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WINTER 2019

THE CORNERSTONE OF THE POCONOS

NOTICE: The Township Office will be closed on the following days: Christmas Eve - Dec. 24, 2019 • Christmas Day - Dec. 25, 2019 • New Year’s Day - Jan. 1, 2020

Delaware Township Celebrates Its 12th Annual

Harvest Festival

See More Inside Page 8

IN THIS ISSUE DAILY LIVING Cemetery, Trash Dumping, and the Law Pike County Conservation District Seeking Public Input Statewide Initiative to Reduce Littering, High Cleanup Cost PUC Launches Annual “Prepare Now” Campaign FirstEnergy Utilities Ramp Up Scam

DAILY LIVING

Delaware Township Budget — Page 5

3

Awareness Outreach Delaware Township Celebrates 12th Annual Harvest Festival Delware Township Christmas Tree

4

EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

6

When It’s Not a Beautiful Day Winter Fire Safety Tips Pike County Fire Department Listing

2

7 8 9 10 11 12

NPS Announces Reduced Winter Services And Priority Snow Removal Routes

12

MEETINGS & EVENTS Board of Supervisors Meetings Planning Commission Meetings

13 13

LEGISLATURE Pike County to Receive Over $700,000 in Grants

14

EVENTS

DIG DELAWARE

2020 Bulk Dump Disposal Days — Page 13

Plants of Christmas — Page 15

Newburgh, NY 12550 PERMIT NO. 335

Like Us on Facebook www.facebook.com/DelawareTownship

PAID

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage


DAILY LIVING “Cemetery, Trash Dumping, And The Law” Cheers for our Pennsylvania State Police! Here’s the story:

DELAWARE TOWNSHIP 116 Wilson Hill Road Dingmans Ferry, PA 18328 Phone: 570-828-2347 HOURS OF OPERATION: Building Inspector: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 8:00 am – 10:00 am Sewage Officer: By appointment only Zoning Officer: Monday, Wednesday, Friday 8:00 am – 10:00 am Office: Monday through Friday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm

In Delaware Cemetery, someone had been bringing huge bags of house hold trash about every five weeks since last spring. The volunteer members of the Cemetery Association Board would, as quickly as possible, get to the cemetery and clean up. Frequently a bear had gone through the bags and trash was spread out into the woods. Each time, the trash was carefully looked through and rebagged. One Board member included the bags of trash at their home for pickup by their trash service. In mid-summer, the Cemetery Association borrowed and

Public Works: Monday through Friday 7:30 am – 3:30 pm

BOARD OF SUPERVISORS:

WORKSHOPS 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of the month, 6:00 pm at the Township Municipal Building

In order to go after anyone doing this Stupid/Horrible trash dumping, a Police Report would need to be filed. A few weeks ago, after the last dumping, we called PSP. A Trooper arrived at the cemetery at the same time as two Board members arrived to do yet-another cleanup. He asked for much information about all the trash dumpings, as the two Board members carefully looked through and re-bagged the scattered trash. Filling out the report papers, and later getting photos and more information from the Cemetery Association, the Trooper clearly wanted to bring an end to the dumpings.

with the person, and presented with all the information/evidence by PSP - the offender admitted his deeds, stated he would be paying the fines, and would not do it again. Delaware Cemetery Association wants everyone to know that we have great Pennsylvania State Police. The effort and attention given to our problem by the Trooper was as thorough

and caring as anyone needing PSP help could hope for. Trash dumping ANYWHERE is stupid and wrong. It is also subject to law enforcement. Our sincere thanks to our “Super” Trooper and PSP for their help. Delaware Cemetery Association Board of Managers

Last week, the Trooper notified the Cemetery Association that he had tracked down the “offender”. He had personally gone to speak

Akenac Park: Open daily from dawn to dusk. Closed every Tuesday for maintenance

MEETINGS 2nd and 4th Wednesdays of the month, 7:00 pm at the Township Municipal Building

bought a couple of trail/ hunting cameras to get photos of vehicles going to the areas where the trash was dumped.

Call Us At

845-456-1218 and ask about our special Advertising Rates!

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LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019


Pike County Conservation District Seeking Public Input

E BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

As the year comes to a close, the Pike County Conservation District is looking to the future, and wants local resident’s input! You spend your life in Pike County, surrounded by its magnificent natural resources, so the Conservation District wants to know what’s important to you!

John Henderson Chair - jhenderson@delawaretownshippa.gov

Pike County Conservation District (PCCD) is a legal subdivision of State government, responsible under Act 217 -- Pennsylvania’s Conservation District Law -- for natural resource conservation work within County boundaries. PCCD was established in 1956 and has worked actively since then to carry out programs focused on conservation of soil, water and other natural resources. The District is guided by a Board of Directors whose members are recommended by county-wide nominating organizations and appointed by the County Commissioners. The Board meets monthly to guide programs and staff and coordinate partnering efforts with other agencies to provide conservation assistance in Pike County. PCCD is committed to natural resource conservation through leadership, education, and technical assistance to ensure the long term protection and sustainable use of Pike County’s natural resources.

Rick Koehler Secretary - rkoehler@delawaretownshippa.gov

To achieve their mission, PCCD regularly provides an opportunity for important input from residents and partners. The Conservation District Board is currently working to update our plan for the future – identifying the needs of residents, the important natural resource issues of concern, and the types of programs and activities that will enhance the District’s ability to meet these needs and issues.   Your input on how Pike County Conservation District can best serve the needs of our community and conserve our natural resources is important. Please provide your input by answering the survey questions on their website, pikeconservation.org. Surveys are also available at the District office at 556 Route 402, Hawley, PA. Surveys must be filled out and submitted by January 10, 2020. Visit PikeConservation.org for more information, and questions can be directed to pikecd@pikepa.org / 570-226-8220.

