North Coast Journal 09-29-2022 Edition

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Humboldt County, CA | FREE Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 Vol. XXXIII Issue 39 northcoastjournal.com

The Wall Cpl. Crystal Landry and the effort to get more women policing Humboldt County BY LINDA STANSBERRY 5 The Schneider hits the Plan 17 It’s the tiny pumpkin


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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


CONTENTS 4 4 5 9

Mailbox Poem

Storytelling

News

‘Never, Ever, Ever’ Again

Guest Views

Taxing Tribal Lands Adds Insult to Injury

10 On The Cover The Wall

17 18

On the Table

Young Pumpkin, Little Jewel of Fall

Fishing the North Coast

Chetco Estuary Pumping Out Big Kings

19 Down and Dirty

Cleaning Up the Garden

20 Home & Garden Service Directory

20 Arts Alive!

Oct. 1, 6 to 9 p.m.

21 Seriously?

Tips for Throwing a Forced Birth Shower

23 The Setlist

Jazz in the Bardo

24 Calendar 28 Screens

Confess, Fletch and Pearl

29 Free Will Astrology 30 North Coast Night Lights

‘All Happy Now’ Beneath the Milky Way

31 31 35 36

Workshops & Classes Cartoon Sudoku & Crossword Classifieds

Sept. 29, 2022 • Volume XXXIII Issue 39 North Coast Journal Inc. www.northcoastjournal.com ISSN 1099-7571 © Copyright 2022

PUBLISHER

Melissa Sanderson melissa@northcoastjournal.com NEWS EDITOR

Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com ARTS & FEATURES EDITOR

Jennifer Fumiko Cahill jennifer@northcoastjournal.com DIGITAL EDITOR

Kimberly Wear kim@northcoastjournal.com STAFF WRITERS

Iridian Casarez iridian@northcoastjournal.com Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com CALENDAR EDITOR

Kali Cozyris calendar@northcoastjournal.com CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

John J. Bennett, Simona Carini, Wendy Chan, Barry Evans, Mike Kelly, Kenny Priest PRODUCTION MANAGER

Holly Harvey holly@northcoastjournal.com GRAPHIC DESIGN/PRODUCTION

Heidi Bazán Beltrán, Dave Brown, Rory Hubbard, Renée Thompson ncjads@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING MANAGER

Kyle Windham kyle@northcoastjournal.com SENIOR ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Bryan Walker bryan@northcoastjournal.com ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE

Heather Luther heather@northcoastjournal.com CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

Mark Boyd classified@northcoastjournal.com INSIDE SALES REPRESENTATIVE

Trevor Lee trevor@northcoasjtournal.com BOOKKEEPER

Deborah Henry billing@northcoastjournal.com OFFICE MANAGER/DISTRIBUTION

Michelle Dickinson michelle@northcoastjournal.com MAIL/OFFICE

310 F St., Eureka, CA 95501 707 442-1400 FAX: 707 442-1401 www.northcoastjournal.com Press Releases newsroom@northcoastjournal.com Letters to the Editor letters@northcoastjournal.com Events/A&E calendar@northcoastjournal.com Music music@northcoastjournal.com Classified/Workshops classified@northcoastjournal.com

Lisa Green’s “Sexy Purple Rain,” acrylic on canvas at CANVAS + CLAY. Read more on page 20. Courtesy of the artist

On the Cover Rio Dell Police Department Cpl. Crystal Landry, photo by Elliott Portillo

CIRCULATION VERIFICATION C O U N C I L

The North Coast Journal is a weekly newspaper serving Humboldt County. Circulation: 18,000 copies distributed FREE at more than 450 locations. Mail subscriptions: $39 / 52 issues. Single back issues mailed $2.50. Entire contents of the North Coast Journal are copyrighted. No article may be reprinted without publisher’s written permission. Printed on recycled paper with soy-based ink.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Editor: Throughout the past 100 years, there have always been Americans who offered excuses and/or support for murderous dictators (Mailbox, Sept. 22). Tens of thousands of Americans were enamored with Joseph Stalin’s “communist utopia” before they discovered that his actions led to the deaths of millions of his fellow Russians via murder, death camps and starvation. To be fair, it was not easy — and perhaps not possible — for Americans to know about events in Russia in those years. Only when Stalin signed his non-aggression pact with Hitler in 1939 did the utopian bubble burst. American fans of Adolf Hitler could not claim a similar ignorance. By the time 20,000 delirious Americans rallied in Madison Square Garden in support of Hitler and Nazism on Feb. 20, 1939, Hitler’s oppression of German, Austrian and Czech Jews had been reported in detail in the United States, as the recent PBS doc “The U.S. and the Holocaust” explains. Front page on U.S. newspapers. Everyone knew. The American Nazis cheered. Chairman Mao’s leadership resulted in the death of 45 million human beings — or perhaps 65 million. Yet as late as 1972, when Richard Nixon traveled to China to meet with Mao, some Americans still argued that Mao Zedong was a great man and a visionary leader. Given this record, it is not at all surprising to see Americans defending Vladimir Putin and insisting that Putin invaded Ukraine because “we made him do it.” This is nonsense. The nations of Eastern Europe that chose to join NATO did so specifically to protect themselves from the possibility of future Russian aggression. Since Russia had subjugated these peoples with both the threat and the use of military force for 45 years, it is not at all surprising they would seek protection from future

Storytelling A good story is woven From finest ingredients Maidenhair fern ribs Lichen dyed beargrass Cedar bark, cedar root Spruce root, cattail leaves Sour grass and straw grass And tule, woven tight So tight you can boil water And cook a tangled plot So intricate, intimate And lovingly patterned Seemingly simply but Specifically complex The narrative is and Is not predictable But still inevitable — James Floss

Russian invasions. This is why they sought membership in NATO. Putin’s despicable war in Ukraine reminds us that the nations of Eastern Europe were wise indeed to seek protection from Russia. David Marshak, Arcata

Write a Letter!

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Write an Election Letter!

The Journal will accept letters endorsing specific candidates or measures until 10 a.m. Oct. 24. Election letters must be no longer than 150 words and must otherwise follow the guidelines outlined above. l


NEWS

‘Never, Ever, Ever’ Again New Schneider permit problems prompt query into planning staff ’s handling of project By Thadeus Greenson thad@northcoastjournal.com

I

t appears Travis Schneider’s permit problems may have just doubled in size and gotten decidedly dirtier. The local developer’s efforts to get a permit and permit amendments necessary to lift a county stop work order and resume construction of his family home on Walker Point Road south of the Indianola Cutoff had already been complicated by concerns over the permitted size of the structure. But revelations in the last week — including that the home currently under construction is more than twice the permitted size and that Schneider hauled in 10 times more fill dirt to the property than his coastal development permit allowed — seem to bring serious ramifications for the project itself, while raising a host of questions about whether Schneider may have received preferential treatment from county staff. Humboldt County Planning and Building Director John Ford confirmed to the Journal this past week that the actual building area of the structure is 20,817 square feet spread over two stories — far larger than the 8,000 square feet with a 1,000-squarefoot natural light cellar that Schneider had listed on his coastal development permit application, an estimate that has been repeated in county staff reports and Planning Commission discussions. Ford, whose department looked into both matters after a Sept. 9 Journal inquiry as to whether the often-repeated numbers were accurate, said there will likely be some discussion about how much of the square footage of the house is living space but there is no question the structure is far larger than what was initially permitted. “It’s really a 20,000-square-foot house,” Ford said. “I would find it hard to call it anything else. … Obviously, on the original permit that was approved it was an 8,000-square-foot house and it’s not in compliance with that.” Ford said the house is, however, being built in accordance with building plans submitted to the county after Schneider

received the coastal development permit. “The plans show a bigger house,” he said, adding that he doesn’t know why plans obviously out of step with the permit would have been approved by the county, explaining the planner who approved them has since retired. “They should have been reviewed by staff. He is building what was on the construction plans. They were approved. They were signed off on.” The situation parallels the issues surrounding Schneider’s use of fill dirt on the property. According to Ford, the project’s coastal development permit allowed Schneider to bring in 1,500 cubic yards of fill dirt to the property but planning staff inexplicably approved a grading permit allowing 15,000 cubic yards of soil. “The grading permit is not in conformance with the (coastal development permit),” Ford said. “I don’t know what happened there. That’s a pretty glaring inconsistency. An extra zero is meaningful.” Revelations that county staff approved plans and issued a grading permit in violation of the coastal development permit — which is designed to be a project’s guiding document — come after news earlier this month that staff had approved a building permit before Schneider had secured a septic permit, also a condition of the coastal development permit. That makes three times staff permitted or approved things out of conformance with the initial permit. Together, the new permitting problems seem to significantly complicate the project’s path forward, while also raising a host of questions about the county’s handling of the project — questions that are now the subject of an internal planning department investigation. “There seem to have been some decisions that were made that I have not found the logic or the paper trail to justify,” he said. “But we’re working on it.” Asked if his investigation has deter-

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

NEWS Continued from previous page

mined whether Schneider was given preferential treatment by planning staff, Ford said that’s still unclear. “That is a concern that I have,” he said. “I would like to think that it’s not true but the mere fact that you come up with that on your own and ask the question is the same thing that occurs to me. It’s like, ‘What the heck happened?’ Because something obviously was not right.” Ford said his query has been complicated by the fact that at least two of the planners who worked on the project in its early stages have retired and are no longer with the department. While his internal investigation is ongoing, Ford said he’s already spoken with the person in his department responsible for ensuring permits are in compliance about implementing additional checks and balances. “This can never, ever, ever happen again,” Ford said. “She’s working on safeguards to make sure numbers get checked and double checked, and numbers get reconciled before permits are issued.” Coastal Commission North Coast District Manager Melissa Kraemer, meanwhile, said she would hesitate to put any ultimate blame for Schneider’s predicament on the county, saying the developer knew — or should have known — the provisions of the coastal development permit, the governing document for the project, and not submitted plans and applications that overstepped its bounds. Kraemer also noted that had Schneider initially applied for a coastal development permit to build a 20,000-squarefoot house and bring in 15,000 cubic yards of fill dirt to the property, it would have almost certainly have gone to a public hearing, if not denied outright. For his part, Schneider wrote in an email to the Journal that he does not believe county staff “set out to make mistakes permitting any more than (he) set out to make mistakes in the field.” “Life is full of mistakes,” he said. “My wife and I have built over 125 homes for Humboldt County families, and I wish I could say every single time we did it without challenges. I tell our kids, we can’t always play error-free baseball — our ability as humans to mitigate mistakes and make something better out of the mess is what defines our character.” As to the size of the house, Schneider pushed back on Ford’s figures in an email to the Journal, saying the “habitable” home is 7,817 square feet spread across a single ground-level, though there’s a “basement portion” of the structure that covers the same footprint and includes various things — mechanical space, storage, a garage, a “rainy day rec room” for his kids, a cellar and covered patio — that would have otherwise been built in different structures or

increased the footprint of the house. “We consolidated the visual disturbance footprint into one structure that is largely subsurface, and not easily discernible from most vantage points, specifically Highway 101,” Schneider wrote. He did not respond to subsequent emails seeking further clarification. Whether dubbed mistakes or attempts by Schneider or county staff to willfully manipulate the process, this week’s revelations are significant. As Ford made clear during the Planning Commission’s Sept. 1 meeting, because Schneider violated the terms of his coastal development permit by building the house in a different location than approved by the county, which in turn caused the structure to encroach on a 100-foot-wetland buffer, the project is now in the appeal jurisdiction of the California Coastal Commission. Schneider also violated the original permit conditions by clearing environmentally sensitive habitat and grading over a known Wiyot cultural site while cutting an unpermitted temporary construction road into the property. In response to Planning Commission Chair Alan Bongio’s efforts to push Schneider’s permits ahead Sept. 1, Ford told commissioners in no uncertain terms that he’d been in touch with multiple layers of California Coastal Commission staff leadership and they had expressed concerns about whether the house conforms with the local coastal plan. “They’re concerned with the size and the mass of the house in a very scenic location and whether or not that fits within the setting of the property,” Ford said, later explaining that when Schneider moved the house’s footprint closer to the Fay Slough Wildlife Area — violating the wetland setback requirement and putting the project in the Coastal Commission’s jurisdiction — it also made it “more prominent, more visible,” heightening Coastal Commission staff’s concerns. And that was when Ford, planning staff and the Coastal Commission all still apparently thought the house was 8,000 square feet with a 1,000-square-foot cellar. Kraemer told the Journal concerns about the project go back years. “I recall when the original permit went through in 2017 that we had concerns with the size of the structure and it being out of character for the area,” she wrote in an email to the Journal, adding there were also concerns about its proximity to the adjacent wetland and the adequacy of an associated biological study. But because the project was ultimately sited 100 feet back from the wetlands — and therefore not appealable to the Coastal Commission — Kraemer said staff simply


recommended the county condition the permit to provide vegetative screening to limit the home’s impact on the public viewscape. But with the house now located within that 100-foot setback, the project is in the Coastal Commission’s jurisdiction and Kraemer said staff has again expressed concern about the house’s size and that, given its new footprint, there “may be a greater visual impact than originally considered.” Informed the structure is actually more than 20,000 square feet — not the 8,000 that initially posed concerns — and asked if that exacerbates existing concerns about the project being out of character with the area and having a larger visual impact, Kraemer responded simply: “Yes and yes.” Kraemer pointed to a provision of the Humboldt Bay Area Plan as the guiding policy on the issue, including a provision that reads: “The scenic and visual qualities of coastal areas shall be considered and protected as a resource of public importance. Permitted development shall be sited and designed to protect views to and along the ocean and scenic coastal areas … [and] to be visually compatible with the character of surrounding areas.” There are no clear objective standards, Kraemer said, so the county needs to evaluate whether the house as constructed and sited protects scenic qualities of the area and is in line with the surrounding area. The subject of the project’s compatibility with the surrounding area was discussed at the Sept. 1 Planning Commission meeting. At that meeting, Bongio argued the project didn’t strike him as incompatible with the surrounding neighborhood. “There’s multiple houses at the end of this subdivision that are above-average size,” he said. “I can’t tell you what the neighboring houses are, but I’m going to make a guess — and I’m a pretty good judge of looking at house, having built them for 40-something years — that everything that’s at the end of that point is probably in the 4,000to6,000 [-square-foot] range.” Bongio then said the way Schneider’s home is constructed — with a single story set over a “daylight basement” — minimizes its visual impact. “I don’t believe it’s out of proportion to what’s there,” Bongio said. “Those were definitely executive-type lots that would have that size of house on them.” Driving down Walker Point Road to where it dead ends at the Schneider’s property at the end of a knoll overlooking the Fay Slough Wildlife Area with views of the bay, it’s clear the homes there have been subdivided and developed in stages. Closer to Indianola Cutoff, the homes are smaller and appear older, while the houses closer to the end of the road are clearly larger. But Bongio’s estimates are off, according to

the square footages listed for neighboring homes on various real estate websites. The websites indicate neighboring homes generally fall between 2,000 and 3,000 square feet, with the largest — one specifically referenced by Bongio at the Sept. 1 meeting as appearing larger than Schneider’s — coming in at just over 3,500. Commissioner Brian Mitchell suggested at the meeting that the county conduct an analysis of recently built neighboring homes to help the commission judge whether Schneider’s project is in line with the neighborhood, but Bongio pushed back, saying the “train left the station” when the house was permitted, and he didn’t believe it appropriate to go back and do a “de-facto design review at this juncture.” Of course, it’s now clear what was permitted is not what is being built. Bongio, who said multiple times over the two Planning Commission meetings that he’s made numerous visits to the project site and is familiar with the building plans, did not immediately respond to a Journal email asking if he knew the home’s actual square footage was more than double what was permitted and repeatedly referenced in planning documents and commission meetings and, if so, why he didn’t take steps to address the discrepancy and correct the record. As to the path forward, Ford said he met with Schneider and Coastal Commission staff separately Sept. 24 to discuss options, saying he presented several to Schneider and is waiting to hear back. Declining to get into specifics about exactly what was proposed, he said the options range from continuing forward with trying to get permit modifications, knowing they would be appealable to the Coastal Commission, to simply taking the structure down, removing the fill dirt and starting the permitting process from scratch. Kraemer said the project is currently under the county’s purview but she and her staff are standing by to help in any way they can, from providing input on the project’s consistency with the local coastal program to offering up “an enforcement division that can assist,” if needed. But Kraemer stressed her view is the structure is out of character for the area and it would consequently be very hard for the county to simply permit what’s being built, finding it in conformance with its local coastal program. “If they were going to do that with this 20,000-foot monstrosity, I just don’t see how they’d be able to come up with the findings necessary,” she said. ● Thadeus Greenson (he/him) is the news editor of the Journal. Reach him at (707) 442-1400, extension 321, or thad@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow him on Twitter @thadeusgreenson.

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


VIEWS

! E T O V e m i t s ’ t I

Taxing Tribal Lands Adds Insult to Injury By Kerri J. Malloy

newsroom@northcoastjournal.com

N

ews feeds are being flooded with pro and con arguments about whether federally recognized tribes and licensed gambling companies should be allowed to offer online sports betting in California. Instead, #LandBack should be trending. The #LandBack movement seeks to return lands to tribal nations. These lands, with few exceptions, are subject to state property taxes. The Legislature should amend California’s tax codes to exempt these lands from property taxes. Doing so would impede the exploitation of Indigenous peoples that has been part of the nation’s history since before its independence. State property taxation was used to acquire Indigenous lands. The 1887 federal Dawes Act authorized the breaking up of Indigenous-held lands into parcels held in trust, and exempt from state property taxes, for a set period. When the exemption ended, many Indigenous people could not pay and forfeited their lands to the state, which then resold them. Taxpayers may fear that eliminating property taxes would diminish needed revenues to support schools, roads and other public services. A system already exists to offset the loss of local property tax revenue that has provided $10.8 billion to states since 1977. Under this system, the federal government makes payments in lieu of taxes for nontaxable federal lands, including reservations. Congress could expand the payments to automatically include lands returned to Indigenous nations. This would remove the threat of the repeat of the loss of lands for the inability or failure to pay state property taxes, while ensuring revenues for local governments to provide services. In 2022, $549.4 million was distributed to 1,900 local governments to compensate for the nontaxable federal lands in their jurisdictions. Revenues generated from commercial activities on public lands fund these payments, eliminating the need for further congressional appropriations.

Kerri J. Malloy

CalMatters

The #LandBack movement is gaining momentum and has already seen lands returned to tribes. Approximately 14,000 acres have been given back to the Indigenous peoples of California since 1995, when 3,900 acres were returned to the Inter-Tribal Sinkyone Wilderness Council in Mendocino County. The city of Eureka made international headlines by returning all the parcels it owned on Tuluwat Island to the Wiyot Tribe in two land transfers in 2004 and 2019. Land transfers have continued, with the most recent in May, when 40 acres above the North Fork of the American River in Placer County were returned to Colfax-Todds Valley Consolidated Tribe. And, in a first for the San Francisco Bay Area, Oakland will create an easement on 5 acres within the city limits in Sequoia Point for the Confederated Villages of Lisjan Nation and Sogorea Te’ Land Trust. The city will retain the title, with the easement providing exclusive rights for the tribe to use the property for ceremonial and cultural purposes. Additional land returns could take place throughout the state with the transfer of excess state-owned land to Indigenous nations to fulfill the governor’s 2020 Statement of Administration Policy on Native American Ancestral Lands. Mention of property taxes is missing from the speeches and press releases celebrating land return. Failure to address this important matter makes these feel-good moments fleeting and requires Indigenous nations to pay for the right to care for the lands they have called home since time immemorial. ● This column was first published by CalMatters, a nonprofit, nonpartisan newsroom committed to explaining California politics and policy.

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A Public Voices Fellow with The OpEd Project, Kerri J. Malloy is an assistant professor of Global Humanities at San José State University. He is an enrolled member of the Yurok Tribe. northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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ON THE COVER

Rio Dell Police Department Cpl. Crystal Landry graduated from the College of the Redwoods Police Academy in 2018, one of three women in her class, and the only one who remains an officer. Photo by Elliott Portillo

The Wall

Cpl. Crystal Landry and the effort to get more women policing Humboldt County By Linda Stansberry linda@northcoastjournal.com

C

pl. Crystal Landry has a cold. It’s just a sinus thing, she says, something she picked up from one of the other officers on last week’s shift. She blots her nose with a tissue and pecks at the keyboard of her computer, typing a Be On the Lookout for a stolen dirt bike. “They took it right off the guy’s porch in broad daylight,” she says. It’s Saturday afternoon in Rio Dell, and Landry is looking forward to a busy shift. The sky outside is threatening a late spring rain, with anemic droplets misting the air. Landry blots, types and shifts uncomfortably in her oversized

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chair. The old computer hums in front of her. On the desk next to her is a repurposed plastic Costco cashew jar full of miscellaneous bullets. The chief, Jeff Conner, is preparing for retirement by cleaning out the evidence locker. Banker boxes full of old files and confiscated detritus are stacked around Landry’s desk. She spots a fossilized rat turd and makes a small sound of disgust, cheerfully razzing Conner as he passes through the bullpen. Blot. Type. Shift. Sniff. Because the dirt bike’s owner and a neighbor around the corner had security cameras, Landry has already identified the alleged thief. The cam-

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

eras gave a good view of his face and that of his female accomplice, as well as the truck and trailer he loaded the bike onto. Within a half-hour of sending stills from the cameras around to other agencies, a colleague at the Eureka Police Department flagged the suspect as a well-known petty criminal. In fact, the EPD officer says they towed the getaway truck just a few weeks prior for lack of license and registration. The Rio Dell Police Department shares a building with City Hall on Wildwood Avenue, the town’s (population 3,400) main drag. The building, like many in Rio Dell, is nestled into the slope of a hill. Because

of the evidence locker, the small station smells strongly of cannabis, a smell Landry says she hasn’t noticed in years. Landry has short blond hair and bright blue eyes, a quick smile, a blurry tattoo across the back of her right wrist. She graduated from the College of the Redwoods Police Academy in December of 2018, one of only three women in her class, and the only one who remains an officer. She started with RDPD a month later, promoting to corporal in 2021. Landry’s goal is to become a detective. She was a stay-at-home parent prior to going into the academy, waiting until her daughter was in pre-school before joining the


profession. She likes a fast-paced job, she says, and the Rio Dell police force has that. It’s a place where she gets to “do a little bit of everything.” “I like to get to the bottom of things, to work a case from beginning to end,” she says. A call comes in with the suspect’s most recent addresses. Landry pulls out her phone, which is adorned with a doughnut pop socket, and types them into her navigator. Her cell phone and its voice assistant function is an essential tool for her job, allowing Landry to call contacts and look up information as she drives from call to call. A few weeks earlier, two teenage boys jumped the fence of the local elementary school and stole an expensive skateboard from an eighth-grade girl. Landry drove from one end of the town to the other while calling contacts using her car’s Bluetooth system. Could the principal send her screenshots from the school’s security camera? Had the clerk at the Dollar General seen two teenagers come in carrying a yellow skateboard in the last half-hour? She studied the stills of the two boys, watched how they walked through the schoolyard. “I swear I recognize that one,” she muttered. “But no, he’s kind of splay-footed. The kid I’m thinking of doesn’t walk that way.” Rio Dell’s small size (just 2.5 square miles) and Landry’s relentless friendliness work to the officer’s advantage in property theft cases. There’s a lot of foot traffic in Rio Dell, people out on the sidewalks and in their front yards, people who almost universally wave when they see Landry on patrol. In the schoolyard, a scrum of children gathered around to look at the video and stills. No, they said, they didn’t know the boys. Landry drove up and down Wildwood, turning down the side streets and stopping when she saw someone. Seniors walking their dogs. The chief of the local volunteer fire department. A woman in a front yard comforting her bereaved friend. No, said the woman, and her friend, the seniors and the fire chief, they didn’t recognize the boys in the video. Now, several weeks later, Landry says the case was resolved when a relative marched the suspect down to the station with the skateboard. Things like that happen all the time in Rio Dell, she says. People know one another. Word gets out. Landry checks in with Conner about going to the alleged dirt bike thief’s addresses, all of which are in Eureka. Conner gives her the go-ahead, telling her to give the Eureka Police Department a head’s up that she’s going to be in their area. Although most police officers in California have

broad power to work cases outside of their jurisdiction, leaving city limits to pursue a suspect can be risky. Once they’ve passed a probationary training period, almost all officers work alone unless they’ve requested back up. Rio Dell and Ferndale both rely on dispatchers at the Fortuna Police Department to route calls for service, and the three Eel River Valley stations offer mutual aid to one another when necessary. Landry says she also gets backup from the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office, the California Highway Patrol and CalFire. Each contact Landry makes is punctuated by a fastidious call into dispatch to relay where she is and what she’s doing and a second call once the contact is completed. In Eureka, Landry will be relying on the availability of officers in other departments to support her if things go wrong. Conner tells Landry to check in with HCSO dispatch during her trip north, “just in case she gets in trouble.” He and the other officer on duty will hold things down while she’s gone. “Don’t get in trouble,” he adds as she leaves.

