dispatch duties when needed after hours, increased ability to bank time, increased collective agreement language regarding access to driver service awards and full pay to attend grievance meetings.

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The transit union also wants employer-supported long-term disability premiums even though this change could cost the District an additional two per cent each year. This benefit is not offered by Coast Mountain Bus Company.

The District of West Vancouver values its relationship with all its employees and is committed to providing competitive and fair compensation to those employees in the Blue Bus transit union.

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A22 | LIVING

nsnews.com north shore news

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

CapU slashes GHGs 50% since 2007 University credits students for reductions JEREMY SHEPHERD jshepherd@nsnews.com

Capilano University’s emissions are in remission.

After belching out more than 2,700 tonnes of carbon dioxide in 2007, the school recently announced that it has cut its greenhouse gas emission in half. The school trimmed 1,445 tonnes of GHGs from 2007 levels through a variety of initiatives ranging from closer monitoring of paper consumption, greater reliance on electric vehicles, and better boilers. “Those have been a big part of our savings,” said William Demopoulos, sustainability manager for the school.

The school’s library used to be heated with three big, brick boilers. At their best, the might have functioned at about 80 per cent efficiency, according to Demopoulos. “From outward appearances, they’re perfectly functioning boilers … but internally, as they age, they’re getting less and less efficient.” Over the year, bricks tended to tumble into the boilers, further hampering efficiency. The school opted to replace the old boilers with 10 modulating boilers. Instead of running between zero and “full tilt,” the new boilers allow for a constant temperature. “You can really match the demands of the weather,” Demopoulos noted. While the new boilers made a “big dent,” in the university’s emissions, their paper consumption also saw a towering reduction, according to Demopoulos. “If you stacked up the reams of paper (used in

BREATH AND SAXES Ashley Biggerstaff, Henrik Nielsen, Peter Eccles, and Ruben Schulz of the Sea to Sky Wind Ensemble hold a friendly saxophone duel in preparation for their Oct. 25 concert at the BlueShore Financial Centre at Capilano University. All proceeds from the concert are slated to be directed to North Shore Rescue. PHOTO KEVIN HILL 2007), it’s the equivalent of three Shangri-Las tall,” he said. “That’s a lot of paper.” By using less paper, the university is effectively preserving trees that sequester carbon, Demopoulos said. While using a certain amount of paper is unavoidable, the school has made

strides by removing personal printers and mandating double-sided printing. “We’ve eliminated one and a half of those ShangriLas,” Demopoulos reported. The university also implemented PaperCut software, a system intended to make students and faculty cognizant

of how much paper they’re using. “That slows people down, it makes them change their mentality about printing,” Demopoulos said. While it’s important to mitigate CapU’s impact on the climate, changing the way people think may be

equally important in the long run. CapU’s 2007 emissions were “still a drop in the bucket compared to what’s going on in the globe,” Demopoulos pointed out. Part of the goal is for the

See CapU page 28

TRICK OR TREAT

MORE SEA, MORE SKY, MORE TO DO.

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 29, 12-4PM The Sea to Sky Gondola welcomes costume-clad families for seasonal surprises, face-painting and trick-or-treating at Basecamp and Alpine Alley Trail at the summit. See website for details.

MADE FOR SQUAMISH

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6, 12-4PM Come out to celebrate our last day of the season with live folk music, crafts and games, seasonal food specials, and a community social. Best of all, adults/seniors tickets are only $25 when you bring a donation to the Squamish Food Bank (min. 1 p/person)

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For details visit seatoskygondola.com


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

| A23

north shore news nsnews.com

STANDARD ALL WHEEL DRIVE. EQUIPPED FOR LIFE’S AUTHENTIC ADVENTURES.

MODELS EQUIPPED WITH EYESIGHT

2016

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

137

1440

1433

1301-1333 Lonsdale Avenue

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1401

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E 14th St 1350

1333 1316

1301

Lonsdale Ave

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DENSITY SOURCE

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120-141 W. 14th Street 1250

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Zoning Amendment Bylaw, 2016, No. 8504 to rezone the subject property from the Central Lonsdale Mixed Use A (C-1A) Zone to a Comprehensive Development 677 (CD-677) Zone. The proposed bylaw changes would allow the construction of a 19 storey mixeduse commercial and residential building with 144 rental units at 1301–1333 Lonsdale. The application includes a density transfer from 120-141 West 14th Street.

1445

$27,190* 0.5%**

PROPOSED DEVELOPMENT SITE

1430

150

OCP Amendment Bylaw, 2016, No. 8503 to amend the Official Community Plan height limit from 37 metres to 57 metres.

121

Notice is hereby given that Council will consider:

135

WHEN:

128

WHERE:

STARTING FROM

Hollyburn Legacy Properties Ltd. Official Community Plan Bylaw, 2014, No. 8400, Amendment Bylaw, 2016, No. 8503 Zoning Bylaw, 1995, No. 6700, Amendment Bylaw, 2016, No. 8504 (CD-677) 1301-1333 Lonsdale Avenue 120-141 West 14th Street Monday, October 24, 2016 at 7:30 pm Council Chamber, City Hall 141 West 14th Street, North Vancouver

132

WHO: WHAT:

LEASE/FINANCE 36 MOS. AS LOW AS

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All persons who believe they may be affected by the proposal will be afforded an opportunity to be heard in person and/or by written submission. Written or email submissions must include your name and address and should be sent to Jennifer Ficocelli, Deputy City Clerk, at jficocelli@ cnv.org, or by mail or delivered to City Hall. Submissions must be received no later than 4:00 pm, Monday, October 24, 2016, to ensure their availability to Council at the Public Hearing. Once the Public Hearing has concluded, no further information or submissions can be considered by Council. The proposed Amendment Bylaws and background material will be available for viewing at City Hall between 8:30 am and 5:00 pm, Monday to Friday, except Statutory Holidays, from October 14, 2016, and online at www.cnv.org/ publichearings. Please direct any inquiries to Michael Epp, City Planner, at mepp@cnv.org or 604-982-3936. 141 WEST 14TH STREET / NORTH VANCOUVER / BC / V7M 1H9 T 604 985 7761 / F 604 985 9417 / CNV.ORG