Jane Neufeld Vice-Chair | Treasurer - jneufeld@delawaretownshippa.gov

E ADMINISTRATION Krista Predmore Township Administrator kpredmore@delawaretownshippa.gov Sharon Franks Administrative Assistant | Permits sharonf@delawaretownshippa.gov Robin Jones H.R. | Administrative Asst. rjones@delawaretownshippa.gov Lori McCrory Permit Assistant lmccrory@delawaretownshippa.gov

E PUBLIC WORKS. Vincent Flatt | Road Master vflatt@delawaretownshippa.gov Michael Moffa mmoffa@delawaretownshippa.gov John Olivieri dtbos@ptd.net Chris Kimble dtbos@ptd.net

E BOARDS & CHAIRPERSONS Planning Commission Sharon Franks, Secretary Zoning Hearing Board Lori McCrory, Secretary Auditors Dennis Lee - dennisleedtauditor@gmail.com

E ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS Building Inspector SFM Consulting - smcglynn@sfmconsultingllc.org Zoning Officer SFM Consulting - smcglynn@sfmconsultingllc.org Sewage Officer Ron Tussel - ecc@masthope.org

CALL 845-456-1218 To Advertise in Living Delaware Township LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019

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DEP, PennDOT, and Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful Announce Statewide Initiative to Reduce Littering, High Cleanup Costs The Pennsylvania Departments of Environmental Protection (DEP) and Transportation (PennDOT), in partnership with Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful, announced an initiative to reduce littering and presented results of the first statewide litter study in over 20 years at a meeting attended by more than 125 local government, legislative, business, and community organization partners. “Pennsylvania has a littering problem. Trash lines many of our roads and neighborhood

streets. Hillsides and streambanks are strewn with tires and other garbage illegally dumped,” said DEP Secretary Patrick McDonnell. “This presents health hazards, it contaminates the soil and water, and cleaning it up is costly to the Commonwealth and taxpayers. “DEP has funded annual community and illegal dump site clean-ups around the state for over two decades. Thanks to these volunteer events, millions of pounds of litter have been removed from our land and water, but trash is accumulating faster than anyone can keep up with,” said McDonnell. “DEP is committed to achieving an even greater impact, working with PennDOT, Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful, and other partners to develop and implement a framework of litter reduction measures

that, for the first time, will be guided by state-specific litter data and a nationally recognized model of behavior change.” The Pennsylvania Litter Research Study was conducted in 2018-2019 with funding from DEP, PennDOT, Keep America Beautiful, and Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful. A phone survey collected 500 residents’ views on litter and littering. Field teams performed on-the-ground litter counts in 180 locations statewide, including state and local roads and urban and rural areas. Over 96 percent of survey respondents said littering is a problem in Pennsylvania. Field results indicate an estimated 500 million pieces of litter on Pennsylvania roads. The most common items are cigarette butts and plastics, such as plastic food packaging, bottles, and bags. Motorists and pedestrians

are leading litterers, followed by improperly secured truck loads. “PennDOT spends upwards of $13.9 million yearly to pick up trash along state-owned roadways,” said PennDOT Secretary Leslie S. Richards. “This enormous amount of resources spent on clean-up means there’s less funding available for improving our roads and bridges. Clean-up is not a sustainable strategy. PennDOT is proud to join forces with DEP, DCNR, and Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful to take action to shift the focus to changing behavior to prevent littering.” “Thankfully, environmental education programs and organized clean-ups help curtail littering at our 121 state parks, but illegal dumping remains a chronic problem in some state forests throughout the state,” said DCNR Deputy Secretary Michael Walsh. “Managers of Michaux State Forest, in the south central section of the state, are actively deploying surveillance cameras in an attempt to deter roadside dumping, which often leaves the district facing high disposal costs.”

recycling infrastructure and markets in the state. Anne Johnson, principal and vice president at Global Corporate Sustainability, demonstrated the economic, environmental, and reputational costs of plastics. California State University social psychologist Wesley Schultz presented his research on why people litter and a nationally recognized five-step process for behavior change. In an open discussion, meeting participants shared their views on priority areas and next steps in the development of a statewide framework for litter reduction. DEP, PennDOT, and Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful will release a report presenting conclusions and complete data from the study and open discussion early in the new year. At that time the agencies will use the data to begin the task of strategizing a framework of measures to reduce specific littering behaviors.

“Keep Pennsylvania Beautiful has been leading clean-ups for nearly thirty years,” said Director Shannon Reiter. “While clean-ups are critical, cleanups alone are not going City government leaders to solve Pennsylvania’s from Allentown, Harrisburg, litter and illegal dumping Philadelphia, and problem. We need to Pittsburgh detailed the change behavior.” high costs of addressing The meeting was held at litter and illegal dumping the Hilton Harrisburg in their cities. Wayne and organized by Keep Bowen, senior recycling Pennsylvania Beautiful, in program manager at the coordination with DEP and Pennsylvania Recycling PennDOT. Markets Center, discussed

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LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019


DELAWARE TOWNSHIP BUDGET The annual Township budget is coordinated and prepared by the Treasurer, the Township Administrator, and the Director of Public Works in accordance with the requirements of the PA SecondClass Township Code. The budgeting process typically begins in late July, three workshops are held in the fall to discuss, and ends in November/December.

Budgeting Goal The goal of the Township Budget process is to comprehensively evaluate the Township’s financial status and present this information in a manner that will facilitate understanding by Township citizens and the government organization. The document presents an assessment of issues and services, a plan for allocating financial resources to address these issues, and provide public services to the community in the short and long term. Following the preparation of the Township budgets that allocate Township financial resources, it is the final responsibility of the Board of Supervisors to formally approve the budget in November/December for implementation in the coming fiscal year. The budget is tentatively approved and open to the public in November, and finally approved in December. Here is the proposed 2020 Township Budget presented at the November 20, 2019 Board of Supervisors Meeting. Submitted by Delaware Township Treasurer Jane E. Neufeld November 20, 2019

Delaware Township Delaware Township All FundsAllProposed Budget Overview Funds Proposed2020 2020 Budget Overview

Nov. 20, 2019 Nov. 20, 2019

ASSETS/INCOME

Catagory

General Fund

Liquid Fuels Fund

Rec/Park Fund

Op. Reserve Fund

Fire Tax Fund

3

Cap. Reserve Fund Gen. Fund

Cap. Reserve Fund Rec/Parks

Roads, Bridges, Equipment

Emer. Services Fund

Acct. Reference Opening Balance Forward 2020

$

811,168.08

$

97,591.97

300-301

Taxes

$

1,041,000.00

$

146,500.00

321-322

Licenses/Permits

$

36,275.00

Fines

$

2,200.00

341-342

Interest/Dividends/Rents

$

21,245.00

$

2,900.00

354-356

Intergovernmental

$

90,757.07

361-364

Charges for service

$

98,872.00

$

3,800.00

382-389

Misc.

