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sonoma

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August 2018

Back to School Plan the year

Heal & Rebuild Super’s welcome

Go Green Eco-students Locavore 21 fresh-food ideas


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Camps Held at Sky Tree Ranch in Santa Rosa www.mcdonaldranch.org • 707 583-6711

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TOO HOT TO COOK? Beat the Heat!

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Birthday Parties Baseball Teams Soccer Teams Fundraisers

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Santa Rosa

2280 Santa Rosa Ave 707-544-2828

Rohnert Park

1451 Southwest Blvd 707-795-4433

Rohnert Park

6314 Commerce Blvd 707-303-7474

Petaluma

919 Lakeville St 707-769-8989

Healdsburg 1051 Vine St 707-433-2911

Windsor

6580 Hembree Ln #258 707-836-1700

Santa Rosa

4501 Montgomery Dr. 707-890-5033


August 2018

Every Issue 6

Dear Reader

7

Cooking with Kids Good Eats

8

10

Bits and Pieces Bend and Breathe Love My Squeezebox Sun-Powered Fun Land of the Fairies

Features

The King Lives

10 A New Dawn

Music Is the Teacher

The Superintendent of Schools welcomes students.

12 It’s Easy to Be Green Learn about eco-friendly school supplies.

14 Kick Off Kindergarten How to ease your child’s fears.

9

Nice Tie

24 Calendar of Events Grab a Grav

34 Humor Kid Companion

16 The Joy of Learning Take advantage of extra-curricular programs.

18 2018–19 School Calendars Plan the year.

21 Wired to Write Honing language skills through blogging.

22 Be a Locavore Why farmers’ markets are the place to shop.

32 Lighten the Load Avoid backpack strain. 4 SonomaFamilyLife

22

August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com

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13840 Healdsburg Ave, down by the river!

IT’S TIME TO PLAY BALL!

AT THE YMCA BATTING CAGES AND PRACTICE FIELD The YMCA Baseball/Softball Complex offers two full-size batting cages with pitching machines, designated tee area with nets, and a small practice field. Participants must bring their own gear (helmets provided). $20 for 30 minutes $30 for 1 hour $45 for team 1 hour (team rate), includes mound, cage, tee/nets. $3 for 20 pitches

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September-October M-F 4-7pm Sat-Sun 10am-6pm June - August M-F 12pm-7pm Sat-Sun 10am-6pm

TO RESERVE, CALL (707)544-1829 Sonoma County Family Y  1111 College Avenue  Santa Rosa 707-545-9622  www.scfymca.org The Y is a non-profit community based organization. Financial assistance is available.

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SonomaFamilyLife 5


Dear Reader

A

s summer break draws to a close, it’s time to welcome another school year. Turn to Sharon Gowan Publisher/Editor Sharon@family-life.us “A New Dawn” (page 10) for a special message from the Sonoma County Superintendent of Schools and our 2018–19 School Calendars (page 18) to plan for school vacations and days off. As you ready your family for classes, check out “It’s Easy to Be Green” (page 12) for ways to make shopping for school supplies an environmentally

friendly affair. And, once you’ve got backpacks prepared, read “Lighten the Load” (page 32) to make sure they fit well and aren’t too heavy. Of course, every kid’s favorite thing to take to school is lunch. Turn to “Good Eats” (page 7) for an easy muffin recipe to give the old brownbag some flair.

Office Manager Patricia Ramos patty@family-life.us

Business Marketing Renee Nutcher renee@family-life.us Warren Kaufman warren@family-life.us

May the start of your children’s academic year be filled with promise and positivity.

Features Editor Melissa Chianta melissa@family-life.us

Production Manager Donna Bogener production@family-life.us

Web and Social Media

3 NEW THINGS

AT SANTA ROSA CITY SCHOOLS 1 2

New district website – Coming in August!

New SRCSchools App – Will be available by September in Apple App store and Google Play store! Parents can find emergency alerts, news, grades, lunch menus, sports schedules, school contact info, and more.

Sara Barry Steven D. Herrington Holly Hester Christa Melnyk Hines Christina Katz Karen Nochimowski Kathryn Streeter Fiona Tapp Jan Wasson-Smith

Publishing Office P.O. Box 351 Philo, CA 95466 (707) 586-9562

New digital flyers – No more messy backpacks and missing out! Digital flyers will be posted on our website and sent right to parents’ email inboxes.

6 SonomaFamilyLife

Contributing Writers

Billing

3

School Starts Wednesday August 15

Natalie Bruzon natalie@family-life.us

www.srcs.k12.ca.us August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


Cooking with Kids

Good Eats Make a Yummy School Lunch By Momma Chef

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s the summer nears its end, we parents ponder the tasks the new school year will bring. Packing lunches is usually a dreaded chore, but it doesn’t need to be. Here are some helpful tips for putting together a delicious, to-go meal.

1. Let your kids try out recipes instead of surprising them with a new lunch. As a food blogger, I do this all the time. 2. When I find something they like, I’ll make that dish on a Sunday night, preparing enough for a few lunches. My kids’ lunch favorites are Banana Muffins, Hidden Zucchini Muffins, Bourbon Chicken, and Crispy Corn Flake Chicken. Find the Banana Muffin recipe in the sidebar. See my blog, mommachef.com, for the others. 3. On Sundays, my boys and I will bake a batch of S’mores Brownies (also on mommachef.com). We cut them into squares, wrapping each one separately, so they’re ready to pop into lunch boxes throughout the week. 4. I also like to throw in individually wrapped bags of organic apple slices from Costco or Trader Joe’s. Of www.sonomafamilylife.com

course, a fabulous autumn activity is apple picking. (To taste some local beauties, go to the Gravenstein Apple Fair, August 11–12, 10 a.m.–6 p.m., in Ragle Ranch Park in Sebastopol.) When using fresh apples, make sure to cut them up in the morning, not before, so they don’t turn brown before lunch. If stored properly, newly picked apples will last up to two months in the refrigerator.

5. Freeze a box of yogurt squeezers (my favorite is Stonyfield Kids organic strawberry) and include one in each lunch box. By the time noon rolls around, the yogurt will be defrosted but still cold enough to keep other food items cool. ¶ Karen Nochimowski is a mother of three active boys (ages 12, 8, and 5). Her recipes, available on MommaChef.com, use no more than six ingredients and six minutes of prep time.

Super Easy and Kid-Approved Yummy Banana Muffins My kids love making these muffins with me. I usually add chocolate chips, which turn them into a lunch box–friendly dessert. 1 ½ cups whole-wheat flour 3 overripe bananas ½ cup honey 1 tsp. baking soda 2 large eggs 1/3 cup avocado or melted coconut oil August 2018

Place ingredients in a large mixing bowl and blend with a hand mixer for three minutes. Fill greased or paper-lined muffin cups half full. Bake at 375°F for 17–19 minutes or until a toothpick inserted near the center of a muffin comes out clean. Cool for five minutes. Makes 16 muffins.