Landry’s vehicle

smells vaguely animal. Last week she broke up a fight and took two assailants into custody — a pair of dogs that had been attacking a neighborhood goat. Although Rio Dell has a dedicated community service officer who also does animal control, Landry and other officers pinch hit these duties during the CSO’s off hours. Landry and her fellow officers also serve as administrative staff much of the time. When there’s no one at the station, walk-ins are instructed to call the phone number on the locked door. This routes to the Fortuna dispatch, which calls whoever’s on patrol back to the station. On one recent shift, Landry pingponged between the station and a call to a suspicious death, taking custody of an abandoned cat, driving to a local home to examine a dead body, then back to the station to retrieve another cat. According to Conner’s staff reports to the city, RDPD responded to 50 animal-related calls for service between April 2 and June 20. The city has an agreement with Miranda’s Rescue Animal Shelter to take in stray dogs and cats; the department is stocked with humane traps, bags of dog food, cans of cat food. Landry has rehomed at least two kittens herself; one went with her, the other to a cousin. But not every animal call is heart-warming. “I was never scared of dogs before I started this job,” she says, pulling out of the station. “Something about the uniform freaks them out.” Continued on next page »

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“The production of this document was supported, in part, by grant number CFDA 93.924 from the US Administration for Community Living (ACL), DHHS, Washington, DC. 20201. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration of Community Living policy. Its contents are solely the responsibility of A1AA/HICAP and do not necessarily represent the official views of ACL.”

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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th

19 l Annua

ON THE COVER

SALES FOR SURVIVORS

Continued from previous page

October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Local businesses donate to BGHP during October in honor of Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Month Long Supporters All Under Heaven, Arcata Campground, Arcata Holly Yashi, Arcata SALT Fish House, Arcata Diver Bar & Grill, Eureka Primal Decor & S.T.I.L., Eureka Pure Water Spas, Eureka Six Rivers Brewery, McKinleyville Diver Bar & Grill Will donate special wine sales (glass & bottle) throughout the month. (While supplies lasts!) Primal Décor Tattoo & Body Piercing Studio Will donate $5 for every nipple piercing and merchandise purchase. Pure Water Spas During the entire month of October will be donating a % of sales to BGHP! Ray’s Food Place and Shop Smart Arcata, Fortuna, Garberville & Willow Creek Ray’s and ShopSmart in Redway will be doing Register Roundup to benefit BGHP during the whole month of October. S.T.I.L. Will donate 100% of their sales of the booby bath bombs. Starseed Originals www.starseedoriginals.com

Special Activities Holly Yashi SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1ST Special event on October 1st. Throughout October, purchase any cancer awareness jewelry to support BGHP! Redwood Harley-Davidson SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1ST Will be holding the Breast Cancer Awareness Month Poker Run! Visit their website for event details. Scrapper’s Edge FRIDAY, SATURDAY & SUNDAY, OCTOBER 21ST - 23RD Shop online at www.scrappersedge.net to support a local business and BGHP! Zumathon at Adorni Center (Eureka) 2PM, SATURDAY, OCTOBER 22ND Dance, raffles, laugh, and glow! Exercise in disguise to support BGHP and local cancer patients! Don’t forget to wear pink! Linden & Company Salon & Spa WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19TH 100% of all services will be donated to BGHP! Check out the 1hr couples massage and facials! ABOUT BGHP The Breast and GYN Health Project (BGHP), is a local, non-profit support organization for people facing breast or gynecologic cancer concerns. BGHP was founded 25 years ago by local breast cancer survivors who wanted to help others. BGHP provides information, assistance, peer support, and a place for healing and hope. We offer patient navigation, support groups, a lending library, wigs, and more, FREE to all clients. We also educate the public about early detection and cancer resources. Open M-F 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m. Call to set up an in person appointment. 987 8th Street, Arcata, CA 95521 707-825-8345 www.bghp.org

10% or more of your purchase supports BGHP services when you shop & dine at these businesses on the following days: Heart Bead, Arcata SATURDAY, OCTOBER 1 Plaza Shoe Shop , Arcata (day 1 ) Art Center, Arcata Headies Pizza & Pour, Trinidad Bubbles, Arcata SATURDAY, OCTOBER 15 Caravan of Dreams, Arcata Beachcomber Café, Trinidad Claudia’s Herbs, Arcata Farmers Miller Farms Nursery, McKinleyville Market Myrtle Ave Pet Center, Eureka Holly Yashi, Arcata Plaza Shoe Shop , Arcata (day 2 ) Hot Knots, Arcata SUNDAY, OCTOBER 16 Humboldt Herbals, Eureka Arcata Scoop, Arcata Northtown Books, Arcata MONDAY, OCTOBER 17 Spring Hill Farmstead Goat Cheese, Garden of Beadin’, Garberville Arcata Farmers Market TUESDAY, OCTOBER 18 Belle Starr Clothing, Eureka Lighthouse Grill, Trinidad Booklegger, Eureka WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 19 Good Relations, Eureka Renata’s Creperie, Arcata Sisters Clothing Collective, Eureka Linden & Company Salon & Spa, MONDAY, OCTOBER 3 Eureka The Burger Joint, Arcata THURSDAY, OCTOBER 20 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 4 The Alibi, Arcata Ramones Café & Bakery, All Locations FRIDAY, OCTOBER 21 WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 5 Happy Donuts, Eureka Brick & Fire Bistro, Eureka Scrapper’s Edge, Eureka THURSDAY, OCTOBER 6 Rosebud Home Goods, Eureka Slice of Humboldt Pie, Arcata OCTOBER 21-23 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 7 Scrapper’s Edge, Website Plaza: Be Inspired, Arcata (https://www.scrappersedge.net/) SATURDAY, OCTOBER 8 OCTOBER 23-29 Yarn, Eureka Celebration Boulevard (Baskets MONDAY, OCTOBER 10 Only), Website (https://celebrationThe Big Blue Café, Arcata blvd.com/) Signature Coffe Co., Redway WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 26 TUESDAY, OCTOBER 11 Plaza Grill, Arcata Adventure’s Edge, Arcata & Eureka THURSDAY, OCTOBER 27 Fiesta Grill & Cantina, Arcata Stars Hamburgers, Eureka WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 12 FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28 El Chipotle, Arcata Coast Central Credit Union, Fin-N-Feather, Eureka All Locations (Jean’s Day!) FRIDAY, OCTOBER 14

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Landry gets on the highway and heads north, dabbing occasionally at her runny nose. She knows Eureka well, she says. She grew up in the area, bouncing from house to house in a chaotic childhood. Some of her family members were and are using drugs. Some were and are on the other side of the law. Landry recalls visiting a notorious apartment building with a group of friends when she was a teenager, someone flicking on a light realizing there were cockroaches everywhere. She jumped on a boy’s back, screaming. “I hate bugs,” Landry says, shaking her head. Her experiences as a child informed her choice to become a cop, she says. She wants to help people, to be there when they’re ready to make a crucial decision, to turn their lives around. Like many people in her profession, she is frustrated with recent changes to the California criminal justice system that have reduced sentencing options for low-level drug offenders and other misdemeanor charges. Many of her arrestees bounce out of jail within hours. Landry sees arrests as an intervention, a consequence, and jail as a chance for some people to disrupt their pattern of recidivism. “I arrest people for charges weekly,” she says. “They never help them. Why are we arresting them if they aren’t keeping them?” Landry pulls into the first address, a small battered house in the Pine Hill neighborhood. She calls into dispatch and gives her location. The front yard is stuffed with the rusty carcass of an old fishing boat. The pipe and wire fence has several “Beware of Dog,” signs on it. Landry looks


Rio Dell Police Department Cpl. Crystal Landry works the phone, trying to find a suspect in a property crime. Photo by Linda Stansberry

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around warily then opens the gate. She knocks on the door, which has a paper with a list of hand-written rules ducttaped to it: No visitors after 7 p.m.; Don’t come here looking for my daughter. Inside, a dog barks. After several knocks Landry gives up. She gets back into the car and radios back to HCSO, calling in all-clear.

According to the 30x30 Initiative, a

coalition working to increase the number of women in policing, women make up only 12 percent of sworn officers and 3 percent of leadership positions in the United States. These statistics play out similarly in Humboldt County. Women make up four of 38 sworn officer positions at the Eureka Police Department (10 percent); two of 19 at the Fortuna Police Department (11 percent); four of 22 at the Arcata Police Department (18 percent); seven of 110 deputy sheriffs (6 percent) and 22 of 88 correctional officers (25 percent) at HCSO. Fortuna Chief Casey Day says that while he is always looking to diversify the make-up of his staff, he says more men are attracted to the field than women. “Traditionally, it was more of a male-occupied profession,” says Day. “I’ve worked for different agencies. It’s always been, at least in my experience, that departments are made up mostly of males.” Mike Perkins, director of the College of the Redwoods’ Public Safety Training Center, says he has seen female cadets generally struggle with some of the physical requirements of the training, which include tasks such as scaling a 6-foot wall and a 165 pound “body drag,” and is interested in offering a specialized unit of women in

policing that would help cadets develop proper technique, as well as prepare them to enter a highly male-dominated field. A similar unit was offered at Perkins’ previous post in Santa Barbara. The ability to bring it to Humboldt, he says, is hampered by the same factors impacting his program and the profession overall: recruitment and retention. The academy does not retain a dedicated teaching staff but relies on local officers to teach units and has had an increasingly hard time finding instructors due to a decline in regional staffing levels. “The struggle that we’re facing is the fact that we’ve seen such a shift out of law enforcement, so many people are retiring and we’re not really able to backfill those positions,” he says. “There’s just a lack of interest in going into the profession. Most agencies around the area are very understaffed. What that results in is officers are working overtime shifts … and that’s our main source of instructors.” The average class size has shrunk over the past two years as well, Perkins says, from 20 down to 13. Greg Allen, who succeeded Conner as chief of the Rio Dell police in July, attributes the decline in enrollment to a number of factors, including COVID but also a nationwide change in attitude toward policing as a profession. Allen taught at the academy for 10 years, and served as a lieutenant with HCSO and several other agencies for a combined 28 years of experience in law enforcement. “When you talk about recruiting in general, this is not a countywide problem, it’s a nationwide problem,” he says, adding that high profile use-of force incidents have tarnished the public image of the profession. “A lot of people are staying away from law enforcement. It’s a dangerous profession. The younger generation wants flexible hours and guaranteed time off to spend with their families.” Allen was referring to incidents such as the murder of George Floyd in 2020 by police officers in Minneapolis. Local agencies have also weathered scandals. In 2021, the Sacramento Bee revealed that several officers in an EPD unit were active on a group text exchange that included derogatory and sexist language directed at homeless people, mentally ill people and Continued on next page »

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13


ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

women, including some of their female colleagues. Allen adds that many trained officers get recruited away from smaller departments by bonuses and higher pay offered to lateral transfers in other agencies and regions. Compensating for this attrition by recruiting new officers is not easy. While almost all cadets currently being recruited into the academy have jobs waiting for them by their recruiting agency, the wait time between finding the right person for the job and getting that cadet onto a beat can be as long as a year when taking into account the six months of academy training, the 10 to 18 weeks of field training and the intense background check, which can take anywhere from 60 days to six months to complete. These background checks for any criminal history or drug use also often include interviews with former coworkers, roommates and family members. For this reason, the average age of a recruit can skew a bit younger, toward people who haven’t had a chance to get a DUI or bounce a check yet. As for the low numbers of women in the ranks, Allen says in his time with the academy the ratio has always been about 70-30. Allen says women bring important strengths to the profession, including being less likely to use excessive force, and having better de-escalation, interpersonal and communication skills. As to why there aren’t more of them, the chief says it’s down to a number of factors, mostly culture. “It’s been a male-dominated field,” Allen says. “The decisions are being made by males. Law enforcement hasn’t been an attractive profession to females. I think the men who hold positions of greater power and influence … they can get things put into action in terms of recruiting women.” Leadership statistics in local law enforcement also follow national trends. Of 277 sworn officer positions combined between APD, HCSO, FPD and EPD, 12 women are ranked as lieutenants, detectives, corporals or sergeants, or about 4.33 percent. Correctional deputies make up the majority of these positions, eight out of 12. Support staff, including dispatchers and administration, also skews heavily female in most departments. In Eureka, Amber Cosetti is the first woman in the department to hold the rank of senior detective and was recently elected by her colleagues to serves as the first female president of the Eureka Police Officers Association. Like Perkins, Allen also references that 6-foot wooden wall, saying it’s an example of physical requirements for the job that may be outdated. (Landry, who was an avid CrossFit devotee prior to joining the

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

academy, says clearing it is more technique than strength.) “That’s one a lot of academies are looking at whether or not to continue,” says Allen. “Traditionally men have more upper body strength, but is it realistic to the job we do? You can ask an officer: ‘When’s the last time you jumped a wall?’” Landry’s promotion to corporal comes with extra responsibilities. On her days off she receives calls from other officers to authorize high-speed pursuits or to drive down for extra help. She’s also working on an associate degree in police science through College of the Redwoods. She tries to keep up with the latest technology and practices, training in red dot sighting for her handgun and victim witness interviews. The 30x30 Initiative reports that under-representation of women in policing “undermines public safety. “Research shows women officers use less force and less excessive force,” 30x30’s mission statement reads, noting they also “are named in fewer complaints and lawsuits; are perceived by communities as being more honest and compassionate; see better outcomes for crime victims, especially in sexual assault cases; and make fewer discretionary arrests.” Landry, for her part, has never had to use any of the weaponry included in the 35 pounds of gear she straps to her waist at the beginning of every shift. “Even if I have to arrest someone, I try to maintain the rapport,” she says. “I don’t want to go down to their level. You will have more cooperation being kind to them than being an a-hole. And that comes naturally to me. Even if someone is on drugs or whatever, I still think of my work as a service to them.”

The next stop is the McCullens

Motel, a cluster of one-room cabins on McCullens Avenue in Eureka that are often rented long-term. The motel gained some infamy in 2016, when Maxx Robison, then 20, opened fire there after a drug deal gone wrong, killing 19-year-old Rihanna Skye McKenzie. Robison was sentenced to 24 years in jail. The motel remains a hot spot for drug activity. It’s raining as Landry pulls up in front of the manager’s office. In a lighted doorway, a trio of young men are blowing cigarette smoke into the wind. They look momentarily nervous at Landry’s arrival but then crane their necks in interest, perhaps curious who she’s looking for. Landry rings the doorbell of the manager’s office, waits in the rain, then finally spots a sign in the window and calls the phone number listed. A middle-aged woman in sweatpants and a Crabs Baseball shirt


New 2022

I Rio Dell Police Department Cpl. Crystal Landry has an easy rapport with the city’s residents that often works to her advantage in property theft cases. Photo by Elliott Portillo

comes to the door. She looks unsurprised to see the uniform. Hearing the name of the man Landry is looking for, she gives a dry guffaw. “That little fucker isn’t here, ‘scuse my language,” she says. “Not on a dare.” The manager asks what her former tenant’s been accused of. Told that it’s theft, she shakes her head sardonically. The group of young men in the cabin next door have dissolved inside. Landry leaves and goes to the next address, a modest and clean craftsman on A Street, although she doesn’t expect to find the alleged thief there. No one answers the door. The rain picks up, then slackens to a dull drizzle. A call comes in as she gets back in the car. A friend from the academy who’s with the sheriff ’s office recognized the suspect from Landry’s BOLO. He’s recovered some stolen property connected with the alleged thief out at a house in Field’s Landing. Landry takes down the address, then radios into dispatch. Leaving A Street, en route to Field’s Landing, there’s a new kind of energy about this call, the tantalizing promise of a solid lead. “It takes a lot to get my adrenaline going anymore,” admits Landry. When she was new on the job, her blood would start pumping when she got a report of a hairy situation, a weapon drawn, a domestic violence situation, but now: “I’m getting adrenaline less and less. I get adrenaline on the ride there, but most of the time when I get there it’s not as bad as it seems.” She takes the turnoff for Field’s Landing, drives down a rugged little street, slowing, looking for the house number. Then: “I can’t believe it,” she says. “That’s the truck.” The black lifted truck is sitting in the driveway. The trailer isn’t there, however, nor is the stolen bike. Landry radios into HCSO then waits impatiently for them to confirm she’ll have backup if she needs it.

The small house is weathered, its porch leaning slightly. The fenced front yard is littered with trash. A battered trailer sits in the driveway. The rising wind causes a blanket covering one of the trailer’s broken windows to ripple and wave. Landry starts there, knocking on the side of the trailer. Nobody answers. She goes to the door of the house and knocks. An elderly woman opens the door, releasing a small pack of large dogs. They are barking but friendly, weaving around Landry’s legs. A middle-aged man, possibly her son, appears in the doorway, as well. Landry introduces herself and asks if the owner of the truck is there. “Is who?” the woman asks. She gives Landry permission to look around the yard and behind the house for the dirt bike or the truck’s owner. Landry does, picking her way through the trash. A package of meat is spoiling on top of an old oil drum. No bike. No suspect. Landry goes back to the front door, where a young woman is now waiting, procured from the back of the house by her grandmother. She has long dark hair and tattoos and is wearing a tank top. One leg of her sweatpants is pulled up to reveal an intense poison oak rash. She scratches at it as Landry explains the situation. “I know you,” Landry says. “You were in the video we got, from the security camera. Is that your boyfriend?” The girl, clearly upset, insists that her boyfriend was just taking back a bike he’d already paid for. “Explain to me what he thought about the bike,” Landry asks as the girl scratches furiously at her rash. “He put a lot of money into it, $100,000, he tried to do it right,” the girl insists. But someone sold it to the guy in Rio Dell even though it didn’t belong to them. She’ll get him to bring it back. Continued on next page »

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ON THE COVER Continued from previous page

As a female officer, Rio Dell Police Department Cpl. Crystal Landry is in the minority locally, but a national initiative thinks the lack of women in policing “undermines public safety.” Photo by Elliott Portillo

Landry nods. The girl can’t tell her where her boyfriend and the bike are now. She gives the girl her phone number, says to have her boyfriend call her. The girl agrees. Landry gets back in her car, then realizes she didn’t get the interaction on her body camera. She nudges it to life, then goes back to the porch and secures the promise from the girl again. The rain is coming down harder now, whipping stinging little blasts in the wind. Landry drives south, back to Rio Dell. She tries to pay a visit to the man whose bike was stolen, but he’s not home. He, too, has a list of rules in front of his door, written on a whiteboard: Don’t visit without calling; I don’t have time to work on your car; Don’t knock on the door, I can’t hear you. She tries calling him. No answer. Landry returns to the station and begins working on her report. The owner of the bike calls back, finally. He’s on his way back to Eureka, he says. The kid who stole the bike is freaked out that the cops are involved and he’s going to meet him and give it back. “Do you want to press charges?” Landry asks. No, he says, he just wants his property back. Landry blots her nose once again and begins to type up her report. Like most local police departments, Rio Dell has struggled to find and retain officers, many of whom are attracted to a better rate of pay at other agencies after their probationary period is over. Landry says she prefers the “low drama” atmosphere of RDPD. She gets along with her coworkers, they get along with her. That counts for a lot. Also, she feels supported by the community. Last

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

year she had to arrest a combative suspect and several citizens stepped in to help. She didn’t need the help, she insists, but was glad to know they had her back. Conner, who worked in local law enforcement since the ’90s, says diversifying recruitment and hiring practices are crucial to improving the profession. While the average recruit is young and male, he’d much rather hire someone in their 30s or 40s, he says, someone with more life experience and patience. He and the older cops he knows have changed their approach to a lot of things, Conner says, becoming better at de-escalation because they “don’t want to roll around on the ground anymore.” “Crystal is the future of the Rio Dell Police Department,” he later adds in an email. Her report finished, Landry gets back in her vehicle and comes to the assist of an officer making a traffic stop on U.S. Highway 101 just north of Scotia. The driver, who’s been popped for drugs before, is known to Landry. He was pulled over for a traffic violation and is now being cited for driving with a suspended license. As the other officer searches the car, Landry talks to the guy. What’s he doing now, is he working? She gives him a pep talk. “It’s a great time to get a job,” she says. “Lots of places are hiring. Lots of opportunities out there.” ● Linda Stansberry (she/her) is a staff writer at the Journal. Reach her at linda@ northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @LCStansberry.


ON THE TABLE

Young Pumpkin, Little Jewel of Fall Starring in juicy, fried meat dumplings By Wendy Chan

onthetable@northcoastjournal.com

F

all, my favorite season of all — the abundance of fresh vegetables and fruits, the joy of celebrating the Harvest Moon, and the brilliant sunsets in the still warm evenings. This fall, I’m extra happy because my parents have come to visit. I have been busy in the kitchen with my mom experimenting with few new recipes. One of my all-time favorites is cooking with the young green pumpkins from the Oriental Food and Spices market (306 W. Harris St., Eureka). If you missed the first season for them, usually in late August and early September, you can still find some at the pumpkin patches in October. I usually pick few immature pumpkins of the green varieties when l go to the patch for big ones — sometimes they let you keep them for free. Some farmers like to trim some pumpkins off the vines when they are little over a month old after flowering so the rest can grow bigger. When cooking young pumpkin, there’s no waste: You can eat the skin, seeds and all. According to some studies, they help regulate blood pressure, boost your immune system and promote heart health. They are also high in vitamin A for healthy looking skin. I like them for their mild, refreshing flavor, their crisp and juicy texture, and the vibrant green against the soft yellow, like a jeweled bowl. I often sauté them with garlic and black bean sauce, make pumpkin pancakes or stir-fry slices with meat. I remember my dad used to grow our favorite kabocha and Jarrahdale pumpkins in their huge yard when they lived in Humboldt. He would call me up, excited, and invite me to come over and count how many pumpkins were growing. Then he’d decide how many young pumpkins to pick, how many to grow to maturity and how many we were going to share with others. While my dad loves spending time in the garden, my mom loves spending time in the kitchen. During this visit,

we decided to make something new: dumplings with young pumpkin and meat filling. l showed her how to roll super thin wrappers but it wasn’t easy for her since she can’t keep her hands as steady as she used to. I told her she could just use the store bought potsticker wrappers and roll them out a bit to spread them thinner. I let her grate the pumpkin and l chopped the meat. Our dumplings turned out deliciously juicy inside and crispy outside. She said she likes them much more than the ones from the dim sum places in San Francisco and she can’t wait to make them again once they get back home.

Young Pumpkin Dumplings If you don’t want to make your own wrappers, you can always use store bought. Just flour your rolling pin and roll each wrapper outward from the center to make it little thinner. But making your own is fun and tastes much better. I like these dumplings plain, but you can serve with a soy and vinegar dipping sauce. For the filling: 1 teaspoon salt 2 cups grated young pumpkin 1 cup minced pork or chicken 2 tablespoons chopped green onion ¼ teaspoon ground white pepper 1 teaspoon sugar 1 teaspoon soy sauce 1 tablespoon oyster sauce ½ teaspoon vegetable oil ½ teaspoon sesame oil For the wrappers: 1 cup all-purpose flour ½ cup warm water, 110°F 1/8 teaspoon salt For frying: 1 ½ tablespoons vegetable oil ½ cup water 1 teaspoon flour Stir the flour and salt. Add the water, reserving 1 tablespoon, as you might not

The flavor of early autumn tucked in crispy-bottomed dumplings. Photo by Wendy Chan

need it, depending on the moisture content of the flour you use. Mix and knead until a soft dough forms. If it still feels crumbly, add the remaining teaspoon of water. Cover and let the dough rest for at least 30 minutes. While the dough rests, make the filling. In a large bowl, toss the grated pumpkin with the salt and let stand for 5 minutes. Squeeze out as much water as you can from the pumpkin. Add the minced pork or chicken, chopped green onion, white pepper, sugar, soy sauce, oyster sauce, ½ teaspoon vegetable oil and sesame oil. Mix well using your hands and refrigerate, allowing the flavors to meld. Now roll out the wrappers. Divide the dough into quarters, then cut each quarter into 5 or 6 pieces for a total of 20 to 24 pieces. Lightly flour your palms and roll the pieces into little balls. Yes, they will be very small. On a floured surface, roll each ball with a flour-dusted Chinese rolling pin or small beer bottle to form a 3 ½-inch circle. The dough will be stretchy and should be easy to work with. Remove the filling from the refrigerator. Holding the wrapper in one hand, place

1 tablespoon of filling in the center. Use the other hand to pleat the edges of the wrapper, pinching your way around in a circle until you have sealed the top. Place the sealed dumplings on a heavily floured tray or platter. The flour is important since the wrappers are thin and you don’t want them to stick to the bare tray. Once you finish wrapping, it’s time to cook. Heat a large nonstick pan over medium heat for a minute before adding the oil. When the oil is hot, place the dumplings in the pan and cook over medium heat for 2 to 3 minutes before lifting one up to check whether the bottom has turned just golden. Mix the ½ cup of water with 1 teaspoon flour and pour it around the edge of the pan. Cover and turn the burner up to high. Once you hear sizzling or see all the water has evaporated, about 4 to 5 minutes, turn the heat off. Let the pan sit for a minute before removing the cover. The dumplings will be juicy and hot, so let them cool for a minute before serving. l You can find Home Cooking with Wendy Chan (she/her) classes benefitting local charities on Facebook.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

17


FISHING THE NORTH COAST

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Chetco Estuary Pumping Out Big Kings By Kenny Priest

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f you’re looking to catch big, oceanbright kings, you’ll want to keep an eye on the Chetco estuary. Salmon have been staging in the tidewater since the beginning of September and they’ll be there until rain allows them to make their way upriver. And according to Andy Martin of Wild Rivers Fishing, the season at the mouth of the Chetco is now in full swing. “With an above-average return so far this season, the estuary has been crowded, as word has gotten out about the good fishing,” said Martin. “There is no ocean ‘bubble’ season this year, meaning all fishing must take place from the trips of the jetties inward. Trolling 360 flashers with spinner blades or anchovies has been effective this season as the technique catches on for bay trolling throughout the Oregon Coast. Trolling plug-cut herring or threaded anchovies without flashers also is working. The last two hours of the incoming tide and first half of the outgoing tide has produced the best fishing.” The daily bag limit for salmon on the Chetco is two adult fish per day, no more than one adult wild Chinook. Anglers may harvest adult hatchery Chinook until the daily bag limit has been met. Once the adult daily limit is harvested, anglers cannot continue to fish for jack salmon. Gear restrictions are in effect upstream from river mile 2.2 until Nov. 4. For additional Chetco regulations, visit eregulations.com/ oregon/fishing/southwest-zone.

