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M O N T A N A S U M M E R Few places offer as much natural beauty as the Flathead Indian Reservation and Lake County. This is Montana at its best, with countless ways to fulfill outdoor recreational cravings. The area is full of choices: hiking, fishing, cycling, bird watching, boating, water skiing, camping, sight seeing, golfing and so much more. Driving in from the south, the view from the crest of Ravalli Hill is breathtaking. The craggy-topped Mission Mountains jut from the valley floor with eye-catch ing beauty, towering over a lush land scape of rolling hills and sweeping

fields. Clear mountain streams fed by winter snowpack cut paths from the mountains and meander through the valley floors en route to Flathead River or Flathead Lake. Viewed from atop Polson Hill, the 28-mile-long lake, dot ted with islands and bordered by moun tains, is picture-perfect. And the area’s postcard beauty does n’t stop there. The National Bison Range and Ninepipe Wildlife Refuge are home to abundant wildlife including deer, elk, antelope, bear, birds and bison. The area’s museums offer locals and

visitors a taste of what it was like in days gone by. Numerous town festivals, powwows, rodeos, stockcar racing, basketball tournaments, fishing derbies and fairs throughout the summer offer tourists and local residents plenty to do each and every weekend. If a person can’t find something fun and exhilarating to do, it’s because they aren’t looking — or they prefer to embrace the laid-back lifestyle of the friendly and fortunate folks who call the Flathead Indian Reservation and Lake County home.

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C O N T E N T S FLYBOARDING

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DISCONNECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 TO-DO LIST . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 FLATHEAD LAKE STATE PARK . . . 13 SEE ROVER RUN . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 WILDLIFE SIGHTINGS . . . . . . . . . 16 PERMIT REQUIRED . . . . . . . . . . . 18 TREASURE HUNTING . . . . . . . . . 20 AQUATIC INVADERS . . . . . . . . . . 22 GLACIER NATIONAL PARK . . . . . . 24 PADDLEBOARD YOGA . . . . . . . . 25 FLATHEAD LAKE FACTS . . . . . . . 27 RODEOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 POWWOWS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 FLATHEAD CHERRIES . . . . . . . . . 32 AMERICA MUSEUM. . . . . . . . . . . 36 LIVE THEATRE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 SHAKESPEARE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 SUMMER EVENTS CALENDAR . . . 39 CITY INFORMATION . . . . . . . . . . 59

2016

MONTANA SUMMER 2016 Montana Summer is a yearly publication of the Valley Journal, a weekly newspaper published each Wednesday in Lake County, Montana, for readers in the Mission, Jocko and lower Flathead Valleys. Our main office is located in Ronan at 331 Main Street S.W. Office hours are 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Business phone - (406) 676-8989. Fax (406) 676-8990.

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Our mailing address is: Valley Journal, PO Box 326, Ronan, MT 59864. Our Web address is www.valleyjournal.net. News and calendar submissions may be sent by email to vjeditor@valleyjournal.net Copyright 2016, the Valley Journal. All rights reserved. Reproduction, reuse or transmittal in any form or by any means is prohibited without written permission of the Valley Journal.

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STAFF Publisher/Owner ..............Summer Goddard Editor................................Linda Sappington Reporter ..............................Karen Peterson Reporter ..................................Kent Luetzen Reporter ..................................Shay Farmer Copy editor................................Kathi Beeks

Advertising mgr/Owner ......Boone Goddard Advertising sales..........................Ben Stone Advertising sales........................Jerry Beeks Production manager ............Mickele Schultz Photographer ......................Nicole Tavenner Office manager............................Leni Baker


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by KAREN PETERSON VALLEY JOURNAL

People can fly above Flathead Lake, feel the wind blowing in their hair, dive into the water — and they get a great view. “I see what the birds see,” said T.J. Andrews. “Fifty feet up, you can see the Mission Mountains from a completely different perspective.” Andrews doesn’t fly up into the air with wings or ride in anything with wings attached to it. He simply puts a flyboard on his feet, which is a bit like a skateboard, and takes off. Basically, a person is riding on the end of a hose up into the air, but, no worries, the process is controlled. A handheld wireless control regulates how much water pressure is moved