SonomaFamilyLife 7


Bits & Pieces

Bend and Breathe

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eed a break from power struggles with the kids? Take the advice of an old gospel tune, and find your peace “down by the riverside.” Go to the People’s Yoga Pop-Up at Riverfront Regional Park in Healdsburg on August 9, 6–7 p.m. Walk a mile to the yoga site and then settle in for an hour of renewal. All levels welcome; there will be a limited number of mats, so bring your own if you have one. The class itself is free but parking is $7. (Free parking is available at Pinnacle Gulch.) Go to the calendar at parks.sonomacounty. ca.gov for more information. ¶

Sun-Powered Fun

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isit any midway and see an array of what amount to enormous mechanical gadgets. Now imagine all of that machinery powered by the sun. It’s the premise of the free Maker Studio: Solar Carnival Rides workshop, where kids will learn how to make miniature sun-powered rides out of cardboard and solar-powered cells. Participants will divide up into teams of two and work on a Ferris wheel, whirligig, super-high swing, or other mini amusement-park ride. The class, suitable for kids in grades 4–6, will be taught in English and Spanish and held on August 3, 3–4:30 p.m., at the Rohnert Park–Cotati Regional Library in Rohnert Park. Registration is required; go to sonomacounty.libcal.com. ¶

Love My Squeezebox

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ccordions are represented in most traditional folk cultures. So it makes sense that the annual Cotati Accordion Festival offers an eclectic mix of sounds. Listen to Balkan, klezmer, gypsy rhumba, zydeco, and even a bit of punk rock— the music of more than 40 bands playing on two stages. The festival, which organizers have dubbed “the Woodstock of accordion music,” will be held August 18 and 19, 9:30 a.m.–8 p.m., at the La Plaza Park in Cotati. Admission is $17–$29; kids 15 and under get in free when accompanied by a paying adult. No dogs are allowed in the park. See cotatifest.com to purchase tickets or for more information. ¶

8 SonomaFamilyLife

Russian River Rose Company Fairy Garden

Land of the Fairies

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here do fairies hang out when they’re not flitting around Peter Pan or exchanging baby teeth for coins? Perhaps at the new Children’s Fairy Garden, at the Russian River Rose Company in Healdsburg. Celebrate the garden’s opening at a special dedication at which kids can make hand-cranked, “fairy-dusted” rose ice cream; craft fairy doors with a 9-year-old expert in the field; and hear local author Angela Sage Larsen read from her Petalwink the Fairy children’s book series. The celebration will be held on August 25 at 11 a.m. and 2 p.m. and on August 26 at 2 p.m. Admission is a $2 donation. See russian-river-rose.com for further details. ¶

August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


The King Lives

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here are some celebrities our collective psyche simply can’t let go of: Jackie O., Marilyn Monroe, and, of course, Elvis. The latter is such an icon that dressing up like him has evolved into a kind of art form. Hence the Sonoma County Fair’s Elvis Impersonation Contest on August 11 at 8 p.m. The fair itself will be held August 2–12, 11 a.m.–9 p.m., and will feature free live music, livestock displays, a Hall of Flowers, and the midway. Events will be held at the Sonoma County Fairgrounds in Santa Rosa. General admission is $7–$15; children ages 6 and younger get in free. Parking is $9–$15. See sonomacountyfair.com for details. ¶

Music Is the Teacher

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usic is a joy for many. When you attend the annual Petaluma Music Festival, which raises money for music education in schools, you help bring its wonder and solace to local kids. This year’s event promises the toe-tapping Americana music of Railroad Earth and the Rainbow Girls, and the hip-shaking grooves of the AfroFunk Experience and Royal Jelly Jive—15 bands in all. The event will be held on August 4, 11:30 a.m.–9:30 p.m., at the Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds in Petaluma. Tickets are $55–$65; children 12 and younger get in free with a paying adult. There will be a limited supply of $20 tickets for students ages 13–17, available only at the gate. Find out more at petalumamusicfestival.org. ¶

Railroad Earth

Nice Tie

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o a sailor or a rock climber, a well-made knot is as valuable as a good breeze or solid handhold. Let Ranger Bill teach your kids how to make one at the Monkeying Around with Knots class on August 10, 3–6 p.m., at Foothill Regional Park in Windsor. The class is $5, parking is $7 (or free for Regional Parks members). Registration is required; go to parks.sonomacounty.ca.gov. ¶

www.sonomafamilylife.com

August 2018

SonomaFamilyLife 9


As we move into 2018–2019, it’s important to remember that we are still in an era of post-fire recovery. Many families will continue to deal with the aftermath of the fires as they rebuild their homes, settle into new neighborhoods, and heal

On behalf of SCOE, I extend my best wishes for a happy and successful school year to all. emotional trauma. Sonoma County Office of Education (SCOE) is committed to providing ongoing support to these families and the schools that serve them.

A New Dawn A Year for Healing and Rebuilding

By Steven D. Herrington, Sonoma County Superintendent of Schools

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he beginning of a new school year is an ideal time to reflect on our hopes, dreams, and goals for the months ahead. Looking back on the year that has just passed provides an opportunity to capitalize on areas of success and address areas needing improvement. In 2017, we saw unprecedented disaster. The wildfires that swept through Sonoma County took a devastating toll on our 40 school districts, 179 public schools, and roughly 70,500 students. In the face of crisis, our educational community showed courage and resilience. 10 SonomaFamilyLife

Most Sonoma County public schools will open their doors between August 14 and 22. To help get families off to a strong start, SCOE has rounded up some helpful resources. Visit scoe.org/ backtoschool to take a look. SCOE’s back-to-school resources this year include updates on fire recovery efforts and ways to address childhood trauma. Our annual Spotlight publication is dedicated to celebrating how local schools supported students and the community during and after the fires. Among these new resources, you will also find familiar items, including a district calendar summary, district lookup tool, and general education facts. We also have a suite of digital publications geared toward students and families. Read about SCOE-sponsored

August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


student events; get the rundown on immunization requirements; and learn tips for preparing children for kindergarten, middle, and high school—and so much more. In case you didn’t know: SCOE provides services and support to students and schools across the county. We offer districts services like fiscal support and professional

Many families will continue to deal with the aftermath of the fires as they rebuild their homes, settle into new neighborhoods, and heal emotional trauma. development while also running our own programs for alternative education and special education students who are not served by school districts. Each school district is self-governing and overseen by a separate board of trustees and district superintendent. If you have questions specific to your school district, please directly contact the specific district. You can find the appropriate contact information in our Directory of Sonoma County schools at scoe.org/ schools. On behalf of SCOE, I extend my best wishes for a happy and successful school year to all. I look forward to making 2018–2019 a year of healing and rebuilding. ¶ Steven D. Herrington is the Sonoma County Superintendent of Schools. www.sonomafamilylife.com

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SonomaFamilyLife 11


It’s Easy to Be Green

Eco-Friendly Back-to-School Choices

By Christina Katz

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he older kids get, the longer their school supplies can endure. An elementary schoolchild may wear out most school supplies each year or exhaust them as part of the classes’ shared supply. But a tween or teen can reuse many school supplies over and over throughout junior high and high school, and this is encouraging news for the planet. If we want kids to grow up green, we need to instill healthy shopping habits from a young age. Shopping smarter for school supplies is not the only way to create a greener back-to-school. There are many ways to reduce, reuse, and recycle. See how many of these strategies you can implement.

Plan ahead on purchases. While it’s tempting to purchase last-minute sale items, look for products that will last. Select a backpack that will be around for two or three years, not merely one. If you pause to think long-term on each purchase, you will make wiser choices in the long run. Share the wealth. Host a back-to-school potluck, school supply, and clothing swap before school starts. Invite friends from the neighborhood with kids a bit younger and older than your children; have each guest bring a few higher-ticket and lower-ticket items 12 SonomaFamilyLife

in good condition to trade. Consider sorting supplies into bags by school grade for swapping. Children often tire of what they already have, whereas someone’s lightly used school supplies will feel new to them.