Upper Klamath, Trinity salmon quota update The upper Klamath and Trinity adult quota closure dates are not yet set, according to Dan Troxel, an environmental scientist with CDFW’s Klamath River Project. “Typically, the quotas are based off harvest timing, meaning a set number of days following the closure of the adult Chinook salmon fishery on the lower Klamath,” said Troxel. “As of now, the

18

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Brody Curry, of Grants Pass, Oregon, holds a hatchery king caught at the mouth of the Chetco with guide Michael McGahan of Brookings Fishing Charters. Photo courtesy of Brookings Fishing Charters

upper Klamath will allow for adult harvest likely into the first week of October. As for the upper Trinity, we like to see what’s happening at Junction City and Willow Creek weirs to better inform that decision, but will likely occur mid to late October. Additionally, the Lower Trinity sector is partly informed by the recreational creel survey conducted by Hoopa Valley Tribal Fisheries; at this point harvest remains fairly low. Please keep an eye out for department press releases in the coming days and weeks.”

The Oceans: Eureka Rock fishing at Cape Mendocino was excellent over the weekend, according to Tim Klassen of Reel Steel Sport Fishing. “There’s lots of variety, and the black rockfish bite is as good as I’ve seen,” said Klassen. “There’s plenty of vermilions, canaries and yellowtails, as well. The lingcod bite has been good, too. We’ve been catching them up to 20 pounds, but the average is about 6 to 12 pounds. Ocean conditions looked good Tuesday and a few boats were headed south off Gorda roughly 35 miles for tuna. It was a one-day window before the wind picks back up.”

Shelter Cove According to Jake Mitchell of Sea Hawk Sport Fishing, the tuna action has been excellent for quite a few days. He said, “We’ve been getting them 15 to 20 miles from the Cove. We’re averaging right around 25 per day and they’re a really good grade. Our biggest this week was 44-pounds. It looks like Tuesday may be the last day for a while. The wind is fore-

cast to pick up Tuesday night, we’ll have to see what happens to the water after that.”

Crescent City According to Britt Carson of Crescent City’s Englund Marine, a few boats were chasing tuna Tuesday. “The warm water pushed out a little, it was about 50 miles,” said Carson. “Late last week the boats did really well around 40 miles out. Hopefully the water will stick around after the wind blows for the next few days. Other than tuna, the rockfish and lingcod bite continue to be wide-open.”

The Rivers: Lower Klamath Fresh kings continue to move into the lower Klamath. Anglers are catching a mix of jacks and adults from the Glen to Johnson’s. Fishing soft beads in some of the flats has been productive. Anglers can keep two jacks (less than or equal to 23 inches) per day with a possession limit of six. All adult Chinook salmon caught must be immediately released and reported on an angler’s report card. For the week ending Sept. 23, 219 jacks were harvested and 252 adults were released above the U.S. Highway 101 bridge. Read the complete fishing roundup at northcoastjournal.com. l Kenny Priest operates Fishing the North Coast, a fishing guide service out of Humboldt specializing in salmon and steelhead. Find it on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and www.fishingthenorthcoast. com. For up-to-date fishing reports and North Coast river information, email kenny@fishingthenorthcoast.com.


DOWN & DIRTY

Cleaning Up the Garden

The friendly wooly banded bear caterpillar, harbinger of cool weather, tells us it’s time to tidy up. Photo by Denise Gilmer

And what to leave messy By Julia Graham-Whitt

downanddirty@northcoastjournal.com

E

ven though we live in a temperate climate, I’ve been noticing some subtle changes in the weather and critters here on the coast. I’ve been seeing wooly banded bears — a caterpillar that has some bizarre obsession with crossing roads, at least down in my neck of the woods. Their fuzzy black and orange presence reminds us it’s going to get cooler and we may even see some rain. That means it’s time to get those garden chores done so we can be prepared for winter crops, as well as next spring. It’s not too late to plant some veggies, as they love our cooler weather and, if we’re lucky, you may not even have to water them much. Vegetables to plant right now include: kale, collards, lettuces, peas, broccoli and the very important garlic. I had a bit of a disaster with my garlic crop this year. Rust! Rust is a pernicious fungal disease. I know other gardeners who also had problems with rust, likely due to the cool, drippy weather we had this summer, followed by warm sunshine. I foolishly planted my garlic in a spot with some afternoon shade, which didn’t do it any favors. I learned from a fellow gardener that she likes to wait until at least November to plant her garlic and she’s found that it helps prevent rust. I normally plant it at the end of October, so I’ll give it a try this year. If you were unfortunate enough to have rust in your alliums (it also affects onions and leeks), you must rotate

the crop next year, as rust spores will stay in the soil. Clean up spent fruit. If you have fallen apples/pears/plums, it’s crucial to clean up the fallen fruit (unless you have the freaking cloven-hooved devil’s spawn deer like I do, in which case, they’ll clean it up for you), because it can attract fruit flies, beetles, and even fungal rot. These are not things you want in your orchard the following season. But when it comes to garden cleanup, don’t clean up everything. Pollinators, birds and other wildlife need food and shelter. Fallen leaves from trees will compost down and turn into what’s known as “leaf litter.” Decaying leaves provide organic matter to your soil, creating habitat for worms, insects and other organisms. The one exception to not cleaning up leaves is if disease has attacked them. You’ll want to clean up black spots on roses and leaf curl on peach leaves so they don’t infect plants the following year. If you can stand the look of it, don’t cut back spent flowers on every single blooming thing you have in your yard or garden. I’d love to say it was on purpose but it was because of overwhelm and a touch of laziness that I never cut back the stalks on the cow parsnip that grows all over the place here on the coast. I was surprised, yet delighted, to watch a Downy woodpecker work on one of the spent stalks. The stalks are strong enough to hold the

bird’s weight, and there was a bonanza of little insects inside, which the woodpecker happily ate as I watched from a distance. Even if you have a small space, try to leave a bit of brush piled up in a spot or two. This will provide cover for wildlife, as well as spots for quail to lay their eggs next year. Don’t panic if you see damage on leaves, such as wisteria or roses, that look like something has been munching on them, making little half circles. These are from leaf cutter bees, native pollinators that use the cut leaves and flowers to make their nests. Do clean up spent vines from tomatoes, pumpkins, squash, peas, etc. As long as they aren’t infected with something nasty, you can put these in your compost pile, along with plenty of “brown” material. Straw or leaves make a good addition to the compost pile. This is also one of the best times to plant shrubs and trees in your garden. The soil is still warm enough for root growth and, if we’re lucky and get rain, you won’t have to water them until next spring. You do need to water any new plants until we start getting significant rain, though, to

give them a good head start. As always, consider adding a native plant or two to your garden. Spring flowering bulbs are already showing up at local nurseries, as well as Costco. I snagged a bag of 50 daffodil bulbs I might even plant this year, rather than watching them turn green, then moldy because I never got around to them. Don’t be like me. Plant those bulbs! Lastly, take a look at what plants did well in your garden this year, and what might want to be moved or outright removed. It’s fun to ponder a new look in your yard or garden next year. As one of my coffee mugs says, a garden is never finished. l Julia Graham-Whitt (she/her) is owner and operator of the landscaping business Two Green Thumbs.

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ARTS NIGHTS

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ureka Main Street presents First Saturday Night Arts Alive on Oct. 1 from 6 to 9 p.m. Our galleries, museums, theaters, bars and restaurants are open. Some businesses continue to require everyone to wear masks and follow other COVID safety precautions to keep patrons and staff safe. Please respect the standards set by individual businesses, be kind and enjoy the evening! ART CENTER SPACE 620 Second St. Selection of local art. BELLE STARR CLOTHING 405 Second St. Amy’s Almost Perfect, “whimsical, oneof-a-kind” textile, mixed medium, updated vintage household items. Wine pour by donation to Planned Parenthood NorCal. BLUE OX BOUTIQUE 515 Second St. Serving local beer and wine. C STREET STUDIOS 208 C St. Various artists. CANVAS + CLAY 233 F St. “ROYALS,” Lisa Green, Tawny Morgan and Gina Tuzzi, paintings and sculpture. GOOD RELATIONS 223 Second St. Ken, black and white photography. Live models in the windows. HUMBOLDT ARTS COUNCIL 636 F St. William Thonson Gallery & Anderson Gallery: “Junque Art Competition & Exhibition,” artwork in this juried exhibition is made from 100 percent recycled materials.

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Kay Harden’s “Manzanar ... Now,” black-and-white pen and ink at Morris Graves Museum of Art. Courtesy of the artist Anderson Gallery: “Shade,” Kay Harden, landscapes. Knight Gallery: “Into the Light,” Serge Scherbatskoy, photography. Floyd Bettiga Gallery: Selections from the Natsoulas Collection. Youth Gallery: Humboldt County Author & Illustrator Festival, select works from winning illustrators. Museum Store/Permanent Collection Gallery: A selection of gifts and merchandise inspired by the artwork on view by Morris Graves, Glenn Berry, Melvin Schuler and Romano Gabriel. Homer Balabanis Gallery/Humboldt Artist Gallery: Humboldt County artists working in a variety of media from representational and abstract paintings, prints, jewelry, photographs and ceramics. HUMBOLDT HERBALS 300 Second St., Thao Le Khac, acrylic painting, watercolors. Music by Craig & Frank’s Adamas. JUST MY TYPE LETTERPRESS PAPERIE 235 F St. “Madhouse Minis,” Madeline Graham, sculpture. Music by Redwood Steel Band. LITTLE SHOP OF HERS 416 Second St. Seana Burden, acrylic painting, pen and ink, glitter. MANY HANDS GALLERY 438 Second St. Featuring work by more than 40 local artists and handmade treasures from around the globe. MENDENHALL STUDIOS 215 C St. Various artists. NEST 330 Second St. Hand painted home and garden décor. OLD TOWN INK LAB 212 G St., Suite 103. Wanderstay vending machine full of art and fun. OLD TOWN COFFEE & CHOCOLATES 211 F St. “Ten Goddesses and more,” mixed media art created in a Healing Arts Workshop hosted by Humboldt Domestic Violence Services. Music by Red Hot Shame. PEARL LOUNGE 507 Second St. Anna Amezcua and Nancy Ayers, oil painting, acrylic painting and mixed media. PROPER WELLNESS CENTER 517 Fifth St. Collection of local artists and glass blowers from Humboldt and around the world. REDWOOD ART ASSOCIATION 603 F

St. Fourth Annual Humboldt Open Paint Out Awards at 5:30 p.m.; music by Ron Honing; wine pour available. REDWOOD CURTAIN THEATRE 220 First St. Carin Billings, oil painting, acrylic painting and mixed media. Lobby gallery hours will be limited due to the performance of Natural Shocks. REDWOOD DISCOVERY MUSEUM 612 G St. Kids Alive! 5:30 p.m. to 8 p.m. This is a drop-off program for children aged 3.5-12 years. Kids can enjoy crafts, science activities, pizza and uninhibited museum fun. Enjoy Arts Alive while the kiddos have the time of their lives ($20/child, $17 for members). Must be confidently potty-trained. RESTAURANT FIVE ELEVEN 511 Second St. Anna Amezcua and Nancy Ayers, oil painting, acrylic painting and mixed media. ROSEBUD HOME GOODS 213 F St. “Fragments,” Tamara Cervenka, collage; sparkling cider pour to raise money for Walk to End Alzheimer’s; pop-up by Moon and Root Botanicals. SAGE 203 F St. Celebrating their twoyear anniversary with Sean Griggs, paintings and DJ music. SAILOR’S GRAVE TATTOO 138 Second St. Tattoo art. SIDEWALK GALLERY at Ellis Art & Engineering 401 Fifth St. “Ancient Faces,” Tania Fonseca, mixed media paintings. THE SPEAKEASY 411 Opera Alley. Live music playing from 8 to 11 p.m. TIMBER BOUTIQUE 514 Second St. Ana Sewell, silversmith jewelry. Music by Jewels Silvia. VIXEN 622 Second St. Emily Silver, watercolors. Pop-Up guest: Linked for Life - Permanent Jewelry. ZEN HUMBOLDT 437 F St. “Cloud, Surf, and Canopy: Works by Beasy,” Justin Ruhnke, photography and acrylic paintings. ZENO’S CURIOUS GOODS 320 Second St., Suite 1B. Portland artist Greg Bye, acrylic paintings. ZUMBIDO GIFTS 410 Second St. Jeni Ward Design, stickers, cards and prints pop-up shop. l


SERIOUSLY?

Tips for Throwing a Forced Birth Shower®

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By Jennifer Fumiko Cahill

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jennifer@northcoastjournal.com

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ho doesn’t love a baby shower, sitting around with a bunch of ladies playing guess the baby food flavor and griping about who came up with the idea to name their son Carbon first? But these days, as our bodily sovereignty is dwindling faster than a flat pitcher of mimosas in a room full of women whose faces hurt from smiling, sniffing diapers smeared with melted chocolate bars doesn’t always strike the right note. Face it, some of us will be carrying out pregnancies we don’t want, can’t afford and maybe won’t survive. It’s time to shift to Forced Birth Showers® for our siblings, besties, children and coworkers with not a lot going on outside the office! Invitations: Balloons and storks make sense when someone chooses the lifelong commitment to raising a child (or twins — Jesus, twins!) but when the guest of honor is just avoiding being a guest of the state, go for something understated. If you’re splashing out, you might try serving manila envelopes summons-style. Or, if you’re on a budget, send a terse email that reads, “Casey is pregnant and the only thing we can do is buy presents and eat a deli tray at my place. Bring liquor. Oh, and thanks for voting Republican, Candace.” (Avoid mentioning whether this pregnancy is the result of consensual sex — it’s tacky and will spoil the quiz at the party.) Decorations: Again, steer clear of pastels and glitter here. Consider camo decorations, since you don’t want to attract the attention of neighbors who might sell out your pal if the pregnancy doesn’t go to term. Besides, if you have to flee under cover of darkness, you can repurpose the tablecloth. If you must do balloons, adorn them with the faces of every state official and U.S. Supreme Court justice who brought this theocratic fuckery into law so we can memorize them and never forget. This dovetails into a dart game later. Don’t forget a balloon for Candace. The cake: Even if reproductive rights for everyone in the country were fully restored tomorrow, nobody wants a freaky belly cake or the fondant sculpture of a sleeping baby we have cut into. However, one of those horrific cakes with a baby emerging from its mother’s body could be a teaching opportunity provided it’s anatomically correct. What a great way to really make less sympathetic guests get a handle on what a torn perine-

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um (shoutout to the rectovaginal septum — stay strong!), hemorrhaging and even a garden-variety episiotomy — snipping a wider exit in the opening of the vagina to avoid a more Kool-Aid Man-like exit — looks like. Birth is seldom shown in media as anything more than some dramatic yelling and hand squeezing, and the fallout of having a Costco-chicken-size baby pushed, pulled and/or cut from your body are almost never mentioned, despite the number of parents who struggle with, for example, returning to normal walking, sitting and bowel movements. And that’s when everything in the previous 39 weeks goes smoothly without say, diabetes or potentially deadly blood pressure issues. Whatever kind of cake you provide, practice baking a file in there, since in some states, even miscarriage or stillbirth can lead to being charged with murder. Games: Here’s a fun one: Pin the Egg on the Uterine Lining. The contestant is blindfolded and spun, then dizzily tries to get a little pompom to stick to the right part of a felt uterus on the wall. Did you, like roughly 1 in 50 pregnancies, end up outside the fallopian tube where a fertilized egg cannot survive and may in fact cause you to die of sepsis or hemorrhaging? Depending on where you live, that may not be enough to get you the standard treatment of ending the pregnancy. There’s no moving the pompom, either, no matter what that dude from Ohio says. Good luck! OK, everybody take out your phones and let’s see who can delete all the apps that might track your menstruation and narc on you to the man first. Because if we’ve learned anything it’s that tech bros do not care about our privacy. For those who date men, do another round deleting dating apps and another round ordering sex toys because given the attending risk factors and your limited options in the event of an unwanted pregnancy, hon, the price of dick is too damn high. Gift ideas: Is the guest of honor Black? Jewelry makes a fine present, specifically a medical bracelet that reads, “Just pretend I’m a white lady and treat me accordingly.” It’s a blunt message but so is the recent study in the American Journal of Public Health that states being Black makes you more than three times more likely to die in pregnancy or postpartum. And while there’s little you can do to fix systemic healthcare disparities at your party, maybe an atten-

tion-getting accessory will remind hospital staff not to downplay or dismiss pain and symptoms of Black people for a hot second. Listen, they almost let Serena Williams die of a blood clot in that maternity ward. Not a bad gift idea for brown and Indigenous friends, either! Give cash. Lots of cash. Unplanned pregnancies are a huge driver of poverty among both singles and marrieds, and maternity leave and childcare are hilarious in this country. Not to mention medical costs (doubles over and breathes into knees for just a minute). Forced childbirth can really derail educational goals that lead to higher income, too, like a high school diploma. Or you can pass along your pal’s Venmo and wait for those anti-abortion activists who hassled you on the way to your pap smear to kick in a couple grand each. Lol, kidding. Guests can pitch in for a flight to somewhere a person’s bodily autonomy is enshrined in law and safe, legal abortions are widely accessible. Just for a vacation totally unrelated to any health issues. Unless you’re poor, in which case it’s a bus ticket to New York or California because evidently coastal elites are not that into forcing their citizens to give birth or even children barely in their teens to push out babies through still developing bodies. Goodie bags: Send those of childbearing age any meds you can hoard, since people are being denied vital prescriptions for pain, depression, cancer, autoimmune diseases, ulcers and more because they could potentially cause miscarriage. Come on, Mamma needs some arthritis pills! Hand out cute boxes of custom bandages that read, “Snitches get stitches,” to remind those who might narc on somebody for the bounty money. Say something, Candace. See what happens. Most of all, focus on making it fun. What’s most important of all is gathering and supporting your pal — they’re who really matters. Well, not as much as a six-week embryo roughly the size of the Viagra pill that’s never going to be taken away from any man. But you know, after that. Cheers, ladies! ● Jennifer Fumiko Cahill (she/her) is the arts and features editor at the Journal. Reach her at 442-1400, extension 320, or jennifer@northcoastjournal.com. Follow her on Twitter @JFumikoCahill.

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MEET OUR NEIGHBORS Humboldt Brewing Company and Coffee House Did you know that Humboldt Brewing Company was one of the first craft breweries in the country when it started 35 years ago? Owners, Dave and his sister, Julie, are excited to have found a new home in the old location of Mosgo’s, right next to Murphy’s Market in the Westwood neighborhood of Arcata. They will be open during the day and continue making coffee as well as beer. “We want to keep it as what it was to an extent…a quiet atmosphere, not a bar,” says Dave. “It’s a great space for students, neighborhoods, and families,” continues Dave, who also says they have big time gratitude for the hospitality Murphy’s Markets has shown

them. “A lot of folks from this neighborhood and Murphy’s are excited because there’s not much in this area of town,” he remarks. “The neighborhood needed a sit-down space and we’re thrilled to be able to provide it.” So if you’re looking for somewhere to study, work, meet, get together, or maybe even take a date, get ready to check out Humboldt Brewing Company Cafe and Brewhouse!

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com


SETLIST

Jazz in the Bardo By Collin Yeo

music@northcoastjournal.com

I

have been trying to find a way to tie the works of the author Hilary Mantel with the music of Pharoah Sanders, and have been coming up bare, I’m afraid. Last week both died, leaving this land of plangent weeping, fallen violence, and occasional delicious meals and orgasms, in favor of the fields in the Bardo reserved for those of our species who worked with the radiant fire of genius. In the case of Mantel, her historical novels proved conclusively the best way to hope to understand the unknowable, alien world of the past is through good fiction. If you haven’t read Wolf Hall yet, please do. You can thank me later. Nothing I could hope to write about Sanders would do any service to his music, so I’ll just point out that no less than Albert Ayler considered himself, Sanders and John Coltrane as the Holy Trinity of saxophone players. I’ll cosign that. Maybe there is a connection between these two disparate people, though. I’ve always felt true genius is revealed not in its incomprehensible splendor, but rather in its ability to translate complicated ideas to almost everyone, and with great ease. The fire of Prometheus was only inscrutable so long as it was solely in the possession of the jealous gods, kept dark to the world by their petty cruelty. Once it lit upon the tinder of the earth, it became the most recognizable thing in creation: The divine spark of inspiration, igniting the dull human clay into vessels of God’s own light. Through art, through music, through writing, through all our struggles to invent anew, we are bathed in its glow. And some among us, like Pharoah Sanders and Hilary Mantel, made a big glow of their own in the process. Have a bright week.

Thursday

The Brevet is an Orange County band that plays a mixture of various genres, from surf rock to RnB, all sort of blended down and fed through a filter of radio-friendly indie pop. A lot of people like this stuff, including many of you out there, so I’ll withhold my own judgment and stick to

the facts: Humbrews, 8 p.m., $15, Sequoia Rose is opening. Bang. Also, today kicks off Eureka’s sprawling, four-day Redwood Coast Music Festival, detailed in the Calendar on page 24.

Friday

Busy night tonight, with two very different, very big acts from yesteryear. First on the marquee is Matisyahu, the Brooklyn reggae crossover artist who started his career as a devout Hasid, although his music has transcended any notion of novelty as his career has grown and his public religiosity regarding the sect has diminished. You can catch him tonight at 7 p.m. at the Arcata Theatre Lounge ($35, $30 advance). Two hours later and a mere single-kick skateboard roll away over at Humbrews, legendary old school punk band The Avengers hits the stage at 9 p.m. ($20, $18 advance). Known best for its contribution to the pre-hardcore days of punk’s pantheon, this four-decade-plus act has kept up a consistent cult following through a reliable and solid discography. Former Chimps provide support.

Saturday

The Pub is putting on an Oktoberfest party today at 1 p.m. There’s a big line-up of musical acts, so I’ll just hit some of the highlights: Scarub (of Living Legends fame), B. Swizlo’s Mystery Lounge (longtime funk keyboard extraordinaire plus a ton of local rappers), ska act Checkered Past and a load of DJs, including Goldylocks. Tickets are $15 at the door, $10 in advance. If you missed it last night, now’s your second and last chance. I am of course talking about the opening performance of the Eureka Symphony, and this program looks hot. First up are a couple of pieces by Ukrainian composer Reinhard Glière, then the big event I’m excited for, Beethoven’s Third Symphony, “Eroica,” which is arguably

Ocean Alley plays the Arcata Theatre Lounge at 8 p.m. on Monday, Oct. 3. Photo by Kane Lehanneur, courtesy of the artists

the exchange point hinge from the Classical to the Romantic era. I’ve never heard this one live, so put me in, coach, I’m ready. Catch it at the Arkley Center ($19-$49, rush tickets available at the box office at 7 p.m. starting at $10 for students).

