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Spring 2017 Continuing Education Catalog


Calling all outliers, innovators, activists, entrepreneurs, and creators to find your home alongside like-minded continuing education students at The New School’s Open Campus. Join a uniquely diverse student body, united by the same drive, vision, and values. Develop your skills in a hive of cross-disciplinary collaboration, making social and personal connections that enhance your knowledge, skills, and progress in unexpected ways. More than a course. A new kind of network.


THE NEW SCHOOL AND OPEN CAMPUS Since 1919, The New School has been reinventing education. Today this comprehensive university continues to pioneer new approaches to learning. This is evident in our newest offering, Open Campus. Open Campus, our continuing education solution, offers a wealth of programs to satisfy every type of student, including youth and teen programs, short courses, programs for the retired, certificate programs, and courses in management, art and design, writing, language, and liberal arts. Open Campus also offers students a vibrant network of faculty, scholars, and fellow students found only here.


Flexible Program Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Resources for Continuing Education . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Campus Directory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Art and Design at Parsons . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Management, Leadership, and Entrepreneurship . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Media, Film, and Technology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 Writing and Literature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Studies in Culture and Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Music at Mannes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 126 Registration Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 128 University Information and Administrative Policies . . . . . . . . . 131


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Open Campus offers a variety of options for students of all ages and backgrounds. Our noncredit and credit offerings include courses and intensive programs for college students, short courses that easily fit into the schedules of busy professionals, management courses for employees ready to take the next step in their careers, and certificate programs that allow students to refine or augment their professional knowledge in a particular area of study.

Noncredit The majority of courses in this bulletin can be taken on a noncredit basis. Noncredit students pay the tuition and fees listed in the course descriptions. As a noncredit student, you receive the instructor’s evaluation of any assigned coursework you complete, but no letter grades are reported. Except for students in certificate programs (see page 5), the university does not maintain a permanent or official record of noncredit enrollment. We can provide a noncredit record of attendance, which can be used for tuition reimbursement from your employer or for your own records. This record of attendance must be requested during the term in which the course is taken, and there is a fee for this service. Course prices listed throughout are for noncredit registration.

Credit Consider registering for general credit in order to test your ability to handle college-level study, qualify for a salary increment from the Board of Education (NYC or other employer), make up for educational deficiencies (prerequisites for an MA, for example), fulfill a language requirement for graduate school, or advance in your career. A student interested in earning undergraduate college credits can register on a general credit basis for most courses in this bulletin,

accumulating a maximum of 24 credits without matriculating. The student receives a letter grade in each course and is entitled to transcripts of record. Each student is responsible for meeting the specific requirements for credit for the course: the books to be read, the paper(s) to be written, and other criteria used for evaluation. Credits are usually transferable to undergraduate degree programs, but it is seldom possible to determine in advance whether credits will be accepted by a particular institution; that will be decided by the school and/or degree program. Students taking courses for transfer to another school should confirm that the credits will be accepted before they register. Fees listed in the catalog are for noncredit registration. If you elect to take a course for credit, tuition of $1,190 and $1,490 for Schools of Public Engagement and Parsons courses, respectively, will be assessed per credit in addition to any applicable fees.


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Certificate Programs You know what it takes to succeed in your chosen field, and you’re ready to take the next step. Parsons, Mannes, and the Schools of Public Engagement offer certificates of completion in various fields of study. A certificate attests to successful completion of a structured program of courses designed to establish proficiency in a specific field. Add a credential that employers will notice: a certificate in some of the nation’s fastest-growing industries, from The New School’s well-respected programs in design, business, and beyond.

Certificate Program Options           Indicates a certificate that is offered on a noncredit basis, meaning few, if any prerequisites, pass/fail grading, and a simple application process. In many cases, you can just go ahead and sign up!   Indicates for-credit, graduate-level certificate most appropriate for those who have already completed or are in the process of completing a certain amount of study. Specific requirements vary by program.

Art and Design at Parsons

BENEFITS

   Graphic and Digital Design 

•• Fast-track development of your skill set in a focused, rigorous environment on a schedule tailored to meet working professionals’ need for flexibility •• Access to many of the same student services and resources as traditional matriculated students •• Measurable growth in your area of focus

   Fashion Design    Fashion Business     Fine Arts    Interior Design

Media and Writing    Film Production

•• Increased earning potential from adding high-value skills to your résumé

   Screenwriting 

•• Demonstrated dedication to your field from committing to a specialized program of study Requirements vary by program. Get started at opencampus.newschool.edu/program/ certificate-programs. If you are interested in pursuing a noncredit certificate in art and design at Parsons or in Media Studies, no prior advisor approval is required, and you can take advantage of self-service registration online at opencampus.newschool.edu/program/ certificate-programs. For all other certificate programs, please consult with the appropriate advisor prior to registration to discuss your options, registration process, and requirements.

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 Documentary Media Studies  Media Management

Liberal Arts at The New School for Social Research    Harm Reduction Psychotherapy  Gender and Sexuality Studies

ESL    English as a Second Language    ESL + Design    ESL + Food    Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Business and Professional Development  Leadership and Change  Organization Development Sustainability Strategies


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Online 

Short Courses 

The New School has always been at the forefront of online learning, and we continue to bring adult students all over the world an array of innovative opportunities for study with the renowned faculties of Parsons School of Design and the Schools of Public Engagement.

Industry-relevant and innovative, Open Campus offers an original suite of cutting-edge short courses each season reflecting the unique design-led, interdisciplinary approach to learning found only at The New School. Market-driven by design, our short courses are crafted to suit the fast-paced schedules and constantly evolving skill sets demanded of today’s working professionals. The full range of offerings can be found online at opencampus.newschool.edu/program/ short-courses.

Visit newschool.edu/online to learn more.

#OpenCampusNetwork

Institute for Retired Professionals newschool.edu/irp | 212.229.5682 Founded in 1962 as a post-career peer learning community, the Institute for Retired Professionals (IRP) is the blueprint for the Lifelong Learning Movement, now replicated on more than 500 campuses around the country. In keeping with its philosophy of making institutions of higher education open to all learners, The New School has nurtured the IRP since its inception. Students from various backgrounds share the responsibility for designing, teaching, and participating in weekly noncredit study groups that mirror the content and structure of college courses. Past study groups have explored topics in literature and the arts, public affairs, sociocultural issues, science and psychology, and history. In addition to offering classroom activities, the IRP sponsors Fridays @ One, a lecture series on diverse and timely topics for its members, the New School community, and the general public. The series has included talks by U.S. presidential historian Robert Dallek, renowned musicians Jane Ira Bloom and Fred Hersch, the chief curator and vice president of Collections at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum, and the executive director of the New York Civil Liberties Union. Please contact the IRP for information about its spring series.


CREATIVE MINDS CREATING CHANGE

Public Programs That Expand Your Network The Nth Degree is a curated series of public events featuring thinkers, visionaries, and creators who bring about positive change in the world—and redefine the cutting edge. The series continues The New School’s century-long tradition of forward thinking by spotlighting lectures, performances, panels, and other public programs that galvanize curious minds. newschool.edu/nth-degree


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Student ID Card

Student Discounts

Noncredit students will be mailed a nonphoto paper ID card at the beginning of every semester. Most certificate students and students registered for general credit are entitled to receive The New School’s photo ID, the newcard. Long-distance learners can also request a nonphoto version of the newcard.

Continuing education students at The New School get up to 60 percent off the retail price of Adobe Creative Cloud with proof of enrollment. Just download your transcript and proof of tuition from your MyNewSchool account and visit creative.adobe.com/plans?plan=edu to get started!

You can obtain your photo ID at the Campus Card Services Office in the bottom level of the University Center, 72 Fifth Avenue, New York City.

Libraries Emphasizing the social sciences, the List Center Library is the principal library for New School students. The University Center Library houses a rich art and design collection. The College of Performing Arts library, at Arnhold Hall, is devoted to European and American classical music.

Open Lab Access Students enrolled in any digital design class have limited access to the eighth- and ninth-floor labs of the University Computer Center, 55 West 13th Street. Stations in these classrooms are accessible primarily Monday through Thursday, 9:00–11:30 p.m., and weekends. Continuing education students registered for a digital design course can use classroom stations when classes are not in session.

Library services are available to all students with the newcard. Noncredit students must show a personal photo ID with their nonphoto paper ID card to use the library. Find more information at library.newschool.edu.

High-end or commercially unavailable software may have special access restrictions. Note: For students beyond the basic level, we strongly recommend the purchase of a home computer. Open lab time is generally insufficient for more complex design projects.

WiFi Access and Technology Labs

Classroom Locations

All continuing education students have access to campus WiFi through either their New School account or a New School Guest account. Some certificate students have additional access to campus technology labs, equipped with Mac and Windows workstations, laser printers, and plug-in stations for laptops. To learn more about the options available to you as part of your program, visit the tech help website and access directories at newschool.edu/information-technology/ technology-labs.

Room assignments are available online via Class Finder at my.newschool.edu. Room assignments are also posted on the first day of class in the lobby of the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, 66 Fifth Avenue and 2 West 13th Street, and on the screens near the elevators at the University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue.


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Campus Directory Johnson/ Kaplan Hall 66 W 12 St

Fanton Hall/ Welcome Center 72 Fifth Ave

13th Street Residence 118 W 13 St

20th Street Residence 300 W 20 St

Eugene Lang College 65 W 11 St

Arnhold Hall/ College of Performing Arts 55 W 13 St

Loeb Hall 135 E 12 St

The New School for Drama 151 Bank St

Lang Annex 64 W 11 St

Stuyvesant Park 318 E 15 St

113 University Place 113 University Pl

K

List Center 6 E 16 St

University Center/ Kerrey Hall 63 Fifth Ave and 65 Fifth Ave

Sheila C. Johnson Design Center 2 W 13 St, 68 Fifth Ave, and 66 Fifth Ave

Parsons East 25 E 13 St 80 Fifth Avenue 80 Fifth Ave

79 Fifth Avenue 79 Fifth Ave

71 Fifth Avenue 71 Fifth Ave

w 21 st

w 21 st

e 21 st

Gramercy park w 20 st

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Chelsea w 19 st

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gramercy w 17 st

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meatpacking district

Park av S

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noho

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Business of Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Fashion Design and Fashion Business . . . . . . . . . . 18 Digital Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Graphic Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Interior Design, Decorative Arts, and Architecture Studies . . 33 Fine Arts, Foundation, and Photography . . . . . . . . . 39

  Short Course  

  Online Course

  

  Noncredit Certificate   Graduate Certificate


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You don’t have to be a designer to think like one or to let design practices influence the way you do business. Business of design courses use cross-disciplinary methods to change the way students approach business, lend narratives to data sets, and empower designers and artists to successfully run a practice. In addition to benefiting from class instruction, students have the opportunity to form professional connections with classmates and professors and engage with the student body at the university. ­   Design Thinking Fundamentals Lee Sean Huang X1 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 10    Design thinking is a practice pioneered by top design firms like IDEO and used by some of the world's most innovative companies. In this course, you learn the methodology and develop the mindset that will equip you to better understand problems, unlock hidden needs, and design groundbreaking innovations to address those needs. We cover every element of the design thinking approach, from empathy research to ideation to prototyping to getting user feedback and iterating with your designs. You will be able to apply your design thinking skills to your own professional field or discipline, as well as everyday life. No design experience is required. PCSP 0801 $360

­   Design Thinking for Better Business Melissa Rancourt A | 2 days | April 29–30 | 10 am–5 pm  It seems as if design thinking is all the rage these days. Curious to learn more about what exactly design thinking is and how you can apply design-led methodology to find solutions to your business challenges? In this hands-on, intensive two-day workshop, learn how design thinking tools can be applied to any industry, challenge, or opportunity to change outmoded dynamics and uncover new approaches. You’ll be ready to

walk into the office on Monday with actionable insights and tools that can be readily applied to optimize your approach to best business practices for the new economy. PCSP 0802 $525

  Fundamentals of Data Visualization Jaime Tanner X1 | 6 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 6 

Jacob Romer X2 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 10    The presentation of data plays a critical role in the shaping of opinion, policy, and decision making in the boardroom and beyond. In this course, we start with the fundamentals—how is data created and archived, and how can we use it? Then, through a series of basic exercises using readily available software, we bring to life data sets to design insights in students’ own specific fields of interest. The knowledge gained from this course can be applied to decision making and support, rapid knowledge assessment, and general storytelling. PCSP 0803 $525


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Making Impactful Infographics Niberca Polo X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31  In a world of massive global data collection and information flows, distilling information for readily available consumption and comprehension—especially in business contexts—is no easy task. In this course, we look at data documentation, analysis, and visualization as the means to understand complex information through compelling visual narratives. Using a practicebased curriculum that fosters peer-to-peer learning, students employ a combination of handmade and digital tools to produce both design process and final pieces applicable to a variety of growing industries, such as finance, fashion, health, and retail. Students learn the history of data visualization, practices for creating effective pieces, and the fundamentals of design and color theory, cognitive theory, and semiotics and their application to defining structure, hierarchy, and emphasis. To develop projects, students learn research methodologies and strategies for data collection and analysis and collect and analyze firsthand data. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of design theory; digital skills beneficial but not required. PCSP 0811 $720

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Business Basics: Intellectual Property and Licensing Linda Saint Marc X1 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 14    Protect your ideas, designs, and creative work. Gain an understanding of intellectual property law and learn to identify and protect copyright, trademark, patent, and domain rights. Learn how to use licensing to turn intellectual property into money. Explore key topics using a variety of realistic case studies and your own concepts. Examine the roles of creator, licensor, agent, and licensee. Develop your own multicategory licensing program. Sessions focus on licensing agreements, partner selection, deal negotiations, brand licensing sales tools, and royalty revenue calculations. No business experience is required. 1 CREDIT

PCGA 2020 $360

Professional Practices: Interior Design Instructor to be announced A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm  This course offers you an overview of the legal, ethical, and financial aspects of the interior design field. You are introduced to current models of practice and study the role of economics, contracts, liability, licensure, and standards of practice in shaping contemporary interior design

Think you don’t have time to take a course? Think again. Our suite of original, cuttingedge short courses offer the same interdisciplinary approach to educating today’s professionals as our full-length courses, but at a pace that suits your busy schedule. To discover the full range of offerings, visit opencampus.newschool.edu/program/short-courses.


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practice. What kind of marketing and promotion is effective for your particular work? Whether you intend to freelance, create a small partnership, or work in-house at a boutique office or large company, this course helps you understand what to expect. We review common business practices, including business proposals, pricing, estimates, invoices, client relations, interviewing techniques, professional conduct, and writing CVs and résumés. 1 CREDIT

Professional Practices: Fashion

PCID 2001 $360

FACULTY PROFILE Bliss Lau After receiving her BFA from Parsons School of Design, Lau launched her handbag collection; she later delved into the sensuous world of fine jewelry and body jewelry. Her work has been featured in publications including Vogue America, Vogue Italia, WWD, Dazed & Confused, Rolling Stone, Interview magazine, New York magazine, Refinery29, Style.com, and Vogue.com. Lau co-teaches the continuing education class Centering Your Brand with Jasmine Takanikos, a globally recognized brand strategist. Read more about the distinguished faculty in the Open Campus network at opencampus. newschool.edu/why-open-campus.

Savannah Todd A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 8 | W 7–9:30 pm  This course introduces you to working in the fashion industry, whether your focus is fashion design, illustration, textile design, buying, or merchandising. Through lectures, research, presentations by visiting professionals, and field trips, you are familiarized with current models of practice and study the various roles involved in shaping a contemporary fashion business. Whether you intend to freelance or intern, establish a small design studio, or work for a fashion company, this course helps you understand what to expect. You review common professional practices, including professional conduct, interviewing techniques, and writing a résumé, CV, and business proposal. 1 CREDIT PCFD 2010 $360

Professional Practices: Graphic Design Instructor to be announced A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 7 | T 7–9:30 pm  This course is an in-depth exploration of the business of graphic design and related professional practices, conducted through lectures, demonstrations, research, and studio work. Whether you intend to freelance, work in a small boutique office, or design at a large corporation, this course will help you understand what to expect. The course focuses on common design problems, including pricing, estimates, invoices, client relations, and professional conduct. 1 CREDIT

PCGA 2030 $360


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Marketing: a simple word with a complex definition. Our courses help you break down the many facets of marketing—from branding to publicity and promotion to digital media—and use them to further your career or business. Learn to develop brand strategies and identities, conquer the social media arena, and tame the public relations beast to take your company to the next level. Branding

products. Prerequisites: Photoshop Basics and Illustrator Basics or the equivalent. 2 CREDITS

Centering Your Brand: Design and Brand Strategy

PCGA 1207 $720

Bliss Lau, Jasmine Takanikos

Consumer Behavior

A | 3 sessions | beg. Apr. 15 | Sat 10 am–5 pm  This workshop pairs design and brand strategy. It is targeted to students and working professionals who intend to launch or already have a business or brand in a creative industry. Students who seek to develop their goals, voice, and expression explore their unique vision through our interactive, hands-on workshop-style course. Presented in three intensive six-hour sessions over consecutive Saturdays: I: Exploration, Discovery & Vision; II: Strategic Direction & Conceptual Development; and III: Finalizing Process. 1 CREDIT PCFD 1905 $360

Marie Johnson X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Gretchen Harnick X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  Today’s competitive marketing climate has led many companies to explore theories of consumer behavior. This course focuses on the profile of the consumer—psychographics and demographics— and consumer interests, with an emphasis on generational marketing. Segmented and niche markets and their development are also discussed. 2 CREDITS

PCFD 1855 $720

Brand Identity Niberca Polo X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  Brand identity is much more than logo design— it is the visual representation of a brand that communicates the company mission, vision, and culture. Students envision a product or service and develop a comprehensive brand strategy that includes research, marketing analysis, and design. Following the step-by-step design process, they create several pieces, including an infographic with which to present their findings, a 3D prototype, a logo design (for stationery and other collateral), promotional pieces, advertising, and a manual outlining strategies for applying brand identity across various platforms. All work builds to a final presentation in which students pitch their

CAREER FAIR ART & DESIGN CERTIFICATES AT PARSONS Thursday, April 27, 4:00–8:00 p.m. University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Want to know how a certificate in art and design from Parsons can take your career in a new direction? Come and participate in panels and workshops, and take advantage of the opportunity to network with colleagues and industry professionals. RSVP at newschool.edu/certificates-career-fair.


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Digital Media

Beyond iCelebrities

­   Social Media Marketing Stephanie Schwab A | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 10    Tap into the enormous potential of social media to elevate your brand and business. In this class, we cover all the essentials—from mapping your strategy, choosing your channels, and crafting viral content to monitoring, measuring, and responding to user activity for best performance. Gain immediately actionable insights and set goals that will have you powering through your core KPIs (we’ll explain what that means, too). By the end of this course, you’ll have a solid trove of tips and tools with which to implement your vision and drive results. PCSP 0804 $525

INFO SESSION ART & DESIGN CERTIFICATES AT PARSONS Thursday, January 12, 6:00–7:30 p.m. Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, Kellen Auditorium 66 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Want to learn more about how you can jump-start the career of your dreams with a certificate in art and design from Parsons? Join us for an information session given by our program director, Melinda Wax. Faculty will be on hand to discuss the latest courses and noncredit certificate options in all areas of study, including digital design, fashion business, fashion design, interior and architectural design, and more! RSVP at newschool.edu/certificates-info-session.

Kathleen Sweeney A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  Popular social networking sites have evolved rapidly in the past few years, alongside Internetsavvy grassroots organizations like MoveOn. This course outlines the recent history of MoveOn, Code Pink, Facebook, YouTube, and Second Life (virtual activism) and the viral nature of Internet trends. What happens when corporate entities enter social networks on the Internet? What is the link between viral marketing and social change? We consider questions about the nature of the “collective generosity” mindset inherent in millennial offerings like Wikipedia, with an eye to mapping global resource and information networks to include the most disenfranchised of global citizens. How can the activist potential of the Internet be used to address global warming, poverty, and political injustice? 3 CREDITS NCOM 3026 $700

Publicity and Promotion

Public Relations Instructor to be announced A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 4–5:50 pm Students learn practical skills for conducting public relations campaigns through traditional and online outlets. They also explore theories of human behavior that help PR specialists develop campaigns and assess a campaign’s effectiveness. Other readings compare public relations with propaganda campaigns and examine ethical issues involved in using information to manipulate behavior. 3 CREDITS NMGT 2120 $700

The Big Idea: Ad Campaigns Kurt Brokaw A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 8–9:50 pm Could you invent a Marlboro cowboy, a milk mustache, a talking E*TRADE baby, an Aflac duck? How do copywriters and art directors come up with campaigns for the hottest viral, stealth, 3D, and experiential media? Students work in self-selected teams to brainstorm, conceptualize, write, test, and pitch campaigns using new media as well as traditional television and print. Assignments include developing


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campaigns for packaged goods, recording artists, and public service causes. Invited guests include Eric Weisberg, executive creative director, J. Walter Thompson; Jennifer McBride, director of digital production, J. Walter Thompson; Andrea Morin, creative director, Possible Advertising; Matt Miller, CEO, Association of Independent Commercial Producers; and Chris Brokaw, singer, songwriter, and guitarist. 3 CREDITS

analysis, developing markets, and innovative problem solving. 2 CREDITS

NMGT 2122 $700

Saturday, December 10, 2016, 12:00–4:00 p.m. University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Print Production in a Digital World

Can one day of learning spark a lifetime

Glenn Baken

of discovery?

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm Whether you are designing a hang tag for fashion, a billboard for advertising, or a lookbook, knowing where print production fits into the digital landscape is essential for all graphic designers working today. This course is a comprehensive introduction to and exploration of the core principles of print production and scale. Classes cover the various uses of printed materials, including merchandising, promotion, marketing, and special events. Field trips to New York City–based print production shops round out the course. 2 CREDITS PCGA 1020 $720

Fashion Marketing in a Global Environment

PCFD 1880 $720

DAY OF LEARNING AND OPEN CAMPUS EXPO

From its founding in 1919, The New School has known that providing access to innovative approaches to education can serve as the engine of groundbreaking social, personal, and professional change. On December 10, experience The New School’s unparalleled approach to learning with Open Campus, offering continuing education courses and programs for adults, youth, and teens. All afternoon, take advantage of FREE pop-up classes, open studios, campus tours, activities, course advising, and info sessions, followed by an evening panel discussion on education access as a force for social change.

Laura Lanteri

RSVP and find the full schedule of events at

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm

newschool.edu/day-of-learning.

Jeanine Polizzi X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  This course provides a foundation in fashion marketing strategy within a global context. Students learn marketing terminology and concepts through analysis of target markets, the global marketplace, branding communication, and the development of integrated marketing programs within the fashion industry. Students investigate the theoretical and practical underpinnings of marketing design and learn to build profitable customer relationships. The class examines the process of product planning, pricing, promotion, and distribution, with a focus on global resources, opportunities, and threats. Students explore the role of marketing in a global business organization, learn the components of a formal marketing plan, and gain a strategic skill set related to marketing management, financial


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Fashion design merges sketching and general visual skills with the power of the imagination. Courses range from the general, like design sketching, to the specialized, like costume design. Fashion business courses, which teach basic business practices in the context of fashion and design, prepare students to work in a variety of fields in the fashion industry, including marketing, retailing, and merchandising.

 Fashion Design Certificate Major Code: FASH Required Courses: Color Theory, Design Sketching I, and Construction Techniques I OR Fashion Design Basic Core plus

Construction Techniques II Fashion Flats Fashion History elective plus

Two (2) elective courses

Fashion Business Certificate Major Code: FSHB Required Courses: Consumer Behavior, Fashion Merchandising, Medium of Fashion: Textiles, Worth to Westwood: Fashion from the 19th to the 21st Century, Retail Buying, and Fashion Marketing in a Global Environment plus

Two (2)  elective courses

Can be completed online or through a combination of online and on-campus study. Learn more and get started at opencampus.newschool.edu/program/ certificate-programs.


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Fashion Design Basic Core

Design Sketching II

Marcia DiLiberto, Maria Bucobo

Julie Muszynski

A | 24 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W, F 7–9:50 pm

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm This course covers advanced figure sketching, the influence of fabric textures on the design of a garment, and the choice of art medium to best illustrate different types of garments and fabrics. Advanced techniques for rendering embroidery, knitwear, furs, and transparent fabrics are covered. Students work on design projects with an emphasis on rendering and illustration. Development of a coherent collection around fashion concepts is stressed throughout. Prerequisite: Design Sketching I or equivalent.

David Leung, Patricia Henry-Turner B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–3:50 pm This intensive course is aimed at those who wish to engage in all aspects of the design process. It provides students with a foundation in the construction and graphic skills necessary for a career in fashion design and related industries. The course is taught in two sections, one on fashion design sketching and the other on sewing and construction methods. Each section is taught by a separate instructor, who covers basic skills and professional practices. Topics covered include form, color, and pattern; fabric selection and textiles; pattern drafting and draping; drawing from the model and the purpose of the design sketch; and fashion history and contemporary fashion. Students are expected to complete regular weekly assignments and keep a standard fashion source book throughout the course. Note: Certificate students must use the FASH major code and follow all guidelines for certificate registration. See registration details for this certificate on page 18. PCFD 1000 $1,610

Design Sketching I Lynne Levin A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:30 pm In the fashion world, new clothing designs are presented in the form of hand-drawn sketches before being chosen to go into production. Designers start with a croquis, a quick sketch of the traditional fashion figure that serves as the base for the design of clothing and accessories, then add color and details to the garments. This is a basic course in making a designer’s sketch, working from live models to learn drawing skills, fundamental anatomy, and the dynamics of movement in preparation for producing fashion illustrations. Attention is given to both the fashion figure and human proportions. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1001 $720

2 CREDITS

PCFD 2001 $720

Fashion Flats Michele Wesen Bryant A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:30 pm

John Jay Cabuay X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  Flat sketching is an essential part of garment production. It communicates details in the design and construction of a garment, from concept to marketing. This course introduces the professional techniques used to create fashion flats, ranging from traditional hand sketching to the use of Adobe Illustrator to produce sketches digitally in a vector format. Prerequisite: Mac Basics or equivalent; experience with Adobe Illustrator or Photoshop is a plus. 2 CREDITS PCFD 2903 $720

Construction Techniques I Katherine Wuersch-Flener A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 7–9:30 pm

Evelyn Nelson B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 1–3:30 pm Learn basic sewing, patternmaking, and draping techniques, along with basic principles of design. Topics covered include machine and hand sewing; cutting and zipper application; and slopers, skirts, bodices, collars, sleeves, and three-dimensional muslin interpretation. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1310 $740


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Construction Techniques II

Patternmaking I

Evelyn Nelson

Laura Volpintesta

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 7–9:30 pm

A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:50 pm Learn the fundamentals of design room patternmaking using basic body slopers. Become familiar with all areas of basic styling, including body slopers, skirts, bodices, collars, sleeves, and dresses. Develop paper patterns and make a fabric sample that demonstrates proper fit.

Katherine Wuersch-Flener B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:30 pm Building on the basic draping and patternmaking skills learned in Construction Techniques I, explore intricate draping exercises to design more tailored apparel and study advanced patternmaking applications. Make muslin tests of garments and develop patterns for stretch fabrics. Use fabric to create a finished garment. Prerequisite: Basic Core or Construction Techniques I. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1311 $740

2 CREDITS

PCFD 1203 $740

Hand Embroidery and Appliqué Beading Vashti de Verteuil

Sewing I Svetlana Lukyanovich A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 29 | Sun 10 am–12:50 pm Learn to sew simple garments using industrial equipment. Acquire the basic skills of cutting, construction, and finishing using a commercial pattern. Learn about fabric selection and practice hand sewing techniques. You will need a home sewing machine to complete homework assignments. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1201 $740

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:30 pm The technique of combining embroidery appliqué and beading on fabric allows you to develop designs to create garments, scarves, bags, etc. Seed beads, sequins, bugle beads, fabric appliqués, pearls, and faux gems are applied to a variety of fabrics. No previous sewing skills are required. Bring to the first class a quarter kilo of seed beads, a spool of 100 percent cotton thread, a general-use needle, a needlepoint hoop (6” to 8”), a yard of solid-color 100 percent cotton fabric, and manicure scissors. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1231 $720

Think you don’t have time to take a course? Think again. Our suite of original, cuttingedge short courses offer the same interdisciplinary approach to educating today’s professionals as our full-length courses, but at a pace that suits your busy schedule. To discover the full range of offerings, visit opencampus.newschool.edu/program/short-courses.


Learn More > opencampus.newschool.edu  | 212.229.5620 | opencampus@newschool.edu

Introduction to Jewelry Design Instructor to be announced A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:50 pm In this course, you develop technical skills and are introduced to contemporary jewelry design while designing and creating jewelry and other small-scale metal objects. You gain proficiency in the basic technical and conceptual skills necessary for working with nonferrous metals (silver, platinum, gold, copper). You learn to use simple hand tools and a soldering iron and develop expertise in joining, filing, burnishing, and polishing metals. You become familiar with the critical language of art and design, analyzing and discussing your work and that of fellow students. A list of materials and tools will be sent before the course starts. 2 CREDITS

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Centering Your Brand: Design and Brand Strategy Bliss Lau, Jasmine Takanikos A | 3 sessions | beg. Apr. 15 | Sat 10 am–5 pm  This workshop pairs design and brand strategy. It is targeted to students and working professionals who intend to launch or already have a business or brand in a creative industry. Students who seek to develop their goals, voice, and expression explore their unique vision through our interactive, hands-on workshop-style course. Presented in three intensive six-hour sessions over consecutive Saturdays: I: Exploration, Discovery & Vision; II: Strategic Direction & Conceptual Development; and III: Finalizing Process. 1 CREDIT PCFD 1905 $360

PCFD 1920 $720

Fabric Selection and Design Style

#OpenCampusNetwork

Salvatore Cesarani A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 13 | M 7–9:30 pm  Explore fabric research and color theory before drawing your own design. Develop color swatch boards like those used by designers to present their season collections. Discuss inspiration and personal style while selecting fabric swatches. As a final step, create an original finished design, sure to be a colorful addition to your portfolio. Three sessions of this course meet during daytime hours at fiber shows and mills; attendance is required. 1 CREDIT

Worth to Westwood: Fashion from the 19th to the 21st Century

PCFD 1261 $360

Aneesa Sheikh

Medium of Fashion: Textiles Cecilia Metheny A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 7–9:30 pm

Bill Brandt X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  A practical exploration of the materials, elements, and techniques used in the modern apparel and fashion industry. Topics discussed include natural and man-made fibers, yarns, textile structures such as knits and woven fabrics, garment structure, practical and decorative trims, and surface design (printing, dyeing, and embellishment). Geared to students of fashion design and design professionals interested in understanding the “how” as well as the “why” of textiles, this course covers the components involved in the design and manufacture of apparel and accessories. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1270 $720

Ann Frank A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:30 pm

Beth Dincuff X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31  X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  Students are introduced to Western fashion dating from the middle of the 19th century to the present day. Broad thematic considerations include the nature of fashion (what it is and what it does) and its relationship to modernity, production and consumption, art, globalization and customization, and identity and the body. The class discusses the relationship of key designers, events, and movements to these broad themes, covering the work of Worth and Westwood, the department store and dress reform, postmodernism, and anti-fashion. 2 CREDITS

PCFD 1802 $720


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Fashion, Pop Culture, and the 20th Century

and Calvin Klein, who started out small and built American fashion empires. The class studies the professional practices of Isaac Mizrahi, who paired high and low fashion; Diane von Furstenberg, who debuted the iconic wrap dress; and Ralph Lauren, a traditionalist who began by selling neckties and ended up marketing a multifaceted lifestyle brand. Lectures, guest speakers, and a visit to the Kellen Archives at Parsons broaden your perspective on this important global industry. Parsons certificate students and students who take this course for credit will have weekly assignments. 1 CREDIT

Rebekah Pollock A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 7 | T 7–9:30 pm  From Victorian conflicts over the decency of women’s dress at the turn of the century to 1990s school board rulings banning certain “gang-related” items of clothing, fashion was a loaded subject throughout the 20th century. This course discusses the parallel paths of fashion and popular culture as they relate to the politics, economics, gender issues, health concerns, and high art expressions of the past century. It is geared to students interested in fashion design, fashion history, and cultural studies. 1 CREDIT PCFD 1804 $360

PCFD 1812 $360

Costume Design for Theater and Film: History and Practice Mary Maxmen

American Fashion Designers

Join us for an information session given by our

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm An introduction to costume design and history for theater, film, and fashion design students, fashionistas, and vintage clothing lovers. Students work on an individual project, designing costumes for the main characters in a classic play, in a historical period chosen by the student, producing a portfolio or look book worthy of being shown to a director or producer. One class session is devoted to painting, familiarizing students with costume rendering techniques and materials. Lectures and demonstrations provide instruction in the stages of the design process: concept development, research, character breakdowns, mood boards, swatching, and finished renderings. The final class session will be devoted to the display and review of students’ work. Fall semester history lectures cover ancient Egypt to the Baroque (1680); spring history lectures cover 1680 to 1929. All history lectures are accompanied by slide decks that are posted online, including ones covering 1930–1979. Practical topics include finding entry-level jobs, interviewing, building a costume portfolio, collaborating with directors and set and lighting designers, writing contracts, unions, and budget. The class takes a field trip to a professional costume shop. There is no sewing required.

program director, Melinda Wax. Faculty will be on

2 CREDITS

hand to discuss the latest courses and noncredit

PCFD 1807 $720

Lisa Santandrea A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:30 pm  In this course, you explore the careers of pioneering American designers. You learn about Claire McCardell and Bonnie Cashin, two fashion designers who revolutionized womenswear in the late 1940s and 1950s by introducing designer ready-to-wear. Following in their footsteps were Liz Claiborne, Anne Klein, and Donna Karan, who shaped workplace fashion for women; Geoffrey Beene and Bill Blass, who dressed the “ladies who lunch”; and Perry Ellis

INFO SESSION ART & DESIGN CERTIFICATES AT PARSONS Thursday, January 12, 6:00–7:30 p.m. Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, Kellen Auditorium 66 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Want to learn more about how you can jump-start the career of your dreams with a certificate in art and design from Parsons?

certificate options in all areas of study, including digital design, fashion business, fashion design, interior and architectural design, and more! RSVP at newschool.edu/certificates-info-session.


Learn More > opencampus.newschool.edu  | 212.229.5620 | opencampus@newschool.edu

Fashion Industry Profile: New York City Anna Philip A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 3:50–6:40 pm Delve into the business of fashion in New York City, one of the world’s most important global fashion capitals. This course presents an overview of New York City’s industry structure across primary, secondary, and auxiliary markets. You explore the interrelationships between design, production, and marketing as they are practiced here. You discuss recent developments in local production, within and outside of the traditional Garment Center, and the rise of innovative fashion incubators developed for area fashion designers and craftspeople. You acquire a working vocabulary of industry terminology to employ when communicating your insights. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1814 $720

Fashion Merchandising Athena Lazarides A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm

Phyllis Shapiro X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Joan Duncan X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  Study the fundamentals of merchandising: market research, planning and control, and product development, promotion, and presentation. Analyze case studies outlining strategies used by manufacturers and retailers. Learn about the impact of consumer behavior, its relationship to forecasting, and the importance of global merchandising. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1860 $720

Retail Buying Stephanie Cozzi A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:50 pm

Gretchen Harnick X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Lori Bae X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  Learn to work with a retail buyer or become one yourself. This course is essential for managers, retail business owners, and manufacturer’s account representatives. Topics include open to buys, cumulative markups, shortages, vendor

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analysis, and stock sales. Students learn to buy or communicate with buyers on their level and complete practical and realistic assignments. Bring a calculator to the first class. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1871 $720

Did you know? According to the most recent rankings, Parsons’ School of Fashion is No. 1 in the country and No. 3 worldwide.

Fashion Trends Patrick Hughes A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:30 pm X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31  X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  What is the fashion news? This course examines significant cultural phenomena that shape new sensibilities in fashion. Historically based slide lectures cover the themes of revolution, music, cosmopolitanism, film, the influence of couture, memory, and the acquisition of the look. This class incorporates roundtable discussions and viewings of current collection showings from the world’s fashion capitals. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1820 $720

Fashion Marketing in a Global Environment Laura Lanteri A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm

Jeanine Polizzi X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  This course provides a foundation in fashion marketing strategy within a global context. Students learn marketing terminology and concepts through analysis of target markets, the global marketplace, branding communication, and the development of integrated marketing programs within the fashion industry. Students investigate the theoretical and practical underpinnings of marketing design and learn to build profitable customer relationships. The class examines the process of product planning, pricing, promotion, and distribution, with a focus on global resources, opportunities, and threats. Students explore the role of marketing in a global business organization, learn the components of a formal marketing plan, and gain a strategic skill


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set related to marketing management, financial analysis, developing markets, and innovative problem solving. 2 CREDITS

Fashion Entrepreneurship

PCFD 1880 $720

Consumer Behavior Marie Johnson X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Gretchen Harnick X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12   Today’s competitive marketing climate has led many companies to explore theories of consumer behavior. This course focuses on the profile of the consumer—psychographics and demographics— and consumer interests, with an emphasis on generational marketing. Segmented and niche markets and their development are also discussed. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1855 $720

Savannah Todd A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm

Donna Berger X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31  Students aspiring to become entrepreneurs in the fashion industry examine the skills needed to conceive, finance, open, and operate a successful fashion business. Through collaborative research and hands-on practice, students learn what’s involved in opening a business and navigating the complexities of working with a team. Students learn to create business models and structure legal business organizations, and they explore the details of financing and insurance. 2 CREDITS

PCFD 1840 $720

Online Retailing Jeanne McPhillips

CAREER FAIR ART & DESIGN CERTIFICATES AT PARSONS Thursday, April 27, 4:00–8:00 p.m. University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Want to know how a certificate in art and design from Parsons can take your career in a new direction? Come and participate in panels and workshops, and take advantage of the opportunity to network with colleagues and industry professionals. RSVP at newschool.edu/certificates-career-fair.

X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Joshua Williams X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  This course introduces students to the online retailing environment and examines a variety of retail models, from the multichannel strategies of large retailers to small niche concepts. Students learn the retail terminology of the online fashion marketplace and compare Web and traditional brick-and-mortar or catalog retail formats. Special attention is paid to online consumers’ unique shopping habits, preferences, and responses to incentives. The course also examines methods of retail promotion in an interactive online environment and the importance of social media and user-generated content. Students develop a theoretical and practical understanding of online retail store design and ways to build profitable customer relationships. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1875 $720


Learn More > opencampus.newschool.edu  | 212.229.5620 | opencampus@newschool.edu

Fashion Portfolio David Leung A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm A strong portfolio is essential to success in a competitive industry like fashion. Learn to communicate your skills to potential employers, whether your focus is fashion design, illustration, textile design, merchandising, or buying. In this course, you are guided in editing work you have done for school assignments or as a working professional, to build a portfolio that accurately tells the story of your talent. You research, edit, and refine your presentation skills in both digital and traditional paper portfolio formats. This class is designed for students preparing a portfolio for college admission or grad school as well as professionals seeking to refresh their portfolios with personal projects using new creative processes. Recommended for students in the final semester of certificate requirements or with equivalent experience. Bring your current portfolio (originals, digital, or Web based) to the first class. 1 CREDIT PCFD 2005 $360

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ONLINE LEARNING Each semester, The New School brings you classes that fit your life as well as they fit your screen—be it mobile, desktop, tablet, or watch. Look for the computer icon to find all of our online classes. Find out about online learning at The New School at opencampus. newschool.edu/program/online-learning.

