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Ike’s Story

Any reproduction of this publication without permission is prohibited. Opinions and comments within this publication are those of the writers and not necessarily that of the Norfolk Hub.

Ike’s RCAF Initial Training School

Photos by KalCommodore.com

By Dave Scott

We printed the story of Ike Hewitt, a gentleman who was a POW during WW II, in our 2009 Remembrance Day issue. That story, when it appeared in the Hub took on a life of its own. To date, that story means more to me than anything I have ever written. Folks over the years have asked if they could get a

In our lives we have a lot to be thankful for… our freedom to make choices, to speak our mind, to vote. Sometimes we forget how lucky we are to live in a country that values democracy. A few years back, I had the opportunity to visit a local fella who is a war vet from World War II. The interview was something I will never forget. I have always enjoyed discovering our history and have read many great books on the subject, but nothing prepared me for the story that Ike Hewitt shared with me about his time in the service. Sitting with Ike, I learned more about our soldiers than any book could ever tell me, more than any teacher could ever teach, and more than any movie could ever show me. For this Ike, I say, “Thank you.” This is Ike’s story. It all starts back in 1940. Ike was 22, working at the Woolen Mill in Simcoe and living on the Cockshutt outside of Dover. The war came along and Ike joined the Air Force. He felt it was his duty. He was shipped out to Calgary for training. Conditions were tough and the men had small quarters to rest in, but the Airmen made the best of it. Before long, Ike was shipped back to Ontario to finish his training at a facility just south of St. Thomas. After the training was completed, the call came and they were shipped out on (of all things) two

copy, but there were none to be found… that is until now. We have decided to reprint Ike’s story this year for Remembrance Day. This is the original story that Ike told to me. Enjoy… and this Remembrance Day please say thank you to our vets… they gave and give so much for our freedom!

ocean liners. The battleship HMS Rodney escorted them. It was the job of HMS Rodney to protect the liners from German U-boats that would quietly slide along beneath the waters of the Atlantic. The Atlantic proved to be a formidable foe. The crossing took seven days. The troops arrived on the shores of Scotland and quickly boarded a train and began the journey to London. The men arrived to the constant sounds of the night bombings, which were taking its toll on the once beautiful city. Ike and the boys grew accustomed to the nightly bombing. The Air Force men continued with their operational training. The crews were picked to fly the mighty, seven man, Manchester Bomber. Ike was appointed to be a wireless operator. The team set about to practice squadron flying over the North Sea. Everyday the men would sit and eat their breakfast. Ike tells me, that it was served by some very beautiful women… and as much as the men asked the ladies out, none of these girls would ever take them up on the offer. The ladies realized that only one in seven of the men would survive and there was no sense starting a relationship. The morning of December 18, 1941, Ike went to grab his parachute, to ready for the day’s mission. He looked in his locker

and his harness was missing from his parachute. Ike scrambled to get another, asking for the smallest one they had. It was big on Ike, but little did he know at the time just how important that harness would be later that day. The men were sent out to do a daylight harbour bombing, because the German battleships were in the French Port of Brest, and the British Navy did not have enough to handle the German battleships, so fortysix aircraft were sent out (three squadrons). That day the flak was very heavy. Ike’s Bomber was the last to go in and drop its load. The Germans were ready for them. An explosion occurred up above the Manchester, destroying the hatch at the top of the aircraft. Ike wondered what the hell was going on. The Manchester dropped its bombs, hitting one of the German battleships. The aircraft was under heavy fire. Being hit three times, the plane was unable to turn and head for home. The pilots had no control of the plane and were headed into the eye of the enemy. Two German planes appeared from behind and opened fire upon the helpless Manchester. The pilot, mid-upper gunner, and a crew member were killed and the tail gunner was fatally wounded. It was just the co-pilot, engineer and Ike left. With the plane on fire, the order came to abandon the aircraft. Ike was up in the front turret and turned to the escape hatch, which