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A24 |

nsnews.com north shore news

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

SPONSORED CONTENT

COMMUNITY CONNECTIONS What Do You Think Of The 15% Tax That Is Now A Few Months Old? Clearly, there was a public outcry to do something about the escalating prices of homes and the concern that these prices will make it impossible for our kids to afford to live here. Then add to the mix, the perception that these homes were all bought by non-tax paying Chinese money launderers and you can see how it created an environment of negativity and concern to an already frenzied real estate market. Most of the comments thrown about were not accurate or a poor generalization of the buyers. To be fair, the accusations of the buyers taking the advantages of Vancouver living, but not paying taxes is in my opinion misdirected. We all hate paying excessive taxes and who would not try and pay less (or none) if it was allowed within the rules that govern us. To Tax Or Not To Tax? Discussions and implementation of an immigration tax or a house tax for non-residents is not unique to British Columbia. Bermuda only allows homes priced at a certain level and in specified areas to be sold to nonBermudians. This protects the locals from rich people buying up the island and making homes impossible for locals to own. Does this sound a bit familiar? I am not well versed on the countries that have an immigration tax but I do know that there is an investment

How Much Of An Impact Has It Had On Residential Sales? Here’s my analogy: imagine, driving on the highway at 100 kilometers an hour and suddenly you slam on the brakes as hard as you can. But nonetheless, call me naive as I am still holding on to the belief that this screeching halt to the sales is just temporary and maybe, just maybe, things will return to a more balanced market where it’s not lopsided in favour of either it is the buyer or the seller.

program in many countries that are essentially the way rich people buy their way in to a country. So, Are You For The Tax Or Against It? Both. I believe it is fair to have a tax for non-permanent home purchasers. But personally, I think 15% is too high and I have an issue with how the program was rolled out. Over 700 homes were legally tied up, but would not be completed prior to the start of the new tax. All of these individuals got blindsided by an additional 15%. To put it in perspective: that’s $300,000 on a $2,000,000 buy. It doesn’t seem right that you can have a legally binding contract in place (that has consequences for both the buyer and seller if they break

“I believe fair to have a tax for non-permanent home purchasers. But, I think 15% is too high and I have an issue with how the program was rolled out.”

it) yet the government can come in and alter the same binding contract, on a whim. It reminds me of a famous movie line said to a character that has been wronged unfairly, “thems the breaks kid!”

Personally, I think the government should rebate that 15% for those who were already entered in to contracts that were affected by the tax. It seems to me like a poorly thought out money grab by our government, as was the “no details pledge of $500,000,000” to build affordable rental housing.

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| A25

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October 2016

REN VATE OR RELOCATE

PHOTOS: JOSHUA PETER ESTERHUIZEN

SOLD

Before

Renovation or New Build?

Smart builder tips to help you decide. BOB DE WIT CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Deciding whether to renovate, or dive in and build a new custom home is a big decision – one that will require professional advice, and early on too! Todd Best, of Best Builders shared some great tips with me the other day on whether to renovate or build new. Todd advised to look at the footprint of the existing home. Renovations often make sense versus a new build when you have a challenging lot. Taking advantage of an existing foundation, if salvageable, can save you on the heavier construction costs, plus a reduction of removable building materials. He pointed out that changes to building code and bylaws in recent years may also impact your decision, as existing footprints may provide additional allowable square footage. Todd referenced a recent renovation featured in the Ovation Awards. Best Builders worked with the homeowner and their

realtor to locate the property. It was determined the existing house would be best to renovate (versus tear down and build new), to take advantage of the existing location of the home on the lot. Existing by-laws would have required a new build to be set back farther than desirable. A main feature of the renovation is the buttery roof. The inverted roof, completely hand-framed, allows for maximum natural light at the front and back of the house, taking advantage of the green belt surrounding the property. Todd advised that when a renovation exceeds 70% of the home, the completed renovation is applicable for the New Home Warranty Insurance. What is this, and why should you care? The provincial government set in place the 2-5-10 New Home Warranty Program to enhance consumer protection on new home purchases. It includes a minimum of 2 years on labour continued on page 27

Affordable Options in Great Communities! A CALL CANDICE FOR UP-TO-DATE MARKET INFORMATION

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A26 |

REN VATE

nsnews.com north shore news SOLD

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

OR RELOCATE

PHOTOS SUPPLIED

Built Green to stand the test of time.

BOB DE WIT CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Looking to build a west coast contemporary home in a quiet neighbourhood on the North Shore, builder and general contractor Alex Nasooti of Build Pros Construction Ltd. visited an open house adjacent to Braemar Park and he knew this was the location of his future home. Valuing privacy, quiet and a sustainable lifestyle, Alex chose to build new versus renovation with the intention of designing a signature “green home” to the highest standards possible. Talking with Alex, he pointed out, “One of the most overlooked aspects of a sustainably-built home is durability. The new Green Built homes built today will last for at least 100 years.”

The home is fitted with a heat recovery ventilation system. Ventilation and indoor air quality are two important sections in the Built Green checklist, and Alex and his family can breathe easier because of it. For those who suffer from ailments like asthma, the focus on improved air quality can become quite important and result in a much more comfortable home life. Proper ventilation also results in a reduced cleaning necessity as the ventilation systems pull stale air and dust particles out of the home, then drawing in fresh, clean air. Alex chose German-engineered Euroline Windows, which in addition to offering superior energy efficiency, offer substantial sound reduction from exterior sources. Walls and roofs are insulated with Polarfoam – a high performance, closed-cell rigid

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| A27

north shore news nsnews.com

REN VATE

SOLD

OR RELOCATE

continued from page 25

and materials (some limits apply), 5 years on the building envelope, including water penetration, and 10 years on the structure. Bringing a professional builder or renovator into your decision process early on is a smart decision in my books. Come talk with our

expert builders and renovators at the GVHBA #HomeRenoPros Booth at the Vancouver Home and Design Show October 27-30, at the Vancouver Convention Centre West. For more tips on home renovations, visit www.gvhba.org/consumers/renovating !