DAY OF LEARNING AND OPEN CAMPUS EXPO Saturday, December 10, 2016, 12:00–4:00 p.m. University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Can one day of learning spark a lifetime of discovery? From its founding in 1919, The New School has known that providing access to innovative approaches to

Professional Practices: Fashion

education can serve as the engine of groundbreaking

Savannah Todd

social, personal, and professional change. On

A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 8 | W 7–9:30 pm  This course introduces you to working in the fashion industry, whether your focus is fashion design, illustration, textile design, buying, or merchandising. Through lectures, research, presentations by visiting professionals, and field trips, you are familiarized with current models of practice and study the various roles involved in shaping a contemporary fashion business. Whether you intend to freelance or intern, establish a small design studio, or work for a fashion company, this course helps you understand what to expect. We review common professional practices, including professional conduct, interviewing techniques, and writing a résumé, CV, and business proposal. 1 CREDIT

December 10, experience The New School’s unpar-

PCFD 2010 $360

alleled approach to learning with Open Campus, offering continuing education courses and programs for adults, youth, and teens. All afternoon, take advantage of FREE pop-up classes, open studios, campus tours, activities, course advising, and info sessions, followed by an evening panel discussion on education access as a force for social change. RSVP and find the full schedule of events at newschool.edu/day-of-learning.


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Digital design classes emphasize design and creativity while providing intensive technical training in user experience (UX), responsive design, and mobile-first design. Instruction is flexible and inclusive, so that beginners and advanced students can learn with and from one another.

 raphic and Digital Design G Certificate Major Code: GRDS Required Courses: Color Theory, Graphic Design I, and Digital Graphics with Illustrator I OR Graphic/Digital Basic Core plus

Digital Imaging with Photoshop I and Graphic Design History plus

Typography I, Digital Layout with InDesign, and one (1) digital or graphic design elective course OR three (3) digital and/or graphic design elective courses Can be completed online, on campus, or through a combination of online and on-campus study. Learn more and get started at opencampus. newschool.edu/program/certificate-programs.

computing skills preparatory classes

Macintosh Basics Anne Finkelstein A | 1 session | Jan. 21 | Sat 10 am–3:50 pm  This course is for students who have little or no experience with Macintosh Operating Systems. Proficiency with the Macintosh Operating System is necessary for most of the computer courses that follow. PCDD 0101 $180

Web Design Basics David Marcinkowski X1 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 14    Create a Web presence using the basic structure of HTML5. Learn the basic rules of CSS3 and how to format text, optimize images, embed video and sound, create hyperlinks, and develop effective interface design and navigation. Aspects of Web technology, such as hosting, domains, self-promotion, and content management systems (CMS), are discussed. Prerequisite: Mac Basics, Photoshop Basics, or equivalent experience. Online class requires (free online) code editors such as TextWrangler for Mac or Notepad++ for PC. 1 CREDIT PCDD 0510 $360


Learn More > opencampus.newschool.edu  | 212.229.5620 | opencampus@newschool.edu

Web Design I

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Frederick Murhammer

Responsive Design for Digital Layouts

A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:50 pm

Instructor to be announced

Iva Son

A | 5 sessions | beg. Mar. 11 | Sat 1–3:50 pm  Using practices related to flexible Web design, students create designs for the Web and its various screen formats (laptops, large desktop monitors, tablets, and mobile phones) and orientation style shifts. In projects, students focus on producing design solutions that reflect the principles of Web design and Web-based typography in elastic and liquid layouts. Students also experiment with designing mobile-first versus desktop-first approaches and acquire specific responsive Web development knowledge, including viewport, CSS media queries, responsive images, and cross-browser site testing. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of HTML/CSS.

X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12     Students learn how to hand-code webpages with HTML and Cascading Style Sheets. They discuss and master the elements of good Web design, the basics of user interface, and recommended standards. Toward the end of the course, each student designs a cohesive website. Prerequisite: Mac Basics or equivalent experience. Online class requires (free online) code editors such as TextWrangler for Mac or Notepad++ for PC. 2 CREDITS

PCDD 1100 $720

WordPress Basics David Marcinkowski X1 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 14    This course is an introduction to WordPress, a powerful open-source content management system. Students learn how to use and customize this system to create dynamic websites and are introduced to the basics of CSS, HTML, and Javascript. 1 CREDIT PCDD 1300 $360

Web Design Fundamentals Frederick Murhammer A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:45 pm Everyone now has a presence online, and knowing how to construct and maintain a basic website is a necessary skill for every professional. In this course, students learn basic skills in Web design programming (HTML and CSS) and Web graphics by developing individual projects. The emphasis is on front-end Web design and learning about different formats and platforms as well as browser compatibility. Each student designs and builds a professional portfolio and/ or project website. Taught on the Macintosh platform. 3 CREDITS NCOM 3210 $1,100 NOTE: This course cannot be used toward the completion of a certificate in Graphic and Digital Design. It is made available through Media, Film, and Technology at The New School's Open Campus.

1 CREDIT

PCDD 0515 $360

3D Modeling Fundamentals Stuart Rentzler A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:50 pm This course is an introduction to computer graphics for 3D modeling, animation, and 3D printing exploration. Students develop a solid understanding of the basic concepts underlying 3D software and learn how to apply concepts to create quality images and assets. Basic animation techniques are introduced, but modeling is the focus. The primary software used is Maya. Students can use either a Mac or a PC for this course. Free Autodesk software can be downloaded from students.autodesk.com. 2 CREDITS PCDD 1153 $720

Illustrator Basics Thomas Reed A | 5 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:50 pm 

Greg Lovinski X1 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 14    Learn the fundamentals of this powerful vector-based illustration and graphic design program. Draw and design using the basic tools and features. Create curves, lines, and shapes to make objects. Manipulate, copy, and color your objects and arrange them into smooth-lined, clean, scalable graphics or artwork for both print and Web. Prerequisite: Mac Basics or equivalent.


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Online students must have Illustrator CS or higher (Mac or Windows platform). 1 CREDIT

Digital Graphics with Illustrator I

PCDD 0502 $360

Did You Know? You can take courses for credit today and may be able to apply them toward a degree later. *Additional fees apply. See page 128 for details. Each student’s situation is unique. Consult with your advisor.

Photoshop Basics Thomas Reed A | 5 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 4-6:50 pm 

Instructor to be announced X1 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6-Apr. 14     Learn the fundamentals of this digital image manipulation software application. Acquaint yourself with the intuitive interface, features, and tools. Customize palettes, control layers, tweak scans, and master selections to create the look you want. Prerequisite: Mac Basics or equivalent. Online students must have Photoshop CS or higher (Mac or Windows platform). 1 CREDIT PCDD 0503 $360

Thomas Reed A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:50 pm

Instructor to be announced X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

John Jay Cabuay X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  This course is for the design student who needs a comprehensive and intensive introduction to Illustrator. Learn to draw, delineate, and design electronically with this standard vector-based illustration and graphic design program. Create curves, lines, and shapes to make objects that can be colored, manipulated, moved, duplicated, scaled, and rotated, generating smooth-lined, clean, scalable graphics or artwork for both print and the Web. Use this course to make Illustrator an integral part of your digital graphics tool kit. Prerequisite: Mac Basics, Illustrator Basics, or equivalent. Online students must have Illustrator CS or higher (Mac or Windows platform). 2 CREDITS

PCDD 1404 $720

Digital Layout with Adobe InDesign Anne Finkelstein

Digital Imaging with Photoshop I Mark Kaplan A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:50 pm

Alisa Evdokimov X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Instructor to be announced X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12    Acquire a working knowledge of this industrystandard software, used for print, webpages, animation, presentation, video production, and enhancement of traditional and digital photography. Explore scanning and color correction, tools and layers for image compositing, elemental retouching, and type treatments. Prerequisite: Mac Basics, Photoshop Basics, or equivalent. Online students must have Photoshop CS or higher (Mac or Windows platform). 2 CREDITS PCDD 1402 $720

A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:50 pm

Andrea Cohn X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Instructor to be announced X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  In this class, students explore the fundamentals of InDesign, including all aspects of the page layout process. Importing, creating type, and working with imagery are covered extensively. Production shortcuts for print, PDF, and the Web are discussed. Prerequisite: Mac Basics or equivalent. Online students must have InDesign CS or higher (Mac or Windows platform). 2 CREDITS

PCDD 1450 $720


Learn More > opencampus.newschool.edu  | 212.229.5620 | opencampus@newschool.edu

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Digital Surface Design with Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop

AutoCAD I

Anette Millington

A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:50 pm For architects and interior and product designers. Learn the basics, including drawing, editing, dimensioning, output, and presentation. Gain a practical understanding of AutoCAD’s relevance to professional practice. Take a project from sketch development and produce professional drawings. Prerequisites: basic drafting skills and familiarity with Windows, or equivalent.

X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12    Digital production is increasingly being used in surface, textile, and wallpaper design. If you are a fashion, product, or interior design student interested in digital methods or a practitioner seeking to learn how to produce textiles or wallpaper on a small scale, this course is perfect for you. Using Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, you explore digital methods of creating geometrics and patterns as well as drawn and photographic image repeats. As you design patterns, you gain an understanding of imaging geometry and symmetry operations, conceptualize a collection, and design in multiples. Course projects culminate in a pattern swatch book that serves as a portfolio piece, one that can be sent to a commercial printer for output as a patterned fabric, wall­ paper, a laser cut, or an etching for commercial, professional, or personal use. Prerequisite: basic Illustrator and/or Photoshop skills. Required software: Adobe Illustrator and Photoshop, Creative Suite 5 or higher. PCDD 0820 $720

Greg Smith

2 CREDITS

PCDD 1501 $720

“Art is not for the few, for the talented, for the genius, for the rich, nor the church. Industry is the nation’s life, art is the quality of beauty in expression, and industrial art is the cornerstone of our national art.”   —Frank Alvah Parsons

DIGITAL DRAFTING AND DESIGN

Rhino I Greg Smith A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 1–3:50 pm Learn 3D modeling techniques using Rhino 3D— a powerful, versatile modeling software program applicable to design disciplines including architecture, sculpture, and interior, furniture, product, and jewelry design. Rhino is fast, intuitive, easy to learn, and compatible with many other software packages. A wide array of plug-ins enable you to perform an impressive and ever-evolving range of functions with Rhino. Projects help you learn the fundamentals of digital design along with skills such as turning digital models into physical objects using laser cutting, 3D printing, and CNC milling. You develop a sense of freedom and independence using Rhino 3D that provides a foundation for further mastery of this important industry software. Basic familiarity with a PC operating system is helpful but not required. 2 CREDITS PCDD 1507 $720

INFO SESSION ART & DESIGN CERTIFICATES AT PARSONS Thursday, January 12, 6:00–7:30 p.m. Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, Kellen Auditorium 66 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Want to learn more about how you can jump-start the career of your dreams with a certificate in art and design from Parsons? Join us for an information session given by our program director, Melinda Wax. Faculty will be on hand to discuss the latest courses and noncredit certificate options in all areas of study, including digital design, fashion business, fashion design, interior and architectural design, and more! RSVP at newschool.edu/certificates-info-session.


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Today’s graphic designers must stay attuned to the rapidly changing world of communication design. The following courses provide students with the tools and skills needed to build a foundation in graphic design, advance in the field, and excel in their careers. Learn how to apply design skills digitally through our courses on digital design, starting on page 26.

 raphic and Digital Design G Certificate Major Code: GRDS Required Courses: Color Theory, Graphic Design I, and Digital Graphics with Illustrator I OR Graphic/Digital Basic Core plus

Digital Imaging with Photoshop I and Graphic Design History plus

Typography I, Digital Layout with InDesign, and one (1) digital or graphic design elective course OR three (3) digital and/or graphic design elective courses Can be completed online, on campus, or through a combination of online and on-campus study. Learn more and get started at opencampus. newschool.edu/program/certificate-programs.

Graphic/Digital Design Basic Core

Graphic Design I

Sally Herships, Etta Siegel

Carmile Zaino

A | 24 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W, F 7–9:50 pm

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm

Ira Robbins, Ivan Rivera

Susan Mayer

B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–3:50 pm In this introduction to visual communication concepts and tools, you learn the fundamentals of typography, graphic design, and layout as well as digital skills. Taught by two instructors, the class includes basic design and type exercises using Photoshop and Illustrator. Develop the essential design skills you need to produce graphics for print, advertising, corporate identity, and other media.

B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 1–3:30 pm

PCGA 1000 $1,860

Lucie Eder X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31  

Alisa Evdokimov X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12   Learn design fundamentals and concept development as they relate to typography, composition, and color. Discover what makes the difference between ordinary images and powerful, effective graphics. Strengthen your design communication skills and develop your style and vision as you transform your concepts into finished designs. Online sections require access to a scanner. 2 CREDITS PCGA 1005 $720


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Graphic Design II Instructor to be announced X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31  Students develop their conceptual and technical skills through sessions in both a nondigital studio and a digital lab. They work on projects that incor-­ porate research, illustrations, and graphics and represent a range of ideas—literal and abstract, metaphorical and symbolic. Discussion of profes­­sional practices and class critiques strengthen students’ ability to present a total graphic concept. Prerequisites: Graphic Design I and working knowledge of Illustrator and InDesign. 2 CREDITS PCGA 2121 $720

Typography I Etta Siegel A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:30 pm

Alexa Nosal X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Steven Kennedy X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  An in-depth understanding of typographic concepts and methods is essential for effective visual communication. Students examine the evolution of the alphabet and the history and basics of typographic style (with an emphasis on 20th-century type design and application). Projects help students understand the difference between legibility and readability and develop a discerning eye and the ability to create effective and expressive type designs. The impact of technology on type design and the work of typographic innovators are discussed. Online sections require access to a scanner. 2 CREDITS PCGA 1001 $720

Letterpress: 3D Typography Steven Kennedy A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm In this printmaking course, students interested in design and fine arts learn the basics of letterpress printing using lead and wood type. Students set type, create visual designs on the press, and print on the Vandercook Proofing Press, developing an in-depth knowledge of letterpress through experi­men­tation and practice. Students work in groups to respond to visual design challenges. For the final project, each student designs and executes a printed work that builds on the skills and ideas

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developed in class. There will be a materials fee for paper and materials of approximately $50. 2 CREDITS

PCGA 1021 $720

Print Production in a Digital World Glenn Baken A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm Whether you are designing a hang tag for fashion, a billboard for advertising, or a lookbook, knowing where print production fits into the digital landscape is essential for all graphic designers working today. This course is a comprehensive introduction to and exploration of the core principles of print production and scale. Classes cover the various uses of printed materials, including merchandising, promotion, marketing, and special events. Field trips to New York City–based print production shops round out the course. 2 CREDITS PCGA 1020 $720

Making Impactful Infographics Niberca Polo X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31  In a world of massive global data collection and information flows, distilling information for readily available consumption and comprehension— especially in business contexts—is no easy task. In this course, we look at data documentation, analysis, and visualization as the means to understand complex information through compelling visual narratives. Using a practicebased curriculum that fosters peer-to-peer learning, students employ a combination of handmade and digital tools to produce both design process and final pieces applicable to a variety of growing industries, such as finance, fashion, health, and retail. Students learn the history of data visualization, practices for creating effective pieces, and the fundamentals of design and color theory, cognitive theory, and semiotics and their application to defining structure, hierarchy, and emphasis. To develop projects, students learn research methodologies and strategies for data collection and analysis and collect and analyze firsthand data. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of design theory; digital skills beneficial but not required. PCGA 0810 $720


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Communication and Promotional Design

Bauhaus, Neue Grafik, and DIY punk. Students explore the evolution of the discipline from typesetting to lithography to digital design and investigate the relationship of the discipline to propaganda, advertising, corporate branding, and social networking. 2 CREDITS

Steven Kennedy A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:30 pm Some of the most challenging and innovative designs fall into the category of promotional design. Assignments include self-promotion and client promotional pieces, including flip books, posters, announcements, brochures, stationery, and packaging. Use of original graphics, folds, structures, and die-cuts is encouraged. Whether the design is rubber-stamped on newspaper or lavishly produced, the concept is always stressed and the sky’s the limit. Flex your creative muscles and make something exceptional for yourself and others. Prerequisite: Graphic Design I or equivalent experience. 2 CREDITS PCGA 1215 $720

Brand Identity Niberca Polo X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  Brand identity is much more than logo design—it is the visual representation of a brand that communicates the company mission, vision, and culture. Students envision a product or service and develop a comprehensive brand strategy that includes research, marketing analysis, and design. Following the step-by-step design process, they create several pieces, including an infographic to present their findings, a 3D prototype, a logo design (for stationery and other collateral), promotional pieces, advertising, and a manual outlining strategies for applying brand identity across various platforms. All work builds to a final presentation in which students pitch their products. Prerequisites: Photoshop Basics and Illustrator Basics or the equivalent. 2 CREDITS PCGA 1207 $720

Graphic Design History Susan Mayer A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7-9:30 pm

James Reeves X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Anna Daley X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  This course covers the history of graphic design from the mid-19th century through the digital revolution. Influential movements are examined, including arts and crafts, art nouveau, Dada,

PCGA 1900 $720

Graphic Design Portfolio Pierre Janssen A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:30 pm Through lectures, demonstrations, and studio work, you learn to build an original, effective graphic design portfolio to present to potential employers and undergraduate and graduate admission counselors. You refine existing projects and are guided in undertaking new projects to fill gaps in your portfolio. You research, develop, and refine your presentation skills using both digital and traditional paper portfolio formats. This class is also ideal for professionals seeking to reawaken their creativity through personal projects and new processes that result in a fresh portfolio with a creative edge. Recommended for students in the final semester of certificate requirements or equivalent experience. Bring your current portfolio (original, digital, or Web based) to the first class. 1 CREDIT

PCGA 2006 $360

Professional Practices: Graphic Design Instructor to be announced A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 7 | T 7–9:30 pm  This course is an in-depth exploration of the business of graphic design and related professional practices, conducted through lectures, demonstrations, research, and studio work. Whether you intend to freelance, work in a small boutique office, or design at a large corporation, this course will help you understand what to expect. The course focuses on common design problems, including pricing, estimates, invoices, client relations, and professional conduct. 1 CREDIT

PCGA 2030 $360


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Demand is on the rise for professionals who know how to effectively organize interiors. Whether you’re interested in claiming your space in retail displays, decorating interiors, or just making the most of a New York City apartment, these courses will provide the skills you need.

Interior Design Certificate Major Code: INTD Required Courses: Color Theory, Basic Drafting, and Basic Interior Space Planning OR Interior Design Basic Core plus

Interior Rendering, Perspective Drawing for Interiors, and Interior Design (or Residential Interior Design) OR

History of Interiors, 1400 to 1800; History of Interiors, 1800 to 2000; and Antiques Connoisseurship plus

Two (2) elective courses Learn more and get started at opencampus. newschool.edu/program/certificate-programs.

Interior Design Basic Core Marlisa Wise, Juan Jofre A | 24 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 7–9:50 pm

Benedict Clouette, Adriana Rodriguez-Pliego B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–3:50 pm Learn basic drafting, rendering, and space layout while studying interior materials and professional practices and methods. Explore the philosophy, art, and science of constructing interior spaces. Taught in separate studio

sections by two instructors, the course begins with basic drafting and rendering exercises and the fundamentals of interior construction. Through coursework and pinups, students engage in critique and critical analysis. Students acquire a basic skill set with which to address more complex problems. Note: Certificate students must use the INTD major code and follow all guidelines for certificate registration. See registration details for this certificate above. PCID 1000 $1,610


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Basic Interior Space Planning

Interior Rendering

Pamela Hersch

Keith Geldof

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:30 pm

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm

Nishan Kazazian

Constance Johannsen

B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm

B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 3:50–6:20 pm Learn about rendering materials, methods, and techniques. Use watercolor, marker, pencil, ink, and mixed media to learn color mixing and color theory and explore shade and shadow. Apply rendering techniques to room drawings, plans, and elevations. Make media comparisons to determine the best use for each finish on the basis of your abilities. Use what you’ve learned to create presentations using color and materials boards. 2 CREDITS

Christian LaHoude C | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:30 pm

Anshu Bangia X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31  This is an introduction to planning interior spaces for students without drafting skills. Learn what it means to be an interior designer and apply conceptual approaches to interior design problems. Through sessions on color, scale and proportion, lighting, furniture arrangement, floor and wall treatments, and client psychology, learn to conceptualize and plan creative solutions for interior spaces. Master freehand drawing of floor plans. Complete one interior design project, from beginning concept through finished visual and verbal presentation. Learn about the use of equipment, tools, and scale drawings. No previous experience in interior design is necessary. 2 CREDITS PCID 1001 $720

#OpenCampusNetwork

PCID 1003 $720

Perspective Drawing for Interiors Eric Strauss A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:30 pm

Constance Johannsen B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 1–3:30 pm Learn the mechanical skills needed to visually communicate spatial concepts. Develop the ability to translate floor plans into threedimensional interiors by exploring the principles of one- and two-point perspective drawing. Learn about isometric views, plan and section perspective, introductory pencil rendering, and concepts of light and shadow. 2 CREDITS PCID 1005 $720

Basic Drafting Conrad Pisarski

Interior Design

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:30 pm

Catherine Pyenson

Sedge Hahm

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:30 pm

B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:30 pm An introduction to the preparation of drawings for architectural purposes. Topics covered include identification and use of drafting equipment, drafting in scale, basic lettering, line weights, and standard notation conventions. The emphasis is on orthographic projections related to floor plans, elevations, and ceiling plans. Trade information related to the practice of architectural and interior design is integrated throughout the curriculum. Learn the skills and techniques necessary to express any design concept graphically. Drafting tools are required. Materials cost approximately $100. 2 CREDITS PCID 1002 $720

Ferruccio Babarcich B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7-9:30 pm Explore the design process by developing a commercial or residential project in a studio environment. Begin from a concept and develop your idea into a coherent interior space, exploring issues of spatial layout and significance, materials and finishes, lighting, and furniture. Present your final project, complete with rendered drawings and a materials board. Prerequisite: Basic Drafting, Basic Interior Space Planning, or equivalent experience. 2 CREDITS PCID 1200 $720


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Residential Interior Design Roger Urmson A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm Explore the possibilities of architectural design of interior space for the private home and apartment. Participate in exercises geared to finding viable and interesting solutions to design problems such as window, ceiling, doorway, floor, and wall treatments. Review drafting techniques that allow you to present projects in a professional manner. Concentrate on space planning, furniture, color, and lighting. Explore materials, methods, and professional practices. Prerequisite: Basic Drafting, Basic Interior Space Planning, Perspective Drawing for Interiors, or the equivalent. 2 CREDITS

PCID 1205 $720

Interior Lighting Jason Livingston A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm An introduction to theory, technique, and creative lighting concepts basic to all interiors. Study materials, color, luminaires and luminaire selection, layout, and approaches to various building types. Prerequisite: Basic Drafting or the equivalent. 2 CREDITS PCID 1140 $720

Kitchen and Bath Conrad Pisarski A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 1–3:30 pm Visualize your dream kitchen and bathroom, then piece it together without bumping your head on the range hood. This class explores basic planning and layout; selection of materials, cabinets, and appliances; essential services; ventilation; lighting; conveying a design idea; and evaluating the existing setup for remodeling. Short assignments and final projects help you tackle practical realities. Prerequisite: Basic Drafting or equivalent experience. 2 CREDITS PCID 1212 $720

Showrooms: A Design Resource Charles Pavarini A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 3–5:30 pm Explore some of the industry’s finest showrooms through instructor-guided tours and lectures. Bring your design and resource knowledge up-to-date. View fabrics, lighting, and furniture,

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as well as window, wall, and floor coverings. The first class meets at the Greenwich Village campus; subsequent classes meet off campus at a variety of Manhattan locations. 2 CREDITS PCID 1730 $600

Product Design for the Home Yvette Chaparro A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm This course is a conceptual exploration of home products, from initial idea to final drawings, models, and presentation, with an emphasis on establishing a rigorous and individual design process. Students design a product for living (furniture, lighting) or dining (tabletop). This semester-long project involves problem solving, market research, and historical study, as well as materials and manufacturing research. Field trips and guest lectures by design professionals reveal the realities of a career in product design. 2 CREDITS

PCID 1255 $720

Furniture Design William Oberlin A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:30 pm Students investigate all aspects of furniture design, including materials, fabrication techniques, form, style, drawing, and production. Emphasis is placed on scale, human factors, and industrial application. This course also covers the relationship of interior space, structure, and product purpose to object design. This is not a studio fabrication course, although scaled prototypes may be produced. 2 CREDITS PCID 1010 $720

Construction Documentation Marlisa Wise A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 13 | M 7–9:30 pm This course provides an overview of construction process and related project documents. Emphasis is placed on both the legal aspect of constructionrelated documents and the roles played by design professionals, contractors, owners, and others involved in the industry. You learn about construction documents, project manuals, bid proposals, specifications, contracts, submittals, and project closeout. We also examine standard forms and ethics. 1 CREDIT PCID 2002 $360


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Professional Practices: Interior Design

Interior Design Portfolio

Instructor to be announced

A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 8 | W 7–9:30 pm  In this course, you focus on designing and producing a professional interior design portfolio. The class begins by discussing the elements of a successful digital or traditional paper format portfolio. Your body of work is reviewed, and any gaps are identified. You undertake exercises, as needed, designed to strengthen your compositional and layout skills and then strategically collect, edit, reorganize, and produce material tailored to a working interior design portfolio. Assignments that develop your presentation skills round out your preparations for entering the interior design industry. If you are preparing a portfolio for college admission or graduate school or are a working professional seeking to infuse your portfolio with new creativity, this class is intended for you. Recommended for students in the final semester of certificate requirements or equivalent experience. Bring your current portfolio (originals, digital, or Web-based) to the first class.

A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm  This course offers you an overview of the legal, ethical, and financial aspects of the interior design field. You are introduced to current models of practice and study the role of economics, contracts, liability, licensure, and standards of practice in shaping contemporary interior design practice. What kind of marketing and promotion is effective for your particular work? Whether you intend to freelance, create a small partnership, or work in-house at a boutique office or large company, this course helps you understand what to expect. We review common business practices, including business proposals, pricing, estimates, invoices, client relations, interviewing techniques, professional conduct, and writing CVs and résumés. 1 CREDIT PCID 2001 $360

STUDENT STORY “We were assigned to design a pop-up exhibition for the lobby of Parsons at West 13th Street and Fifth Avenue. Our client and inspiration for the assignment was a contemporary artist of our choosing. Projects from my other required studio classes varied from designing a three-story NYC townhouse to creating a six-page magazine to sketching the interiors of the Frick Museum. The final project culminated in a formal presentation to a panel of NYC designers. It was nerve-racking yet so rewarding because it was a sample of the real world. I was really happy with the outcome.” —Sarah, Interior Design and Architecture Studies Certificate Student

Catharine Pyenson

1 CREDIT

PCID 2005 $360

History of Interiors, 1400 to 1800: From the Medicis to Louis XVI Rebekah Pollock X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23-Mar. 31  X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  In this course, you acquire a basic understanding of the development of decorative arts in Europe from the 15th to the 18th century. Focusing on the cultures of Italy, France, and England, you explore objects and environments drawn from public and private life. Furniture, textiles, metalwork, glass, ceramics, interiors, and architecture are examined in relation to style and meaning, with special consideration given to the cultural, social, and political contexts in which they were designed and used. 2 CREDITS PCID 1800 $720

History of Interiors, 1800 to 2000: From Napoleon to Michael Graves Erica Forester X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31  The decorative arts produced after World War II reflect the impact of the Industrial Revolution and the social and economic changes it gave rise to.


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In this course, you investigate furniture, ceramics, metalwork, and textiles of the modern era. Subjects covered include the arts and crafts movement, art nouveau, art deco, the Bauhaus, the Victorian era in the United States and England, 19th-century revival styles in architecture and the decorative arts, functionalism, and the relationship between design and technology.

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2 CREDITS

condition, and design in historical context. Learn how to judge articles in terms of excellence and success as works of art. Develop an eye for good design, proportion, and authenticity. Study English, French, and American pieces. Field trips include visits to The Metropolitan Museum of Art, fine furniture galleries, and conservation studios. A guest speaker from Sotheby’s speaks on validity and criteria for collecting. 2 CREDITS

PCID 1801 $720

PCID 1900 $720

Architecture of New York City

Decorative Arts: New York Collections

John Kriskiewicz A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 9:15–11:45 am New York has a compelling architectural heritage, from the Federal-style rowhouse to the modern skyscraper. Acquaint yourself with the philosophy and forces that have shaped our city. Using the city as a classroom, physically experience New York City architecture and its urban environments. Learn to identify architectural styles and understand them in the context of social, economic, and technological currents. The first class meets at Parsons’ Greenwich Village campus; subsequent classes meet off campus at various Manhattan locations. 2 CREDITS PCID 1700 $720

History of Antique Furniture

Louise Devenish A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 9 | Th 3–5:30 pm  Take advantage of the valuable resources of and current happenings in the New York City art world. Tour a range of collections, special exhibitions, and historic homes. Glimpse the current art market through group visits to major museums and private collections in and around the city. Participate in discussions of the scholarly impact of small and private collections and of current blockbuster decorative arts exhibitions inspired by major historical events, such as Henry Hudson’s 400th anniversary. There are entrance fees for exhibitions and museums, and class meetings may run over. 1 CREDIT

PCID 1907 $360

Erica Forester X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  This course is a survey of antique furniture styles and antique objects dating from 1400 to 1800, including the Renaissance, baroque, rococo, and early neoclassical periods in western Europe and the United States. You learn how to identify antique furniture by stylistic genre and historical style while developing a keen eye for the way past styles are reflected in modern furniture. This course is ideal for interior designers, stylists, production designers, antique collectors and sellers, product designers, and individuals interested in the decorative arts. 2 CREDITS PCID 1915 $720

CAREER FAIR ART & DESIGN CERTIFICATES AT PARSONS Thursday, April 27, 4:00–8:00 p.m. University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Want to know how a certificate in art and design from Parsons can take your career in a new direction? Come and participate in panels and workshops, and take advantage of the opportunity to network with colleagues and industry professionals. RSVP at newschool.edu/certificates-career-fair.

Antiques Connoisseurship Louise Devenish A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 12:10–2:40 pm Is it an antique or a reproduction? Learn the essential criteria for collecting and evaluating antique furniture. Study quality, craftsmanship,


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The Art Auction

Appraising and Sourcing Art and Objects

Nicholas Dawes A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 12:10–2:40 pm  What is it worth? How do I get involved? Find answers to these questions and much more in this intensive study of the fascinating world of fine art auctioneering, with a focus on New York’s auction houses. The class features frequent field trips, guest speakers, a mock auction, and a weekly look at the international world of art and objects at auction. 1 CREDIT PCID 1909 $360

SHEILA C. JOHNSON DESIGN CENTER EXHIBITIONS Exhibitions at the Sheila C. Johnson Design Center galleries are at the forefront of political and social engagement through art and design. This past fall, our galleries featured a number of innovative and thoughtful exhibitions, such as Push Play, which examined the work of artists who borrow from play and games to explore social, cultural, and

Nicholas Dawes X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 Whether you’re acquiring art and objects for pure enjoyment, with an eye to investment, to begin a collection, or as a profession, it’s important to make informed decisions. This course is an introduction to the professional appraisal of Western decorative arts and interior design from the 18th century to the modern era. Students learn to make critical decisions in building a private or professional collection and the fine art of the auction business. Throughout the course, you engage with the field of decorative arts and design in ways relevant to your setting, such as conducting research in online auction and sale platforms or visiting auction houses, galleries, and art and antique shows where you can network with professionals. You gain hands-on experience appraising fine and decorative arts in the commercial auction world and learn to identify and assess the value of art and objects, which prepares you for a career in the world of auction, appraising, or interior design. PCID 0810 $720

philosophical issues; a showcase of the diverse work of Parsons alumni; and City and City, an exhibition and programming with artists based in New York and in Beirut, which was supported by the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council and the New York State Council on the Arts. For more details, visit newschool.edu/sjdc.

Did you know? Parsons awards an average of 100 certificates in fashion design, fashion business, graphic and digital design, architecture and interior design, and fine arts every year. Find out how you can join our network of accomplished certificate holders at opencampus.newschool.edu/program/ certificate-programs.


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Fine arts and foundation courses provide a basis and collaborative educational environment for all the art and design disciplines. Beginning artists and illustrators are introduced to essential tools and ideas, while those with more experience develop their skills and creativity in more advanced courses. Find more fine arts courses in Arts and Social Engagement on page 120.

Fine Arts Certificate Major Code: FINE Required Courses: Color Theory, Drawing I, Painting I plus

Life Drawing, Painting II plus

Three (3) elective courses Learn more and get started at opencampus. newschool.edu/program/certificate-programs.

Color Theory Jennifer Graves A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:30 pm

Dik Liu B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm

Richard Beenen C | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm

Daniel McDonald X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Daniel McDonald X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12 

Discover color and its implications for designers and artists. Study ideas of space and the use of color to solve spatial problems. Look at color harmony and the way colors interact, as well as color qualities and combinations. Online students must have access to a scanner. 2 CREDITS PCFA 1100 $720


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Drawing Basics

Drawing in New York City

Eileen Mullan

Michelle Greene

A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 7 | T 7–9:30 pm  This course explores both traditional and contemporary approaches to drawing with a variety of materials. Through a series of assignments with still life arrangements and live models, students learn about the importance of seeing form and master the basic principles of drawing. Critiques and discussion help students develop analytic and evaluative skills. Instruction is one-on-one and is geared to the needs of individual students. 1 CREDIT

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 12:10–2:40 pm This course gets you out into the city drawing at indoor and outdoor locations. You’ll learn how to depict a landscape or interior in an expressive and cohesive composition that captures value, space, form, and movement. Beginning and advanced students draw using their own approach while remaining aware of the solutions reached by successful artists throughout history. Critiques and discussion help students develop analytic and evaluative skills. Instruction is one-on-one and is geared to the needs of each student. Drawing sites may include the High Line, The Met, the Central Park Zoo, and the Central Park Conservatory Garden. The first session meets at the southwest corner of Union Square Park, inside the dog run. We will draw the dogs and the Greenmarket. (In case of rain, we will meet at the subway entrance at the southwest corner of the park.) 2 CREDITS

PCFA 0401 $360

Drawing I Pedro Cuni A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:30 pm For those who have never picked up a pencil and beginners who prefer sticking to the basics. The class discusses form, drawing materials, line, and shading. Students learn about perspective, foreshortening, gesture, drapery, and portraiture. The class includes some life drawing from the model. 2 CREDITS PCFA 0501 $720

PCFA 1436 $720

Painting I Sonya Sklaroff A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:30 pm

Drawing II Sonya Sklaroff A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm This class is geared to students who wish to build upon basic drawing skills. Selective observation, including working from the figure, helps students develop an understanding of structure and form. Students explore composition, line quality, and spatial relations. References to art history and contemporary art, one-on-one instruction, and demonstrations aid the learning process. Prerequisite: Drawing I or equivalent experience.

John Silver B | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 1–3:30 pm This basic painting studio begins with an examination of the use of color, composition, spatial structure, and transition. Students work with a variety of observed sources, including the figure model, while receiving guidance on issues they are struggling with. Art history and study of contemporary art are incorporated. 2 CREDITS PCFA 1401 $720

Painting II

2 CREDITS

Margaret Krug

PCFA 1001 $720

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 1–3:30 pm Students practice painting, from direct observation, abstract motifs for sketches and fully developed pieces created in oil and watercolor. They explore ways to depart from established creative techniques to express their individual vision. Even “mistakes” and other surprises that are part of everyday studio activity are considered in the context of their contributions to creative practice. Students discover their own methods of engaging with painting, bringing the

Life Drawing Grace Burney A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:30 pm Discover aspects of drawing by working from the live model. Study master drawings and develop an understanding of structure to cultivate elements of draftsmanship. 2 CREDITS PCFA 1010 $720


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ancient art into the present. Prerequisite: Painting I or equivalent experience. 2 CREDITS PCFA 2300 $720

Life Painting Gilda Pervin A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm Using live models as subject matter, students explore fundamental concepts of painting using close observation of color, form, and light and dark to compose paintings of the human figure occupying space. Both accuracy and expressiveness are addressed and encouraged. This course is recommended for students who have taken at least one previous life drawing class. Bring vine charcoal and an 18×24 newsprint pad to the first session. 2 CREDITS PCFA 1411 $720

Oil Painting Basics

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Watercolor Beverly Brodsky A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 3:50–6:20 pm Beginning and advanced students explore all facets of watercolor painting and develop their technical ability and creativity. A variety of styles and approaches are demonstrated, including wet-on-wet, glaze, and washes. The course covers subjects including landscapes, flowers, and buildings, with an emphasis on design and color. The development of each student’s personal vision is encouraged. 2 CREDITS PCFA 1414 $720

INFO SESSION ART & DESIGN CERTIFICATES AT PARSONS Thursday, January 12, 6:00–7:30 p.m. Sheila C. Johnson Design Center, Kellen Auditorium 66 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Eileen Mullan

Want to learn more about how you can jump-start

A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm Explore color and form by painting from the live model and still life setups. Gain a basic understanding of the use of oil paints, media, and brushes while developing painting skills and learning techniques specific to painting materials and the surfaces on which they are painted. Prerequisite: Drawing I or equivalent. 1 CREDIT

the career of your dreams with a certificate in art

PCFA 0702 $360

digital design, fashion business, fashion design,

and design from Parsons? Join us for an information session given by our program director, Melinda Wax. Faculty will be on hand to discuss the latest courses and noncredit certificate options in all areas of study, including interior and architectural design, and more!

Acrylic Painting Basics Nuno Campos A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 8 | W 7–9:30 pm  In this introductory class, students learn about the properties of acrylic paint and how it behaves on substrates such as canvas, paper, and other materials. They practice controlling and mixing acrylics on projects ranging from ones inspired by found images to still lifes; experimentation is encouraged. Topics discussed include the archival nature of acrylic paint and artists who work primarily in acrylics. Prerequisite: Drawing I or the equivalent. 1 CREDIT PCFA 0703 $360

RSVP at newschool.edu/certificates-info-session.


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Collage

Project Studio

Mariah Fee

Peter Garfield

A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 1–3:30 pm  Collage is the integration of painting, handmade surfaces, three-dimensional objects, and photographs to create multiple layers of visual meaning. It offers an ideal medium for personal and autobiographical work, storytelling, and visual narratives. Students develop their design ideas and technical skills by creating color compositions using digital inkjet prints, art papers, fabrics, and photos. Classes include demonstrations of transfers from laser prints and newspapers, the use of specialty papers, binding methods, and the history of collage art. Students are encouraged to experiment with text using layers of transparencies and textures. Final projects can be scanned for use in online portfolios, on websites, and in online interactive digital graphics.