through the hose, so the person can hover above the water or take off up into the sky. “It’s as close to flying without wings that people can get, and it’s an awesome feeling,” he said. The board is attached to a long hose that is much like a firehose. The hose attaches to a jet ski. The jet ski forces water into the hose, and the pressure pushes the flyboard into the air. Andrews is a certified flyboard instructor, and he has taught hundreds of people to fly in the last few years. He says that it isn’t difficult to learn. “It can be a workout the first time some people try it because they won’t relax,” M O N T A N A

he said. “They think they need to do too much.” The technique is simple. “You just stand on the board and use your toes,” he said adding that toe direction creates the direction of the flight path. In Andrews’ experience, only a few people are not able to fly because, after putting on the flyboard, they realized that they have a phobia of water. “They have a hard time relaxing,” he said adding that flying does require getting wet. After a person figures out how to fly, they get to do tricks. SEE PAGE 6

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“I start with the dolphin dive,” he said, describing it as a process of hovering above the water and then diving in, all in one motion. The next move involves spinning. “You learn to spin a 360 in one spot,” he said. “You can spin as many times as you want.” It can take about 20 minutes on average for people to get the basics down. “More advanced tricks people can work up to are the Superman, backflips, and

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spiral dives,” he said. During a lesson, Andrews is on the jet ski controlling the throttle and walking a person through the process. “You need a certified instructor,” he said to make sure the experience is safe. “Safety is the main issue.” The safety obsession is for the individual and the sport as a whole. Andrews said that flyboarding is only a couple years old, and if someone gets hurt, it could be the end of it. “It could ruin the sport if people don’t do it right,” he said.

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Andrews requires people to wear safety gear. “You need a life vest, helmet, the board floats, and an instructor right there,” he said. He added that a certified instructor knows how to slowly and safely let a person fall into the water by gently letting off on the throttle. “If you have a bad instructor, you will have a bad time,” he said. Flying costs on average about $150 for a half hour lesson depending on the season. He said that the price tag might


seem high, but he said it comes from the cost of the equipment, the insurance for that equipment, and the company also covers the cost of insurance for the customers. “It isn’t a cheap sport,” he said. “But once people fly, they say it’s worth it.” Andrews takes people out for flying lessons all over Montana as long as the water is at least 8 feet deep. He manages a company called FlyBoard of Montana. The company also sells flyboarding equipment. “Before people get the equipment, they have to take a certification course,” he

said that is focused on, of course, safety. And when he isn’t giving flying lessons, he competes as a professional athlete in flyboard world championship competitions. “Flyboarding has become an extreme sport,” he said. He is one of only 10 other competitors from the United States and the only one from the northwest that competed in the 2015 World Cup. Andrews grew up in Polson and learned to do flips on a trampoline in his backyard. He moved onto the ski slopes around Montana before trying out his

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skills with the flyboard. He said that the trampoline is a great place to practice for a flyboard adventure if people want to work up to doing flips. “It’s about teaching your equilibrium that everything is all right,” he said. “When people get upside down their brain thinks things are not all right. You have to teach yourself that it’s okay, and then, it’s a blast.” For more information, contact Andrews through Flyboard of Montana at 406270-1787 or www.flyboardofmontana.com

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“The chaos of life can be all-consuming, but when I first saw Flathead Lake all of my racing thoughts suddenly went quiet.” Jason Christensen, Florida by KENT LUETZEN VALLEY JOURNAL

In a world filled with Instagram, Facebook and Snapchat, it is easy to constantly be checking a computer or connected to a phone. Traveling to Montana was where Minneapolis, Minnesota native Laura Edwards found an escape from technology and the big city. “It makes you forget about your phone,” Edwards said about the serene environment. Living in Minneapolis with the constant hustle and bustle of people and traffic, Edwards was more than relieved to find solitude in Glacier National Park. “There is no light pollution … I could see the stars in the sky,” she said. Edwards spent three weeks in the Flathead Valley visiting friends and going on hikes. 8

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She swam in Lake McDonald, trekked the Highline trail at the top of Going to The Sun Road, and got to taste the staple Flathead cherries. “I love to be outside and I am a nature kind of gal,” Edwards said. “The weather was phenomenal, so we had no reason to be inside.” Other newcomers to the Flathead Valley were Minnesota resident Brandon Reshetar and Orlando, Florida local Jason Christensen. Both were looking to disconnect from the realties of life. After a semester of studying for his Ph.D., Christensen booked a flight to escape so he could relax before his final semester at University of Central Florida. He enjoyed huckleberry ice cream while driving down

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Highway 93 on the east shore of Flathead Lake, wandering through downtown Bigfork, and taking part in the nightlife Whitefish has to offer. “Flathead Lake captivated me for it’s silent, peaceful presence,” Christensen said. “The chaos of life can be all-consuming, but when I first saw Flathead Lake all of my racing thoughts suddenly went quiet.” Not only does Montana have exceptional views, the residents are what surprised Reshetar. “The Montana culture is very laid back and calming. After years living in a big city, it was a much needed reset,” Reshetar said. Reshetar said he had seen pictures of Montana online, but never with his own eyes.