was on the floor of the plane just a little behind him. The co-pilot and engineer had already jumped and their parachutes were open as they floated down. The 19-year-old tail gunner was a good friend of Ike’s from London. Ike tried to get to him & wanted to comfort and stay with him as he was dying, but the smoke and fire were so bad, he could not reach him. Ike opened the escape hatch and sat on the edge. His socks & shoes were blown off & he struggled to tighten the large harness. Then he jumped - with the big harness and parachute on - and hurled towards the sea. His chute opened and his body jolted. He watched as his fiery plane continued on, smoke billowing. As Ike continued his descent towards the sea, a German plane spotted him. The aircraft was bearing down on him. Ike thought he was done, closed his eyes and prepared for what he thought would be his last few seconds on this earth. All at once a “heck of a draft” hits his chute, blowing him sideways and the plane misses. With the water fast approaching, Ike turned the button on the harness, released the chute and dropped quickly to the sea. Feet first plummeting deep into the water, Ike reached across his chest and inflated his life jacket. He slowly reached the surface of the water. Six hours… six long hours

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NORFOLK HUB, November 5, 2013 page 3

Ike’s Story Continued... in the sea, fighting large waves trying to stay awake with a small shrapnel wound to his ankle. It was cold and night was setting in. Near exhaustion… Ike simply blacked out not awakening until the next day. Ike was told that he was picked up after 6 pm that evening, by a French fishing boat being run by Germans. The next day when Ike awoke, he found himself laying on a bench with a blanket on him and surrounded by heated rocks. The French engineers on the vessel heated the rocks (used on the boat for ballast) by the diesel engines and placed them around Ike to give his cold, sopping wet body a little heat. The boat docked in the Bay of Biscay on the West Coast of France. With nothing on his feet, in an inch of snow, Ike was taken to the German base where he met one of the guys who had shot his plane down just the day before. He was put into a room, where he slept and was given a bowl of soup. The next day Ike and some other prisoners were handed over to the Gestapo and were placed on a train for Frankfurt Germany. Once there, they were questioned by the Gestapo for three days. Facing question after question, the airmen all lied to keep their captors from knowing any of the truths about the allied forces. The Gestapo tried tactics of making the room extremely hot and then extremely cold. The prisoners did not buckle and finally, they were placed on a train with no heat. The train headed north and the prisoners drifted off to sleep. In the morning when they awoke, the train was stopped. It was freezing, with no heat. Slowly, they scratched away the frost on the window and could make out that they were on a hill overlooking a valley. They peered out through the glass. Ike believed he could see people crawling on the ground in the snow… a German soldier on the train appeared and ordered the men to back away from the window. What our guys were seeing was the concentration camp, Dachau. They saw people of Jewish descent crawling on the ground… and well much worse. It was a memory that remains etched in Ike’s mind to this day. The train continued on to Moosburg, located 40 miles from the Swiss Alps. Close to 10,000 men were interned here. Ike said it was horrible; no heat in the barracks, but a lot of fleas. This was where Ike would spend the next year of his life. It has been said that this camp had men from over twenty-seven different countries in it. “Hell of a place!” Bunks were old bags with wood shavings in them. They had only cabbage soup with no meat, three or four potatoes, a mint tea and a 1/5 of a loaf of black bread,

which contained “tree flour” (wood sawdust) as one of the ingredients. That was it, all they had to eat. This was the beginning of three and half years of Ike’s life he can never get back. That summer typhus ran rampant and Ike remembers the Red Cross coming and inoculating the British soldiers in their upper bellies. One man refused on religious grounds and a few weeks later he passed away. As quick as they had arrived a year earlier, all the air force men at the camp were moved. Ike figures about one hundred of them marched down to Moosburg where they were loaded into boxcars on a train. The boxcar itself was as barren as the land that has been ravaged by war, with not even so much as a bucket to relieve oneself. There were fifty men in each, and the doors were locked. There was just a ray of light trickling in from a small hole covered by wire in the top corner of the car. The Airmen knew not where they were going. The trip ended and the men found out they were in Bavaria. They were ordered from the train and marched to a camp where they were told to strip and tie their clothes in a bundle. It was late October and cold. As Ike remembers, the men were placed in a room, which appeared to be a shower. The group slowly looked up at the ceiling, eyeing the tiny holes… no one said a word, but everyone knew what the other was thinking. Was this it? Was this the way his life would end? Would a lethal gas slip from the tiny holes? Ike said a huge sigh went up when water poured down upon the men. Again Ike had escaped with his life. At the camp, the men stayed in huts, twelve in each and life went on. They all got along pretty well, and for the next few years, this was where Ike stayed. At that time he received a book, it was a diary and Ike started to record his days at the camp. Ike passed the days by swapping smokes with men to have them contribute to his diary. Some were artists who drew pictures, others perhaps wrote about the day’s events, a few fellows painted pictures, and there were even some camera photos that were placed in there as well. The log became his salvation. Ike even had a fellow prisoner forge a stamp and place it on one of the first pages to protect it from being taken by the Germans. The stamp itself was carved from a rubber sole of a shoe, by a fellow prisoner and it looked remarkably professional - enough to fool any German solider who spotted it. The stamp in German, simply said that the book was OK. The log would continue with Ike wherever he went for the rest of the war; tucked under his shirt and only taken out when he was sure he was in safe