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm In this studio, intermediate- to advanced-level students complete self-directed projects in media including drawing, painting, sculpture photo, video, and animation and create interdisciplinary work. Students plan, develop, and produce a project or series of their own design with the technical and critical support of the instructor. The emphasis is on articulating a personal approach to the chosen medium. This course helps you create a cohesive series of pieces, build your portfolio for graduate school, and advance your professional development. Guest artists and critics contribute to the dialogue. Bring a sample portfolio of your work (originals, digital, or Web based), if available, to the first session. 2 CREDITS PCFA 1910 $720

1 CREDIT

PCFA 1150 $360

Mixed Media: Contemporary Fusion Mariah Fee A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 11 | Sat 1–3:30 pm  Unlock ways of creating unique images and expressing personal vision using mixed media. Create artwork that brings together photo imagery and the transparent textures of paint. Juxtapose found images with art materials to connect personal content with elements from the environment. The relationship between personal expression and cultural images is explored. A variety of materials and processes can be used: water-soluble pencils, acrylic paints, inks, layering old book pages and found text, and photo transfers. A portion of this course will take place in a digital lab. Final work can be scanned and incorporated into digital formats. A selection of mixed media practitioners will be studied and discussed, including Picasso, Rauschenberg, Hannah Hoch, the Dadaists and Surrealists, and Native American, folk, and contemporary artists. 1 CREDIT

PCFA 1440 $360

Introduction to Digital Photography Michael Grimaldi A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm This lecture/demonstration course introduces you to the fundamentals of digital photography. You emerge from the class with a new sense of the power of photography and confidence in using a camera without focusing excessively on the technical details of the medium. Topics covered include different types of cameras, how to choose a camera, and how to hold the camera to ensure sharp photographs. You also learn about aperture opening (f-stop) and shutter speed in detail so that you can control the way the two elements work together to determine exposure, sharpness, and depth of field. You explore lighting techniques, image size and perspective as related to lens and focal length choice, depth of field and its creative potential, automatic features of electronic cameras, digital darkroom techniques, and accessories including tripods, flashes, and filters. Your individual creativity is stressed and your work is viewed and discussed in class. If you own a camera, bring it to the first class session. 2 CREDITS PCFA 1200 $720


Immerse yourself in scholarship and creativity this summer at The New School. Our summer intensive programs let you explore a range of fields, including art and design at Parsons, writing, drama, media and film, liberal arts, and more. Develop a portfolio, earn university credit, or acquire new career skills. We offer summer courses on campus in NYC, at Parsons Paris, and with partners in London, Barcelona, and beyond, so you can draw inspiration from and learn in global creative capitals.

Join Us—We make the longest days of the year feel like the shortest. NEWSCHOOL.EDU/SUMMER


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The Photographic Portrait

Available Light Photography

Brian Lav

Daniel Featherstone

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm Since Leonardo da Vinci painted Mona Lisa, the portrait has been a favorite genre for artists and photographers. Whether you choose to photograph your family, capture strangers on the street, or set up a formal portrait, this course gives you the technical and conceptual skills you need to make a successful picture. Camera use, lighting, composition, personal vision, and point of view are discussed. You can shoot work in black-and-white or color, using analog or digital cameras. A darkroom is not provided, but if you wish to shoot film, you can have your negatives scanned for digital workflow at a commercial printer. Cameras must have manual focus and exposure controls. 2 CREDITS

A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm  Getting great shots in extreme conditions like harsh sunlight or the street at night is a challenge. This course shows you how to work with any kind of light at any time, including dim lighting and night, natural, and ambient light. Students develop their vision and technical ability as they translate light, color, and ideas into powerful images. Special software, processes, equipment, and camera techniques and their use in creating evocative images are demonstrated and discussed. Regular assignments and critiques are an important part of the course. Students learn how to prepare images for a book produced from online sources. You must have an adjustable digital camera (not a basic point-and-shoot) and Lightroom or any version of Photoshop on your laptop or home computer for the course. Assignments must be brought to class on a USB drive. Students should bring samples of their work to the first class. Prerequisite: Introduction to Digital Photography or equivalent. 1 CREDIT

PCFA 1211 $720

Study on your own schedule We offer more than 75 online courses each term.

PCFA 1213 $360

Introduction to Printmaking #OpenCampusNetwork

New York City Street Photography Arlene Collins A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:30 pm  Photograph New York City using only technique and the simplest of equipment. Learn how to use landscape, form, and existing light to master the photographic resources on hand. Each week, you explore various New York neighborhoods with the class and capture your own striking lowbudget images. The use of point-and-shoot digital cameras, simple 35mm film cameras, and even disposable cameras is encouraged to help you develop a unique photographic vision. Beginners are welcome. Bring your camera to the first session. 1 CREDIT PCFA 1212 $360

Janice Loeb A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:30 pm Beginning students explore printmaking media including etching, monotypes, and collagraphy. This workshop enables students to develop their own personal vision. It covers conventional techniques and introduces students to experimental methods. 2 CREDITS PCFA 1800 $740 plus a $100 materials fee. Faculty will have information on fee payment on the first day of class.

Etching and Engraving Mohammad Khalil A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm This course introduces all forms of intaglio printing, including drypoint, engraving, softground, and mezzotint. Color printing includes demonstrations with multicolor plates, and students explore printing with zinc and copper plates. Design and drawing are stressed, with attention given to developing each student’s personal aesthetic. Historical and modern


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applications of these techniques are related to classwork through examples of professional prints. Limited to 12. 2 CREDITS

DAY OF LEARNING AND OPEN CAMPUS EXPO

PCFA 1801 $740 plus a $100 materials fee. Faculty will have information on fee payment on the first day of class.

Saturday, December 10, 2016, 12:00–4:00 p.m. University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Can one day of learning spark a lifetime

Woodcut, Etching, and Collagraph

of discovery?

Mohammad Khalil

From its founding in 1919, The New School has known

A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:30 pm Study basic intaglio methods (etching, and softground), relief printing (B&W and color woodcut), and experimental work with the collagraph, building a surface for printing with cardboard and other textural two-dimensional objects. Freedom and flexibility are emphasized as students learn to use drawing and cutting tools while mastering printing and registration techniques. Design and drawing are stressed, with attention given to developing each student's personal aesthetic. Historical and modern applications of these media are related to classwork through examples of professional prints. Limited to 12. 2 CREDITS

that providing access to innovative approaches to

PCFA 1806 $740 plus a $100 materials fee. Faculty will have information on fee payment on the first day of class.

education can serve as the engine of groundbreaking social, personal, and professional change. On December 10, experience The New School’s unparalleled approach to learning with Open Campus, offering continuing education courses and programs for adults, youth, and teens. All afternoon, take advantage of FREE pop-up classes, open studios, campus tours, activities, course advising, and info sessions, followed by an evening panel discussion on education access as a force for social change. RSVP and find the full schedule of events at newschool.edu/day-of-learning.

Silkscreen Printing Pan Terzis A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 7–9:30 pm Screenprinting is one of the simplest and most direct ways to create multiple-color images. Using hand-drawn, digital, and photographic sources, students learn to construct images on almost any flat surface. All printing is waterbased. This class develops skills that can support other artistic techniques. 2 CREDITS PCFA 1802 $740 plus a $100 materials fee. Faculty will have information on fee payment on the first day of class.


Management, Leadership, and Entrepreneurship . . .

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Business of Design . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Marketing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 Finance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

  Short Course  

  Online Course

  

  Noncredit Certificate   Graduate Certificate


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The world is changing moment to moment—creating unprecedented risks and opportunities for companies and organizations across a variety of industries. Make your contributions count and meet people who will help you develop the skills you need to successfully launch your own start-up, navigate a new nonprofit venture, or keep your business—and your career—ahead of the competition.

Leadership and Change  Post-Master’s Certificate The Leadership and Change Certificate program at Milano at The New School emphasizes learning in action and provides tools, time, and structure that enable participants to apply their learning in their own organizational situations. Students in this post-master’s program test their ideas and skills in real projects for real clients, discuss their experiences with faculty and fellow students, and return to their careers with new insight. Get started at newschool.edu/public-engagement/ post-masters-leadership-change-certificate.

Organization Development Post-Master’s Certificate  This professional certificate is designed for current internal and external practitioners seeking to build on their professional knowledge and for those wishing to enter the organization development field. The Organization Development Certificate curriculum at The New School is critically reflective, rooted in real-world experience, and flexible in delivery. Our focus on

change leadership competencies prepares students to work with a wide range of cultural and social identity groups within the global community in organizations that cross sectors. Requirements vary by program. Get started at newschool.edu/public-engagement/post-mastersorganization-development-certificate.


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 ustainability Strategies S  Post-Master’s Certificate This post-master’s certificate program at The New School prepares working and aspiring managers who are or aim to be planners, directors, and consultants for environment-oriented nonprofits, emerging “green” industries, and planning and regulatory agencies. The Certificate in Sustainability Strategies attests to successful completion of a short structured program of study designed to build competencies in defining and implementing sustainability as a value and a bottom-line management goal. For more information, visit newschool.edu/public-engagement/postmasters-sustainability-strategies-certificate.

Graduate Certificate in Media Management  This graduate certificate program provides a strong foundation of management principles and leadership skills for business professionals working or seeking work in the ever-changing global media landscape. The curriculum includes courses in industry perspectives, media management and leadership, media economics, information technologies, competitive strategies,

and corporate responsibility. The Media Management Certificate curriculum can be completed on campus at The New School in New York City, online from anywhere, or by combining online and on-campus study. For more information, visit newschool.edu/ public-engagement/media-managementgraduate-certificate.

Introduction to Nonprofit Management

Social Entrepreneurship

David Eng A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm Nonprofit organizations have grown in number and importance over the last several years. In New York City, the nonprofit sector employs more people than the garment and financial services industries combined. This course introduces the principal theories of not-for-profit enterprise and the implications of various management practices for nonprofit organizations. Topics covered include the history and scope of the nonprofit sector, variations within this sector, and management issues as they pertain to nonprofits: fundraising and development, financial management, entrepreneurship, human resources management, marketing, governance and leadership advocacy, ethics, and nonprofit law. The course provides an ideal foundation for those contemplating a career in the field or seeking to become more effective board members or other volunteers. 3 CREDITS

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm Social entrepreneurship is a new field that blurs the lines between the nonprofit and for-profit sectors. It has emerged in response to the inability of government and philanthropy to alleviate the world's social ills, focusing on market-based solutions to problems such as hunger, poverty, HIV/AIDS, and global warming. This course examines the three primary models currently being used: nonprofits starting for-profit ventures, for-profit companies with a social purpose, and nonprofits that approach social need in new and innovative ways. Students address such questions as: What does it take to be a social entrepreneur? Who are the leaders in this sector? What determines success and failure? Which is the appropriate business model for my idea? How does an organization find funding? How are corporations helping? And how does one assess the positive impact of the social venture? 3 CREDITS

NMGT 2400 $700

NMGT 3030 $700

Diana Ayton-Shenker


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Public-Private Partnerships and Development

basis of market forces is not enough to guarantee adequate safeguards for working conditions. This course covers essentials of the latest research and debates on corporate codes of conduct to enforce labor standards. Upon completion of the course, students will be more informed and critical readers of academic work, news accounts, and policy materials that present evidence and policy arguments about corporate social responsibility, labor standards, and worker rights. The purpose is to equip students with tools and concepts that will help them advocate for, write about, and research policy reforms and behavior changes to improve working conditions.

Barbara Adams A | 4 sessions | M  ar. 1 | W 6–7 pm   Mar. 4 | Sat 10 am–3 pm Mar. 11 | Sat 10 am–3 pm Mar. 15 | W 6–7 pm  

In this course, we analyze the emerging trend of private funding and partnership arrangements in addressing global challenges and explore their impact and influence across a range of areas, from program development to decision making and democratic governance. Global economic, social, and ecological crises have intensified in recent years, yet the ability of states and multilateral organizations to tackle these crises appears to have diminished and there has been an expansion in the role of the business sector and philanthropy in meeting these challenges. While innovative in many ways, these partnerships also raise questions: Is the public interest really served? Do these partnerships lead to excessive corporate capture of decision making? Do they erode democratic governance? The course is designed to equip students with the concepts and tools needed to research and assess the impact of partnerships and private funding and to develop policy frameworks for private financing of global public goods and services. 1 CREDIT NINT 5004 $450

Business and Human Rights Yana Rodgers A | 4 sessions | Mar. 19 | W 6–7:50 pm  Mar. 29 | W 6–7:50 pm  Apr. 12 | W 6–7:50 pm  Apr. 22 | Sat 10 am–3 pm

Weak enforcement of national labor laws, together with changes in market forces arising from growing consumer pressure for decent working conditions, has contributed to a surge in corporate self-regulation through codes of conduct since the mid-1990s. With pressure from nongovernmental organizations and the negative consequences of media exposure of noncompliance, most major retailers and manufacturers now either have their own compliance programs or rely on multi-stakeholder organizations. While this approach may improve working conditions in monitored factories, critics argue that relying on companies to self-regulate compliance on the

1 CREDIT

NINT 5002 $450

Trade and Health: TPP and IPR Judit Rius Sanjuan A | 5 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm    The Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) and parallel regional trade agreements now under negotiation will further deepen global integration of markets around the world. Among the most contentious issues are the provisions for intellectual property and their consequences for people’s ability to access medicines and treatments. This course will demystify the complex legal provisions and the economics of health, both of which are hotly contested. 1 CREDIT NINT 5007 $450

Arts Management Pi-Isis Ankhra A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm We examine the tensions between artistic integrity, economic viability, and stakeholder benefit in arts management. Readings and case studies develop student understanding of the economic and social importance of the arts. Students also acquire practical skills—organizational, financial, strategic, and promotional— applicable to day-to-day and long-term management of nonprofit and commercial ventures in the arts. The backgrounds and interests of the students enrolled help the instructor determine which kinds of arts enterprises to emphasize: for-profit or nonprofit, popular arts or fine arts, performing arts or visual arts. 3 CREDITS NMGT 3110 $700


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No. 1 for Small Classes Among national universities, The New School had the highest proportion of classes with fewer than 20 students.

Business of Screenwriting Douglas Tirola A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 8–9:50 pm Talent is only one part of being a successful screenwriter. Navigating the complicated movie industry, with its many layers of professional personnel, is another. This course explains how to find an agent and what can realistically be expected from one. Learn what is involved in working with agents, producers, production companies, and studio executives. Guest speakers include agents, producers, development executives, studio executives, and screenwriters from organizations such as the William Morris Agency and Fox and from New York–based production companies, who tell you what it takes to do business with them. This course is useful for aspiring producers and development executives as well as screenwriters. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3454 $700

Fashion Industry Profile: New York City Anna Philip A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 3:50–6:40 pm Delve into the business of fashion in New York City, one of the world’s most important global fashion capitals. This course presents an overview of New York City’s industry structure across primary, secondary, and auxiliary markets. You explore the interrelationships between design, production, and marketing as they are practiced here. You discuss recent developments in local production, within and outside of the traditional Garment Center, and the rise of innovative fashion incubators developed for area fashion designers and craftspeople. You acquire a working vocabulary of industry terminology to employ when communicating your insights. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1814 $720

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Fashion Entrepreneurship Savannah Todd A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm

Donna Berger X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31  Students aspiring to become entrepreneurs in the fashion industry examine the skills needed to conceive, finance, open, and operate a successful fashion business. Through collaborative research and hands-on practice, students learn what’s involved in opening a business and navigating the complexities of working with a team. Students learn to create business models and structure legal business organizations, and they explore the details of financing and insurance. 2 CREDITS

PCFD 1840 $720

WHAT IS AN OPEN CAMPUS? BEYOND THE IVORY TOWER Saturday, December 10, 6:00–7:00 p.m. University Center, UL104, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

We live in an age of near-constant disruption. Innovations in various industries push the creative envelope and advance the social good by offering radically new ways of approaching accepted industry practices. But can such disruption happen within the “ivory tower”? Or do we need to look beyond the traditional campus to find new ways of reaching and serving today’s new and wider audiences? What can traditional education providers learn from non­ accredited academic institutions to help reimagine the learning landscape? Join thinkers at the vanguard of discourse on and practice of education. Panelists explore innovations in learning modalities, discuss advances in education access, and share insights from The New School’s own work to transform the educational experience for learners from a wide range of backgrounds and interests. This event is part of the Nth Degree Series and will be live streamed. RSVP at newschool.edu/open-campus-panel.


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You don’t have to be a designer to think like one or to let design practices influence the way you do business. Business of design courses use cross-disciplinary methods to change the way students approach business, lend narratives to data sets, and empower designers and artists to successfully run a practice. In addition to benefiting from class instruction, students have the opportunity to form professional connections with classmates, professors, and the entire student body at the university. ­   Design Thinking Fundamentals Lee Sean Huang X1 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 10    Design thinking is a practice pioneered by top design firms like IDEO and used by some of the world's most innovative companies. In this course, you learn the methodology and develop the mindset that will equip you to better understand problems, unlock hidden needs, and design groundbreaking innovations to address those needs. We cover every element of the design thinking approach, from empathy research to ideation to prototyping to getting user feedback and iterating your designs. You will be able to apply your design thinking skills to your own professional field or discipline, as well as everyday life. No design experience is required. PCSP 0801 $360

­   Design Thinking for Better Business Melissa Rancourt A | 2 days | April 29–30 | 10 am–5 pm  It seems as if design thinking is all the rage these days. Curious to learn more about what exactly design thinking is and how you can apply design-led methodology to find solutions to your business challenges? In this hands-on, intensive two-day workshop, learn how design thinking tools can be applied to any industry, challenge, or opportunity to change outmoded dynamics and

uncover new approaches. You’ll be ready to walk into the office on Monday with actionable insights and tools that can be readily applied to optimize your approach to best business practices for the new economy. PCSP 0802 $525

­   Fundamentals of Data Visualization Jaime Tanner X1 | 6 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 6 

Jacob Romer X2 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 10    The presentation of data plays a critical role in the shaping of opinion, policy, and decision making in the boardroom and beyond. In this course, we start with the fundamentals—how is data created and archived, and how can we use it? Then, through a series of basic exercises using readily available software, we bring to life data sets to design insights in students’ own specific fields of interest. The knowledge gained from this course can be applied to decision making and support, rapid knowledge assessment, and general storytelling. PCSP 0803 $525

Making Impactful Infographics Niberca Polo X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31    In a world of massive global data collection and


Learn More > opencampus.newschool.edu  | 212.229.5620 | opencampus@newschool.edu

information flows, distilling information for readily available consumption and comprehension—especially in business contexts—is no easy task. In this course, we look at data documentation, analysis, and visualization as the means to understand complex information through compelling visual narratives. Using a practicebased curriculum that fosters peer-to-peer learning, students employ a combination of handmade and digital tools to produce both design process and final pieces applicable to a variety of growing industries, such as finance, fashion, health, and retail. Students learn the history of data visualization, practices for creating effective pieces, and the fundamentals of design and color theory, cognitive theory, and semiotics and their application to defining structure, hierarchy, and emphasis. To develop projects, students learn research methodologies and strategies for data collection and analysis and collect and analyze firsthand data. Prerequisite: basic knowledge of design theory; digital skills beneficial but not required. PCSP 0811 $720

Business Basics: Intellectual Property and Licensing Linda Saint Marc X1 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 14    Protect your ideas, designs, and creative work. Gain an understanding of intellectual property law and learn to identify and protect copyright, trademark, patent, and domain rights. Learn how to use licensing to turn intellectual property into money. Explore key topics using a variety of realistic case studies and your own concepts. Examine the roles of creator, licensor, agent, and licensee. Develop your own multicategory licensing program. Sessions focus on licensing agreements, partner selection, deal negotiations, brand licensing sales tools, and royalty revenue calculations. No business experience is required. 1 CREDIT

PCGA 2020 $360

Professional Practices: Interior Design Instructor to be announced A | 6 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm  This course offers you an overview of the legal, ethical, and financial aspects of the interior design field. You are introduced to current models

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of practice and study the role of economics, contracts, liability, licensure, and standards of practice in shaping contemporary interior design practice. What kind of marketing and promotion is effective for your particular work? Whether you intend to freelance, create a small partnership, or work in-house at a boutique office or large company, this course helps you understand what to expect. We review common business practices, including business proposals, pricing, estimates, invoices, client relations, interviewing techniques, professional conduct, and writing CVs and résumés. 1 CREDIT

PCID 2001 $360

Professional Practices: Fashion Savannah Todd A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 8 | W 7–9:30 pm  This course introduces you to working in the fashion industry, whether your focus is fashion design, illustration, textile design, buying, or merchandising. Through lectures, research, presentations by visiting professionals, and field trips, you are familiarized with current models of practice and study the various roles involved in shaping a contemporary fashion business. Whether you intend to freelance or intern, establish a small design studio, or work for a fashion company, this course helps you understand what to expect. We review common professional practices, including professional conduct, interviewing techniques, and writing a résumé, CV, and business proposal. 1 CREDIT PCFD 2010 $360

Professional Practices: Graphic Design Instructor to be announced A | 6 sessions | beg. Mar. 7 | T 7–9:30 pm  This course is an in-depth exploration of the business of graphic design and related professional practices, conducted through lectures, demonstrations, research, and studio work. Whether you intend to freelance, work in a small boutique office, or design at a large corporation, this course will help you understand what to expect. The course focuses on common design problems, including pricing, estimates, invoices, client relations, and professional conduct. 1 CREDIT

PCGA 2030 $360


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Marketing: a simple word with a complex definition. Our courses help you break down all the facets of marketing­—from branding to publicity and promotion to digital media­—and use them to further your career or business. Learn to develop brand strategies and identities, conquer the social media arena, and tame the public relations beast to take your company to the next level. Branding

Centering Your Brand: Design and Brand Strategy

Brand Identity

Bliss Lau, Jasmine Takanikos

X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  Brand identity is much more than logo design— it is the visual representation of a brand that communicates the company mission, vision, and culture. Students envision a product or service and develop a comprehensive brand strategy that includes research, marketing analysis, and design. Following the step-by-step design process, they create several pieces, including an infographic with which to present their findings, a 3D prototype, a logo design (for stationery and other collateral), promotional pieces, advertising, and a manual outlining strategies for applying brand identity across various platforms. All work builds

A | 3 sessions | beg. Apr. 15 | Sat 10 am–5 pm  This workshop pairs design and brand strategy. It is targeted to students and working professionals who intend to launch or already have a business or brand in a creative industry. Students who seek to develop their goals, voice, and expression explore their unique vision through our interactive, hands-on workshop-style course. Presented in three intensive six-hour sessions over consecutive Saturdays: I: Exploration, Discovery & Vision; II: Strategic Direction & Conceptual Development; and III: Finalizing Process. 1 CREDIT PCFD 1905 $360

Niberca Polo

Think you don’t have time to take a course? Think again. Our suite of original, cutting-edge short courses offer the same interdisciplinary approach to educating today’s professionals as our full-length courses, but at a pace that suits your busy schedule. To discover the full range of offerings, visit opencampus.newschool.edu/program/short-courses.


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to a final presentation in which students pitch their products. Prerequisite: Photoshop Basics and Illustrator Basics or the equivalent. 2 CREDITS PCGA 1207 $720

Consumer Behavior Marie Johnson X1 | 9 weeks | Jan. 23–Mar. 31 

Gretchen Harnick X2 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  Today’s competitive marketing climate has led many companies to explore theories of consumer behavior. This course focuses on the profile of the consumer—psychographics and demographics— and consumer interests, with an emphasis on generational marketing. Segmented and niche markets and their development are also discussed. 2 CREDITS

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enter social networks on the Internet? What is the link between viral marketing and social change? We consider questions about the nature of the “collective generosity” mindset inherent in millennial offerings like Wikipedia, with an eye to mapping global resource and information networks to include the most disenfranchised of global citizens. How can the activist potential of the Internet be used to address global warming, poverty, and political injustice? 3 CREDITS NCOM 3026 $700

Did You Know? You can take courses for credit today and may be able to apply them toward a degree later. *Additional fees apply. See page 128 for details. Each student’s situation is unique. Consult with your advisor.

PCFD 1855 $720

Digital Media

­ Social Media Marketing Stephanie Schwab X1 | 5 weeks | Mar. 6–Apr. 10    Tap into the enormous potential of social media to elevate your brand and business. In this class, we cover all the essentials—from mapping your strategy, choosing your channels, and crafting viral content to monitoring, measuring, and responding to user activity for best performance. Gain immediately actionable insights and set goals that will have you powering through your core KPIs (we’ll explain what that means, too). By the end of this course, you’ll have a solid trove of tips and tools with which to implement your vision and drive results. PCSP 0804 $525

DAY OF LEARNING AND OPEN CAMPUS EXPO Saturday, December 10, 2016, 12:00–4:00 p.m. University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Can one day of learning spark a lifetime of discovery? From its founding in 1919, The New School has known that providing access to innovative approaches to education can serve as the engine of groundbreaking social, personal, and professional change. On December 10, experience The New School’s unparalleled approach to learning with Open Campus, offering continuing education courses and programs for adults, youth, and teens. All afternoon, take advantage of FREE pop-up classes, open studios, campus tours, activities, course advising,

Beyond iCelebrities

and info sessions, followed by an evening panel

Kathleen Sweeney

discussion on education access as a force for

X1 | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  Popular social networking sites have evolved rapidly in the past few years, alongside Internetsavvy grassroots organizations like MoveOn. The course outlines the recent history of MoveOn, Code Pink, Facebook, YouTube, and Second Life (virtual activism) and the viral nature of Internet trends. What happens when corporate entities

social change. RSVP and find the full schedule of events at newschool.edu/day-of-learning.


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Publicity and Promotion

Print Production in a Digital World

Public Relations Instructor to be announced A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 4–5:50 pm Students learn practical skills for conducting public relations campaigns through traditional and online outlets. They also explore theories of human behavior that help PR specialists develop campaigns and assess a campaign’s effectiveness. Other readings compare public relations with propaganda campaigns and examine ethical issues of using information to manipulate behavior. 3 CREDITS NMGT 2120 $700

Glenn Baken A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:30 pm Whether you are designing a hang tag for fashion, a billboard for advertising, or a lookbook, knowing where print production fits into the digital landscape is essential for all graphic designers working today. This course is a comprehensive introduction to and exploration of the core principles of print production and scale. Classes cover the various uses of printed materials, including merchandising, promotion, marketing, and special events. Field trips to New York City–based print production shops round out the course. 2 CREDITS PCGA 1020 $720

ONLINE LEARNING Each semester, The New School brings

#OpenCampusNetwork

you classes that fit your life as well as they fit your screen—be it mobile, desktop, tablet, or watch. Look for the computer icon to find all of our online classes. Find out about online learning at The New School at opencampus. newschool.edu/program/online-learning.

Fashion Marketing in a Global Environment Laura Lanteri A | 12 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:30 pm

Jeanine Polizzi

The Big Idea: Ad Campaigns Kurt Brokaw A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 8–9:50 pm Could you invent a Marlboro cowboy, a milk mustache, a talking E*TRADE baby, an Aflac duck? How do copywriters and art directors come up with campaigns for the hottest viral, stealth, 3D, and experiential media? Students work in self-selected teams to brainstorm, conceptualize, write, test, and pitch campaigns using new media as well as traditional television and print. Assignments include developing campaigns for packaged goods, recording artists, and public service causes. Invited guests include Eric Weisberg, executive creative director, J. Walter Thompson; Jennifer McBride, director of digital production, J. Walter Thompson; Andrea Morin, creative director, Possible Advertising; Matt Miller, CEO, Association of Independent Commercial Producers; and Chris Brokaw, singer, songwriter, and guitarist. 3 CREDITS NMGT 2122 $700

X1 | 9 weeks | Mar. 6–May 12  This course provides a foundation in fashion marketing strategy within a global context. Students learn marketing terminology and concepts through analysis of target markets, the global marketplace, branding communication, and the development of integrated marketing programs within the fashion industry. Students investigate the theoretical and practical under­ pinnings of marketing design and learn to build profitable customer relationships. The class examines the process of product planning, pricing, promotion, and distribution, with a focus on global resources, opportunities, and threats. Students explore the role of marketing in a global business organization, learn the components of a formal marketing plan, and gain a strategic skill set related to marketing management, financial analysis, developing markets, and innovative problem solving. 2 CREDITS PCFD 1880 $720


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Make the numbers work to your advantage. Our courses break down the complexities of investing, explain global markets, detail the best ways to financially manage for-profit and not-for-profit enterprises, and take you from a novice to a data and statistics pro ready to ace any presentation to your company’s financial board. Macroeconomics

Finance for Management

Aviva Ancona

Michelle Henderson

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This course introduces both theoretical and applied issues in macroeconomics, looking at the U.S. economy on the one hand and the global economy on the other. The course emphasizes theoretical controversies relevant to contemporary policy debates. Beginning with the key principles of modern economics, we examine major questions in macroeconomic policy, including measuring the gross domestic product, the possible connection between employment and inflation, the relationship between saving and investment, the effects and limitations of government monetary and fiscal policy, and business cycles. We also consider issues in the inter­national political economy, such as trade policy and its relation to current account deficits and the role of the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank in the international financial system.

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm Understanding financial statements may seem almost as difficult as explaining nuclear fission versus nuclear fusion. In this course, students learn how and why standard financial statements are used at for-profit and not-for-profit enterprises, how enterprises of various sizes are financed, and how governance practices affect financial health. Case studies are used extensively.

3 CREDITS

NECO 2002 $700

The Basics of Investment Aviva Ancona A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23 – May 15  Have you ever wondered what the Dow actually measures? What a hedge fund is? When you should prefer stocks to bonds? How to allocate your savings to various financial investments, and what difference it will make when you retire? This course covers the basics: the difference between financial assets and real assets, between stocks and bonds. It explains how financial markets work, various types of financial instruments, mutual funds, the rudiments of asset allocation and its importance, and the risk/return nexus. 3 CREDITS NMGT 1300 $700

3 CREDITS

NMGT 2133 $700

Convince with Numbers Michelle Henderson A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm Can't quite understand a financial or statistical application at work? Maybe you finally have an opportunity to pitch your start-up company to potential investors, or you want to identify the best use of your nonprofit’s funding or support your research findings. Numbers and statistics can provide the data you need to make a convincing presentation. If it is time for you to better utilize elements of statistics and basic financial analysis, this course is for you. Students learn to 1) identify the situations in which numbers can strengthen a case, 2) find the best sources for reliable data, and 3) organize, graph, and present information in the most compelling way. This course will sharpen your skills in preparation for increased opportunities in your chosen profession. 3 CREDITS NMGT 2200 $700


Media Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60 Film Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62 Film Production . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Screenwriting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71

  Short Course  

  Online Course

  

  Noncredit Certificate   Graduate Certificate


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Delve into the history of media and trace its evolution into present-day forms. Step behind the camera to claim your space as a cineaste, complementing your skills with scholarship on the art of filmmaking. Join your classmates and form your own production crew. Become an expert on current digital technologies for the silver screen and beyond, mastering modern commuication strategies to develop your personal voice and vision through traditional narrative and radically experimental media modalities. Introduction to Media Studies Natasha Chuk A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm

Peter Haratonik B | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  Students explore media history and the basic concepts employed in media analysis, spanning the history of technologies from the magic lantern to multimedia and stressing the relationship between media and their social, political, and economic contexts. Since media are at once technology, art, entertainment, and business enterprises, they need to be studied from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. The readings for this course reflect this multifaceted approach and draw attention to the work of key thinkers and theorists in the field. Examples are drawn primarily from the visual media of commercial film, television, advertising, video, and the Internet, although alternative media practices are also noted. Students gain an understanding of how media texts are constructed, how they convey meaning, and how they shape one another in significant ways. 3 CREDITS NCOM 3000 $700

Reggae, Media, and Representation Jean Oliver-Cretara A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  Reggae originated on the island nation of Jamaica, but it is one of the most popular musical forms in the world and is heard in a multitude of derivative forms in every corner of the planet. Reggae’s

revolutionary spirit has stood as a potent symbol of independence and social critique and has informed notions of selfhood, nationhood, race, ethnicity, religion, and politics. The course begins with a history of reggae that considers the genre in its various forms (ska, rocksteady, dub, roots rock, DJs, toasting) and its influence on popular music worldwide. We explore the ways in which people around the world have adopted the genre’s gestures, attitudes, and icons as their own and discuss the role of media in the international spread, adaptation, and enjoyment of reggae. Reading the critical and historical literature about reggae music and studying the reggae texts themselves (songs, films, videos, and images), we track its influence and responsiveness to music and cultures from the Caribbean to Britain, the United States, Latin America, Japan, Australia, and western, southern, and eastern Africa. 3 CREDITS

NCOM 3009 $700

Beyond iCelebrities Kathleen Sweeney A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15   Popular social networking sites have evolved rapidly in the past few years, alongside Internetsavvy grassroots organizations like MoveOn. The course outlines the recent history of MoveOn, Code Pink, Facebook, YouTube, and Second Life (virtual activism) and the viral nature of Internet trends. What happens when corporate entities enter social networks on the Internet? What is the link between viral marketing and social change? We consider questions about the nature


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of the “collective generosity” mindset inherent in millennial offerings like Wikipedia, with an eye to mapping global resource and information networks to include the most disenfranchised of global citizens. How can the activist potential of the Internet be used to address global warming, poverty, and political injustice? 3 CREDITS NCOM 3026 $700

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has become the tail that wags the dog of the television business and a financial powerhouse fueling media empires. Through individual research, class discussions, and visits from media professionals, students put themselves in the shoes of industry hopefuls as they learn how to create a series pitch and sell it to a production company or network. 3 CREDITS NCOM 3114 $700

Media Ethics Jennifer Heuson A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This course provides a theoretical foundation that will enable students to identify and analyze ethical issues in the media. Students are familiarized with scholarly literature and case studies on media ethics and apply approaches to ethical decision-making strategies to current and past media practices. The emphasis is on the ethical and moral dilemmas that news, advertising, public relations, and entertainment organizations face in conjunction with their professional obligations and market pressures. Concurrently we analyze the societal implications of these ethical dilemmas and the role of media in relation to social justice, freedom, diversity, and responsibility. Ethical questions presented include: Do the media have a special obligation to behave ethically, and to what extent might that affect public access to a “free marketplace of ideas”? Do advertising and journalism operate under the same ethical rules? How much information should the media provide about the private lives of public figures? What role should competition and the profit motive play in news reporting? 3 CREDITS NCOM 3048 $700

Real TV Stuart Cohn A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  Once confined to PBS and other educational programming, reality TV has grown into a major player in cable and network television. For better or worse, shows like The Biggest Loser and Jersey Shore have redefined both the TV medium and the cultural landscape. How did we get to this point, and where is reality TV going next? Who does what in the production of a reality show? How can you be a part of it? In addition to studying the who, what, when, and where of reality TV, the class examines the economics of this entertainment form, especially as cable TV

Web Design Fundamentals Frederick Murhammer A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:45 pm Everyone now has a presence online, and knowing how to construct and maintain a basic website is a necessary skill for every professional. In this course, students learn basic skills in Web design programming (HTML and CSS) and Web graphics by developing individual projects. The emphasis is on front-end Web design and learning about different formats and platforms as well as browser compatibility. Each student designs and builds a professional portfolio and/ or project website. Taught on the Macintosh platform. 3 CREDITS NCOM 3210 $1,100

History of Radio Joan Schuman A | 15 sessions | Jan. 23–May 15 | M 4–5:50 pm   Radio not only shapes culture; it is also shaped by it. This course examines the past 100 years of radio technology and the culture it has made possible, from nascent amateur broadcasts to studio music and drama, from war correspondents to right-wing talk radio, from public and community broadcasting to corporate monopolies, from satellite radio to low-power narrowcasting and DIY Internet radio and podcasting. We investigate the relationships of producers and listeners to the evolving medium, the way radio voices have challenged dominant cultural modes of speaking, and radio art and broadcasting experiments. Students gain an understanding of mainstream and alternative radio by listening to programming produced with a range of techniques, researching and comparing programming styles, and exploring selected aspects of radio history in depth. 3 CREDITS NCOM 3246 $700


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Study the history of film and follow its evolution into present-day art forms. Step behind the camera and become a cinematographer or director. Write the movie you want to see on screen. Or claim all roles, writing, filming, and producing your masterpiece, and share the responsibility with a team united for a common purpose: to tell compelling stories on the screen.

 raduate Certificate in G  Documentary Media Studies The Documentary Media Studies program at The New School provides an opportunity to study documentary filmmaking—production and theory—in a small, tightly focused program in New York City, the world’s documentary capital. This is a full-time, daytime intensive one-year curriculum. The program culminates in a student documentary festival, Truth Be Told, at the end of each school year, at which certificate students’ films are publicly screened and discussed by the filmmakers and faculty. For more information, visit newschool.edu/public-engagement/ documentary-media-graduate-certificate.

Introduction to Cinema Studies John Freitas A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  A survey of major theories and the critical literature on film from the 1920s through the present. The course builds an overall view of film theory and criticism with respect to the various modes of inquiry that have affected the study of cinema, including structuralism, semiotics, Marxism, psychoanalysis, feminism, race and ethnicity studies, postcolonial theory, queer theory, and cultural studies. Students also become familiar with key concepts in cinema studies, including realism, montage, auteurism, genre, and star studies. As students acquire a general familiarity with the literature that defines film theory and criticism, they become better prepared to form sure and sound judgments

about their own film experiences and to speak and write about those judgments with clarity and skill. Through readings combined with screenings and discussions about a range of films, students expand and refine their own impressions and responses to the cinema, variously incorporating and responding to the theories, key concepts, and critical approaches studied in class. 3 CREDITS NFLM 2400 $700

The Human Experience Toby Talbot A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 12:10–2:50 pm Documentaries are living stories, and “the viewer is the participant,” wrote Roberto Rossellini. In this course, we look at a wide range of documentaries that question, trigger thought, and make


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our world larger. There are portraits of individuals, communities, historical events, and pressing social issues. How can these films create empathy and trigger engagement? Since each spectator responds in accordance with his or her own experience, discussions are an important aspect of the class. The following films are scheduled: Battle of Stalingrad, depicting the brutal and pivotal battle between Germans and Russians in World War II; Primary, the landmark film in which pioneering filmmakers Richard Leacock and Alfred Maysles observe the 1960 presidential campaign; Transit, Maysles’ final film, about passengers aboard America’s longest long-distance train route; Marlene, an inventive portrait by Maximilian Schell of the famed actress, with clips of her films; The Other Side of Immigration, a rare look into the roots of illegal immigration; The Newburgh Sting, about how the FBI targets Muslims; Stolen Childhoods, about child labor around the world, narrated by Meryl Streep; India’s Daughter, about the brutal gang rape on a Delhi bus of a 23-year-old medical student; Dateline-Saigon, about five young journalists who risked their lives in Vietnam to bring back a story no one wanted revealed; My Afghanistan: Life in the Forbidden Zone, based on civilian photographs; Our Terrible Country, about Syrian dissidents during the current revolt; The Return, about ex-prisoners attempting to resume normal life; When Worlds Collide, about an indigenous Peruvian leader attempting to protect the Amazonian rain forest; Family Portrait Sittings, in which the filmmaker, Alfred Guzzetti, uses photographs, interviews, and home movies to lay out his family history; Mother and Son, famed film director Sokorov’s powerful film about a son attending his dying mother; and Grizzly Man, Werner Herzog’s depiction of an Arctic explorer obsessed with grizzly bears. There will be occasional guest speakers and, if necessary, a substitute for a particular film.