Sunday

Miami-born, Los Angeles-based pop duo Magdalena Bay exists in the vacuum created by the collapse of the vaporwave scene in the early 2010s. This project borrows from those sample-heavy, old Macintosh, synthy aesthetics to build a much bigger sound, like 1980s Japanese jazz and restaurant lounge music made stadium size. I enjoyed what I heard, and the real deal can be seen tonight at the Arcata Theatre Lounge at 7 p.m. ($20). Bring your brightest dancing shoes.

Monday

Remember that brief period in the 1980s when it seemed like everything in American culture was being infiltrated for the first time by Australian artists? From new wave band Men at Work to actors Paul “Crocodile Dundee” Hogan and Yahoo Serious, the nation seemed poised for an Aussie invasion that, frankly, never came to be. My own favorite artifact from that era is the 1985 film Bliss, based on Peter Carey’s novel of the same name. Anyhoo, I’m just riffing right now because the Arcata Theatre Lounge has some musicians from Down Under in the house tonight at 8 p.m. ($20).

Ocean Alley is a sextet whose press release mentions surf and psychedelic rock, which I definitely hear down in the sound. However, at its core, the act is a very proficient, shimmery pop band with a sound like a mirage of beauty rolling off the strip where the blacktop meets the beach.

Tuesday

Do you like bluegrass music? Of course, you do — few people don’t around these parts. If you’re in the mood for seeing some live bluegrass music played by young pros, and for an unbeatable price ($10), then I suggest you mosey over to Humbrews at 8 p.m. There you will find one of North Carolina’s finest bluegrass quintets Fireside Collective doing what it does best. Viva.

Wednesday

The Jam is throwing another reggae night with DJ Sarge One Wise, among others. You know the sound, you know the dance, so the time is really the only missing component here (apart from the cover charge, which appears to be nil). Roll through any time after 9 p.m. l Collin Yeo (he/him) thinks that when Plutarch wrote: “The obligation of law and equity reach only to mankind, but kindness and beneficence should be extended to the creatures of every species,” he was pretty right on, for an ancient Roman. He lives in Arcata.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Calendar Sept. 29 – Oct. 6, 2022 Photo by Mark McKenna

Submitted

Ready to feel fall down to your core? Same. Kick off the finest season of them all at the Fortuna Apple Harvest Festival, happening Saturday, Oct. 1 all day long in the Friendly City (free admission). The old-fashioned harvest festival is a family friendly citywide celebration. This year, there won’t be any bouncy hayrides (sad) at Clendenen’s Cider Works, but there’s no shortage of all things apple. They’ve got your apple dumplings, caramel apples and apple tastings plus live music. And the downtown street fair features merchant and vendor street sales, children’s games, live music and more. See you there!

It’s fall and the weather’s turned cool, but things are about to get hot, hot, hot in the Creamery District as the Humboldt Latin Dance and Music Festival twirls into action Oct. 6-9 at Redwood Raks World Dance Studio. The festival brings to town award-winning instructors ready to show you the steps in salsa, bachata, Cuban dances and more. And after you’ve learned a thing or two about how to shake, stomp and soulfully stare at your partner, try your moves out on the dance floor at the festival’s three late-night dance parties — complete with a bar and DJs pulsing out the rhythm. Find out more and get tickets at HumboldtLatinDance.com.

Dale Watson, courtesy of the artist

Shake, Rattle and Roll

Let’s get ready to rockabilly, Eureka! The Redwood Coast Music Festival is back after two years and gets into full swing Sept. 29-Oct. 2 with more than 40 performers playing 100 sets of live music playing at seven venues around town. They’re gonna rock this town, rock it inside out with Jazz, swing, blues, zydeco, rockabilly, American roots, country and Western swing. With this much music packed into four days, I’m gonna have to direct you to the website (rcmfest.org) for all the details, but here are highlights not to be missed: Shine up your saddle shoes for the Redwood Coast

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Music Festival Opening Night Dance, Thursday, Sept. 29 at Adorni Recreation Center. Doors open at 6 p.m. The Delta Nationals get things greased at 6:30 p.m. followed by Dave Stuckey and the Hothouse Gang until 10:30 p.m. There’ll be some good rockin’ tonight. If jazz is your jam, get tickets for the Redwood Coast Music Festival Friday Masters Sets - Jazz Meets Blues on Friday, Sept.. 30 from 1 p.m. to midnight at Adorni Recreation Center featuring Sugar Ray Norcia, Brian Casserly, Cornet Chop Suey, Duke Robillard and others. Festival favorite and blues and R&B giant Curtis Salgado turns up the heat in our cool coastal town at the Redwood Coast Music Festival Soul Night, Friday, Sept.. 30 at Eureka Theater. Locals Jenni and David and the Sweet Soul Band get things moving and grooving at 5:30 p.m. followed by Bishop Mayfield and Friends featuring Dave Storie at 7:15 p.m. and headliner Salgado taking the stage at 9 p.m. Doors at 5 p.m. Saturday at the Eureka Theater, it’s the Redwood Coast Music Festival Blues Revue with Jontavious Willis, Michael Doucet, Tom Rigney & Flambeau, Sugar Ray Norcia, Duke Robillard, Uptown Kings and more starting at 5 p.m. Doors open for that show at 4:30 p.m. And honkytonk guitarist Dale Watson and the Lone Stars rock the Adorni Recreation Center on Saturday, Oct. 1 for the Redwood Coast Music Festival Redwood Roundup starting at 3 p.m. along with a host of others, including the Western Swing All Stars with Dave Stuckey, Paul Anastasio and James Mason; the Joel Patterson Trio and Dave Bennett and the Memphis Speed Kings. These are just highlights. There are plenty more performances and dance events. Get tickets online at rcmfest.org for the whole festival or for individual days/events, and join music lovers from all over who come to Eureka to experience one of the best music and dancing festivals in the country.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Submitted

Want to help to protect our coastal dune habitats and support free outdoor education for local schools? Do you love wine, cheese and dessert? Well, naturally. Get tickets to Wine by the Sea taking place this Saturday, Oct. 1 from 3 to 6 p.m. at the Humboldt Coastal Nature Center ($45-$55). Bring a date and spend the afternoon enjoying local wines, cheeses, snacks and desserts. There’s also a wine pull, auction items and live music. All in all, a lovely afternoon. Tickets are available at Wildberries, the center or online at friendsofthedunes.org/winebythesea.

H

eads up, Humboldt: While the county’s masking mandate has been lifted, Public Health is still strongly recommending masking indoors in public, social distancing and “avoiding crowds and poorly ventilated spaces.” COVID-19 is still with us, so be sure to check the protocols at event venues.

29 Thursday ART

Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Exhibit of the late Arcata artist’s work. Curated by friend and neighbor, Shoshanna. redwoodraks.com.

BOOKS Beelzebub’s Tales To His Grandson Radio Hour. 10-11 p.m. The book will be read in its entirety on Humboldt Hot Air. This week’s reading: Episode 36: Chapter 42 (Part 2): Beelzebub In America. Free. rybopp@suddenlink.net. HumboldtHotAir.org. (707) 826-7567.

COMEDY Just Joshin’. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Last Thursday of each month Josh Barnes hosts talk, games and special guests. All ages w/caution for language. 21 and up to drink. $5. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. facebook.com/events/611411623947623. (707) 845-8864.

MUSIC The Brevet, Sequoia Rose. 8 p.m. Humboldt Brews HumBrews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Alternative rock, folk. $15. (707) 826-2739. Josephine Johnson. 6:30-9 p.m. Septentrio Tasting Room, 650 Sixth St., Arcata. The, singer-songwriter and Cal Poly Humboldt graduate returns to Arcata to perform. Drummer Jay Forbes (Strix Vega, Money) joins along with more musical guests. Free.

Karaoke (Thirsty Bear Lounge). 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. Come get your sing on. Free. bearrivercasino.com. McKinleyville Community Choir Rehearsal. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Lutheran Church of Arcata, 151 E. 16th St. Join if you like to sing or play an instrument. Reading music or prior experience not necessary. Rehearsals are every Thursday evening. ccgreene46@gmail.com. (831) 419-3247. Protoje with Lila Ike and Jesse Royal. 9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Ages 21 and up. $45. arcatatheatre.com. Redwood Coast Music Festival Opening Night Dance. 6 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. The Delta Nationals open at 6:30 p.m. followed by Dave Stuckey and the Hothouse Gang until 10:30 p.m. Get tickets online. rcmfest.org/.

THEATER Natural Shocks. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. Lauren Gunderson’s 60-minute, one-woman play about a woman waiting out an imminent tornado in her basement and reflecting on a lifetime of trauma. $20. nanettevoss@gmail.com. redwoodcurtain. com. (269) 355-0819.

EVENTS Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. Auction with plants, local artists, paintings, jewelry, glass, ceramics, autographed books by local authors, gift certificates from Cypress Grove and more. hbgf.org. (707) 442-5139. Redwood Coast Music Festival. -Oct. 2. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. The three-decade celebration of roots American music features more than 200 performers – from national to regional and local acts – playing at seven Eureka venues. See website for full schedule and ticket information. Tickets prices vary. rcmfest.org.

FOOD Dine and Donate. 5-8 p.m. Plaza Grill, 780 Seventh St., Jacoby’s Storehouse Third Floor, Arcata. A fundraiser to benefit the Alzheimer’s Association with door prizes, a silent auction and a raffle. doraleedsmith@gmail.com. www.plazagrillarcata.com. Food for People’s Free Produce Market - Eureka. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Bayshore Mall, 3300 Broadway, Eureka. Drive-thru event. foodforpeople.org. (707) 445-3166. Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. Freshest local produce, meat, fish, cheese, eggs, bread, flowers and more. Plus music and hot food vendors. Free. info@ northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/hendersoncenter.html. (707) 441-9999. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. Farm fresh produce, music and hot food vendors. Trained, ADA certified, service animals only. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/mckinleyville.html. (707) 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. Help fight hunger and improve nutrition in the community. Visit the website to be invited to a Zoom orientation. Free. volunteer@foodforpeople.org. foodforpeople.org/ volunteering. (707) 445-3166 ext. 310.

ETC Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents classes focused on strength and mobility (Tuesday), and on relaxation and breath work (Thursday). Contact instructor Ann Constantino for online orientation. $3-$5 donation per class, no one is turned away for lack of funds. annconstantino@ gmail.com. sohumhealth.org. (707) 923-3921.


Wind Energy Workshop. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Eureka Woman’s Club, 1531 J St. Discussing the next steps for California offshore wind energy development, including available data. RSVP by Friday, Sept. 23 at docs.google.com/ forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSftgWCMEghayRA8cCCv4Ytpm16bqRqnvwh3KFsRbNQEhwj24Q/viewform. chrisl@rcaa. org. eurekawomansclub.org.

30 Friday ART

Course for Creativity. 4-5:30 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Automated writing, guided visualization, movement and free doodling/exploration through mediums will be covered. Recommended for ages 15 and up. $20 each or $150 for all classes. sanctuaryarcata.org. Tim O’Reilly Memorial Art Exhibit. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. See Sept. 29 listing.

BOOKS Barry Evans Book Signing. 6 p.m. Eureka Books, 426 Second St. Barry signs copies of his book, The Humbook, a book of essays about Humboldt County history, hikes, geography, fauna and flora. eurekabookshop.com.

COMEDY

and Bishop Mayfield, and locals Jenni and David and the Sweet Soul Band. Tickets online. rcmfest.org.

20th Annual

THEATER Natural Shocks. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See Sept. 29 listing. Tiny Beautiful Things. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. Adapted by Nia Vardalos from Cheryl Strayed’s book, the play is about reaching when you’re stuck, healing when you’re broken. Proof of COVID vaccination or a recent negative test (72 hours) is required for entrance. Masks are recommended and may be required depending on local conditions. ncrt.net.

October 1 & 2, 2022

Humboldt, California

with Wyatt Shutt October 8-14, 2022

Horse Arena/Perigot Park - BLUE LAKE $10 Adults • $5.00 Children 3-12 2 years & under are free

A Family Weekend of Stories, Skill, Amusements, Medieval Morsels, Treasures, Knights & Royal Horses!

Knights of Valour Jousting 12:30 & 3:30 Daily

EVENTS

Horseback Archers

Eureka Friday Night Market. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Farmers market, arts and craft vendors, a bar featuring Humboldt-produced beverages, food vendors and live local music for dancing. humboldtmade.com/eureka-friday-night-market. Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 29 listing. Redwood Coast Music Festival. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. See Sept. 29 listing.

11:30 & 2:30 Daily

Tempest

Celtic Rock Headliner both days

Enchanted Story Tour Saturday 10 (for 1st 150 children)

FOR KIDS

Mike And Victoria - Evan Vest’s Album Recording Show 1. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Humboldt County comedian Evan Vest records his first album Mike And Victoria live at the Savage Henry Comedy Club. $15. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. facebook.com/events/449903990497859/. (707) 845-8864.

Kid’s Night at the Museum. 5:30-8 p.m. Redwood Discovery Museum, 612 G St., Eureka. Drop off your 3.5-12 year old for interactive exhibits, science experiments, crafts and games, exploring the planetarium, playing in the water table or jumping into the soft blocks. $17-$20. info@discovery-museum.org. discovery-museum.org/ classesprograms.html. (707) 443-9694.

MUSIC

FOOD

The Avengers, Former Chimps. 9 p.m. Humboldt Brews HumBrews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Punk rock. $20, $18. (707) 826-2739. Eureka Symphony “Bold Beginnings”. 8-10 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. This season begins with Beethoven’s “Eroica Symphony” plus Ukrainian composer Reinhold Glière’s “Russian Sailor’s Dance from The Red Poppy” and Glière’s “Horn Concerto in B flat, Op. 9” featuring horn soloist Daniel Nebel. $19$49, $10 student RUSH tickets at door. eurekasymphony@ gmail.com. eurekasymphony.org/get-your-tickets/#1. (707) 845-3655. Kenny Bowling. 9-midnight. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Country music. Every Friday. Matisyahu. 7 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Reggae, rock, hip-hop. All ages. $30. arcatatheatre.com. Opera Alley Cats. 7-10 p.m. The SpeakEasy, 411 Opera Alley, Eureka. Professional-level jazz twice a week with cool vibes and great people. Free. thespeakeasybar@yahoo.com. facebook.com/speakeasyeureka. (707) 444-2244. Pretty Kitty Karaoke. 9:30 p.m. Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872, 1018 H St., Eureka. Hosted by Jamie Kohl of Little Red fame. Cash only. 21 and up. Veterans welcome. Shuffleboard. PearceHansen999@outlook.com. facebook. com/profile.php?id=100082987501904. (206) 348-9335. Redwood Coast Music Festival Friday Masters Sets - Jazz Meets Blues. 1 p.m.-midnight. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Blues harmonica/vocalist Sugar Ray Norcia joins Emmy-award winning band leader Brian Casserly and the St. Louis jazz band Cornet Chop Suey for a set. Blues guitarist Duke Robillard swings with trumpet player Marc Caparone’s Back O’Town All Stars. American roots guitarist Joel Paterson and his trio play with acclaimed West Coast pianist Carl Sonny Leyland and saxophonist Jonathan Doyle. Tickets online. rcmfest.org. Redwood Coast Music Festival Soul Night. 5-10 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. With headliners Curtis Salgado

Medieval Festival of Courage

Information at

humboldtyoga.com

Boffing • Axe Throwing Archery • Tavern • Petting Zoo Pony Rides • Fairyland Art Vendors • Cider Pressing Blacksmithing & Ceramic Demos Costumed Revelry • & More www.MedievalFestivalofCourage.org

Garberville Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Garberville Town Square, Church Street. Fresh produce, eggs, meat, baked goods, nursery plants and starts, oysters, live music on the square, crafts and more.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Help with animal care, weeding, watering, planting and occasional harvest help on Saturday mornings. Volunteers get free produce. flowerstone333@gmail.com. (530) 205-5882.

ETC Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. SoHum Health presents online classes with short, high intensity cardio workouts. Contact instructor Stephanie Finch by email for a link to the class. Free. sfinch40@gmail.com. sohumhealth.com.

1 Saturday

ART

Arts Alive. First Saturday of every month, 6-9 p.m. Historic Old Town Eureka, Second Street. Art, and a heap of it, plus live music. All around Old Town and Downtown, Eureka. Free. eurekamainstreet.org. (707) 442-9054. MIGRATIONS: Walking Together. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Playhouse, 1251 Ninth St. This procession starts at the playhouse and finishes with a parade at Carlson Park in Valley West with stops for contributions from cultural groups such as Humboldt Asians & Pacific Islanders in Solidarity, Centro Del Pueblo, the Yurok Wellness Coalition, Outer Space and the North Coast Environmental Center. Walk the whole route or drop by. Free. laura@ arcataplayhouse.org. arcataplayhouse.org/2022/06/28/ migrations/. (707) 822-1575. Continued on next page » northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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CALENDAR Continued from previous page

Pastels on the Plaza. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Area businesses support North Coast Children’s Services by sponsoring more than 100 artists chalk drawing on the plaza during the farmers market. Free. info@ncsheadstart.org. ncsheadstart.org/events/227-2/. (707) 825-7206.

BOOKS Book Launch Party. 4-7 p.m. Septentrio Tasting Room, 650 Sixth St., Arcata. Two local authors celebrate the release of their novels: Lelia Moskowitz with Growland and Kathy Wollenberg with Far Less. Free.

COMEDY Mike And Victoria - Evan Vest’s Album Recording Show 2. 9-11:30 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Humboldt County comedian Evan Vest records his first album, Mike And Victoria, live at the Savage Henry Comedy Club. $15. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. www. facebook.com/events/1225887494931400/. 707-845-8864.

LECTURE AAUW-Humboldt Explores Hospice of Humboldt. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Red Lion Hotel, 1929 Fourth St., Eureka. Gail Saunders and Tia Bartelle from Hospice of Humboldt are the speakers for the American Association of University Women-Humboldt (AAUW) meeting. $9 coffee/tea, $24 breakfast. roseweave52@gmail.com. humboldt-ca. aauw.net. Humboldt County Historical Society Program. 2:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Eureka’s Historic South Park Neighborhood And Racetrack 1860s – 1910s. Presented by HCHS Board Member Mike Berry. Via zoom. Register at humboldtgov.org/library before Friday, Sept. 30 at 5 p.m. Free.

MUSIC Boogie T w/Dirt Monkey and Chopsjunkie. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Dance/electronic. All ages. $30. arcatatheatre.com. Club Mateel 2nd Edition. Mateel Community Center, 59 Rusk Lane, Redway. Lucas Mergip Rohe, Deiv Schon, Nico Mura, B2B, Agus Pazos. Doors at 6 p.m. $20. mateel.org. Eureka Symphony “Bold Beginnings”. 8-10 p.m. Arkley Center for the Performing Arts, 412 G St., Eureka. See Sept. 30 listing. Josephine Johnson at Redwood Curtain. 6-9 p.m. Redwood Curtain Brewery & Tasting Room, 550 South G St., #4, Arcata. Johnson, singer-songwriter and Cal Poly Humboldt graduate, returns to Arcata to perform. Drummer Jay Forbes (Strix Vega, Money) joins along with more musical guests. Free. redwoodcurtainbrewing.com. Oktoberfest. 1-11 p.m. The Pub at The Creamery, 824 L St., Suite A, Arcata. Family-friendly event with games, prizes, music, beer and Oktoberfest snacks. Music by Scarub of Living Legends, Woven Roots, OG of Slightly Stoopid, DJ Leo, B. Swizlo’s Mystery Lounge, G.Davis, Nac One, Eli Fowler, DJ Goldilocks, Dj D’Vinity, The Moondots and Checkered Past. $10. bootyshakinmusicproductions@ yahoo.com. facebook.com/thepubatc. (707) 630-5178. Ophelia’s Daydream. 8-11 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. Classic rock jam band. $5. opheliasdaydreamband@gmail.com. blondiesfoodanddrink.com. (707) 822-3453. Redwood Coast Music Festival Blues Revue. 5-11 p.m. Eureka Theater, 612 F St. With Jontavious Willis, Michael Doucet, Tom Rigney & Flambeau, Sugar Ray Norcia, Duke Robillard, Uptown Kings and more. Get tickets online. rcmfest.org. Redwood Coast Music Festival Redwood Roundup. 3 p.m. Adorni Recreation Center, 1011 Waterfront Drive,

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Eureka. Headlined by honky tonk guitarist Dale Watson and the Lone Stars. Also the Western Swing All Stars with Dave Stuckey, Paul Anastasio and James Mason; the Joel Patterson Trio and Dave Bennett and the Memphis Speed Kings. Tickets online. rcmfest.org.

THEATER Natural Shocks. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See Sept. 29 listing. Tiny Beautiful Things. 8 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Sept. 30 listing.

EVENTS Fortuna Apple Harvest Festival. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. City of Fortuna, various city locations. A citywide celebration of the fruit of fall. Narrated tours of the Historic Apple Orchard at Clendenen’s Cider Works, apple dumplings and caramel apples, live music, downtown street fair, merchant and vendor street sales, children’s games and more. Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 29 listing. Humboldt Sponsors Final Rummage Sale. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Redwood Acres Fairgrounds, 3750 Harris St., Eureka. Humboldt Sponsors’ last and final sale. Three buildings full of bargains galore for the whole family. Free admission and parking. humboldtsponsors@gmail.com. humboldtsponsors.org. (707) 499-9935. The Medieval Festival of Courage. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Blue Lake Horse Arena, 210 Chartin Road. A benefit for local schools and nonprofits featuring jousting knights, archers on horseback, medieval morsels and a craft market. Musical acts include Tempest, Barn Fire, Good Company and others. On Saturday morning, the first 200 children will walk the village tour to meet the characters and receive special gifts. $10, $3 kids. medievalfestivalofcourage.org. Redwood Coast Music Festival. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. See Sept. 29 listing. Trinidad Flea Art. First Saturday of every month, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Trinidad Town Hall, 409 Trinity St. High quality flea market items and art made by local artisans. Live music. For more info or to be a vendor, call 707-834-8720. tcc@ trinidadcivicclub.org. (707) 677-3655. Wine by the Sea. 3-6 p.m. Humboldt Coastal Nature Center, 220 Stamps Lane, Manila. An afternoon gazing at the ocean, sipping local wines and nibbling local cheeses and more. Wine pull, auction items and live music. Benefits the Friends of the Dunes. Tickets at Wildberries, online and at the center. $45-$55. info@friendsofthedunes.org. friendsofthedunes.org/winebythesea. (707) 444-1397.

FOOD Arcata Plaza Farmers Market. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. The North Coast Growers’ Association Farmers’ Market features local produce, food vendors, meats, plant starts and flowers every week. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/ arcataplaza.html. (707) 441-9999. Drive-by Oktoberfest. The Griffin, 937 10th St., Arcata. Rotary Club of Arcata Sunrise offers a meal of bratwurst, German-style potato salad, sauerkraut, soft pretzel and homemade black forest truffles . Meals and to-go Griffin signature drinks or beer must be pre-ordered online. Pick up from 3 to 5 p.m. Must be 21 to pick up drinks. $25. arcatasunrise.org. Oktoberfest at the Bigfoot Taproom. 1-9 p.m. The Bigfoot Taproom, 1750 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Enjoy drinks, food, games and prizes. Food by The Ville Co., including a variety of sausages, sauerkraut and pretzels. Draft Bers will include: Spaten Oktoberfest, Alesmith

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Oktoberfest, Fall River Oktoberfest, Goodlife Bavarian Lager, Almanac German Kolsch and more. thebigfoottaproom.com. Sea Goat Farmstand. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Fresh veggies grown on site, local eggs and sourdough bread. Work from local artists and artisans. flowerstone333@gmail. com. (530) 205-5882.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See Sept. 30 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Eureka Zombie Walk. 5:30 p.m. Humboldt County Courthouse, 825 Fifth St., Eureka. Calling all zombies for the ninth annual Arts Alive Takeover. Meet outside and in costume. Fortuna Pumpkin Patch & Corn Maze. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Fortuna Pumpkin Patch, 1813 Eel River Drive. Pumpkins priced by the pound. Corn maze. Pigs and goats to pet, too. Special events each weekend through October. Free admission, $5 corn maze, corn maze free for under 5. info@ tableblufffarm.com. TableBluffFarm.com. (707) 890-6699.

MEETINGS Sistahood. 9:30-11 a.m. Virtual World, Online. For women teenagers and older on Zoom, to build healthy relationships and strengthen ties through validation and affirmation. Music from 9:30 a.m., open conversation from 9:45 a.m., meditation with the Sista Prayer Warriors from 10:45 a.m. Stewardship Work Day. 9:30 a.m.-noon. Trinidad Coastal Land Trust, 380 Janis Court. Join Trinidad Coastal Land Trust in caring for the coast. Email or call to sign up. zoe@trinidadcoastallandtrust.org. www.trinidadcoastallandtrust. org. (707) 677-2501.