The best way to get your kids interested in thrift shopping is to do it together when they are young. Hit the resale shop. Shopping green means being strategic. If you go to the retail store first, you will likely fill your cart with brand new, non-sustainable items. But if you start at your local resale shop, you are more likely to find clothes, supplies, and organizational products to sustainably

equip your students for the entire academic year. Resale items also don’t typically come in bulky packaging, but be sure to recycle whatever packaging you acquire this season. Donate your overflow. Even if you shop smart for supplies and swap with friends and neighbors, there is a good chance you will still have some extra school items that are no longer wanted or needed. Don’t throw them away! Donate them to your local resale shop. Your school supply trash can become another family’s green treasure. Find recycled products. Once you’ve done your green diligence, you may still require a few things from the retail store, but never fear. If you track down highly recycled, post-consumer products such as notebook paper, recycled wood pencils, and even

August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


post-its, you can feel good about your purchases. Ask local retail salespeople to direct you to the recycled products areas of their store. Support the class. Remember, whenever students share supplies, waste is reduced. So if you are asked to contribute school supplies to your school classroom, go ahead and participate and even contribute a bit extra, if you can. Some families in your community will likely not be able to afford to pitch in. Check with your child’s new teachers one week after school starts to discover classroom supply gaps you can fill. Model sustainability. The best way to get your kids interested in thrift shopping is to do it together when they are young. If they see you

scoring designer deals and wearing them with satisfaction, kids will learn to thrift shop first and retail shop second. Having an annual or semi-annual family yard sale is another great way to model making room for the new in a sustainable, community-building manner.

Host a back-to-school potluck, school supply, and clothing swap before school starts. Opt for organic cotton. Cotton is environmentally friendly because it is sustainable, renewable, and biodegradable. Just make sure the cotton you purchase is both organic

and pesticide-free. Toxin-free cotton is not harmful to farmers, workers, consumers, and wildlife eco-systems. You can shop online to find new-to-you brands that make sustainable cotton clothing and products. Send lunch from home. Skip pre-packaged foods. Opt for fresh organic fruits and veggies, and nuts and trail mix from the bulk section. Encourage students to drink lots of water throughout the day rather than sugary beverages. Âś Author and journalist Christina Katz likes to think about the long-term, big-picture effects of her actions. A proponent of progress rather than perfection, she takes pride in gradually becoming a more sustainable parent.

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SonomaFamilyLife 13


on the first day may help calm any nervous butterflies. Read together. Reading to your children teaches valuable listening skills and prepares your children for the kindergarten experience. Check out books like The Night Before Kindergarten by Natasha Wing and Kindergarten Rocks by Katie Davis.

Kick Off Kindergarten Get Your Child Excited about School

By Christa Melnyk Hines

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or many parents, kindergarten signals an important step away from the all-consuming baby and toddler years. Suddenly, your “baby” is expected to make more choices on her or his own, stay focused over a longer period of time, learn new skills, and navigate a social circle with less oversight from you. Plan ahead to pave the road to a happier kindergarten transition for all. Visit the school. Before school begins, attend school orientations and meet the teacher to help your children grow familiar with their new learning environment.

Calm kindergarten jitters. Build excitement and optimism about school. Shop together for new backpacks or lunchboxes, school supplies, and new 14 SonomaFamilyLife

clothes. “Even if parents are feeling nervous, they should do their best not to convey that to their child,” says Kathy Weller, a kindergarten teacher. “Be very upbeat about the upcoming new experience.” Recognize friendly faces. Before school starts, arrange play dates with future classmates. A few familiar faces

Tackle a few skills. Knowing their colors, the ABCs, and how to count to ten will give your children a head start. Work on other skills like tying shoes and memorizing their names, telephone number, and birthdays, too. Plan transportation. To avoid snafus, make a transportation plan, and once you tell your children (and their teachers) about it, stick to it. If your children are nervous about riding the bus, listen and reassure them. Drive the route ahead of

Before school starts, arrange play dates with future classmates. time. Also find them a “bus buddy,” whether a responsible older neighbor child or another classmate. On the first day of school, arrive early at the bus stop. Introduce yourself and your children to the driver. Assure your children that you (or whomever you’ve designated) will be waiting for them when the bus returns after school. Get good eats and sweet dreams. Make sure your new kindergarteners get plenty of rest and eat healthy meals so that they can better manage the stress of the transition and stay focused during

August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


school. Wake up a little earlier to avoid a rushed first day. Team up with the teacher. Share insights about your children’s strengths with their teachers to help them understand what motivates and interests your children. “Parents should approach school with the idea that the teacher has their child’s best interest at heart,” says Dr. Holly Schiffrin, an associate professor of psychology. “The parents should convey that they are on the same team as the teacher (even if they have different ideas about how to assist their child).” Reflect on the day. Having a hard time getting your children to discuss their day? “Keeping a daily journal of their day (with

Preschool 2018-19

mom’s help) is a fun way to get your kids to talk about school,” says kindergarten teacher Wendy Hughes. “Ask your child to tell you some funny or interesting things that may have happened that day.”

Find a “bus buddy,” whether a responsible older neighbor child or another classmate. Manage adversity. Every child is bound to have a rough day. Encourage your kids to resolve their own problems and take responsibility for their actions.

acknowledge and empathize, and then shift the focus towards reaching solutions as a family and in unison with your teachers and school,” says parent coach Tom Limbert, author of Dad’s Playbook: Wisdom for Fathers from the Greatest Coaches of All Time. “Focus on giving your child the tools, morals, and lessons she will need when not in your presence.” Mark the occasion. Celebrate your children’s first day of school with a special outing after school, such as a frozen yogurt, dinner out, or a play date. Who knows? You may find that initial celebration turns into an annual first-day-of-school tradition. ¶

“Ask your child for her input and perspective, genuinely listen,

Freelance journalist Christa Melnyk Hines is a family communication expert, wife, and mom.

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SonomaFamilyLife 15


paint, or would they like to join a new sports team? If children pursue an activity that truly inspires them, they are more likely to keep at it. Pick Teachers’ Brains Have chats with your children’s teachers. They may have noticed that your children have special interests or talents and might be able to steer you toward local enriching workshops or classes.

The Joy of Learning Benefits of After-School Activities

By Fiona Tapp

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ur modern lives are busier than ever. In many families, both parents work full time, and weekdays are spent ushering children from home to school and back again. By the time daily activities, chores, and dinner prep are completed there can be little time left over for extracurricular activities.

But the skills learned in sports, music, dance, and art classes may also improve children’s overall performance across curriculum areas. If you would like to sign up your child for a class after school, where should you start? 16 SonomaFamilyLife

Let Inspiration Lead Check out a local community center’s programming guide or website with your children and ask them what peaks their interest. Would they like to learn how to play an instrument, act on stage, sing, or

Build Confidence Extracurricular classes or activities are beneficial for both academically high-achieving children and those that struggle in traditional classroom settings. For high flyers who are bored in school, taking piano lessons or joining a soccer

If children pursue an activity that truly inspires them, they are more likely to keep at it. team can provide challenge and reignite passion in the learning process. Conversely, excelling in non-academic areas can boost the confidence of children who find school difficult. In addition, interacting with new people also gives children the opportunity to practice social skills and expand their circle of friends. Stick With It There can be a period of adjustment when children first start extracurricular programs. Tired after a full day of school, kids may rather crash in front of the TV instead of participating in other

August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


activities. It’s important, though, to encourage them to respect the commitment they have made as well as the instructors’ time and effort and the money you have invested. Explain to children that if they don’t go, they might be missing out on a fun and rewarding experience. But Know When to Quit However, if your children are genuinely unhappy or disinterested, consider allowing them to stop attending their extracurricular programs. Children often say they want to quit and then happily get ready for their activities the next time they roll around, so be sure they mean it before canceling. Then start looking into new programs; there are so many opportunities

available you are sure to find a suitable alternative. Celebrate Success When children have invested energy into learning new skills or honing special talents, it’s really important

Taking piano lessons or joining a soccer team can provide challenge and reignite passion in the learning process. that the whole family celebrates their achievements. Make sure you go to the recital, attend the sports games, bring Grandma along to the opening night of the play, or go out for dinner when an award is won.