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including the evolution of American cinema from classical to new Hollywood films, the emphasis is on the alternative film tradition that runs parallel to Hollywood, including neorealism (with its use of locations and amateurs and its hybrid of fiction and documentary), the rise of the notion of the “auteur” and the idea of film as a form of individual expression, “art cinema” and other modernist practices, new modes of political cinema, and alternative uses of the medium of digital video. 3 CREDITS NFLM 2501 $700

Distribution for Filmmakers James Browne A | 6 sessions | beg. Feb. 27 | M 8–9:50 pm  You’ve made a film—now what? The goal of this six-week short course is to introduce students to the ever-changing landscape of independent film distribution and exhibition. Students learn how to navigate the world of film festivals and the business of distribution, from theatrical to digital/VOD, broadcast, and educational. Most filmmakers hope to premiere their films at festivals like Sundance, SXSW, and Tribeca, overlooking regional festivals as viable alternatives. Students gain an in-depth understanding of how to intelligently take command of this essential component of the life of their films. Topics covered include film festival best practices, short film success stories, and how to build a team of collaborators. Students devise distribution and marketing strategies specifically tailored to their films. The instructor, a seasoned film programmer and distributor, guides them through this significant yet often neglected process. Grades are based on a final marketing distribution presentation and active participation in class discussion. 1 CREDIT NFLM 3016 $250

NSOS 0840 $650

Movements in World Cinema 2 Alheli Alvarad A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 6–7:50 pm This course surveys the key cultural and technological developments in cinema of the last 50 years, from the French New Wave (Nouvelle Vague) in the 1960s to the rise of digital cinema at the end of the 20th century. Although the class considers a variety of industry practices,

The Avant-Garde and the Moving Image MM Serra A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 8–9:50 pm This course provides a historical survey of avant-garde cinema, concentrating on the major tendencies within this tradition. Topics presented will include dada and surrealist films, the camera as metaphor for the eye, structural film and expanded cinema, the filmmaker as poet, found-footage filmmaking, cinema and sexuality,


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abstract filmmaking, and multiple projection/ installation, as well as cross-genre practices. Work by filmmakers such as Hans Richter, Maya Deren, Stan Brakhage, Bruce Conner, Shirley Clark, Kenneth Anger, George Kuchar, Martha Colburn, Peggy Ahwesh, Jack Smith, and Craig Baldwin will be presented. The course also explores various techniques, concepts, and means of production employed by experimental film­ makers and should be of particular interest to students who wish to work outside of the traditional mode of narrative filmmaking. The class will consist primarily of screenings and discussions about the work viewed and the context in which it was produced but will also provide a forum for discussion of the practical aspects of being a film artist within the film community. 3 CREDITS

Human Rights on Film

NFLM 3246 $700

The Art of Film Heliodoro San Miguel A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 8–9:50 pm

Rebecca Qidwai B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm This course lays the foundation for understanding the practical techniques, specialized language, and unique aesthetics of motion pictures. The class considers the expressive range of cinematic language and the ways in which complex emotions and ideas are communicated to the viewer. Students analyze the basic elements of cinematic form as seen through essential properties of the medium, including editing, cinematography, production design, and sound design, and gain an appreciation of film history and the impact of culture and technology on the development of the cinema. The class also studies the filmmaking process and the impact of the industry on this collaborative art. Discussion of various films by directors including Jean-Luc Godard, Agnes Varda, Jane Campion, Werner Herzog, Alfred Hitchcock, Orson Welles, Wong Kar-Wai, Yasujirō Ozu, Ingmar Bergman, Pedro Almodóvar, and Michelangelo Antonioni is supplemented by readings. Students acquire a general familiarity with the range of cinematic expression and become better prepared to form sure and sound judgments about their own film experiences and to speak and write about those judgments with clarity and skill. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3411 $700

Karen Kramer A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm Independent filmmakers around the globe capture human rights stories at great personal risk. We discuss a range of provocative, emotionally challenging, and important questions: What issues of human rights are raised in each film? Are they primarily race or gender issues? Do they involve war or dehumanization? What are the cultural implications of these human rights issues? Do outsiders have the right to interfere? Most important, how do the filmmakers use their craft and technique to tell the stories? Film screenings and discussions are supplemented by presentations by guest filmmakers, who take us behind the scenes. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3418 $700

American Independent Cinema Anthony Kaufman A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  Tracing the rise of independent filmmaking in the 1970s and 1980s through its explosion in the 1990s and today, this course will focus on the varying artistic, political, and industrial concerns that have affected filmmakers over the last 40 years, from the dreamlike feminism of Maya Deren to the queer cinema of Todd Haynes to the macho postmodernism of Quentin Tarantino. The class will also pay close attention to the evolving business of independent film, from production to distribution to marketing, as well as the changing role of digital platforms and social media. Students will be asked to watch such seminal indie films as Shadows, Stranger Than Paradise, and She’s Gotta Have It, examining the films through the dual lens of art and commerce. 3 CREDITS

NFLM 3424 $700

Surrealism in Cinema Rebecca Alvin A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  The surrealist movement in art reached its peak during the early years of filmmaking. Surrealists like Salvador Dali and Germaine Dulac saw cinema as an excellent means of exposing a mass audience to their ideas. The films that resulted from this movement are still striking today for their complexity, atypical humor, and


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attack on the senses. Several recent filmmakers also bring surrealist sensibilities to their work. This course looks at the work of surrealist filmmakers past and present, including Luis Buñuel, David Lynch, Germaine Dulac, and Alexandro Jodorowsky. Students are required to view films on video outside of class; the instructor will help students locate hard-to-find films.

cinema’s relationship to censorship and the larger notion of moral responsibility in artistic expression. Students must view assigned films on their own. 3 CREDITS

3 CREDITS

Silvia Vega-Llona

NFLM 3436 $700

The Producer’s Role Charles H. Schultz A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm Once a film is in pre-production, the producer is responsible for providing the best possible support system. The producer must organize all the elements, human and material, needed to implement the creative team's artistic vision. A producer's duties may include legal and accounting work; revising the script; casting actors; finding props, wardrobe, and equipment within budget; and working with the director and editor during and after the shoot. Low-budget and student filmmaking provides invaluable experience as preparation for larger productions, teaching students how to assess technical materials and the skills and talents of above- and below-theline personnel. This course tracks the producer’s role, from the selection of material to the delivery of the production. Students choose a project and spend the term developing a professional-quality proposal. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3456 $700

NFLM 3471 $700

Art and History of Documentary A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 4–5:50 pm Documentary filmmaking is a broad and diverse cinematic form that variously informs, delights, angers, touches, provokes, calls to action, shapes attitudes, and challenges assumptions. This introduction to the genre of ostensibly nonfiction filmmaking begins with the earliest actuality films of the Lumière brothers and moves through the deployment of various documentary modes and aesthetics, including propagandistic film, expositional film, direct cinema, poetic film, performative film, and self-reflexive explorations of film truth. The course examines how changing technology, shifting social and political realities, and the personalities and talents of influential individuals have continually redefined what documentary means. Ethical as well as aesthetic issues are considered. Throughout the class, as we survey the art and history of documentary filmmaking, we supplement our viewing of various films with reading, written response, and discussion. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3489 $700

Selling Your Film Amotz Zakai

Film and Censorship Maya Smukler A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  According to filmmaker John Waters, “Bad taste is what entertainment is all about. If someone vomits watching one of my films, it's like getting a standing ovation.” Is there really such a thing as “appropriate” entertainment? Are there boundaries that should never be crossed? In the 1930s, the Hays Office, Hollywood's watchdog, declared, “Wrong entertainment lowers the whole living conditions and moral ideals of a race.” But who is responsible for determining these ideals? This class considers the U.S. film industry's attempts at regulation, from the 1930s Production Code to the Hollywood blacklist in the 1950s to the current ratings system. Students examine

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  Most screenwriting classes teach the fundamentals of putting feature film ideas on paper, from the “hero’s journey” to the three-act structure. This course goes a step further, teaching aspiring writers how to write a script that could actually be sold to a Hollywood studio, production company, or independent producer. Students explore the film genres whose scripts are the easiest to sell and learn how to come up with high-concept loglines and create castable characters that could attract A-level stars. The class also delves into the fine details of a screenplay that make it attractive to buyers: scene lengths, careful writing of dialogue and exposition, situations to avoid putting your characters in, and much more. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3565 $700


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Master the art and craft of filmmaking. Students explore all aspects of filmmaking and professional development, including pre-production planning, producing, writing, cinematography, directing, and editing.

Certificate in Film Production The New School awards a certificate attesting to successful completion of a sequence of courses in which students master the art and craft of filmmaking. For more information, go online to opencampus. newschool.edu/program/certificate-programs.

Intensive: Sony, Arri, RED Mariusz Cichon A | 3 sessions | beg. Feb. 10 | F, Sat, Sun 12–6 pm  Independent filmmakers now have several options for high-end cameras and digital workflows that can create motion pictures with a look that rivals productions made with much larger budgets. This workshop is a hands-on introduction to the leading professional packages of Sony F65, Arri Alexa, and RED Epic. There is discussion and demonstration of camera operation, the advantages and limitations of different cameras, capture formats, data management (basic treatment of raw footage and transcoding options), and post-production workflow. The instructor, a digital media expert, leads the discussions and brings the latest equipment packages for in-class testing. Students have an opportunity to shoot footage and process the data in class and, by the end of the workshop, should be able to make informed decisions about shooting and posting with these cameras and workflows on their own projects.

Credit sudents must submit a project dossier within one week of the last day of class. 1 CREDIT NFLM 3001 $300

Location Sound Recording Jeanne Gilliland A | 3 sessions | beg. Feb. 3 | F, Sat, Sun 12–6 pm  The importance of capturing high-quality sound when filming on location cannot be overestimated; the inconvenience and expense incurred as a result of poorly recorded sound are considerable. This intensive course, taught by a veteran of the TV and film industry, introduces best practices of recording and mixing sound on location. Students learn to achieve professionalquality results with the equipment widely used in the industry today. Practical challenges introduce students to the basic skill of conducting informed “field diagnostics”—assessing the location and


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choosing the best recording technique and equipment for the situation. After an introduction to the principles of acoustical theory (what is sound, and how does it behave in different environments?), students engage in recording and listening exercises. Lessons include training in the use of microphones, recorders, and mixers and instruction on lineup, levels, indicators and monitoring, compressors and limiters, boom operation, recording to camera, noise, and set protocol. 1 CREDIT NFLM 3003 $300

Did You Know? You can take courses for credit today and may be able to apply them toward a degree later. *Additional fees apply. See page 128 for details. Each student’s situation is unique. Consult with your advisor.

The Aesthetics of Directing Ethan Spigland A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 4–6:45 pm

Shimon Dotan B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:45 pm

Timothy Sutton C | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–8:45 pm Your challenge as a director is to realize your vision on the screen. Designed for students who are making or planning to make their own films, this course covers the art and craft of directing. We analyze the work of classic and contemporary directors, observing how they use the language of cinema. Topics include framing and composition, camera angles, camera movement, blocking actors, visualizing action, creating a sequence, script breakdown, and techniques for establishing character, mood, and conflict. We explore different directing styles, such as the subjective approach of expressionism, the pursuit of authenticity in realism, and the narrative conventions of Hollywood. Students do a script breakdown and storyboard for a scene, which they then videotape. Short scenes produced on video in class demonstrate principles in practice. Noncredit students must bring their own camcorders; New School cameras are available only for credit students. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3510 $800

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Advanced Experimental Film Joel Schlemowitz A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:45 pm This course is a detailed presentation and exploration of the concepts underlying film editing, designed for both film production students and those with a general interest in the medium. Selected films, sequences, and scenes are shown to illustrate various techniques, approaches to structure, and organizational skills. Discussion concentrates on the infinite flexibility of image and sound and on how director and editor collaborate creatively to integrate storytelling, drama, performance, time, and place into an effective whole. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3511 $1,500

Color Correction Intensive Evan Anthony A | 15 sessions | beg. Feb. 21 | T 7–9:45 pm Color correction can not only help tell your story but keep the flow from one shot to another as smooth as possible. In this course, you learn the basics of color correction using DaVinci Resolve software. The course teaches students the fundamentals of moving an edited timeline from Adobe Premiere into DaVinci Resolve color correction software and then back into Adobe Premiere. They learn how to set up a project, the DaVinci user interface, basic color correction technique, advanced DaVinci “node” operations, and final delivery of master files. 1 CREDIT NFLM 3512 $300

Cinematography and Lighting Jun Oshima A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 12:10–2:50 pm

Cecilia Dougherty B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–9:45 pm Students explore theoretical and practical elements of cinematography, with an emphasis on lighting and cinematographic language. While learning techniques of studio and location lighting, students also study historical and contemporary trends and styles. Theoretical and technical topics covered include operation and characteristics of cameras, lenses, accessory camera equipment, lighting, composition, digital compression, and exposure (in-camera tools like histograms as well as light meters) along with traditional film emulsion and laboratory


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processing. Professional techniques for altering the look of a film are demonstrated and discussed. Practical tests and scenes are shot with an eye to solving practical problems and achieving a visual strategy. 3 CREDITS

structure of a film crew and the responsibilities of its members, lenses and lighting equipment, shooting exteriors and interiors, gripping, production design, field sound recording, pre-production planning and breakdowns, HD workflows, and the collaborative process. Working as a team, students set up and shoot several scenes in class and two scenes on location, rotating crew positions. The scenes are then screened and critiqued by the class. Students hone their skills and work collaboratively to master the technical knowledge necessary to execute professional film and video projects. Prerequisite: Filmmaking Studio 1 or permission. This course may be taken concurrently with Film 3. 3 CREDITS

NFLM 3515 $1,400

Non-camera Filmmaking Joel Schlemowitz A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 7–10 pm In this do-it-yourself workshop, students create unique handmade short films without using cameras. The course includes film screenings and discussions of historical practices in avant-garde cinema, focusing on the pioneers of direct animation and found footage, from Len Lye to Craig Baldwin. The adventure begins with the film material itself as the class creates images and sounds directly on blank film using a variety of processes, including photograms, scratching, bleaching, painting, and collage. Students are encouraged to invent their own tools and techniques. Next the class investigates the use of found footage and the art-historical, educational, anthropological, ethical, political, and personal issues relating to recycling images made by others. Students have access to a library of recycled films, where they can find images, or they can find and use their own footage. The course requires extensive work outside of the classroom. Assignments and critiques are geared to students' interests and designed to help them complete their films by the end of the term. There is a final screening party at a local film venue. There are no prerequisites. No prior knowledge of filmmaking is necessary. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3520 $1,500

Film 2: Intermediate Lab Jeremy Brooke A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 12:10–2:55 pm

John Didato B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:45 pm To realize an artistic vision in film requires an in-depth understanding of the technology, process, and tools. In this workshop, students explore advanced concepts and techniques in film and digital media production through a series of exercises that evolve into increasingly complex collaborative projects. Topics covered include operation of advanced HD digital cameras, video formats and compression, the

NFLM 3632 $1,500

Filmmaking Studio 1 Kathleen Rugh A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:45 pm

Jenny Perlin B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 4–6:45 pm

Kevin Allen C | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:45 pm This course is an opportunity for the serious beginner to learn the fundamentals of 16mm filmmaking, a discipline that clarifies the fundamental concepts and terminology of all digital formats. Students engage in a series of exercises in basic cinematography, lighting, scriptwriting, directing, and editing. Discussions emphasize the theoretical and practical framework of film language, and student work is critiqued by both the instructor and classmates. Students are expected to crew on one another’s projects to develop production skills and gain on-set experience. A substantial commitment of time outside of class is required. Cameras and digital editing equipment are provided, but students will incur additional modest costs for film stock, developing, and supplies. By the end of the course, students will have experienced all aspects of MOS (nonsync) filmmaking, from pre-production to production and postproduction, and will be ready for more ambitious personal film projects at the next level of production courses. Familiarity with the Macintosh platform is assumed. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3660 $1,500


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Did you know? The New School was the first American university to teach the history of film.

Film 3: Advanced Pre-production William Pace A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 8–9:50 pm Student filmmakers lay the groundwork for an advanced narrative, documentary, or experimental film project, learning how to develop a visual approach to written material. In the first weeks of the course, the class examines a variety of approaches to visual storytelling, from the concept to dramatic structures, character development, tone, and style. Each student develops a script for a seven- to ten-minute film based in or around New York City. In the second half of the course, students engage in a series of exercises designed to help them find the right artistic and practical approaches to their scripts while they continue refining their stories. The important ways in which short films differ from full-length features are discussed. The workshop ends with shot breakdowns, planning, budgeting storyboarding, and location scouting. Prerequisite: Filmmaking Studio 1. This course may be taken concurrently with Film 2 with permission from the student’s advisor. It must be taken before Film 4: Advanced Film Production. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3670 $700

Film 4: Advanced Film Production Marcus Turner A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:45 pm Students are guided in the production (shooting) of their own narrative, documentary, or experimental films. All students in the class crew on one another’s productions as a way of practicing the teamwork that is part of filmmaking and in order to maximize the learning experience. The course covers all aspects of the production process as well as some ongoing (from Film 3) aspects of pre-production, including casting, production design, scheduling, and securing a crew as well as production challenges like working with actors, communicating with a crew, sticking to a budget, and adhering to a restricted shooting schedule. Students should expect to incur some personal expenses beyond the course tuition. Prerequisites: Filmmaking Studio 1, Film 2, and Film 3. Bring a seven- to ten-page script to the first session. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3680 $1,500

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Film 5: Advanced Post-production Workshop Sonia Bozic A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 7–9:45 pm This course is an overview of the entire postproduction and finishing process for students who have completed shooting a short film project. Class time is devoted to editing exercises, lectures, group discussions, screenings, and presentations by guest film professionals. Topics discussed and demonstrated include creating rhythm; dramatic arc and character emphasis in scenes; cutting on, after, and before movement; match cutting; symbolic and thematic editing; and A and B cutting for documentaries. The class also explores sound editing and design, color correction, screening formats for festivals, standard industry mastering options, and distribution. Prerequisite: Film 4 or permission of the instructor. Students must bring their own hard drive with complete film dailies ready to edit to the first session. This course fulfills one of two capstone requirements for Media Studies majors with a declared concentration in Film Production. 3 CREDITS

NFLM 3690 $1,100

Digital Video Production Michele Beck A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 7–9:45 pm With digital cameras and computer editing equipment widely accessible, the possibility of creating engaging, professional-quality moving images is within virtually everyone's reach. Digital video is an exciting and powerful medium of expression, but knowing how to use the tools isn't enough to enable you to create a coherent and articulate video project. This course can help artists in any genre create works that are both technically and conceptually sound. Students work toward this goal by learning digital video editing and using it to experience the power of editing as creative expression. They are also introduced to production techniques, including the use of the digital camera, storyboarding, and basic lighting and sound. Several short video projects are completed during the term. There are no prerequisites, but familiarity with the Macintosh is assumed. Students have access to New School digital video cameras and editing software but must have a firewire drive. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3700 $1,500


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Documentary Production Workshop

Audio Production

Leslie McCleave

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 4–6:45 pm This course covers core concepts and skills that equip students to work in a range of media, including radio, film or video, multimedia, or CD production. Instruction in recording, editing, mixing, microphone techniques, and writing provides production context for projects and prepares students for advanced work in audio and inter-media applications. Working with analog and digital recording technologies and digital audio workstations (Macintosh computers and ProTools software), each student produces three projects. While each project is aimed at building proficiency in specific production skills, students also gain experience in developing content and form. In-class listening, analysis and critique, and assigned readings provide support and context for production work. Prerequisite: Integrated Media Production or permission of the instructor. 3 CREDITS

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:45 pm This course covers the essentials of shooting a five- to seven-minute documentary: developing an idea, researching the topic, interviewing subjects, creating a visual strategy, and location scouting, lighting, and shooting. Creative uses of still photographs, artwork, and stock footage are also explored. Students may work individually or in groups. By the end of the term, each student or group should have a working rough cut or fine cut edited with non-linear editing software tools that students have learned to use during in-class instruction. Students have access to New School digital video cameras, but each must bring a firewire drive. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3715 $1,500

DAY OF LEARNING AND OPEN CAMPUS EXPO

John Plenge

NCOM 4005 $1,500

Saturday, December 10, 2016, 12:00–4:00 p.m. University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Digital Editing: Fundamentals

Can one day of learning spark a lifetime

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 4–6:45 pm Affordable professional desktop editing software has given all filmmakers an economical and time-efficient way to edit their films using the same tools as the pros. Creating transitions, filters, titles, layered audio, and multiple versions has never been simpler, but knowing the tools is not enough. An understanding of editing conventions and the aesthetics of montage, continuity, and pacing is equally important. In this workshop, students learn both. Through lectures, demonstrations, and hands-on exercises, the course offers a conceptual and technical introduction to post-production and non-linear editing. Students become acquainted with workflow and HD video formats, as well as the basic functionality of Avid Media Composer on Macintosh computers. Using professional footage, students learn techniques for organizing media, editing picture and sound, and outputting to various formats. Students must have their own Mac-formatted firewire hard drive. This course is not intended for students completing a Film 4 project. 3 CREDITS

of discovery? From its founding in 1919, The New School has known that providing access to innovative approaches to education can serve as the engine of groundbreaking social, personal, and professional change. On December 10, experience The New School’s unparalleled approach to learning with Open Campus, offering continuing education courses and programs for adults, youth, and teens. All afternoon, take advantage of FREE pop-up classes, open studios, campus tours, activities, course advising, and info sessions, followed by an evening panel discussion on education access as a force for social change. RSVP and find the full schedule of events at newschool.edu/day-of-learning.

Jeremy Brooke

NFLM 4627 $1,100


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Share your story on the screen. Learn the fundamentals of screenwriting, from analyzing scripts to outlining to writing the first draft and revising. Write the movie you’ve always wanted to watch, develop the television show that earns a cult following, and come up with the jokes that keep sitcom viewers laughing.

Certificate in Screenwriting The New School awards a certificate attesting to successful completion of a sequence of courses in which students master the art and craft of writing for the cinema. This curriculum can be completed entirely online, on campus, or through a combination of online and on-campus courses. For more information about the certificate program, see Screenwriting in the following pages or at opencampus.newschool.edu/ program/certificate-programs.

Script Analysis

B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm

Students end the term with the ability to analyze any film script and apply that knowledge to their own screenwriting. This class is required for all students interested in pursuing the Screenwriting sequence and may be taken before or concurrently (permission required) with Screenwriting 1.

Marina Shron

3 CREDITS

C | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  Whether you are a writer, a director, or a producer, an understanding of story structure and dramatic principles is essential. In-depth analysis of a screenplay’s storyline, characters, dialogue, images, and theme reveals a wide range of narrative techniques and storytelling styles, from Hollywood to independent and everything in between. Students view successful films and analyze their scripts, learning how essential information is conveyed, how story elements are communicated through visual means, how dramatic momentum is built with cause and effect, and what makes a character credible and complex.

NSRW 2800 $800

Gregory Takoudes A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 8–9:50 pm

Leslie McCleave

Business of Screenwriting Douglas Tirola A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 8–9:50 pm Talent is only one part of being a successful screenwriter. Navigating the complicated movie industry, with its many layers of professional personnel, is another. This course explains how to find an agent and what can realistically be expected from one. Learn what is involved in working with agents, producers, production companies, and studio executives. Guest


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speakers include agents, producers, development executives, studio executives, and screenwriters from organizations such as the William Morris Agency and Fox and from New York–based production companies, who tell you what it takes to do business with them. This course is useful for aspiring producers and development executives as well as screenwriters. 3 CREDITS

plotting, scene construction, character arc, tone, mood, and theme. Students examine popular screenwriting conventions and paradigms as well as rule-bending experiments in storytelling, learning from pillars of classic style as well as the cutting edge of the craft. The class presents the formal standards for a variety of screen forms, including the three-act structure of the feature film screenplay, the four or five acts plus teaser for an hour-long TV series, the three acts plus tag at the end of a half-hour comedy episode, and the TV show bible, a series guide that allows the writer to explore larger themes, character arcs, and season-long dramatic events. This writingintensive class approaches screenwriting both creatively and critically, with assignments designed to teach aspects of craft and protocols of workshopping and critique. The class proceeds from the premise that students must be able to tell a strong story, and by the end of the course, students will have developed their own concept and written a treatment that they can develop further in either the Film or TV writing track. This class fulfills the prerequisite for Screenwriting 1, Sitcom Writing 1, and Episodic and Procedural.

NFLM 3454 $700

Screenwriting 1: The First Act Loren-Paul Caplin A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 8–9:50 pm

Jonathan Danziger B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm

Douglas Morse C | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This course for the beginning screenwriter guides students through the process of executing a detailed step outline and drafting a first act. In the first half of the class, the focus is on further developing the story; articulating the dramatic idea; considering plot, structure, character, and action; and translating those elements into a working outline. In the second half of the class, students learn about the essential dramatic elements of a feature film set-up, including the establishment of tone, theme, world, character, inciting incident, tension, and stakes. Writing craft and technique are explored along with these fundamental features of the first act. The class is run largely as a workshop, with students reading one another’s work and providing both written critique and focused and constructive feedback in class discussion. Prerequisite: Introduction to Writing for the Screen. This course should be taken concurrently with Script Analysis. 3 CREDITS

NSRW 3810 $800

Introduction to Writing for Screen David Negrin A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 4-5:50 pm This course explores the basic theory, form, art, and craft of writing for the screen—whether for a feature-length film screenplay, a film short, or a serialized television show. Learning the essential concepts of classical dramaturgy, mythic structures, hero psychology, comedic premise, and genre, students build a solid grounding in the principles of storytelling, including act structure,

3 CREDITS

NSRW 3811 $800

Screenwriting 2 Douglas Morse A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm Students undertake the challenging task of finishing a draft of their feature-length screenplays. They begin by revising their step outline to solidify structure and simplify the writing process. In workshop, with careful guidance by the instructor, each writer re-examines, tightens, and rewrites the outline, giving close attention to structure, logic, motivation, complex character development, tone, and theme. Students use their finished outlines to make revisions to act one and draft acts two and three. Weekly page requirements keep them on track, while in-class reviews offer support, guidance, and direction. The emphasis is on the specific problems of successful scene writing and on development of a professional writing style that makes for a compelling presentation on the page. The goal for each student is to finish the term with a polished and professional first draft. Prerequisites: Script Analysis and Screenwriting 1. 3 CREDITS NSRW 3820 $800


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Screenwriting 3

Episodic and Procedural

Mort Scharfman

Ian Grody

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15 

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  From period dramas like Mad Men and Boardwalk Empire to fairy tale–inspired procedurals like Grimm to musicals like Smash and Glee, the diversity of shows on TV today is unprecedented. The industry is always innovating and looking for fresh ideas. This course begins with a guided analysis of contemporary network and cable pilot scripts, ranging from the serialized (Breaking Bad, Big Love, Mad Men) to the procedural (Grimm, Awake, Psych). Students examine the structures, episodic breaks, and essential elements of functional origin stories. They are challenged to identify the qualities of a script that make it special to viewers. A discussion of dramatic questions explored in the course of a series or season and of unique selling points follows. Each student devises a five- to ten-page treatment or pitch document describing an idea for an original series, including character breakdowns, a pilot synopsis and brief outline of the first season, a description of episode structure (A and B stories), and a statement of theme and tone. After these have been reviewed, students go on to write the first and second acts of their original scripts. 3 CREDITS

Jusu Nikyatu B | 15 weeks | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6-7:50 pm Permission required. Students undertake the challenging task of finishing their feature-length screenplays. In workshop, with careful guidance by the instructor, each writer re-examines, tightens, and rewrites the outline and existing scenes, giving close attention to structure, logic, motivation, complex character development, tone, and theme. There is an emphasis on the specific problems of successful scene writing and on development of a professional writing style that makes for a compelling presentation on the page. Successful screenplays are studied as examples. The goal for each student is to finish the term with a polished and professional first draft. Prerequisite: Screenwriting 2, with at least 50 pages of an original screenplay. 3 CREDITS NSRW 3830 $800

Sitcom Writing 1 Gregory DePaul A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 8–9:50 pm The sitcom is no joke. It is a specialized, highly competitive form of screenwriting that has its own set of rules, expectations, and required skills. For those wishing to break into TV writing, the front door is the spec script, a sample episode for a current popular TV series, which is an indispensable tool for selling your talents in the television marketplace. This course investigates the half-hour episodic TV comedy form and gives students the fundamental tools necessary to conceive and execute a sitcom teleplay. Over the course of the semester, students research a popular half-hour comedy, learn its secrets and develop techniques for building premises, generating a story, outlining, structuring, scene writing, and editing—all in collaboration with other student writers. Students write in the voice, tone, and style of an established show, completing a beat sheet, episode diagram, and draft of a complete spec script for a current half-hour comedy show, and progress as far as they can toward polishing it. The class concludes with an overview of the business of the sitcom, the current comedy series marketplace, and breaking in as a writer. Prerequisite: Introduction to Writing for Screen. 3 CREDITS NSRW 3842 $800

NSRW 3852 $800

Sitcom Writing 2 Mort Scharfman A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This class is modeled on a half-hour comedy “writer’s room” and, as such, is a virtual facsimile of the real world of sitcom writing. Students are guided in the ways of writing a draft spec script from a half-hour comedy beat outline worthy of a professional writer. Students first rework a completed outline, simplifying the story, improving the DNA of characters, focusing and economizing scenes, creating mood and pacing, and “punching up” dialogue from the blueprint draft. Next it’s on to the writing and polishing stage of the script. The course concludes with an overview of the business of the sitcom, the current comedy series marketplace, and breaking in as a writer. Students must have a complete outline coming into the course. Prerequisite: Sitcom Writing 1. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3853 $800


Writing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Intensives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Fundamentals . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Journalism and Feature Writing . . . . . . . . . . .

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Poetry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 Fiction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 81 Nonfiction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Special Topics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 85 Screenwriting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 87 Literature, Culture, and Democracy . . . . . . . . . . 90

  Short Course  

  Online Course

  

  Noncredit Certificate   Graduate Certificate


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The New School offered the first creative writing workshop in the country, pioneering a new philosophy of education. Today classes are taught using the workshop model, in which a professional writer works closely with serious-minded students who write regularly and participate actively in discussion of their own and classmates’ work, forming a community of new voices.

Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing Live the writer’s life in New York City. Join a community of diverse voices, plug into New York’s publishing world, and build a network that will support you through graduation and beyond. The New School offers a Master of Fine Arts degree in creative writing. Concentrations in this two-year full-time graduate program include Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, and Writing for Children and Young Adults. Students develop their craft in workshops and literary seminars led by internationally recognized faculty with close ties to New York publishing and the city’s literary scene. For more information, visit the Creative Writing program’s website, newschool.edu/publicengagement/mfa-creative-writing. To discuss continuing education course offerings in writing, call 212.229.5611.

Intensives

Meditation and Writing Lisa Freedman A | 5 sessions | beg. Apr. 7 | F 4–5:50 pm  Limited to 12. This five-week course offers a haven for creative people in the midst of our noisy, screen-filled city. We meditate and develop our ability to notice more and to stay open to all that arises. We bring attention to our breath, to relevant works of art, to texts, and to our own words. As we practice not judging, we make room for our writing to surprise us. As poet

Denise Levertov says in “Making Peace”: “peace … can’t be imagined before it is made / can’t be known except /in the words of its making.” Readings include Allen Ginsberg, Claudia Rankine, Fanny Howe, Pema Chodron, the I Ching, and more. Everyone is welcome. No writing or meditation experience is needed. 1 CREDIT NWRW 3912 $500


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The School of Dreams Laura Cronk A | 10 sessions | beg. Feb. 16 | 4–5:50 pm Dreams teach writers lessons of rapidity, mystery, boldness, and depth. What dreams have to teach is useful to poets and fiction writers, memoirists and essayists, as well as those who write between and across genres. In this workshop, writers not only track their dreams and write from them through prompts but also compose pieces apart from their own dreams using new tools. Pieces are developed into poems or prose, and each writer produces a compact body of new work by the end of the course. “The School of Dreams,” a chapter of Hélène Cixous’ Three Steps on the Ladder of Writing, is our core text. Readings from writers such as Franz Kafka, Marina Tsvetaeva, Anton Chekhov, and Walt Whitman, as well as contemporary writers Anne Carson, Richard Siken, Lisa Jarnot, and Kelly Link, enrich our work. 2 CREDITS

NWRW 3528 $500

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Fundamentals

Fundamentals of Punctuation Lisa Freedman A | 5 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm 

Noelle Kocot-Tomblin B | 5 weeks | Jan. 23–Feb. 26  Second-guess yourself no more. This course provides a supportive structure for mastering proper punctuation. No punctuation mark is left unturned as students learn the use of commas, semicolons, apostrophes, quotation marks, em and en dashes, colons, parentheses, ellipses, question marks, and exclamation points. Each week, students write short essays in which they practice punctuation. Everyone gives and receives feedback as part of the ongoing discussion. 1 CREDIT

NWRW 1012 $300

Building the Sentence Lisa Freedman A | 5 sessions | beg. Mar. 1 | W 6–7:50 pm 

One Day: Personal Nonfiction

Noelle Kocot-Tomblin

Nancy Kelton

B | 5 weeks | Feb. 27–Apr. 2    Good writing is the sum of its verbs, and every writer who wants his or her words on the page to be taken seriously must master certain skills. In this short course, students focus on two essential components of composition that trip up even seasoned writers: verb use and syntax. Exercises illustrate the correct use of the past and future tenses and the conditional, as well as common mistakes in subject-verb agreement. The class then addresses the rules of English syntax, or word order. Students practice these skills in short original pieces that are workshopped in class.

A | 1 session | Mar. 15 | Sat 10 am–3 pm  Whether the impulse to write comes from a longtime yearning, a recent itch, or a desire to get down your experiences for yourself and your loved ones, this workshop will help you capture your memories, dreams, childhood incidents, and truths in your own voice. You will learn to get rid of your internal critic, express yourself authentically, establish disciplined work habits, avoid procrastination, and open up. In-class writing exercises, home assignments, suggestions for outside readings, and marketing advice are given. NWRW 0222 $200

1 CREDIT

NWRW 1013 $300

Style and Effectiveness Lisa Freedman A | 5 sessions | beg. Apr. 12 | M 6–7:50 pm 

Noelle Kocot-Tomblin B | 5 weeks | Apr. 3–May 7    It's how you say it. In this short course, students consider the elements that work together to create stylish and effective prose, by dissecting the choices every writer makes that add up to style. The class reads examples of effective prose


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by best-selling authors, including Toni Cade Bambara, Garrett Hongo, and Amy Tan, and students write short pieces inspired by the readings and workshop them in class. This course offers a supportive environment in which to think critically about and strengthen your unique writing style. 1 CREDIT

as professional artists or critics in the field. In the first half of the class, students learn the craft of critical writing from the ground up—constructing one analytic essay in increments. The second part of the semester is devoted to putting these skills into professional practice, as students write artist statements, reviews of current work, personal essays, creative pieces, and more. Students read top critics in their fields as well as writers from the canon particularly relevant to their own work. 3 CREDITS

NWRW 1014 $300

Did You Know? You can take courses for credit today and may be able to apply them toward a degree later. *Additional fees apply. See page 128 for details. Each student’s situation is unique. Consult with your advisor.

Mechanics of Writing Instructor to be announced A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  The study of effective English prose makes the sentence its principal focus. In this course, designed to meet the needs of beginning writers, we examine the sentence, looking at syntax, the parts of speech, and other aspects of grammar. Later we look ahead to considerations of effectiveness and style. Chapters from a grammar and style textbook are assigned. Students workshop short writing assignments weekly. They look at what is correct versus what is incorrect and when rules should be broken, how language changes, how context determines choices, and how these choices develop into a style. Note: Students for whom English is a foreign language should take the relevant English as a second language course instead of this course. 3 CREDITS NWRW 1011 $800

Writing for Artists Instructor to be announced A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 6–7:50 pm Writing is performance. Visual artists, designers, musicians, writers, dancers, filmmakers, actors—artists of every kind come together in a supportive workshop environment to develop their writing skills. Students practice the skills of argumentation, research, and clarity of expression that benefit critical pieces as well as the kinds of writing they are likely to have to produce

NWRW 1030 $800

Tools, Not Rules: Rhetorical Grammar Joseph Salvatore A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 6–7:50 pm Not a traditional course in grammar, this class examines the most complex tool in the writer's tool box—the sentence. The course is guided by the belief that as writers, we need to know not only how to use this tool but how to talk about it. The goal for students is not to memorize grammar rules but rather to understand how those rules can be used to produce a wide range of rhetorical effects. In order to manipulate those rules, writers must understand them. The course begins at the beginning: nouns, verbs, subjects, predicates, all the parts of speech. Students then learn to analyze sentences in both what they read and what they write; they learn not only what syntax is but how to control it consciously and how the decisions they make will affect readers. They come to see how words become sentences, sentences become paragraphs, and paragraphs create a cohesive whole. The class reads chapters from a grammar and rhetoric textbook and completes practice exercises assigned weekly. This course is a workshop for writers of all genres, absolute beginners as well as experienced professionals, who want to better understand all the tools in the tool box. 3 CREDITS NWRW 1119 $800

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Academic Writing: Short Course Carol Goodman A | 10 sessions | beg. Feb. 6 | Th 6–7:50 pm Writing well is the key to success in college. This course teaches students the foundations of academic writing: the nature of research; the skills of criticism, analysis, and argumentation; the process of revision; and the basics of correct grammar and American English usage. Note: Students for whom English is a foreign language should take ESL Academic Writing instead of this course. 2 CREDITS

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Writing for New York City Newspapers, Magazines, and Webzines Susan Shapiro A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 6–7:50 pm

Journalism Basics for the Digital Era

B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 8–9:50 pm The New York Times, Daily News, Newsday, New York Post, and Wall Street Journal all use freelance writers for profiles, features, reviews, news stories, humor, and editorials. So do New York Magazine, the Village Voice, Time Out New York, and the New Yorker. Taught by a writer whose work has appeared in more than 100 publications, this course reveals the secrets of breaking in. Topics include tailoring pieces to specific columns, writing a perfect cover and pitch letter, contacting the right editors, and submitting the work, following up, and getting clips. Assignments are read and critiqued in class. Speakers include top Manhattan editors.

