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TH E VOIC E O F THE HARDWOOD IN DUSTRY

H A R D W O O D M AT T E R S Ma rch 20 1 8

Hardwood Cross-Laminated Timber: Why We Should Care

pl us ASIA’S FURNITURE INDUSTRY OUTLOOK INFASTRUCTURE AND TRUCK WEIGHT EFFICIENCY

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F T H E N AT I O N A L H A R D W O O D L U M B E R A S S O C I AT I O N S T R O N G R O O T S . G L O B A L R E A C H . | W W W. N H L A . C O M


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CONTENTS March 2018 • Issue 187

WHAT'S INSIDE

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ONLINE

feature

instant

10 Hardwood Cross-Laminated Timber: Why We Should Care

TOP POST OF THE MONTH at facebook.com/NHLAOfficial

12 ‘Asia’s Furniture Industry Outlook: Status and Market Prospects’

Alumni, what are your words of encouragment for the 185th class as they wrap up week 3?

departments 8 Legislative Log 16 Rules Corner 17 Alumni Notes

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reader services 4 6 18 20

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President’s Message In The News Educational Calendar Job Board

nhla.com 2019 NHLA RULES CHANGE RESUTLS ARE IN! TORONTO 2018 SAVE THE DATE OCT. 2-4

Follow us

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H A R D W O O D M AT T E R S T H E VO I C E O F T H E H A R DWO O D I N D U ST RY National Hardwood Lumber Association PO Box 34518 • Memphis, TN 38184-0518 901-377-1818 • 901-382-6419 (fax) info@nhla.com • www.nhla.com

THE MISSION OF NH LA To serve NHLA Members engaged in the commerce of 2 North American hardwood lumber by: maintaining order, structure and ethics in the changing global hardwood marketplace; providing unique member services; promoting North American hardwood lumber and advocating the interest of the hardwood community in public/private policy issues; and providing a platform for networking opportunities.

ADVERTISER INDEX 20 Dunavant 3 King City/Northway Forwarding IFC Pike Lumber Company, Inc. 7 RossiGroup 5 Thompson Appalachian Hardwoods IBC TRN USA Forest LLC 15 U•C Coatings

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

MISSION LEADERS

Brent Stief Huron Forest Products President

Jon Syre Cascade Hardwood LLC Unique Services

Darwin Murray McClain Forest Products Vice President

Nordeck Thompson Thompson Appalachian Hardwoods Rules

Pem Jenkins Turn Bull Lumber Co. Past President 2014-2016

Orn Gudmundsson, Jr. Northland Corporation Structure

NHLA STAFF

Mike Powers Maley & Wertz Industry Advocacy & Promotion

Lorna D. Christie CEO l.christie@nhla.com Amanda Hinesley Digital Marketing Specialist a.hinesley@nhla.com Renee Hornsby Director of Communications/Editor r.hornsby@nhla.com Jennifer VanDyke Marketing Manager j.vandyke@nhla.com

■■■ Trisha Clariana Office Manager Desirée Freeman Controller Julia Ganey Member Relations Manager Rich Hascher Inspector Training School Instructor John Hester Director of Membership and Business Development Carol McElya Accounting Assistant & Publications

For advertising inquiries: Contact John Hester, Director of Membership at j.hester@nhla.com or 901-399-7558.

Becky Miller Inspector Training School Administrator Dana Spessert Chief Inspector

Kevin Gillette Tioga Hardwoods Membership & Networking COMMITTEE CHAIRS Dave Mayfield Mayfield Lumber Co. Membership Dave Bramlage Cole Hardwood, Inc. Promotion & Advocacy Garner Robinson Robinson Lumber Convention Pem Jenkins Turn Bull Lumber Co. Nominating Steve Jones Ron Jones Hardwood Sales, Inc Inspection Services Orn Gudmundsson, Jr. Northland Corporation Finance Bucky Pescaglia Missouri-Pacific Lumber Co., Inc. ITS/Continuing Education Stephanie VanDystadt DV Hardwoods, Inc. Communications & Marketing Joe Snyder Fitzpatrick & Weller, Inc. Rules Darwin Murray McClain Forest Products Strategic Planning

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PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE

2017 YEAR-END REVIEW

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4 year-end budget uring the NHLA and financial review by the Executive Committee, I was reminded of the need to inform the membership of everything going on at NHLA. The EC deals with the NHLA operations and financials every month, so they are aware of the changes and improvements taking place. All too often we assume that everyone knows and understands what we see all of the time. I want to take this opportunity to explain how different the NHLA of today compares to the NHLA of just a few years ago. First, NHLA revenues grew 10% in 2017 due to the new approach of providing members with new value for their dues investment. It was a great year thanks to an improving partnership between the staff and the board, as well as exceptional planning and budget management. We had an extremely successful convention in Nashville, offered members new sponsorship opportunities and dramatically increased the value provided by the Industry Services team. Stay tuned for new consulting services offered by our Inspectors, as well as new educational opportunities. The strong foundation established in 2017, will ensure that we are able to meet or exceed the 7% revenue increase forecasted for this year. Bottom line, NHLA is planning to, and delivering the services our members value. We are improving member engagement by including more relevant material in our publications and equally important, thanking our members for their support. This was all made possible by building better connections with members as well as an enhanced understanding of member needs and effective planning. Over the last five years, situations have caused NHLA to dip in to financial reserves rather seriously. We felt like an industry association in decline – a slow decline, but a decline nonetheless. Last year, we actually grew net members. I cannot remember the last year

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membership actually grew. Our staff plans to grow it again in 2018, thanks in part to new marketing hires. This change is real. It is the result of a fundamental shift in attitude in management and the entire staff. And thanks to our new 2017 strategic plan, staff is also focused on making members more aware of all of the services we have available. We are also near the end of our new database installation. Like most new database installations, this has come with a few glitches but it will now start to pay dividends in more efficient service, identifying new prospects, and lowering administrative costs. It will also provide the staff with data to help them gear more programs to where they are most desired.  NHLA’s financial position is strong and ready to take on 2018 and beyond. We have excellent accounting and measurement practices.  Your staff (not the EC) are on top of weekly fluctuations in revenues and expenses. They have a budget that they designed with the help of the entire board, to which they are totally committed. They believe it, and they will deliver results that will make you proud.  On behalf of the entire board, I wanted you to know that our management is keen to add to membership value, and provide programs that will make the industry more profitable for all. We will keep you updated throughout 2018. In the meantime, don’t hesitate to visit our website, or call our dedicated staff to find out more about what “the new NHLA” has to offer. Regards,

Brent Stief, NHLA President | Huron Forest Products brent@huronfp.com

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IN THE NEWS

Fleet Owner Magazine January 29, 2018

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How to cash in on ELDs By Sean Kilcarr Electronic logging devices can save fleets money and pay for themselves, if used correctly. David Carruth will tell you that when he switched his 55-truck LTL fleet over to electronic logs back in 2015, his intent was to make recording hours of service (HOS) information simpler and more accurate for both his full-time company drivers and contracted owner-operators. “One of the stresses we found with paper logs is that drivers really never knew when their day was going to end,” Carruth, CEO of Canada-based ONE For Freight, told Fleet Owner. “By moving over to electronic logs, they know exactly when their day must end and allow us to plan around that accordingly,” he said. “It holds everyone else in the company accountable to the driver’s time and puts them all on a level playing field, including the dispatcher and the technician.” http://www.fleetowner.com/driver-logs/how-cash-elds

Indiana Hardwood Lumbermen’s Association February 7, 2018

The R Street Institute February 9, 2018

WOMEN WEARING WOOD

MANDATED ELECTRONIC LOGGING DEVICES WILL PUMP THE BRAKES ON THE TRUCKING INDUSTRY

These wooden dresses were designed and produced by Dr. Eva Haviarova of Purdue University (pictured above right) with the intension to demonstrate differently, Hardwood Value Added or as we illustrated in the in Jan/Feb issue of Hardwood Matters – A New Look at Hardwood Promotion.

The economy is finally emerging from a period of its slowest growth in several decades, and guess what’s about to put the brakes back on?

Kendria Huff – undergraduate student in the Sustainable Biomaterials program at Purdue, FNR

By Alan Smith

Following a frenzied, multi-pronged effort by independent over-the-road truckers to stave off the new federal requirement that drivers use electronic logging devices (ELDs) to calculate hours of service, the Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) has opened a comment period to consider a five-year exemption for small businesses at the request of the Owner Operator Independent Drivers Association (OOIDA). https://www.rstreet.org/2018/02/09/mandated-electronic-loggingdevices-will-pump-the-brakes-on-the-trucking-industry

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SALES Sales@rossilumber.com rd Map Maple • Soft Map Maple • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tuli ulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Map Maple • Soft Map Maple • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tuli ulipwood • www.rossigroup.net Middletown, CT, USA Ph 01 (860) 632 3505 Fax 01 (860) 613 3727