$

2,701.00

$

1,300.00

365

Employee Insur. Contribution

$

14,000.00

392

Interfund Transfers Total Income

$

1,307,050.07

$

154,500.00

$

218,000.39

$

146,500.00

$

313,466.54

$

313,147.63

$

312,678.69

$

337,105.57

$

492,553.18

TOTAL ALL ASSETS/INCOME

$

2,118,218.15

$

252,091.97

$

626,251.91

$

146,500.00

$

313,466.54

$

313,147.63

$

312,678.69

$

337,105.57

$

492,553.18

$

11,100.00 $

146,500.00

146,500.00

331

$

408,251.52 $

$

7,500.00

$

210,500.39

$

312,686.54

$

311,257.63

$

309,378.69

$

335,125.57

$

490,503.18

$

780.00

$

1,890.00

$

3,300.00

$

1,980.00

$

2,050.00

146,500.00

EXPENDITURES

Catagory

Acct. Reference

400-409*

General Govt.

$

202,705.00

410-419*

Public Safety

$

243,530.77

Health/Welfare

$

6,000.00

PW-Roads/Maintenance/Other

$

215,310.00

423 427-439*

Liq. Fuels -- Roads, bridges, etc Liq. Fuels -- Veh./ equipment 454

Culture/Recreation

470

Debt Service

$ $

82,351.00

23,538.84

Employee Wages

$

365,904.00

$

40,000.00

Employer Paid Taxes/Benefits/W Comp

$

86,224.10

$

3,640.00

486

Insurance Premiums

$

44,076.00

487

Employee Health Insur. Benefits

$

115,935.52

Misc/Unclassified

$

2,350.00

Total Expenditures

$

1,282,035.39

$

137,091.00

$

23,538.84

$

Year End Income-Exps.

$

25,014.68

$

17,409.00

$

194,461.55

$

Plus Bal. Fwd at start of 2020

$

811,168.08

$

97,591.97

$

408,251.52

TOTAL ALL EXPENDITURES

$

2,118,218.15

$

252,091.97

$

626,251.91

481-484**

489-493

Capital Purchase/Projects 492

*= ** =

Interfund Transfers

$

-

146,500.00

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

313,466.54

$

313,147.63

$

312,678.69

$

337,105.57

$

492,553.18

$

313,466.54

$

313,147.63

$

312,678.69

$

337,105.57

$

492,553.18

Does Not include figure for 2020 Employee Wages/Salaries Does Not include Pension update, figure re: 2020 wages, any changes re: Employee health insurances

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019

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PUC Launches Annual “Prepare Now” Campaign; Urges Electric & Natural Gas Utilities to Help At-Risk Consumers Address Winter Heating Expenses As part of its 17th year of “Prepare Now” education efforts, the Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission (PUC) is urging utilities to identify and assist consumers who may struggle with cold-weather energy bills.

efficient utility programs for vulnerable consumers. While those changes will go into effect over the coming year, the Commissioners continue to stress that education and consumer outreach are the most direct actions utilities can take immediately to increase participation in vital assistance programs before winter weather descends on the state.

In September of this year, the PUC advanced two major proposals focused on lowering the maximum “energy burden” for lowincome Customer Assistance A letter from the PUC Program (CAP) participants Commissioners has and ensuring effective and been sent to all of the

electric and natural gas utility companies under the PUC’s jurisdiction, underscoring the PUC’s recent efforts to address energy affordability – especially for low-income households – and also emphasizing that every utility can take actions right now to increase their outreach to at-risk consumers:

and maintaining vibrant communities. Energy unaffordability is an unsustainable burden for many thousands of Pennsylvanians, and while the Commission’s forwardleaning actions are intended to enhance future services, it is imperative that we work together in the short term to help consumers prepare for the coming winter,” the Commissioners wrote to energy utility CEOs.

“Energy services – whether electric or gas – are essential for health, safety, a livable The PUC’s 2019 Prepare home, child development Now campaign continues to focus on educating consumers about the availability of low-income programs; increasing consumer awareness of ways to reduce winter heating costs; educating consumers on energy conservation; encouraging consumers to check electric and natural gas bills and supplier contracts; and informing customers about PAPowerSwitch. com and PAGasSwitch.com as resources to shop for energy suppliers and learn more about efficiency and conservation measures. Electric and natural gas customers across the state are helping heat their homes or pay energy bills through CAPs, LowIncome Usage Reduction Programs (LIURPs) and other services. Low-income households may also be eligible for grants under the federal Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP), a companion to the utility-based services. Last year, utilities across Pennsylvania spent more than $400 million on universal service programs, not counting LIHEAP. Collectively, these utility programs reach nearly 300,000 electric customers and over 156,000 natural gas customers, reducing monthly energy bills; promoting weatherization

PAGE 6

and other improvements to cut energy consumption; and supporting hardship programs. Consumer outreach specialists from the PUC are active across the state, conducting or participating in workshop events, free seminars, roundtable discussions and community fairs. During those events, plain language materials and literature designed to educate consumers about assistance programs and their rights are handed out. Materials include information on consumer rights in dealing with terminations and reconnections, available low-income programs and tips on how to Prepare Now for winter. For more information on hosting a PUC consumer outreach specialist at a community event, call the PUC Office of Communications at 717-787-5722. The Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission balances the needs of consumers and utilities; ensures safe and reliable utility service at reasonable rates; protects the public interest; educates consumers to make independent and informed utility choices; furthers economic development; and fosters new technologies and competitive markets in an environmentally sound manner. Visit the PUC’s website at www.puc.pa.gov for recent news releases and video of select proceedings. You can also follow us on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram and YouTube. Search for the “Pennsylvania Public Utility Commission” or “PA PUC” on your favorite social media channel for updates on utility issues and other helpful consumer information.