Richard Huff

3 CREDITS

NWRW 1126 $500

Journalism and Feature Writing

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15   Writing a well-structured, accurate news or feature story that resonates in today’s multi­ platform landscape is a critical skill for today’s journalists. Students interested in the craft of journalism are challenged to write clear, interesting stories on deadline and in a form suitable for a variety of media, including newspapers, websites, magazines, and some kinds of social media. With plenty of encouragement, insider tips, and more, students learn how to develop news and feature story ideas, write reviews and columns, structure a story from start to finish, find sources, conduct interviews, and produce marketable pieces. Students are also introduced to the fundamental skills of being a journalist beyond writing, such as research, setting tone, fact-checking, pitching outlets to sell their work, and ethics. A selection of contemporary journalism from newspapers, magazines and online journalism outlets is examined and critiqued on a regular basis. There are weekly writing assignments of varied lengths on topics chosen by the students and a basic multimedia project to end the semester. 3 CREDITS

NWRW 2601 $800

NWRW 3601 $800

Writing About the Arts Jerry Portwood A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | Th 8–9:50 pm If everyone’s a critic, why do we need arts writers? This writing workshop investigates arts journalism—encompassing theater, screens, architecture, food, dance, opera, fashion, music, visual arts, books, and more—and what it means to be a feature writer or critic in the 21st century. We look with an editor's eye at classics (from Edmund Wilson to Susan Sontag) and contemporaries (beyond the New Yorker). Weekly writing assignments include first-person essays, Q&A interviews, reviews, and blog stories, with an opportunity to pitch to and publish with both mainstream and alternative outlet editors. Guest lecturers include speakers from traditional as well as e-publishing, including ones from Amazon and the New York Times, who offer their viewpoints on what good arts writing means to us today. Jerry Portwood is currently the executive editor at Out magazine, the world's leading gay lifestyle and fashion magazine, working on both print stories and overseeing its digital strategy, including its must-read Popnography blog. Previously he was the editor in chief at the alternative newsweekly the New York Press and was the founding editor of CityArts, a weekly arts publication that continues to publish in New York City. 3 CREDITS NWRW 3881 $800


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Writing and Reporting for the Web

New Media Journalism

Matthew Melucci

Richard Huff

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15   Print media is on the decline and may well be on the way out as readers continue to flock to the Internet to get their fill of media. What does this mean for aspiring journalists and authors? How can they prepare for the brave new world of Web reporting, blogging, and multimedia journalism and remain true to their dreams of creating great nonfiction writing? The simple truths of communicating are the same in any medium. Students practice narrative style, interviewing techniques, and anecdotal reporting. Regular exercises help them discover the Internet as a vehicle for sharing prose in powerful new ways. Topics covered include blogs, user-generated journalism, rich media, and the changing face of newspapers and magazines online. Students work in groups throughout the term, editing one another's work and analyzing assigned readings from some of the best online sources around. All students are expected to complete one major piece of online writing by the end of the course. 3 CREDITS

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 8–9:50 pm No longer limited to once-a-day deadlines and publications, journalists are now required to know how to deliver accurate news reports using a variety of media formats. Students learn to use Facebook, Twitter, and other social media to crowdsource ideas, connect with interview subjects, and break stories in real time. The emphasis is on writing well-crafted stories. Projects include live reporting an event on Twitter, creating and analyzing videos, and packaging news reports.

NWRW 3691 $800

DAY OF LEARNING AND OPEN CAMPUS EXPO Saturday, December 10, 2016, 12:00–4:00 p.m. University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Can one day of learning spark a lifetime of discovery? From its founding in 1919, The New School has known that providing access to innovative approaches to education can serve as the engine of groundbreaking social, personal, and professional change. On December 10, experience The New School’s unparalleled approach to learning with Open Campus, offering continuing education courses and programs for adults, youth, and teens. All afternoon, take advantage of FREE pop-up classes, open studios, campus tours, activities, course advising, and info sessions, followed by an evening panel discussion on education access as a force for social change. RSVP and find the full schedule of events at newschool.edu/day-of-learning.

3 CREDITS

NWRW 3615 $800

Poetry

Beginning Poetry Workshop Instructor to be announced A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm

Richard Tayson B | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15   “A poem,” said William Carlos Williams, “is a small (or large) machine made of words— efficient, with no unnecessary parts, doing important work.” In this workshop, students learn how to build verse, from the individual word through lines and stanzas to the finished, polished poem. Poetic inspiration is explored: what activities can summon it and how to use it when it happens. Writing exercises help students practice basic elements of the craft, such as line breaks, voice, and openings and closings. Students read a variety of modern and contemporary poets, selected according to the interests and needs of the class. In every class meeting, students’ poems are read and discussed to clarify their strengths and develop students’ understanding of the process of revision. 3 CREDITS NWRW 2203 $800

Poetry and the Creative Process Richard Tayson A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 6–7:50 pm “If you can paint with a brush, you can paint with words,” a teacher told Joni Mitchell when she was in sixth grade. Just as language may be used in ways reminiscent of paint, it may also be observed as having musical and visual


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components. Open to students at all levels of experience, this poetry workshop considers how the arts influence and strengthen one another. How is writing a poem like composing a song, making a film, designing a garment, or performing a monologue? We think about how poems get made and make them by harnessing various theories of art. We discuss student work in an atmosphere open to all forms of creativity. Student participation includes deciding on readings together from multiple creative disciplines, using all art forms as inspiration. 3 CREDITS

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“failure” can provide the basis for their best work. Students are also offered help in preparing and submitting work for publication. Written comments are given on all work submitted, and private conferences are available. For permission to register, send ten sample pages by December 5 to the instructor, c/o New School Writing Program, 66 West 12th Street, room 503, New York, NY 10011. 3 CREDITS NWRW 4213 $800

Fiction

NWRW 3845 $800

Mechanics of Fiction Poetry: The Language of Music John Johnson A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 8–9:50 pm This study of musical poetics focuses on the buried linguistic and musical structures of poetry and on the way these structures create voice and meaning in a poem. We discuss the way music serves as a muse for the poet and creates a relationship between form and content. Some class time is devoted to close reading of established and younger poets representing different poetic styles, and to close listening to the voices of poets reading from their own work. Most class time, however, is devoted to examination of student writing, with the goal of helping students find their own music and voice within the poem. This course is open to poets at all levels, but beginners are especially welcome. 3 CREDITS

NWRW 3205 $800

Making Poems: An Advanced Workshop Patricia Carlin A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 4–5:50 pm Permission required. “Good poets borrow; great poets steal.” Poetry in English is a storehouse we can raid at will. The focus in this workshop for experienced writers is discussion of student poems, but we also explore ways to make creative use of other poems, from the most recent innovations to the poetry of the Middle Ages. Each week, suggested assignments, illustrated by a wide range of models, serve as jumping-off points from which to explore. Every strong poem is experimental. Students try old forms, invent new ones, and learn to see how

Joseph Salvatore A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm Not a traditional workshop, this course covers the essential elements of the craft of fiction: character, dialogue, point of view, description, and theme, as well as plot versus story, time and pacing, metaphor and comparison, style and structure, and language and revision. Examples of these elements are culled from both canonical and contemporary works. Students read articles and essays by critics, theorists, and fiction writers, especially writers who both create and teach fiction writing. When covering the idea of character, for example, students read what Henry James has to say on the topic, as well as Virginia Woolf, Aristotle, E. M. Forster, and contemporary voices such as Wayne Booth, Alice Munro, and Francine Prose. In addition to studying basic elements and foundational theories, students undertake several short creative writing exercises that build on the lessons. This course is designed as an introduction for students who wish to take or are taking a fiction writing workshop and want to understand better not only the elements of the craft but also the vocabulary of the writing workshop. 3 CREDITS NWRW 2306 $800

Introduction to Fiction Robert Lopez A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 8–9:50 pm

Sharon Mesmer B | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This course is intended to encourage and guide students who are starting to explore the many creative possibilities fiction affords. Through reading assignments, writing exercises, and discussions, we consider character development,


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dialogue, point of view, and significant detail. Attention is also paid to recognizing good ideas, developing stories, finding the best structure, and honing one's own unique voice. The majority of class time is spent reviewing projects by students, which are workshopped on a weekly basis. Readings include works by Rick Moody, Jhumpa Lahiri, Tim O’Brien, Lorrie Moore, and Michael Cunningham. 3 CREDITS

discipline. Basics are stressed—character, story, point of view, voice, style—as well as rhythm, pacing, psychological subtlety, development, imagery, color, tone, and the power of what's not stated but is nonetheless made clear. We discuss one another’s original stories as well as classics by Chekhov, Joyce, and others. Assignments are given to students who need a gentle goad. Each story is individually critiqued by the instructor, and marketing advice is given. Professional writers and editors occasionally join our discussions. 3 CREDITS

NWRW 2301 $800

Fiction Writing

NWRW 3308 $800

Sidney Offit A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 10–11:50 am This course acquaints students with aspects of fiction-writing technique. It is designed for students trying to develop a project or find the approach with which they can best express themselves. The instructor discusses viewpoint, mood, characterization, dialogue, plot, and story. Readings from the works of Joyce, Hemingway, Sterne, and D. H. Lawrence demonstrate these elements. During the early weeks, the instructor may give assignments to help students explore their own experiences for realization in a short story or novel. Students may be asked to write a scene depicting a child-parent relationship or to create a dialogue between characters one of whom wants something from the other. Experiments in various styles are encouraged. Work is read aloud and examined. Promising projects are developed under the instructor's supervision, and consideration is given to publication possibilities. An editor or writer may occasionally visit the class to share his or her experiences with students. 3 CREDITS NWRW 3303 $800

Fiction: Memory, Imagination, Desire Robert Dunn A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm Fiction, though we write it to share with the world, comes from a place within us that is a private, interior alembic in which memory and imagination, heated by desire, mix. This course helps students discover this special place and the voices that arise from it and learn how to draw these voices into a well-written story. We ponder the essential mystery of putting words on paper—how to discover material, conquer initial confusion or lack of confidence, and proceed with

Intermediate Fiction Robert Lopez A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This workshop is designed for students who have writing experience or life experience that puts them beyond the beginner level. Class exercises develop writing skills and broaden students’ awareness of creative possibilities. Readings on structure and technique by Madison Smartt Bell and Joyce Carol Oates guide the class’s thinking and discussions. Selected works by contemporary authors, coupled with interviews from the Paris Review, encourage students to explore influences and techniques. Student writing is workshopped throughout, enabling students to develop their own understanding of what it means to write fiction. Confidence and ability go hand in hand, and this course is designed to give students the resources and stamina that they need to mature as writers. 3 CREDITS NWRW 3338 $800

Beginning the Novel Catherine Texier A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  In a relaxed and supportive but intellectually rigorous atmosphere, this beginner's course explores the delicate alchemy that produces excellent fiction. In our attempt to pinpoint exactly why we feel certain works are successful, we scrutinize character, tone, point of view, setting, plot, and dialogue, with a focus on the metaphor as a resonant thematic pattern. Close attention is paid to craft, to the necessary artifice behind the art of fiction. The course is taught as an interactive workshop: Students submit chapters from their novels-in-progress for group assessment. Most sessions include a topic


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presentation and a discussion of assigned readings. Ultimately, students must internalize the skills they learn until those skills become second nature. 3 CREDITS NWRW 2304 $800

Novel Workshop Catherine Texier A | 15 weeks | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm This workshop is for students who want to develop the discipline and skills needed to write a novel. Exercises keep the class writing at a fast clip and are aimed at developing facility with elements of the novel, such as character, story, plot, dialogue, and meaning. Students encounter different possibilities of form, style, and subject matter through close readings of historical and contemporary novelists including Charles Dickens, Jane Austen, Jean Rhys, James Baldwin, Joan Didion, and Lynne Tillman. Students share their work with the class weekly, and the instructor provides written comments. The desire to write a novel is the only prerequisite. 3 CREDITS

Stories to Keep You Up All Night, edited by James Patterson. 3 CREDITS NWRW 3334 $800

Advanced Short Story Workshop Alexandra Shelley A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm This workshop is for short story writers who already know the rules and want to break them. Through exercises and class discussion, students experiment with new voices, push the envelope of form, plumb memory, and work at taking greater emotional risks. Stories by workshop members are read before each class session to provide the author with both written critique and focused class discussion. The aim is to revise the story until it’s as good as it can be. Workshop members also give a group reading and polish at least one piece that can be submitted to magazines. Readings of stories, poetry, and drama introduce the class to contemporary writers who are not in the usual anthologies. 3 CREDITS

NWRW 3301 $800

NWRW 4321 $800

The Art of Suspense in Fiction

Advanced Fiction: Revise and Polish

Katia Spiegelman Lief A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm In both literary and commercial fiction, good writing and compelling suspense should go hand in hand but often don’t. Instead, we get literary fiction that doesn’t move and suspense fiction without soul. In this course, the goal is to merge the two to create exciting fiction that satisfies on every level. Through work shared in class and assigned exercises and reading, we explore the essentials of successful fiction writing—how to develop story and character, how to write good dialogue, and how to self-edit. Students master the techniques that make for can’t-put-it-down suspense. This course is open to both beginning and seasoned fiction writers, whether of stories or novels, who wish to explore the crossover territory where the commercial thriller meets literature. The goal is for each student to finish a knockout story or the outline and first chapter of a novel. The suggested reading list includes The Collector by John Fowles, Saturday by Ian McEwan, Strangers on a Train by Patricia Highsmith, The Spy Who Came in from the Cold by John le Carré, The Poet by Michael Connelly, Mystic River by Dennis Lehane, and Thriller:

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John Reed A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 4–5:50 pm This workshop is an opportunity for writers to speed their creative and technical maturation. The course is for students who are beyond introductory courses and are ready to take their writing to a higher level. Workshop time is dedicated primarily to student work; assignments look toward and initiate tasks commonly encountered by aspiring writers. The intention of the course is to help individuals prepare themselves and their work for the next phase of their vocation, be it approaching editors, agents, and literary journals or applying to graduate schools. These subjects are addressed realistically and reasonably, with the quality of the writing always foremost on the agenda. 3 CREDITS NWRW 4310 $800


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Nonfiction

suspenseful, compelling, page-turning nonfiction. We discuss aspects of writing that help hook a reader—including dialogue, character, when to reveal crucial information, and how to bring about the correct level of uncertainty in a reader’s mind. Students put these elements of craft to use in their own submissions. Each student has two opportunities to workshop an essay, chapter of a memoir-in-progress, or any other type of nonfiction in a supportive, constructive atmosphere. By the end of the course, students will have completed a compelling piece of writing that will have readers hooked. 3 CREDITS

Introduction to Creative Nonfiction Betty Liu A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This workshop is for serious beginners as well as more experienced writers who want to delve into the still-evolving genre of creative nonfiction, which includes personal essay, memoir, documentary, and literary journalism. Through in-class writing and weekly assignments, students develop the skills needed to build a narrative frame around real-life events and situations. Student work is read and discussed in class. Readings from both The Art of the Personal Essay: An Anthology from the Classical Era to the Present, edited by Phillip Lopate, and Vivian Gornick’s The Situation and the Story guide our considerations of the choices made by James Baldwin, Joan Didion, Natalia Ginzburg, Walter Benjamin, and other masters. 3 CREDITS NWRW 2401 $800

STUDENT PROFILE Joseph Alexiou Writing wasn’t always Joseph Alexiou’s primary ambition, but after taking a few creative writing classes with continuing education at The New School, he knew he had something. That something turned out to be his first book, Gowanus: Brooklyn’s Curious Canal. Today his freelance work appears in the New York Observer, Gothamist, and New York magazine’s Daily Intel. Discover more student stories from our network at opencampus.newschool.edu/ why-open-campus.

Suspenseful Storytelling in Nonfiction Jessica Sholl A | 15 weeks | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm Why are some memoirs and essays almost impossible to put down? In this course, open to writers at all levels, we explore ways to create

NWRW 3430 $800

Essays in a Changing World Madge McKeithen A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  The world of writing and reading is changing rapidly, in large part because of changing technology. This writing course is designed for students eager to use new technologies to write and publish personal essays, including autobio­ graphical essays, arts and cultural criticism, and pieces about race and ethnicity and social and political change. Assignments draw attention to the connections and tensions between individual experience and social context. Students write five short pieces and two longer essays exploring questions of self, voice, and audience and using online key word search tools provided by Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Flickr. Readings include George Orwell, George Packer, James Baldwin, Nikki Giovanni, Orhan Pamuk, Pico Iyer, Maxine Hong Kingston, Susan Griffin, Dave Eggers, Ian Frazier, Bruce Chatwin, Alain de Botton, J.M. Coetzee, and Herta Mueller. 3 CREDITS

NWRW 3345 $800

Writing Memoirs Candy Schulman A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm “The memoir is the novel of the 21st century,” writes Susan Cheever. This contemporary art form holds a prominent place in today’s literary world. Editors respond to voice and tone, where writers capture the story, transport readers to another place, and convey honest feelings. Memoirs range in style from the humor of David Sedaris to the stark minimalism of Joan Didion and Nick Flynn, who push new boundaries.


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This workshop is designed for writers who have started a memoir as well as those looking to transform and cultivate an idea into larger themes. Students work on short personal histories or book-length projects. Writers develop a compelling voice and point of view, creating dramatic tension and scenes with sensual detail. Discussions include what makes a memoir publishable in today’s market and crafting an elevator pitch and cover letter with which to approach agents and editors. 3 CREDITS NWRW 3410 $800

Writing from Personal Experience Nancy Kelton A | 5 sessions | Mar. 7–Apr. 11 | T 4–5:50 pm This workshop teaches students methods of capturing their own memories, dreams, childhood experiences, and personal truths in a unique voice. They learn how to write with precision of thought and language, unimpeded by the inner critic. Exercises in class and weekly writing assignments help students establish disciplined work habits. The instructor critiques all student work, suggesting revisions and guiding serious writers toward publication. Assigned readings provide models of subject matter, style, and form. 1 CREDIT NWRW 3426 $200

Special Topics

Children’s Book Illustration and Writing Jacquie Hann A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 8–9:50 pm In this course, each student develops a children’s book from an initial concept to a “dummy” ready for submission to a publisher. The class explores the entire production process, including searching for ideas, writing a first draft, making sketches and character studies, editing, creating finished artwork and dummies, and writing cover letters and submitting a finished work to publishers. Writing assignments help students focus their ideas and build their stories. Illustration assignments lead to creation of a portfolio that can be shown to art directors. Weekly critiques help students hone their individual styles. 3 CREDITS NWRW 3812 $800

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Graphic Novel Ariel Schrag A | 15 weeks | beg. Jan. 24 | T 8–9:50 pm This course leads students step-by-step through the process of creating a short graphic novel. The course begins with analysis and critique of comics and then guides students through the stages involved in creating their own projects: outline, rough sketches, penciling, lettering, inking, and editing. Student work is critiqued in class, and students hold individual meetings with the instructor. The class studies work by cartoonists Art Spiegelman, Daniel Clowes, Renée French, Chris Ware, Alison Bechdel, Joe Matt, Gabrielle Bell, R. Crumb, and many more. Strong drawing skills are not required, as the emphasis of the class is on storytelling. 3 CREDITS NWRW 3521 $800

Walking in New York Rebecca Reilly A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 4–5:50 pm New York is a great walking city, and a uniquely urban form of literature has grown out of the activity of flanerie, or aimless strolling. From the poetic reveries of James Schuyler and Frank O’Hara to the meditations on exile of Walter Benjamin and Paul Celan, walking becomes a creative act. In this course, students plan and document a series of walks, creating their own literary and autobiographical map of New York—a personal poetics of space. We create a poetics of walking, of ethnography, and of autobiography, mapping discoveries of self and others through writing. These voyages and readings provide the occasion to write a series of texts documenting our walks through New York and our responses to the literature of flanerie. Students are also encouraged to explore the intersections between writing and other media/ art forms, such as performance, digital media, visual art, film, and sound as we document the unfolding and creation of our own New York landscapes. Authors read include Frank O’Hara, Joe Brainard, James Schuyler, Walter Benjamin, Charles Baudelaire, Blaise Cendrars, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and Paul Celan. 3 CREDITS NWRW 3111 $800


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Playwriting

Writing the Photobook

Robert Montgomery

Robert Dunn

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  An introduction to the basics of drama, including story, character, conflict, scene construction, and overall plotting. Students also consider issues such as drama as metaphor, the realities of staging, and production problems. The course is geared to the theatrical experience of each student, with readings and writing exercises suggested when appropriate. Feedback from classmates approximates an audience experience, and the instructor provides detailed responses to all work submitted. Students should expect to complete at least 20 pages of script by the end of the course. 3 CREDITS

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm In the last decade, the world of photobooks— books composed of a series of photos, analogous to a short story collection or a chapbook of poems—has grown dramatically. The best photobooks don’t just present strong photos; their order, the layout of the book, and the materials used to make it all define a successful work. Class time is divided between studying the history of the serious photobook and making our own books. Guests, writers, curators, and artists help us along. Central to the course is the study of narrative structure, which will help in all kinds of media, including writing, film, and graphic novels. Written requirements: an ongoing prospectus on your book, refined as your work changes, plus an essay on a classic photobook of your choice. General requirements: passion, curiosity, and enough photos (and more) to make the best possible photobook. 3 CREDITS

NWRW 3702 $800

Playwriting from Personal Experience Alice Cohen A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 8–9:50 pm How do you start writing a play? In this workshop, students use personal experience as a springboard for generating original characters, stories, and imagery for the stage. Basic elements of playwriting are explored through in-class writing exercises and weekly writing assignments. We experiment with the possibilities of dramatic storytelling, with an emphasis on fictionalizing and transforming personal experiences and memories. Students read their own work aloud and discuss it in class and also read selections from well-known playwrights. By the end of the course, students will have completed the first draft of a one-act play or a collection of very short plays. Open to all levels, this workshop is designed to be a safe, supportive environment for a hands-on exploration of playwriting. 3 CREDITS NWRW 3708 $800

NWRW 3913 $800

Food Narratives Stacey Lehman A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm Food, glorious food! Is food a source of pleasure or anxiety? What did you have for dinner last night or for breakfast this morning? How did you decide what to eat and how to prepare it? Do you long for the food of your childhood? Do your religion and spiritual life guide your food choices? How would you describe the flavors of last night’s meal to your best friend? These are the sorts of questions that trigger the most memorable writing on the subject of cuisine and gastronomy. In this course, we examine the ways writers have depicted food, cooking, and eating. We look at the many forms of food writing and talk about those we find most satisfying. The instructor guides students in their exploration of the gastronomic essay, memoirs, short stories, poetry, blog posts, recipes, and restaurant reviews. The reading list includes Horace, Sholom Aleichem, M.F.K. Fischer, Laurie Colwin, Wendell Berry, Charles Simic, Robert Sheckley, Lydia Davis, and Kevin Young. Prominent figures from the world of newspaper and magazine writing, both online and in print, visit the class. Students produce weekly assignments, some of which take advantage of New York City as a center of culinary activity. 3 CREDITS NWRW 3346 $800


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Share your story on the screen. Learn the fundamentals of screenwriting, from analyzing scripts to outlining to writing the first draft and revising. Write the movie you’ve always wanted to watch, develop the television show that earns a cult following, and come up with the jokes that keep sitcom viewers laughing.

Certificate in Screenwriting The New School awards a certificate attesting to successful completion of a sequence of courses in which students master the art and craft of writing for the cinema. This curriculum can be completed entirely online, on campus, or through a combination of online and on-campus courses. For more information about the certificate program, see Screenwriting in the following pages or at opencampus.newschool.edu/ program/certificate-programs.

Script Analysis Gregory Takoudes A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 8–9:50 pm

Leslie McCleave B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm

Marina Shron C | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  Whether you are a writer, a director, or a producer, an understanding of story structure and dramatic principles is essential. In-depth analysis of a screenplay’s storyline, characters, dialogue, images, and theme reveals a wide range of narrative techniques and storytelling styles, from Hollywood to independent and everything in between. Students view successful films and analyze their scripts, learning how essential information is conveyed, how story elements are communicated through visual means, how

dramatic momentum is built with cause and effect, and what makes a character credible and complex. Students end the term with the ability to analyze any film script and apply that knowledge to their own screenwriting. This class is required for all students interested in pursuing the Screenwriting sequence and may be taken before or concurrently (permission required) with Screenwriting 1. 3 CREDITS NSRW 2800 $800

Business of Screenwriting Douglas Tirola A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 8–9:50 pm Talent is only one part of being a successful screenwriter. Navigating the complicated movie industry, with its many layers of professional personnel, is another. This course explains how to find an agent and what can realistically be expected from one. Learn what is involved in working with agents, producers, production


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companies, and studio executives. Guest speakers include agents, producers, development executives, studio executives, and screenwriters from organizations such as the William Morris Agency and Fox and from New York–based production companies, who tell you what it takes to do business with them. This course is useful for aspiring producers and development executives as well as screenwriters. 3 CREDITS

principles of storytelling, including act structure, plotting, scene construction, character arc, tone, mood, and theme. Students examine popular screenwriting conventions and paradigms as well as rule-bending experiments in storytelling, learning from pillars of classic style as well as the cutting edge of the craft. The class presents the formal standards for a variety of screen forms, including the three-act structure of the feature film screenplay, the four or five acts plus teaser for an hour-long TV series, the three acts plus tag at the end of a half-hour comedy episode, and the TV show bible, a series guide that allows the writer to explore larger themes, character arcs, and season-long dramatic events. This writingintensive class approaches screenwriting both creatively and critically, with assignments designed to teach aspects of craft and protocols of workshopping and critique. The class proceeds from the premise that students must be able to tell a strong story, and by the end of the course, students will have developed their own concept and written a treatment that they can develop further in either the Film or TV writing track. This class fulfills the prerequisite for Screenwriting 1, Sitcom Writing 1, and Episodic and Procedural.

NFLM 3454 $700

Screenwriting 1: The First Act Loren-Paul Caplin A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 8–9:50 pm

Jonathan Danziger B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm

Douglas Morse C | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This course for the beginning screenwriter guides students through the process of executing a detailed step outline and drafting a first act. In the first half of the class, the focus is on further developing the story; articulating the dramatic idea; considering plot, structure, character, and action; and translating those elements into a working outline. In the second half of the class, students learn about the essential dramatic elements of a feature film set-up, including the establishment of tone, theme, world, character, inciting incident, tension, and stakes. Writing craft and technique are explored along with these fundamental features of the first act. The class is run largely as a workshop, with students reading one another’s work and providing both written critique and focused and constructive feedback in class discussion. Prerequisite: Introduction to Writing for the Screen. This course should be taken concurrently with Script Analysis. 3 CREDITS

NSRW 3810 $800

Introduction to Writing for Screen David Negrin A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 4-5:50 pm This course explores the basic theory, form, art, and craft of writing for the screen—whether for a feature-length film screenplay, a film short, or a serialized television show. Learning the essential concepts of classical dramaturgy, mythic structures, hero psychology, comedic premise, and genre, students build a solid grounding in the

3 CREDITS

NSRW 3811 $800

Screenwriting 2 Douglas Morse A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm Students undertake the challenging task of finishing a draft of their feature-length screenplays. They begin by revising their step outline to solidify structure and simplify the writing process. In workshop, with careful guidance by the instructor, each writer re-examines, tightens, and rewrites the outline, giving close attention to structure, logic, motivation, complex character development, tone, and theme. Students use their finished outlines to make revisions to act one and draft acts two and three. Weekly page requirements keep them on track, while in-class reviews offer support, guidance, and direction. The emphasis is on the specific problems of successful scene writing and on development of a professional writing style that makes for a compelling presentation on the page. The goal for each student is to finish the term with a polished and professional first draft. Prerequisites: Script Analysis and Screenwriting 1. 3 CREDITS NSRW 3820 $800


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Screenwriting 3

Episodic and Procedural

Mort Scharfman

Ian Grody

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  Permission required. Students undertake the challenging task of finishing their feature-length screenplays. In workshop, with careful guidance by the instructor, each writer re-examines, tightens, and rewrites the outline and existing scenes, giving close attention to structure, logic, motivation, complex character development, tone, and theme. There is an emphasis on the specific problems of successful scene writing and on development of a professional writing style that makes for a compelling presentation on the page. Successful screenplays are studied as examples. The goal for each student is to finish the term with a polished and professional first draft. Prerequisite: Screenwriting 2, with at least 50 pages of an original screenplay. 3 CREDITS

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  From period dramas like Mad Men and Boardwalk Empire to fairy tale–inspired procedurals like Grimm to musicals like Smash and Glee, the diversity of shows on TV today is unprecedented. The industry is always innovating and looking for fresh ideas. This course begins with a guided analysis of contemporary network and cable pilot scripts, ranging from the serialized (Breaking Bad, Big Love, Mad Men) to the procedural (Grimm, Awake, Psych). Students examine the structures, episodic breaks, and essential elements of functional origin stories. They are challenged to identify the qualities of a script that make it special to viewers. A discussion of dramatic questions explored in the course of a series or season and of unique selling points follows. Each student devises a five- to ten-page treatment or pitch document describing an idea for an original series, including character breakdowns, a pilot synopsis and brief outline of the first season, a description of episode structure (A and B stories), and a statement of theme and tone. After these have been reviewed, students go on to write the first and second acts of their original scripts. 3 CREDITS

NSRW 3830 $800

Sitcom Writing 1 Gregory DePaul A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 8–9:50 pm The sitcom is no joke. It is a specialized, highly competitive form of screenwriting that has its own set of rules, expectations, and required skills. For those wishing to break into TV writing, the front door is the spec script, a sample episode for a current popular TV series, which is an indispensable tool for selling your talents in the television marketplace. This course investigates the half-hour episodic TV comedy form and gives students the fundamental tools necessary to conceive and execute a sitcom teleplay. Over the course of the semester, students research a popular half-hour comedy, learn its secrets, and develop techniques for building premises, generating a story, outlining, structuring, scene writing, and editing—all in collaboration with other student writers. Students write in the voice, tone, and style of an established show, completing a beat sheet, episode diagram, and draft of a complete spec script for a current half-hour comedy show, and progress as far as they can toward polishing it. The class concludes with an overview of the business of the sitcom, the current comedy series marketplace, and breaking in as a writer. Prerequisite: Introduction to Writing for Screen. 3 CREDITS NSRW 3842 $800

NSRW 3852 $800

Sitcom Writing 2 Mort Scharfman A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This class is modeled on a half-hour comedy “writer’s room” and, as such, is a virtual facsimile of the real world of sitcom writing. Students are guided in the ways of writing a draft spec script from a half-hour comedy beat outline worthy of a professional writer. Students first rework a completed outline, simplifying the story, improving the DNA of characters, focusing and economizing scenes, creating mood and pacing, and “punching up” dialogue from the blueprint draft. Next it’s on to the writing and polishing stage of the script. The course concludes with an overview of the business of the sitcom, the current comedy series marketplace, and breaking in as a writer. Students must have a complete outline coming into the course. Prerequisite: Sitcom Writing 1. 3 CREDITS NFLM 3853 $800


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These courses dissect fiction and poetry to examine their structure and role in our society. Topics explored include how authors and readers like you can use literature as a form of progressive activism and political protest. The Problem of Evil Yunus Tuncel A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  In The City of God, Saint Augustine confronts a central problem: How did evil come into the world if human beings were created good? In this course, we explore the question of evil through a study of texts ranging from biblical to modern. With Dostoevsky and Kafka, we travel on the dark side of life, examining crime, transgression, and nightmarish systems. We explore a number of theoretical perspectives, from Augustine’s notion of the “evil will” to Nietzsche’s standpoint “beyond good and evil” to Arendt’s thesis of the “banality of evil.” Through our study of the ethical universe of literary texts, we engage with questions essential to humanity, including the nature of human beings, the basis for moral conventions, individual and collective responsibility, goodness versus happiness, and guilt, forgiveness, and redemption. 3 CREDITS NLIT 3434 $700

Elena Ferrante Margaret Birns A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  A ferocious modern masterpiece that has attained a global readership, the four novels by Elena Ferrante that make up the Neapolitan series have been described as “inimitable,” “groundbreaking,” and “titanic” and as “a work of genius.” Beginning in the years after World War II and ending in 2010, these novels feature two poor children from a neighborhood in Naples whose adult lives epitomize the tremendous changes sweeping over not only their impoverished but beautiful Neapolitan world but all of

Italy, Europe, and the United States in the second half of the 20th century. We focus on the volatile, complex relationship between the daring, brilliant, and formidable Lila and her rival, opposite number, twin, enemy, and friend—the author, Elena. As we follow these two extraordinary modern women, as well as their brothers, husbands, lovers, sons and daughters, through the second half of the 20th century’s possibilities, power struggles, Mafioso entanglements, transgressions, and revolutions, we explore the way these two friends love and hate, work, study and create, marry and raise children, and finally struggle to make sense of it all. Readings: the Neapolitan novels by Elena Ferrante—My Brilliant Friend, The Story of a New Name, Those Who Leave and Those Who Stay, and The Story of the Lost Child. 3 CREDITS NLIT 3389 $700

The Body Artist: Don DeLillo Joseph Salvatore A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm In this course, we examine the work of the American novelist Don DeLillo. In 1999, DeLillo, considered one of the leading candidates for the Nobel Prize for Literature, was the first American recipient of the Jerusalem Prize, an award given every two years to a writer whose body of work expresses the themes of the individual's freedom in society. The award’s jury characterized his work as “an unrelenting struggle against even the most sophisticated forms of repression of individual and public freedom during the last half of the century.” DeLillo has said, “Writers must oppose systems. It’s important to write against power, corporations, the state, and the whole system of consumption and of debilitating


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entertainments.” Indeed, DeLillo has spent a career challenging systems such as multinational capitalism and, as John Duvall points out, its manipulation of the image in media and advertising to construct first-world identity through the individual’s acts of consumption. He has challenged political and historical forces in his work—notably, in Libra, the Warren Commission Report regarding the role Lee Harvey Oswald played in the assassination of President Kennedy. We consider DeLillo’s style, artistry, and themes, such as paranoia, underground conspiracies, global terrorism, post-apocalyptic satire, technology in the digital age, television and media, consumerism, language, and celebrity, as we read selected texts: Americana (1971), End Zone (1972), Players (1977), The Names (1982), White Noise (1985), Libra (1988), Mao II (1991), Underworld (1997), The Body Artist (2001), Point Omega (2010), and Zero K (2016). Note: This course coincides with a conference on DeLillo to be held at The New School in spring 2017. 3 CREDITS NLIT 2310 $700

Chekhov and the Short Story Anthony Anemone A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm More than 100 years since his death, Chekhov remains a favorite among students, general readers, scholars, and writers. In this seminar, which presupposes a basic acquaintance with the writer’s life and works, we try to understand why he is considered perhaps the main architect of the modern short story. In analyzing the stories, we look to the approaches, structures, themes, characters, plots, and compositions that make a story “Chekhovian” and that continue to exert a powerful influence on the short story today. 3 CREDITS

NLIT 4120 $700

Shakespeare and Poetry Patricia Carlin A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 4–5:50 pm In this course, we explore techniques, forms, and issues in four Shakespeare plays and a selection of poetry. Henry the Fourth, Part One, is a father-son drama, a study of power politics in a world similar to ours and a guide to the invention of dramatic form. As You Like It, a romantic comedy with a sharp contemporary edge, deals

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with love in a difficult world and points the way to new dramatic and poetic forms. Hamlet, intensely focused on the boundaries of personal and public life, rewrites As You Like It in a darker key. The Tempest, a fantasy of love, poetry, and power politics, remains a seminal work for novelists, filmmakers, poets, and artists. We also read selected poems by Whitman, Dickinson, Anne Carson, Harryette Mullen, David Lehman, Elaine Equi, Wisława Szymborska, Charles Simic, Blake, Wordsworth, Yeats, Auden, and others. In exploring these plays and poems, student readers and writers learn how to understand them and use them in their work and in their lives. 3 CREDITS NLIT 3891 $700

“The precise role of the artist … is to illuminate that darkness, blaze roads through that vast forest, so that we will not, in all our doing, lost sight of its purpose, which is, after all, to make the world a more human dwelling place.” —James Baldwin

Other Worlds: Exploring the Critical Realms of Science Fiction Ricardo Montez A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 4–5:50 pm The development of science fiction as a literary genre is closely connected to the history of colonialism and anthropological projects documenting contact with so-called primitive cultures. We examine literary and filmic narratives involving other worlds, bodies, and technologies within this historical legacy. In particular, we discuss how science fiction writers explore systems of oppression while imagining new possibilities for political transformation. 3 CREDITS

NLIT 3530 $700


Foreign Languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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English as a Second Language . . . . . . . . . . . . 102 Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages . . 104

  Short Course  

  Online Course

  

  Noncredit Certificate   Graduate Certificate


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Open Campus offers a comprehensive and robust foreign languages program. Understand and get ahead in our increasingly global society, travel abroad, conduct business in other countries or with NYC’s multicultural communities, make new connections, and appreciate great literature or films in the original languages by learning a foreign language. Arabic

Chinese

Introductory 2

Introductory 1

Iman Maiki

Peng Zeng

A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 10:15–11:30 am This is the second part of a two-course sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Modern Standard Arabic (MSA). It is designed for students with elementary knowledge of the language. Students continue acquiring elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. They learn about the Arabicspeaking world while building their communicative skills. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. Prerequisite: Arabic Introductory 1, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. 3 CREDITS

A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 10:15–11:30 am This is the first course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Chinese. It is designed for students with no prior training in the target language. Students acquire elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Chinese-speaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS

NARB 1102 $700

NCHM 1101 $700

Intensive 2 Yan Deng

Intensive 2 Iman Maiki A | 13 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–1:45 pm This accelerated course is a continuation of Introductory Intensive 1 and concludes the study of the fundamentals of spoken Levantine Arabic. Students continue studying elementary grammar and expanding their vocabulary. More complex topics of conversation are introduced, such as eating at restaurants, shopping at the market, and visiting places. Students learn about the cultures of Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, and Palestine while building their communicative skills. Prerequisite: Arabic Introductory Intensive 1 or the equivalent. 4 CREDITS NARB 1004 $1,100

A | 13 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–1:45 pm This accelerated course is a continuation of Introductory Intensive 1 and concludes the study of the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Chinese. Students continue studying elementary grammar (present and past tenses, expressing negation, asking questions, and using pronouns). They practice by conversing and writing about shopping, food, daily life, health, technology, and ecology. Students continue to learn about Chinese culture. Prerequisite: Chinese Introductory Intensive 1 or the equivalent. 4 CREDITS NCHM 1004 $1,100


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Introductory 2 Li Duan A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 6–7:15 pm This is the second course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Chinese. It is designed for students with elementary knowledge of the language. Students continue acquiring elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Chinese-speaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS NCHM 1102 $700

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context of aesthetics, ethics, morality, social justice, and resistance. Students develop literary, analytical, and critical thinking skills and are exposed to dynamic approaches to understanding the rapidly changing Chinese society. This course is taught in English. 3 CREDITS NFLN 3501 $700

French

Introductory 1 Sanaz Partovi A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 10:15–11:30am

Stephen Gendell B | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 6–7:15 pm

Fatiha Bali

Conversational Chinese Lei Ping A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 6–7:15 pm This course is for students with very basic intermediate fluency who wish to refine their speaking skills and complement their language class with a practical session focused on conversation. Students in this course practice the same topics covered in Chinese Intermediate 1 and apply them in conversational situations. In addition to studying cultural topics, students focus on retelling events in the past, expressing their opinions about issues that affect their lives and others’, describing habits in the past and comparing them with current ones, giving instructions and directions, describing different kinds of housing and finding the right roommate, and talking about their future and that of others. Prerequisite: Chinese Intermediate Level 1. 3 CREDITS

NCHM 2731 $700

Contemporary Chinese Cinema and Society Lei Ping A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 4–5:50 pm This course introduces contemporary Chinese cinema from the vantage points and through representations of the artistic, cultural, literary, visual, and historical. The class studies award-winning sociopolitically polemic Chinese films produced for both Chinese and global audiences in the past century, examining the questions of modernity and socialism in the

C | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 6–8:30 pm This is the first course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French. It is designed for students with no prior training in the target language. Students acquire elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Francophone world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS NFRN 1101 $700

Intensive 1 Alfredo Marques A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–1:45 pm This is an accelerated elementary course for beginners with little or no knowledge of French looking for an intensive, in-depth study of the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French. Students acquire elementary grammar skills, build vocabulary, and learn about France and the Francophone world while enhancing their communicative skills. The course has a fully integrated multimedia program (electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises and activities). Offered only on Saturdays. 4 CREDITS

NFRN 1003 $1,100


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Intermediate 1

Intensive 2

Marie-Laure Hoffmann

Stephane Zaborowski

A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 6–7:15 pm This is the first part of a two-course intermediatelevel sequence that reviews and expands on previously studied grammatical structures and vocabulary. Language is taught in context through simple cultural and literary readings, short films, and other audiovisual and online resources. Prerequisite: completion of introductorylevel French coursework. 3 CREDITS

A | 13 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–1:45 pm This is the second course of an accelerated elementary sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French. Students continue acquiring elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation and continue to learn about France and the Francophone world while enhancing their communicative skills. Offered only on Saturdays. The course has a fully integrated multimedia program (electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities). 4 CREDITS

NFRN 2101 $700

Did you know? Students come to The New School from the 50 states and 116 foreign countries, and as an Open Campus student, you’ll find that there’s no limit to sharing our university with them all.