OUTDOORS Eureka October Trash Bash. 8:45-10:30 a.m. Bayshore Mall, 3300 Broadway, Eureka. Meet at Walmart behind the Bayshore Mall and help pick up trash around the surrounding waterfront areas. Volunteers sign in and get supplies when they arrive. Come at 8:45 a.m. for a Los Bagels bagel. empowereureka.org/events/trash-bash-4. (707) 441-4080. Explore North Coast Humboldt Bay Coastal Cleanup. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Humboldt Bay Boat Launch under the Samoa Bridge, Waterfront Drive, Eureka. Join Explore North Coast for a kayak cleanup around Tuluwat Island in Humboldt Bay. All water craft are welcome, life vests are required. Cleanup supplies provided but bring your own gear if you like. Register online. Free. brianorland@ gmail.com. actionnetwork.org/events/tuluwat-islandhumboldt-bay-kayak-cleanup.

SPORTS Run in the Redwoods 5k Walk & Fun Run. 10 a.m. Prairie Creek Redwoods State Park, 127011 Newton B Drury, Orick. The scenic 5K course starts on Drury Parkway, midway down Elk Prairie, and ends at the Prairie Creek Visitor Center. Register online. redwoodparksconservancy. org/9th-annual-run-redwoods-5k.

ETC Abbey of the Redwoods Flea Market. First Saturday of every month, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Grace Good Shepherd Church, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. Local arts, products, goods. Free entry. Apple Harvest Skate. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Fortuna Skating Rink, Rohner Park. Discount night. $1.50 off per skater. Refreshments, special photo backdrop, coloring contest with free skate giveaways throughout the night.

2 Sunday

COMEDY

Sunday Open-Mic. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. Sign-ups at 9 p.m., show at 9:30 p.m., local favorite features for the 10@10. Comics get 5 minutes. Zero hate speech tolerated. All-ages w/caution for language, 21 and over with ID to drink. Snacks, drinks, friendly atmosphere. Free, donations accepted. info@ savagehenrycomedy.com. savagehenrycomedy.com. (707) 845-8864.

MUSIC Always on Sunday. 12-5 p.m. Fieldbrook Winery, 4241 Fieldbrook Road. Beer, wine and appetizers/salads for purchase. Reservations are required for wood-fired pizza. fieldbrookwinery.com. Magdalena Bay. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Los Angeles-based electro indie-pop duo. All ages. $20. arcatatheatre.com. Music in the Garden. First Sunday of every month, 1-3 p.m. Humboldt Botanical Garden, 7351 Tompkins Hill Road, College of the Redwoods campus, north entrance, Eureka. Enjoy live music in the garden. hbgf.org. Sunday Jazz Jams. 5:30-8:30 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. Every Sunday. Jazz players, all ages, all levels. Bring your ax and play some Real Book tunes. Everybody who wants to play, plays. Free. blondiesfoodanddrink@gmail.com. blondiesfoodanddrink. com. (707) 822-3453.

THEATER Natural Shocks. 2 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See Sept. 29 listing. Tiny Beautiful Things. 2 p.m. North Coast Repertory Theatre, 300 Fifth St., Eureka. See Sept. 30 listing.

EVENTS Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 29 listing. The Medieval Festival of Courage. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Blue Lake Horse Arena, 210 Chartin Road. See Oct. 1 listing. Redwood Coast Music Festival. City of Eureka, Humboldt County. See Sept. 29 listing.

FOOD Food Not Bombs. 4 p.m. Arcata Plaza, Ninth and G streets. Free, hot food for everyone. Mostly vegan and organic and always delicious. Free. Humboldt County Historical Society Annual Luncheon. 12:30-2:30 p.m. Eureka Veteran’s Memorial Building, 1018 H St. Past HCHS president Arlene Hartin speaks about the history of the Society from its founding. Tickets by phone or online. $50. humboldthistory.org. (707) 445-4342. Old Fashioned Pancake Breakfast. 8-11 a.m. Freshwater Community Guild, 49 Grange Road, Eureka. Enjoy breakfast in the spacious hall with buttermilk and whole grain pancakes, ham, sausages, scrambled eggs, apple compote, orange juice, tea and French roast coffee.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Fortuna Pumpkin Patch & Corn Maze. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Fortuna Pumpkin Patch, 1813 Eel River Drive. See Oct. 1 listing.

ETC Clean the Sidewalk Day. First Sunday of every month, 9-11 a.m. Valley West Park, Hallen Drive, Arcata. Help pick up non-hazardous items left behind. Meet at the park entrance. Instructions and supplies at the check-in table. gmartin@cityofarcata.org. cityofarcata.org. Humboldt Flea Market. First Sunday of every month,


9 a.m.-3 p.m. Arcata Community Center, 321 Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway. New location. Masks and safe social distancing required. Browse antiques, collectibles, tools, records, clothes, crafts, pies, jams and more. $2, free for kids under 13.

3 Monday

ART

Art + Film Dept Faculty & Staff Exhibition. Reese Bullen Gallery, Cal Poly Humboldt, Arcata. See the professional work and diverse talents of instructor and staff artists through a wide spectrum of forms, themes and styles. art.humboldt.edu/galleries. Art Show - Neil Gilchrist, Photography. Arcata Marsh and Wildlife Sanctuary Interpretive Center, 569 S. G St. An exhibit of images photographed over the past year during the artist’s morning walks in the Arcata Marsh. Painting for Children. 4-5:30 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. A space for children paint freely and share their work at the end of each class. $20 each or $150 for all classes. sanctuaryarcata.org. Yoga & Art. 5:30-6:45 p.m. Humboldt Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, 24 Fellowship Way, Bayside. Four weeks of outdoor, gentle yoga practice for adults, along with art sessions for kids aged 5-12. Sign up online. donation-based. comm@huuf.org. bit.ly/huufyoga. (707) 822-3791.

BOOKS Equity Arcata’s Community Book Club. First Monday of every month, 4-6 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Alia Dunphy and Meridith Oram discuss Adrienne Marie Brown’s book Emergent Strategy: Shaping Change, Changing Worlds. On Zoom. Register online. equityarcata.com.

MUSIC Ocean Alley. 8 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Australian psychedelic surf rockers. All ages. $20. arcatatheatre.com.

EVENTS Humboldt Botanical Garden Online Auction. 6 a.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 29 listing.

FOOD Miranda Farmers Market. 2-6 p.m. Miranda Market, 6685 Avenue of the Giants. Fresh produce, herbs and teas, eggs, plants and more. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation. org. (707) 441-9999. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3:30-4:30 p.m. See Sept. 29 listing.

ETC Ham Radio Technician License Class. 7-9 p.m. Humboldt Bay Fire Department, 3030 L St., Eureka. The Humboldt Amateur Radio Club is offering a class to prepare students for the Amateur Radio Technician Class license examination. This class will be a hybrid class, meeting via Zoom and in person at the Humboldt Bay Fire Training Room. Free. Homesharing Info Session. 9:30-10 a.m. and 1-1:30 p.m. This informational Zoom session will go over the steps and safeguards of Area 1 Agency on Aging’s matching process and the different types of homeshare partnerships. Email for the link. Free. homeshare@a1aa.org. a1aa.org/homesharing. (707) 442-3763. Humboldt Bounskee League. 6-8 p.m. Humboldt Brews, 856 10th St., Arcata. Weekly league nights. Purchase of any wood bounskee from Humbrews or the website includes one-month family membership for future events. All ages. Free. bounskee@gmail.com. bounskee.fun. (707) 601-9492. Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 30 listing.

4 Tuesday

MUSIC

Opera Alley Cats. 7-10 p.m. The SpeakEasy, 411 Opera Alley, Eureka. See Sept. 30 listing.

THEATER Cirque Mechanics in Zephyr. 7 p.m. Van Duzer Theatre, Cal Poly Humboldt, Arcata. Theatrical circus show. $39, $25 kids, $5 Cal Poly Humboldt students w/ID.

FEATURED HUMBOLDT COUNTY ARTIST

Shred My Couch

Cat stickers, pins, patches and apparel

FOOD Fortuna Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. 10th and Main streets, Fortuna. Locally grown fruits, veggies and garden plants, plus arts and crafts, music and hot food vendors. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/fortuna.html. (707) 441-9999. Old Town Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Old Town, F Street between First and Third streets, Eureka. Fresh local produce, eggs, bread, specialty sourdough donuts and more. Plus music and hot food vendors. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/oldtown. html. (707) 441-9999. Shelter Cove Farmers Market. 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Mario’s Marina Bar, 533 Machi Road, Shelter Cove. Fresh produce, flowers, plant starts and more. Live music and hot food vendors. Market match for CalFresh EBT customers. Free. info@northcoastgrowersassociation.org. northcoastgrowersassociation.org/sheltercove.html. (707) 441-9999.

MEETINGS Humboldt Cribbage Club Tournament. 6:15-9 p.m. Moose Lodge, 4328 Campton Road, Eureka. Weekly six-game cribbage tournament for experienced players. Inexperienced players may watch, learn and play on the side. Moose dinner available at 5:30 p.m. $3-$8. 31for14@ gmail.com. (707) 599-4605. Monthly Meeting VFW Post 1872. First Tuesday of every month, 6-7 p.m. Redwood Empire VFW Post 1872, 1018 H St., Eureka. Calling all combat veterans and all veterans eligible for membership in Veterans of Foreign Wars to meet comrades and learn about events in the renovated Memorial Building. Free. PearceHansen999@outlook.com. (707) 443-5331.

ETC English Express: An English Language Class for Adults. Build English language confidence in ongoing online and in-person classes. All levels and first languages welcome. Join anytime. Pre-registration not required. Free. englishexpressempowered.com. (707) 443- 5021. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 29 listing.

5 Wednesday

ART

Art Club. First Wednesday of every month, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Redwood Retro, 211 G St., Eureka. Come for the conversation and bring your own project or partake in one where you’ll be provided with materials and instruction for an additional fee. Sign up and see what this month’s project is online. $22. stainedghost.com. Figure Drawing. 6-8:30 p.m. Blondies Food And Drink, 420 E. California Ave., Arcata. $5. blondiesfoodanddrink.com.

BOOKS On the Same Page Book Club. 5:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. Online book club that meets on the first WednesContinued on next page »

OPEN MON-SAT 9 - 5 & SUNDAY 10 - 4 394 MAIN STREET, FERNDALE

www.humboldtshometownstore.com

U O Y K T HAN

FOR VOTING US

BE S T

LOCALLY MADE FOOD

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

27


CALENDAR

SCREENS

Continued from previous page

day of the month on Zoom. Sign up using the Google form at forms.gle/bAsjdQ7hKGqEgJKj7.

COMEDY Open Mikey. 9-11 p.m. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. The longest running comedy open-mic in Humboldt County. Sign-ups at 9 p.m. Show at 9:30 p.m. Comics get 5-minute sets. Snacks, drinks, friendly atmosphere, zero hate speech tolerated. All-ages w/caution for language. Free, donations accepted. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. savagehenrycomedy.com. (707) 845-8864.

MOVIES Sci-Fi Night: Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1992). 6-9 p.m. Arcata Theatre Lounge, 1036 G St. Custom curated preshow at 6 p.m. Free raffle at 7:30 p.m. Movie at 7:35 p.m. All ages. Parental guidance suggested. Retro-gaming in the lobby. $5, $9 admission and poster. info@arcatatheatre. com. facebook.com/events/798409954534083. (707) 613-3030.

MUSIC Bayside Ballads and Blues. 6-8 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Every Wednesday.

THEATER Madsummer. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. A jukebox musical adaptation of A Midsummer Night’s Dream set in a care home during a pandemic. Masks are recommended for this 90-minute production without an intermission. $20, $15 students/seniors. www. redwoodcurtain.com.

GARDEN Sea Goat Farm Garden Volunteer Opportunities. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Abbey of the Redwoods, 1450 Hiller Road, McKinleyville. See Sept. 30 listing.

HOLIDAY EVENTS Fortuna Pumpkin Patch & Corn Maze. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Fortuna Pumpkin Patch, 1813 Eel River Drive. See Oct. 1 listing.

ETC Tabata. 5:30-6:30 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 30 listing.

6 Thursday

MUSIC Karaoke (Thirsty Bear Lounge). 9 p.m.-1 a.m. Bear River Casino Resort, 11 Bear Paws Way, Loleta. See Sept. 29 listing. McKinleyville Community Choir Rehearsal. 6:30-8:30 p.m. Lutheran Church of Arcata, 151 E. 16th St. See Sept. 29 listing.

THEATER Madsummer. 8 p.m. Redwood Curtain Theatre, 220 First St., Eureka. See Oct. 5 listing.

EVENTS Drag Queen Bingo with Mo Heart. 7 p.m. Jolly Giant Commons, Cal Poly Humboldt, Arcata. Drag Queen Bingo featuring Mo Heart from RuPaul’s Drag Race. (707) 826-3928. Our Lady of Fatima Celebration Weekend: Arraial Game & Silent Auction. 6-11 p.m. Arcata Portuguese Hall, 1285 11th St. Three-day event with Mass and Rosary, food, live music, Arraial white ticket game, silent and live auctions. Get daily event info on Facebook. 1/?active_tab=about.

FOOD Best of the Wurst. 5-7 p.m. The Lodge, 445 Herrick Ave., Eureka. The Rotary Club of Southwest Eureka’s annual bratwurst dinner includes grilled bratwurst, German potato salad and a giant pretzel. Dine-in at the Lodge or drive-by for a boxed dinner delivered to your car. Benefits the Lyme Disease Testing Access Program and other club projects. Tickets online or at pickup site, no cash. $25 before 9/30, $30 after 9/30. swrotary.org. (707) 845-3459. Henderson Center Farmers Market. 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Henderson Center, Henderson near F Street, Eureka. See Sept. 29 listing. McKinleyville Farmers Market. 3-6 p.m. Eureka Natural Foods, McKinleyville, 2165 Central Ave. See Sept. 29 listing. Volunteer Orientation Food for People. 3-4 p.m. See Sept. 29 listing.

GARDEN Drop-In Volunteer Day. 1-4 p.m. Bayside Park Farm, 930 Old Arcata Road, Arcata. Get a taste of a farmer’s work growing vegetables, herbs and flowers. Come prepared for sunshine, cold, wet and working in the dirt. Bring a water bottle, snacks, closed toe shoes, long pants, sleeves and a sun hat. Free. baysideparkfarm@cityofarcata.org. cityofarcata.org/440/Bayside-Park-Farm. (707) 822-8184.

ART

HOLIDAY EVENTS

Art Night at the Sanctuary. First Thursday of every month, 4-7 p.m. The Sanctuary, 1301 J St., Arcata. Create with others freely or work on a guided project. Bring your own supplies or use what’s around to collage, paint, draw, make an art book, etc. $5-$20 suggested, no one turned away for lack of funds. sanctuaryarcata.org.

ETC

COMEDY Savage Henry Comedy Festival. Savage Henry Comedy Club, 415 Fifth St., Eureka. For three days, 140 or so comedians from all over the country descend on Humboldt County at more than 10 venues and more than 40 shows for the 11th annual festival $65 for everything or $5-$20 for individual shows. info@savagehenrycomedy.com. savagehenrycomedy.com/comedy-festival. (707) 845-8864. Comedy Humboldt Open Mic. First Thursday of every month, 8-10 p.m. Clam Beach Tavern, 4611 Central Ave., McKinleyville. Tell your jokes.

DANCE Humboldt Latin Dance and Music Festival. 7 p.m.-midnight. Redwood Raks World Dance Studio, 824 L St., Arcata. Award-winning instructors teach 20+ workshops in salsa, bachata, Cuban dances and more. Late-night dance parties on Thursday, Friday and Saturday night with a bar and DJs. All access wristbands are available presale online or at the door. $18. latindancehumboldt@gmail.com. humboldtlatindance.com. (707) 816-2809.

28

Fortuna Pumpkin Patch & Corn Maze. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Fortuna Pumpkin Patch, 1813 Eel River Drive. See Oct. 1 listing. Restorative Movement. 10:30-11:30 a.m. & 2-3 p.m. Virtual World, Online. See Sept. 29 listing.

Heads Up …

Ink People Center for the Arts invites artists to submit work in any media for the We Are Worthy: Artwork of Survivors group exhibition at the Brenda Tuxford Gallery. Deadline for application submission is Oct. 14. Apply at www.inkpeopleinc.submittable.com. Any questions? Email gallery@inkpeople.org. Humboldt County artists and craftspeople are encouraged to submit grant applications for the Victor Thomas Jacoby Award, which includes $10,000 in funding for four recipients. Applications accepted through Nov. 1 and can be found online at hafoundation.org/Grants1. KEET-TV seeks a diverse group of individuals to join its Community Advisory Board. Meetings are held quarterly on Zoom. Go to KEET.org to find the link at the bottom of the page. Become a volunteer at Hospice of Humboldt. For more information about becoming a volunteer or about services provided by Hospice of Humboldt, call (707) 267-9813 or visit hospiceofhumboldt.org. l

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

You can take the pumpkin spice latte from my cold, dead hands. Pearl

Confess, Fletch and Pearl By John J. Bennett

screens@northcoastjournal.com

CONFESS, FLETCH. To a vast, often problematic swath of the population (read: Gen X white guys, to whom I am only generationally adjacent, thanks very much), Chevy Chase is as a god. This is due in part, of course, to his SNL antics, Clark Griswold and his, in hindsight, surprisingly minor, world-devouring turn in Caddyshack (1980). But it is Chase’s rendering of Irwin M. Fletcher in Fletch (1985), from Gregory McDonald’s series of mystery-solving reporter novels, that spawned a million shaky impersonations and made him a successful, if unlikely leading man for the next decade. I’ve seen and enjoyed Fletch — maybe even Fletch Lives (1989), I can’t really recall — but it wasn’t a particularly formative text. Funny? Sure, and kind of sexy in the mildly uncomfortable style of movies borne of the transition from the prior decade. And, full disclosure: I certainly put in my time with my VHS copy of Three Amigos (1986). But recasting Fletch poses no threat to the sanctity of my remembered childhood. If it does yours, well, write a song about it and pitch it to your other dad-band sad sacks. Jon Hamm, on the other hand, is an actor (star?) for whom I’ve long wished an appropriate starring vehicle. He shall always be the Don Draper of our dreamless drunken dreams, but we have had it on good information for some time now that the guy’s got jokes; a shame Hollywood

has all but abandoned comedy. Before the genre is ground completely to dust, though, Confess, Fletch has managed to sneak in, albeit primarily via streaming. The fact that a clever, modestly scaled comedy whodunnit with charisma and sex appeal has to sneak anywhere is disheartening, and speaks to tragic developments both in the collective consciousness and in the movie business. But Confess, Fletch is here now and I should be glad. I’ve yet to read any of McDonald’s source material but, as I understand it, his Fletch is less grandstanding goof than Chase made him, more sardonic and capable. And that is the character as Hamm plays it, prone to muttered asides, apt to be bested in physical contest, but cleverer and smarter than most. After a brief Roman holiday leads to a romantic entanglement, Fletch makes his way to Boston, where he trips over a dead body and falls into a murder investigation set against an intercontinental art heist. Doggedly pursued by Detective Monroe (Roy Wood, Jr.), a Celtic to his Laker, Fletch quickly becomes a person of interest in multiple felonies and must conduct his own investigation while ducking tails and infiltrating the yacht-clubbing Northeast blue-bloodery. Admittedly, I’m a sucker for noir and detective stories reimagined in contemporary settings, so the briefest of plot sketches had me intrigued. But, as is so


ASTROLOGY

John J. Bennett (he/him) is a movie nerd who loves a good car chase.

NOW PLAYING

AVATAR 3D (2009). It’s like the blue cat

people with boobs are right there with you. PG13. 301M. BROADWAY. BARBARIAN. AirBnB nightmare with Georgina Campbell, Bill Skarsgård and Justin Long. R 102M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. BROS. Bawdy rom-com starring Billy Eichner and Nicholas Stoller. R. 115M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. BULLET TRAIN. Five killers zip through Japan on the same rails. Starring Brad Pitt, Joey King, Sandra Bullock and Hiroyuki Sanada. R. 126M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA. DC LEAGUE OF SUPER-PETS. Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart and Kate McKinnon voice superheroes’ best friends. PG. 106M. FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. DON’T WORRY DARLING. A 1950s utopian community goes awry. Starring Florence Pugh, Olivia Wilde and Harry Styles. Pick your fighter. R. 123M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. THE GREATEST BEER RUN EVER. Zac Efron stars as a naïve bro who brought beer to his GI pals deployed in the Vietnam War and I guess Hollywood figures that’s the story we need. R. 126M. BROADWAY. JAWS 3D (1983). We’re gonna need bigger glasses. PG. 130M. BROADWAY. MINIONS: THE RISE OF GRU. Animated prequel with the chaotic little henchfolk. PG. 90M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK. MOONAGE DAYDREAM. Dreamy documentary about David Bowie. PG13. 134M. MINOR. SEE HOW THEY RUN. Murder and mystery hold up the filming of a movie in 1950s London in this comedy starring Sam Rockwell and Pearl Chanda. PG13. 98M. BROADWAY, MILL CREEK, MINOR. SMILE. A shrink with baggage starts seeing people with scary grins everywhere and suddenly my bitchface doesn’t seem so bad, does it, people? Starring Sosie Bacon. R. 115M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK. TOP GUN: MAVERICK. Tom Cruise returns to the cockpit with a note-perfect work of pure energy that sidesteps thorny politics for the pure physicality and mental plasticity required of a modern fighter pilot. PG13. 137M. MILL CREEK. THE WOMAN KING. Viola Davis flexes on us all as general of the 19th century all-female army of West African kingdom of Dahomey. With Thuso Mbedu, Lashana Lynch and John Boyega. PG13. 134M. BROADWAY, FORTUNA, MILL CREEK, MINOR. For showtimes call: Broadway Cinema (707) 443-3456; Fortuna Theatre (707) 7252121; Mill Creek Cinema 839-3456; Minor Theatre (707) 822-3456.