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019


FirstEnergy Utilities Ramp Up Scam Awareness Outreach As Cold Winter Weather Arrives As winter arrives and temperatures drop, FirstEnergy utility customers should be on high alert for phone calls or door-to-door visits from scammers trying to trick them into paying fictional unpaid bills to avoid immediate shutoff. Realizing scammers feed off people’s fear of losing heat in the cold weather, FirstEnergy and dozens of other electric and gas companies are banding together for Utility Scam Awareness Week, held Nov. 17-23, to prevent customers from falling victim to scams this season. The annual awareness week is organized by Utilities United Against Scams – a group consisting of more than 100 utilities and related organizations – to educate the public about the ever-growing list of scams targeting utility customers. With a goal of keeping customers informed about all types of utility scams, FirstEnergy’s awardwinning video, “Hang Up, Don’t Pay Up: When a Scammer Calls,” features two business owners contacted by phone scammers impersonating FirstEnergy electric company employees. The video – which has been viewed more than 150,000 times – provides red flags and tips for avoiding scams.  FirstEnergy customers are urged to keep the following information in mind to help ensure the safety of their family, property and personal information: Customers who are behind on their accounts receive written notices of a possible disconnection and how to prevent it. FirstEnergy representatives will not call or email to demand immediate payment to avoid a same-day shutoff.

While FirstEnergy representatives often make courtesy calls to customers to remind them about an outstanding balance, they would explain how a payment can be made using the established payment options. They would never require a customer to purchase a pre-paid money card as the only acceptable means of payment.

excellence. The company’s transmission subsidiaries operate more than 24,500 miles of transmission lines that connect the Midwest and Mid-

Atlantic regions. Visit FirstEnergy online at www. firstenergycorp.com and follow FirstEnergy and its operating companies on Twitter @FirstEnergyCorp, @OhioEdison, @

ToledoEdison, @ IlluminatingCo, @W_Penn_ Power, @Penn_Power, @ Penelec, @Met_Ed, @ JCP_L, @PotomacEdison, @ MonPowerWV.

FirstEnergy field collectors working in New Jersey, Maryland and Ohio – carrying company-issued photo identification – will offer customers with past-due accounts the opportunity to pay their bill in person before shutting them off. FirstEnergy employees do not contact customers to request sensitive information such as social security numbers or bank account information. Scammers often use Caller ID spoofing software to misrepresent the source of a phone call to further mislead and confuse their targets. Call-back numbers provided by these criminals often use greetings and hold messages that mimic legitimate businesses. If customers have any doubts about the status of their electric service, they should call their utility company using the customer service phone number listed on the FirstEnergy website to ask about their account. Never dial the phone number the scammer provides. Customers who suspect a scam should hang up the phone or close the door and call the local police then FirstEnergy. FirstEnergy (NYSE:FE)  is dedicated to safety, reliability and operational

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019

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Delaware Township Celebrates Its 12th Annual Harvest Festival Each year visitors are offered a free ride on the hay wagon with a stop off for children to pick a free pumpkin. This year’s attractions also included free painting and a petting zoo. Over 40 crafters, non-profits, for profits and food vendors lined the lanes with items to purchase, offered free games, raffles and/or give a-ways. If you are interested in learning more about our annual Harvest Festival or any of our other events, please find us at www.facebook. com/recreation18328 or email delawaretownshiprecboard@gmail.com. Feel free to join us during our monthly meeting. Meetings are held on the second Thursday of each month at 6:00pm. During the months of November through March, our meetings will be held in the Emergency Management Building on Wilson Hill Rd and during the months of April through October, they will be held in the Rec Hall in Akenac Park. Delaware Township Recreation Commission wishes to offer a special thanks to our sponsors, Wayne’s Lawn Care, Ron Hough and Holy Trinity Luthern Church. We also wish to thank our volunteers: Shane, Anthony, Carl, John, Joey, Joseph, Danny, Demetrius, Tommy, Stephany, Haley, Sarah, Lexi and Emily.

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LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019


Delaware Township Christmas Tree Richard Heimbrook, retired Delaware Township Public Works employee is pictured with his wife Mary, standing in front of the Delaware Township Municipal Building Christmas Tree. Mr. Heimbrook’s mom, Eva Heimbrook, bought the pine tree that Delaware Township lights annually in front of the Municipal Building located along Wilson Hill Road. The tree, when purchased from Whispering Pines, was only 2 feet tall and came in a pail. After spending some time inside at the Heimbrook household it was then planted on their property. Sometime in the early 1990’s the tree was removed from the Heimbrook homestead and replanted to where it resides today, towering well above the building and lighting up the holiday season for all to enjoy as they drive at night.

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019

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EMERGENCY MGMT. When It’s Not A Beautiful Day As I sit down to write this installment, Thanksgiving is clearly in sight and the Christmas holidays and the end of another year just peaking over the horizon. For many of us our focus right now and in the weeks to come is firmly rooted in family and traditions, and sometimes subject to all the extreme pressures that the impacts of modern society and social media can bring to bear. It is unlikely that anyone is thinking back to the devastation of the back to back winter storms of about 18 months ago or anticipating what preparation or response might be needed through the coming winter season. It is almost certain that very few, if any folks drive through town or walk their “neighborhood” and recall the devastation of Hurricane Sandy 7 years ago and how the recovery was still ongoing for many of our residents around Thanksgiving that year. So first, let me take a moment to ask all of you to give thanks that we have been spared any really significant events in quite some time. However, I would also ask that you realize that the township and all of our volunteer responders continue to equip, train and prepare for the next major