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A28 | LIVING

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DEVELOPER’S INFORMATION SESSION Cornerstone Architecture and the Arlington Group will be hosting an information session where interested members of the public are invited to learn about our application for two buildings, each with five townhouses, six with accessory lock-off units, located at 324 Ridgeway Avenue and 610 East 3rd Street. Meeting Location: Ridgeway Elementary School, 420 East 8th Street, North Vancouver Date: Tuesday, October 25, 2016 Time: 6 pm to 8 pm

Name: Andy Conrad, M.Arch., Leed AP Company: Cornerstone Architecture Phone Number: 604.253.8800 Email: aconr@cornerarch.com

Community Development Contact: Heather Evans, Planner, 604.982.3993, hevans@cnv.org This meeting has been required by the City of North Vancouver as part of the Development Permit process.

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WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

CapU readies to host Sustainability Week

From page 22

university to be an example of “our ability to mitigate climate change as a society,” he said. The approach seems to be working as students have spearheaded a community garden and explored various environmentally friendly initiatives, according to Demopoulos. He recalled a particular case when an outraged international student demanded to know why there was Styrofoam in the university cafeteria. Based on that complaint, the university initiated a new position dedicated to buying more sustainable materials. Many students are quick to offer reminders about

taking the stairs instead of the elevator or turning off an unused screen. “You can only tolerate so much pestering and eventually you’re going to turn your monitors off,” Demopoulos said with a laugh. The mindset seems to be yielding promising results. Typically, energy use in commercial buildings tends to grow between two and five per cent each year, according to Demopoulos. “That doesn’t sound like much, but I can promise you that if my investments were growing five per cent per year, I’d be pretty happy,” he said. However, despite increasing their total square footage by about 12 per cent and introducing charging

stations for electric vehicles, the school has also managed to cut their electrical consumption by 10 per cent since 2007. The school is now focused on cutting GHGs 67 per cent by 2020. CapU is planning to host a series of events for Sustainability Week beginning next Monday. Attendees are slated to include representatives from not-for-profit clean energy organizations, as well as Segways and electric sports cars. Festivities begin Monday at 11 a.m. with an appearance by Suzanne Spence, the executive director with the B.C. Ministry of Environment’s climate action secretariat.


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

north shore news nsnews.com

Your North Shore Guide to exceptional cuisine

| A29

taste

Brewery manager Darren Hollett draws a glass of beer for inspection at Hearthstone Tap & Forno in North Vancouver. The eatery’s menu features flavour-forward Mediterranean culinary influences. The photo above right shows a fennel pizza with salami. PHOTOS MIKE WAKEFIELD

REVIEW: HEARTHSTONE TAP & FORNO

Menu meant to complement craft beers

If you need any further evidence that this craft beer thing is real, that it’s here to stay, and that it’s helping to transform not just the beer scene, but the food scene too, you needn’t look farther than the menu of the newly opened Hearthstone Tap & Forno.

The menu works on a number of levels: it’s very “now” featuring some trendy items like kettle-cooked popcorn, Humboldt squid, and beer can chicken; it makes use of smallscale, responsible suppliers like Meadow Valley Meats,

The Dish Chris Dagenais Two Rivers, Noble Pig Ranch, and J&K poultry; and it has a healthy inventory of share

plates. Perhaps most notable about the menu, however, is that it is designed with beer in mind. This is brew food, thoughtfully and lovingly realized with the craft beer enthusiast in mind. At the centre of the menu, as well as the room, is a lovely, imposing, white-tiled, woodburning double forno (oven), which is used for great pizzas and a number of other specialties cooked at extremely high heat. It’s a fitting approach for Hearthstone, whose beers have been on the market for a while now and have found fans (me included) for their

contemporary take on classic styles. Take a close look at the Hearthstone beer logo. It looks like two stalks of wheat set in front of water. Upon closer inspection, however, you will discern in the negative space created by the wheat stalks, a stylized forno. The reference is both literal and figurative. Yes, you can now sit around the giant forno in the brewery’s tap room and enjoy a meal and a few pints, but the broader reference is to the idea of warmth and comfort of the kind afforded not just by a wood-burning oven, but by

classic, well-crafted beers. The menu, which draws on bright and flavour-forward Mediterranean culinary influences, takes some of its inspiration from the similarly colourful labels and packaging of the beer lineup. It was Hearthstone coowner and general operations manager Maeghan Summers who shared this little bit of trivia with me when I phoned her for a bit of background on the place after a recent meal at the tap room with my wife DJ. Summers co-owns the restaurant along with her husband, executive chef Jared

Summers, and other partners from the Hearthstone Group, which also operates Mission Springs Brewing Company. The Summers own The Noble Pig up in Kamloops, an operation similarly focused on beer and comfort food. The couple now divide their time between the two rooms, though the explosive launch of Hearthstone might require a bit more attention for the North Shore operation in the short term; DJ and I spent 25 minutes on a waitlist for a table on our visit, despite the

See Salted page 30


A30 | TASTE

nsnews.com north shore news WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

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Correction:

Michaels Stores included the Star Shower in our 10/14 & 10/21 advertisements. Unfortunately, the Star Shower will not be in stores until 11/7/16. We apologize for any inconvenience this delay may have caused.