“The clear blue water of the lake, nice people, and overall Montana experience is something that can’t be shared through a photo or an Instagram post,” Reshetar said. When a person lives in an area for so long, he or she can forget how beautiful their backyard truly is, Christensen said. He wanted to remind the locals to take advantage of the nature they have access to yearround.

“Remember how many people travel from around the world to experience what you have daily. The more I travel, the more I realize what a treasure places like Montana have to offer,” Christensen said. “It is not something to be taken for granted.” Reshetar agreed after spending a few days reflecting and exploring around the Flathead River and enjoying the unique bays on Flathead Lake.

“I would tell anyone who lives in Montana to take a break everyday and go explore,” Reshetar said. “Let your thoughts get lost in the mountains and live in the moment.” At the end of their individual trips to Montana, Edwards, Christensen and Reshetar all said they would have changed only one thing. “I’d simply stay longer,” Christensen said.

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P L A C E S MUSEUMS • Garden of the Rockies Museum, 518 Round Butte Road in Ronan, features Sloan’s Flat Stage Stop, a one-room schoolhouse, an old log home with dovetailed construction, and a tool shed and farm machinery building. Call 406-6765210 for hours and more information. • Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana, 69316 Highway 93 in Charlo, boasts wellcrafted exhibits of weaponry, spurs and saddlery, “grizzly set,” and a vast collection of Native American beadwork. Life-size dioramas of wild animals and of an Indian camp make this museum unique. Call 406644-3435 for hours and more information. • Arlee Jocko Valley Museum, run by the Arlee Historical Society, is located two blocks east of Highway 93 on the corner of Bouch and Fyant, south of the Arlee Elementary School. The museum features a military display, with stories and photos of Jocko Valley residents who lost their lives in the service of their country and athletic trophies, uniforms, pictures, and stories about the athletes from Arlee schools. For hours, more information on special features this summer, and to arrange a viewing appointment, call Alvaretta Morin at 406-726-3167. • The People’s Center and Museum at 53253 Highway 93 in Pablo is open Monday-Saturday, from 9 a.m.-5 p.m., during the months of June through September. The center features an exhibit gallery, educational programs and Native Ed-Venture interpretive tours focusing on Native American heritage, natural history and cultural interpretation. Call 406-6750161 or go to www.peoplescenter.org for more information. • Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane in Polson, is open all year. Displays include Native American items, cars, motorcycles, toys, dolls, guns, clothing, wagons, buggies, sleighs, snowmobiles, military items, tools, tractors, wooden boats, logging memorabilia, a pioneer village and much more. Call 406-883-6804 for hours and more information. • Polson Flathead Historical Museum, located at 708 Main St. in Polson, is open from Memorial Day through Labor Day. It features a hands-on Kids’ Korner, Native American collection, Homesteaders’ kitchen, schoolroom exhibits, an 1885 1 0

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trading post, Polson memorabilia, and much more. Call 406-883-2680 for hours and more information. ART G A L L E R I E S • Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery, 306 Main Street, Polson, is a non-profit artists’ cooperative, supporting the arts and art education in Lake County, Montana. It was founded in 1971 by a group of artists, many of whom remain involved today. Their mission is to encourage and promote participation in the arts in Lake County through workshops, scholarships, exhibits, a library, and other resources. For additional information call 406-883-5956. Hours of operation are: Monday-Friday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and on Saturdays from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. • The Red Poppy, located at 1 Eisenhower Street in Ronan, features local artists’ creations. Call 406-676-3010 or go to www.theredpoppy.org for more information. • Hangin’ Art Gallery and Coffee Shop in Arlee displays local art in a cozy environment. The community gathering place and arts center at 92555 Highway 93 offers local music, organic free trade espresso and locally-sourced organic foods. For hours and more information call 406-7265005 or go to hanginartgallery.com CITY PARKS Dayton • Dayton Park, a Lake County park located in the center of town, provides tree shaded picnic tables, a vault toilet, a playground with swings, a slide, spring riders and a teeter-totter. There’s ample parking area for cars, designated parking for trucks towing boat trailers, and it’s just a one-block walk to a roped swim area with dock and ladder. The park is the site of the Easter Egg Hunt each spring, and Dayton Daze in September. Polson (Note: Alcohol is not allowed in any Polson park without a permit, which must be obtained from Polson City Hall, 106 First St. E.) • Boettcher Park, adjacent to the Polson Bay Golf Club, offers picnic tables and shelters, swimming area, playground, restrooms and shower, concession stand, volleyball court and horseshoe pits.