event. I will detail some of these ongoing efforts a little further on and remind you of your need to focus on family and personal preparedness entering the winter season. My inspiration for this issue’s contribution is hinted at in the title- and is found in the wisdom of Fred Rogers, the famous children’s program host. The new movie depicting his life and philosophy is due to be released shortly and there are lessons that can possibly be learned that are appropriate for each of us in relation to emergency preparedness for both individuals and communities. Anyone whoever saw the program, Mr. Roger’s Neighborhood, will recall that the show always opened with him entering the show singing “it’s a beautiful day in the neighborhood” and the song ended with a question to his audience -”won’t you be my neighbor?” So what does that have to do with Emergency Management? Myself and many others who have served our communities for any length of time know emergency response and recovery in America is all based in the concept of “neighbors helping neighbors”. For long time residents you may remember

when the township motto was “nestled among nature and neighbors”. Pretty much before the explosion of the internet and cell phones and social media that many rely on for their day to day connection with the reality and shape of events ongoing around them. We have seen firsthand during significant disasters that when these connections fail the sense of community or neighborhood breaks down, impacting both response and recovery. That motto implied a common bond and a sense of shared responsibility to our community our fellow citizens, a bond that in the past was based more in actual face to face contact and day to day interaction with our neighbors. So one of my goals in this column is to examine how we might revisit this concept of “neighborhood” in the interest of improving the resiliency of Delaware Township for the coming year and beyond. Because, as the title says, “it’s not always going to be a beautiful day, but we still need you to be our neighbor”. The lessons from Fred Rogers were not just geared for the children viewing the acclaimed program, but the parents, relatives and educators in their life who

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he said- should strive to instill from a young age- a sense of “self and service”. For us as a community and a country, instilling that “sense” forms the backbone of almost all disaster response activities across our nation and will help insure that organizations like volunteer fire and career fire departments, emergency medical services, law enforcement, red cross, church groups and other charitable organizations are able to meet the challenges that natural and man made disasters will continue to pose. Rogers was ascribed as a hero by many for his willingness to understand and address the diverse needs of all children, but he himself chose to offer this perspective, “we live in a world in which we need to share responsibility. It’s easy to say- it’s not my child, not my community, my world, my problem. Then there are those who see the needs and respond. Those are my heroes. When I was a boy and I would see scary things in the news, my mother would say to me- look for the helpers. Look and you will always find people who are helping” So the message is simple and obvious, become one of the “helpers” if you are not already. It is easy to sit on the sidelines as events unfold and wait for someone else to come, someone else to do it. But in the rural environment resources are often limited and the limited number of responders overwhelmed especially in the early and later phases of a major event. Collectively, we should strive to return to or improve the ways each of us chooses to serve our communities and our neighbors. Be the person who helps that frightened senior citizen or family with small children next door during the next power outage or ice storm. Volunteer to join any of the many organizations in or around Delaware Township directly or indirectly involved in

response to or recovery from disasters. Work within your private communities to establish a disaster preparedness committee, evaluate risks and partner actively with the Township to add another “layer” of protection for your residents. Any additional or new commitment from any resident to any organization becomes as the military says, a “force multiplier” in the face of small or large scale events- and increases our chances of successful protective actions for our community as a whole. For many, I know you already understand this message and are actively engaged in some way in the community. Fred Rogers would tell you- “ I hope you’re proud of the times you’ve said YES, when all it meant was extra work for you and seemingly helpful only to somebody else”. After 45 years in the volunteer fire service, the words ring particularly true. If you are one of those who wavers just on the edge of jumping into the “community service pool” please consider how much good you could bring to bear by joining us who are already there. For the fire company in particular, as we begin our 65th year of service, we remain committed to improving our ability to serve. We have reestablished our junior firefighter program to develop that sense of service in another generation and help insure that the spirit of volunteerism and our ability to respond remains strong for all incidents. This decision was not made lightly, as it requires a significant additional commitment of the officer’s administrative time since junior firefighter activities are tightly controlled and regulated. The fire department is also actively engaged in expanding some “technical” rescue capability with a core group training with other firefighters in

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019


the county and the National Park Service to re-establish and enhance Rope Rescue/ High Angle response throughout the county. This has involved almost 100 hours of additional training specifically tasked for this skill.

during the last series of storms the ability to work in multiple locations and with multiple crews for anything from pump outs to debris removal to road closures to oil spills will be improved with the deployment of tools contained on the trailer. Additionally, the At the Township level unit can be towed by being a better neighbor multiple vehicles both is best exhibited by the in the Township and fire anticipated rollout and company. This will allow deployment of our “All us to place both personnel Hazards Response Trailer”. and equipment in the Last spring Pike County right place in a timely Emergency Management fashion as conditions permanently reassigned permit to more effectively one of the former enclosed help our neighbors when firefighting foam trailers to needed. And as the new Delaware Township for use year begins, we will begin in disaster response. With a required update of our the financial, operational Township Emergency and philosophical support Operations Plan, of the Board of Supervisors including expanded input this trailer has been from both the business outfitted with a variety community and private of equipment critical to developments in order to response and recovery. better define expectations Based on lessons learned and partnerships where

possible. Because being a good neighbor means understanding your concerns while sharing the reality of capabilities of what can be achieved during an event. On an individual level, you can be a better neighbor by making sure that your family is prepared beginning now for the possibility of winter weather events. Good neighbors make sure they make the best effort at preparation whenever so that valuable resources are committed to true emergency need not those who were ill prepared. Follow the recommendations of the Red Cross, ReadyPA or FEMA in assembling emergency supplies for your family sufficient to last 72 hours. Have a family emergency and contact plan and make sure the information is current.