PERFECT PICK Two-year-old MacKenzie McInnes chooses a pumpkin at the annual Loutet Farm Pumpkin Patch event on Saturday. The event featured live entertainment, apple pressing, and more. Pumpkins were on sale for $5-$10, with proceeds going to support Edible Garden Project programs. PHOTO PAUL MCGRATH

Salted popcorn offers bold flavour from page 29

fact that the place has not issued an official press release about its opening. Once seated, we found service swift and informed. We ordered a number of apps to kick things off, including Hearthstone Popcorn, made with hop salt and malt vinegar, Brave Potatoes, fried wedges of spiced potatoes served with a side of aioli, and Crispy Humboldt Squid with Two Rivers chorizo sausage, strips of fresh cucumber, mint yogurt and wedges of lemon. The popcorn was a treat, nicely salted and boldly flavoured with the odd singed bit; it paired very nicely with a pint

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of Wyld Raspberry, a Berliner-style Weissbier with a tart, berry finish. DJ, who has yet to warm to the craft beer flavour profile, tested out a pint of Rizla Rice Lager, a creative brew designed to serve as a bridge between the well-known taste of a massproduced domestic lager and the distinct, no-holds-barred character of craft beer. The Humboldt squid was a similarly beer-friendly dish, generously portioned with strips of breaded, steak-like squid. Humboldt is a real treasure of the Pacific and, despite catching on at a number of progressive venues, is, in my opinion still underutilized; maybe that’s just as well if the cephalopod population is to be sustained. The Brave Potatoes were a great snack to munch alongside a pint of Special Bitter, a hop-forward and refreshing beer. DJ opted for an order of Almond-Breaded Mozzarella, flash-fried spheres of fresh mozza served with tomato chutney. The dish was not the usual riff on fried mozzarella. While the nut coating around the cheese was hot, the interior remained room temperature in order to preserve the texture and flavour of fresh fiore di latte. While completely superfluous to my actual sustenance needs by this stage, I could not, in good conscience, leave Hearthstone without trying a pizza from their signature wood-burning oven, so I ordered the Smoked Beef Cheek iteration, prepared with cream, roast garlic, fiore di latte, grana padano and truffle. The crust on this pizza was at once chewy and crispy, with the deeply satisfying character of freshly baked bread. Overall the pizza was a clever combination of bold flavours, but I have to admit I was bested by the smokiness of the beef cheek. This is an unusual criticism from me, as a huge fan of Islay malts and cold-smoked fish, but it was simply too smoky for my palate in the end; this is not a pizza for the faint of heart. However, based on that incredible crust, I will be sure to head back for another pie, perhaps the Albacore Tuna or the Fennel Salami. When I do, I’ll proceed straight for the pizza, maybe with a pint of IPA, and leave a bit of room for the Goat Cheesecake, which caught my eye on the dessert menu. Our meal was $80 (including two pints each) before gratuity. Hearthstone Tap & Forno. 1015 Marine Dr., North Vancouver. hearthstonebrewery.ca 604-984-1842 Chris Dagenais served as a manager for several restaurants downtown and on the North Shore. He earned his sommelier diploma in 2001. He can be reached via email at hungryontheshore@gmail. com. North Shore News dining reviews are conducted anonymously and all meals are paid for by the newspaper


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

LIVING | A31

north shore news nsnews.com

DEVELOPER’S EARLY PUBLIC INPUT OPPORTUNITY Seylynn North Shore Development LP will be hosting a meeting to present a development proposal for the area south of Fern Street and east of Mountain Highway.

Wednesday October 26th, 2016 6:30PM - 8:30PM Holiday Inn Hotel 700 Old Lillooet Road North Vancouver E KEITH R

D

MOUNTAIN HWY

LI

CLASSIC ROCK CHOIR All are welcome to try out this group any Thursday, 7-9 p.m. at Canyon Heights Church, 4840 Capilano Rd., North Vancouver. harmonyhousemusicstudio. com THE NORTH VANCOUVER COMMUNITY BAND invites new members to join the group which rehearses Thursdays, 7:30-9:15 p.m. at Carson Graham school,

2145 Jones Ave. The group performs about 10 concerts a year. For more information visit: saxalamode@msn.com BOOK READING Claudia Casper, author of The Merc Journals, discusses dystopian fiction, climate change and murder and reads from her new novel Wednesday, Oct. 19, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. at Capilano University, Library Building 322, 2055 Purcell Way, North Vancouver.

BRIDGE TO AFRICA Capilano Grandmothers to Grandmothers are scheduled to hold their annual bridge luncheon to support grandmothers in Africa who are raising children orphaned by AIDS Wednesday, Oct. 19, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. at Eagle Harbour Yacht Club, 5750 Eagle Harbour Rd., West Vancouver. $30 (tickets sold in sets of four). 604-929-7688 or 604980-8418

Honouring Our V E T E R A N S

Because we are proud of the men and women that are serving our country or served in the past, the North Shore News would like to pay tribute to our military personnel. Submit a photo of yourself or a loved one who served our country and include a name and a 25 word or less biography to be published in the North Shore News or in our online photo galleries at nsnews.com/galleries in early November.

Cpl. Glen Windsor

*

ORWELL ST

CHARLOTTE RD

MARIE PL

HUNTER ST

CROWN ST

COMMUNITY BULLETIN BOARD

LILLOOET RD

SITE

TO A TEA North Vancouver fire services are touring schools with No Dragons for Tea,

a play intended to serve as a reminder of the importance of fire safety and smoke alarm maintenance. Smoke alarms should be replaced every 10 years. PHOTO MIKE WAKEFIELD

FERN ST

R LD T O E O O LL

D

The proposed development site, located between Fern Street and Hunter Street is approximately 1.3 hectares (3.2 acres) in size. The project proposes up to 470 residential housing units in four buildings ranging in size from 6 storeys to 19 storeys. Commercial spaces are proposed along Mountain Highway.