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G O • Sacajawea Park, north of the bridge in Polson, provides large shaded grassy areas, swimming (area is not roped off), picnic tables, benches, restrooms and dogs are allowed on a leash. • Riverside Park is on Flathead River just south of the bridge. It includes a swimming area, boat launch ramp, children’s playground, picnic tables, benches, volleyball court and restrooms. • Ducharme Park is on Highway 93 and Seventh St E. in Polson with shady trees and benches to enjoy the outstanding lake view. • O’Malley Park is on the corner of 11th Ave. E. and Fourth St. E. in Polson and consists of an American Legion baseball field, Little League baseball field, concession stand, basketball court, swings, horseshoe pits, restrooms and picnic tables. • Pomajevich Park is on the corner of 12th Ave. E. and Third St. E. in Polson and offers a baseball field, children’s playground and restrooms. • Sports Complex (Kerr Dam Field) is on Seventh Ave. W. and Kerr Dam Road and includes soccer fields, two softball fields, basketball court, children’s playground, picnic tables, shelter and restrooms. • 7th Avenue Skatepark, located at 613 Seventh Ave. W. in Polson, next to Kerr Dam Fields, offers skaters of all levels and BMX bikers a great place to spend an afternoon. It boasts the first-ever helmetshaped bowl. Ronan • Bockman Park in Ronan offers a paved walking path alongside Spring Creek, playground equipment and a small waterworks playground. St. Ignatius • Good Old Days Park, across from Cenex in St. Ignatius, includes a large shaded picnic area and a grandstand. • Skate Ignatius Skatepark, adjacent to St. Ignatius Mission, is a cloverleaf with two shallow bowls for learners and a deep bowl for the more advanced skaters. There’s also a ramp for easy access on the shallow end. Charlo • Charlo Park, located next to the Charlo Senior Center, is a shaded grassy park SEE PAGE 12


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with picnic tables and rose bushes. SENIOR CENTERS Senior Centers and nutrition sites in Lake County offer delicious meals, friendly atmospheres and plenty of activities: Arlee Senior Center 406-726-3213, 34522 Wessinger; St. Ignatius Center 406-745-4462, 212 North Main Street; Ronan Senior Center 406-676-2371, 528 Main Street SW; Polson Senior Center 406-883-4735, 504 Third Ave. E. OTHER ATTRACTIONS • Mission Valley Aquatic Center, 309 Ridgewater Drive, Polson, is an indoor swimming facility for the Mission Valley community with drop-in day rates for the public. The center provides a state-ofthe-art aquatic facility with a 25-yard competitive/fitness pool with eight lanes; a warm water therapy/instructional pool; a party room, locker rooms and a lobby. The pools accommodate a variety of programs such as youth and adult competitive swimming, recreational swimming, swim lessons for all ages, water safety instruction, senior fitness, physical therapy/cardiac rehabilitation and family fun. Call 406-883-4567 or go to: www.mvaquatics.org for more information. • National Bison Range, located at 132 Bison Range Road in Moiese, is open from Mother’s Day to Labor Day. Red Sleep Mountain Drive is open daily 7 a.m. to dark (need to start by 7 p.m. to finish by dark). The Visitor Center is open daily, call for hours. Take the two-hour Red Sleep Mountain Drive self-guided tour to view bison, whitetail and mule deer, elk, bighorn sheep, pronghorns and Rocky Mountain goats. Call 406-644-