Heed the weather warnings that come from a myriad of sources and restrict travel as much as possible during the main portion of any storm to allow public works to operate effectively. Don’t drive around barricades or posted road closure or under downed trees or power lines, the people who will have to risk their lives and help you if this goes bad are your neighbors with families of their own. Check alternative fuel supplies prior to arrival of the weather and always use alternative power or heating sources in accordance with manufacturers directions. Never run standby generators inside of a structure. If a fireplace, wood or coal stove is a primary or secondary source of heat keep the equipment properly maintained and have the chimney professionally cleaned. Make sure that carbon

monoxide and smoke detectors are properly installed and working. Keep the entrances and walkways to your home free snow and ice to the best extent possible. When possible, take time to check on those directly around your home who may be unable to accomplish some of these precautions for themselves and help if you can. Most of all try to remember that all of those who respond formally or informally are doing the best they can, with what they have at the time under conditions that may be less ideal. It may not be a beautiful day in the neighborhood, but we will do our best to make it better and Fred Rogers would tell you – your neighbors, the helpers are coming. Best wishes to all for a safe and happy holiday season and New Yea

WINTER FIRE SAFETY TIPS The cold weather is upon us. Which means most people will be spending a lot more time indoors. The heat will be on and you’ll be spending more time in the kitchen cooking. Fire safety may not be the first thing you think about, but steps can be taken to make sure your family stays safe. The top 2 most common causes of house fires involve cooking and heating. Here are a few simple tips you can take to protect your family and home from household dangers that could cause harm to you and your loved ones: Smoke detectors • Seconds count when there is a fire. Smoke detectors that work provide warning of a fire, which can double survival chances. Smoke detectors can be the difference between life and death. • Smoke detectors should be installed on every level of your house. Outside all sleeping areas and in every bedroom • Smoke detectors should be checked every month Install carbon monoxide detectors in your home • Winter season can increase the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning. Carbon monoxide cannot be seen. It is an odorless, fatal gas that is produced by heating systems, water heaters, chimneys, kerosene heaters, gas stoves, fireplaces and car exhausts. It can cause flu-like symptoms, vomiting, loss of consciousness, brain damage and even death. Install at least one on every floor approximately 5 feet from the ground. *Smoke detector and carbon monoxide detector batteries should be changed at least twice a year. Fall and spring when the clocks are changed is a great way to remember to change them. Smoke and carbon monoxide detectors should be changed every 10 years. Electric outlets & extension cords • Fires can be caused by overloaded extension cords and circuits or even incorrectly installed wiring. Use the right extension cord of gauge and length for the intended use. Make sure the cord is of proper wattage and current rating for what you are using it for. • Never splice or cut an extension cord for any reason. A cut cord could possibly cause a weak point in your wire, making it unsafe • Use the correct extension cord. Make sure you have the proper gauge and length for the intended use. • Do not place electrical cords under carpets, because they are too long. This could cause the cord to overheat and start a fire • Have an electrical professional install GFI outlets inside and out where water is present, which would include bathrooms, kitchens and laundry rooms. Fireplaces and wood stoves • Did you have your fireplace and chimney cleaned and inspected? Cracks, broken brick and mortar along with creosote, can block the chimney. • Burn dry seasoned wood to minimize chimney build up. • Place ashes in a metal bucket container outside at least 5 foot away from house or anything that could catch fire. Do not set ash bucket on your porch or wood deck. • Use a sturdy metal screen or tempered glass to stop sparks from escaping your fireplace. • Child guard your fireplace and wood stove, if you have children in the house. Space heaters • Always read the label on the cords to make sure the electric heater is set up correctly. • Keep all furniture, curtains, papers or combustibles at least 4ft away from space heaters. • Check your space heater power cord to make sure they aren’t cracked or frayed. If they are cracked or frayed, do not use them. • Always turn off heaters when your family is asleep or not home. Heaters should be used by adults only • Make sure the electric heater is UL approved, that it has a temperature control, it should also have a shut off to protect if it tips over Escape plan • You need one! Almost all home fires that are fatal happen between midnight and 8 a.m. During times people are asleep. When a smoke detector goes off, it’s possible you could have less than 2.5 mins to get out. Therefore every family should have an escape plan. • Make sure to have a family meeting place, everyone should know it. Good plans are knowing two ways out of each room and having your meeting spot outside the house. • Practice your escape plan at least two times a year. When you are safe outside, stay outside. Call 911 once outside.

Remember, your family’s safety starts with you. Wishing everyone a safe and happy holiday season, from our family to yours, Stacy Hughes, Delaware Township Volunteer Fire Company - Station 28 - Fire Prevention Committee Volunteers are always needed. If you are interested please contact us at: info@dtvfc.net

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019

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Pike County Fire Depts. Lackawaxen Twp. Volunteer Ambulance Service (Dept. 21) 109 PA Rt. 590, Greeley, PA 570-685-4022 Greeley Fire Department (Dept. 23) 245 PA Rt. 590, Greeley, PA 570-685-7537 Bushkill Fire Company (Dept. 24) 124 Evergreen Dr., Lehman, PA 570-588-6033 Blooming Grove Fire Dept. (Dept. 25) 484 PA Rt. 739, Hawley, PA 570-775-7355 Dingman Twp. Fire Dept. (Dept. 26) 680 Log Tavern Rd., Milford, PA 570-686-3696 Central Fire Dept. (Dept. 27) 574 Westcolang Rd., Hawley, PA 570-685-7344 Delaware Twp. Fire Co. (Dept. 28) 131 Wilson Hill Rd., Dingmans Ferry, PA - 570-828-2223 Delaware Twp. Ambulance Corp. (Dept. 28) 135 Park Rd., Dingmans Ferry, PA - 570-828-2345 Hemlock Farms Fire & Rescue (Dept. 29) 1053 Hemlock Farms, Lords Valley, PA - 570-775-6447 Lackawaxen Fire Dept. (Dept. 31) 116 Township Rd., Lackawaxen, PA - 570-685-7330 Matamoras Borough Fire Dept. (Dept. 32) 506 Avenue Q, Matamoras, PA 570-491-4154 Milford Fire Dept. (Dept. 33) 107 W. Catharine St., Milford, PA - 570-296-6121 Mill Rift Fire Dept. (Dept. 34) 139 Bluestone Blvd., Mill Rift, PA 570-491-4850 Promised Land Fire & Ambulance (Dept. 35) RR 390, Greentown, PA 570-676-3818 Tafton Fire Co. (Dept. 37) 235 PA Rt. 507, Hawley, PA 570-226-4273 Westfall Fire Dept. (Dept. 39) 101 Mtn. Ave., Matamoras, PA 570-491-4717 Shohola Fire Dept. (Dept. 41) 325 PA Rt. 434, Shohola, PA 570-559-7525 Forest Fire Dept. (Dept. 81) 1129 Towpath Rd., Hawley, PA 570-226-5022