RUPERT ST

An information package has been distributed to owners and occupants within approximately 150 meter radius of the site in compliance with District of North Vancouver Policy. If you would like to receive a copy or if you would like more information, contact Pedram Hosseini at (604) 987-5000 or Michael Hartford of the District of North Vancouver Planning Department at (604) 990-2387, or bring your questions and comments to the meeting. *This is not a Public Hearing. DNV Council will receive a report from staff on issues raised at the meeting and will formally consider the proposal at a later date.

DEVELOPER’S INFORMATION SESSION N.J. Keate Home Design Inc. is holding an information session where interested members of the public are invited to learn about our application for a two stories plus cellar, duplex building located at 200 E 18th Street, North Vancouver, B.C.

Meeting Location:

Jeff Keate, (M.Arch)

200 E 18th St, North Vancouver, B.C.

N.J. Keate Home Design Inc.

Date: Tuesday October 25, 2016

Email: jeff@keatedesign.com

Time: 7pm - 9pm

Office: 604 986 7543

Served in the Canadian Army during World War II. Member of the Red Deer Branch of the Legion in Alberta with Member Title of Trooper. Cpl. Windsor passed away on June 11, 1997 at the age of 80.

Please email submissions to display@nsnews.com with the subject line ‘Veteran Photo Submission’ no later than Sunday, October 30, 2016.

Drawing / Rendering

West Elevation

Community Development Contact: Annie Dempster, 604 990 4216, email: adempster@cnv.org This meeting has been required by the City of North Vancouver as part of the rezoning process.


A32 |

nsnews.com north shore news

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

Your North Shore Guide to the games people play SPORTS NEWS? Contact sports editor Andy Prest at 604-998-3538 or email aprest@nsnews.com

Blues ready for final shot

Four fifth-year players chase gold with Capilano ANDY PREST aprest@nsnews.com

When the Capilano University women’s volleyball team takes the court for their home opener Friday night, it’s possible that head coach Cal Wohlford will have something in his starting lineup that no PacWest coach has ever had before.

Four somethings, in fact. With setter Sarah Hughes, middle blocker Kolby Richter, right side Kira Sutcliffe and left side Kelsi Boroevich set to take starring roles, the Blues will have four fifth-year players trying to blast their way to glory in their final seasons. Wohlford has been around the league for a while and said he’s never encountered a team with four fifth-year players. He’s happy to be the first. “When it’s your last year, you want to make it your best year,” he said. “I think we have four girls that have a little bit of that attitude that they want to leave it all on the court. I think that’s driving them, and they’re driving each other. I notice that the four of them are really pushing each other to work hard, and that’s going to make a good atmosphere for the younger players that we have.” With that veteran presence on the floor, expectations are high for this season. The Blues began their campaign Saturday at University of the Fraser Valley – after driving out to Abbotsford Friday night only to have their season opener postponed due to a power outage – and knocked off the Cascades in straight sets. Looking at

the scores, it appeared to be a commanding win, but Wohlford wasn’t about to pat his team on the back too hard. “We played OK,” he said. “I wouldn’t say it was our best match. For a season opener, we worked some things out and got some things going. … We have a lot of age on our team, a lot of maturity on our team, so I think our bar is set pretty high.” Taking a look at the bigger picture, Wohlford said it’s encouraging for the university and the volleyball program that players are willing and able to stick around for five years. “Hopefully it’s a good sign that good athletes want to stay in the program,” he said, adding that the transition from a college to university has made it more feasible for athletes to stay at Capilano for several years, rather than transferring out after one or two seasons. “The biggest thing that keeps your athletes is definitely the programs in your school,” he said. “Their work ethics are very strong in their educations, they make a lot of decisions because of their educations.” The five-timers club also includes Wohlford, who took over the program after former coach Wayne Desjardins retired prior to the 2012 season. Wohlford said he feels fortunate to have shared so much time with the fifth-year players, a luxury few coaches get. “In the PacWest it’s a rare thing,” he said of getting to coach a player for five years. “You enjoy it. You

See Talented page 33

Capilano University’s Kira Sutcliffe blasts a hit during a PacWest match last season. Sutcliffe will be one of four fifth-year players in the lineup for Capilano for their home opener Friday. PHOTO PAUL MCGRATH

Lynn Valley Center #121 – 1199 Lynn Valley Road North Vancouver 604.986.1155 (located inside the mall next to Kin’s Market & the Liquor Store)

Capilano Mall #30 – 935 Marine Drive North Vancouver 604.904.9700 (located next to Wal-Mart near Kin’s Market & the Liquor Store)


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

SPORTS | A33

north shore news nsnews.com

Talented team still faces tough test From page 32 definitely get a good relationship with your players. They understand you and you understand them. It’s going to be a little different (next year) not having those guys around for sure, but right now I’m thinking more about now and I’m enjoying every practice with these guys.” That veteran presence also helps him run smoother practices, said Wohlford. “They know what I want,” he said, adding that they’ve figured out one of the crucial parts of his practices: “they laugh at my bad jokes.” The fifth-year players are also no slouches on the volleyball court. All four are starters, with Sutcliffe earning all-Canadian status last year and Hughes joining Sutcliffe on the PacWest first all-star team. Richter has been a rock as a starting middle blocker

for several seasons while Boroevich returned to the team this year after spending one year playing CIS volleyball at Brock University. And the Blues are not just a four-woman team. Several other veterans are expected to play leading roles, including third-year middle Danae Shephard, fourth-year libero Abigail O’Neil, and secondyear outside hitter Meghan Koven, an Argyle grad who was named to the PacWest allrookie team last season. Middle blocker Keeley Bell, another Argyle grad, outside hitter Zoe Mydansky, and left side Tyneille Neufeld are three more second-year players expected to play large roles. There’s also an incoming crop of seven-talented rookies hungry for playing time. The monster roster makes for some tough decisions on game day, but also keeps thing incredibly competitive at practice, said Wohlford.