Ike Hewitt company. Mail from home was few and far between. Ike found it hard to receive mail. It made him think about home and well, he just didn’t want to think about what he couldn’t have. The men looked forward to the Red Cross packages and the little food that came in them. Without it, they felt they would have starved. They basically were fed watered down cabbage soup as their main meal. The troops had to keep their minds busy. Some of the boys from London had been actors before entering the service and put together the occasional play. Plus there was a band that had been captured in Dunkirk and the Germans had allowed them to keep their instruments. Also there was a New Zealand Professor who took to teaching math to the men. With what little equipment they had, they would attempt to indulge in any sports activity they could, but that was never easy with a camp of 7500 men. On another occasion some of the men stole an empty wooden beer barrel from the Germans. They proceeded to make their own distillery using the raisins and prunes from their Red Cross packages to make their own form of alcohol. “The only problem was during the warm weather when the flies were crazy,” Ike says with a laugh and then he talks about the

time they got caught by a German guard. So they offered him a drink and, “It damn near floored him…” Things were very tough and nothing was wasted. The guys would make their own cups and plates out of tin cans that were sent in the Red Cross packages. Things took another turn in July 1944. The top officer of the Prisoners of War (POW) asked Ike to round up the Canadian soldiers, telling Ike the commandant wanted to see them. Ike gathered the other six guys and off they went. The commandant told Ike and the men that because of how humane the Canadians were treating the German prisoners of war back in Canada - Berlin was offering the Canadian soldiers a chance to stay on German farms for the rest of the war. They would reside there and they didn’t have to work, just stay there. The commandant left it up to the men to decide and said he would return in fifteen minutes and wanted their answer. Ike knew something wasn’t right… a few days earlier word had been around camp that Hitler wanted to shoot all the air force men because of all the heavy of bombing that was going on… Ike knew if they went to a farm, there was a good chance they would be killed. Ike told the commandant, no thank you. The

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NORFOLK HUB, November 5, 2013 page 4

Winter Scene 383 Hohenfels 1943

Ike’s Story Continued... commandant was not happy with this answer and two days later all of the air force men were put into a boxcar and moved again. It was hot being locked in a boxcar in the middle of summer. The temperature was crazy and no food for three days. Finally they stopped to feed them… of course Soup! The men lined up to receive their soup and thanked the ladies serving it. As they returned to the train another train pulled in across from Ike’s. There Ike spotted a young wounded German soldier. The German soldier asked if they were POWs. The boys responded, “yes” and the German soldier said, “Don’t worry you will be going home soon.” The POWs wandered carefully over and started to talk to him. He told them the war was just about over and he felt they would be returning to their families soon. As the conversation wound down, the doors of the boxcar started to close. Before getting on, one of the POWs lit a cigarette and gave it to the young German soldier. The soldier thanked them. Ike stopped his story and turned to me, “You hate, like hell, war… He was just doing his job. Like we were doing ours.” The doors closed and the train chugged on towards Poland. Finally reaching their destination the train stopped and the men were forced to march an additional five miles to another camp. This one was just being built. Ike remembers seeing soldiers who had just recently been captured… uniforms decently clean and the men looking fit. One of the newly captured soldiers told Ike that when they saw him and the men coming, they wondered if they were left over soldiers from the First World War… Ike laughed, “Same clothes on from when we were shot down.” He said, “The ass of my pants were so thin you could read the paper through them!” This camp was another hellhole. The huts were less than six feet, just a hole for an entrance, no door, no windows, wood floor and seven