Aim for Balance Although after-school programs and classes can teach children a whole host of new skills and allow them to excel in a range of areas, it is important to ensure children also have time to rest and play. It’s all too easy for kids to have so much on their plates that they get burned out. When planning your children’s schedules, leave space for unorganized free time, socializing with their friends or siblings, hanging out with family, and, of course, getting enough sleep. Fiona Tapp is a parenting writer who has been published in Parents, the Washington Post, National Geographic, and more. Find her work at fionatapp.com.

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SonomaFamilyLife 17


2018–19 School Calendars The following are holidays for all schools in Sonoma County: Sept. 3, Nov. 12, Jan. 21, Feb. 18, May 27

First Day

Thanksgiving

Winter Break

Lincoln Day

Spring Break

Last Day Other Days Off

Alexander Valley Union

Aug. 15

Nov. 21–23 Dec. 21–Jan. 4

Feb. 15

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Bellevue Union

Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 4 Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Bennett Valley Union

Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4 Feb. 15

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Oct. 19, Feb. 11

Cinnabar Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4 Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Apr. 22

Cloverdale Unified

Aug. 16

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 7 Feb. 15

Mar. 18–22

June 6

Oct. 5, Feb. 14, Apr. 22–23

Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified* Aug. 14

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 4 Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Sept. 21, Oct. 8

Dunham

Aug. 22

Nov. 21–23 Dec. 24–Jan. 7 Feb. 11

Mar. 25–29

June 6

Nov. 9, Apr. 19

Forestville Union

Aug. 16

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 4 Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

June 5

Nov. 1, Apr. 19–22

Geyserville Unified

Aug. 15

Nov. 21–23 Dec. 24–Jan. 7 Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 30

Oct. 19, Apr. 22

Apr. 19 & 22, May 24

*Charter & year-round schools in these districts may follow a different calendar.

Join Our Community Apple Blossom Elementary School

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August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


First Day

Thanksgiving

Winter Break

Lincoln Day

Spring Break

Last Day Other Days Off

Gravenstein Union

Aug. 15

Nov. 21–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Sept. 10, Oct. 5, Apr. 19 & 22

Guerneville

Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Oct. 8, Apr. 22

Harmony Union*

Aug. 16

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 7

Feb. 15

Mar. 18–22

June 4

Apr. 19 & 22

Healdsburg Unified

Aug. 16

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 7

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

June 6

Oct. 8

Kenwood

Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Feb. 25

Liberty*

Aug. 22

Nov. 21–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4

Feb. 15

Mar. 18–22

June 12

** See below

Mark West Union

Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Oct. 5, Apr. 22

Montgomery

Aug. 22

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

June 6

Jan. 25

Oak Grove Union

Aug. 16

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

June 5

Nov. 1–2, Apr. 19 & 22

Old Adobe Union

Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 8

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Petaluma City Schools*

Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 7

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Oct. 15

Piner-Olivet Union

Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 7

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Oct. 5

Rincon Valley Union

Aug. 13

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 7

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Sept. 21, Nov. 2

*Charter & year-round schools in these districts may follow a different calendar. ** Sept. 17, Oct. 15, Nov. 9, Feb. 18–19, Apr. 19–22, May 24

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2018–19 School Calendars

First Day

Thanksgiving

Winter Break

Lincoln Day

Spring Break

Last Day Other Days Off

Roseland

Aug. 14

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 7

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 30

Oct. 15

Santa Rosa City Elementary* Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 30

Apr. 11

Santa Rosa City High*

Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Apr. 11

Sebastopol Union*

Aug. 16

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 7

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

June 6

Oct. 8, Apr. 22

Sonoma Valley Unified*

Aug. 20

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4

Feb. 15

Mar. 18–22

June 6

Nov. 2, Jan. 30, Apr. 22

Twin Hills Union*

Aug. 16

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 20–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

June 5

Apr. 19 & 22

Two Rock Union

Aug. 15

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Oct. 8

Waugh

Aug. 21

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 24–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

June 7

Oct. 11–12, Apr. 22

West Side Union

Aug. 16

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 20–Jan. 7

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

June 6

Oct. 8, May 24

West Sonoma County High

Aug. 16

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 7

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–25

June 6

Oct. 8, Apr. 22

Wilmar Union

Aug. 20

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

June 6

Nov. 1, Apr. 22

Windsor Unified

Aug. 16

Nov. 19–23

Dec. 21–Jan. 4

Feb. 11

Mar. 18–22

May 31

Wright** Aug. 15 Nov. 19–23 Dec. 20–Jan.Free 8 Feb. 11 Mar. 18–22 June 5 Oct. 8 Consultation! *Charter & year-round schools in these districts may follow a different calendar. **J. X. Wilson School follows a modified balanced school year.

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body of the blog post (flanked by a mini-introduction and conclusion), your children should state their case, using three main points to defend their view.

Wired to Write Teach Kids the Art of Blogging By Kathryn Streeter

M

y 9-year-old son was a great student—he was fluent and eloquent during presentations and when debating an issue. But his ease vanished when he had to write.

As I wracked my brain, trying to think of a fresh, fun writing exercise he could do, my eyes wandered into my husband’s home office, where he sat typing furiously—blogging! My son’s eyes lit up when I suggested on a whim that he should try blogging, too. Blogging conveyed fun while writing a short essay did not. Perhaps your children will feel the same way.

Guidelines for your young bloggers: 1. Choose a topic. It should be something your kids absolutely love. Since I gave my son control over what he blogged about—the NFL, politics, www.sonomafamilylife.com

cars, and sneakers were favorites—he owned his work in a new way. He felt energized and motivated. It was still an assignment, but it felt less like “work” to him. 2. Mentally lay out the argument. Focus on a particular angle. Is it clear, rational? Psst, it’s not enough for your children to write about their love affair with fast cars. They’ll need to dive into why Lamborghinis are superior to Ferraris, for example. You want them to be invested in their opinions. They need to have skin in the game. 3. Defend the argument. In the August 2018

4. Focus on building a cohesive argument. Don’t worry about getting spelling, grammar, and punctuation perfect. I told my son, “I’ll only pay attention to your argument and how effectively you state your case.” With this reassurance, friction between us over writing assignments abruptly came to a halt. He released the fear of messing up, and the weekly blogging assignments became a hit. Over time, he learned how to develop an argument, whether for a paper or a speech (the latter is still his preference). Equally significant, he wrestled through issues he may not have otherwise confronted. In the process, he demonstrated raw leadership material. Unlike me, my son was endowed with decisive intuition. He didn’t waffle as he played judge over disparate controversies. He didn’t see both sides: With certitude, he declared a winner. If you’ve successfully sold this writing hack to your child, you’ll also appreciate its liberating versatility. As a parent, you can judiciously assign blog posts, whether after dinner on a quiet evening, while sitting under a shady tree in the backyard or at the park, or even on family vacations. Want to get started? Check out a list of kid blogger sites at kidslearntoblog. com/45-best-blogging-sites-for-kids. ¶ Kathryn Streeter’s writing can be found in the Washington Post, the Week, Austin-American Statesman, and elsewhere. Find her on Twitter @streeterkathryn.  