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rd Maple • Soft Maple • Red Oak • White Oak ak • T Tulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Maple • Soft Maple • Red Oak • White Oak ak • T Tulipwood •

rd Maple • Soft Maple le • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tulipwood • Ash • Cherry • Hard Maple • Soft Maple le • Red Oak • White Oak • T Tulipwood •

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LEGISLATIVE LOG

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INFASTRUCTURE AND TRUCK WEIGHT EFFICIENCY

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by DANA COLE, Executive Director Hardwood Federation

resident Trump gave his first State of the Union address on January 29, laying out his agenda for 2018. A significant piece of that agenda was addressing the state of the national infrastructure an issue in great need of attention, but one that has bedeviled past Administrations.

the U.S. system is in need of attention and improvement. In 2017, the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) gave the U.S. a grade of D+ for its overall infrastructure quality. The study cited eye opening statistics, including the following:

Infrastructure as a category is a diverse one. It encompasses a wide range of matters including roads, bridges, waterways, railways, energy sources, aviation and dams. There is broad agreement that

• BRIDGES: The U.S. has 614,387 bridges, almost four in 10 of which are 50 years or older. 56,007 — 9.1% — of the nation’s

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• ROADS: More than two out of every five miles of America’s urban interstates are congested and traffic delays cost the country $160 billion in wasted time and fuel in 2014. One out of every five miles of highway pavement is in poor condition and our roads have a significant and increasing backlog of rehabilitation needs.

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An issue that may surface in the infrastructure debate is truck weight efficiency. A new coalition has formed called SHIP—Safer Hauling and Infrastructure Protection—that is advocating for heavier trucks on our nation’s interstate with the addition of a sixth axle. So, the rig is not wider or longer, but will accommodate more weight without any more tire pressure on the roadway given that extra axle. The coalition is being funded by pulp and paper manufacturers and brewers like Anheuser Busch that have long complained that trucks leaving their facilities are half empty because they weigh out before they cube out. A similar proposal was defeated during consideration of the last highway bill, but shippers are committed to getting something passed in this issue space.

Infrastructure as an issue is one that impacts us all, not only as businesses, but as every day citizens living our lives.”

bridges were structurally deficient in 2016, and on average there were 188 million trips across a structurally deficient bridge each day. • DAMS: The average age of the 90,580 dams in the U.S. is 56 years. The overall number of high-hazard potential dams is increasing, with the number climbing to nearly 15,500 in 2016. Due to the lack of investment, the number of deficient high-hazard potential dams has also climbed to an estimated 2,170 or more. • DRINKING WATER: Drinking water is delivered via one million miles of pipes across the country. Many of those pipes were laid in the early to mid-20th century with a lifespan of 75 to 100 years. The quality of drinking water in the United States remains high, but legacy and emerging contaminants continue to require close attention. While water consumption is down, there are still an estimated 240,000 water main breaks per year in the United States, wasting over two trillion gallons of treated drinking water. Infrastructure seems to be an agenda item for every President, regardless of party affiliation, but the silver bullet for achievable reform has been elusive. Although specific details of the Trump Administration’s $1.5 trillion plan were not revealed during the State of

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the Union, several broad principles could be identified: • Incentives for cities and states to fund local projects through dedicated revenue streams; • Block grants for increased broadband access in rural areas; • Expansion of existing federal infrastructure loan programs; • Encouraging innovative transportation efforts; • Transportation workforce development programs; • Permitting reform to shorten government approval time for infrastructure projects. Infrastructure as an issue is one that impacts us all, not only as businesses, but as every day citizens living our lives. The Hardwood Federation will continue to follow the debate with interest and will engage as appropriate . . . not only to meet the needs of the hardwood business sector, but to meet the needs of the men and women who depend on that sector for their livelihood. www.hardwoodfederation.com

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Daytime view, Framework, Portland, OR, 2016. Courtesy LEVER Architecture. The 130 foot tall Framework building will be one of the tallest timber buildings in the United States when complete. Designed by LEVER Architecture, Framework was one of two competition winners of the U.S. Tall Wood Building Prize, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

HARDWOOD CROSS-LAMINATED TIMBER WHY WE SHOULD CARE by URS BUEHLMANN, Professor / Department of Sustainable Biomaterials Virginia Tech

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Maybe most importantly, the hardwood industry needs to get involved in formulating CLT standards and the corresponding building codes to ensure that hardwoods are allowed as a viable raw material for CLT manufacturing.