Free Will Astrology

Week of Sept. 29, 2022 By Rob Brezsny

freewillastrology@freewillastrology.com ARIES (March 21-April 19): Poet Susan Howe describes poetry as an “amorous search under the sign of love for a remembered time at the pitch-dark fringes of evening when we gathered together to bless and believe.” I’d like to use that lyrical assessment to describe your life in the coming days—or at least what I hope will be your life. In my astrological opinion, it’s a favorable time to intensify your quest for interesting adventures in intimacy; to seek out new ways to imagine and create togetherness; to collaborate with allies in creating brave excursions into synergy. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Social reformer Frederick Douglass (1817-1895) had a growlery. It was a one-room stone cabin where he escaped to think deep thoughts, work on his books, and literally growl. As a genius who escaped enslavement and spent the rest of his life fighting for the rights of his fellow Black people, he had lots of reasons to snarl, howl, and bellow as well as growl. The coming weeks would be an excellent time for you to find or create your own growlery, Taurus. The anger you feel will be especially likely to lead to constructive changes. The same is true about the deep thoughts you summon in your growlery: They will be extra potent in helping you reach wise practical decisions. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Conduct your blooming in the noise and whip of the whirlwind,” wrote Gemini poet Gwendolyn Brooks. I love that advice! The whirlwind is her metaphor for the chaos of everyday life. She was telling us that we shouldn’t wait to ripen ourselves until the daily rhythm is calm and smooth. Live wild and free right now! That’s always good advice, in my opinion, but it will be especially apropos for you in the coming weeks. Now is your time to “endorse the splendor splashes” and “sway in wicked grace,” as Brooks would say. CANCER (June 21-July 22): “Don’t look away,” advised novelist Henry Miller in a letter to his lover. “Look straight at everything. Look it all in the eye, good and bad.” While that advice is appealing, I don’t endorse it unconditionally. I’m a Cancerian, and I sometimes find value in gazing at things sideways, or catching reflections in mirrors, or even turning my attention away for a while. In my view, we Crabs have a special need to be self-protective and self-nurturing. And to accomplish that, we may need to be evasive and elusive. In my astrological opinion, the next two weeks will be one of these times. I urge you to gaze directly and engage point-blank only with what’s good for you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Tips to get the most out of the next three weeks: 1. Play at least as hard as you work. 2. Give yourself permission to do anything that has integrity and is fueled by compassion. 3. Assume there is no limit to how much generous joie de vivre you can summon and express. 4. Fondle and nuzzle with eager partners as much as possible. And tell them EXACTLY where and how it feels good. 5. Be magnanimous in every gesture, no matter how large or small. 6. Even if you don’t regard yourself as a skillful singer, use singing to transform yourself out of any mood you don’t want to stay in. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In the coming weeks, you should refrain from wrestling with problems that resist your solutions. Be discerning about how you use your superior analytical abilities. Devote yourself solely to manageable dilemmas that are truly responsive to your intelligent probing. PS: I feel sorry for people who aren’t receptive to your input, but you can’t force them to give up their ignorance or suffering. Go where you’re wanted. Take power where it’s offered. Meditate on the wisdom of Anaïs Nin: “You cannot save people. You can only love them.” LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Buddhist monk Thich Nhat Hanh was born under the sign of Libra. He said, “The root-word ‘Buddha’ means to wake up, to know, to understand; and he or she who wakes up and understands is called a Buddha.” So

according to him, the spiritual teacher Siddhartha Gautama who lived in ancient India was just one of many Buddhas. And by my astrological reckoning, you will have a much higher chance than usual to be like one of these Buddhas yourself in the coming weeks. Waking up will be your specialty. You will have an extraordinary capacity to burst free of dreamy illusions and murky misapprehensions. I hope you take full advantage. Deeper understandings are nigh. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): I invite you to be the sexiest, most intriguing, most mysterious Scorpio you can be in the coming weeks. Here are ideas to get you started. 1. Sprinkle the phrase “in accordance with prophecy” into your conversations. 2. Find an image that symbolizes rebirth and revitalization arising out of disruption. Meditate on it daily until you actually experience rebirth and revitalization arising out of disruption. 3. Be kind and merciful to the young souls you know who are living their first lifetimes. 4. Collect deep, dark secrets from the interesting people you know. Employ this information to plan how you will avoid the trouble they endured. 5. Buy two deluxe squirt guns and two knives made of foam rubber. Use them to wage playful fights with those you love. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): There’s an ancient Greek saying, “I seek the truth, by which no one ever was truly harmed.” I regard that as a fine motto for you Sagittarians. When you are at your best and brightest, you are in quest of the truth. And while your quests may sometimes disturb the status quo, they often bring healthy transformations. The truths you discover may rattle routines and disturb habits, but they ultimately lead to greater clarity and authenticity. Now is an excellent time to emphasize this aspect of your nature. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Let’s imagine you are in your office or on the job or sitting at your kitchen table. With focused diligence, you’re working on solving a problem or improving a situation that involves a number of people. You think to yourself, “No one seems to be aware that I am quietly toiling here behind the scenes to make the magic happen.” A few days or a few weeks later, your efforts have been successful. The problem is resolved or the situation has improved. But then you hear the people involved say, “Wow, I wonder what happened? It’s like things got fixed all by themselves.” If a scenario like this happens, Capricorn, I urge you to speak up and tell everyone what actually transpired. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): To honor your entrance into the most expansive phase of your astrological cycle, I’m calling on the counsel of an intuitive guide named Nensi the Mercury Priestess. She offers the following advice. 1. Cultivate a mindset where you expect something unexpected to happen. 2. Fantasize about the possibility of a surprising blessing or unplanned-for miracle. 3. Imagine that a beguiling breakthrough will erupt into your rhythm. 4. Shed a few preconceptions about how your life story will unfold in the next two years. 5. Boost your trust in your deep self’s innate wisdom. 6. Open yourself more to receiving help and gifts. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Author Colin Wilson describes sex as “a craving for the mingling of consciousness, whose symbol is the mingling of bodies. Every time partners slake their thirst in the strange waters of the other’s identity, they glimpse the immensity of their freedom.” I love this way of understanding the erotic urge, and recommend you try it out for a while. You’re entering a phase when you will have extra power to refine and expand the way you experience blending and merging. If you’re fuzzy about the meaning of the words “synergy” and “symbiosis,” I suggest you look them up in the dictionary. They should be featured themes for you in the coming weeks. l

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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Homework: What’s the best change you could make that would be fairly easy to accomplish? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com

rarely the case, Confess, Fletch rose to and exceeded my expectations. Hamm and the supporting cast (including Marcia Gay Harden positively chewing on a bad Italian accent and John Slattery cursing like a sailor) play it cool without really trying, rendering a perfectly balanced blend of suspense and humor. Director Greg Mottola (Superbad, 2007; Adventureland, 2009) orchestrates the affair with aplomb, lending a sort of effortless style to each frame and maintaining a consistently compelling, never rushed pace. Character name notwithstanding, I didn’t think of Chevy Chase in an Afro wig; not once. R. 93M. AMAZON PRIME. PEARL. Earlier this year, writer/director Ti West broke a long feature dry spell with X, a paean to the roots of indie horror filmed entirely in New Zealand during the pandemic. An end credits teaser promised more — a color-saturated origin story of sorts. We would then come to learn that West and star/co-writer Mia Goth had conceived this prequel, set 60 years before the events of X, while quarantined in their respective hotel rooms, waiting for production to commence. And further, that they had undertaken the ambitious project of shooting both movies in sequence. And so now we have Pearl, a sort-of throwback to the Technicolor Cinemascope extravaganzas of a bygone era, a tale of stifled dreams corrupted into homicidal rage. In the depths of the Spanish influenza pandemic and the winding down of the Great War, Pearl (Goth) is largely homebound, caring for her debilitated father and subject to the military discipline of her German born mother. With her husband serving in Europe, Pearl is starved for affection and dreams of stage stardom. The movie palace and its handsome projectionist (David Corenswet) offer momentary respite from reality, and an upcoming audition for a touring dance company dangles the chance of escape. But we already know whence this chapter leads. On first watch, Pearl feels maybe-too deliberate in its pacing, maybe a little too enamored of its own aesthetic achievements. Upon reflection, though, the movie meets its own ambitions admirably, creating something distinct from its ostensible homage. And there is, again, another chapter in the offing. R. 102M. BROADWAY, MINOR. l


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eter Santino completed his “All Happy Now” earth sculpture in 2008 but I only became aware of it last semester, when one of my College of the Redwoods students shared a photograph of it in class after an afternoon hike in the Humboldt Botanical Garden. I was mesmerized at the scale of the art piece, by the spiral pathway that takes the traveler up from one side of the dirt track at its base a quarter of a mile to the top, and then a quarter of a mile back down on the other side in perfect symmetry without retracing a step. It is a half-mile, gently sloping walk contained entirely within this 100-foot-diameter mound. The earth sculpture is situated above a vista I had desired for years to include in a nighttime photograph: a view looking out over the CR campus and across the valley, with the Milky Way in the sky above it all. I was astonished when I found “All Happy Now” sat in the foreground. In my mind’s eye, I saw that at this time of year the spiral mound would interact powerfully with the rising Milky Way, a light spear of celestial origin sent to pierce the earthen ring of light. Or perhaps the sculpture was the source of light and the Milky Way shone forth from the mound itself in some mysterious interaction with the heavens. Or neither? That story will be left to the mind of the beholder. By the good graces of the universe, circumstances came together for me to finally capture that vista at a time of year when the extraterrestrial elements could line up just so with the mound. The word “photography” is a combination of two words from Greek roots that mean “light” (photo) and “painting or drawing” (graph). Thus, I think of

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

photography as “painting with light.” Sometimes, this is more literal than others. This image is literally a light painting. A photograph like this cannot simply be “taken,” as so many The core of the Milky Way galaxy rises in the night sky above the snapshots are. “All Happy Now” Earth sculpture at Humboldt Botanical Gardens. Capturing the imThe sign reads, “Peter Santino’s All Happy Now Earth Sculpture is the age was a process only one of its kind in North America. It is a merger of two ancient that began with landscape architectural features, the ziggurat and the labyrinth. pre-visualization Based on a mathematical equation named Fermat’s Spiral, the 100and ended after foot diameter earth mound is covered with grass and features two many attempts to non-intersecting quarter mile pathways which take the walker to the paint and capture center and back down out the opposite side.” the light just Self-portrait photograph by David Wilson. Sept. 16, 2022. right. I was happy to have the help the vision to create “All Happy Now” in of my CR colleague Sean Patton. Over the early 2000s and, while I don’t know the course of about an hour and a half, him personally, in a way we’re now conwe took about 20 photos from this camera position to get the lighting the way I nected through our art. had envisioned. Humboldt Botanical Garden is a Patton helped me by staying up world-class botanical garden comprising with my camera to open and close the 44 acres of diverse plant species, trails, shutter as needed, while I “painted” the greenhouses and sculptures about 8 scene in with light: I’d walk around the miles south of Eureka at 7707 Tompkins Hill Road, adjacent to College of perimeter, painting strokes of light onto the Redwoods and accessible from its the trail and mound with my light wand northern Tompkins Hill Road entrance. like a paint brush. The exposures ranged Learn more the gardens and “All Hapfrom 30 seconds to several minutes. After each attempt at painting the scene, py Now” at hbgf.org, call (707) 442-5139 I’d evaluate the results and then paint or email hbgf@hbgf.org. again — for while I am painting, I’m l unable to see the results. To me and any To keep abreast of David Wilson’s observer, I’m just a guy walking around (he/him) photography or purchase a in the dark with a light. After around 20 print, visit mindscapefx.com or follow attempts, I had the scene illuminated him on Instagram @david_wilson_mfx just so. and on Twitter @davidwilson_mfx. He It struck me as I made this image that teaches Art 35 Digital Photography at it was in some way an asynchronous collaboration between artists. Santino had College of the Redwoods.


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50 and Better OLLI ONLINE: GETTING STARTED IN LOCAL HISTORY. Explore Humboldt County’s outstanding local history organizations. New online resources for researching local history will also be discussed. Sat, Oct 8 from 10 a.m.−12 p.m. OLLI members $20. Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli OLLI ONLINE: UTILIZING THE INTERNET SAFELY: PROTECTING YOUR PERSONAL INFORMATION WITH MEGHAN GALLAGHER. Learn the ins and outs of how to protect your personal information online, and how to stay safe in cyberspace. Thurs., Oct. 13 from 1−2:30 p.m. OLLI members $10 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli OLLI ONLINE: BOB DYLAN’S LYRICS AS LITERA− TURE WITH DAVID MARSHAK. We will explore lyrics from every decade of Dylan’s career, and we will consider the ways in which Dylan’s lyrics achieve literary status. Tues., Oct. 11−25 from 1−3 p.m. OLLI members $45 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli OLLI ONLINE: EXPERIENCE FALL AND HISTORY OF THE HEADWATERS FOREST RESERVE WITH JULIE CLARK. Walk with naturalist park ranger Julie Clark at Headwaters Forest along the Elk River Trail. Ranger Julie will tell the history of Headwa− ters, as well as the 50−year history of the lumber town Falk. Wed., Oct. 12 from 10 a.m.−1 p.m. OLLI members $10 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli OLLI ONLINE: UNDERSTANDING UNCONSCIOUS BIAS WITH MOLLY CATE. Examine the history of unconscious/implicit bias, how it spreads, and discuss its relevance to several current social problems. You’ll also have opportunities to test your own biases by participating in ongoing research at Harvard. Weds., Oct. 12−26 from 10 a.m. −12 p.m. OLLI members $45 Sign up today! 826− 5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli

OLLI ONLINE: INTRO TO PERMACULTURE AND REGENERATIVE LIVING WITH STEVEN SAINT THOMAS. "Permaculture" and "Regenerative Agri− culture" are similar paths to making a course correction for our carbon−emission reduction −− and you can help! Sat., Oct. 15 from 10 a.m.−1 p.m. OLLI members $35 Sign up today! 826−5880 or www.humboldt.edu/olli

TAKE A CLASS WITH OLLI. Anyone can take an OLLI class. Join OLLI today and get the member discount on classes. Non−members add $25 to the class fee listed. https://extended.humboldt.edu/ olli/olli−upcoming−courses (O−1229)

Spiritual EVOLUTIONARY TAROT Ongoing Zoom classes, private mentorships and readings. Carolyn Ayres. 442−4240 www.tarotofbecoming.com carolyn@tarotofbecoming.com (S−1229) SOTO ZEN MEDITATION Sunday programs and weekday meditation in Arcata locations; Wed evenings in Eureka, arcatazengroup.org Beginners welcome, call for orientation. (707) 826−1701 (S−1229)

Therapy & Support

FREE COMPUTER SKILLS CLASSES: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500.

MEDICAL BILLING & CODING ONLINE October 4, 2022 − March 2, 2023 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

FREE ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE CLASSES: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500.

NOTARY October 11, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500.

FREE HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY/GED PREP: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500.

PHARMACY TECH ONLINE October 4, 2022 − March 18, 2023 2023 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

FREE LIVING SKILLS FOR ADULTS W/ DISABILITIES CLASSES: Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500.

REAL ESTATE PROGRAM FACE TO FACE Starts October 3, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

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SERVSAFE CERTIFICATION October 20, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

HOME INSPECTION CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Visit: https://www.redwoods.edu/communityed/ Detail/ArtMID/17724/ArticleID/6231/Home− Inspection−Certification−Program

VENIPUNCTURE November 18, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

INJECTIONS November 4, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476− 4500. INTERMEDIATE BOOKKEEPING October 4 − November 22, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500.

Wellness & Bodywork AYURVEDIC LIVING SCHOOL TRAININGS w/Traci Webb & Guests. Ayurveda Health & Life Coach/ Practitioner Training starts 1/11/23, Ayurveda Herbalist Training starts 2/21/23. Seasonal Self− Care Retreats: 6/24 & 9/30, Seasonal Detoxes: July 12−26 & Oct. 4−18, Herbal Remedies Making Immer− sions: 7/10 & 9/25, www.ayurvedicliving.com (W−0930)

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BECOME CERTIFIED IN SWEDISH MASSAGE. 9 WEEK CLASS STARTS OCT. 10 AT LOVING HANDS INSTITUTE IN ARCATA. Massage Hacks for Body− workers w/Dr. Sarah Griffith. Nov 5, 9−6pm. call Loving Hands at 707−630−3407 to register! CANNABIS BUSINESS TRAINING Online Oct. 5 − 26, 2022, Call College of the Redwoods Commu− nity Education at (707) 476−4500. EMT REFRESHER COURSE October 27 − November 6, 2022 Call College of the Redwoods Community Education at (707) 476−4500. FREE AMERICAN SIGN LANGUAGE CLASSES: Online or Face to Face Call College of the Redwoods Adult Education (707) 476−4500.

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LEGAL NOTICES NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Donald Paul Koski CASE NO. PR2200259

fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Kenneth M. Bareilles Attorney at Law 533 E Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 443−9338 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Jocelyn M. Godinho, Esq. Law Office of Hjerpe & Godinho, LLP 350 E Street, 1st Floor Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 442−7262 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Donald Paul Koski A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, Teresa Lynn Koski In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Teresa 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 (22−367) Lynn Koski be appointed as personal repre− NOTICE OF PETITION TO sentative to administer the estate ADMINISTER ESTATE OF of the decedent. Kenneth Carpenter CASE NO. THE PETITION requests the dece− PR2200270 dent’s will and codicils, if any, be To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, admitted to probate. The will and contingent creditors and persons any codicils are available for exami− who may otherwise be interested in nation in the file kept by court. the will or estate, or both, of THE PETITION requests authority to Kenneth Carpenter administer the estate under the A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−373) Independent Administration of filed by Petitioner, Leslie Matteis Estates Act. (This authority will NOTICE OF PETITION TO In the Superior Court of California, allow the personal representative ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Mary County of Humboldt. The petition to take many actions without Elaine Nelson aka Mary E. for probate requests that Leslie obtaining court approval. Before Nelson CASE NO. PR2200280 Matteis taking certain very important To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, be appointed as personal repre− actions, however, the personal contingent creditors and persons sentative to administer the estate representative will be required to who may otherwise be interested in of the decedent. give notice to interested persons the will or estate, or both, of THE PETITION requests authority to unless they have waived notice or Mary Elaine Nelson aka Mary E. administer the estate under the consented to the proposed action.) Nelson Independent Administration of The independent administration A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been Estates Act. (This authority will authority will be granted unless an filed by Petitioner, Nanette C. Jones allow the personal representative interested person files an objection In the Superior Court of California, to take many actions without to the petition and shows good County of Humboldt. The petition obtaining court approval. Before cause why the court should not for probate requests that Nanette taking certain very important grant the authority. C. Jones actions, however, the personal A HEARING on the petition will be be appointed as personal repre− representative will be required to held on October 6, 2022 at 1:31 p.m. sentative to administer the estate give notice to interested persons at the Superior Court of California, of the decedent. unless they have waived notice or County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth THE PETITION requests the dece− consented to the proposed action.) Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. dent’s will and codicils, if any, be The independent administration For information on how to appear admitted to probate. The will and authority will be granted unless an remotely for your hearing, please any codicils are available for exami− interested person files an objection visit https://www.humboldt.courts. nation in the file kept by court. to the petition and shows good ca.gov/ THE PETITION requests authority to cause why the court should not IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of administer the estate under the grant the authority. the petition, you should appear at Independent Administration of A HEARING on the petition will be the hearing and state your objec− Estates Act. (This authority will held on October 13, 2022 at 1:31 p.m. tions or file written objections with allow the personal representative at the Superior Court of California, the court before the hearing. Your to take many actions without County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth appearance may be in person or by obtaining court approval. Before Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. your attorney. taking certain very important For information on how to appear IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a actions, however, the personal remotely for your hearing, please contingent creditor of the dece− representative will be required to visit https://www.humboldt.courts. dent, you must file your claim with give notice to interested persons ca.gov/ the court and mail a copy to the unless they have waived notice or IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of personal representative appointed consented to the proposed action.) the petition, you should appear at by the court within the later of The independent administration the hearing and state your objec− either (1) four months from the authority will be granted unless an tions or file written objections with date of first issuance of letters to a interested person files an objection the court before the hearing. Your general personal representative, as to the petition and shows good appearance may be in person or by defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− cause why the court should not your attorney. fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days grant the authority. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a from the date of mailing or A HEARING on the petition will be contingent creditor of the dece− personal delivery to you of a notice held on October 20, 2022 at 1:31 dent, you must file your claim with under section 9052 of the California p.m. at the Superior Court of Cali− the court and mail a copy to the Probate Code. Other California fornia, County of Humboldt, 825 personal representative appointed statutes and legal authority may Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. by the court within the later of affect your rights as a creditor. You For information on how to appear either (1) four months from the may want to consult with an remotely for your hearing, please date of first issuance of letters to a attorney knowledgeable in Cali− visit https://www.humboldt.courts. general personal representative, as fornia law. ca.gov/ defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days by the court. If you are a person the petition, you should appear at from the date of mailing or interested in the estate, you may the hearing and state your objec− personal delivery to you of a notice file with the court a Request for tions or file written objections with under section 9052 of the California Special Notice (form DE−154) of the the court before the hearing. Your Probate Code. Other California filing of an inventory and appraisal appearance may be in person or by statutes and legal authority may of estate assets or of any petition your attorney. affect your rights as a creditor. You NORTH COAST Sept. 29, with 2022an• northcoastjournal.com or account as provided in JOURNAL Probate • Thursday, IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a may want to consult Code section 1250. A Request for contingent creditor of the dece− attorney knowledgeable in Cali− Special Notice form is available dent, you must file your claim with fornia law. from the court clerk. the court and mail a copy to the YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept

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ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Carlton D. Floyd Floyd Law Firm 819 Seventh Street Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 445−9754 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−389)

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF Patricia Ann Bagley CASE NO. PR2200276 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of Patricia Ann Bagley A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by Petitioner, Kenneth D. Brink In the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt. The petition for probate requests that Kenneth D. Brink be appointed as personal repre− sentative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece− dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for exami− nation in the file kept by court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 6, 2022 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6.

consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on October 6, 2022 at 1:31 p.m. at the Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt, 825 Fifth Street, Eureka, in Dept.: 6. For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts. ca.gov/ IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objec− tions or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the dece− dent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58(b) of the Cali− fornia Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in Cali− fornia law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE−154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. ATTORNEY FOR PETITIONER: Daniel E. Cooper Morrison, Morrison & Cooper 611 I Street, Suite A Eureka, CA 95501 (707) 443−8011 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−386)

PUBLIC SALE

4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt. Velma Price, Space # 5321 Velma Price #5464, Space # 5464 The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Melissa Boynton, Space # 2120 The following spaces are located at 3618 Jacobs Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Dard Tufts, Space # 1167 The following spaces are located at 105 Indianola Avenue Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Joseph Salas, Space # 202 Rosemary Hancorne, Space # 596 Vicky Nurkiewicz, Space # 746 Toni Peters, Space # 828 The following spaces are located at 1641 Holly Drive McKinleyville, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Samantha Rigge, Space # 6223 Mikkel Burrowes, Space # 7227 The following spaces are located at 2394 Central Avenue McKinleyville CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units. Kathleen Brewer, Space # 9258 Items to be sold include, but are not limited to: Household furniture, office equip− ment, household appliances, exer− cise equipment, TVs, VCR, microwave, bikes, books, misc. tools, misc. camping equipment, misc. stereo equip. misc. yard tools, misc. sports equipment, misc. kids toys, misc. fishing gear, misc. computer components, and misc. boxes and bags contents unknown.

The undersigned will sell at auction by competitive bidding on the 5th of October, 2022, at 9:00 AM, on the premises where said property has been stored and which are located at Rainbow Self Storage.

Anyone interested in attending Rainbow Self Storage auctions must pre−qualify. For details call 707−443 −1451. Purchases must be paid for at the time of the sale in cash only. All pre −qualified Bidders must sign in at 4055 Broadway Eureka CA. prior to 9:00 A.M. on the day of the auction, no exceptions. All purchased items are sold as is, where is and must be removed at time of sale. Sale is subject to cancellation for any reason whatsoever. Auctioneer: Kim Santsche, Employee for Rainbow Self− Storage, 707−443−1451, Bond # 40083246.

The following spaces are located at 4055 Broadway Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt.

Dated this 22nd day of September, 2022 and 29th day of September, 2022

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned intends to sell the personal property described below to enforce a lien imposed on said property pursuant to Sections 21700−21716 of the Business & Professions Code, Section 2328 of the UCC, Section 535 of the Penal Code and provisions of the civil Code.

Velma Price, Space # 5321 Velma Price #5464, Space # 5464 The following spaces are located at 639 W. Clark Street Eureka, CA, County of Humboldt and will be sold immediately following the sale of the above units.


ness as Shaw House Inn

SUMMONS (Citation Judicial) CASE NUMBER: FIRST AMENDED CV2100837 -------NOTICE TO Defendant: Eliah Dinur-Loranger and Candice Morris and Does 1 to 10 You are being sued by Plaintiff: Statewide Collection, Inc. Notice: You have been sued. The court may decide against you without you being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more infor− mation at the California Courts Online Self−Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county library, or the court− house nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for free waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money, and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self−Help Center(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/self− help), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. The name and address of the court is: Superior Court of California, County of Humboldt 825 Fifth Street Eureka, CA 95501 The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Troy Wilkinson 152064 Law Office of Troy Wilkinson PO Box 993966 (530) 342−6142 9/29, 10/6, 10/13, 10/20

L4E4 2G ALS? -1 4 0 0 × 3 1 4

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00534 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Humco Cleaning Humboldt 1026 Main St. Apt. 1 Fortuna, CA 95540 1026 Main St. Apt. 1 Fortuna, CA 95540 Kylee A Guerrero 1026 Main St. Apt. 1 Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Kylee Guerrero, Owner This August 17, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−364)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00543 The following person is doing Busi− ness as SEGI Consulting Humboldt 2006 Woody Road McKinleyville, CA 95519 Craig S Christensen 2006 Woody Road McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Craig S Christensen, Owner This August 22, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−369)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00548 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Shaw House Inn Humboldt 703 Main Street Ferndale, CA 95536 PO Box 1369 Ferndale, CA 95536 Paula D Bigley 703 Main Street Ferndale, CA 95536

Humboldt 703 Main Street Ferndale, CA 95536 PO Box 1369 Ferndale, CA 95536 Paula D Bigley 703 Main Street Ferndale, CA 95536 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Paula Bigley, Owner This August 16, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

Alder Design & Development LLC CA 202250716516 719 Driver Rd. Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Stacie Marshall, Manager This August 26, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−381)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00565 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Deni Vision

9/8, 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 (22−355)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00553 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Humboldt Pack Tracks Humboldt 1702 West Ave. Eureka, CA 95501 Jazzmyn M Zamora 1702 West Ave. Eureka, CA 95501 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Jazzmyn Zamora, Owner/Oper− ator This August 25, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−380)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00554 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Moonstone Beach Trinidad Humboldt 100 Moonstone Beach Road Trinidad, CA 95570 PO Box 96 Trinidad, CA 95570 Alder Design & Development LLC CA 202250716516 719 Driver Rd. Trinidad, CA 95570 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable.