2211 for more information or go to bisonrange.fws.gov • St. Ignatius Mission, located at 300 Beartrack Ave., two blocks off Highway 93 in St. Ignatius, was built in the early 1890s and features 61 original fresco paintings on its interior walls by Brother Joseph Carignano, S.J. Call 406-7452768 for more information. • Ninepipe Wildlife Refuge is located right off Highway 93, five miles south of Ronan. The refuge includes numerous observation areas and walking paths and provides prime nesting habitat for grebes, loons, cormorants, great blue herons, swans, geese and various species of ducks. Nearly 200 bird species have been observed in the refuge. • Pablo Wildlife Refuge is approximately three miles west of Pablo. The wetland habitat supports Canada geese, mallards, redheads, pintails, American wigeon, northern shovelers, ruddy ducks, gadwalls, common mergansers, western and red-necked grebes, and American coots. The refuge has an active bald eagle nest and is home to yellow warblers, American robins, warbling vireos ` and many other bird varieties. ^ • Selis Ksanka Qlispe , formerly Kerr Dam, was transferred to tribal ownership in September 2015 and is located off Kerr Dam Road. Head west on Seventh Avenue and continue as Seventh Avenue turns into Kerr Dam Road and follow the signs. The concrete arch-type dam stands at 205 feet high. A 1,000-foot boardwalk takes spectators down, right above the falls, where they can enjoy an amazing view of the canyon — and sometimes a rainbow in the mist. In the spring and early summer, the rushing

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water is fantastic. It offers picnicking, white-water rafting, fishing and vista overlook. Tours are by appointment. Call 406-883-1113 for more information. • Flathead Lake, the largest freshwater lake in the western U.S., is 28 miles long by 15 miles wide and more than 300 feet deep in places. The lake was originally formed by a glacier and is now continuously fed by the Swan and Flathead Rivers. Swimming and boating access is available in several locations. Two scenic highways parallel the lake. Highway 93 on the west side and Highway 35 on the east side wind along the curving shorelines, offering majestic views of the lake, mountains and the beautiful Montana scenery. In late July and early August, Flathead Cherries are available from cherry stands primarily along the east shore, providing a tasty, local snack for a scenic drive. • A variety of camps and summer programs for youth are available at Camp Bighorn, a non-denominational Christian adventure camp next to the beautiful Clark Fork River near Plains. The outdoors and adventure activities – such as whitewater rafting and rock climbing – offer opportunities to experience God in unique and real ways and step outside of comfort zones to adventures. There are extended tailored programs for campers from kindergarten to college and every age in between. Camps for individuals, groups, and families, as well as day programs focused on team building or raft trips on the Alberton Gorge are offered. Retreats and student programs are also available. More information is available at campbighorn.org

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F L A T H E A D L A K E S T A T E P A R K There’s some changes floating around the pristine waters of Flathead Lake this year. To encourage a “sense of place,” Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks have grouped the six state parks along the shores into one big Flathead Lake State Park, with “units” at West Shore, Big Arm, Finley Point, Yellow Bay, Wild Horse Island and Wayfarers. “We’re managing it cohesively as one park, and it makes sense,” said Amy Grout, Flathead Lake State Park Manager. Last fall a new ranger station was built in the Harry Horn day use area near the entrance to the Wayfarer unit, just south of Bigfork off Highway 35, a location with easier access to campers than the Kalispell office. “It’s a big step,” Grout said. “We’re more integrated in the parks and into the community. We’re reaching out and building relationships.” The center is a convenient location to gather information, purchase a forgotten camping necessity or buy a Flathead Lake T-shirt or ball cap. It’s a great stop to chat with the friendly staff while the children scramble around the shaded playground. A covered picnic area on the grounds can be reserved for large groups but is open to all. Americorp volunteers are on hand to help with interpretive displays, guided hikes and programming. Montana State Parks receive no general tax funds. They function on revenue gen-

erated from campsite rentals, use fees, and a $6 State Parks fee that Montana residents can opt to pay when they register their vehicle. Montana State Parks Foundation, the official nonprofit fundraising partner of Montana State Parks, accepts donations. People can designate their contribution toward their favorite unit, toward a special project, or in honor of a loved one or special occaision. Find out more at montanastateparksfoundation.org. Online reservations for campsites opened May 20 at stateparks.mt.gov WAYFARER’S UNIT As the name suggests, the drive-in park is a perfect place to stop and snap photos of the lake, let cranky children unbuckle from their car seats and enjoy the playground, and chow down on a beachside picnic. The 69-acre facility also includes amenities to enjoy overnight stays.