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ue to environmental, economic, and aesthetic advantages, Cross Laminated Timber (CLT), defined as “Prefabricated engineered wood product made of at least three orthogonally bonded layers of solid-sawn lumber that are laminated by gluing of longitudinal and transverse layers with structural adhesives to form a solid rectangular-shaped element intended for roof, floor, or wall applications” has attracted considerable attention from developers, construction professionals, and other (public) decision makers. So much so that in 2014, the U.S. Government, together with the Softwood Lumber Board and the Binational Softwood Lumber council has announced the U.S. Tall Wood Building Prize Competition which promises the winner(s) support “. . . For incremental costs of pioneering wood construction techniques . . .” However, not only the Federal Government has seen the promises of building with wood, the State of Oregon, to name another example, is moving aggressively to support the emerging future where wood will be used for all types of building construction. Thus, several CLT buildings have received support from the U.S. Tall Wood Building Prize Competition program and more have been built or are being built throughout the nation. Unfortunately for the hardwood industry, all the interest and demand to build with CLT is entirely a softwood affair. Despite research results showing the feasibility and, in some aspects, the superiority of making CLT from hardwoods, our industry has failed to capture the opportunity. Thus, today, the standard for the certification of structural CLT (ANSI/APA PRG 320-2017) explicitly allows only softwoods for the production of CLT. But even without this explicit requirement, hardwoods would have a difficult time conforming with the standard as is due to other, less obvious requirements. For example, the moisture content of the wood to be used for the manufacture of CLT is set at 12± 3%, which is above the typical moisture content of appearance graded hardwood lumber of 6 to 8%. Furthermore, ANSI/APA PRG 320-2017 requires the CLT product to conform to tests that are more difficult for hardwoods to meet than they are for softwoods. For example, the Cyclic Delamination Test (AITC Test T110-2007) looks at the quality of the adhesive bond between two pieces of wood. It essentially requires soaking the wood in water and then drying it back. Hardwoods, due to higher shrinkage/swelling coefficients compared to softwoods, perform worse in such tests. So, why should the hardwood industry care? Haven’t we been the industry that produces appearance grade products, the industry that provides material to make beautiful things that are visible and bring warmth to everyone’s home? Yes, indeed, we do and we will continue to do. But our operations also produce substantial volumes of lower grade material that is being used for low value applications. Why not use “ . . . low value hardwood to create high value construction . . .” to quote Lorna Christie, CEO of NHLA?

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Today, there is only one commercial producer of hardwood (birch) CLT, Hasslacher Norica Timber in Austria. However, as hardwoods have gained interest for construction purposes over the past years, numerous successful hardwood construction projects have been executed successfully, albeit mainly in Europe. Research into the subject has increased greatly, too, and has produced interesting results. A recent literature search confirmed that the production of hardwood CLT is technically feasible and that hardwood CLT offers comparable or better structural performance compared to softwood CLT. However, for hardwood CLT to capture market share and help the industry prosper, efforts are required to overcome some challenges. Maybe most importantly, the hardwood industry needs to get involved in formulating CLT standards and the corresponding building codes to ensure that hardwoods are allowed as a viable raw material for CLT manufacturing. Questions such as lumber quality (structural, not appearance), lumber width and thickness requirements, moisture content, bonding strength, procurement and processing considerations, as well as the issue of cost must be investigated and resolved. Also, thought has to be given to how our industry will handle the potential volumes of lumber being directed towards the production of CLT without starving the existing customer base. And finally, the design/build community of architects, engineers, developers and other decision makers need to be told of and become convinced that our material offers an economic and sustainable solution to their construction needs. Time will tell how successful we are in addressing these and other challenges to introduce hardwood CLT as a material of choice for selected construction needs.

Façade detail (axonometric), Framework, Portland, OR, 2016. Courtesy LEVER Architecture. Axonometric view of the building’s façade, featuring Aluminum Composite Material (ACM) panels and recessed windows. Designed by LEVER Architecture, Framework is one of two competition winners of the U.S. Tall Wood Building Prize, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

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Wegmans - American Oak ‘Newman’ furniture detail.

‘Asia’s Furniture Industry Outlook:

Status and Market Prospects’ by MICHAEL BUCKLEY

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he value of the global furniture market is estimated at around US$430 billion – depending who you talk to. I like to quote CSIL in Milan as an authority. But who really knows how much of that is wood and does it really matter in the context of predicting the furniture industry’s prospects? Of course, the use of wood does matter a great deal when it comes to considering the environmental impact of not using wood. And what we can say is that there is a gradual, if fragile, upturn in the global economy and that always helps the furniture industry. Notice in the chart to the right that over 50% of global consumption is China and U.S. Data on the amount of furniture which is wooden, such as the 80% quoted by Malaysia, does not really take into account the effect of mixed materials. So we can only talk about the general direction of the wooden furniture industries.