NFRN 1004 $1,100

Intermediate 2 Noelle Carruggi A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 12–1:15 pm

Introductory 2

Daisy Bow

Daisy Bow

B | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 2–3:15 pm This is the second part of a two-course intermediate-level sequence that reviews and expands on previously studied and more complex grammatical structures and vocabulary. Language is taught in context through cultural and literary readings, films, and other audiovisual and online resources. Prerequisite: completion of introductory-level French coursework.

D | 15 weeks (online synchronous) | beg. Jan. 23 | M,

3 CREDITS

W 8–9:15 pm 

NFRN 2102 $700

Noelle Carruggi A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 10:15–11:30 am

Instructor to be announced B | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 8–9:15 pm

Instructor to be announced C | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 10:15–11:30 am

Note: Section D for spring 2017 meets synchronously online twice a week (Monday and Wednesday, 8–9:15 pm). This is the second course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in French. It is designed for students with elementary knowledge of the language. Students continue acquiring elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the French-speaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS NFRN 1102 $700

French Grammar and Composition 2 Marie-Christine Massé A 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This workshop offers a comprehensive French grammar review for students who have completed two or more years of college-level French or the equivalent. It helps students improve their grammar and perfect their writing and reading skills, especially in preparation for taking advanced literature or civilization courses or studying in a Francophone country. The emphasis is on grammatical accuracy, clarity, and the appropriate use of idioms and syntax. 3 CREDITS NFRN 3011 $700


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Advanced Conversation: Rendez-Vous in French Instructor to be announced A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 12–1:15 pm This course focuses on the dynamics of everyday speech, both formal and informal. Students practice listening and speaking through structured dialogues, oral presentations, and topical conversation. The course materials include various media (newspapers, magazines, movies, etc.) selected to build vocabulary and encourage students to speak spontaneously on a variety of topics. Prerequisite: French Level 5 or the equivalent or permission of the instructor. This course is conducted entirely in French. 3 CREDITS NFRN 3714 $700

Advanced: Self-Portraits, Renaissance to Contemporary Marie-Christine Massé A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 6–7:15 pm In this course, students explore self-representation from the French Renaissance to today, in French literature, painting, photography, and film, as well as today’s pop culture, music, and street art. Issues of identity, gender, nonconformity, multiculturalism, war, and socioeconomics are addressed in French and Francophone contexts. Coursework includes readings, presentations, student-led discussions, and regular written practice with creative exercises of self-representation in French. Prerequisite: at least two years of French. 3 CREDITS NFRN 3102 $700

German

Introductory 2 Rainer Brueckheimer A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 6–7:15 pm

Adelheid Ziegler B | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 12–1:15 pm This is the second course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in German. It is designed for students with elementary knowledge of the language. Students continue acquiring elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire

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knowledge of the German-speaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS NGRM 1102 $700

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Italian

Introductory 2 Giuseppe Manca A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 6–7:15 pm

Caterina Bertolotto B | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 10:15–11:30 am Students expand their vocabulary, add to their knowledge of Italian grammar, and develop their conversational skills in an interactive and fun classroom atmosphere. Prerequisite: Italian Introductory 1, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. 3 CREDITS NITL 1102 $700

Intermediate 2 Caterina Bertolotto A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 4–5:15 pm This is an advanced-intermediate-level course in which students apply and polish their Italian skills by reading and discussing short literary texts. Further knowledge of the history and culture of Italy is introduced through films and magazines and individual class presentations. Grammar topics are studied in depth, and organization of written compositions is emphasized. Prerequisite: Italian Intermediate 1, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor. 3 CREDITS

NITL 2102 $700


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Japanese

their skills, expressing themselves and exchanging information on a wide range of topics. Teaching is conducted in Japanese whenever possible. Students are expected to learn more Kanji during the semester. Prerequisite: Japanese Intermediate 1, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

Introductory 1 Instructor to be announced A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 12–1:15 pm This is the first course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Japanese. It is designed for students with no prior training in the target language. Students acquire elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Japanese-speaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS NJPN 1101 $700

Introductory 2 Kyoko Hincapie A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 12–1:15 pm

Instructor to be announced B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 10 am–12:30 pm

John Molnar C | 15 weeks (online synchronous) | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 8–9:15 pm 

Note: Section C for spring 2017 meets synchronously online twice a week (Monday and Wednesday, 8–9:15 pm). This is the second course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Japanese. It is designed for students with elementary knowledge of the language. Students continue acquiring elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Japanese-speaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities.

3 CREDITS

NJPN 2102 $700

Conversational Japanese Ichiro Kishimoto A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 10:15–11:30 am This course is for students with very basic intermediate fluency who wish to refine their speaking skills and complement their language class with a practical session focused on conversation. Students in this course practice the same topics covered in Japanese Intermediate Intensive 1 and apply them in conversational situations. In addition to studying cultural topics, students focus on retelling events in the past, expressing their opinions about issues that affect their lives and others’, describing habits in the past and comparing them with current ones, giving instructions and directions, describing different kinds of housing and finding the right roommate, and talking about their future and that of others. Prerequisite: intermediate-level Japanese. 3 CREDITS NJPN 2731 $700

Korean

Introductory 1 Sunhee Song

Intermediate 2

A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 12–1:15 pm This is the first course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Korean. It is designed for students with no prior training in the target language. Students acquire elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Korean-speaking world. The course utilizes a textbook, including a workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS

Kazue Kurahara

NKRN 1101 $700

3 CREDITS

NJPN 1102 $700

A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 12–1:15 pm Students learn complex grammatical constructions, increase their vocabulary and knowledge of Kanji (Chinese characters), and continue to improve


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Introductory 2 Instructor to be announced A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 12–1:15 pm This is the second course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Korean. It is designed for students with elementary knowledge of the language. Students continue acquiring elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Korean-speaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS

NKRN 1102 $700

Latin

Practical Latin Rama C. Madhu A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 10–11:50 am Latin is a simple language with a complex family history. Knowledge of Latin has practical benefits for the study of language and literature, as the language is the origin of Spanish, French, and Italian and the source of most English words. This course, for beginning and advanced students, is designed to efficiently apply these benefits. We study the historical development of Latin into the Romance languages and the history of Latin’s influence on English. Beginners learn Latin quickly and painlessly using the simplest selections of authors such as Ovid, the Vulgate Bible, and the Carmina Burana. Advanced students broaden their knowledge with writings from Plautus, Spinoza, Pope Francis, and others. 3 CREDITS NLTN 1103 $700

Portuguese (Brazilian)

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communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Portuguese-speaking world. The course utilizes a textbook, including a workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS NPRT1101 $700

Introductory 2 Tobias Nascimento A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 10 am–12:30 pm This is the second course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Portuguese. It is designed for students with elementary knowledge of the language. Students continue acquiring elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Portuguese-speaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS

NPRT 1102 $700

American Sign Language

Introductory 2 Jeffrey Mooney A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 6–7:15 pm This is the second course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of Sign Language. It is designed for students with elementary knowledge. Students continue acquiring elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Sign Language–speaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS NSLN 1104 $700

Introductory 1 Liria Van Zandt A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–12:30 pm This is the first course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Portuguese. It is designed for students with no prior training in the target language. Students acquire elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their

Selected Topics: The World of the Deaf—Signing and Culture Gabriel Gryszka A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 10–11:50 am This course provides an overview of the worlds of deaf culture and signing. It includes a discussion of the multiple forms of sign languages (SEE, PSL, ASL) and provides a history of the Deaf movement.


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Topics covered include the cochlear implant controversy, total communication, and the founding of Gallaudet University. Class activities include single spelling practice and real-life scenarios. There is no prerequisite. 3 CREDITS

Spanish

NSLN 2705 $700

A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 2–3:15 pm

Introductory 1 Sara Villa Luis Guzman B | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 10 am–12:30 pm

FACULTY PROFILE Raúl Rubio Chair of Foreign Languages and associate professor of Hispanic studies at The New School, Raúl Rubio trained as a Hispanist and cultural studies scholar, and is widely known for his research on Cuban visual and material cultures. He has published numerous studies on comparative literature, film, and graphic and decorative arts. Rubio earned a doctorate in Latin American literature and cultural studies at Tulane University in New Orleans. Discover more faculty from the Open Campus network at opencampus.newschool.edu/ why-open-campus.

Sonia Granillo-Ogikubo C | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 12–1:15 pm This is the first course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish. It is designed for students with no prior training in Spanish. Students acquire elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Spanishspeaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS NSPN 1101 $700

Introductory 2 Teresa Bell A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 6–7:15 pm

Victor Tirado B | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 8–9:15 pm

Luis Guzman C | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 27 | F 2–4:30 pm

Instructor to be announced D | 30 sessions (online synchronous) | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 8–9:15 pm  

Note: Section D for spring 2017 meets synchronously online twice a week (Monday and Wednesday, 8–9:15 pm). This is the second course of a two-part sequence that introduces the fundamentals of speaking, listening, reading, and writing in Spanish. It is designed for students with elementary knowledge of the language. Students continue acquiring elementary grammar, build vocabulary, and practice basic conversation. While enhancing their communicative skills, students acquire knowledge of the Spanishspeaking world. The course utilizes a multimedia textbook program, including an electronic workbook with audio, video, chapter exercises, and activities. 3 CREDITS NSPN 1102 $700


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Intermediate 2

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Luis Guillermo Galli Vilchez

Spanish Grammar and Composition

A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 12–1:15 pm

Sara Villa

B | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 6–7:15 pm This course is designed to advance students toward high-intermediate fluency. Students learn useful communicative skills through activities emphasizing oral proficiency, culture, and grammar. Prerequisite: Spanish Intermediate 1, the equivalent, or permission of the instructor.

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This writing course is designed for students at the intermediate level. Students review and reinforce their understanding and use of basic grammatical features, including past tenses, distinctions between ser and estar, the subjunctive, and discourse markers. Students focus on writing short and longer assignments—a blog entry, a reflexive self-portrait, letters, diary entries, argumentative essays, and more.

3 CREDITS

NSPN 2102 $700

Intensive 2

3 CREDITS

NSPN 2011 $700

Irma Romero A | 13 sessions | beg. Jan. 28 | Sat 10 am–1:45 pm This accelerated course is the continuation of Introductory Intensive 1 and completes the study of the fundamentals of the Spanish language. Students extend their knowledge of essential grammar, learning how to express opinions (using past and present subjunctive) and make conjectures (using the conditional and the future). They continue learning about Spanish and Latin American cultures while developing communicative skills. Prerequisite: Spanish Introductory Intensive 1 or the equivalent. 4 CREDITS

NSPN 1004 $1,100

Conversational Spanish Raul Rubio A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T, Th 12–1:15 pm This is an intermediate-level conversation course, conducted entirely in Spanish, that is designed to reinforce and extend students’ communicative skills in Spanish and to deepen their cultural knowledge. A variety of texts are discussed, including news articles, video clips, ads, films, and more. Students are expected to participate actively in a wide range of interactive small- and large-group activities, including conversations, interviews, film reviews, group discussions, and presentations. Prerequisite: intermediate- to advanced-level proficiency in Spanish. 3 CREDITS NSPN 2731 $700

Advanced: Latin American Fiction Sara Villa A | 30 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M, W 12–1:15 pm This is an advanced language course, conducted entirely in Spanish, that examines a selection of influential Latin American films touching upon a wide range of societal themes, including immigration and exile, sexual and racial politics, human rights and memory, marginalized or fringe groups, and others. Film analysis discussions are supplemented by topical readings and written assignments. This course is grounded in a content-based, communicative approach to language learning. 3 CREDITS NSPN 3101 $700

Latino/a Media: TV Film, Advertising, and Social Media Raul Rubio A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 4–5:50 pm This course examines a wide range of Hispanic media, including television, film, print, advertising, and social media. The course provides a multilingual approach to Hispanic media including Spanish language media, bilingual media, and English language, Latino-oriented media in the United States. While surveying the general aspects of production, stylistics, language use, and target geographical locations, the course also focuses on media’s role in identity politics, social engagement, community reaffirmation, and cultural economies. This course is conducted in English and includes Spanish and bilingual content. 3 CREDITS NFLN 1555 $700


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The New School offers English language instruction from the lowintermediate to the advanced level for speakers of other languages. The courses are designed for students preparing for studies in the United States, professionals working in English-speaking environments, and anyone who needs to speak and write better English for personal or career purposes. Students can take individual courses or enroll in a full-time intensive certificate program, depending on their needs. The New School awards a Certificate in English as a Second Language to students who successfully complete a minimum of 100 hours of ESL classes. All students who complete the certificate program can expect to emerge with improved fluency and independent learning skills.

 ertificate in English as C a Second Language The School of Language Learning and Teaching at Open Campus at The New School offers courses in English as a second/foreign language (ESL) for speakers of other languages who wish to improve their English communication skills. A Certificate in English as a Second Language is awarded to students who successfully complete a minimum of 100 hours of ESL classes. The classes provide intensive instruction in grammar, conversation and listening, and reading and writing. Students who complete the certificate program emerge with improved fluency and independent learning skills.

ESL COURSES

Grammar 24 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 |

Students learn more than just rules of grammar; they learn how to use grammar in speaking and writing. Grammar classes are lively and active, with reading, discussion, videos, songs,

presentations, games, and writing as well as more traditional exercises and quizzes. Levels 3–6 offered. $1,190


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Listening/Speaking

Reading

24 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 |

24 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 |

In these classes, students practice speaking and listening in a variety of informal and formal situations. They learn idioms and phrasal verbs, practice difficult pronunciation patterns and sounds, and develop presentation skills. Listening practice involves movies, YouTube, videos, and lectures. Levels 3–6 offered. $820

Students read a variety of longer and shorter texts, which they are expected to discuss and write about in detail in class, in homework assignments, and on quizzes. In-class activities and homework assignments help students increase their reading speed, comprehension, confidence, and enjoyment. Levels 3–6 offered. $820

Academic Writing

ESL SCHEDULING

24 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 |

Below is the class schedule for the ESL courses in grammar, listening/speaking, writing, and reading.

These courses take students through the process of writing, from pre-writing to organizing, drafting, and revising everything from paragraphs to full-length essays. At each level, students learn the sentence structure, vocabulary, and writing techniques that will help them express themselves clearly in academic English. Levels 3–6 offered. $1,190

TIME 9–11:40 am 1:50–3:40 pm

M, W Grammar Listening/Speaking

T, Th Writing Reading

ESL+ Certificates The New School’s ESL+ certificates are innovative language preparation programs that provide a high-quality English language foundation and pathway for students to continue their academic and professional careers at The New School and beyond. ESL + Design The ESL + Design program of study is the structured set of intensive English language (ESL) courses detailed above plus a design studio, short supplemental workshops, and an orientation to life in the United States. Those who successfully complete the program can obtain a certificate of completion confirming they have attained a specified level of proficiency in English speaking, reading, and writing and foundational skills in art and design. The program also includes short practical workshops on topics such as preparing your application to Parsons, the vocabulary of fashion and design, and how to succeed at Parsons. newschool.edu/public-engagement/ esl-design-certificate

ESL + Food The ESL + Food Certificate was designed by The New School in New York City in collaboration with the International Culinary Center (ICC). The certificate program provides a high-quality English language education for students who want to attend culinary school at the ICC, obtain a degree in Food Studies at The New School, or choose another career path within the food industry. Program features include access to New York City’s culinary scene, including culinary events and food industry guest speakers. Students are also exposed to influential chefs and restaurants and take field trips to the ICC for demonstrations by master chefs and to the Union Square Greenmarket. Our signature course, The Language of the Kitchen, reinforces key vocabulary of food, cooking, and preparation techniques in a supportive and interactive classroom setting. newschool.edu/public-engagement/ esl-food-certificate


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English has become the language of international communication; command of spoken and written English is important in business, the arts, and other professions all over the world. Locally, learning English can empower and assist underserved communities of immigrants and refugees. The demand for trained ESL teachers and ESL courses continues to grow. With our classes we aim to create a network of qualified ESL teachers.

Certificate in Teaching English The New School offers a certificate for aspiring and working ESL teachers for whom a master’s degree is inappropriate or impractical. The certificate curriculum has a practical orientation based on theory and techniques of communicative, student-centered learning. Students learn a variety of skills readily applicable to classroom teaching and tutoring. Note: This program does not certify teachers for New York public schools. The certificate curriculum is awarded for successful completion of these five courses: •M  ethods of Teaching ESL/EFL •E  nglish Grammar for ESL Teachers •T  eaching the Sound System of English •U  sing Authentic Materials to Teach ESL •E  SL Teaching Practicum To apply, visit newschool.edu/tesol.

Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

For more information, visit the website at newschool.edu/matesol.

The New School offers the Master of Arts in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL), with concentrations in teaching and curriculum development.

Methods of Teaching ESL/EFL Theresa Breland A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7–9:45 pm Learn the basics of student-centered teaching and how to plan lessons that integrate


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contextualized grammar instruction with the teaching of vocabulary and the four language skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing). Also learn about error correction and classroom management. Participants are required to observe at least three hours of ESL classes and teach an ESL/EFL class for a minimum of 20 hours during the semester. 4 CREDITS NELT 3411 $1,100

Teaching the Sound System of English

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performance objectives. The workshop leader presents specific lesson-planning strategies that integrate all the language skills and produce task-based results. The activities reflect the real-world workplace, involving collaboration, individual accountability, and work with learners at all levels of a business, from the new trainee to the senior executive. The themes and strategies discussed in the workshop can be further developed and applied in a variety of English language teaching contexts, making them extremely useful for today’s global workplace. NELT 0539 $200

Polly Merdinger A | 15 sessions | beg. Apr. 1 | Sat 10 am–1 pm Enrollment limited. Permission required; call 212.229.5372. The class studies the sound system of English, with special attention to characteristics that learners of English as a foreign language often find difficult. Participants learn to develop contextualized pronunciation exercises and incorporate them into an ESL syllabus. 1 CREDIT NELT 3414 $450

ESL Teaching Practicum Linda Pelc A | 13 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm Enrollment limited. Permission required; call 212.229.5372. This course consists of two components: 30 hours of volunteer teaching (cumulatively over the course of the semester) and a weekly seminar class with other student teachers. Students choose a location for their teaching from the many suggested off-site locations throughout the metropolitan area. Prerequisites: Methods of Teaching ESL/EFL, English Grammar for ESL Teachers, and Using Authentic Materials to Teach ESL. 3 CREDITS NELT 3416 $700

X-Word Grammar for Writing Tamara Kirson A | 1 session | Mar. 11 | Sat 10 am–4:45 pm  The strict word order of English can challenge both ESOL students and native speakers, so it is helpful to be able to identify a trunk (subject– predicate) in a sentence. X-word grammar is a foolproof way for students to answer the question: Is it a trunk or a fragment? Once ESOL students know how to identify trunks, they can construct more elaborate sentences by following simple rules to combine trunks and add adverbial information (where, when, why, and how). Students then learn the seven basic sentence patterns, enabling them to add variety, relate ideas, and punctuate their writing in a way that clarifies meaning for their readers. In this workshop, teachers learn how to use X-word grammar to reveal the building blocks of sentences and the four sentence constructions, identify fragments, and construct the seven types of sentences. NELT 0541 $200

Pronunciation: Beyond the Basics Polly Merdinger

Professional Development: One-Day Workshops

Teaching Business English Theresa Breland A | 1 session | Apr. 8 | Sat 10 am–4:45 pm  The key to teaching English for business is content customization. Using a learner-centered approach and a variety of multicultural case studies, this workshop helps teachers develop step-by-step techniques for assessing learners’ needs and helping them meet their job

A | 1 session | Feb. 18 | Sat 10 am-4:45 pm  In this course, you learn pedagogically important pronunciation points beyond the basic ones covered in Teaching the Sound System of English. These include aspects of positional variation such as aspiration, flapping, glottalization, vowel length, light and dark “l,” r-coloring, and palatalization. The emphasis is on how to integrate these pronunciation points into various types of ESL lessons. NELT 0557 $200


Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Race and Ethnicity Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Ethics, Power, and Justice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Philosophy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 116 Gender and Sexuality Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . 118 Arts and Social Engagement . . . . . . . . . . . . 120 Food Studies . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 123

  Short Course  

  Online Course

  

  Noncredit Certificate   Graduate Certificate


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Investigate the complexity of human behavior through a multitheoretical approach. How do we grow, speak, think, dream, and define our sexuality? What are the bounds of “normality” and the types and depths of “abnormality”? How can we achieve inner calm? Our courses help you answer all these questions and more.

 arm Reduction H Psychotherapy Certificate This professional certificate program offers licensed and license-eligible mental health and substance abuse students and practitioners specialized training in the theory and application of harm reduction psychotherapy. Certificate participants gain knowledge and practical skills to enhance their credentials and further their careers in this field. Offered in the Department of Psychology at The New School for Social Research, this program is recognized by the New York State Education Department’s State Board for Social Work as an approved provider of continuing education for licensed social workers #0199. Participants can receive up to 48 continuing education hours. Learn more and get started at newschool.edu/ harmreduction.

Theories of Personality

Abnormal Psychology

Anna Odom

Nicholas Fehertoi

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This course explores the way personality can be understood through a variety of theoretical perspectives, including psychoanalytic, traitbased, biological, behavioral, cognitive, and humanistic approaches. In addition, we examine personality assessment from a variety of approaches. We also examine personality disorders, their diagnosis, and treatment. This course places an emphasis on primary-source material and on the research supporting each perspective. 3 CREDITS

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm Using a multitheoretical model of psychopathology, students explore basic contemporary and historical conceptions of abnormal behavior. They are introduced to the current classification system of mental disorders, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV-TR), and consider its strengths and weaknesses in an increasingly complex field. Psychodynamic, cognitive, humanistic, and sociocultural approaches to major Axis I and Axis II disorders are presented. The class employs critical thinking to examine current controversies over classification,

NPSY 2401 $700


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assessment, and treatment of mental illness. This course was formerly listed as NPSY 3501. Do not take this course if you have previously taken NPSY 3501; it is the same course and cannot be taken twice for credit. 3 CREDITS NPSY 2501 $700

#OpenCampusNetwork

Psychology and Sexuality Instructor to be announced A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 6–7:50 pm This course explores the psychological foundations of sexual development and response patterns in human behavior. A study of sexuality is inherently interdisciplinary, and thus multiple psychological perspectives are used to examine the constructs of sex, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, and sexual identity. We examine both historical and contemporary research on sexuality, including both mainstream and critical frameworks. Given the near absence of sexuality education (a topic explored in this course), we address basic information about sexuality, as well as more advanced topics. 3 CREDITS

NPSY 2601 $700

Developmental Psychology Catherine Mindolovich A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm How do people grow and change through life, from conception to death? This course introduces the field of human developmental psychology. Topics addressed include the characteristics and capacities of the human infant, infant-parent attachment and interaction, cognitive development, control of emotions, social cognition, family and peer relationships, moral development, and aging. We consider both biological and cultural influences and explore controversial issues in the field of lifespan developmental psychology. Students learn about the research methods developmental psychologists use to ask and answer questions about change and stability across the course of an individual's life. 3 CREDITS NPSY 3256 $700

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Language and Thought Shelley Feuer A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm Ordinary mental activities such as recognizing a word, forgetting a phone number, and distinguishing a cup from a glass seem transparently simple. Examined more closely, they are complex and not easily explained. Cognitive psychology is the empirical study of long-standing questions about what we know, how we know it, and how our knowledge is structured, accessed, and used. We start with the psychology of William James, which examines how we experience thought and feeling. With that background, we examine the theory, research, and methods of contemporary cognitive psychology. We consider attention, perception, memory, the structure of knowledge, language, reasoning, problem solving, and cognitive neuroscience. 3 CREDITS NPSY 3425 $700

Psychology of Dreams Patricia Simko A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 10–11:50 am Dreams are our subconscious attempt to reconcile our inner and outer worlds. Dreams are triggered by many needs—to resolve a problem, to gratify a wish, to relive an event, to give expression to suppressed emotions. What all dreams have in common is the depth of their message, for dreams come from the most profound part of the self. In dreaming, we explore that mysterious place; we evolve and become. The class studies the history of dream theory, with a focus on psychoanalytic theories of dream formation and analysis (Freud, Jung, Erikson, Kohut, etc.). We also explore the creative expression of the self through dream interpretation and work together on understanding ourselves and growing through our dreams. 3 CREDITS

NPSY 3444 $700

A History of Psychoanalytic Thought Aleksandra Wagner A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 4–5:50 pm What is termed psychoanalytic thought is considered as a form of thinking that corresponds to the conceptual and institutional development of psychoanalytic—scientific,


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political, and cultural—communities. Most sessions have a historical and geographical focus while highlighting notions such as dissent, the vexed relationship between psychoanalysis and science, intersections of feminism and psychoanalysis, “national” traditions in psychoanalysis, psychoanalysts’ formation, conceptualizations of subjectivity and of psychoanalytic interaction, views psychoanalysts and others have had of psychoanalysis, and modes (genres) of recording and rendering its history. 3 CREDITS

Mindfulness and Meditation

NPSY 3460 $700

WHAT IS AN OPEN CAMPUS? BEYOND THE IVORY TOWER Saturday, December 10, 6:00–7:00 p.m. University Center, UL104, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

We live in an age of near-constant disruption. Innovations in various industries push the creative envelope and advance the social good by offering radically new ways of approaching accepted industry practices. But can such disruption happen within the “ivory tower”? Or do we need to look beyond the traditional campus to find new ways of reaching and serving today’s new and wider audiences? What can traditional education providers learn from nonaccredited academic institutions to help reimagine the learning landscape? Join thinkers at the vanguard of discourse on and practice of education. Panelists explore innovations in learning modalities, discuss advances in education access, and share insights from The New School’s own work to transform the educational experience for learners from a wide range of backgrounds and interests. This event is part of the Nth Degree Series and will be live streamed. RSVP at newschool.edu/open-campus-panel.

Jonathan Kaplan A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 4–5:50 pm Drawn from Buddhist meditation, the practice of mindfulness has found application in therapy and research. This course is designed to familiarize students with this movement in psychology. Students learn about the historical origins of this practice and its overlap with psychology. Particular attention is paid to its incorporation into psychotherapy as well as scientific research. This course involves an experiential component in which students practice mindfulness and meditation themselves. 3 CREDITS NPSY 3646 $700

Psychology of Women and Gender Autumn Winslow A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  How has Western psychology understood the concept of gender? How have conceptualizations of gender changed over time? Over the past 35 years, feminist psychologists have challenged what we study, whom we study, how we study, and what (we think) we know about gender in psychology. Feminist psychology has both informed and been transformed by queer theory, critical race theory, and disability studies. These frameworks are integrated throughout the course. After interrogating the gender binary, we examine the gender stereotypes that support this binary, and the consequences of these stereotypes for cognition, behavior, and affect. Key topics include gender in developmental psychology, sex, and sexualities; objectification theory; medicalization; mental health; gender in the workplace; and gender-based violence. 3 CREDITS NPSY 3841 $700


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Health Psychology

Psychology of Appearance

Gina Turner

Lisa Rubin

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This course provides an overview of the rapidly growing field of health psychology. We examine current research to understand how biological, psychological, and social factors influence health outcomes, with a focus on chronic and life-threatening illnesses (e.g., cancer, AIDS, diabetes, hypertension, and chronic pain conditions). We explore the role of psychologists and psychological research in prevention, early detection, and adaptation to illness. Consideration is given to cultural and gender factors that influence health-related behaviors, access to and utilization of health-related resources, and health outcomes.

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 4–5:50 pm Psychological science demonstrates that appearance matters, influencing our judgments of the character and well-being of others, as well as our sense of self. Nonetheless, “appearance matters” as an integrated field of psychological inquiry is just beginning to take shape. This course provides an overview of key topics in appearance-related research in psychology, including beauty ideals in a diverse society, body image and eating problems, gender and visual media, visible differences related to illness and disability, and other topics. This course highlights key research and theoretical perspectives to explore the social and clinical significance of appearance matters, as informed by feminist, queer, and critical disability theories, as well as social and evolutionary perspectives on the science of beauty and appearance. This course counts toward the Gender Studies minor.

3 CREDITS

NPSY 3843 $700

Psychology of Men Warren Spielberg A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 4–5:50 pm Men grapple with identity, work, fatherhood, and the heroic male ideal. Men and boys lead statistics for violent crimes, suicide, early mortality, school failure, learning disabilities, and a host of psychiatric maladies. This course considers the complexities of male psychology, beginning with the neurobiology of, and psychoanalytic perspectives on, male development through the life cycle. We move on to examine the historical origin of the traditional male role model in Western civilization and contrast it with models in other parts of the world, incorporating more recent feminist critiques. We pay special attention to boyhood in the United States, including issues of sexuality, race, and violence. We conclude by considering various treatment models used in psychotherapy to address the particular psychological problems of men. This course counts toward the Gender Studies minor. 3 CREDITS NPSY 3844 $700

3 CREDITS

NPSY 3846 $700

Treating Victims of Abuse Michele Frank A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 8–9:50 pm This course introduces students to the dynamic and often controversial field of advocacy, intervention, and treatment for abused children, ranging from the reporting of abuse to protective services to therapeutic treatment of child victims and adult survivors. There are lectures and group discussions, and experts describe their professional experiences. Specific topics include the workings of the New York City Administration for Children’s Services, the identification of child abuse and the investigative process, the range of services in foster care, the role of the battered women’s shelter movement, and the realities of working with abused children, their families, adult survivors, and child-abuse offenders. Students and practitioners in social work and related fields can expect a thorough overview of child abuse advocacy, an understanding of how human services agencies currently interact in New York City, and valuable resources for using these agencies. This course counts toward the Gender Studies minor. 3 CREDITS NPSY 3860 $700


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Discuss and debate the ways in which race and ethnicity permeate our society. Gain a better understanding of the way racial and ethnic identities shape you personally, as well as the world around you. Debates in Race and Ethnicity Ricardo Montez A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm Through an interdisciplinary engagement with contemporary literature and scholarship on race and ethnicity, this course considers the following questions: How do race and ethnicity organize the social world? What are the historical conditions under which the various definitions of racial and ethnic difference emerge? What is at stake in the institutional recognition of race and ethnicity, particularly as these categories come to be defined in relation to other nodes of difference such as gender and class? How do individuals use labels of racial and ethnic difference to develop an understanding of the self in relation to the social and political worlds they inhabit? As an introductory course to the curricular area of Race and Ethnicity Studies, this course provides an overview of different areas within this complex field, including Latino studies, African-American studies, Asian-American studies, and whiteness studies. 3 CREDITS NCST 2103 $700

Race, Class, and Education Carla Kelly A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 6–7:50 pm School is among the most powerful institutions in American culture, reproducing deep inequalities of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexuality, and more. Still, narrative accounts reveal that education permits great transformations in the lives of individuals and plays a crucial part in movements for social change. We explore these haunting contradictions from the points of view of parents, teachers, and citizens through the lenses of autobiography and memoir, ethnography, and documentary film. Both global developments and local situations inform our thinking. We consider state-run and private,

market-driven institutions’ reliance on standardized testing and the Internet and their vast social and political influence. Guest educators discuss public schools, elite private schools, and nontraditional teaching settings, such as prisons and critical pedagogy projects, that build on youth culture. Students are encouraged to engage with diverse communities in New York City and individuals whose backgrounds differ from their own as they analyze their own educational autobiographies. 3 CREDITS NHUM 2010 $700

Harlem Renaissance Tracyann Williams A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm This course offers an in-depth exploration of the pivotal period in African-American social and cultural history known as the Harlem Renaissance. Following the Great Migration— the influx of southern Blacks into northern cities in the early 20th century—African-Americans in New York City produced a body of work remarkable for its breadth and the complexity of its themes. We explore the work of artists and intellectuals of the era and contextualize this self-conscious movement in relation to other social, cultural, and historical phenomena that define modern times. We examine the tension between the desire for free artistic expression and the urgency of sociopolitical change—the critical issue for the movement’s participants. Finally, we consider the movement’s overarching focus on race in relation to emerging issues of sexuality, gender, class, generation, and nationality. Note: This course is offered at the foundational level to promote the development of key reading, writing, and critical thinking skills. This course counts toward the Gender Studies minor. 3 CREDITS NLIT 2386 $700


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What is popular is not always what is right. Our courses take an interdisciplinary approach to examining who has power, what justice means and who defines it, and whether we can maintain an ethical society in the face of present-day social conditions. Anthropology of Home Rachel Heiman A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 4–5:50 pm When we think of home, we typically think of spaces, sentiments, and relationships that are deeply personal, familiar, and familial. Yet these seemingly private spaces are also key sites through which we become national subjects and cultural citizens with specific gendered, classed, and culturally infused desires. How might we understand the relationship between domestic design, national anxieties, and intimate lives? This course provides students with an introduction to the anthropology of home and explores sites that include living rooms in Hungary, dining rooms in Egypt, cramped quarters in Algeria, service entrances in Rio, and dens in New Jersey. Our readings examine topics that range from how kitchens and drawing rooms in Punjab have replaced national spaces of personal transformation to the ways love and marriage in China have been recast amid the rise of home ownership. Final projects enable students to write about an aspect of home of their own choosing. 3 CREDITS NANT 3423 $700

Identity and Social Theory Aleksandra Wagner A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm Social theory, both classical and contemporary, has always wrestled with the issue of identity, seeking to interpret and explain the social processes and political struggles by means of which individual and collective identities are constructed. Since the dawn of modernity, human identity—who we are as individual and collective beings—has not been viewed as a fixed,

stable, or ascribed position. We begin with a discussion of self-identity in late modernity and then explore three theoretical frameworks within which identity is examined as a social and cultural construction. We analyze the conceptualizations of class and status in classical social theory; we discuss theories of collective action that elaborate on the production of collective identities within different social movements; and we examine feminist thought as it addresses the categories of women and gender and the complexities of identity politics. This course counts toward the Gender Studies minor. 3 CREDITS

NSOC 3502 $700

Did you know? In 1948, W.E.B. DuBois taught the first course in African-American history and culture ever offered at a university. And it all happened right here at The New School.

Anthropological Perspectives: Language and Gender Gretchen Pfeil A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 6–7:50 pm In 2015, the American Dialect Society named singular they the word of the year. Even after receiving this honor, singular they—the pronoun they used to refer to an individual person of undisclosed or non-binary gender identity—has generated quite a bit of controversy in the English-speaking world. In France as well, the possibility of introducing a gender-neutral pronoun has elicited anxieties about language, gender, and their relationship. In this class, we


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investigate the ways in which language and gender intersect and shape each other, a relationship that reveals hidden sides of each. From the popular book Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus to discussions of the development of Japanese “women’s language,” from the use of “dude” and “fag” by American high school boys to West African women’s use of Qur’anic Arabic, we consider what gender means when observed through language use, and what language use might mean in terms of gender.

Childhood in Crisis

3 CREDITS

NANT 3623 $700

DAY OF LEARNING AND OPEN CAMPUS EXPO Saturday, December 10, 2016, 12:00–4:00 p.m. University Center, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

Can one day of learning spark a lifetime of discovery? From its founding in 1919, The New School has known that providing access to innovative approaches to education can serve as the engine of groundbreaking social, personal, and professional change. On December 10, experience The New School’s unparalleled approach to learning with Open Campus, offering continuing education courses and programs for adults, youth, and teens. All afternoon, take advantage of FREE pop-up classes, open studios, campus tours, activities, course advising, and info sessions, followed by an evening panel discussion on education access as a force for social change. RSVP and find the full schedule of events at newschool.edu/day-of-learning.

Victoria Malkin A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 4–5:50 pm What is childhood? What does it mean to be a child? How much are these ideas a reflection of adult anxieties and desires? In this class, childhood is approached as an object of ethnographic study. We consider the ways in which different discourses and practices create specific types of childhoods. Exploring the stories we tell about childhood and comparing the lived experience of children as active agents across sociocultural and historical contexts enable us to think critically about this stage. The class also explores how transnational and global forces draw children into different practices. What can we say about children as victims, social actors, and contributors to their world? Through classic texts such as Jean Briggs’ Inuit Morality Play: The Emotional Education of a Three-Year-Old and Margaret Mead’s classic Growing Up in New Guinea: A Comparative Study of Primitive Education, anthropology provides us with rich descriptions of children in their sociocultural worlds. More contemporary ethnographies explore how children are taught their “place in the world” and how their bodies are policed and disciplined. Among the issues we explore are race, class, and gender; normative expectations; and the ways in which children are policed and punished. We consider writings about child soldiers, child migrants, and child sex workers as growing transnational phenomena. We also examine the way our prevailing ideologies influence well-meaning interventions that are developed to address children’s needs but that can fail in the context of communities with radically different ideas around these needs and roles. 3 CREDITS NANT 3636 $700

Incarceration Claire Potter A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 4–5:50 pm In the late 20th century, changes in criminal sentencing in the United States resulted in heightened levels of judicial confinement, a phenomenon sometimes known as mass incarceration. Using an interdisciplinary humanities approach, this course asks: What is the purpose of incarceration? What have its goals been across time, cultures, and states? Are prisons similar in their purpose to other “total institutions,” such as concentration camps, black


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sites, penal colonies, asylums, treatment centers, juvenile homes, stockades, boarding schools, ghettoes, and workhouses? In addition to serving as a means of punishment, incarceration has been a vehicle for collecting debts, conveying shame, forcing contemplation, articulating reforms, extracting information, protecting people from self-harm, assembling a labor force, and restraining dissenters. Sites of incarceration can also be sites of protest and ethical connection. Calls to greatly reduce or abolish incarceration in the United States often do not address these many purposes, and are often not specific about what a post-incarceration society, or incarceration that did not rely on violence, would look like. When we examine incarceration outside of a U.S. context, do other purposes reveal themselves that can illuminate the American experience? 3 CREDITS

WHAT IS AN OPEN CAMPUS? BEYOND THE IVORY TOWER

NHIS 2420 $700

the learning landscape?