men crowded in them to sleep. The group took turns sleeping with their feet sticking outside; it was that small. There was no place for them to go. Finally, the barracks were built in late October. By December the Red Cross packages had stopped coming, and the men were surviving on next to no food. The calendar turned to a new year and on January 15, 1945, it was as cold as hell. Snowing a bit out of the northeast with a fairly strong wind, the German soldiers gathered the men and informed them they were marching them out… the sky began to roar and two Russian fighter planes buzzed the camp… they were so close you could see the faces of the pilots. The POWs scattered, not knowing what was happening. The Russian planes bombed the German headquarters, which was down the road from the camp. A bomb exploded less then three hundred yards from their barracks, blowing out the windows. Ike and his mates jumped for cover under the bunks as the rain of bombs continued. The next morning the Germans started the POWs on a three-week forced march, with no food, in the middle of January, and with nothing more then the clothes on their backs. They walked at night to avoid Russian aircraft, 1500 men with no water; afraid to drink from the local wells in fear they had been poisoned by the Russians. These brave men, reduced to literally, licking the dew off the morning ground in order to get some form - any form - of water into their system. They grabbed and ate a plant known as sugar beets as they continued the march that was slowly sucking the life from their bodies. Sleeping on the ground and hoping to God you awoke. With so little food and basically eating anything they could find, about 800 of the men came down with dysentery. Ike remembers walking for days in his own faeces. The guards would not let them stop. The smell was overwhelming but giving up was not an option - death was not an option. They pushed on.

Finally they arrived at a train station where they spent a few days in a boxcar, no food, no water. Sixty men in each car, not even enough room to sit. Everyone was ill. Their shoes and socks were filled with their own faeces. At long last they were taken out of the train. These brave men staggered another mile

Photos by KalCommodore.com

to the next camp, located roughly 40 miles outside of Berlin. Tired and barely alive they were first turned away. Many might have perished right there, if not for a British doctor who convinced the commanding German officer to take the men in. Finally the frail

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NORFOLK HUB, November 5, 2013 page 5

Ike’s Story Continued... men were let in and provided with a cold shower. Their clothes somewhat cleaned, the men were told to lay on a cold floor and that is where they stayed. The camp ran out of food. The situation was worsening daily. Until one night, the German soldiers deserted the camp. The date was April 23rd, 1945. Shortly after, an American appeared in an armoured vehicle and told the men that trucks would be arriving soon to take them away. Unfortunately the next day, in came the Russians. The POWs were put back into prisoner mode and made to stay at the camp. Well, Ike had had enough. After three and a half years of captivity he decided to plot his escape. A young Nova Scotia fellow named Mac, asked if he could go along and Ike agreed. That night, the two crawled out on their backs through a hole in the fence and headed into a field where only a few days earlier the Gestapo had roamed. The two knew they were about 40 miles from safety. They set out travelling at night to avoid any soldiers. Finally on the third day they heard something coming. They jumped and hid in the bushes… it was a jeep. Slowly it drew closer. Ike could make out the marking. It was… YES! an American jeep with the star proudly displayed on the hood. The men scurried from the bushes to stop the jeep. They started to yell to get the jeep to stop. The driver stopped and pulled out his machine gun asking who they are. Ike and Mac replied that they were Canadian POWs. The American asked Mac, “Where you from?” Mac responded, “Nova Scotia,” “I don’t know where that is”, replied the American. He asked the same question to Ike. Ike proudly stated, “From Simcoe Ontario.” The solider half smiled at Ike and asked what the highway was that went through Simcoe. Ike looked back and said, “There is only one, Highway 3.” The American started to laugh and said that he was from Buffalo and he had been through SIMCOE many times on his way to his uncle’s in Detroit. Ike and Mac hopped in the jeep and were taken to an American outpost where Ike eyed up a fellow enjoying the biggest, juiciest, roast beef sandwich he had ever seen. It had been three and half years since Ike had meat. He could not take his eyes off of the sandwich. The solider asked Ike, “Would you like one?”