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There are 30 campsites, six of which are designated for tents only. Flush toilets, showers and a dump station are on-site. Hiking, biking, swimming, fishing, and sunset photography are some of the site’s most popular activities. YELLOW BAY UNIT For those who enjoy roughing it in tents, Yellow Bay, located halfway between Polson and Bigfork, might be a good option. The 15-acre primitive campgrounds has five tent sites available with one touch of civilization – flush toilets. Don’t plan on singing “Kumbaya” around the campfire, though. Only charcoal and camp stoves are allowed. Yellow Bay is the perfect place to fish or swim on the park’s beach or keep a keen eye out for birds ashore. SEE PAGE 14

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FINLEY POINT UNIT The southernmost and largest park along the eastern shore is Finely Point, which is located 7 miles east of Polson. The 28-acre park has the most facilities of any park on the eastern shore, but requires a 4-mile drive into the secluded heart of cherry orchard country. Finley Point is known for its varied camping opportunities on the eastern shore. The disability-accessible park has 16 slips for vessels up to 25 feet long, four of which can be used for overnight visits and 16 spaces for RVs up to 16 feet long. All RV spaces and four boat spaces have 30-amp electricity and water hookups available. A pump out station for boats and RVs is on site. BIG ARM UNIT Located 13 miles north of Polson off Highway 93, the park is shady and has amazing views of Flathead Lake. It’s a great place to watch sunsets or sunrises over the lake. Big Arm also features

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excellent swimming and a nature trail as well as a dock and a boat ramp. The park has 40 campsites, a day use area, a picnic shelter, picnic areas, showers and flush toilets as well as pit toilets. Yurts are available at the Big Arm unit and are “extremely popular,” Grout said. Small rental cabins may be built in the future, she added. WILD HORSE ISLAND UNIT Legend has it W ild Horse Island got its name from the herd of escaped horses the Salish and Kootenai tribes lost when they used the island to pasture their horses.

A handful of wild horses still live on the 2,000-acre primitive park that is home to mule deer, bighorn sheep, coyotes, marmots, squirrels and many birds, including golden eagles and ospreys. Accessible only by boat, W ild Horse Island is open year round for day use only. No camping, motorized vehicles or bicycles are allowed. Boats can be rented in Polson or Bigfork to make the trek to the island. There are six public landing sites on the island, and a public dock is set to be finished this summer. WEST SHORE UNIT West Shore is timbered with lots of shade and offers great views of the Missions and the Swan Range, fishing, boating and camping — 31 campsites of which seven are tent only. RVs must be 40 feet or smaller to camp here. Camp hosts live in the park, and there is a dock, a boat launch, picnicking, electricity and water. Campsites have established fire pits and grill or fire rings. Trash cans are available, and there are vault toilets.

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Man’s best friend makes a great travel companion, but restless dogs that have been confined to a vehicle need space to run with wild abandon within a safe, fenced area. Polson’s Travis Dolphin Park, a free, non-leash dog park provides more than two full acres and river access for fourlegged friends to play. The dog park is located at the west end of Seventh Avenue West. The idea for the park was conceived in June 2007 as an Eagle Scout project by John Crosby, a scout with Polson Troop 1947. He earned the support and backing of Polson Parks Superintendent Karen Sergeant and other community members who donated time and resources to bring the park to fruition. Polson Water and Sewer Department donated the land in memory of Travis Dolphin, a well-loved employee whose life ended too early due to cancer. Before the dog park became the premier jewel it is today, volunteers joined scouts and worked tirelessly throughout 2007 and early 2008, lugging rusty metal car and tractor parts, rubber tires, even 40-gallon drums uphill for disposal or recycling.

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Crosby raised money through fundraising projects to pay for the fencing. By November 2007, the park was still a work in progress but open for dogs and their owners. Crosby earned his Eagle Scout status upon completion of the park. Since then, the dog park has served as a springboard for four additional Eagle Scout projects. Scouts built and installed a dock and steps using wood recycled from a torn-down picnic shelter and an informational kiosk board for posting lost dog signs, sale notices and dog-related services. A drinking fountain designed for dogs and their owners has been set up, and a graveled trail system that meets American Disabilities Act requirements for recreation trails is finished, making the shoreline accessible to all. A list of doggie etiquette is posted near the entrance, and dog clean-up bags are also available on site. Dog park hours are the same as all Polson City Parks, 7 a.m. till dusk. Alcohol of any kind is not allowed in city parks without a permit. Permits may be obtained from Polson City Hall 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