“We have a pretty strong nine players, and then rookies that we’ve got coming in are extremely talented, and they’re pushing them too,” he said. “It’s hard to keep the new athletes engaged when they don’t get to actually play in the matches. Some of them have to fight through that. I feel our group is very engaged right now and they understand team unity. … They contribute to that because they work so hard at practice.” Even with all that firepower, success is no sure thing in what is traditionally the toughest league in Canada. The Blues have finished third in each of the past two seasons, upset in the semifinals last year by College of the Rockies. “Bronze is bittersweet,” said Wohlford. “I think we were a little disappointed last year with our semifinal – we didn’t play as well as we know

we could have, and COTR played very well – they played well that whole weekend. Do we feel that there’s some unfinished business? Yes.” This year the road will be as tough as ever. Camosun College is hosting the national championships, meaning that the rest of the PacWest league will be fighting for just one spot at the Canadian championships. Any team that wants to make nationals will have to go through Vancouver Island University, the defending national champs who also happen to be hosting this season’s PacWest provincial championships. “It’s not going to be easy, but I don’t think we want it easy,” said Wohlford, adding that those four fifth-year players know exactly what’s at stake. “They know that it’s now or never.” qqq The Blues will host the Douglas College Royals this weekend with action starting at 6 p.m. Friday and 5 p.m. Saturday. The women play first with the men to follow.

Sarah Hughes returns for her fifth season after earning PacWest all-star honours last year. PHOTO PAUL MCGRATH

Transmission line maintenance work North Vancouver

We are updating

ACCREDITED BUSINESS

www.ShyloNursing.ca www.VancouverSeniorHealth.BlogSpot.com

Riverside Drive

levard Seymour Bou

Forester Street

Upper Levels Highway

Ol dD oll ar ton Ro ad

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Main Street

d r Roa Spice

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I look forward to my Shylo caregiver visits every week. If you enjoy helping others and want a career supporting seniors in our community, apply to Shylo today at HR@ShyloNursing.ca

Phibbs Exchange Bus Loop Bus Loop

r eymou Mt. S ay Parkw

GDS15-038

We’re doing this work TRANSMISSION LINE SUBSTATION to maintain and extend the life of our electrical system and to ensure a safe, reliable supply of electricity for our customers. ve de Dri Riversi

Yeah! Shylo is here

Real Canadian Superstore

d ur Roa Harbo

SNOW BUSINESS Stuart Loop loads up a shot for Mountain United’s U16 boys team at the Sport Chek National Club Championships held earlier this month in Lethbridge, Alta. The North Shore/Burnaby-based squad reached the bronze medal match but didn’t get their final kicks in as a snowstorm cancelled play on championship day. Soccer Canada will decide the fates of the contending teams at a board meeting next month. PHOTO SUPPLIED

Bridge. We expect to complete the work by the end of November.

Lillooet Road

Mountain Highway

equipment and replacing several wood pole structures on a transmission line (see map) near the Second Narrows

Traffic management staff will be in place as needed to safely direct traffic and pedestrians around the work areas. We may need to prune or remove trees and plants around some of the poles to complete the work. If any power outages are required, we’ll let customers know in advance. For more information, please contact BC Hydro Stakeholder Engagement at 604 623 4472 or stakeholderengagement@bchydro.com.

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nsnews.com north shore news

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

Your Community

MARKETPLACE Book your ad ONLINE:

Or call to place your ad at

classifieds.nsnews.com

604-630-3300

Email: classifieds@van.net

Phone Hours: Mon to Fri 8:30 am to 4:30 pm Office Hours: 9 am to 5 pm

COMMUNITY SUPPORT WORKER

SPROTTSHAW.COM

REMEMBRANCES obituaries .

NEMETH, Frank .

12 October, 1933 13 October, 2016

BOKENFOHR, Linda M. December 19, 1964 − September 16, 2016

It is with great sadness that we announce the sudden and unexpected passing of Linda Bokenfohr on September 16, 2016. Linda is survived by her father David Bokenfohr and sister Judy Bokenfohr as well as numerous relatives. Linda is predeceased by her mother Pauline and her brother Dwight. Linda was originally born and raised in Morinville, Alberta and later made Vancouver her home. A Celebration of Linda’s Life officiated by Pastor Dave Sattler will be held at North Shore Alliance Church, 201 East 23rd Street, North Vancouver on Saturday, October 22, 2016 at 1 PM. Burial will be at a later date in Morinville, Alberta where Linda will be laid to rest with family. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to your local Women’s or homeless Shelters.

Frank left us this morning for an early flight. Predeceased by his first wife Ella, his sister Helen and daughter-in-law Lene. He will be lovingly remembered by his sons Mark (Tamara), Collin (Sheila); his wife Vivia; stepsons Lou (Alison) Du Hamel, Guy (Leah) Du Hamel; 10 grandchildren, Kelsey, Brent, Elishia, Kyle, Mitchell, Livia, Alec, Charles, CaSandra and Desmond; one great-granddaughter Lucy, sister Agnes Nemeth and sister-in-law Verna Hayward. Frank started his working years with a tool box at his side. He spent 21 years in the RCAF, flying Search and Rescue. When he retired from the Air Force, he went on to a second career with BC Parks and Housing, and then he spend a few years keeping the firetrucks rolling for the District of North Vancouver. After his final retirement, he continued repairing and rebuilding cars in the back garage until Vascular Dementia started to take charge. For the past 3Ω years, Frank has been a resident of Delta View Life Enrichment Center where he was lovingly cared for by an exceptional staff of trained care givers. A Gathering of his friends and family will be held in the Family Room at Delta View Life Enrichment Center, located at 9321 Burns Road in Delta, BC from 1:00 to 3:00 pm on Saturday, October 22, 2016.