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Ike took a bite and immediately got sick… his body rejecting the meat and white bread instantly. The new American friend then took our two fellows to a local bridge. He pointed out that they could catch a ride with one of the trucks and get a lift to the base. Just as this was happening, Mac spotted a couple of his buddies who were coming down the road. Mac said his goodbye and headed out with the men in the opposite direction of Ike. For the first time in three and a half years,

there stood Ike alone… all at once it hit Ike… he had survived… over the years as a prisoner, he simply lived one day at a time choosing not to think about home, living on next to no food, sleeping on floors, no washroom facilities ever, watching men die, living with disease and illness, wondering if today would be his last. He was alive. His strength drained from this body. He simple sat down. It was over and he began to cry… he was FREE!

More photos on pages 7 and 12


NORFOLK HUB, November 5, 2013 page 6

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NORFOLK HUB, November 5, 2013 page 8

GardeninG Tips

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LookinG afTer Your perenniaL pLanTs

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oving or dividing perennials in the autumn is a great way to reduce your work next spring. The cool, moist weather that we are now enjoying is an ideal time for the perennial roots to become well established. Gardeners often ask when the best season is to move a specific perennial. Here is the basic rule of thumb: • If the plant blooms between early spring and late June, then early fall division or moving is ideal. • If the plant blooms after late June, then early spring division is ideal. Exceptions to the rule are: • Peonies - move or divide in fall only. • Oriental Poppies - move or divide in August. • Bearded Iris - move or divide in July through September. • True Lilies - move or divide in mid to late fall. Of course, you can always break the rules to see what happens. Just remember that if you move or divide a big, bushy perennial, always cut back the foliage by at least half to prevent serious wilting. This helps to keep the leaf mass in proportion to the reduced number of roots! Here are a few other tips and ideas: Fall-blooming ornamental grasses usually remain gorgeous well into the winter. It seems a real shame to cut them back to the ground before late winter or early spring. Some gardeners are now waiting even beyond that, and enjoying the effect of wheat-colored grass clumps contrasting with springflowering bulbs! The seed-heads of certain perennials provide food for finches and other birds, and they look great against a blanket of snow. Most late-flowering daisy-type perennials like Rudbeckia and Purple Coneflower for example. Also now is the time to dig up and store those tender Summer-bloomers: Dahlia, Canna, Calla Lily and Gladiolus bulbs. There are no absolute rules for over-wintering the tender plants but in general: 1. Keep them dry and above freezing temperatures. 2. Don’t store in airtight containers that could cause moisture build up and rot or fungus. 3. Check regularly for desiccation and mould. 4. And remember to label by type and colour.

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How does it work?

A pneumatic generator physically delivers the shock wave to the skin, where it is transformed to sound energy and delivered to the targeted area. The use of shock waves makes the treatment completely non-invasive and is well tolerated by patients. The effects of shock waves were discovered several decades ago after it was noticed swimmers in the Pacific Ocean were affected by the detonation of mines although they were well out of the blast radius. As the scientific community grew more understanding of the effects caused by shock waves, and medical technology advanced to a sufficient level, the medical profession was able to harness the power of shock waves for therapeutic uses. Radial Shockwave Therapy works by effectively breaking down tissue in a controlled manner to allow the targeted area to heal properly through the regeneration of blood vessels. It has shown to be successful in the treatment of chronic pain. Results can be felt after only one treatment with a large improvement becoming evident after a month’s worth of treatment, on average tissue regeneration takes place after three months. With Radial Shockwave Therapy, patients are in and out the door with treatments typically only taking between five to ten minutes.

West Street Health Centre, Simcoe • 519-426-8330 Waterford Medical Centre • 519-443-6663 Visit our website at www.drthompsonchiropractic.com for more information.

Investment AdvIce

John de Witt

Investment AdvIser scotIA cApItAl Inc.