Humboldt 2460 Eye St. Arcata, CA 95521 Denise Tomkinson 2460 Eye St. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Denise Tomkinson, Owner This August 30, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−382)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00566 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Fortuna Cabinets and More Humboldt 175 Ogle Ave Rio Dell, CA 95562 Randy Maynard 175 Ogle Ave Rio Dell, CA 95562

above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Randy Maynard, Owner Operator This August 30, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by wc, Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00568 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Continued on next page » Rustic Wood Source Humboldt 201 C St Fields Landing, CA 95537 1834 Allard Ave #34 Eureka, CA 95503 George Buck 1834 Allard Ave #34 Eureka, CA 95503

9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−362)

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− The following person is doing Busi− tious business name or name listed ness as above on Not Applicable. Rustic Wood Source I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. Humboldt A registrant who declares as true 201 C St default any material Fields Landing, CA 95537 UNMET TRANSIT NEEDSmatter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and 1834 Allard Ave #34 PUBLIC HEARINGS Professions Code that the regis− Eureka, CA 95503 trant knows to be false is guilty of a The Humboldt County Association misdemeanor of Governments (HCAOG)by anda fine its punishable George Buck member entities will conduct Public Hearings to satisfy requirements for not to exceed one thousand dollars 1834 Allard Ave #34 Transportation and solicit transit needs input ($1,000). Eureka, CA 95503 Development Act funding for Humboldt County. Meetings may /s beGeorge attended in-person Buck, Ownerat respecCity Hallsby / Board or Auhust by teleconference. 30, 2022 The business tive is conducted an RoomsThis KELLYmeeting E. SANDERS Please see web sites for more details. Individual. by wc, Humboldt County Clerk The date registrant commenced to 9/8, 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 (22−359) transact ficti−Oct 4 at 6 p.m City ofbusiness Rio Dell under theTues, cityofriodell.ca.gov tious listed Citybusiness of Eurekaname or name Tues, Oct 4 at 6 p.m www.ci.eureka.ca.gov above on NotTransit Applicable. Humboldt Authority Wed, Oct. 5 at 9 a.m. hta.org/board-meetings/ I declare that all information in this City of Arcata Wed, Oct 5 at 6 p.m. cityofarcata.org statement is true and correct. City of Trinidad Tues, www.trinidad.ca.gov A registrant who declares as trueOct 11 at 6 p.m. of Fortuna Mon,toOct 17 at 6 p.m. friendlyfortuna.gov anyCity material matter pursuant City of17913 Ferndale Wed, Section of the Business andOct 19 at 7 p.m ci.ferndale.ca.us County ofCode Humboldt Professions that the Tues, regis−Oct 25 at 9:30am humboldtgov.org/167/ trant knows to be false is guilty of a Board-of-Supervisors misdemeanor punishable by a fine City of Blue Lake Tues, Oct 25 6:30p.m. bluelake.ca.gov notHCAOG to exceed one thousand dollars Thurs, Nov 17 at 4 p.m. hcaog.net ($1,000). /s George Buck, Owner You may also send email comments to stephen.luther@hcaog.net or This Auhust 30, 2022 callE.(707) 444-8208. For more information about the Unmet Transit Needs KELLY SANDERS by wc, Humboldt County Clerk

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00568

default

9/8, 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 (22−359)

NOTICE INVITING BIDS

Notice is hereby given that the Redwood Coast Energy Authority (RCEA is soliciting bids for the Installation of H Street Eureka Electric Vehicle Charging Station (“Project”). The Project involves installation of four (4) RCEA-supplied ChargePoint CT4000 electric vehicle charging stations (EVCS), installation of electrical infrastructure associated with the EVCS, to be connected to an existing electrical service at 3rd & H Streets in Eureka, CA. The Work consists of furnishing all labor, materials, equipment, incidentals necessary to complete the project as detailed in Plan Drawing and Technical Specifications and other Bid Documents. Interested bidders should attend the mandatory pre-bid meeting will be held at 3rd & H Streets in Eureka, CA. on September 27, 2022 at 10:00 a.m. for the purpose of acquainting all prospective bidders with the Contract Documents and the Project site. Failure to attend the pre-bid meeting will result in the disqualification of the bid of the non-attending bidder. Bids will be received at the office of Redwood Coast Energy Authority (“RCEA”), 633 Third Street, Eureka, California until 3:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 6, 2022. Each Bid shall be submitted on the forms furnished by RCEA within the Bid Documents. The Invitation for Bids package and Plan Drawing and Technical can be obtained on RCEA’s website at: https:// redwoodenergy.org/contracting/. RCEA has determined that prevailing wages apply to this Project. The selected contractor must register with the State Department of Industrial Relations pursuant to Labor Code Section 1725.5 prior to award of a contract. The successful Bidder shall possess a valid Contractor’s license in good standing, with a classification of Class C-10 at the time the contract is awarded. The selected contractor will enter into a construction contract prior to commencing work. Inquiries regarding this IFB should be submitted in writing to: Redwood Coast Energy Authority Mike Avcollie 633 3rd Street, Eureka, CA mavcollie@redwoodenergy.org DATED: September 13, 2022

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Publication Dates: 1) 9/22/2022 2) 9/29/2022 Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Randy Maynard, Owner Operator

33


Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed LEGAL NOTICES above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s George Buck, Owner This Auhust 30, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by wc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/8, 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 (22−359)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00573 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Trinity Fork Outfitters Humboldt 303 Lower Camp Creek Road Orleans, CA 95556 PO Box 358 Orleans, CA 95556 Trinity Fork Outfitters LLC CA 202204110325 303 Lower Camp Creek Road Orleans, CA 95556 The business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Shane Dante, Managing Member This September 2, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by jc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/8, 9/15, 9/22, 9/29 (22−360)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00575 The following person is doing Busi− ness as ReProp Financial Humboldt 735 4th St Eureka, CA 95501 ReProp Investments, Inc California C0894115 735 4th St Eureka, CA 95501

A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Dane Valadao, COO, ReProp Investments, Inc. This September 6, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−361)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00576 The following person is doing Busi− ness as High Standard Accounting Humboldt 788 Shively Flat Road Scotia, CA 95565 PO Box 248 Scotia, CA 95565 Hilary J Schwartz 788 Shively Flat Road Scotia, CA 95565 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Hilary J Schwartz, Owner This September 06, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by tn, Humboldt County Clerk

trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Gerardo Gonzalez−o, Owner This Sept. 12, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by jc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−368)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00596 The following person is doing Busi− ness as EA Knox Design/Build Humboldt 1650 12th Street Arcata, CA 95521 Ethan A Knox 1650 12th Street Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Ethan Knox, Owner, Contracter This September 16, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−376)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22−00597

Lily Haas 3559 Spear Ave. Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 900 Hodgson St. Eureka, CA 95503 3313 M St. Eureka, CA 95503

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Lily Haas, Business Owner This September 20, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

Reily A Hall 3313 M St. Eureka, CA 95503 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Reily Hall, Owner This September 20, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk 9/29, 10/6, 10/13, 10/20 (22−383)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00600 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Creekside Produce Humboldt 6821 Myrtle Ave. Eureka, CA 95503 1414 Beverly Dr. Arcata, CA 95521

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Touch of Love and Healing

Luke Smetana 1414 Beverly Dr. Arcata, CA 95521

Humboldt 1890 Heartwood Drive McKinleyville, CA 95519

The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Luke Smetana, Owner This September 20, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by sc, Humboldt County Clerk

9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−363)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00582 The following person is doing Busi− ness as The Patron Kitchen Humboldt 70 B Wildwood Rio Dell, CA 95562 3010 Kenmar Rd. Fortuna, CA 95540 Gerardo L Gonzalez-o 3010 Kenmar Rd. Fortuna, CA 95540 Leticia Gonzalez-o 3010 Kenmar Rd. Fortuna, CA 95540 The business is conducted by a Married Couple. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Gerardo Gonzalez−o, Owner This Sept. 12, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by jc, Humboldt County Clerk

Brook E Madison 1890 Heartwood Drive McKinleyville, CA 95519 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct. A registrant who declares as true any material matter pursuant to Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− trant knows to be false is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by a fine not to exceed one thousand dollars ($1,000). /s Brook E. Madison, Owner This September 16, 2022 KELLY E. SANDERS by jc, Humboldt County Clerk

The business is conducted by a Corporation. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−377) above on Not Applicable. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME I declare that all information in this STATEMENT 22-00598 statement is true and correct. The following person is doing Busi− A registrant who declares as true ness as any material matter pursuant to Busy Baby Academy Section 17913 of the Business and Professions Code that the regis− Humboldt trant knows to be false is guilty of a 900 Hodgson St. misdemeanor punishable by a fine Eureka, CA 95503 not to exceed one thousand dollars 3313 M St. ($1,000). NORTH COO, COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept.9/15, 29,9/22, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com Eureka, CA 95503 /s Dane Valadao, ReProp 9/29, 10/6 (22−368) Investments, Inc. Reily A Hall This September 6, 2022 3313 M St. KELLY E. SANDERS

34

The following person is doing Busi− ness as Busy Baby Academy

9/29, 10/6, 10/13, 10/20 (22−384)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT 22-00603 The following person is doing Busi− ness as Phoenix Ceramic and Fire Supply Humboldt 824 L St., Ste. 10 Arcata, CA 95521 Lily Haas 3559 Spear Ave. Arcata, CA 95521 The business is conducted by an Individual. The date registrant commenced to transact business under the ficti− tious business name or name listed above on Not Applicable. I declare that all information in this statement is true and correct.

9/29, 10/6, 10/13, 10/20 (22−385)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Adam Dean Shilts CASE NO. CV2201281 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Adam Dean Shilts for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Adam Dean Shilts to Proposed Name Adam Dean Schild THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 21, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: Sept. 1, 2022 Filed: Sept. 1, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−365)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Janet Renee OBrien CASE NO. CV2201343 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Janet Renee OBrien for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Janet Renee OBrien to Proposed Name Janet Renee Dudal THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the

PETITION OF: Janet Renee OBrien for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Janet Renee OBrien to Proposed Name Janet Renee Dudal THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 28, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: Sept. 13, 2022 Filed: Sept. 13, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 9/22, 9/29, 10/6, 10/13 (22−375)

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Richard Conrad Shilts CASE NO. CV2201282 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Richard Conrad Shilts for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Richard Conrad Shilts to Proposed Name Richard Conrad Schild THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 21, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: Sept. 1, 2022 Filed: Sept. 1, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−366)


OBITUARIES

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec− tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objec− tion is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Date: October 28, 2022 Time: 1:45 p.m., Dept. 4 For information on how to appear remotely for your hearing, please visit https://www.humboldt.courts.ca.g ov/ SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: September 12, 2022 Filed: September 12, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court 9/29, 10/6, 10/13, 10/20 (22−387)

LEGALS? County Public Notices Fictitious Business Petition to Administer Estate Trustee Sale Other Public Notices classified@north coastjournal.com

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Marilyn Robertson February 1933 - September 2022 Marilyn L. (Paxton) Robertson of Eureka passed peacefully on September 1, 2022, age 89. Marilyn was born February 13, 1933 in San Bernardino,, the eldest of four children. She moved to northern California in the early ‘50s with her first husband, Willard Watts, and two small children, Linda and Tony Watts. She later began working for the phone company, where she met and married James “Fuzzy” Robertson. They purchased the current home in 1958 and had three children together - Joe, Ruthie and Lori - and a step-son, Jimmy Robertson, joined their blended family. Marilyn balanced homemaking, child-rearing and outside employment with PG&E and Dr. Richard Wissinger. “One year, she was room mother at Freshwater School and transformed herself into the Wicked Witch of the West ( complete with full green makeup, pointed hat and cackle) and even scared her own children who didn’t know who she was,” fondly remembers her sister-in-law, Roxie Paxton. Fuzzy was a teamster and retired from the short-haul trucking industry and together they delighted in spending time with the grandchildren. Everyone who knew her will miss her intelligence, love for the wildlife, and her fresh tortilla & beans dinners with the family! She was very creative and talented - sewing Halloween costumes and clothes for her kids; making popcorn balls for the neighborhood parties; whistling to her kids for them to come home; her attachment to the wringer washers for doing the family laundry and drying the clothes on the line! Marilyn was preceded in death by daughter Linda, husband Fuzzy, grandson Cody Watts, step-son Jimmy Robertson; her parents and three siblings. Surviving her are her children Tony & Marilee Watts (Reno), Joe (Eureka), Ruthie Robertson & Paul Shoen (Gardnerville, Nevada) and Lori & Mike Koehnen (Chico); brother Tim and Roxie Paxton, Eureka; seven grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. A celebration of life will be held in the future.

IS THIS THING ON ACROSS

1. Places for sgts. 4. What trees do in the wind 8. Oldman’s “JFK” role 14. Issa of “Awkward Black Girl” 15. ____ stick 16. Well-being 17. Reward for acting well? 19. Home runs, in slang 20. Ragged 21. Make a blackboard black, say 23. When some close games are won, briefly 24. City that’s home to the Munch Museum 29. Literally, “tooth fish” 31. Lego series with its own 2017 movie 32. Words said with a sigh

34. Fairy tale’s second word 35. Question asked while tapping a microphone (or a clue for 17-, 24-, 52or 60-Across) 41. Home to Athens and Dublin 42. Not ____ eye in the house 43. Doesn’t deviate from 47. War room topic 52. Line of sight? 54. Saudi Arabia neighbor 55. Eat away 56. Cost for a spot 57. Deem appropriate 60. Source of the word “saga” 63. Flasher at a rock concert 64. Clarinetist’s need 65. Inner ____ 66. “____ the love?”

ANSWERS NEXT WEEK!

67. Elapse 68. Triage areas: Abbr.

DOWN

1. “Take this bit of advice ...” 2. Aquafina : PepsiCo :: ____ : Coca-Cola 3. Division of the economy 4. Agile 5. Prevailed 6. Back in the day 7. Sing in a high range? 8. 2021 A.L. MVP Shohei ____ 9. Fall, e.g. 10. Cooler container 11. It may be brown or blonde 12. Std. paper size 13. They don’t play the field: Abbr. 18. Start of an encouraging phrase 22. “Anchorman: The Legend of ____

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Submit information via email to classified@ northcoastjournal.com, or by mail or in person.

The North Coast Journal prints each Thursday, 52 times a year. Deadline for obituary information is at 5 p.m. on the Sunday prior to publication date.

310 F STREET, EUREKA, CA 95501 (707) 442-1400 • FAX (707) 442-1401

45. They take 2-10 yrs. to mature 46. A-to-zed reference work, in brief 48. Commotion 49. “Sure, we can chat now” 50. ____ salad 51. Scornful looks 53. Corp. shake-up 56. Samberg of “Brooklyn NineNine” 57. Opposite NNE 58. Ending for many a biblical verb 59. Poet’s “before” 61. Soccer star Messi, to fans 62. Haaland who became U.S. Secretary of the Interior in 2021

© Puzzles by Pappocom

We Print Obituaries Please submit photos in JPG or PDF format, or original photos can be scanned at our office.

Burgundy” 24. “Fancy meeting you here!” 25. ____ Club (Costco competitor) 26. D.C. media giant, for short 27. 1957 Stravinsky ballet 28. Over there, quaintly 30. “Hard pass” 33. Uber Eats guesstimate 35. Waffle House alternative 36. Riverbed sediment 37. Absolutely fabulous 38. Purchase for the den 39. “Dies ____” (hymn) 40. It contains M.S.G. 41. “That’s your game, eh?” 44. Professional copyist

LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS TO HALF EMPTY

www.sudoku.com

ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME Sophia McMillin CASE NO. CV22001337 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH ST. EUREKA, CA. 95501 PETITION OF: Sophia McMillin for a decree changing names as follows: Present name Sophia McMillin to Proposed Name Sophia Machado

©2022 DAVID LEVINSON WILK

9/15, 9/22, 9/29, 10/6 (22−366)

CROSSWORD by David Levinson Wilk

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT 825 FIFTH STREET EUREKA, CA 95501 Date: Sept. 1, 2022 Filed: Sept. 1, 2022 /s/ Timothy A. Canning Judge of the Superior Court

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northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT default

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K’ima: w Medical Center

K’ima: w Medical Center

K’ima: w Medical Center

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking

an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

BILLING OFFICE SUPERVISOR FT REGULAR ($30.60-$33.78 PER HOUR DOE) Coordinates and supervises the overall functions of all KMC (i.e., Medical, Dental, Pharmacy, etc.) patient billing, cashiering, patient accounts file maintenance, and credit and collection of patient bills; reconciles accounts receivable balances to general ledger control accounts as directed; directs the implementation of administration/approved billing, and collection policies. Establishes annual department goals and provides overall direction regarding department priorities and standards. Bachelor’s degree (B.S.) in Business or related field is preferred, from four-year college or university; however, experience in hospital patient accounting will be considered in lieu of college degree (5 years minimum experience); or equivalent combination of education and experience. Employee must have attended a medical terminology course. In the event the employee has not attended a medical terminology course employee will obtain within 1 year of employment. Current CPR Certificate or obtain within 60days, must possess a Valid California Driver’s License. OPEN UNTIL FILLED. HIM MANAGER – FT REGULAR ($30.60-$35.49 PER HOUR DOE) Responsible for organization and supervision of the Medical Records Department. Acts as a consultant to medical staff and clinical staff in meeting accreditation standards. Is a resource for legal aspects of documentation and consent. Is responsible for maintaining confidentiality and integrity of medical records. Knowledge of functions and requirements of Medical Records. Familiarity with legal aspects of the Medical Record. Knowledge of requirements of accrediting agencies and government regulations affecting Medical Records. Knowledge of ICD-10 CM, CTP-4, and DRG coding practices and reimbursement requirements. Ability to supervise others and establish cooperation with all KMC department and medical staff. Minimum Requirements: Registered Record Administrator (RRA) or Accredited Record Technician (ART) from a twoyear college or technical school; and three (3) to five (5) years related experience. Current CPR or obtain within 60 days, and a valid California Driver’s License. OPENED UNTIL FILLED For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: apply@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

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applicants for the following positions:

PARAMEDIC – FT REGULAR Administers life support care to sick and injured persons in the pre-hospital setting as authorized and directed by Base Hospital Physician or MICN and NCEMS Protocols by performing the following duties. High school diploma or general education degree (GED); and a Paramedic license from the State of California. OPEN UNTIL FILLED. CERTIFIED MEDICAL ASSISTANT – FT REGULAR ($20.44 - $27.55 HR.) OR MEDICAL ASSISTANT – FT REGULAR ($18.62 - $25.09) Responsible for bringing patients from the waiting room to the patient care area and performing assessments/examinations in accordance with KMC’s policies and procedures for providing age specific care. High school diploma or GED equivalent; medical assistant certificate (if applying for the CMA); proficient in Medical Terminology. OPEN UNTIL FILLED 2 COMMUNITY HEALTH REPRESENTATIVES (CHR) – FT REGULAR ( $18.62 $25.09 HR.) Provide supportive services to persons in need of short/long term health care assistance and performs routine health screening in the community and in homes, health education, safety/injury prevention education and preventative health programs. High School Diploma or GED, experience working in health setting/field, must have a valid California Driver’s License, and must be insurable, current CPR Certificate or obtain within 60 days. OPEN UNTIL FILLED FACILITIES ASSOCIATE – FT REGULAR ($15.99 PER HOUR) Installs, maintains, and repairs machinery, equipment, pipe, electrical systems KMC land maintenance in and around the health care facility and related building. Must be a self-starter and solution seeking. High school diploma or GED equivalent, one year certificate from college or technical school; or three to six months related experience and/ or training; or equivalent combination of both; current CPR certificate or obtain within 60 days of hire; valid CA Driver’s License. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS OCTOBER 10, 2022 BY 5PM. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: apply@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

PHYSICIAN – FT REGULAR (SALARY NEGOTIABLE DOE) – Provides outpatient and inpatient care. Pursuant to Rural Acute Care Hospital standards. Conducts regular outpatient clinics and general medical and pediatric examinations, diagnosis, and treatment of patients. Determines when the services of a specialist are needed to treat unusual cases. Makes necessary arrangements for the admission of hospital patients to appropriate hospital. Analyzes the clinical records of new inpatients to determine preliminary diagnosis; affords professional care to patients confined; obtains necessary consultation for cases presenting difficulty in diagnosis of treatment; and authorizes admission of patients to acute care hospitals for emergency medical care and surgery. Participates in organization meetings to develop new, modify existing, and evaluate medical procedures relative to patient care with objective of improving and increasing the degree of patient care given to patients. Minimum requirements: A Doctor of Medicine or a doctor of Osteopathy from a school in the United States approved by a recognizing body in the year of applicant’s graduation; or a Doctor of Medicine with an equivalent degree from a foreign medical school which provided education and medical knowledge substantially equivalent to accredited schools in the United States. Subsequent to obtaining a Doctor of Medicine or a Doctor of Osteopathy degree, applicant must have at least one (1) year of supervised experience providing direct services in a clinical setting, i.e., a one (1) year internship or the first (transition) year of a residency program in an institution accredited for such training in the United States. Must possess a permanent, current, full, and unrestricted license to practice medicine in the State of California. Must possess a valid California Driver’s License, current CPR or obtained within 60 days. OPEN UNTIL FILLED. MEDICAL DIRECTOR – FT REGULAR The Medical Director is responsible for leadership and administration of K’ima:w Medical Clinic services. Direct and coordinate all activities of the medical functions. Provide clinical consultation and oversight to physicians and mid-level providers. Collaborate with al K’ima:w Medical Center departments, Chief Executive Officer, and Board of Directors in planning, implementing and evaluating health programming quality health services to clients. Graduation from a United States accredited medical school. Five years direct ambulatory care experience with two years administrative/leadership experience. OPEN UNTIL FILLED. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: apply@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.


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CITY OF FORTUNA

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ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST & BUSINESS IMPROVEMENT DISTRICT ADMINISTRATOR Temporary - Part-Time. $24.00 – $28.00 per hour. Under the general direction of the City Manager, the position is responsible for developing and administering the Fortuna Business Improvement District programs and activities, and acting as a liaison between the City of Fortuna and its business community; and to do related work as required with an emphasis on fulfilling the purposes of the Business Improvement District. The expected term for this position is 6-12 months and may be renewed annually depending upon achievement of stated goals and objectives. Must be at least 18 years of age. Complete job description and required application available at friendlyfortuna. com or City of Fortuna, 621 11th Street. Applications must be received by 4:00 pm Friday, October 14, 2022. default

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THE CITY OF

ACCOUNTING SPECIALIST I CITY OF EUREKA HOUSING AUTHORITY COUNTY OF HUMBOLDT HOUSING AUTHORITY

P O L I C E D E PA RT M E N T

COMMUNITY SERVICES OFFICER

THE CITY OF EUREKA

$3,065-$3,726 /month **Base salary will increase by 2% in 2023 with another increase of 5% in 2024.

ZOOKEEPER

Plus excellent benefits including free family Zoo membership, free family Adorni Center membership, free enrollment at Little Saplings Preschool for employee children and more! Come join the City of Eureka’s team with this great opportunity in the Eureka Police Department serving in a law enforcementadjacent capacity and assisting in communityoriented police service. This position performs a wide variety of complex activities in administering non-sworn police support services and programs to provide support to patrol units and community members. A combination of education and experience equivalent to an Associate’s Degree in Criminal Justice or a closely related field and two (2) years of related administrative support is desired. This position may be assigned evening and/or weekend shifts. For more information regarding qualifications and to apply online go to www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. We will be accepting applications until 5:00 p.m. on Friday, October 7th, 2022. EOE

Grade: $3,279/month + benefits package

$2,830-$3,440 monthly *Base salary will increase by 2% in 2023 with another increase of 5% in 2024. The City is currently hiring to fill two (2) permanent full- time vacancies for this position. Plus excellent benefits including free family Zoo membership, free family Adorni Center membership, free enrollment at Little Saplings Preschool for employee children and more! This is a journey-level class in the City Zoo that performs a range of routine and complex animal care duties, provides customer service and education to patrons, maintains high husbandry standards, and assists with veterinary decisions. This class may exercise technical and functional supervision over part-time zookeeper staff and volunteers. Minimum requirements include an Associate’s degree in zoology, biology, natural sciences, or a related field, and two (2) years of experience working with exotic/wild animals within a zoo operation, a wild animal park, animal care, or other animal facility. For more information or to apply online please visit our website at: www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. Final filing date is Friday, October 14, 2022 at 5pm. EOE.