Celebrate the lives of loved ones with your stories, photographs & tributes on: legacy.com/ obituaries/nsnews

ADVERTISING POLICIES

All advertising published in this newspaper is accepted on the premise that the merchandise and services offered are accurately described and willingly sold to buyers at the advertised prices. Advertisers are aware of these conditions. Advertising that does not conform to these standards or that is deceptive or misleading, is never knowingly accepted. If any reader encounters non-compliance with these standards we ask that you inform the Publisher of this newspaper and The Advertising Standards Council of B.C. OMISSION AND ERROR: The publishers do not guarantee the insertion of a particular advertisement on a specified date, or at all, although every effort will be made to meet the wishes of the advertisers. Further, the publishers do not accept liability for any loss of damage caused by an error or inaccuracy in the printing of an advertisement beyond the amount paid for the space actually occupied by the portion of the advertisement in which the error occurred. Any corrections of changes will be made in the next available issue. The North Shore News will be responsible for only one incorrect insertion with liability limited to that portion of the advertisement affected by the error. Request for adjustments or corrections on charges must be made within 30 days of the ad’s expiration. For best results please check your ad for accuracy the first day it appears. Refunds made only after 7 business days notice!

Remembrances would be appreciated for the Heart & Stroke Foundation: www.heartandstroke.ca or the Alzheimer Society of BC: www.alzheimer.ca Delta Funeral Home • (604) 946.6040

RICHMOND, Neil Hugh Passed away on Sunday, October 9, 2016 at Lions Gate Hospital. He is survived by sons Greg (Julie) and Brent (Donna), grandsons Brandon (Brianna), Nathan and Jeffrey, granddaughters Brittany (Saif) and Amber. Neil was 86 years old and born in Abbotsford, BC in 1930. With his parents, Hugh and Nina and sister, Relda, they moved to East Vancouver when Neil was young. He attended Brittania Secondary School prior to working on a commercial dragger (fishboat). His love of cars led him into automotive work where he became a licensed mechanic specializing in automatic transmissions. He doubled as a volunteer fireman serving his community of Lynn Valley, BC. Neil and Corinne raised their family there, where he passed his love of football, rugby, baseball, fishing, hiking and skiing on to his sons. He especially loved the Ex-Brit RFC for whom he had played. He was service manager at Taylormotive for many years, a job which he did with pride. In his retirement years he enjoyed repairing bicycles and friends’ cars. He had many dear friends, too many to mention. Dad, we love you and you will be missed beyond measure. Until we meet again, we know you watch over us. A Celebration of Neil’s Life will be held on Saturday, October 22, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at First Memorial Boal Chapel located at 1505 Lillooet Road, North Vancouver, BC.

Celebrate the lives of loved ones with your stories, photographs and tributes on

legacy.com/obituaries/nsnews

PELLOW, Heather G. March 17, 1961 − September 30, 2016

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of a beloved wife and remarkable mother, Heather, who passed away peacefully with her devoted husband, Scott and loving son Gordon at her side. She will be deeply missed by her sister Laurine, other family members, and the many friends who knew and loved her dearly. Heather was a positive, spirited, fun loving, and strong willed woman who had a great passion and zest for life. She lived life to the fullest no matter what the circumstance. A caring and giving person, Heather loved tradition and entertaining with family and friends. The life of the party, she made all occasions special, elegant, and memorable. Heather enjoyed taking long walks with friends and her faithful dog Jill, summers in Naramata with her RAR gang, traveling to sun filled destinations, attending concerts and yoga, and relaxing on the deck in her backyard. Heather spent many years with ICBC as a Legal Assistant, Bodily Injury Adjuster, and ultimately as a Manager in Injury Services. She was well known and respected in the Legal community where she developed many close friendships. While her time with us was far too short, she left an incredible mark on all she knew. Heather, her husband, and son were gifted with a special love and great bond that was obvious to all who knew them. A service will be held at 2 PM on Friday, October 21st at St. Francis in the Wood, 4773 South Piccadilly Road, West Vancouver. For those who wish, a memorial donation may be made by calling the BC Cancer Foundation at 604−877− 6040 and specifying the donation for Pancreatic Cancer Research.

BUNDERLA, Ernest January 30, 1935 − October 14, 2016

Ernest, never Ernie, entered eternal life on Friday, October 14, 2016 after succumbing to injuries sustained from a tragic accident that occurred only two days before. He died gently and peacefully at Lions Gate Hospital with his family by his side. Ernest was born in Matjasevci, Slovenia and spent much of his childhood outside, exploring, climbing, creating, improvising − activities and qualities that he never abandoned and that never diminished. Ernest was fearless, curious, engaged, creative, energetic, loving, mischievous, and generous. He was nature’s friend and admirer, a builder, baker, helper, traveler, hiker, and chef. He was one−of−a− kind. Ernest is survived by his wife, Stefka, his daughter Veo and her partner Jewel, his son David and his wife Kerri, and by his most cherished grandchildren Anthony, Maxwell, and Jacob − these boys were his legacy, his kingdom, his heart, his breath. Special thanks to the staff at Lions Gate Hospital Emergency and Intensive Care Unit − everyone (truly, everyone) was professional, compassionate and responsive to the needs of both Ernest and the family. Funeral mass Wednesday October 19th at 1:30 PM at Christ the Redeemer Catholic Church in West Vancouver.

As you share the stories and the memories of how they lived their lives and how very much they meant, may you find comfort...