WAnted - AdmInIstrAtIve AssIstAnt FInAncIAl servIces

WhAt do We do? We make a positive difference in peoples’ lives by providing customized plans that outline solutions towards financial success. We help identify the most comfortable and efficient way to make their dreams and goals as real as possible. Job descrIptIon: Responsible for providing administrative and client service support to the Investment Advisor (IA). responsIbIlItIes Include but Are not lImIted to: Maintain an appropriate Contact Relationship Management System (CRM). Coordinate client appointments and calls with the IA. Recommend and implement My business card improvements to support a well-run platform with appropriate processes. Full knowledge of Excel, Word, PowerPoint, Contact Management, Back has changed.DundeeWealth, How IPlatforms, Office Systems and Investment Planning Software now Financial part of Scotiabank, (i.e.do NaviPlan), Internethas Explorer, Firefox and Microsoft Windows. business not. has become HollisWealth. Yes, our name has DundeeWealth, part of Scotiabank, AddItIonAl Assets:changed, Well organized. Experiencednow in financial services but our commitment to your financial DundeeWealth, now part of Scotiabank, has become HollisWealth. Yes, our name has industry and working with and providing support topartfinancial advisors. DundeeWealth, now of Scotiabank, has become HollisWealth. Yes,success our name has has not. Contact to learn more. Comfortable dealing with people. High attention tome detail. Excellent has become HollisWealth. Yes, our name has changed, but our commitment to follow your financial commitment to your financial up.changed, Abilitybuttoourdeal with ambiguity. Committed tonot. providing outstanding changed, but our commitment your to financial success has Contactto me learn more. success has not. Contact me to learn more. customer service. success has not. Contact me to learn more. Please forward your resume to john.dewitt@holliswealth.com

My business card has changed. Howcard I My business has changed. How I do business hascard not. My business

do hasI not. has business changed. How do business has not.

John de Witt

John de Witt

John dede Witt John Witt

Investment Advisor | Scotia Capital Inc. Investment Advisor | Scotia Capital Inc. Investment Advisor | Scotia Capital Inc.

My business card 4-191 Queensway West Simcoe, ONHow N3Y 2M8 I has changed. 519-428-2615 do business has not. john.dewitt@holliswealth.com

DundeeWealth, now part of Scotiabank, I coach successful people to make smart has become HollisWealth. Yes, our name has decisions with their retirement money. changed, but our commitment to your financial success has not. Contact me to learn more. holliswealth.com

Investment Advisor | Scotia Capital Inc. 4-191 Queensway 4-191 Queensway WestWest Simcoe, ON N3Y 2M8 4-191 Queensway West Simcoe, ON N3Y 2M8 519-428-2615 Simcoe,

ON N3Y 2M8

519-428-2615 john.dewitt@holliswealth.com 519-428-2615

I coach successful people to make smart john.dewitt@holliswealth.com decisions with their retirement money. john.dewitt@holliswealth.com

I coach successful people to make smart I coach successful people to make smart decisions with their retirement holliswealth.com decisions with money. their retirement money.

HollisWealth is a division of Scotia Capital Inc., a member of the Canadian Investor Protection Fund and the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada. ™ Trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia, used under licence.

John de Witt

HollisWealth

HollisWealth is a division of Scotia Capital Inc., a member of the Canadian Investor Protection Fund and the Investment Industry Regulatory Organization of Canada. ™ Trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia, used under licence.

Investment Advisor | Scotia Capital Inc.

holliswealth.com holliswealth.com jdewitt@holliswealth.com 4-191 Queensway West

Simcoe, ON N3Y 2M8 4-191 QueensWAy West, sImcoe on 519.428.2615

HollisWealth is aofdivision of ScotiaInvestor Capital Inc., a member of the InvestorIndustry Protection Fund and the Investment Industry Regulatory HollisWealth is a division of Scotia Capital Inc., a member the Canadian Protection Fund andCanadian the Investment Regulatory Organization of Canada. Trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia, used under licence. Organization of Canada. ™ Trademark of The Bank of Nova Scotia,™used under licence.

519-428-2615

john.dewitt@holliswealth.com I coach successful people to make smart decisions with their retirement money.


H

Big SplaSh 519.426.0208

NORFOLK HUB, November 5, 2013 page 9

of the

alloween in Port Ryerse!

Week!