Use the link below for the job application packet or you may inquire by emailing heatherh@eurekahumboldtha.org. Use a subject line of "Accounting Specialist I". In the body, please request an application packet. You may also pick up the application packet at the Housing Authority office, 735 W. Everding Street, Eureka, California, on Tuesday − Thursday between the hours of 10:00am − 3:00pm. This position will remain open until filled. Interviews will be scheduled as soon as possible. SUMMARY Performs the duties of an accounting specialist within the finance department. ESSENTIAL DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES include the following. This list is meant to be representative, not exhaustive. Reasonable accommodations may be made to enable individuals with disabili− ties to perform the essential functions. Processes accounts payables and payroll. Prepares payments for rents, security deposits and other tenant charges. Prepares daily bank deposits. Places inventory orders and maintains relationships with existing and new vendors. Maintains a variety of records including organizing and filing. Distributes and processes daily mail. Performs related duties as assigned. Job descriptions are written as a representative list of the ADA essential duties performed by the entire classification. They cannot include, and not intended to include, every possible activity and task performed by every specific employee. FLSA Status: Non− Exempt https://eurekahumboldtha.org/wp−content/uploads/ 2022/06/Job−Posting−ASI−2022.06.29.pdf

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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EMPLOYMENT default

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HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT Employment Opportunity

Deputy Clerk IV/V

Salary range: $20.01-$27.00/hr. DC IV/V attends court sessions and takes minutes during court proceedings: at the direction of a judge, impanels juries, sets future court dates, etc. Legal experience required. Please apply at www. humboldt.courts.ca.gov/ gi/employment.htm and submit application to: Jobs@humboldtcourt.ca.gov.

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YOUTH PROGRAM MANAGER Regular, F/T, Salary: $20/hr. the Program Manager is responsible for planning, coordination, and implementation of activities at the Wiyot Youth Programs. This includes addressing the developmental needs, interests, and char− acteristics of youth based upon the assessment of needs and inter− ests of youth and the community. Activities shall strive to relate to the five core areas of Youth Programming. Other duties assigned. Experience / Education Required: Bachelor’s Degree in Early Childhood Education, Child Development, Elementary Educa− tion or Special Education or related fields. Two years of experience working with youth in a leadership position. Demonstrated experi− ence in planning, developing, and implementing activities that provide social enrichment and personal development. Must be able to complete a background check, DOJ fingerprinting and Tuberculosis test before beginning work. Pre−employment drug testing required. Full−time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/ sick leave, 16 paid holidays, health, dental, life insurance and matched profit sharing. Open until filled. Please go to www.wiyot.us for complete job description. Contact Operations Manager for an application and submit to Wiyot Tribe 1000 Wiyot Dr. Loleta, CA 95551 www.wiyot.us

SOCIAL WORK ADVOCATE FT in Loleta, CA. Advocating, coordinating and guiding clients improving well being. Requires a BA w/ experience in SW or related fields. Salary starts at $3200/mo. excellent benefits. Visit www.wiyot.us for an application and a full job description or contact HR at (707) 733−5055 www.wiyot.us

SOCIAL SERVICES ASSISTANT P/T, year round. Under the direc− tion of the Health and Human Services Director, the Social Service Assistant will assist the Health and Human Services director to provide services to Tribal families. Transporting clients to appoint− ments, assisting Elders in and out of vehicles, scheduling, delivering meals, boxes, and supplies to elders, opening the HHS office, setting up and cleaning up for Health and Human Services events, workshops, groups etc. High school diploma or GED required. Possess a valid California Driver’s License, automobile insurance and be 25 years old. Must work well with other staff and be cour− teous to Tribal members and visitors. Must be able to complete a background check, DOJ fingerprinting and TB test before beginning work. Must be food handler trained. www.wiyot.us default

The Hoopa Valley Tribe is accepting applications to fill the following vacant position

ROADS DIRECTOR default

HUMBOLDT SUPERIOR COURT Research Attorney $85,403-$119,564 FT – 40 HRS. (SALARY EXEMPT)/FULL BENEFITS This professional level position performs legal research, gathers information regarding legal motions, pleadings, and writs presented to the Court; reviews and summarizes evidence, procedural history and legal contentions and submits recommendations for resolving matters before the Court. Please apply at: https://www.humboldt. courts.ca.gov/general-information/humanresources-and-employment and submit application to: jobs@humboldtcourt.ca.gov.

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DISHGAMU PROJECT MANAGER FT in Loleta, the Dishgamu Project Manager is responsible for plan− ning, coordination, and implementation of activities. Plan and organize Dishgamu programs, Promote and market programs to the community, Provide administrative support to the Director. Knowledge of building trades, job development, construction and land acquisition is required. Two years of experience working in a leadership position. Eligible for benefits. Three−month proba− tionary period. Contact HR at 707−733−5055 to request full job description and application. www.wiyot.us

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

Roads Department, Regular, F/T, Salary: DOE. Responsible for planning and maintaining transportation systems on the Hoopa Valley Indian Reservation; and, oversees all operations including Road Construction, Aggregate and Ready-mix enterprises, New Construction, and Road maintenance program. Minimum Qualifications: Must have a Bachelor’s Degree in Engineering, Planning, or a related field; AND a Minimum of 5 years of public road maintenance, facilities, and construction experience at a management level; OR an equivalent combination of education, training and/or experience. Knowledgeable about federal and state laws pertaining to road construction (BIA, FHA, NEPA, and highway and bridge engineering); Class A General Engineering Contractor’s license preferred, but not required; and, knowledgeable in the basic operation of heavy machinery. Must have a valid CA Driver’s License and be insurable. DEADLINE: September 9, 2022. For job descriptions & employment applications, contact the Human Resource Department, Hoopa Valley Tribe, P.O. Box 218, Hoopa, CA 95546. Call (530) 625-9200 Ext. 23 or email dori.marshall@ hoopainsurance.com. The Tribe’s Alcohol & Drug Policy and TERO Ordinance Apply.


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Northcoast Children’s Services

Hiring? northcoastjournal.com

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE SPECIALIST, Arcata Duties include a variety of specialized tasks involving the prep & processing of on-going accounts payable. High school graduate or equivalent, plus 3 yrs. of bookkeeping exp. F/T, 40 hrs./wk. $21.03-$22.08/hr. Open Until Filled.

ASSISTANT TEACHERS, Eureka, McKinleyville, Fortuna, Del Norte

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Northcoast Children’s Services

CENTER DIRECTOR, Eureka

Overall management of a Head Start center base program. Must meet Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix, plus 3 units in Administration (BA/BS Degree in Child  a minimum of 2 yrs. exp. working w/ preschool children in a group setting. F/T 40 hr./wk. Open Until Filled.

TEMPORARY ASSOCIATE TEACHER, Willow Creek

Assists teacher in the implementation & supervision of activities for preschool children.   w/ children. F/T Temporary, 32 hrs./wk., $17.43-$18.30/hr. Open Until Filled.

TEACHERS, McKinleyville, Eureka

  providing support & supervision for a toddler program. Must meet Associate Teacher Level on Child Development Permit Matrix & have one-year exp. teaching in a toddler setting.  hrs./wk. $17.94-$19.78/hr. Open Until Filled. Please note: Per grant requirements, All NCS  COVID -19 vaccination, except those who are  for an exemption must undergo weekly testing for  coverings regardless of vaccination status. Please contact Administrative Services if you need information regarding vaccinations or exemptions. Submit applications to: Northcoast Children’s Services  For addtl info & application  www.ncsheadstart.org

Northcoast Children’s Services

Post your job opportunities in the Journal. 442-1400 ×314

     Open until Filled.

INTERPRETERS, Eureka, Fortuna

Do you love being with children? Do you enjoy supporting children learn and grow? Are you looking for a meaningful profession? Do you want a job that has evenings and weekends off? Would you love to find a job with a Hiring Incentive? Northcoast Children’s Services may be what you’re looking for! Northcoast Children’s Services provides early education and family support services to children and families from pregnancy to  toddler and preschool centers in a variety of locations in Humboldt and Del Norte counties. We have a variety of full and part time positions working with children and families.  holidays to all employees and an additional  care option to full time employees. All employees may also obtain assistance with education and child development permits. We are currently looking for people   center directors and home visitors.   after 2 months of full-time employment.  for more information on how to join our growing team! https://ncsheadstart. org/employment-opportunities/

      Open Until Filled. Please note:           Northcoast Children’s Services    www.ncsheadstart.org

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The City of Rio Dell Is now accepting applications for

Fiscal Assistant I/II/Senior ($34,942 - $51,747 + Benefits) Provides customer service to the public, customers and complex support to the Finance Department. This is a great way to get experience and earn a reference. Applications may be obtained at 675 Wildwood Avenue in Rio Dell, or call (707)764-3532. Position is open until filled.

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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THE CITY OF

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MAIL HAUL, INC / TS TRANSPORTING, INC COMMERCIAL TRUCK DRIVERS FULL OR PART-TIME A California CDL (Class A) is required, along with a DMV report and a current medical. We have dedicated runs from Eureka to the Bay Area and back. There is a layover while down south, but the runs are consistent and year-round. Pay is good, trips are generally easy, and this is an excellent team that is GREAT to work with! We prefer 2 or more years of tractor / trailer experience, but can help with training. Backing skills are a plus. Up to $32.21/hr. There are retirement account or health insurance options. Vacation and holiday pay begin after probation period. Please call, email, or text Charles (707-834-8350), clindquist00@gmail.com with questions or if you would like to schedule an application interview.

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NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

ANIMAL CONTROL OFFICER $3,320-$4,035 Monthly *Salary will increase by 2% on January 1 2023 and another increase of 5% will be issued January 1, 2024. Plus excellent benefits including free family Zoo membership, free family Adorni Center membership, free enrollment at Little Saplings Preschool for employee children and more! The City of Eureka is seeking a qualified individual to assume the duties of Animal Control Officer for the Eureka Police Department. The principal function of an employee in this class is to independently perform a variety of complex animal control tasks, including field patrol, investigation, and quarantine of specified animals. Duties include the enforcement and communication of animal services codes, ordinances, and regulations; ensuring public safety by capturing and caring for wild, vicious, and/or injured animals. For a complete job description with list of requirements and to apply online, please visit our website at: www.ci.eureka.ca.gov. Final filing date: 5:00 pm on Friday, October 7, 2022. EOE.


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Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish).

K’ima: w Medical Center an entity of the Hoopa Valley Tribe, is seeking applicants for the following positions:

GRANT WRITER & PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS – FT/REGULAR ($29.0036.00 PER HOUR DOE) Build and maintain a tracking system for grants applicable to K’ima:w Medical Center. Monitor grant announcements and apply for grants. Perform professional level work in compiling grantrelated datasets and interpreting and applying grant funding announcement guidelines. Build a system of tracking demographic and other data components for use in future grant opportunities. Develop, draft, and edit written communications for KMC to all segments of the public. Minimum Requirements: High school diploma or GED; Must meet one of the following - (1) Master’s degree in business administration or related field and 1 year experience working in development or reporting in a grant funded program; OR (2) Bachelor’s degree in business administration or related field and 2 years of experience as a lead or program developer in a grant funded program; OR (3) Associates’ degree and 4 years of experience in grant writing or as a program lead in a grant funded program; certificate from a grant writing course of study may experience required; and, two previous grant excerpts must be submitted with application. OPEN UNTIL FILLED. DENTAL HYGIENIST – FT REGULAR ($39.0043.00 DOE) Provides general preventative dental care designed to preserve teeth and prevent the spread of oral disease. Minimum requirements: Graduate of an accredited School of Dental Hygiene; clinical experience preferred, Valid State License for Dental Hygienist (State of California Preferred), CPR certification. OPEN UNTIL FILLED. WELLNESS COORDINATOR – FT REGULAR ($20.00-$23.00 PER HOUR) – Coordinated and implements activities and action steps as listed in the goals and objectives of the CDC Tribal Wellness Grant. Responsible for helping create opportunities for community members to improve their physical, mental, and emotional health through cultural activities. High School Diploma or GED equivalent and two years clerical and/or administrative experience; must actively participate in tribal cultural activities; must be able to assist with grant reporting and with grant compliance; current CPR certificate or obtain within 60 days of hire; valid CA Driver’s License. DEADLINE TO APPLY IS SEPTEMBER 26, 2022 BY 5PM. For an application, job description, and additional information, contact: K’ima:w Medical Center, Human Resources, PO Box 1288, Hoopa, CA, 95546 or call 530-625-4261 or email: apply@kimaw.org for a job description and application. You can also check our website listings for details at kimaw.org. Resume and CV are not accepted without a signed application.

Clinician I

Starts at $27.09/hour

Clinician II

Starts at $5,381/month

Bilingual Clinician I Starts at $28.94/hour

Bilingual Clinician II Starts at $5,730/month

Mental Health Support Specialist Starts at $20.30 /hour

Full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid platinum-level health, dental, vision, and life insurance, and a retirement plan including matching contributions and profit sharing . Part-time positions offer paid sick leave. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. default

www.changingtidesfs.org Hablamos español @changingtidesfamilyservices

Build to edge of the document Margins are just a safe area

Network Analyst Cal Poly Humboldt invites applicants for the position of Network Analyst, which will join the team responsible for operating the growing campus and regional wired and wireless networks on the main Arcata campus and throughout the region. This team will also be designing and building a high-speed, low-latency dedicated Science Network; this will connect multiple campus research facilities with other California State universities, the Pacific Research Platform, and international partner campuses. To see more information about this vacancy visit https://apptrkr.com/3434137 and see job 517711

Would you like to apply your skills in an established organization helping local children and families? Our exciting workplace has full- and part-time time openings. We offer excellent benefits for full-time positions and provide additional compensation for qualified bilingual candidates (English/Spanish).

Program Assistant Starts at $16/hr

Program Assistant, Case Management Starts at $16/hr

Human Resource Specialist

PLACE YOUR JOB LISTINGS CLASSIFIEDS.NORTHCOASTJOURNAL.COM Place Ad

Starts at $18.73/hr

Bilingual CCIP & R&R Specialist Starts @ $17.59/hr

Full-time positions offer excellent benefits: paid vacation/sick leave, 14 paid holidays, 100% agency-paid platinum-level health, dental, vision, and life insurance, and a retirement plan including matching contributions and profit sharing . Part-time positions offer paid sick leave. COVID-19 Vaccine required. Please go to www.changingtidesfs.org for complete job descriptions and application requirements. Positions open until filled. Submit complete application packets to Nanda Prato at Changing Tides Family Services, 2259 Myrtle Ave., Eureka, CA 95501 or via email to nprato@changingtidesfs.org. www.changingtidesfs.org

Hablamos español

@changingtidesfamilyservices

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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BATH & SHOWER UPDATES IN AS LITTLE AS ONE DAY! Afford− able prices − No payments for 18 months! Lifetime warranty & professional installs. Senior & Military Discounts available. Call 1−866−370−2939 (AAN CAN)

PAYING TOP CA$H FOR MEN’S SPORT WATCHES! Rolex, Breitling, Omega, Patek Philippe, Heuer, Daytona, GMT, Submariner and Speedmaster. Call 888−320−1052

Work from the comfort of your home. We are seeking caring people with a bedroom to spare to help support adults with special needs. Receive ongoing training and support and a monthly stipend of $1200-$4000+ a month.

BIG GUY, LITTLE PICKUP Small cleanups and hauls. Eureka area. Reasonable rates. Call Odd Job Mike at 707−497−9990.

Contact Rita

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high−end, totaled − it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 866−535−9689 (AAN CAN)

at 707-442-4500 www.mentorswanted.com

MARKETPLACE Miscellaneous

CREDIT CARD DEBT RELIEF! Reduce payment by up to 50%! Get one LOW affordable payment/month. Reduce interest. Stop calls. FREE no− obligation consultation Call 1− 855−761−1456 (AAN CAN) DIRECTV SATELLITE TV SERVICE Starting at $74.99/month! Free Installation! 160+ channels avail− able. Call Now to Get the Most Sports & Entertainment on TV! 877−310−2472

ALL CHILDREN’S CLOTHES ½ PRICE @ THE DREAM QUEST THRIFT STORE! & CHECK OUT OUR HALLOWEEN COSTUMES! Where your shopping dollars support local youth. Senior Discount Tuesdays & Spin’n’Win Wednesdays! (530) 629−3006. Sep27−Oct1.

4G LTE HOME INTERNET NOW AVAILABLE! Get GotW3 with lightning fast speeds plus take your service with you when you travel! As low as $109.99/mo! 1− 866−571−1325 CAN) Build to edge(AAN of the document

TRAIN ONLINE TO DO MEDICAL BILLING! Become a Medical Office Professional online at CTI! Get Trained, Certi− fied & ready to work in months! Call 866−243−5931. (M−F 8am− 6pm ET). Computer with internet is required.

HALLOWEEN COSTUMES Unique*Classic*Retro Costumes, Hats, Shoes Professional Makeup, Wigs Encore Closet Open Wed−Fri 11−5:30. Sat. 11−5.

WATER DAMAGE TO YOUR HOME? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 833−664−1530 (AAN CAN)

The Costume Box 202 T St. Eureka, Ca 707−443−5200

Lawn Care Service Riding & cordless mowers, both with baggers Dump runs • Weed eating Hedge trimming ur $ 35/ho

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TOP CA$H PAID FOR OLD GUITARS! 1920−1980 Gibson, Martin, Fender, Gretsch, Epiphone, Guild, Mosrite, Rick− enbacker, Prairie State, D’An− gelico, Stromberg. And Gibson Mandolins / Banjos. 877−589− 0747 (AAN CAN)

Call Corey 707-382-2698

Lodging

Ripple Creek TRINITY ALPSCabins WRITING CONSULTANT/EDITOR. Fiction, nonfiction, poetry. Dan Levinson, MA, MFA. (707) 443−8373. www.ZevLev.com

Macintosh Computer Consulting for Business and Individuals Troubleshooting Hardware/Memory Upgrades Setup Assistance/Training Purchase Advice 707-826-1806

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WILDERNESS AREA Getaway in beautifully furnished cabins on the Upper Trinity River. Hike, bike, fish or just relax in seclusion.

OPEN YEAR ROUND www.ripplecreekcabins.com

(530) 266-3505

macsmist@gmail.com

Your Business Here YOUR AD HERE

SUNNY ROOM FOR RENT IN FORTUNA $650 a month, 6 month lease, First and Last months rent. Furnished/ unfurnished, Shared kitchen and bath No Smoking on property & no pets. Includes utilities & WIFi. Fully vacci− nated, Honest, & have integrity. References req. Available Oct. 1 Call Camille Fellion 707−223−2630 enlight enengage@gmail.com

DISH TV $64.99 FOR 190 CHAN− NELS + $14.95 HIGH SPEED INTERNET. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. Promo Expires 1/21/23 1− 866−566−1815 (AAN CAN)

Margins are just a safe area

2 hour m minimu

SPECTRUM INTERNET AS LOW AS $29.99, CALL TO SEE IF YOU QUALIFY FOR ACP AND FREE INTERNET. No Credit Check. Call Now! 833−955−0905

Computer & Internet

442-1400 ×314

northcoastjournal.com

Home Repair 2 GUYS & A TRUCK. Carpentry, Landscaping, Junk Removal, Clean Up, Moving. Although we have been in business for 25 years, we do not carry a contractors license. Call 845−3087

YOUR AD HERE 442-1400 ×314 northcoastjournal.com

Auto Service ROCK CHIP? Windshield repair is our specialty. For emergency service CALL GLASWELDER 442−GLAS (4527) humboldtwindshield repair.com

Cleaning

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HUMBOLDT PLAZA APTS. Opening soon available for HUD Sec. 8 Waiting Lists for 2, 3 & 4 bedroom Apts. Annual Income Limits: 1 pers. $24,500, 2 pers. $28,000; 3 pers. $31,500; 4 pers. $34,950; 5 pers. $37,750; 6 pers. $40,550; 7 pers. $43,350; 8 pers. $46,150 Hearing impaired: TDD Ph# 1-800-735-2922 Apply at Office: 2575 Alliance Rd. Bldg. 9 Arcata, 8am-12pm & 1-4pm, M-F (707) 822-4104

BODY MIND SPIRIT Other Professionals CIRCUS NATURE PRESENTS A. O’KAY CLOWN & NANINATURE Juggling Jesters & Wizards of Play Performances for all ages. Magical Adventures with circus games and toys. Festivals, Events & Parties. (707) 499−5628 www.circusnature.com

HIGHER EDUCATION FOR SPIRITUAL UNFOLDMENT. Bachelors, Masters, D.D./ Ph.D., distance learning, University of Metaphysical Sciences. Bringing profes− sionalism to metaphysics. (707) 822−2111 metaphysicsuniversity.com default

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Home & garden improvement experts on page 20.

   

442-1400 ×315 kyle@ northcoastjournal.com

CLARITY WINDOW CLEANING Services available. Call Julie (707) 839−1518

YOUR AD HERE classified@northcoastjournal.com

NORTH COAST JOURNAL • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • northcoastjournal.com

(707) 442-1400 ×314

      




Charlie Tripodi

Owner/Broker

Kyla Nored

Barbara Davenport

BRE #01930997

Associate Broker

Realtor

Realtor

BRE# 01066670

BRE # 02084041

BRE# 02070276

916.798.2107

707.601.6702

Owner/ Land Agent BRE #01332697

707.476.0435

OUSE! OPEN H2 11AM-1PM /0 10 SUNDAY

ARCATA – 2 UNITS - $849,000

707.834.7979

707.498.6364

Mike Willcutt

MYERS FLAT – CULTIVATION PROPERTY - $799,000

Modern, completely remodeled 2 units in the Jacoby Creek School District situated on ±0.86 flat acres! 3 Bedroom, 3 Bathroom main house with 1 bedroom, 1 bathroom second unit, massive backyard, large shop, stunning deck, patio, and so much more!

±40 Acres featuring County road access, power close by, open meandering meadows, and oak studded woodland with commercially viable fir timber. Multiple charming outbuildings, plus a cannabis permit for 34,776 sq. ft. of outdoor, 3,000 sq. ft. of mixed light and 2,000 sq. ft. of nursery space! Wonderful business and recreational opportunity!

860 D STREET, ARCATA - $549,000

922 HILDA COURT, RIO DELL – $385,000

Amazing investment opportunity centrally located just 5 blocks from Cal Poly Humboldt and a short walk to the Plaza! Fantastic income potential with 5 bedrooms, bonus room, and 2 bathrooms. Lower floor enjoys the signature 1930’s high ceilings, plenty of sunlight, new exterior paint and roof!

MAPLE CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE - $4,000,000 Stunning custom home on ±116 acres with ±1 mile of river frontage! Home features a top of the line gourmet kitchen, hardwood floors, wraparound deck and so much more! Enjoy the convenience PG&E as well as paved road access just 17 miles from Blue Lake. Income opportunity with State & County cannabis permits for 15k sq.ft.!

WILLOW CREEK – HOME ON ACREAGE - $1,050,000

3 bedroom 2 bath 1386 sqft. Move in ready!! This home has just had the interior painted and new carpet installed. Located in a cute family friendly cul-de-sac. Just needs you and your personal touches

OPEN SATURDAY HOUSE! 10/01 11AM -1PM

BLOCKSBURG – HOME ON ACREAGE - $349,000 Premium hunting property perched high on a ridgetop with expansive views of the local mountains! Property boasts a newly drilled well & water system, end of the road privacy, beautiful rolling meadows and a 1,000 sq. ft. open concept cabin. Sustainable living at its finest with plenty of space for gardening, animals, and great solar energy potential!

WILLOW CREEK – LAND/PROPERTY – $237,000

Beautiful river view estate on over 4 acres just minutes from Willow Creek! Property boasts a 3/3 3,650 sq. ft. main residence, large in ground pool complete with outdoor kitchen and pool house featuring a full bathroom and kitchenette area, separate barn with a 1/1 apartment above and so much more!

±177 Acre homestead, mountain recreation, or timberland property adjacent to Forest Service lands. Hardwood & fir forests, exceptional views to the south & west, several flats for development, w/ county road access and just 6 miles from downtown Willow Creek.

TRINITY LAKE – LAND/PROPERTY - $199,000

+/- 60 secluded acres just 30 minutes off 101. With a large shop and two story house with surrounding views. The House will need to be remodeled which is a perfect opportunity to make it into the getaway home of your dreams. Open to a lease or rent as well which gives you a number of ways to make this property your own. Large flats are pushed and cleared giving endless possibilities for gardening or building another home or shop.

Two parcels totaling ±100 acres overlooking beautiful Trinity Lake! Great timber investment or vacation spot with well and building site in place!

Ashlee Cook

MIRANDA-LAND/PROPERTY- $ 550,000

northcoastjournal.com • Thursday, Sept. 29, 2022 • NORTH COAST JOURNAL

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BACK TO SCHOOL

@ THE HUMBOLDT COUNTY COLLECTIVE

WELCOME BACK STUDENTS FOR THE WHOLE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER STUDENTS GET

10% OFF with a purchase MUST HAVE STUDENT ID NO EXCEPTIONS

UP THE ALLEY

BEST PRICES IN HUMBOLDT

ATION AND TO THE LEFT OF OUR OLD LOC

M

YR

TL

E

A

. VE

1662 Myrtle Ave. SUITE A Eureka 707.442.2420

NEW HOURS

M-F 10am-7pm Sat 11am-6pm Sun 11am-5pm

License No. C10-0000997-LIC

21+ only