The Right to Private Judgment Gina Walker A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 4–5:50 pm The Protestant demand for the right to private judgment placed responsibility on individual Christians to interpret the scriptures according to their own reason. Recent scholarship reveals that heterodox understandings produced by such private interpretations were a pivotal force in the emergence of the freedom to dissent as a value of civil society. This course considers the tangled evolution of the concept of the right of private judgment, from Martin Luther’s defiance of pope and emperor to the development of the modern understanding of the right of political dissent, through three historical case studies: 1) the religious wars between Catholics and Huguenots (Protestants) in 16th-century France, the consequent invention of the virtual Republic of Letters, and the effect of Huguenot skepticism on early modern liberal thought; 2) the English civil war in the next century and the role of religious intolerance in the regicide and abolition of the monarchy and uneasy alternations between anarchy and order; and 3) the grassroots struggles of 18th-century British rational dissenters to cast off second-class citizenship, which led to radical reinterpretations of patriotism (many supported the American colonists’ fight for independence), abolition of the slave trade, expansion of the franchise to workingclass men, and even some attention to the wrongs of women. 3 CREDITS NHIS 3861 $700

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Saturday, December 10, 6:00–7:00 p.m. University Center, UL104, 63 Fifth Avenue, New York City

We live in an age of near-constant disruption. Innovations in various industries push the creative envelope and advance the social good by offering radically new ways of approaching accepted industry practices. But can such disruption happen within the “ivory tower”? Or do we need to look beyond the traditional campus to find new ways of reaching and serving today’s new and wider audiences? What can traditional education providers learn from nonaccredited academic institutions to help reimagine

Join thinkers at the vanguard of discourse on and practice of education. Panelists explore innovations in learning modalities, discuss advances in education access, and share insights from The New School’s own work to transform the educational experience for learners from a wide range of backgrounds and interests. This event is part of the Nth Degree Series and will be live streamed. RSVP at newschool.edu/open-campus-panel.


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Our classes offer bold ways to better the world through critical inquiry, engagement, and expression. By examining multiple methods used in philosophy, you and your classmates can debate and study with both scholarly rigor and intellectual freedom. Introduction to Philosophy I Timothy Quigley A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  This course surveys the history of Western philosophy from Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle to the beginnings of modern philosophy in the work of Descartes. Students are introduced to the classic philosophical questions: What is truth? Beauty? Justice? What are the essential components of a good life? What are the proper roles of reason and the passions? While examining these questions, we also consider the nature of philosophy as a practice and how philosophical exercises and reflection take the philosopher beyond purely theoretical concerns. Students interested in thinking critically about reality, knowledge, mind and body, desire, and values will benefit from this class, a fundamental course for anyone interested in self-reflection and understanding the world. This course was formerly listed as NPHI 3100. If you have previously taken that course, do not take NPHI 2100; it is the same course and cannot be taken twice for credit. 3 CREDITS NPHI 2100 $700

Modern Political Philosophy Karsten Struhl A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm This course is an introduction to theories that have shaped thinking about power, authority, and justice in modern liberal societies. We examine the meanings and moral foundations of rights; the idea of a social contract; state sovereignty and individual autonomy; competing conceptions of human nature; the role of reason, nature, and natural law in politics; the concepts of justice, liberty, equality, and democracy; and the emerging tensions between the nation-state and the forces of globalization. Students critically

analyze primary texts by Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Kant, Mill, and selected contemporary theorists. The relevance of these thinkers and their theories to contemporary social and political issues is a theme throughout the course. 3 CREDITS NPHI 2125 $700

Critical Thinking Kelly Gawal A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  In this course, we study and apply the principles and methods that distinguish good reasoning from poor reasoning. Working with this tool kit of techniques for evaluating arguments, we examine the logic that shapes contemporary debates about politics, media, art, and science. As a complement to this practical exercise, we also reflect on the psychological structures that make critical thinking an essential aspect of constructive civic engagement and human well-being in general. 3 CREDITS NPHI 2610 $700

Philosophical Skepticism Luis Guzman A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm Skeptical thinking has always existed as a counterpoint to the search for knowledge in philosophy. Beginning with Pyrrho in the fourth century CE, each historical period has had figures who doubt or outright negate the possibility of humans’ grasping the way the world is. Both Descartes and Kant, towering figures of modern philosophy, generated their philosophical reflections in response to skepticism. However, this means that a skeptical attitude is parasitic on the particular view of knowledge held. Thus, if the criterion for knowledge is no longer absolute certainty or universal necessity but is rather one


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based on common sense and probability, then skepticism might be robbed of its thrust. In this course, we trace the history of skepticism from classical Greece through modernity and end with contemporary thinkers. The guiding thread is the relevance of skepticism, and its loss, throughout the history of philosophy. We read texts from the following philosophers and others: Sextus Empiricus, Descartes, Montaigne, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Quine, Davidson, and Goodman. 3 CREDITS NPHI 3264 $700

International Law in the Age of Terror Glynn Torres-Spelliscy A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  The conclusion of World War II led to a new era in international relations, one purportedly based on international law and human rights. In practice, however, states frequently ignore international legal requirements when the laws impede the pursuit of their own national interests. Since the catastrophic attacks on September 11, 2001, the United States has responded to security threats with policies and practices in its declared Global War on Terrorism that have challenged fundamental legal understandings. These policies have not so much disregarded international law as redefined it. This course focuses on the complex legal and domestic constitutional issues posed by the U.S. government’s words and actions. Topics covered range from domestic issues, such as the USA Patriot Act, warrantless wiretapping, and indefinite detention, to international legal issues, such as the doctrine of preemption, the practice of “extraordinary rendition,” and the treatment of detainees in U.S. custody and control. Policies of the Bush and Obama administrations are compared and contrasted with respect to effects on the international legal order. 3 CREDITS NPOL 3571 $700

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Supreme Court Controversies Erica Eisinger A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 4–5:50 pm Can the U.S. Congress limit what corporations or labor unions spend to influence congressional and presidential elections? Can the U.S. Supreme Court halt a state’s recount of the votes in a presidential election? Can the U.S. attorney general limit a doctor’s right to prescribe a medicine that is sometimes prescribed to assist a suicide in a state where assisted suicide is legal? Can a police officer search a home without a warrant if one of the occupants gives permission but another denies it? Can the government withhold all federal funding from a school that refuses to permit the military to recruit on campus because of its policy on homosexuality? We consider these issues, examining recent Supreme Court cases and the legal and political reasoning underlying individual justices' decisions. 3 CREDITS NPOL 3635 $700

ONLINE LEARNING Each semester, The New School brings you classes that fit your life as well as they fit your screen—be it mobile, desktop, tablet, or watch. Look for the computer icon to find all of our online classes. Find out about online learning at The New School at opencampus.newschool.edu/ program/online-learning.


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Approach gender and sexuality from a range of disciplinary perspectives. We design our courses to foster intellectual collaboration on the study of gender and sexuality between you, your fellow students, and faculty representing a variety of disciplines. You will be able to recognize and respond to questions like: What is gender? How is sexuality culturally constructed? How do attitudes toward gender affect individual experience, artistic production, and modes of social organization? What does social justice look like in a gendered (or post-gendered) world?

Gender and Sexuality  Studies Certificate Whether you’re exploring graduate school opportunities or furthering your career, the Gender and Sexuality Studies Certificate offers a path to advancement. Students who earn the certificate go on to careers in academia, the arts, design, fashion, public policy, government, NGOs, nonprofit management, and clinical psychology or pursue advanced study. The program prepares its students to recognize and respond to gender-based questions such as: What is gender? How is sexuality culturally constructed? How do attitudes toward gender affect individual experience, artifact design, artistic production, and modes of social organization? Learn more and get started at newschool.edu/ gsscertificate.


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Introduction to Performance Studies

Looking: Disability and Representation

Ricardo Montez

Paula Stuttman

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 6–7:50 pm This course offers an overview of the interdisciplinary field of performance studies as it has developed from the 1960s to the present, paying close attention to gender, sexuality, the construction of racial identity, and the politics of taste. Often inspired by the performing arts, performance studies emphasizes critical approaches to the study of individuals as actors in society. It provides a valuable set of questions for thinking about everyday life, language, and culture as performance practice. Questions that we bring to our work include: How do we perform our identities? How do different performances illuminate the way the world functions? How do the continually shifting scripts that guide our behavior give us insight into the nature of power and the way it plays out in public? This course emphasizes critical approaches rather than the practical study of traditional drama and theater. Given the various types of media we examine— including film, visual art, and music—the course is useful to students wishing to employ a performance studies approach in the social sciences, to artists, and to those who wish to consider the social and political effects of art and media.

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 8–9:50 pm How do we define disability? How do we represent disability? This class explores representations of disability through an interdisciplinary platform that includes the visual arts, theater, film, literature, popular culture, and the law. Works under discussion include The Naked Kiss, a 1964 film in which a former prostitute starts a new life that includes nursing (and singing to) disabled children in the local hospital; choreographer Jérôme Bel’s Disabled Theater (2012), a collaboration with Zurich’s Theater Hora, a professional theater company made up of actors with disabilities; and Marc Quinn’s white marble sculptures (1999–2008) depicting individuals with physical disabilities. Questions the class considers include: How have representations of disability changed over time? How do they affect our understanding of disability? What stereotypes exist? Students are introduced to the Disability Rights Movement and disability rights laws in the United States. The final assignment is a collaborative curatorial project examining the concept of disability. This class is a seminar. Participation is required. This course counts toward the Gender Studies minor. 3 CREDITS

3 CREDITS

NARH 3720 $700

NHUM 2035 $700


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Trace the arts’ influence on our society throughout history to the present day. Discover how we responded to certain movements and what those responses indicate about our society. Participate in serious inquiry into the arts from a global perspective and gain better insight into the ideas that shape expression around us. Find more courses on fine arts on page 39 and on music on page 126.

Whose Heritage?

End of Art

Jennifer Scott

Timothy Quigley

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  What does “culture” mean to those who produce it and those who consume it as tourists? Can sites, objects, and their histories simultaneously belong to a local community, a nation, and all humanity? How do culture-specific museums operate in a global context? How do mainstream museums address diversity? This course is an examination of the phenomenon of cultural heritage from an anthropological perspective, pairing specific cultural sites with questions central to anthropology. We begin with sites in New York City, including the American Museum of Natural History, the National Museum of the American Indian, Ellis Island, the Museum of Chinese in the Americas, The Metropolitan Museum of Art, and Weeksville Heritage Center. We then consider the meaning of “world heritage” and “universal value” as defined by UNESCO and focus on some of its World Heritage sites, including Chichen-Itza in Mexico, Angkor in Cambodia, Ghana’s El Mina Slave Fort, and pharaonic and Islamic monuments in Egypt. Through our case studies, we link the local to the global, exploring the role of public memory; the representation of racial, ethnic, religious, and sexual identities; the role of archaeology in constructing national identities; indigenous ownership of material culture; performance theory in historical re-enactment; and symbolism and iconography in site marking and the marking of tragic histories, such as slavery and wars.

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  In 1984, the American philosopher Arthur Danto declared that art and its history had come to an end. Others jumped on the bandwagon, proclaiming the death of modernism, narrative, and even history itself. In the wake of the unprecedented period of artistic production and criticism in the United States after World War II, which included abstract expressionism; pop art; the critical writings of Clement Greenberg, Rosalind Krauss, and Michael Fried; and the "postmodern" critiques of the late 1960s and 1970s, there seemed to be no guiding principles. From now on, Danto claimed, anything could be a work of art. In this course, we critically examine postwar visual culture with particular emphasis on the transition from “late modern” to contemporary art. Through careful study of the artists, philosophers, and critics whose work has shaped the present discourse, we assess the meaning and implications of Danto’s thesis and consider the prospects for constructing radically new ways of understanding and experiencing visual culture after “the end of art.” 3 CREDITS

3 CREDITS

NANT 3633 $700

NARH 2550 $700


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The Art of Viewing Art

Museum Studies: An Introduction

John Zinsser

Agnes Szanyi

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 1-2:50 pm Learn to use the city's galleries and museums as your classroom. Each week, students visit a different exhibition. Course lectures illuminate the exhibitions in historical context and from a broader cultural perspective. Guest speakers include artists, gallery owners, curators, and art critics. We view a mix of contemporary and historical shows and compare the artworks we have seen. The New York art world offers eye-opening experiences for those who know how and where to look. This course is for noncredit students only; credit students must register for NARH 3010.

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm Museums have always been contested sites of representation: Who decides what artifacts are collected and displayed, whose story is represented, how is it represented, who has access to the museum? What a society values enough to collect, how these artifacts are interpreted and displayed, and how access to the museum is granted or denied reflect and in turn construct collective identity and memory. This course will critically discuss the history and role of museums; questions of collecting, representation, architecture, and display; issues in museum education and access; and different types of public and private funding. 3 CREDITS

NARH 0010 $650

NARH 2102 $700

Architecture as Intervention Margarita Gutman A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 6–7:50 pm Architecture, a complex product of many different times and cultures, has a powerful impact on people’s behaviors, feelings, activities, and well-being, both for individuals and for society. Physical space is an important part of the social, economic, cultural, and political life of societies. Its design and materialization are a major interven­ tion that can modify for better or worse the life of families, neighborhoods, cities, and even nations. This course explores architecture as intervention in a selection of contemporary and historical societies and its impact on culture, politics, environment, urban context, inequality, and economy. It also explores the processes of design and materialization of architecture through selected cases taken from Europe, Latin America, and East Asia. Students actively explore expressions of architecture on different scales—as a building, a street, a neighborhood, a building complex (such as Rockefeller Center, Lincoln Center, Grand Central Station, and the High Line)—and also learn to understand architecture through representation. 3 CREDITS NARH 3832 $700

#OpenCampusNetwork

12 Contemporary Artists Paula Stuttman A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm This course offers students the opportunity to investigate current practices in the visual arts by exploring the work of 12 contemporary artists. By limiting our focus to 12 artists, we develop a better understanding of the diverse ideas that shape the contemporary art world. The selected artists explore challenging subjects including the representation of trauma, war, and history (Walid Raad, Regina José Galindo, Kara Walker), the art market (Jeff Koons), humor (Peter Fischli and David Weiss), and site-specific installation (Thomas Hirschhorn). They work in a variety of media, including painting (Kerry James Marshall, Vija Celmins) performance (Yoko Ono, Marina Abramović) and sculpture (Adrian Piper). Through the work of these 12 artists, we gain an understanding of contemporary art and the way meaning is shaped by an active engagement with the world. This course is a combination of lecture and discussion. Participation is required. 3 CREDITS

NARH 3745 $700


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Did You Know?

Music and War in the 20th Century

You can take courses for credit today and may be able to apply them toward a degree later. *Additional fees apply. See page 128 for details. Each student’s situation is unique. Consult with your advisor.

Simplicity in Music Sonya Mason A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15   Returning to simplicity is a practice that people gravitate to when life begins to feel too cluttered with artificialities and meaningless muddle or when outside forces, such as hard economic times or a catastrophic event, cause them to reevaluate their own priorities and happiness. Music has long followed a pattern of returning to simplicity after periods of increased complexity. Composers, artists, and performers purge, renew, and re-grow, which inevitably results in increased complexity, which eventually begins the entire cycle again. Often this cycle is a natural progression that comes from the exhaustion of ideas, but sometimes the natural flow of things is interrupted purposely by artists who feel disconnected; music is no longer reflecting the way of the world, from their perspective, or no longer gives them meaning. In this course, we study six periods in music when artists dramatically shifted their style and sought out simplicity. We begin with the emergence of opera in 1600, then move through Russian nationalism in the late 19th century, minimalism in the late 1960s, punk in the 1970s, jazz in the 1980s, and hip-hop in the 2000s. We ask whether some of these massive shifts in the history of music were mirrored in our own need to de-clutter, whether the results were sustainable and influential, and whether the audience was somehow elevated by the philosophy behind the changes. This is the search for simplicity in music. 3 CREDITS NMUS 3424 $700

William Gustafson A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 4–5:50 pm The 20th century has been shaped by war, a cataclysmic event that has influenced every aspect of life and culture, including music. This course examines how World War I, World War II, and the war in Vietnam influenced both classical and popular music and led to some of the great antiwar works of our time. We look at the importance of jazz in France following World War I (Harlem in Montmartre), due to the influx of African-American musicians into France; works composed in Nazi prison camps (including Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time and Viktor Ullmann’s opera The Emperor of Atlantis); popular songs of World War II; antiwar works such as Benjamin Britten’s War Requiem; and works written in reaction to the U.S. intervention in Vietnam, including George Crumb’s Black Angels, Pete Seeger’s “Waste Deep in the Big Muddy,” Jimi Hendrix’s “Star Spangled Banner,” Joan Baez’s “Saigon Bride,” and Stevie Wonder’s “Front Line.” This class examines the way composers channeled emotions arising from the despair and horrors of war to create unique, powerful works. 3 CREDITS NMUS 2240 $700


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Explore the connections between food, culture, social policy, and the environment. You can investigate subjects like food-growing practices, food marketing, and global food security and public health issues like obesity and malnutrition. Drawing on a number of disciplines, these courses prepare you to implement positive changes in food systems by engaging with processes of production, distribution, consumption, and regulation. Introduction to Food Studies Megan Elias A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6–7:50 pm In this course, we explore the connections between food, culture, and society, looking at the role of food in the construction of personal and collective identity in terms of body, race and ethnicity, class, gender, nationality, and social movements. We also examine cultural aspects of food politics, paying particular attention to the United States but also considering globalization and international flows of people, goods, ideas, and technologies. The course introduces analytical approaches and methods that are widely used in the growing research field of food studies. This course counts toward the Gender Studies minor. 3 CREDITS NFDS 2050 $700

Contemporary Food Controversies Andrew Smith A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 6–7:50 pm Everybody eats. Yet few understand the importance of food in our lives and the decisions we make each time we eat. This class will provide an overview of the industrialization of the U.S. food system, probe problems created by the industrial food system, and examine alternatives. Is organic food better for us, or is it just a fad of the elite? Are genetically engineered products “frankenfoods,” or are they the key to feeding the planet? Does globalization destroy local culinary traditions or foster diversity? Can locally produced artisanal food ever replace industrial food in the world’s most heavily populated urban centers? What do we really know about the

relationship between nutrition and health? This course addresses political, economic, historical, social, and cultural dimensions of food. Guest speakers enliven our discussions of these fascinating topics. 3 CREDITS NFDS 2001 $700

American Culinary History Andrew Smith A | 15 sessions (on campus and online) Jan. 25–Mar. 1 | W 6–7:50 pm Mar. 8–Mar. 29  Apr. 5–12 | W 6–7:50 pm Apr. 19–May 10 

What does the Erie Canal have to do with Wonder Bread? Which American war gave us condensed soup? Why did American farmers turn away from organic farming in the first place? This course examines the historical, cultural, social, technological, and economic events that have influenced what Americans eat today. It is an action-packed history of home economists and fancy restaurateurs, family farmers and corporate giants, street vendors and captains of industry, mom-and-pop grocers and massive food conglomerates, burger barons and vegetarians, the hungry and the affluent, hard-hitting advertisers and health food advocates. All these players have shaped the contentious American foodscape of the 21st century. 3 CREDITS NFDS 2101 $700


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The Sweet and the Bitter

Food and Media

Michael Krondl

Stefani Bardin

A | 5 sessions | beg. Feb. 1 | W 6–7:50 pm  While the liking for sweetness is undoubtedly evolutionary in origin, desserts and candies are purely cultural phenomena. This course examines the interplay of food, culture, and society from multiple perspectives, including religion and ritual, class and gender, the connection between elite tastes and global supply chains dependent on slavery, confectionery as art and as an industrial commodity, and the effects of a high-sugar diet on Americans’ taste and health.

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 4–5:50 pm Food is at the center of frequent and significant interactions, as it occupies an increasingly visible role in today’s world. This course examines how food representations establish, question, reinforce, reproduce, or destroy cultural and social assumptions about individuals and communities. Students examine and critically analyze advertising materials, TV shows, films, cookbooks, social media, magazines, blogs, and videos, among other media, to identify elements and themes connected with eating and ingestion that shape popular culture and its impact on contemporary social and political debates.

1 CREDIT

NFDS 2120 $300

3 CREDITS

Study Green The New School University Center is one of the greenest buildings in the United States—and it’s the largest LEED Gold Certified urban university building in the country.

Restaurant Ownership David Friedman A | 15 sessions (on campus and online) | beg. Jan. 27 | F 2–3:50 pm  

Learn what it takes to be in the driver’s seat of your own restaurant. This short course is a behind-the-scenes look at the nuts and bolts of running a profitable restaurant, focusing on the choices that can make a restaurant great. We review the most important aspects of launching a start-up: having a solid business plan; raising capital; meeting legal requirements; and deciding whether to buy or build. From there we go on to discuss marketing, staffing, training, food and beverage costing, food storage and sanitation, and the essential financial tools. Finally we touch on the latest trends in social network marketing and farm-to-table cuisine and how they are changing restaurant operations everywhere. This class takes place partly on-site and partly online. The dates for the on-site meetings are January 27, February 17, March 17, April 14, and May 5. 3 CREDITS NFDS 2300 $700

NFDS 2615 $700

NYC Eats: Food, People, Places Cathy Kaufman A | 10 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 6–7:50 pm In this course, we examine the history of food in New York City, from its place in the city’s early colonization to contemporary restaurant culture. We explore issues of class, ethnicity, immigration, labor, technology, and culture, with a special focus on New York’s culinary pioneers, from the Delmonico brothers to David Chang. 2 CREDITS NFDS 2906 $500

Cultural History of Nutrition Fa-Tai Shieh A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  In this course, the science of nutrition is explored as a cultural and historical phenomenon. Students learn how ideas about food, health, and body image and fears and disgust vary in different times and places, beginning with the ancient world and continuing through the 20th century. This class examines how the concept of nutrition itself has changed over time and how those changes have affected what societies and individuals think is fit to eat. Readings include work by Michael Pollan, Rachel Laudan, Jared Diamond, and Michel Foucault. 3 CREDITS NFDS 3110 $700


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Alternative Food Networks

The Science of Food

Bradley Christensen

Ann Yonetani

A | 15 weeks | Jan. 23–May 15  In recent decades, alternative practices of food production and consumption have emerged in response to concerns about the environmental and social impact of the global industrial food system. Farmer’s markets, community-supported agriculture, food co-ops, and urban farms are examples of alternative food networks, which are place-based, socially embedded, and intended to change the way we grow, know, and get our food. In this class, we examine the history of these and other alternative food enterprises. Using critical theory, we evaluate the promise and limitations of alternative food networks as a means of creating more sustainable and just food systems. Readings are drawn from the fields of economic geography, rural sociology, community psychology, critical theory, and public health. Case studies from the popular press serve as a basis for class discussions about the practices brought together under the umbrella of alternative food networks. 3 CREDITS

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 4–5:50 pm This course is for food lovers who want to learn about the biology and chemistry that turn our daily meals into more than simple sustenance. We begin by studying the chemistry of food, including basic principles of food metabolism, food pathogens, food preservation, and the chemistry of cooking. We then explore the biology of taste and smell, the role played by genetics in producing distinct food experiences for different people, and the possible link between these sensations and memory in the brain. Finally, we examine the sources of food in our society: global versus local or seasonal foods, industrial versus organic farming, and traditionally cultivated versus genetically modified crops. We consider the effects of these choices on farmers, the environment, food, taste, and nutrition. 3 CREDITS NFDS 3700 $700

NFDS 3203 $700

Food, Global Trade, and Development

Eating Identities

Fabio Parasecoli

Ashna Ali A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 26 | Th 8–9:50 pm This course explores how gender and race are experienced and expressed through food. It starts from the premise that food is at once political and quotidian, and that is what gives it power. Far from being an uncomplicated activity, preparing and consuming food becomes a forum for the performance, reproduction, negotiation, manipulation, and at times rejection of racial and gendered identities. Readings and discussions address how appetites are marked by gender and race, how cooking has served as a medium of female oppression and empowerment, how soul food evolved as a productive and problematic symbol of blackness, and how identities change through distance and difference. Topics include home cooking, ethnic restaurants, norms of taste and pleasure, ideal bodily images, migration and diaspora, and the shifting position of women and racial minorities within the food system today. 3 CREDITS

NFDS 3401 $700

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 23 | M 4–5:50 pm Food security is a basic human right and an urgent priority in countries rich and poor, but the causes of food insecurity and means to address it are the subject of intense controversy. Multiple discourses shape debates in areas ranging from food sovereignty to sustainable food systems to the new Green Revolution. We examine a number of controversial questions: How can geographical indications be used to enhance opportunities for trade? Did speculation cause the recent price hikes in world food markets? From a cultural and ethical perspective, is the global intrinsically bad and the local intrinsically good? How do global value chains help or undermine local food systems? Drawing on food studies and development economics, this course is an exploration of key policy approaches and challenges around food security in the context of rapidly evolving global food systems. This is a graduate-level course that is also appropriate for undergraduates. 3 CREDITS NFDS 4260 $700


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Play or sing in one of our large performing ensembles. You’ll join a community of like-minded musicians, with a range of abilities and levels of experience. Community Orchestra

New School Chorus

Conductor varies

Nathan Kochi

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 25 | W 7:30–10 pm Open to all community members, faculty, staff, and students at Mannes and the other colleges of The New School, the Community Orchestra is a performance-based ensemble with openings for all orchestral instruments. Rehearsals are held in The New School’s Tishman Auditorium. 1 CREDIT

A | 15 sessions | beg. Jan. 24 | T 6:45–8:30 pm The New School Chorus is an exciting ensemble open to members from the entire New School and greater New York City community. The chorus fosters joyful communal singing and offers participants a chance to explore a range of music and singing styles from around the world—everything from Western choral masterpieces to eastern European folk singing, classic American jazz and popular song to traditional music. In rehearsals, members perform both written works and music learned by ear using a fun and educational approach to exploring the sonic possibilities of the human voice. 1 CREDIT

CAPR 1050 $20

CAPR 1051 $20


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Online •• Visit opencampus.newschool.edu/ courses to get started. •• Filter by Spring 2017 Term, and further refine results based on what matters most to you—subject, school, meeting time­—the choice is yours! •• Decide whether to register as a noncredit, credit, or certificate student. Most students take courses on a noncredit basis (the cheapest option; no grade or academic record is kept). However, please bear in mind that if you register as a noncredit student, it’s not possible to apply credits retroactively if you decide you’d like to use them down the road. If you think there’s a chance you might like to transfer credit for a course toward a degree or credential at a later date, we strongly encourage you to take your course for credit. •• Browse courses and click “Enroll” to proceed to the registration portal. •• Pay by MasterCard, Visa, American Express, or Discover. Immediately after registering for your course, you will receive an email confirming your registration. •• Check out.

Over the Phone

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Additional Payment and Registration Options •• In person at 72 Fifth Avenue, 2nd floor Regular hours: Monday–Thursday, 10 am–5:45 pm; Friday, 10 am–4:45 pm Extended hours: January 17–January 20: Tuesday–Thursday, 9 am–5:45 pm; Friday, 9 am–4:45 pm January 23–February 10: Monday-Thursday, 9 am–6 pm; Friday, 9 am–4:45 pm •• By fax to 212.229.5648. Use printable registration form found here: newschool.edu/registrar/forms. •• Pay by MasterCard, Visa, American Express, or Discover; by personal check or money order payable to The New School; or with cash. For questions regarding registration, email reghelp@newschool.edu. More questions about a class? Email opencampus@newschool.edu.

Tuition and Fees NONCREDIT Tuition: Noncredit tuition reflected throughout the catalog, plus $7 registration fee

Before Registering

Materials fee: Stated in course description if applicable

•• Select a course.

Registration fee: $7 per term

•• Note the course number and section (for example, NLIT 1000 section A).

CREDIT

•• Prepare payment. Full payment is due at the time of registration. •• Call 212.229.5690 (noncredit only). Hours: Monday–Friday, 9:00 am–6:00 pm. Pay by MasterCard, Visa, American Express, or Discover.

Tuition: NSPE: $1,190 (per credit); Parsons: $1,490 (per credit) Fees listed in the catalog are for noncredit registration. If you elect to take a course for credit, tuition of $1,190 and $1,490 for Schools of Public Engagement and Parsons courses, respectively, will be assessed per credit in addition to any applicable fees.

Materials fee: Stated in course description if applicable Registration fee: $80 per term CERTIFICATE Tuition: The noncredit tuition Materials fee: Stated in course description if applicable Registration fee: $80 per term Tuition and fees are payable in full at the time of registration. Payment can be made by bank debit card or cash (in person only for both), personal check, credit card (MasterCard, Visa, Discover, American Express), or wire transfer. Please make checks payable to The New School and include the student’s name and (if assigned) New School ID number in the memo section. Registration is not complete until payment or payment arrangements, such as verification of employer reimbursement, have been made. Confirmation is the statement/schedule received at the cashier (mailed to students who register online or by fax or telephone). Verify the accuracy of your class schedule: You are not registered for and will not earn credit for any course that does not appear on your class schedule. You are responsible for all courses and charges that appear on the statement/ schedule. Register early. The class you want might fill or be canceled because of insufficient registration. Deadlines: Online, telephone, and fax registrations must be submitted three business days before the class starts. If you miss these deadlines, you can still register in person.


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CERTIFICATE PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS All courses required for the certificate must be completed within two years. A grade of “AP” must be earned in all required courses. Students must petition for the certificate no later than one semester following completion of their final course. Electives: All of the certificate programs have an elective requirement. Parsons courses meeting for nine or more sessions on-campus or online meet the requirement for an individual elective. Courses meeting for fewer than nine sessions count as half of an elective and would need to be combined to fulfill one elective requirement. With the exception of Color Theory, courses that are covered in the Basic Core course cannot be taken as an elective. Note for Schools of Public Engagement students: Credit registration for nine or more credits requires prior approval and must be completed in person. Schedule an advising appointment with Academic Services by calling 212.229.5615 or emailing academicservices@newschool.edu.

Services, 72 Fifth Avenue, lower level. The hours are Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday, 9:00 am–5:30 pm; and Wednesday, 9:00 am–6:00 pm. There is a fee to replace a lost or stolen card. If you withdraw from your courses, The New School may terminate your student privileges, including access to university buildings and resources.

Find Your Class Location •• Online at newschool.edu/registrar: Click on Schedule of Classes/Location at the lower right-hand corner of the page. Room assignments can change, so check as close to your class start time as possible. •• In person on the day the class starts: Room assignments are posted on the lobby screens in all classroom buildings. Some courses meet at off-site locations, as indicated in the course description. If your course is online, instructions for logging in to your virtual classroom will be emailed to you.

Withdrawal/Refund Policy Student ID Number and ID Cards •• ID number (the letter N plus 8 digits): appears on your Statement/Schedule. Use this number for future registrations and correspondence with The New School. •• ID cards: Upon receipt of payment, noncredit students are mailed an ID card (without photo), valid only for the term in which they are enrolled. If you do not receive your ID card within two weeks of registration, contact Student Financial Services at 212.229.8930 or sfs@newschool.edu. All certificate and credit students can obtain a photo ID at Campus Card

•• To cancel your registration in a course, you must formally withdraw with the Registrar’s Office (online, by fax, or in person). Nonattendance does not constitute withdrawal. •• The registration/University Services fee is not refundable unless you are withdrawing because of changes in the course schedule or instructor. •• Refund processing takes approximately four weeks. For more information on refund policy, visit newschool.edu/registrar/ registration-policies.

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COURSE SCHEDULE

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DEADLINE TO ADD A COURSE

DEADLINE TO DROP WITH TUITION REFUND

CREDIT STUDENT WITHDRAWAL FOR GRADE OF “W”

Before Feb 6

Before Jan 30: 100% refund

Before Apr 17

CLASSROOM/ONLINE A 15 sessions (beginning Jan 23–Jan 29)

Before Feb 6: 80% refund Before Feb 13: 60% refund Before Feb 20: 50% refund Before Feb 27: 20% refund

CLASSROOM 10–15 sessions (beginning Feb 6–Feb 12)

Before Feb 20

Before Feb 13: 100% refund

Before Apr 30

Before Feb 20: 80% refund Before Feb 27: 60% refund Before Mar 6: 50% refund Before Mar 13: 20% refund

ONLINE B Online 9-week courses (beginning Jan 23–Jan 29)

Before Feb 6

Before Jan 30: 100% refund

Before Mar 31

Before Feb 6: 80% refund Before Feb 13: 60% refund Before Feb 20: 50% refund Before Feb 27: 20% refund

ONLINE C Online 9-week courses (beginning Mar 6–Mar 12)

Before Mar 20

Before Mar 13: 100% refund

Before May 15

Before Mar 20: 80% refund Before Mar 27: 60% refund Before Apr 3: 50% refund Before Apr 10: 20% refund

CLASSROOM AND ONLINE 10 or more sessions/ any start date

Before 3rd session

Before 1st session: full refund

Between 4th & 7th sessions

Before 2nd session: 80% refund Before 3rd session: 50% refund Before 4th session: 20% refund

6–9 sessions

Before 2nd session

Before 1st session: 100% refund

Between 3rd & 4th sessions

Before 2nd session: 60% refund Before 3rd session: 20% refund 3–5 sessions

Before 2nd session

Before 1st session: 100% refund

N/A

Before 2nd session: 60% refund 1–2 sessions

Before 1st session

Before 1st session: 100% refund

N/A


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About The New School The New School prepares students to understand, contribute to, and succeed in a rapidly changing society and thus make the world a better and more just place. We will ensure that our students develop both the skills a sound liberal arts education provides and the competencies essential for success and leadership in the emerging creative economy. We will also lead in generating practical and theoretical knowledge that enables people to better understand our world and improve conditions for local and global communities. For more information, visit newschool. edu/mission-vision.

Bryna Sanger, Deputy Provost and Senior Vice President for Academic Affairs Tokumbo Shobowale, Chief Operating Officer Steve Stabile, Vice President for Finance and Business and Treasurer DEANS AND DIRECTORS Stephanie Browner, Dean, Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts Richard Kessler, Dean, Mannes School of Music Martin Mueller, Executive Director, School of Jazz Pippin Parker, Director, School of Drama William Milberg, Dean, The New School for Social Research

Administration

Joel Towers, Executive Dean, Parsons School of Design

OFFICERS OF ADMINISTRATION

Mary R. Watson, Executive Dean, Schools of Public Engagement

David E. Van Zandt, President Tim Marshall, Provost and Chief Academic Officer Anne Adriance, Chief Marketing Officer

Visit the website at newschool.edu for the university board of trustees as well as information about administrative and academic offices.

Andy Atzert, Vice President for Distributed and Global Education

UNIVERSITY REGISTRAR

Carol S. Cantrell, Senior Vice President for Human Resources and Labor Relations

Alina Baboolal, Associate Registrar

Lia Gartner, Vice President for Design, Construction, and Facilities Management Mark Gibbel, Chief Development Officer Roy P. Moskowitz, Chief Legal Officer and Secretary of the Corporation Anand Padmanabhan, Senior Vice President and Chief Information Officer Linda Abrams Reimer, Senior Vice President for Student Services Michelle Relyea, Vice President for Student Success Donald Resnick, Chief Enrollment and Success Officer

Alex Carnes, Associate Registrar

STUDENT FINANCIAL SERVICES Barbara Garcia, Director of Student Accounts Lisa Shaheen, Director of Financial Aid Sobeida Santiago, Associate Director of Student Accounts Lisa Banfield, Associate Director of Financial Aid Lissette Gonzalez, Associate Director of Student Accounts

The New School in Brief In 1919, a few great minds imagined a school that would never settle for the status quo, one that would rethink the purpose of higher learning. The New School was the result. Today it is a progressive university housing five extraordinary schools and colleges. It is a place where scholars, artists, and designers find the support they need to unleash their intellect and creativity so that they can courageously challenge convention. We dissolve walls between disciplines to create a community in which journalists collaborate with designers, architects with social researchers, artists with activists. Our academic centers in New York City, Paris, and Mumbai offer over 10,000 students more than 135 undergraduate and graduate degree programs uniquely designed to prepare them to make a more just, more beautiful, and better-designed world. COLLEGE OF PERFORMING ARTS newschool.edu/mannes 55 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 212.580.0210 newschool.edu/jazz 55 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 212.229.5896 newschool.edu/drama 151 Bank Street, New York, NY 10014 212.229.5150 The College of Performing Arts is a progressive arts center housed within The New School, in the heart of New York City. Artists receive individualized training, becoming fearless risk takers who value real-world relevance, pursue excellence, and embrace collaboration. Celebrated faculty mentors guide students to take their place as artistic leaders who can make a positive difference in the world today.


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We offer undergraduate and graduate degree programs for musicians, composers, actors, directors, writers, and performers of all kinds through three renowned schools: Mannes School of Music, the School of Jazz, and the School of Drama. Unlike small standalone conservatories, our performing art schools offer students the valuable opportunity to pursue interdisciplinary studies within a comprehensive university. MANNES SCHOOL OF MUSIC Since 1916, Mannes has been rigorously training artists to engage with the world around them through music. By practicing—day in and day out—with some of the most revolutionary musicians anywhere, Mannes students have become world-renowned masters of their craft and the canon. Today Mannes has transformed traditional conservatory education by integrating our rigorous classical training with new music, improvisation, real-world experiences, and cross-disciplinary projects. Mannes also offers a program for adult learners and a preparatory program for young people. EUGENE LANG COLLEGE OF LIBERAL ARTS newschool.edu/lang 65 West 11th Street, New York, NY 10011 212.229.5665 Eugene Lang College of Liberal Arts, part of The New School in NYC, is where scholarly rigor meets intellectual freedom. This small progressive liberal arts college is designed for fiercely independent scholars. Students map out their own curriculum. They immerse themselves in primary texts rather than textbooks, attend small seminars rather than large lectures, work closely with faculty, and become part of a community committed to social justice. Lang students ask the big questions,

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challenge assumptions, and develop their potential by studying disciplines across our entire university. PARSONS SCHOOL OF DESIGN newschool.edu/parsons 2 West 13th Street, New York, NY 10011 212.229.8950 Parsons School of Design is the only major design school within a comprehensive university, The New School. Ranked by Quacquarelli Symonds 2015 World University Rankings one of the country’s top art and design schools, Parsons is at the vanguard of design education, providing artists, designers, and scholars with the skills they need to devise design-led approaches to complex contemporary challenges— from sustainability to social and economic inequalities to globalization in creative industries. A proven design education methodology produces graduates with a passionate commitment to technical mastery and reflective practice through inquiry, radical ideas, iterative experimentation, and creative collaboration. In addition to its bachelor’s, master’s, and associate’s degree programs, Parsons offers general art and design courses and certificate programs for students of all ages. Parsons offers undergraduate and graduate degrees at its five schools: •• School of Art and Design History and Theory (ADHT) •• School of Art, Media, and Technology (AMT) •• School of Constructed Environments (SCE) •• School of Design Strategies (SDS) •• School of Fashion (SOF) Students pursue degrees at Parsons’ home campus in New York City and at Parsons Paris. They also gain international experience taking courses online,

with partner universities worldwide, or at The New School’s global academic center in Mumbai. SCHOOLS OF PUBLIC ENGAGEMENT newschool.edu/publicengagement 66 West 12th Street, New York, NY 10011 212.229.5615 These schools and programs are designed for the intellectually curious and creative, at all stages of life and career, who are passionate about social justice around the world. Here students are asked to challenge what others take for granted. We offer innovative graduate and undergraduate programs in media, creative writing, languages/ TESOL, international affairs, policy, and management that integrate real-world practice with cutting-edge theory.  achelor’s Program for Adults B and Transfer Students Designed specifically for adults and transfer students seeking an alternative to the traditional four-year college experience, the bachelor’s program offers flexible study options (including part-time and full-time study), a curriculum tailored to individual goals, and credit for workplace experience. Milano School of International Affairs, Management, and Urban Policy Milano offers graduate programs designed for students dedicated to addressing social, economic, environmental, and political issues. Students gain a truly global and multidisciplinary perspective on real-world problems through intellectually rigorous study as well as hands-on experience. This renowned school takes advantage of the extensive resources available throughout New York City, its celebrated faculty, and its extraordinary partnerships in the private and public sectors.