NPS Announces Reduced Winter Services and Priority Snow Removal Routes Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area provides year-round recreational opportunities, however visitor services and maintenance operations are reduced during the winter months when staffing levels and visitation are at their lowest. This includes the closure of some roads and visitor use sites. Areas that will be closed through the winter were selected based on several factors including winterization of water supply systems, reduced custodial and maintenance staff, safety requirements, and other priorities for snow and ice removal. “Plowing and treating the main roads through the park is our top priority when we have snow and ice. Secondary roads, administrative buildings, and visitor use sites that will remain open for the winter will be plowed after the main roads have been cleared and are safe for travel. These areas may be closed temporarily in the interim and may not re-open for several days following a storm. Some park roads will receive no winter maintenance and will be closed to vehicles from January 2 to April 15.� said John Lambert, Chief of Maintenance at the park. Of the more than 150 miles of dirt and paved roads within the recreation area, a few have been determined to be of highest priority for snow and ice removal and treatment. These roads provide critical access to and through the park, including emergency access, and also provide routes for residents living within park boundaries to get to and from their homes. Park staff will make every effort to keep the priority routes open and safe for travel during and after winter weather events, however, roadways may be snow-covered and winter driving conditions may exist during a storm. Even high priority roads may be closed temporarily if conditions deteriorate faster than road crews can keep up with or in the event of equipment failures or breakdowns, but these roads will be re-opened as soon as park staff can get them cleared for travel.

New Jersey Roads: In New Jersey, the top priority roads that will remain open during the winter months are: Route 602 (from Millbrook Village to the NPS boundary); NPS Route 615; Old Mine Road (between Flatbrookville and Pompey Ridge Road); Pompey Ridge Road to Route 615; and Old Mine Road between Millbrook and Flatbrookville. Mountain Road, the dirt section of Old Mine Road south of Van Campen Inn, and Old Mine Road from Worthington State Forest and Millbrook Village will be closed between January 2 and April 15. The portion of Old Mine Road south of Millbrook may be opened temporarily during this period if there is no snow or ice on the pavement surface or in the forecast. If this happens, crews will close the road well ahead of any forecast of snow or ice so that they can focus on other identified priority routes. Additionally, Blue Mountain Lakes Road will remain open up to the parking area and will be closed beyond that point for the season.

Pennsylvania Road Closures: US Route 209 is the top priority road for winter maintenance and treatment in Pennsylvania. River Road in PA will be closed prior to snow and/or ice

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events and will not be re-opened until priority routes are clear and safe and conditions permit. Zion Church Road will be plowed after River Road has been opened. Visitor Information: Bushkill Meeting Center on Route 209 will be open Monday through Friday from 11 am to 4 pm from November 25 to December 31, except federal holidays. From January 2 to April 15, hours of operation will be Wednesday through Saturday from 10 am to 4 pm. River Access: Winter river access will be available at Smithfield Beach, Milford Beach, and Bushkill Access. These areas will be closed temporarily during a storm and re-opened after priority routes are clear and safe for travel. River ice may limit access depending on conditions. The NPS does not clear river ice from launch areas. Eshback Access will remain open but will receive no winter maintenance. Trail Access: All trails that are currently open will remain open during the winter months but trailhead parking will be dependent on conditions and may be limited in some areas. Road closures may also affect access to trails. Trailhead parking areas that will remain open during the winter months will not be cleared of ice and snow until after all priority routes are clear and safe for travel. Access to the McDade Recreational Trail will be available at Smithfield Beach, Park Headquarters, Bushkill Access, and Milford Beach. The parking lot and access road to Dingmans Falls will be closed from January 2 to April 15 but the trail will remain open and visitors may walk, ski, or snowshoe to the falls. The upper parking lot for Raymondskill Falls will be closed from the first snowfall until April 15 but the lower parking lot will remain open, as conditions permit. Restrooms: Restrooms are available at Kittatinny Point Picnic Area and Millbrook Village in NJ and at Smithfield Beach, Bushkill Meeting Center, Bushkill Access, and Milford Beach in PA. For more information on Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area and site openings and closures, call Bushkill Meeting Center at (570) 588-7237; visit our website at www.nps.gov/dewa; or follow us on Facebook at www.Facebook.com/DelWaterGapNPS.

LIVING DELAWARE | WINTER 2019


EVENTS Notice is hereby given that the meetings for the Delaware Township Board of Supervisors for 2020 will be on the second (2nd) and fourth (4th) Wednesday of each month on the following dates: January 8th and 22nd, February 12th and 26th, March 11th and 25th, April 8th and 22nd, May 13th and 27th, June 10th and 24th, July 8th and 22nd, August12th and 26th, September 9th and 23rd, October 14th and 28th. November and December meetings ONLY will be on the first and third Wednesday of each month on the following dates: November 4th and November 18th, and December 2nd and December 16th. All meetings to be held at the Delaware Township Municipal Building(s), located at 116 Wilson Hill Road, Dingmans Ferry, PA 18328. Workshops will begin at 6:00pm and regular meetings at 7:00pm.

PLANNING COMMISSION MEETINGS:

2020 Bulk Dump Disposal Days The Delaware Township Bulk Disposal will be open the first and third Saturday of each month from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. during the Spring, Summer and Fall. Bulk will only be available the first Saturday of the month during the winter months.