WOTTON, Betty Lorraine (nee Holley) October 22, 1937 - September 15, 2016 With great sadness, we announce the passing of Betty, beloved wife, mother, Nana, Great Grandma, sister and friend. Betty is survived by her loving family; devoted husband of 60 years, Tom; son Bob (Pam); daughters Susan (Bill) and Sandy (Brad); eight grandchildren; six greatgrandchildren; siblings Nancy, Herb, Janice, Marilynne & Ken; as well as many other family and friends. A Celebration of Life will be held on October 22, 2016 at Memorial Community Recreational Centre, in the Capilano Room, 125 East 23rd St., North Vancouver, BC, from 2PM - 5PM. We would like to thank the nurses and doctors in ICU at Lions Gate Hospital for all their comfort and support through this difficult time. To write a condolence to the family, please visit www.mckenziefuneralservices.com

Remembrances continued on next page


A38 |

nsnews.com north shore news

TIMEOUT! WORD SEARCH

AESTHETIC ARCH BISPHOSPHONATE BLEACHING BRIDGE CARIES CAVITY COSMETIC CROWN

DECAY DECIDUOUS DENTIFRICE DENTISTRY DENTURES DISEASE ENAMEL EROSION EXTRACT

Solutions can be found in next Wednesday's issue.

Find the words hidden vertically, horizontally & diagonally throughout the puzzle.

FLOSS FLUORIDE GINGIVAL IMPLANT INFLAMMATION INTRAORAL JAW MALOCCLUSION MOLARS

Sudoku puzzles are formatted as a 9x9 grid, broken down into nine 3x3 boxes. To solve a sudoku, the numbers 1 through 9 must fill each row, column and box. Each number can appear only once in each row, column and box. You can figure out the order in which the numbers will appear by using the numeric clues already provided in the boxes. The more numbers you name, the easier it gets to solve the puzzle! LAST WEDNESDAY'S SUDOKU SOLUTION:

JIM PATTISON VOLVO OF NORTH VANCOUVER

WE HAVE MOVED 1765 Marine Drive, North Vancouver

Jim Pattison Volvo of North Vancouver

CROSSWORD

ORTHODONTIC PERIODONTAL PLAQUE RECEDE ROOT CANAL SALIVA SEALANT TEETH VENEERS

HOW TO PLAY:

SUDOKU

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

This is an exciting time for The Jim Pattison Auto Group and the Volvo brand. As the brand continues to evolve globally – with new models and technologies – it is important that we maintain our core values while also looking to innovate. It is these goals that we hold in high regard in order to keep you happy with the Customer Experience that we provide. With that being said, it is with great pleasure that we announce to you that Jim Pattison Volvo of North Vancouver has just recently relocated to a new location at 1765 Marine Drive, just east of Capilano Road. Our new, state-of-the-art facility has been “Designed Around You”, our Volvo customer, to meet the newest Volvo Retail Experience facility guidelines. We sincerely welcome you to our new facility and look forward to seeing you soon.

1765 Marine Drive, North Vancouver, BC V7P 1V3 www.jpvolvoofnorthvancouver.com 604-986-9889

Dealer #10969

CLUES ACROSS 1. Neighborhood 5. Use snow runners 8. Original garden 12. Storage containers 13. Zilch 14. The ___ Ranger 15. Evens’ opposites 16. Entirely 17. Electrical device 18. Game cube 19. ____ of passage 21. Bundy son 22. Glossy paint 24. Ship’s kitchen 26. Developed

27. 28. 30. 32. 35. 36. 38. 39.

Prized Like Sweetie Disorder Decrease Straight Picnic spoiler Audition tapes 41. Train unit 42. Attempt 44. Disintegrate 45. Law 46. So long, in Liverpool: 2 wds. 47. Chimpanzee 48. Metallic rocks 49. Child’s snow slider 50. Was ahead 51. Bunks

CLUES DOWN 1. Residence 2. Going by bus 3. Make beloved 4. Donkey 5. Slow shell -dweller 6. Highlander’s attire 7. Forbidden 8. Fairy 9. Twin 10. Resulted 11. Down-and-out 19. Telegraphed again 20. Deli meats 23. Buttes’ kin 25. Tempter 27. Contend 29. ____ spring (spa)

30. 31. 33. 34. 35. 36.

Kind of floss Manor Safe Climbed Survives Loved too much

37. Ringlet 40. Sulk 43. Evil 45. Filch Crossword puzzle answers use American spelling

LAST WEDNESDAY'S CROSSWORD SOLUTION:

LAST WEDNESDAY'S WORD SEARCH SOLUTION:


WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

| A39

north shore news nsnews.com

GREEN CAR OF 2016 THE

CARTER GM NORTH SHORE

IS AT

2016 CHEVY VOLT 14

TO CHOOSE

FROM

WITH MORE ON THE WAY

Stk #7V62520

Electric Drive (86 km Range), 1.5 L Range Extender, Navigation, Bose Premium Audio, Rear Vision Camera, Bluetooth MSRP

$40,090

SALE PRICE

$

34,090

OR

LEASE FROM

BI-WEEKLY

604-987-5231

chevrolet • Buick • GMc • cadillac DL# 10743

249

$

Northshore

Northshore Auto Mall, 800 Automall Dr. North Van www.carternorthshore.com

Sale price of $34,090 is MSRP of $40,090, less $5,000 Government rebate and $1,000 Carter discount, Plus taxes and fees.


A40 |

nsnews.com north shore news

WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2016

Fall into savings at The Honda

MODEL

CLEAROUT

Y A D S R 9pm U 9am TH 0 2 R E B O LY N O OCT Y DA ONE

Only at Pacific Honda

ALL 2016 CR-V

SAVE UP TO

The leaves are falling and so are our prices!

ALL 2016 CIVIC

ALL 2016 HR-V

SAVINGS UP TO

1,750

$

SAVINGS UP TO

1,280

$

All remaining 2016’s will be priced to sell with additional incentives from 9am-9pm. Do not miss this one-day-only savings event! RSVP to receive access to early-bird savings and arrange your test drive!

COMPLIMENTARY SNACKS AND REFRESHMENTS VEHICLES WILL RETURN TO REGULAR PRICING 9:00 A.M. FRIDAY. Take the Honda test drive. It costs nothing. It proves everything.

CELEBRATING

816 Automall Drive, North Vancouver 604-984-0331

www.pacifichonda.ca

40 YEARS IN B US IN E SS

North Shore News October 19 2016  
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