SonomaFamilyLife 21


may use up the sugar you have in your house and then transition to local sweetener, such as honey. You can also decide when you will bend the rules. Lilly’s family chose to eat non-local food when they were visiting friends.

Be a Locavore

Feed Your Family Homegrown Produce

By Sara Barry

W

ant food that tastes amazing? You can’t beat local, in-season products. And when you eat locally grown food, you cut down on fossil fuel use and support local agriculture and the economy, too.

Going local doesn’t have to be difficult. Lilly Steirer and her family experimented with a year of local eating, and found that it wasn’t so hard, even with two small children. The biggest concerns about eating locally are usually time, money, and if the kids will eat what they’re served. Lilly found that their food budget stayed about the same but how they spent their money shifted. Less money went to restaurants, and more went to whole food ingredients for at-home meals. She needed to plan and prep 22 SonomaFamilyLife

more, but even with a busy family the time required was doable. Define Local Eating So what does eating locally really mean? One common standard is food grown within a 100-mile radius of your home. Some choose to define locally as anywhere in their state. You get to decide what “local” means to you. You also get to choose if you will have exceptions to your eating practices. You may decide that you’re not ready to give up your morning coffee; you

Identify Food Sources One of the benefits of local eating is knowing where your food comes from. To find food producers, start where you already shop and see what local foods they offer. Explain that you are

Eating one regionally sourced meal a week isn’t that tough. looking to buy more locally; ask if they can recommend anybody who grows or produces specific things you need. Also visiting farm stands/stores or farmers’ markets is a great way to connect with regional food producers. 5 Easy Ways to Eat More Local Food Even once you’ve figured out what eating locally means to you, you don’t have to eat only local foods. Here are five meaningful, but doable changes you can make: Cut out processed food. It usually isn’t local so eliminating it can make a big difference. Choose one type of food to only buy locally. Try adding one local food at a time. For example, start by only eating locally grown greens. You could plant a patch of lettuce or pick up a variety of greens at the weekly farmers’ market. Once you get used to that, then tackle

August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


another vegetable, or eggs or dairy or meat. Make local food the norm. Lilly noticed that, before her experiment, she only went to the farmers’ market for “special” food. Try buying the veggies you eat every day only from

Visiting farm stands or farmers’ markets is a great way to connect with regional food producers. a local farmers’ market. Because California is so fertile and has a long growing season, there are usually a variety of produce to choose from.

21 Ways to Go Local • Plant a garden. • Shop farmers’ markets and farm stands. Find one near you at sonomacounty.ca.gov. Use CalFresh EBT funds to purchase double what you would in a store. See marketmatch.org for more info. • Pick your own fruits and veggies at farms or orchards. • Get your kids involved in choosing local foods.

Trade out one food you eat for something local. Get creative about local grains or starches, oils, or sweeteners.

• Learn what is harvested when.

Plan one local meal each week. Eating one regionally sourced meal a week isn’t that tough. Make a list of items you buy regularly, and ask yourself if you can source it locally or replace it with a different, locally grown food. Then think about meals that are easy to make with local ingredients. For example, you could make an omelet with local eggs and veggies, adding regional cheese or meat if you choose. Switch it up each week by using different fillers and herbs. Other flexible options include soup and salad; both can be made with a variety of ingredients that can shift as the growing season changes. ¶

• Satisfy your sweet tooth with local honey, dates, or fruit.

Sara Barry is a writer, gardener, and cook who plans dinner while walking through her garden or the farmers’ market.

• Shop for local items at your grocery store or co-op, and let them know you want more regional options.

www.sonomafamilylife.com

• Grow herbs on your windowsill. • Go to a harvest festival. • Join a CSA. Find several at farmtrails.org/guide/csas. • Host a weekly dinner when your CSA share comes in. • Try a local food you’ve never had before. • Buy a share of an animal raised in your area. • Preserve food during the peak of the growing season (think canning, freezing, dehydrating, or fermenting). • Keep chickens or bees. • Start or support a garden at your kids’ school. The School Garden Network is trying to get gardens in all Sonoma County schools. See schoolgardens.org. • Hold a harvest feast. • Look for restaurant specials that feature locally grown food or go to a farm-to-table restaurant. Find a list of the latter at sonomcounty.com. • Visit a local winery or brewery. Search sonomacounty.com for a list of both. • Try locally produced pickles, jams, or sauces. • Invite others to a meal made with local ingredients.

August 2018

SonomaFamilyLife 23


August

Calendar of Events

Grab a Grav

C

ider. Pie. Applesauce. There are many ways to enjoy Gravensteins. Let your culinary imagination be inspired at the Gravenstein Apple Fair. Besides gastronomical entertainment, including microbrews and wines, there will be live music, contests, arts and crafts vendors, and, for kids, hands-on craft activities in the Children’s Corner, as well as a hay maze and cow-milking and sheep-sheering demos. Roaming stilt walkers, a giant bubble man, balloon-animal makers, and rope tricksters will also be on the scene. Join the fun on August 11 and 12, 10 a.m.–6 p.m., at Ragle Ranch Park in Sebastopol. Onsite admission is $10–$15; kids 5 and under get in free. Discounted tickets are available at area Copperfield’s, Oliver’s, and Harmony Farm Supply and Nursery in Sebastopol and at gravensteinapplefair.com. Onsite parking is $5 and offsite parking, available via shuttle, is free. ¶

Wednesday 1 FREE Wednesday Night Market.

Live music, vendors & produce. Wednesdays. 5–8:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 22. Courthouse Square. Santa Rosa. wednesdaynightmarket.org.

Thursday 2 A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

Shakespeare under the stars. Bring blankets, chairs & picnic goodies. $10–$25. (Aug. 2 is Value Night: adults

& seniors $15). Thursdays–Saturdays. 7:30 p.m. Thru Aug. 11. Seghesio Family Vineyards. 700 Grove St., Healdsburg. 433-6335. raventheater.org.

Brothers. All ages. No pets or coolers. 7:30–11 p.m. KRUSH Backyard. 3565 Standish Ave., Santa Rosa. krsh.com.

FREE Andy’s Unity Park Community

6 & under: free. Ages 12 & under: free on Thursdays only. Parking: $9–$15. Gates open daily 11 a.m.–11 p.m. Runs thru Aug. 12. (Elvis Impersonation Contest: Aug. 11, 8 p.m.) Visit website for full schedule, advance tickets & discount packages. Sonoma County

Garden Work Day. Help LandPaths

create a community garden; spread compost & plant seeds. 10 a.m.–5 p.m. 3399 Moorland Ave., Santa Rosa. parks.sonomacounty.ca.gov. FREE KRUSH Backyard Movies.

Cadillac Records. Aug. 16: The Blues

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24 SonomaFamilyLife

Sonoma County Fair. $7–$15. Ages

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Fairgrounds. 1350 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa. sonomacountyfair.com. FREE Wonderbread 5. Live music. No personal alcohol. See website for Aug. lineup. Thursdays. 6–8 p.m. Windsor Town Green. Windsor. townofwindsor.com.

Friday 3 FREE Maker Studio: Carnival Rides Workshop. Learn how to make miniature sun-powered rides out of cardboard & solar-powered cells. Grades 4–6. 3–4:30 p.m. Rohnert Park–Cotati Regional Park. 6250 Lynne Conde Way, Rohnert Park. sonomacounty.libcal.com. Shall We Dance: Broadway Under the Stars. Musical production.