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Current Global Furniture Consumption (Source: CSIL Milan) What we also know is the value of global furniture trade is approaching $150 billion and with China accounting for almost 40% of pro-

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Fast growing, small diameter plantation in Thailand.

duction it is no secret which country influences raw material supplies and furniture markets. The forecasts for global consumption in 2017 and 2018 contain uncertainties, mainly due to U.S. trade policy under the current administration and also political problems in Europe. So with only $150 billion traded out of $430 billion manufactured, one can see the importance of domestic markets especially in Asia in general and China in particular – and perhaps to some extent in U.S. Right from the outset I venture to suggest that furniture markets are price-driven more now than ever before. Thus manufacturers are under great pressure to improve efficiency and yields and to cut costs. (In Kuala Lumpur in 2016, I suggested that furniture is in danger of following the clothing market – with downward trends in prices. I cited the case of a Malaysian-made upholstered stool offered to wholesalers at US$2.90 as an extreme example. What remains true today however is that the furniture market is price-driven, except at the very top end.) Despite the current focus by China on its domestic market, China is still the largest exporter of furniture, although not all wood! For example, China is the number one supplier of furniture imported by Malaysia. (see chart to the right) Then let’s look at furniture manufacturing bases and markets in Asia. I will focus on five ‘M’s as some of the key issues: Manufacturing, Management, Materials, Markets and Money.

MANUFACTURING

With labor varying from foreign worker dependence in one country to self-sufficiency in another means that it is difficult to compare one country with another. Lack of labor eventually leads to investment in automation and innovation. But as furniture manufacturing W W W. N H L A .C O M

is both capital and labor intensive, like no other, manufacturers with the most adequate labor force, balanced with capital investment, will succeed best. Efficiency, by improving yield, has always been an issue but with technology can be further improved – particularly with high speed optimizers and data gathering of raw materials. Recent investment signals from woodworking machinery manufacturers from Taiwan, Germany and Italy currently indicate that some Asian industries (Vietnam and Indonesia) are gearing up for growth and improved efficiency in furniture manufacturing.

MANAGEMENT

Management methods vary so much in Asia that it is almost impossible to draw comparisons, but Q.C. needs to be, and is becoming, ever more stringent with buyers’ inspectors operating in plants almost like

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staff and should be welcomed if claims are to be avoided. Moisture control of materials and finished products depends on ambient climate and therefore location of manufacturing. ISO standards and attention to VOCs as a key issue needs no introduction these days. The hot topic today is Due Diligence (DD), not only on product out, but also increasingly for materials inwards.

MATERIALS

The furniture industry is ever more dependent on fast grown, small diameter plantation species such as rubber-wood and acacia, but international furniture product markets are not always receptive. This is not always helped by misleading names such as ‘Malaysian oak’, for example. (See – ‘Finish Now’ journal by MIFF, August 2017 page 28 ‘Update on the Malaysian Furniture Industry’) I thought that had been killed off by legal threats from the EU years ago. Increasingly, materials other than wood such as metal and glass are being incorporated into modern style furniture. Pigments are also increasingly common14 in painted and stained furniture. There can be many approaches to colours which are increasingly supplanting the look of raw wood. Packaging is the great protector of furniture, but a cost along with freight, that requires analysis. Certification, or at least DD, of both materials and finished products is now a fact of life in markets outside Asia and maybe soon in Asia.

home-grown design talent and capabilities. However there are, in my personal view, still too many manufacturers giving scant attention to their design capabilities.

MARKET PROSPECTS & TRENDS “For the year 2018 consumption of furniture in the 100 countries is forecasted to grow by about 3.5% in real terms worldwide. The fastest growing region continues to be Asia and Pacific, with all other regions growing between 1% and 3% in real terms”. CSIL - Milan I certainly agree with that statement and I see huge growth continuing in Vietnam and for all Asian producers who can succeed in the Chinese market. So turning to trends there are a number of discernible changes. Painted and stained furniture is increasing and so wooden furniture is showing less wood. An insight into the new stain colours, that finishing manufacturers are marketing, provides a clue and, at the end of 2017, this colour range below was the offering from one of the leading manufacturers of finishes, with ‘clay’ and garnet likely to be the most popular. Metal and veneer furniture is also an increasing trend.