29 Talbot St. North , Simcoe, ON N3Y 3W5

Photo by MARG WERDEN

SIMCOE VOLKSWAGEN ~ presents ~

NORFOLK

Celebrating 26 Years! Customer Appreciation Day! Friday, November 15th 10am - 6:30pm

Now Showing

Friday, novemBer 8 to thursday, novemBer 14th th

Jackass Presents: Bad GrandPa - 14a

15% Storewide

Off *

Fri & Sat EvEning: 8:45 pm

Free Birds - G

Fri & Sat EvEning: 7:00 pm Sat - Sun matinEE: 2:00 pm Sun - thurS EvEning: 7:00 pm

*Some exceptions apply

Draws • Sampling Sales Reps

thor: the dark World - PG

Please bring non-perishable goods for the food bank or make a monetary donation.

Fri & Sat EvEning: 6:45 & 9:00 pm Sat - Sun matinEE: 1:45 pm Sun - thurS EvEning: 6:45 pm

tickets$ 8/a dult, $ 6/child, tuesday eveninG $ 5 w w w. s t r a n d t h e a t r e . c a 55 Robinson St., Simcoe ( 519 ) 4 2 6 - 2 7 3 6

10 Norfolk St S, Simcoe

519.428.2077

Health Tip of the Week Naturopathic Flu cliNicS

Tuesday, N ovember 12Th

call to book a time (519.426.4275) , available to the public. Egg, needle and preservative free! $22+hSt/person

FOOD

AUTOBAHN

DRIVE

in support of the Food Banks of Norfolk County

Sunday, November 17th

ROAD RALLY

Start Time: 1 p.m. to approximately 3 p.m. Location: Simcoe Volkswagen, 370 Queensway West, Simcoe The Road Rally will start at Simcoe Volkswagen and head to Delhi, then over to Waterford, on to Port Dover and will finish at Simcoe Volkswagen. Special check points are required in Delhi, Waterford and Port Dover where you will receive a ballot – collect all three ballots and you will be entered in a grand prize draw to win a pair of Toronto Maple Leaf home game tickets. Additional prizes to be drawn. VEHICLE ADMISSION: ANY NON-PERISHABLE FOOD ITEMS or $5.00 DONATION

519.426.4275

www.armstrongclinic.com 55 Kent Street South, Simcoe

Everyone is welcome to enjoy the fun. Donations will be received at the dealership.

To register, please call 519-426-6150 or email tdean@simcoevw.ca


NORFOLK HUB, November 5, 2013 page 10


Victoria E ldErcarE

NORFOLK HUB, November 5, 2013 page 11

www.victoriaeldercare.com 519.429.2644 Roulstons’s Wellness Centre, 65 Donly Dr. N. Simcoe N3Y 0C2

Companion Visits  oVernight Companion  VaCation Companion errand & appointment Companion  mediCation reminders  household Chores

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Thanks for Zipping through the Hub! lpfun.ca 1-877-743-TOUR — TRADITIONAL TURKEY SUPPER Wednesday, November 6th, @ 5:30 pm. Adults $15 and 12 & under $7. Advance Ticket Sales only. OLD WINDHAM UNITED CHURCH, 30 Glendale Cres., Simcoe. Call: (519) 426-0869. — Frosty Fair - Saturday, November 9th, 9 am to 12 pm, Christmas Bazaar featuring Baking, Penny Table, Crafts, Jewelry, Books, Surprise Packages, Christmas Items, General Store and more. St. James United Church, 150 Colborne St. S. Enter off parking lot. Accessible. — FALL POTTERY SALE - November 8th, 9 am to 8 pm and November 9th, 9 am to 5 pm at the First Baptist Church, 129 Young St., Simcoe, beside the Talbot Street Arena. Enter a draw for a beautiful piece of Handcrafted Pottery. Enjoy coffee and goodies on us! Give a Gift of Local Talent. — Simcoe & District Youth Soccer Club 2013 Annual General Meeting - November 12th, at 7 pm at the Simcoe Public Library, 46 Colborne St. S. Simcoe. For inquiries Contact: Club Manager Bev Suggett by email clubmanager@simcoesoccer.ca or mail Club Manager, SDYSC Inc. PO Box 1012, Simcoe, ON. N3Y 5B3.