$45–$139. Fridays, Saturdays &

Sundays. Thru Aug. 19. Pre-show picnicking: 5 p.m. Show: 7:30 p.m. Jack London State Historic Park. 2400 London Ranch Rd., Glen Ellen. transcendencetheatre.org. FREE Party on the Plaza. Farmers’

market, outdoor concerts, food & craft vendors. 5 p.m. City Center Plaza lawn. Rohnert Park Library North Parking Lot. 500 City Center Dr., Rohnert Park. communityfarmersmarkets.com. Garden Valley Ranch Guided Tour.

Visit rose fields at this working farm. $10. Ages 12 & under: free. Adults must accompany kids. 11 a.m.–noon. Garden Valley Ranch. 498 Pepper Rd., Petaluma. 792-0377. gardenvalley.com. FREE Friday Night Live & Street Fair. Aug.

3: Roy Rogers & the Delta Rhythm Kings. Aug. 10: The

Nightowls. Aug. 17: The Stone Foxes. Aug. 24: Locos por Juana. Aug. 31: Samantha Fish. Fridays. 6 p.m. Downtown Cloverdale (between 1st & 2nd Streets). 894-4410. cloverdaleartsalliance.org. The Big Fit (aka Frobeck). Part of Funky Fridays concert series. $10. Ages 18 & under: free. Fridays. 7 p.m. The Hood Mansion. 389 Casa Manana Rd., Santa Rosa. See lineup at funkyfridays.info.

Saturday 4 Solar Viewings & Star Parties. Solar Viewing: 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Star Party: 8 p.m.–midnight. $3. Under 18: free. Parking: $8. Same times on Aug. 11. Special Perseid Meteor Shower: Aug. 12, 9 p.m. Robert Ferguson

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Observatory. Sugarloaf Ridge State Park. 2605 Adobe Canyon Rd., Kenwood. rfo.org. Science Saturday. Learn

about boats, buildings & bridges. Event: free. Parking: $7. 1–4 p.m. Spring Lake Regional Park. Environmental Discovery Center. 393 Violetti Rd., Santa Rosa. parks.sonomacounty. ca.gov.

Live Music on the Lawn Series.

FREE Concerts at Montgomery

Saturdays & Sundays. Thru Aug. 12. 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Viansa Sonoma. 25200 Arnold Dr., Sonoma. viansa.com.

Village. Rockin’ Concerts at the Village: Saturdays, noon–3 p.m. Terrace Concerts: Sundays, 1–4 p.m. Concerts Under the Stars: Aug. 9 & Aug. 23. 5:30–8 p.m. Visit our website for a schedule of performances. 911 Village Ct., Santa Rosa. mvshops.com.

Pet Caricatures with Joe Wos. Bring

your dog, cat, rabbit, or iguana for a personalized caricature. Donation of $5 or more in front of the museum. 11 a.m.–2 p.m. Charles M. Schulz Museum. 2301 Hardies Ln., Santa Rosa. schulzmuseum.org.

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FREE KidWorks. Explore interactive displays provided by the Children’s Museum of Sonoma County. 9 a.m.– noon. Friedman’s Home Improvement Center. 4055 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa. Giant canopy next to garden center. cmosc.org. Norcal BrewFest. Unlimited

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Hot Rod Show & BBQ Competition.

Fun activities, a parade & music. 11 a.m.–3 p.m. Forestville Youth Park. 7045 Mirabel Rd., Forestville. forestvilleyouthpark.org.

tastes of more than 50 beers & ciders. $47. 1–4 p.m. Sonoma County Fairgrounds. 1350 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa. 545-4200. norcalbrewfest.com. Petaluma Music Festival. More

than a dozen bands. Kids’ area. $65. Ages 12 & under: free with paying adult. Ages 13–17: $20, at the door only. Benefits music education in local schools. 11:30 a.m.–9:30 p.m. Sonoma-Marin Fairgrounds. 175 Fairgrounds Dr., Petaluma. petalumamusicfestival.org. Relay for Life. 24-hour relay race. Aug. 4, 10 a.m.–Aug. 5, 10 a.m. Fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. Cardinal Newman High School. 50 Ursuline Rd., Santa Rosa. 545-6728. relay.acsevents.org.

August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


Let’s Get Spicy to End Alzheimer’s.

Wine & live music by Jessica Malone. Proceeds benefit the Sonoma-Marin Walk to End Alzheimers’s Team Purple People. $25. 6:30–10 p.m. Spicy Vines Winery. 441 Healdsburg Ave., Healdsburg. eventbrite.com. Metini Day. SuNuNu Shinal Pomo dancing, arts & crafts demos, food vendors & more. Park entrance fee: $7–$8. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. Fort Ross State Historic Park. 19005 Hwy. 1, Jenner. fortross.org/events. Nuestros Parques. 2–4-mile walk

with a bilingual naturalist. Walk: free. Parking: $7. Meet at Petaluma Hill entrance. 10 a.m.–1 p.m. Taylor Mountain Regional Park. 3820 Petaluma Hill Rd., Santa Rosa. parks. sonomacounty.ca.gov.

Sunday 5 Movies on the Green. Double feature: The Lion King & Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle. Admission: free. Parking: $5. 3 p.m. Second film: 5 p.m. Sonoma State University. Green Music Center. 1801 E. Cotati Ave., Rohnert Park. 866-955-6040. gmc.sonoma.edu. FREE Anthony Presti & the Tusslers.

5–7 p.m. Juilliard Park. 227 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa. srcity.org/2169/ Live-at-Juilliard. Perfect Pairing: Wisdom & Wine.

An afternoon of Jewish learning & wine led by Reb Irwin Keller & Rabbi George Gittleman. $35. Organized by Congregation Ner Shalom & Jewish Concierge of Sonoma County. 2–4 p.m. St. Francis Winery. 100

Pythian Rd., Santa Rosa. 415-847-2992. jewishfed.org.

Monday 6 FREE Dungeons & Dragons. 14

players (two tables of 7). Grade 7 & up. Sign up to reserve spot. Aug. 6 & 13. 2–5:30 p.m. Sebastopol Library. 7140 Bodega Ave., Sebastopol. 823-7691. sonomalibrary.org.

Tuesday 7 FREE Bodega Marine Laboratory Public Tours. Numerous marine aquarium displays containing local fish & invertebrates & kelp forest. Fridays. 2–4 p.m. 2099 Westshore Rd., Bodgea Bay. 875-2211. bml.ucdavis.edu. FREE Tuesdays in the Plaza Concerts. Aug. 7: Dirty Red Barn

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August 2018

SonomaFamilyLife 27


(Americana). Aug. 14: Celebration of Latino Music & Art. Aug. 21: Royal Jelly Jive (Soul jive/gypsy blues). Aug. 28: Petty Theft (Tom Petty tribute band). Tuesdays. 6–8 p.m. Healdsburg Plaza. Healdsburg Ave. & Matheson St., Healdsburg. ci.healdsburg.ca.us. FREE National Night Out. Meet

local law enforcement, see demos & enjoy family-friendly activities & food. Hosted by the Rohnert Park Department of Public Safety. 5–8 p.m. Rohnert Park City Center Plaza. Rohnert Park. ci.rohnert-par.ca.us.

Wednesday 8 Rainbow Girls. Part of Peacetown Concert Series. Aug. 15: Halden Wofford & the Hi-Beams. Aug. 22: Soul Fuse. Aug. 29: Tom Rigney &

Flambeau. Wednesdays. 5–8 p.m. Thru Aug. 31. Ives Park. 7400 Willow St., Sebastopol. seb.org.