The most pertinent point of the data in this table is the absence of China, confirming it is increasingly a domestic market. China, for example, is only Malaysia’s 10th market.

MONEY

The world economy currently shows some signs of improving from the crisis of 2008 and the dip in 2015 but is still facing major issues on governance, exchange rates and uncertainty of interest rates for 2018 onwards, which could easily affect consumer purchasing. No forecasts here - sorry! Design ultimately determines what sector and at what level furniture manufacturers operate. I doubt there are many that do not believe Asia needs to up its design game, particularly in developing

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In fact it is probably true to say that only high-end furniture, with design at its heart is not price-driven. Many furniture trends develop W W W. N H L A .C O M


ANCHORSEAL® Superior Protection for Superior Hardwoods.

Wegmans - Walnut veneer on Rubberwood frame 2016 collection.

from top designers down and to this extent Asian manufacturers are still looking to Italy for the lead. The industry, as always, is facing challenges – of which I see raw material supply and increasing government legislation as the two most important. But keeping up with trends is vital, but so is anticipating what buyers will want. In the future this is likely to focus on better furniture in the middle market. A recent example was the increasing need for smaller space furniture. Ask some American and European companies why they went out of business and while many will cite cheaper labour elsewhere, especially in Asia, falling behind on manufacturing innovation and design may be nearer the truth. Finally online and virtual shopping may become a big disrupter for the industry.

• Protection for the cut ends of logs and lumber • Prevents up to 90% or more of end checks • Conserves resources and improves yield • Easy application

However in conclusion the bottom line for Asia is simply that the current status of Asia’s furniture production and markets appears better than anywhere else in the world and is set for at least modest growth, if not more.

WOOD PROTECTION PRODUCTS

1-888-363-2628 sales@uccoatings.com www.uccoatings.com Left plantation hardwood material alongside U.S. tulipwood lumber. W W W. N H L A .C O M

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RULES CORNER

CHANGES To the 2019 Rules book FOR THE MEASUREMENT AND INSPECTION OF HARDWOOD & CYPRESS

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by DANA SPESSERT, NHLA Chief Inspector

ast month, NHLA announced the results of the proposed Rules Changes that will go in to effect January of 2019. I would like to take this opportunity to explain in more detail the changes that will be made based on the result of the NHLA Rules Committee meeting. 16

The only NHLA Rule that will be changed as a result of the membership vote, pertains to Aromatic Red Cedar on page 34 of the 2015 version of the NHLA Rules Book. The change that will be made effects the thickness measurement for determining if it is Miscut. The current Rule allows for a variation in thickness of ½” for 4/4 to 8/4, this could cause many problems with drying and machining. The NEW Rule will now be the same as the standard Miscut Rule on page 5, paragraph 9 only allowing over thickness and no under thickness. (Please refer to the Miscut Rule for more information.) The Rules changes that are made based on membership votes are not the only changes to the 2019 NHLA Rules Book. Additional changes can be made to simply clarify the interpretation of some of the less understood Rules. These clarification changes are based on the many questions received from National Inspectors and/or have been published in articles by the Chief Inspector. The clarifications that passed through the Committee and will be added to the 2019 Rules Book are below:

“In F1F and Selects, limitation applies to better face only. In FAS, limitation exceeding on both faces will reduce the grade to 1 Common.” This will clarify how to handle a FAS board that exceeds the mineral limitation. 4. Page 9, paragraph 24: a. Remove “grades of ” This change will make the sentence grammatically correct and easier to understand. In addition to the Rules changes and clarification edits, in this update of the Rules Book we will be adding a new section of “Tips and Tricks”. This section will be in the back of the Rules Book and is in no way intended to be applied as Rules, simply a way to help apply Rules and other aspects of grading lumber. Tips and Tricks to be added to the back of the Rules Book are as follows: 1. To determine 2/3 the width of the board, use the 16’ scale on the lumber rule and divide by 2.

2. To determine value for upgrading, obtain the percentage difference between lumber prices, then divide 100 by the surface mea1. On page 7, paragraph 17: Tapering lumber: a. Add – “Width of the piece is determined at the narrowest point sure. When reducing the surface measure percentage, do not exceed the percentage difference of the prices. in the standard length with a sawn edge.” a. Example: FAS $1200 – 1 Common $850 divided by FAS This is to clarify the way that the NHLA Chief Inspector and $1200 = 29%. The board: 100 divided by 6’ SM = 16.66%, NHLA National Inspectors measure the width and is also learned removing 1 foot SM will be profitable. the Inspector Training School. 3. To determine the amount of side bend in a board, stand the board on its edge and measure the bend at its greatest distance from 2. Page 26 & 27, Red Oak, White Oak, & Locust (Plain Sawn) a straight line. When taking full length cuttings, this amount must and (Quarter): a. Add to the end of the Mineral limitation: “In F1F and Selects, be deducted from the total width of the cutting. limitation applies to better face only. In FAS, limitation exceeding a. Example: A board 6” wide and 10’ long with a 1” bend would allow a maximum 5” wide, full length cutting. on both faces will reduce the grade to 1 Common.” This will clarify how to handle a FAS board that exceeds the mineral limitation.