— Lynn Valley Trail Association Annual General Meeting on Thursday, November 14, 7:30 - 9:00 pm at the Port Dover Community Centre. Guest speakers will be Mark and Joanne Gamble, “A Hiking Tour of Europe”. Light refreshments... everyone welcome. — FESTIVE FARE & LUNCHEON - Saturday, November 16, 10 am to 2 pm. OLD WINDHAM UNITED CHURCH, 30 Glendale Crescent, Simcoe. Lunch and Bake table, deli, pickle table, frozen pies, new & nearly new table, and other vendors. Come and enjoy lunch. — “Scams, Fraud, and Identity Theft” - OPP Constable Ed Sanchuk will speak on this topic at Grace United Church, 18 Chapman St. West, Port Dover, at 5 pm Thursday November 21st. Soup and bun supper to follow (Free will offering). RSVP Nancy at (519) 583-3937. — St. Paul’s Presbyterian Church in Simcoe is holding its annual Holly Lunch and Bazaar on Saturday November 23rd from 11 am to 2 pm. Visit for lunch and enjoy the silent auction and sales of hand-crafted jewelry, fresh baking and frozen ready-to-bake pies (small turkey, beef, and large fruit). The church is located at 85 Lot street in downtown Simcoe, across from the public library. — The Salvation Army Simcoe Community Church, 184 Colborne St N, Simcoe, Angel

Alpine Alps Andes Appalachian Avalanche Basin Cascade Chain Climbing Clouds Erosion Everest Foothills Glaciers Goat Highlands Himalayas Lake

Lion Pass Peak Plateau Range Robson Rockies Shadow Sheep Slide Snowcap Summit Towering Trail Tree line Valley Volcanic Waterfalls

Solution: It isn’t the mountains to climb (that wear you out; it’s the pebble in your shoe.)

H U B S E A R C H

Mountains Solution: 25 letters

Bazaar & Luncheon - Saturday, November 23rd, 10 am to 2:30 pm. Crafts, Baked Goods, Christmas Puddings, White Elephant Table and Silent Auction, Cabbage Rolls or Turkey Pot Pie Meal $10 per person. Call (519) 426-5420 for Luncheon Tickets. — WATERFORD LIONESS CHRISTMAS HOUSE TOUR - Sunday, November 24th from 1 pm to 4 pm. Tickets are $12 each and available from Lioness Val (519) 443-5614, Lorna (519) 443-7011 or Mary Anne (519) 443-0729. — The CARILLON BELLES Simcoe Chorus, a member of Sweet Adelines International, presents "HARMONIZE THE WORLD" under the direction of Joan Minns and Heidi Bowman. This concert is being held at the "LIGHTHOUSE FESTIVAL THEATRE" on November 24, from 2 pm to 4 pm. Special Guests are THE FIVE GUYS Afterglow - light refreshments - Tickets are $15 from chorus members, or can be purchased at the Lighthouse Festival Theatre. A portion of the proceeds go to the Haldimand & Norfolk Women's Services. For more information, call (519) 583-2221 or (519) 420-7422. — Delhi United Church Christmas Bazaar 105 Church St. W., Delhi, December 7, 10 am to 2 pm. Lunch is available anytime. Includes frozen pies, baked goods, penny table, handicrafts, attic treasures and more.

For sale: KHS 29er

Hydraulic Brakes, $649 Last One, Call Now!

OntariO’s sOuth COast BiCyCles and tOurs inC. JOhn FultOn

WBi PRoFESSional BicyclE mEchanic touRS, REPaiRS, REntalS, SalES oF Quality PREoWnED BikES tanDEm, RoaD & mountain BikE REntalS Fully SuPPoRtED GuiDED & SElF-GuiDED touRS lakE ERiE WatERFRont tRail niaGaRa to Point PElEE

FREE Pick-uP & DElivERy (PoRt DovER & SimcoE) fulton@kwic.com • 519 428-3428 • Cell 519 429-8184


NORFOLK HUB, November 5, 2013 page 12

Thank You Ike

Photos by KalCommodore.com


Norfolk Hub - Ike Remembers