Thursday 9 FREE Despicable Me 3. Part of

Movies in the Park Series. Pre-show activities, kids’ games & food trucks. 6–9 p.m. Lucchesi Park. 320 N. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. visitpetaluma.com.

Bill. $5. Parking: $7. 3–6 p.m. Foothill Regional Park. 351 Arata Ln., Windsor. parks.sonomacounty.ca.gov. The Comedy of Errors. A madcap

ride, known as Shakespeare’s funniest play. $18–$36. Fridays–Sundays. Thru Sept. 2. 7 p.m. 6th Street Playhouse. 52 W. 6th St., Santa Rosa. 523-4185. 6thstreetplayhouse.com.

Saturday 11

People’s Yoga Pop-Up. Class: free.

FREE Zumba for Kids. Wear

Parking: $7. Free parking at Pinnacle Gulch. 6–7 p.m. Riverfront Regional Park. 7821 Eastside Rd., Healdsburg. parks.sonomacounty.ca.gov.

comfy clothes & shoes. Ages 5 & up. Saturdays. 10:30–11:30 a.m. (Class also available at other branches, visit website.) 308-3020. Central Santa Rosa Library. 211 E St., Santa Rosa. sonomalibrary.org.

Friday 10 Monkeying Around with Knots.

Learn how to make knots with Ranger

Train Days. The Redwood Empire Garden Railway Society shows off

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28 SonomaFamilyLife

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their model trains & buildings. Build your own train tracks. Climb aboard the ride-on trains ($2). Event free with admission. $12. Ages 12 months & under: free. August 11: 9 a.m.–4 p.m. Aug. 12: 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Sonoma County. 1835 W. Steele Ln., Santa Rosa. 546-4069. cmosc.org. CardinalFest. Featuring

the band Rock Candy. Hosted by the Cardinal Newman Booster Club. $50. 4:30 p.m. Cardinal Newman High School. 50 Ursuline Rd., Santa Rosa. cardinalfest.org. Gravenstein Apple Fair. Live music,

arts & crafts, contests & activities, local food, wine & cider, heirloom apples & children’s corner. $8–$15. Ages 5 & under: free. Aug. 11 & 12: 10

a.m.–6 p.m. Ragle Ranch Regional Park. 500 Ragle Rd., Sebastopol. gravensteinapplefair.com. Star Gazing & Meteor Shower Social. The largest object known

to repeatedly pass by Earth, the Swift-Tuttle comet, will be visible. Enjoy potluck-style snacks or desserts to share. Registration required. Parking: $7. 7:30–9:30 p.m. Taylor Mountain Regional Park. 2080 Kawana Terrace, Santa Rosa. parks. sonomacounty.ca.gov.

Sunday 12 FREE Shabbat in the Park Series.

Children’s music & stories. Challah, grape juice & water provided. Bring your meal. All welcome. 10 a.m.– noon. Helen Putnam Regional Park.

411 Chileno Valley Rd., Petaluma. Aug. 19, 4:30 p.m.: Franklin Park. 2095 Franklin Ave., Santa Rosa. 415-847-2992. jewishfed.org.

Tuesday 14 FREE Disney’s Coco. Bring a

blanket. Movies starts after dark. 9 p.m. Healdsburg Plaza. Healdsburg Ave. & Matheson St., Healdsburg. avfilmsociety.org.

Thursday 16 Steel Pulse, Tribal Seeds & the Green Concert. All-ages

show. $45–$48. Ages 5 & under: free when accompanied by a paying adult. 5–10 p.m. SOMO Village Event. 1100 Valley House Dr., Rohnert Park. eventbrite.com.

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August 2018

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SonomaFamilyLife 29


Friday 17 I Love the ’90s Tour. Vanilla Ice, Coolio, All 4 One & C&C Music Factory. $25. 9 p.m. Graton Resort & Casino. 288 Golf Course Dr. West, Rohnert Park. 855-588-7100. gratonresortcasino.com.

FREE Movies in the Park. Toy Story. Aug. 24: Despicable Me 3. Aug. 31: Paddington 2. Bring the family, picnic & blanket. Vendors selling food. Movies starts at dusk. Howarth Park. 630 Summerfield Rd., Santa Rosa. parks.sonomacounty.ca.gov.

Saturday 18

Museum Night Out: Live Jazz & Happy Hour. Featuring New York duo

Gelber & Manning. Light appetizers & cash bar. $15. 5–7 p.m. Art Museum of Sonoma County. 425 7th St., Santa Rosa. 579-1500. museumsc.org.

Summer Drive-In Series. The Wizard of Oz. Car: $40. Individuals: $12 (bring chair). Food & wine. No outside alcohol. 6:30 p.m. Cloverdale Citrus Fairgrounds. 1 Citrus Fair Dr., Cloverdale. 866-811-4111. Tickets: web. ovationtix.com/trs/cal/34924.

Dancing Under the Stars. Wine, food & salsa dancing in the outdoor pavilion. Dance instruction included with admission. Reservations required. Ages 21 & up only. $35. Lessons: 6:30–7 p.m. Dancing: 7–10 p.m. Francis Ford Coppola Winery. 300 Via Archimedes, Geyserville. 857-1471. francisfordcoppolawinery.com. Relay for Life. 24-hour relay.

Fundraiser for the American Cancer Society. Casa Grande High School. 333 Casa Grande Rd., Petaluma. 545-6728. relay.acsevents.org. Cotati Accordion Festival. Eclectic

mix of sounds from all over the world. $17–$29. Kids 15 & under: free when accompanied by adult. No dogs. 9:30 a.m.–8 p.m. La Plaza Park. Old Redwood Hwy., Cotati. cotatifest.com.

Monday 20 FREE Lawyers in the Library.

Legal information & referral for 20 minutes. No appointment necessary. Sign-ups begin at 12:30 p.m. No language translation services offered. 1–3 p.m. Windsor Library. 9291 Old Redwood Hwy., Windsor. 838-1020. sonomalibrary.org.

Tuesday 21 CAPFest 2018. Paella dinner,

Amor a la Naturaleza

N

ature speaks in a language everyone understands. Nuestros Parques lectures seek to make its beauty even more accessible, especially to those who speak Spanish. On August 4, 10 a.m.–1 p.m., go on a free 2–4-mile walk with a bilingual naturalist at Taylor Mountain Regional Park in Santa Rosa. Enjoy expansive views of the city as well as meadows, cows, and, if you are lucky, a wild turkey or two. End the morning with a potluck lunch. Meet at the Petaluma Hill entrance. See the calendar at parks.sonomacounty.ca.gov for more information. ¶

dancing, silent auction, raffle, costume contest & kids’ area. Benefits Sloan House & Harold’s Women’s Housing. Adults: $40. Under 21: $20. 5 & under: free. 5:30–8:30 p.m. Lagunitas Brewing Co. 1280 N. McDowell Blvd., Petaluma. capsonoma.org.

Saturday 25 ATA Martial Arts Tournament.

Admission TBD. Parking: $9. 30 SonomaFamilyLife

August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


8 a.m.–6 p.m. Sonoma County Fairgrounds. 1350 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa. segalsata.com. FREE Pacific Islander Festival.