I appreciate all of the votes cast by our members in this year’s voting process. Please let me know if you have any questions about the Rules Changes or voting process.

3. Page 24, Basswood a. Add to the end of the black or brown spots or streaks limitation:

Chief Inspector, Dana Spessert, d.spessert@nhla.com.

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ALUMNI NOTES

WHERE ARE THEY NOW? TREY TRAINUM, 111th CLASS WHAT'S YOUR FONDEST INSPECTOR TRAINING SCHOOL MEMORY? It was studying from the oak trailer floor tables in the classroom. HOW DID THE CLASS FURTHER YOUR CAREER? The class gave the basics of grading hardwood lumber which was necessary for entering the industry. After graduation and two inspector positions later, a purchasing position came available. The inspector positions and purchasing position led to four sales positions which in retrospect took me to nine countries within three continents. I would have never been a past president of The Lumbermen’s Club of Memphis if I hadn’t quit my first career and signed up for the 111th Class. WHAT IS YOUR CURRENT OCCUPATION? I am currently the Sales Manager at Oakman Hardwood, Inc. WHAT IS YOUR FAVORITE ASPECT OF YOUR JOB? My favorite aspect of the job is being nimble and changing gears as markets change. Are you an ITS Alumni? We’d love to hear from you. Send us your story or give us an update at alumninews@nhla.com.

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What is the NHLA Inspector Training School Progressive Class all about? The NHLA dictionary defines the progressive class as NHLA Inspector Training School Progressive Class

n·h·l·a \ in-ach-el-a \ in·spec·tor \ in-spek-ter \ train·ing \ trey-ning \ school \ skool \ pro·gres·sive \ pruh-gres-iv \ class \ klas \

A class designed to get your employees trained at a progressive pace saving you time and money. 1 Related to or characterized as progress; moving forward, onward; advancing. 2 A person employeed to grade lumber, to oversee the profits of a mill. 3 A body of students meeting regulary in person & online.

Register Now

Block 1 • April 9-21 • Memphis, TN

www.nhla.com/education/inspector-training-school

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EDUCATION & TRAINING For hardwood business owners and their employees Register for classes at www.nhla.com/calendar

MARCH

5-23

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Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 3 Final block of study for ITS Progressive Program. Only students who have successfully completed Block 1 & 2 can apply.

Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN

MARCH

! New 15-16

Sawing and Edging Workshop

Improve your sawing & edging skills and improve the yield of higher grade lumber. More yield = more revenue Venue: University of Kentucky / Jackson, KY Instructor: Barry Kibbey, NHLA National Inspector

Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

MARCH

19-23 Intro to Hardwood Lumber Grading

Intro class to gain a basic understanding of the NHLA hardwood lumber grading rules and how the rules affect the value of lumber.. Venue: Maysville Communmity and Technical College / Morehead, KY Instructor: Barry Kibbey, NHLA National Inspector

MARCH

APRIL

APRIL

APRIL

27-29

9-20

18-20

30-May 2

Intro to Hardwood Lumber Grading

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 1

Intro to Hardwood Lumber Grading

Intro to Hardwood Lumber Grading

Intro class to gain a basic understanding of the NHLA hardwood lumber grading rules and how the rules affect the value of lumber. Venue: Graber Lumber Company / Spencerville, IN

Alternative program to the 12week Inspector Training School Block 1: Two weeks of hands-on training Block 2: Online study time Block 3: Three weeks handson training and testing

Instructor: Barry Kibbey, NHLA National Inspector

Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN

Intro class to gain a basic understanding of the NHLA hardwood lumber grading rules and how the rules affect the value of lumber.

Intro class to gain a basic understanding of the NHLA hardwood lumber grading rules and how the rules affect the value of lumber.