January 4, 2020 February 1, 2020 March 7, 2020 April 4, 2020 and April 18, 2020 May 2, 2020 and May 16, 2020 June 6, 2020 and June 20, 2019 July 18, 2020 August 1, 2020 and August 15, 2020 September 5, 2020 and September 19, 2020 October 3, 2020 (and October 17, 2020 November 7, 2020 December 5, 2020

The Delaware Township Planning Commission will hold regularly scheduled meetings on the first (1st) and third (3rd) Tuesdays of each month at 6:30 p.m.; with the fourth (4th) Tuesday as a workshop on an as needed basis.

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LEGISLATURE Northeast Legislators Announce Pike County to Receive Over $700,000 in Grants for Major Development Projects In efforts to bring further economic development to northeast Pennsylvania, Sen. Lisa Baker (R-Luzerne/ Pike/Susquehanna/ Wayne/Wyoming), and Reps. Rosemary Brown (R-Monroe/Pike) and Mike Peifer (R-Pike/ Wayne), announced today that Pike County will receive over $700,000 in multimodal grants from the Commonwealth Financing Authority, which will support two major projects in the county. “With the construction of the new Weis grocery store in Delaware Township, as well as the road improvements that come in tandem, this will help give our communities the economic boom they need to bring more jobs and more travelers to our area,” said Brown. “I am pleased to see that the funding came through and am eager to see the final product once the projects conclude.” “Economic growth and development are key for any community to continue

to thrive, which is why this funding is so crucial,” said Peifer. “The money these townships received will help them further develop and improve major roadways allowing for residents and visitors to travel more safely and efficiently while new services are offered, and jobs are created.” Weis Markets Inc. in Sunbury received $512,151 for roadway improvements at the new Delaware Plaza located in Delaware and Dingman townships, Pike County. The planned Delaware Plaza is a 26acre development to be anchored by a 63,000-square-foot Weis Markets grocery store.

turning lanes at three intersections affected by the new plaza, widening the roads and installing new pavement base drains at all four intersections within the project area. The project also include reconstructing existing driveways at Dingman Court and Dingman Place. The total project cost is $1.48 million. Pike County Economic Development Authority received $232,000 to construct intersection improvements to Route 739 for the future development of the Dingman Towne Center located in Dingman Township, Pike County.

Improvements include the The transportation construction of the access improvements will be road to the site including to four intersections on new signalization and a State Route 739. The mast arm, turning lanes improvements will consist and related signage. The of installing traffic signals Towne Center will be built at the plaza and routes in a cluster development, all 739 and 2006, new turning connected by a main spinal lanes and plaza driveway, road to the new traffic light adding additional intersection. Funds will be

used for highway occupancy permit (HOP) work and for the construction of the entry road to the site. The total cost for this phase of the project is $425,404. Matching funds will be provided by DEPG Dingman’s Associates, LLC in the amount of $127,621. “Whenever we can secure substantial state funding to assist in local development projects, as with these grants, it moves up the timetable for completion and eases the burden on local taxpayers,” said Baker. “These commercial projects will provide better access and more retail options for residents. This is another example of constructive cooperation between our communities and state government to support progress.”

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Representative Rosemary M. Brown 189th District Representative Mike Peifer 139th District Pennsylvania House of Representatives Media Contact: Abby Krueger 717.260.6617 akrueger@pahousegop.com RepBrown.com/RepPeifer.com

The Commonwealth Financing Authority (CFA) was established in 2004 as an independent agency of the Department of Community

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DIG DELAWARE Plants of Christmas By Carol Padalino Christmas plants are as basic to the holiday season as Santa Claus and Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer. The traditional greens including fir, holly, white pine and hemlock are seen in wreaths and decorations on front doors and porches everywhere.  I  have enjoyed reading about these plants and their legends in a small, old book “Plants of Christmas” by Hal Borland.  Besides the charming stories, the plants are beautifully illustrated by Anne Ophelia Dowden. The poinsettia was named for Dr. Joel Roberts Poinsett, U.S. ambassador to the Republic of Mexico from 1825 to 1829.  He was also a botanist and gardener and sent the poinsettia to America.  The color of this plant comes not from its flowers, but from its brilliant bracts.   Coming from mostly tropical Mexico, this plant was used  to decorate churches at Christmas.  It is a short day plant and only sets flowers when the nights are long and the days short.  Now the poinsettia is widely raised in greenhouses for the Christmas season. English holly, an evergreen with stiff, glossy, sharp pointed leaves and clusters of red berries, is also used in Christmas decorations.  It’s name is derived from the Old English holegn meaning “to prick”.   The holly tree is one of the most beloved trees in Celtic mythology and is believed to possess protective qualities such as guarding against evil spirits.  Legend has it that bringing the leaves inside   during the winter months would provide shelter from the cold for fairies who in return would protect those living in the dwelling. Tradition held that holly was a man’s plant and ivy, a woman”s.  To the Greeks, ivy was an emblem of happiness, fertility and honor.  Also an emblem of fidelity, it was used in wreaths for the newly married.  Ivy was used as decorations for churches and homes at Christmas, but only for outer areas.   Pagan customs  such as bringing evergreens into the house during the winter solstice continued   even after Christianity became dominant.  This custom is still popular during today’s Christmas celebrations. In most cases, the evergreen tree referred to in legends was the Norway spruce which was king of the conifer forests.  In England, it was a symbol of enduring life, while in Germany it was decorated with lights, flowers  and colored eggs.  European pagans were known to dress their homes with evergreen branches in order to bring color and light into  their dark winters.  In 2004, Pope John Paul called the Christmas tree a symbol of Christ.  This ancient custom, he said, exalts the value of life, as in winter, what is evergreen becomes a sign of undying life. Mistletoe legends go back to Norse mythology where it was the Druid’s golden herb.  It symbolized purity and strength and was hung in houses to bring happiness, promote romance and enforce peace.  Because of the plant’s pagan associations, the Church banned it from Christmas ceremonies.  But people continued to use it secretly as hidden amulets.  In Norse mythology, it was used as a sign of love and friendship, hence the custom of kissing under the mistletoe.

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Living Delaware Township - Winter 2019/20  

Living Delaware Township - Winter 2019/20