Authentic Polynesian cuisine, music & hula. 11 a.m.–6 p.m. City Center Plaza lawn. 475 City Center Dr., Rohnert Park. facebook.com/ rpwarriorspifestival. The Red & White Ball. West Coast Clam Bake, Sonoma & Napa wines, Valley Vibes Orchestra & Dave Martin’s House Party Band. $200. Dance only: $40. Benefits Sonoma students. 5–10 p.m. Sonoma Plaza. 453 1st St. E., Sonoma. svgreatschools.org/ red-white-ball.html. Fairy Garden Dedication. Create

fairy doors; visit fairy village with special fairy roses & houses. Book-signing & reading with author of the Petalwink the Fairy series. $2 donation. Aug. 25: 11 a.m. & 2 p.m. Aug. 26: 2 p.m. Russian River Rose Company. 1685 Magnolia Dr., Healdsburg. 433-7455. russian-river-rose.com. 25th Annual Bodega Seafood Art & Wine Festival. Seafood, live music,

magic shows. $10–$20. Ages 12 & under: free. Tasting package: $20. Tasting & festival: $30. No dogs. Aug. 25: 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Aug. 26: 10 a.m.–5 p.m. Watts Ranch. 16855 Bodega Hwy., Bodega. bodegaseafoodfestival.com.

Sunday 26 FREE Russian River Car Show.

Pancake breakfast, raffle, prizes, poker walk & best-in-show awards. 1973 & older American cars & trucks. 8 a.m.–3 p.m. Monte Rio Community Center. 20488 Hwy. 116, Monte Rio. monterio.org. www.sonomafamilylife.com

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SonomaFamilyLife 31


Parties

Lighten the Load How to Manage

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s schools go into session, students will be filling up backpacks with books, notebooks, and supplies. Think such a packed bag slung haphazardly across a child’s shoulder is harmless? Think again. Heavy loads can cause injuries and low-back pain that often last through adulthood.

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• Make sure the height of the backpack extends from approximately two inches below the shoulder blades to waist level, or slightly above the waist. • The child should always wear well-padded shoulder straps on both shoulders so the weight is evenly balanced.

• Distribute weight evenly. Load heaviest items closest to the child’s back and balance A backpack that is worn incorrectly or materials so the child can easily stand up that is too heavy can become a risk factor straight. for “discomfort, fatigue, muscle soreness, • Wear the hip belt, if the backpack has one, and musculoskeletal pain, especially in to improve balance and take some strain off the lower back,” says Karen Jacobs, a sensitive neck and shoulder muscles. clinical professor of occupational therapy • Check that the child’s backpack weighs and an expert on school ergonomics no more than 10 percent of his or her body and healthy growth and development of weight. If it weighs more, determine what school-age children. supplies can stay at home or at school each The American Occupational Therapy day to lessen the load. Association offers the following tips for keeping kids safe while toting books to and from school:

• If the backpack is still too heavy for the child, consider a book bag on wheels. ¶

• Always select a backpack that is the correct size for your child.

To find out more about the American Occupational Therapy Association, go to aota.org.

32 SonomaFamilyLife

Cheri Winter 707-387-4138 www.cheriscreativecelebrations.com

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August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


Classified Marketplace Services

Childcare/Preschools

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• Make your bunny into a house rabbit • Learn about rabbit care • Shop our Bunny Boutique • Free Nail Trim (bring rabbit in carrier) www.rpanimalshelter.org Rohnert Park Animal Services 707-584-1582

Check out our online directories at SonomaFamilyLife.com Schools

Homeschool Program Grades K-5

www.sunridgeschool.org 707-824-2276 August 2018

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The Bridge School. Located in Central Santa Rosa, 1625 Franklin Ave. Year-round full/half–day. Rich nurturing environment. Center based program for ages 3–5 with separate 2’s program. Caring, qualified teachers. Julie & Andrew Day; owners. Lic.#493005697. 575-7959.

Playtime Daycare/Preschool Join our loving family. Spacious playroom, large yard, meals provided. CPR & first aid certified. M-F. Infants & up. Call Wendy 539-7524. Lic. #04746.

SonomaFamilyLife 33


Humor Break

Kid Companion A Mother-Son Road Trip By Holly Hester

M

y son Buck and I took our first-ever solo trip together. I wrote an episode of a television show, and I thought it was a great opportunity to take Buck to the show’s taping. I wanted to try to convince him that I have more skills than just getting ketchup stains off of his t-shirts, but I’m not sure I succeeded. The thing that seemed most impressive to Buck was the amount of candy there was backstage (which was impressive, I must say).

The whole trip was a blast. I have been in multiple-children-babyland so many years that traveling with just one child who happens to be ten years old was like traveling with an adult. We drove for hours without even having to stop for a playground or Chuck E. Cheese. We even listened to books on CD on the way. And they were good books, too! We’re not talking the usual Bedtime for Frances story CDs that we normally listen to on an endless loop. And best of all, the day after the taping, Buck and I went to Universal Studios, and we were both tall enough to ride all of the rides. I 34 SonomaFamilyLife

Scooby-Doo hangs out with the author and her son.

knew motherhood deprived me of my sleep and my sanity, but I didn’t realize how much motherhood had deprived me of my love of roller coasters. In my ongoing effort to explore my mama-fashionista side, I used

Separating one kid from the herd is just fascinating. Buck and I had conversations we never would have been able to have with his brother and sister around. this trip to experiment with my own style. I thought that for my day at Universal I needed to be comfortable, but stylish, so I went with a vintage plaid shirt, skinny jeans, and cool sneakers. In my head I was imagining that I looked kind of like a cool, skater mom, but then when we had a picture taken of us (see above), I realized that I just looked like a mom in a plaid shirt and jeans. Oh well. I really hope we get to do more trips. I’d especially love to do solo

trips with each of our other kids. Separating one kid from the herd is just fascinating. Buck and I had conversations we never would have been able to have with his brother and sister around. I really got to see him as a person on his own, and I must say, he’s really great. This is true even though he drags his long hair through salad bars without even noticing that he’s doing it, seems not to know how to walk on sidewalks at all, and thinks spitting in public is not only perfectly acceptable, but funny!

I knew motherhood deprived me of my sleep and my sanity, but I didn’t realize how much motherhood had deprived me of my love of roller coasters. But still, he’s totally great. I’m proud of him, and because I’m his mother, I’m proud of myself, too. ¶ Holly Hester lives in Sebastopol and writes about life on her blog, Riot Ranch. Find her book, Escape from Ugly Mom Island!, on Amazon.

August 2018 www.sonomafamilylife.com


HUNTER HAYES

AN EVENING WITH LYLE LOVETT & HIS LARGE BAND

FRI, AUG 10 AT 7:30 P.M. GATES OPEN AT 5 P.M.

SAT, SEPT 8 AT 7:30 P.M. GATES OPEN AT 5:30 P.M.

AN EVENING WITH CHRIS BOTTI

Tower of Power 50th Anniversary Tour with Special Guest Average White Band

SUN, AUG 12 AT 7 P.M. GATES OPEN AT 5 P.M.

SAT, SEP 22 AT 7:30 P.M. GATES OPEN AT 5:30 P.M.

BOYZ II MEN THU, AUG 16 AT 7:30 P.M. GATES OPEN AT 5:30 P.M.

THE LION KING & JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE SUN, AUG 5 AT 3 P.M. & 5 P.M.

PUNCH BROTHERS OPENING ACT: MADISON CUNNINGHAM

THU, AUG 23 AT 7:30 P.M.

BLACK PANTHER FRI, SEPT 7 AT 7 P.M.

GATES OPEN AT 5:30 P.M.

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Sonoma Family Life August 2018  
Sonoma Family Life August 2018  
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