Venue: Allard Lumber Company / Battleboro, VT

Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN

Instructor: Jack English, NHLA National Inspector

Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

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EDUCATION IS KEY TO YOUR COMPANY’S SUCCESS "No better place to start in the lumber/forest industry. That knowledge can carry you in many avenues of our industry." —Michael Klingler, NHLA Inspector Training School 116th Class

For Inspecor Training School info visit www.nhla.com/education/inspector-training-school

MAY

MAY

16-Aug 3

22-24

Inspector Training School 186th Class

Walnut Lumber Grading

Traditional 10 week hands-on training to achieve the certificate of completion in Hardwood Lumber Inspection.

This seminar is designed to teach Walnut lumber grading. This is the only species that will be discussed.

Venue: Northwestern Michigan College Traverse City, Michigan

Venue: Ohio State University South Centers / Piketon, OH

Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

Instructor: Tom Byers, NHLA National Inspector

JUNE

JUNE

AUGUST

AUGUST

4-7

19-21

6-17

29-Nov 17

Intro to Hardwood Lumber Grading

Inspector Training School Progressive Program BLOCK 1

Inspector Training School 187th Class

Intro to Hardwood Lumber Grading

Intro class to gain a basic understanding of the NHLA hardwood lumber grading rules and how the rules affect the value of lumber.

Intro class to gain a basic understanding of the NHLA hardwood lumber grading rules and how the rules affect the value of lumber.

Venue: Yoder Lumber Co., Inc. Millersburg, OH

Venue: North Carolina State University / Raleigh, NC

Instructor: Barry Kibbey, NHLA National Inspector

Instructor: Mark Bear, NHLA National Inspector

Alternative program to the 12week Inspector Training School Block 1: Two weeks of hands-on training Block 2: Online study time Block 3: Three weeks handson training and testing Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN

Traditional 12 week hands-on training to achieve the certificate of completion in Hardwood Lumber Inspection. Venue: NHLA Headquarters Memphis, TN Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor

Instructor: Rich Hascher, NHLA ITS Instructor W W W. N H L A .C O M

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JOB BOARD

* To view current job postings or to post a job, visit www.nhla.com/industry-services/job-board.

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

An equivalent combination of education and experience may substitute for the Bachelor’s Degree.

The Hardwood Forest Foundation is seeking a qualified individual to serve as its Executive Director.

We offer a comprehensive benefits package including life insurance; health, dental, vision and prescription coverage; vacation and holiday pay; flexible spending accounts; and 401(k) plan with employer contributions. Salary is negotiable

The Executive Director is the key management leader and chief visionary spokesperson of the Hardwood Forest Foundation, responsible for overseeing and stewarding the administration, programs and strategic plan of the organization. Other key duties include fundraising, marketing, and community outreach. This position requires a broad-based knowledge of the forest products industry and a deep commitment to the ongoing education and promotion of the industry to the public. The position reports directly to the Board of Directors.

Please go directly to our careers page on the Timber Products Company website at https://www.timberproducts.com/about/careers. Select “View Open Positions” and follow the links to apply for this position. Applications will be accepted through March 30, 2018. Timber Products Company E11256 M-28 East | Munising, MI 49862 Phone: 906-452-7009

For additional information email info@hardwoodforest.org.

HARDWOOD LUMBER SALES MANAGER

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Timber Products Michigan is seeking a Hardwood Lumber Sales Manager for its Munising, MI manufacturing facility. Must be proficient in the use of computers and a variety of software programs. Knowledge of and ability to apply NHLA grading rules preferred. Excellent communication skills, strong organizational skills, ability to work in a team environment and produce results in conjunction with fellow team members, and willingness to travel within the USA, primarily within the Midwest, with additional visits to Canada and Mexico as necessary, is essential.

LUMBER INSPECTOR

AHC Clarksville is seeking an experienced Lumber Inspector both green and kiln dried. 2+ years experience required. We offer a comprehensive benefits package incuding 401K, health, dental and vision Insurance, as well as, production bonuses paid monthly. We are a growing company with advancement potential. To apply please email your resume to kbergeron@hardwoodweb.com.

A minimum of 5 years of sales experience in a related field is required, and a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing, Business Administration, or other technical field is preferred.

AHC Clarksville 310 Dover Rd | Clarksville, TN 37042 Phone: 931-472-0389 EXT 17

Managing domestic and international commodities logistics, delivered with superior customer service.

DUNAVANT.COM

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THE GLOBAL GATHERING OF THE HARDWOOD COMMUNITY

TORONTO 2018

NHLA ANNUAL CONVENTION & EXHIBIT SHOWCASE

SAVE THE DATE: OCTOBER 2-4 Don’t forget Passports are required! SHER ATON CENTRE | W W W.NHL ACONVENTION.COM

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