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Creative Writing Program Concentrations in Fiction, Nonfiction, Poetry, Writing for Children and Young Adults. In less than 20 years, The New School’s Master of Fine Arts in Creative Writing has become one of the world’s best-respected graduate writing programs, attracting promising writers from all corners of the globe who shape the contemporary literary landscape and related industries and have the opportunity to live the writer’s life in New York City. School of Media Studies Our media studies programs are based on the belief that media can be a tool for social good. Students learn to think critically about the history of media and its evolving forms, with the aim of designing solutions to real problems. They are prepared for careers as media makers, critics, managers, and entrepreneurs able to interpret and improve our highly mediated world through critical reflection. School of Languages The ability to communicate in different languages and across cultures is an essential skill in a global economy. The School of Languages offers degree and certificate programs in English language instruction and for-credit, open enrollment, and weekend immersion courses in more than a dozen foreign languages. THE NEW SCHOOL FOR SOCIAL RESEARCH newschool.edu/socialresearch 6 East 16th Street, New York, NY 10003 212.229.5700 In 1933, The New School gave a home to the University in Exile, a refuge for scholars fleeing persecution by the Nazis. Today The New School for Social Research (NSSR) is an internationally renowned graduate school where scholars, practitioners, and innovators guide students to understand the world

around them in intellectually intense, heterodox ways. Our interdisciplinary master’s and doctoral degree programs in the social sciences break with traditional modes of thinking. Students develop knowledge through research, become critical and creative scholars, and learn to grapple with the tensions of contemporary society.

Accreditation The New School has been regionally accredited by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education, a federally recognized body (MSCHE, 3624 Market Street, 2nd Floor West, Philadelphia, PA 19104; 216.284.5000), since 1960. All degree programs at the New York City campus of The New School are registered by the New York State Department of Education (NYSED, 89 Washington Avenue, Albany, New York 12234; 518.474.1551). Both NYSED and MSCHE provide assurance to students, parents, and all stakeholders that The New School meets clear quality standards for educational and financial performance. Parsons Paris is a registered branch campus of The New School and is accredited by MSCHE and the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD, 11250 Roger Bacon Drive, Suite 21, Reston, VA 20190-5248; 703.437.0700). In addition, Parsons Paris has the authorization of the French Ministry of Education to operate in France. For more details, visit newschool.edu/ provost/accreditation.

Higher Education Opportunity Act and Distance Learning The New School monitors developments in state laws in every state. If authorization or licensure is necessary or

becomes necessary, The New School will obtain the required additional approvals. The New School is currently authorized, licensed, exempt, or not subject to approval in Alaska, Arizona, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Hawaii, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Maine, Massachusetts, Michigan, Mississippi, Missouri, Montana, Nebraska, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Rhode Island, South Carolina, South Dakota, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, and Wyoming. Exemptions and authorizations for states not listed are currently in progress. For information on states that have their own information for students enrolling in a New School online program, see newschool.edu/ provost/accreditation.

Academic Calendar The university’s academic calendar can be found at newschool.edu/registrar/ academic-calendar.

University Policies The New School Board of Trustees has adopted a number of policies addressing student rights and responsibilities, some of which are summarized below. Other policies address sexual and discriminatory harassment, use of alcohol and illegal drugs, and disciplinary procedures. The texts of these policies are published on the university website at newschool.edu/policies and newschool.edu/student-rights-andresponsibilities and are available in the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities.


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ACADEMIC HONESTY AND INTEGRITY Statement of Purpose: Academic Honesty and Integrity The New School views “academic honesty and integrity” as the duty of every member of an academic community to claim authorship for his or her own work and only for that work, and to recognize the contributions of others accurately and completely. This obligation is fundamental to the integrity of intellectual debate and creative and academic pursuits. Academic honesty and integrity include accurate use of quotations, as well as appropriate and explicit citation of sources in instances of paraphrasing and describing ideas, or reporting on research findings or any aspect of the work of others (including that of faculty members and other students). Academic dishonesty results from infractions of this “accurate use.” The standards of academic honesty and integrity, and citation of sources, apply to all forms of academic work, including submissions of drafts of final papers or projects. All members of the university community are expected to conduct themselves in accord with the standards of academic honesty and integrity. Students are responsible for understanding the university’s policy on academic honesty and integrity and must make use of proper citations of sources for writing papers; creating, presenting, and performing their work; taking examinations; and doing research. Through syllabi, or in assignments, faculty members are responsible for informing students of policies with respect to the limits within which they may collaborate with, or seek help from, others. Individual colleges/programs may require their students to sign an Academic Integrity Statement declaring that they understand and agree to comply with this policy.

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The New School recognizes that the different kinds of work across the schools of the university may require different procedures for citing sources and referring to the work of others. Particular academic procedures, however, are based in universal principles valid in all schools of The New School and institutions of higher education in general. This policy is not intended to interfere with the exercise of academic freedom and artistic expression. Definitions and Examples of Academic Dishonesty Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to: •• cheating on examinations, either by copying another student’s work or by utilizing unauthorized materials •• using work of others as one’s own original work and submitting such work to the university or to scholarly journals, magazines, or similar publications •• submission of another student’s work obtained by theft or purchase as one’s own original work •• submission of work downloaded from paid or unpaid sources on the internet as one’s own original work, or including the information in a submitted work without proper citation •• submitting the same work for more than one course without the knowledge and explicit approval of all of the faculty members involved •• destruction or defacement of the work of others •• aiding or abetting any act of academic dishonesty •• any attempt to gain academic advantage by presenting misleading information, making deceptive statements or falsifying documents, including documents related to internships

•• engaging in other forms of academic misconduct that violate principles of integrity Adjudication Procedures An administrator or faculty member at each of the colleges/programs of the university is the Dean’s designee with responsibility for administering the university’s Academic Honesty and Integrity Policy (hereinafter “school designee”). The name of each School Designee is listed on the Provost’s Office website. The steps below are to be followed in order. If the two parties come to agreement at any of the steps, they do not need to proceed further. Throughout this policy where correspondence is indicated, but the method is not specified, New School email accounts and/or hard copy, sent through regular mail or hand delivery, may be used and is considered a good faith effort of notification on the part of the university. Each school will follow internal procedures for tracking correspondences with students related to this policy. All time frames indicated by days refer to business days that do not include when the university’s administrative offices are closed, including weekends and holidays. Grades awarded under the university’s Academic Integrity and Honesty Policy are not subject to review under this Grade Appeal Policy. Step 1: Notification to Student A faculty member who suspects that a student has engaged in academic dishonesty will meet with the student. It is expected that the faculty member will contact the student within ten (10) days after the last day of classes for that semester in which the alleged incident occurs. If academic dishonesty is alleged


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on an examination, paper, or creative work due within the last two weeks of classes, the faculty member should submit an incomplete grade until the student can be properly notified and the matter resolved. If grading a major culminating work (for example, a Senior Exhibit, final course paper, Master’s Thesis, or Doctoral Dissertation) which may take longer to evaluate, faculty may request an exception to this deadline through the Dean’s office.

clarifying questions about this policy and its processes, and facilitate communication between the faculty member and the student. The name of each Third Party is listed on the Provost’s Office website and the School Designee can never also serve as a Third Party. If the faculty member and/or the student elect to have a third party present, the requestor is responsible for notifying the other of his/her decision in advance of the meeting.

The student must contact the faculty member within ten (10) days of the notification to schedule a meeting with the faculty member. The faculty member is responsible for setting the meeting. This meeting can be in person or via telephone. A student who fails to respond in the time required will be deemed to have waived his/her rights under this policy. If the student does not respond, and the faculty member determines that the infraction is an actionable offense, s/he will inform in writing the School’s Designee of his/her determination and include copies of the following: correspondence with the student, syllabi, and course assignments.

During this meeting, the student may either accept responsibility for the allegations or dispute them. Regardless, the faculty member will consult with the School Designee and then make one or more of the following determinations:

In cases where the student is taking a course with a faculty member of a different school, the faculty member’s school designee will inform the student’s School Designee, who will then oversee the adjudication process. Step 2: Faculty Meeting with Student During the meeting with the student, the faculty member will review the allegations with the student and allow the student the opportunity to respond. The student and/or the faculty member may, on a voluntary basis, request the presence of a designated third party from the student’s school or the university’s student ombudsman. A Third Party is appointed within each school for this purpose and can assist in

1. Indicate that the student has not committed an infraction of this policy. 2. Indicate that the student has committed an infraction and impose one of the following sanctions: a. require the student to resubmit the assignment; or b. give the student a failing grade for that particular assignment; or c. give the student a failing grade for the course. 3. Indicate that the student has committed an egregious infraction supporting the recommendation to the Dean that the student be suspended or expelled. Examples of egregious infractions include, but are not limited to: (1) multiple instances of academic dishonesty in a single course, (2) repeated instances of academic dishonesty by a student in different courses, and (3) academic dishonesty related to a major culminating work such as a Senior Exhibit, Master’s Thesis, or Doctoral Dissertation.

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The faculty member will send correspondence as well as syllabi and course assignments to the School Designee with his/her determination. In the rare and exceptional circumstance where the Step 2 process cannot occur, the instructor or the School Designee shall notify the student of the instructor’s concern that the student has engaged in academic dishonesty and that the matter has been referred to the Dean for resolution. In such cases, the student may proceed as set forth in the Appeals Procedures. Step 3: Review of Faculty Determination and Possible Imposition of Sanctions by School Designee The School Designee will review the faculty member’s determination and consult, as needed, with appropriate academic personnel. Based on the faculty member’s determination, the nature of the most recent violation as it relates to past violations, consistency within the college and across the university, and any other relevant information pertaining to the student’s record at the university, the School Designee may determine that modified sanctions should be imposed on the student that can include, but are not limited to, suspension or expulsion. Recognizing the importance of the decision for the student, the faculty member and the School Designee will notify the student in writing of the sanction(s) as soon as possible, but not more than twenty (20) days after receipt of the faculty member’s written recommendation. In addition, the School Designee will notify the appropriate offices in the school, the faculty member, the faculty member’s School Designee (if the course at issue is offered through another school), as well as the Office of the Assistant Vice President for Student and Campus Life.


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Appeal Procedures If the student is dissatisfied with the outcome of the adjudication procedures, s/he has the right to appeal. Student’s Right to Appeal The student may appeal the School Designee’s decision to the Dean/ Director of the School or his/her designee (hereinafter “Dean”). The appeal must be in writing and sent within ten (10) days of the decision letter received by the student. The student may request that the Dean convene a meeting of the existing committee that is responsible for academic standards and standing, or convene such a committee should one not already exist, to review the appeal. No member of this committee will have been part of the appeals process to date. The committee’s recommendation will be made to the Dean, whose decision is final except in cases where the student has been suspended or expelled. Alternatively, the student may waive review by a committee and request that the appeal be reviewed exclusively by the Dean or his/her designee, who will not be the School Designee. The student’s appeal must be reviewed within fifteen (15) days of receipt. Note that an appeal to the Dean may result in a stricter penalty than that applied by the School Designee. The student must be notified in writing of the appeal decision within five (5) days of the decision. A copy of the decision must be sent to the faculty member who brought the initial allegations, the Office of the Assistant Vice President for Student and Campus Life, and other offices as appropriate. The Dean’s decision is final, and not subject to further appeal, except in cases where the decision is either to suspend or expel.

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Appeal to the Provost A student who has been ordered suspended or expelled from the university because of a violation of this policy may appeal to the Provost or his/her designee (hereinafter “Provost”). The appeal must be made in writing within five (5) days of receipt of the Dean’s decision. If the Provost decides to consider the appeal, such a review will be limited to: (a) whether the adjudication procedures outlined in this policy were properly followed; and (b) whether the sanction imposed is appropriate given the nature of the violation, and is consistent with sanctions imposed across the university in the past for similar violations. Note that an appeal to the Provost may result in a stricter penalty than that applied by the Dean; e.g., an appeal of a Dean’s decision of suspension could result in the Provost’s decision of expulsion. The Provost will, within ten (10) days of receipt of the request, make a determination. The Provost’s decision is final. INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY POLICY Under The New School’s Intellectual Property Policy, the university shall have a nonexclusive, royalty-free, worldwide license to use works created by its students and faculty for archival, reference, research, classroom, and other educational purposes. With regard to tangible works of fine art or applied art, this license will attach only to stored images of such work (e.g., slides, videos, digitized images) and does not give the university a right to the tangible works themselves. With regard to literary, artistic, and musical works, this license will attach only to brief excerpts of such works for purposes of education. When using works pursuant to this license, the university will make reasonable efforts to display indicia of the authorship of a work. This license shall be presumed to arise automatically, and no additional formality shall be required. If the

university wishes to acquire rights to use the work or a reproduction or image of the work for advertising, promotional, or fundraising purposes, the university will negotiate directly with the creator in order to obtain permission. ACADEMIC FREEDOM: FREE EXCHANGE OF IDEAS An abiding commitment to preserving and enhancing freedom of speech, thought, inquiry, and artistic expression is deeply rooted in the history of The New School. The New School was founded in 1919 by scholars responding to a threat to academic freedom in this country. The University in Exile, progenitor of The New School for Social Research, was established in 1933 in response to threats to academic freedom abroad. The bylaws of the institution, adopted when it received its charter from the State of New York in 1934, state that the “principles of academic freedom and responsibility … have ever been the glory of the New School for Social Research.” Since its beginnings, The New School has endeavored to be an educational community in which public as well as scholarly issues are openly discussed and debated, regardless of how controversial or unpopular the views expressed are. From the first, providing such a forum was seen as an integral part of a university’s responsibility in a democratic society. The New School is committed to academic freedom in all forms and for all members of its community. It is equally committed to protecting the right of free speech of all outside individuals authorized to use its facilities or invited to participate in the educational activities of any of the university’s schools. A university in any meaningful sense of the term is compromised without unhindered exchanges of ideas, however unpopular,


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and without the assurance that both the presentation and confrontation of ideas takes place freely and without coercion. Because of its educational role as a forum for public debate, the university is committed to preserving and securing the conditions that permit the free exchange of ideas to flourish. Faculty members, administrators, staff members, students, and guests are obligated to reflect in their actions a respect for the right of all individuals to speak their views freely and be heard. They must refrain from any action that would cause that right to be abridged. At the same time, the university recognizes that the right of speakers to speak and be heard does not preclude the right of others to express differing points of view. However, this latter right must be exercised in ways that allow speakers to state their position and must not involve any form of intimidation or physical violence. Beyond the responsibility of individuals for their own actions, members of the New School community share in a collective responsibility for preserving freedom of speech. This collective responsibility entails mutual cooperation in minimizing the possibility that speech will be curtailed, especially when contentious issues are being discussed, and in ensuring that due process is accorded to any individual alleged to have interfered with the free exchange of ideas. Consistent with these principles, the university is prepared to take necessary steps to secure the conditions for free speech. Individuals whose acts abridge that freedom will be referred to the appropriate academic school for disciplinary review.

THE STUDENT RIGHT TO KNOW ACT The New School discloses information about the persistence of undergraduate students pursuing degrees at this institution. This data is made available to all students and prospective students as required by the Student Right to Know Act. During the 2014–2015 academic year, the university reports the “persistence rate” for the year 2013 (i.e., the percentage of all freshmen studying full-time in fall 2013 who were still studying full-time in the same degree programs in fall 2014). This information can be found under the common data set information. Visit the Office of Institutional Research at newschool.edu/provost/institutionalresearch-effectiveness for more information. For important information regarding your rights as a student, visit newschool.edu/your-right-to-know.

Campus Crime Statistical Report The Security and Advisory Committee on Campus Safety will provide upon request all campus crime statistics as reported to the United States Department of Education. Anyone wishing to review the university’s current crime statistics can access them through the website for the Department of Education: ope.ed.gov/security. A copy of the statistics can also be obtained by contacting the Director of Security for The New School at 212.229.5101.

Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, with which The New School complies, was enacted to protect the privacy of education records, to establish the right of students to inspect and review their education

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records, and to provide guidelines for correction of inaccurate or misleading statements. The New School has established the following student information as public or directory information, which may be disclosed by the institution at its discretion: student name; major field of study; dates of attendance; full- or part-time enrollment status; year level; degrees and awards received, including dean’s list; the most recent previous educational institution attended; addresses; phone numbers; photographs; email addresses; and date and place of birth. Students may request that The New School withhold release of their directory information by notifying the Registrar’s Office in writing. This notification must be renewed annually at the start of each fall term. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights with respect to their education records. These rights include: The right to inspect and review the student’s education records within 45 days of the day the university receives a request for access. A student should submit to the registrar, dean, head of the academic department, or other appropriate official, a written request that identifies the record(s) the student wishes to inspect. The university official will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the records are not maintained by the university official to whom the request was submitted, that official shall advise the student of the correct official to whom the request should be addressed. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate,


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misleading, or otherwise in violation of the student’s privacy rights under FERPA. A student who wishes to ask the university to amend a record should write to the university official responsible for the record, clearly identify the part of the record the student wants changed, and specify why, in the student’s opinion, it should be changed. If the university decides not to amend the record as requested, the university will notify the student in writing of the decision and the student’s right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. The right to provide written consent before the university discloses personally identifiable information from the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. The university discloses education records without a student’s prior written consent under the FERPA exception for disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the university in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health services staff); a person or company with whom the university has contracted as its agent to provide a service instead of university employees or officials (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the New School Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks.

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A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibilities for the university. Addendum to FERPA Regulations As of January 3, 2012, U.S. Department of Education FERPA regulations expand the circumstances under which education records and personally identifiable information (PII) contained in such records—including Social Security Number, grades, and other private information—may be shared without a student’s consent. First, the U.S. Comptroller General, the U.S. Attorney General, the U.S. Secretary of Education, or state or local education authorities (“Federal and State Authorities”) may allow access to a student’s records and PII without the student’s consent to any third party designated by a Federal or State Authority to evaluate a federal- or state-supported education program. The evaluation may relate to any program that is “principally engaged in the provision of education,” such as early childhood education and job training as well as any program that is administered by an education agency or institution. Second, Federal and State Authorities may allow access to education records and PII without the student’s consent to researchers performing certain types of studies, in certain cases even when the educational institution did not request or objects to such research. Federal and State Authorities must obtain certain use-restriction and data security promises from the entities that they authorize to receive a student’s PII, but the Authorities need not maintain direct control over such entities. In addition, in connection with Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems, State Authorities may collect, compile,

permanently retain, and share without a student’s consent PII from the student’s education records and may track a student’s participation in education and other programs by linking such PII to other personal information about the student that they obtain from other federal or state data sources, including workforce development, unemployment insurance, child welfare, juvenile justice, military service, and migrant student records systems. The right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the university to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the office that administers FERPA: Family Policy Compliance Office U.S. Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-5901

Equal Employment and Educational Opportunity Pursuant to federal, state and local laws, The New School does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, color, creed, sex or gender (including gender identity and expression), pregnancy, sexual orientation, religion, religious practices, mental or physical disability, national or ethnic origin, citizenship status, veteran status, marital or partnership status, or any other legally protected status. In addition, The New School is committed to complying with Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 by providing a safe learning and working environment for all students and employees regardless of sex or gender identity. Title IX states that no individual “shall, on the basis of sex, be excluded from participation in, be denied the benefits of, or be subjected to discrimination under any education program or


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activity receiving federal financial assistance.” Title IX also prohibits retaliation against individuals who report sex-based or gender-based discrimination. The New School has adopted policies and procedures to prevent and respond to sex- or gender-based discrimination in the form of sexual harassment, sexual assault, or other types of sexual misconduct. These policies and procedures apply to all members of the university community, including students, staff, and faculty. The New School has designated a Title IX Coordinator to ensure the university’s compliance with and response to inquiries concerning Title IX and to provide resources for victims and community members who have experienced sex- or gender-based discrimination.

also be referred to The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs, U.S. Department of Labor, 23 Federal Plaza, New York, NY 10278; U.S. Department of Education, Office of Civil Rights, 32 Old Slip, 26th Floor, New York, NY 10005; or the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), New York District Office, 33 Whitehall Street, 5th Floor, New York, NY 10004. For individuals with hearing impairments, EEOC’s TDD number is 212.741.3080. Persons who want to file a complaint regarding an alleged violation of Title IX should visit the website of the Office of Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education or call 1.800.421.3481.

Inquiries concerning the application of the laws and regulations concerning equal employment and educational opportunity at The New School (including Title VI—equal opportunity regardless of race, color or national origin; Section 504—equal opportunity for the disabled; and Title IX—equal opportunity without regard to gender) may be referred to the following university officials:

The New School reserves the right to take or cause to be taken, without remuneration, photographs, film or videos, and other graphic depictions of students, faculty, staff, and visitors for promotional, educational, and/or noncommercial purposes, as well as approve such use by third parties with whom the university may engage in joint marketing. Such purposes may include print and electronic publications. This paragraph serves as public notice of the intent of the university to do so and as a release to the university giving permission to use those images for such purposes.

Jennifer Francone AVP for Student and Campus Life Title IX Coordinator 72 Fifth Avenue, 4th floor New York, NY 10011 212.229.5900 x3656 titleixcoordinator@newschool.edu Irwin Kroot Interim VP for Human Resources   and Labor Relations 79 Fifth Avenue, 18th floor New York, NY 10003 212.229.5671 x4968 krooti@newschool.edu Inquiries regarding the university’s obligations under applicable laws may

Use of Photographs by the University

correspondence is mailed to the address designated as “official” or emailed to the student’s New School email address.

University Resources and Facilities The New School is located in New York City’s Greenwich Village. For a campus map and a list of building hours, visit newschool.edu/about.

Libraries and Archives The New School Libraries and Archives offer a full array of resources and instructional services for students and faculty. Individual research appointments for both students and faculty are available upon request. For information about the New School libraries and the Research Library Consortium of South Manhattan, visit library.newschool.edu. New School Libraries University Center Library List Center Library Performing Arts Library Archives and Special Collections Research Library Consortium Members New York University Avery Fisher Center for Music and Media Elmer Holmes Bobst Library Library of the Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences Cardozo Law Library of Yeshiva University The Cooper Union Library

Student Life CHANGES OF ADDRESS AND TELEPHONE NUMBER Students are responsible for keeping their addresses and telephone numbers current with the university. They can update their contact information whenever necessary through MyNewSchool. University

New York Academy of Art The New-York Historical Society

Canvas Canvas is the virtual “classroom” used for online and many on-campus courses. Log in by visiting my.newschool.edu and selecting Canvas.


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Computing Facilities Students have access to the latest technology in the labs and work spaces. For services, locations of facilities and hours of operation, visit newschool.edu/ information-technology. For information on resources available to continuing education students, please see page 8.

Wireless The New School provides free wireless Internet access throughout the campus. For information, visit newschool.edu/ information-technology/ wireless-network.

IT Central IT Central is the point of contact for students, faculty, and staff requiring assistance or information on all university computing issues. Visit newschool.edu/informationtechnology/help for hours of operation and to create a support or service request ticket. Location: 72 Fifth Avenue, lower level Telephone: 212.229.5300 x4357 (xHELP) Email: itcentral@newschool.edu

Student Accounts and Records All registered students can access their current personal student information on the Internet through a secure connection. Go to account.newschool.edu to look up your Net ID and set or reset your password. You will need your New School ID number (N plus 8 digits). Once you log in, click on the Academics tab for access to up-to-date records of your student activities, including your enrollment in courses, the status of your tuition and fees (paid, owed, refundable), and, if you enrolled as a credit or certificate student, your grades. You can also authorize

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parents, guardians, or employers to view your student accounts and make payments on charges due. Students are responsible for keeping their own addresses and telephone numbers current in university records. They can update this information online at my.newschool.edu as necessary. Note: All university correspondence will be mailed to the address designated “official” in the student’s record and/or emailed to the student’s email address.

Tuition and Fees Payment to the university is the responsibility of the student. Liability for tuition and fees is not contingent on completing courses, receiving grades, receiving passing grades, or realization of financial aid awards or loans. Failure to complete payment does not void your registration or charges due. Contact Student Accounts at 212.229.8930 with inquiries about payment of tuition and fees, or email myaccount@newschool.edu using your New School email account if you have one. Access your personal account information online at my.newschool.edu. DEFERRAL OF PAYMENT FOR EMPLOYER REIMBURSEMENT Students expecting reimbursement from an employer or sponsor can defer payment of tuition and fees by submitting a signed authorization letter on official employer/sponsor letterhead along with the appropriate deferral form(s) as described below. This can be done by mail or fax or in person but not by email. The authorization letter must show a current date and must include the student’s full name (and, if available, the

student’s New School ID number), the amount to be reimbursed, the academic term for which the charges will be covered, the signer’s address and telephone number, and the specific terms for reimbursement (either contingent on receipt of grades or else billable upon registration; see below). Any portion of charges that the employer has not agreed to pay cannot be deferred. Certificate and nonmatriculated students must submit these forms with their registration forms. Authorization letters and forms should be faxed to 212.229.8582; mailed to The New School, attention Third Party Billing, 79 Fifth Avenue, 5th floor, New York, NY 10003; or brought in person to the cashiering office at 72 Fifth Avenue, on the second floor. Payment can be made at my.newschool. edu by ACH or credit card, or by faxing a credit card authorization along with the deferral form to 212.229.8582. Payment of all charges is the responsibility of the student. The student is liable for any and all deferred charges that the employer does not pay for any reason. The student’s liability is not contingent on receiving grades, receiving passing grades, or completing courses. TERMS OF REIMBURSEMENT If the reimbursement will be made upon receipt of grades: There is a participation fee of $150, and the student must complete both the Employer Reimbursement Deferment Form and the Deferral Credit Card Payment Authorization. (These forms can be downloaded from the website: Go to newschool.edu/studentfinancial-services and select Billing and Payment.) Payment of the $150 participation fee and any balance of tuition and university fees not covered by the authorization letter must be made before submission of the deferment forms or along with them. Deferred charges must


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be paid in full by February 1 for the fall semester, June 15 for the spring semester, and August 15 for summer term. If payment is not contingent on receipt of grades and The New School can bill the employer directly: There is no participation fee. The student submits only the Employer Reimbursement Deferment Form (found on the website; see above) with the employer authorization letter. The New School will send an invoice for payment to the employer according to the authorization. Payment for any balance due not covered by the authorization letter must be made before submission of the deferment forms or along with them. For answers to questions regarding employer reimbursement, email myaccount@newschool.edu or call 212.229.8930. TAX DEDUCTION FOR EDUCATION Under certain circumstances, educational expenses undertaken to maintain or improve job skills are deductible for income tax purposes. Students are advised to bring this to the attention of their tax advisors. RETURNED CHECK POLICY All checks returned from the bank are automatically redeposited for payment. If, for any reason, a check does not clear for payment after being deposited a second time, a penalty of $30 is charged to the student’s account. The university cannot presume that the student has withdrawn from classes because the check has not cleared or has been stopped; payment and penalty remain due. Payment for the amount of the returned check and the $30 returned check fee must be made with cash, certified bank check, or money order; another personal check will not be accepted. An additional 10 percent penalty is charged if payment for a returned check

is not received within four weeks. After a second returned check, all future charges must be paid with cash, certified bank check, or money order. Personal checks will no longer be accepted from the student. If it becomes necessary to forward an account to a collection agency, an additional 10 percent penalty will be charged on the remaining account balance. CANCELLATIONS, REFUNDS, ADD/ DROP, STATUS CHANGES Students are responsible for knowing university policies regarding adding or dropping courses and refund of tuition and fees. The policies and deadlines published in this bulletin are applicable to all certificate and nonmatriculated (noncredit or credit) students. Students matriculated in the Bachelor’s Program for Adults and Transfer Students should consult the website at newschool.edu/ public-engagement/bachelors-program. Students taking courses in other schools of the university should consult the appropriate school or program website for applicable policies and deadlines. SCHEDULE AND STATUS CHANGES Withdrawals, transfers from one course to another, registration for additional courses, and changes of status (e.g., from noncredit to credit) must be completed within the deadlines shown in the table on page 130. Transfers from one course to another and changes of status can be made online, in person, or in writing. (They cannot be made by telephone.) Any additional tuition or fees resulting from a course transfer or status change are payable at the time the change is made. Schools of Public Engagement certificate students must obtain advisor approval for all program changes, including withdrawals, grade of “W,” add/drop, and status changes.

REFUNDS FOR CANCELED COURSES The New School reserves the right to cancel courses or to adjust the curriculum. Courses may be canceled because of insufficient enrollment, the withdrawal of the instructor, or inability to schedule appropriate instructional space. If you are registered in a course that is canceled, you will be notified by telephone or email. You will be asked whether you wish to transfer to another course or you wish a full refund of tuition and fees (including registration fees). If you are a certificate student, consult with your advisor if one of your courses is canceled. WITHDRAWALS AND REFUNDS: CONTINUING EDUCATION If you wish to withdraw from a course without adding another, log in to online registration at opencampus.newschool. edu/courses; Search for your course and click “Enroll,” which will lead you to the registration portal. Once there, log in to your account and click “Manage Registration” to drop the course online. Alternatively, you can download and complete the Noncredit Add-Drop Form or the Credit Add-Drop Form, as appropriate, to transfer from one course to another. To drop a course, you can also download and complete the Continuing Education Request to Drop Form, or you can write a letter to the registrar stating your wish to withdraw from the course. Be sure to include your first and last names, your New School ID number (or date of birth), and the course master number (from your course schedule-receipt). Submit your signed and dated request in one of the ways listed below: •• Email the form to reghelp@newschool. edu. Please send it from the email address you provided at registration. •• Fax the form to 212.229.5648.


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•• Mail the form to The New School, Registrar’s Office, 72 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10011. •• Bring your request in person to 72 Fifth Avenue, 2nd floor, New York City. Please note that we cannot accept requests made by telephone. The following policies apply: •• Full refund of course tuition requires advance withdrawal. Otherwise, the refund will be prorated—see the Add/ Drop table on page 130. •• Refunds are computed from the date and time the written notice is received in the Registrar’s Office or the date of the postmark if the notice is mailed. •• The registration/university services fee is not refundable unless a student’s withdrawal is due to a change of course schedule or instructor or the course is canceled by the university. •• Withdrawals or refund requests cannot be made by telephone. •• Refunds of fees paid by credit card will be processed as a credit to the same account. •• Failure to attend classes or notification to the instructor does not constitute official withdrawal. Failure to make or complete payment does not constitute official withdrawal. •• Questions? Email reghelp@newschool. edu or call 212.229.5620. Refund processing takes approximately four weeks.

Grade of “W” A student taking any course for credit can withdraw from the course without academic penalty by filing a request for a grade of “W” with the Registrar’s Office within the appropriate deadline. Deadlines are given in the Add/Drop

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Schedule on page 130. A grade of “W” will be recorded for the course and will appear on the student’s transcript. Deadlines for refunds of tuition and fees, described in the same Add/Drop Schedule, will apply.

Admission to Class The New School reserves the right to deny a person admission to or continuance in its courses of study. All persons wishing to attend any course at The New School must be properly registered. Students should be prepared to show a valid statement/ schedule to the instructor or designated faculty services assistant for admission to any class. Possession of a current New School student ID card does not entitle the bearer to attend any particular course or session of a course. The statement/schedule is issued by the Office of Student Financial Services upon receipt of payment. If you register by mail, telephone, or fax, or on the Web, your statement/schedule will be mailed to you. Please retain this form. If you have not yet received your statement/schedule or have forgotten or lost it, you will be admitted to the class if your name appears on the class roster. You can access your course schedule online at my.newschool.edu (you will need your New School student ID number).

Campus Security The New School employs a security staff to monitor and maintain the rights, privileges, and safety of members of the university community and the security of university property. It is assumed that members of the community will comply with security measures such as the checking of ID cards at building entrances and will report incidents to the security staff, if and when they

occur. The university’s latest crime reporting statistics can be viewed online at newschool.edu/campus-safety.

Admission to Public Programs Tickets to lectures, readings, concerts, and other events are available at the Box Office in the lobby of Johnson/ Kaplan Hall, 66 West 12th Street. Visit newschool.edu/events, call 212.229.5353, or email publicprograms@ newschool.edu for more information. Tickets can be reserved in advance with a credit card (MasterCard, Visa, Discover, American Express), and students and alumni with a valid university ID can obtain free tickets to most special events by presenting their ID at the Box Office.

Other University Policies The board of trustees has adopted policies on Free Exchange of Ideas and Freedom of Artistic Expression, Discriminatory Harassment, Sexual Harassment, Alcohol and Illegal Drugs, Smoking, University-Wide Disciplinary Procedures, and other matters. Copies of these policies are available at newschool.edu/student-rights-andresponsibilities and from the Office of Student Services.

Records, Grades, and Academic Transcripts An official transcript carries the registrar’s signature and the New School seal. It documents a student’s permanent academic record at the university. You can request your transcript online at my.newschool.edu. Transcripts are not issued for students who have outstanding debts to The New School.


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For additional information, visit newschool.edu/registrar/transcripts.

I Temporary Incomplete: Indicates failure to complete assigned work.

the student can pursue the matter as follows:

NONCREDIT RECORD OF ATTENDANCE Noncredit students can request a noncredit record of attendance during the academic term in which they are registered. This record identifies the course and verifies the student’s completion of the course. It is not an academic evaluation and does not provide a course grade. A noncredit record of attendance must be requested from the Registrar’s Office in writing no later than four (4) weeks before the final session of the course. The written request may be faxed to 212.229.5648 (credit card payment only), mailed, or presented in person at the Registrar’s Office. A separate record is issued for each noncredit course; the nonrefundable fee is $20 per course, which must be paid with the student’s own personal check or MasterCard, Visa, Discover, or American Express card; cash is not accepted. The noncredit record of attendance is not available for any event listed in the New School bulletin without a course number or for any course meeting fewer than four times.

This mark is given not automatically but only on the request of the student and at the discretion of the instructor. A Request for Grade of Incomplete Form must be completed and signed by student and instructor. The time allowed for completion of the work and removal of the “I” mark will be set by the instructor but can be no later than the seventh week of the following fall semester for spring or summer term incompletes or the seventh week of the following spring semester for fall term incompletes. Grades of “I” not revised in the prescribed time will be recorded as a final grade of “Z” by the Registrar’s Office.

1 The student submits a formal letter briefly stating objections to the assigned grade directly to the faculty member, with a copy to the department chair or director (or, if the faculty member is the department chair, with a copy to the dean).

GRADE REPORTING Grades are recorded for all students registered in a course for credit or a noncredit certificate. Students must be properly registered in order to attend any course or session of a course. Attendance in class and/or completion of course requirements is not the equivalent of registration and will not make a student eligible to receive academic credit or certificate approval for any course. Grades are normally posted within two weeks after a course ends. Students can view their grades on the Internet at my.newschool.edu. A student ID number (printed on your statement/schedule and photo ID card) is required for access.

W Official Withdrawal Without Academic Penalty: Written request must be presented in person at the Registrar’s Office by the published deadline. Z Unauthorized Withdrawal: Issued by an instructor to a credit student who has not attended or not completed all required work in a course but did not officially withdraw. Faculty may also determine a letter grade as opposed to “Z” on the basis of student progress and attendance in the course. “Z” has no impact on a student’s GPA. AP Approved (noncredit certificate student) NA Not Approved (noncredit certificate student) GM Grade Not Reported for Student GRADE REVIEW POLICY A student can petition for review of any grade within 60 days after the grade was issued. Before deciding to appeal a grade, the student should first request from the course instructor an informal explanation of the reasons for assigning the grade. If the student is not satisfied with the explanation or none is offered,

2 The instructor is required to respond in writing to the student’s letter within one month of receipt, also with a copy to the department chair or director or the dean, as appropriate. 3 If the student is not satisfied by the faculty member’s written explanation, further appeal can be made by a written request to the dean’s office for a review of the previous communications. An appropriate administrator designated by the dean will then convene an appeals committee to review the student’s letter and the instructor’s response, clarify any outstanding questions or issues, and make a recommendation to the dean. The dean’s decision is final. CHANGE OF GRADE Final grades are subject to revision by the instructor with the approval of the dean’s office for one semester following the term in which the course was offered. After one semester has elapsed, all grades recorded in the Registrar’s Office become a permanent part of the academic record, and no changes are allowed.


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International Student and Scholar Services The New School is authorized under federal law to enroll non–immigrant alien students. The mission of International Student and Scholar Services is to help international students reach their full potential and have positive experiences at The New School and, in cooperation with other departments, faculty, staff, and the students themselves, to promote diversity and foster respect for cultures from all over the world. International Student and Scholar Services helps international students help themselves through printed handouts, orientations, workshops, and individual advice and support. Before registering, all international students are required to attend an orientation and check in with International Student and Scholar Services to confirm that they have been properly admitted into the United States and to review their rights, responsibilities, and regulations. Visit the website at newschool.edu/studentservices.

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Students who have disabilities are encouraged to self-identify. While there is no deadline by which to identify oneself as having a disability, early disclosure helps ensure that reasonable accommodations can be made before the start of the student’s courses. Once a student has self-identified, a meeting will be arranged to review appropriate medical documentation from a qualified clinician and discuss the student’s needs and concerns. Students who need special accommodations, please contact Student Disability Services at 212.229.5626 or studentdisability@ newschool.edu. Students with disabilities who feel they have been denied reasonable accommodations should follow the procedure provided for by the New School Policy for Requesting Reasonable Accommodations, available on the website at newschool. edu/student-rights-and-responsibilities and at the Office of Student Rights and Responsibilities. The New School/Parsons (760-830) Volume 33, No. 3, December 2016. Published four times a year, in January, May, July, and December, by

Services for Students with Disabilities The Office of Student Disability Services shares the university’s philosophy of encouraging all students to reach the highest levels of achievement and recognizing and embracing individual differences. Student Disability Services assists students with disabilities in obtaining equal access to academic and programmatic services as required by the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and Section 504 of the Federal Rehabilitation Act of 1973. For more information about Student Disability Services, please visit newschool.edu/student-rights-andresponsibilities.

The New School, 66 West 12th Street, New York, NY 10011. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to The New School 66 West 12th Street, Suite 705 New York, NY 10011 The information published here represents the plans of the university at the time of publication and does not constitute an irrevocable contract between the student and The New School. The university reserves the right to change without notice any matter contained in this publication, including but not limited to tuition, fees, policies, degrees, programs, names of programs, course offerings, academic activities, academic requirements, facilities, faculty, and administrators. Payment of tuition or attendance at any classes shall constitute a student's acceptance of the administration’s rights as set forth above. The New School is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity Institution. For important information including accreditation, student rights, campus safety statistics, and tuition and fees, visit newschool.edu/your-right-to-know. Published 2016 by The New School. Produced by Marketing and Communication, The New School. Photo credits: Puxan BC, Daniel A. Cherrin, Andrew Friedman, Michelle Gevint, Don Hamerman, Bob Handelman, Matthew Mathews, Jessica Miller, Jacob Arthur Pritchard, Martin Seck, Matthew Septimus, Michael Kirby Smith.


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