• Organic Produce • Grass Fed Beef • Wild Caught Fish • Bulk Herbs, Spices, Teas • Supplements & Body Care • Houseware & Baskets • Jewelry, Crystals & Stones • Cards, Sunglasses & Hats • Scarves & Bags • Kids Toys & Games • Baby Clothes

319 Main Street • Polson 883-2847 M O N T A N A

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W I L D L I F E For those wanting to see wildlife, Mission Valley is home to a diverse population of species - from the largest land mammals to the smallest creeping creatures. Multiple management agencies have created a haven for wildlife in the valley, so plenty of viewing opportunities are open to the public as long as people use caution and respect. Some of Montana’s iconic large mammals – grizzly and black bear, bighorn sheep, moose, and elk – call Mission Valley home, though they are often located off the beaten path, in the heart of desolate wilderness. “They aren’t ones you see very often,” said Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes Wildlife Management Program Manager Dale Becker. Wildlife officials ask that any sightings of grizzly bear, mountain lion, wolverines, or moose be reported so biologists can log

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the data. Bighorn sheep that are away from established herds need to be reported immediately because they are at risk of contracting diseases from livestock that can decimate entire wild herds. Porcupine sightings are also of interest as the tribes try to get a handle on how many live in the area. In over two decades, Becker has seen two or three reports of dead porcupines, typically hit by vehicles, each year. The species is of interest culturally because of quill work, but most people who do quills locally don’t get their quills from Mission Valleybased porcupines since the critters are so hard to find. “They are generally associated with wooded habitat, so it’s not uncommon to find them along streams, ” Becker said. “Also in the mountains.” The National Bison Range, established in

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1908, is a great spot to find wildlife. The range is located on Highway 212 in Moiese about 37 miles south of Polson and 5 miles southwest of Dixon. Visitors need to pay a $5 per vehicle fee in the Visitor’s Center just over the hill after entering the gates, or at the Iron Ranger in the parking lot. This year the shorter Prairie Drive along the river will be open to two-way traffic all summer long. People can also look for wildlife from designated walking paths. Each year more than 115,000 people enjoy the 19-mile Red Sleep Mountain scenic drive from the safety of their car. The 2-hour loop is chock-full of animal watching possibilities including large game like bears, elk, or bighorn sheep. Bison also roam across the range along with whitetail deer, mule deer, and pronghorn antelope. “People do see the bighorn sheep once


in a while, and black bear,” volunteer and former longtime employee Pat Jamieson said. “Occasionally a mountain lion will pop out, or a badger. If people stop at the visitor center we can tell people where other people have seen animals.” Jamieson said one of the best ways to have a successful day and see lots of animals is to allow plenty of time for the adventure. “The biggest thing is that if people want to see the animals, they have to take their time,” she said. Early morning and late evening are best for viewing opportunities, though a few species typically stay out of the forest all day long. “The bison and the pronghorn don’t care what time it is,” Jamieson said. “They like to be out in the open. The other animals, the heat drives them into the forest.” Jamieson said crowds are typically thinnest in early morning. “People don’t get up that early,” she

said. “The other trick is that if there is a light rain, the animals don’t mind that. If it’s too rainy to go to the lake, it can be really great wildlife viewing.” Jamieson said it is important that people stay at their cars to avoid injury from animals on the drive. People can get out of their vehicle to take a photo, but they need to stay close to the car. However, people should stay inside their car if range animals are close by. Listening is as important as looking to hear meadowlarks sing, pheasants squawk, and elk bugle in the fall. The Bison Range website includes information about visiting hours http://www.fws.gov/refuge/National_Biso n_Range. For those who want to see feathered creatures, CSKT Wildlife Program Manager Becker said that many bird species live in the valley. “This is one of the premiere areas in the west,” Becker said. “There is just real diverse habitat on the reservation. We’ve

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got sub-alpine habitats at the top of Missions to dry sagebrush grassland west of the Flathead River. All of those niches have their own species that have adapted through time.” Several places are open to the public where people can spot trumpeters and other waterfowl in the valley. Ninepipe Wildlife Refuge, Ninepipe Wildlife Management Area, and Ducharme boat launch in Polson are some good areas to explore. People should check regulations for hours, times and rules. More information is available at http://www.fws.gov/refuge/nine-pipe. When searching for birds, Becker said to gravitate toward places that have water. Those areas usually have the most diversity, especially when compared to pasture or grassland. “The whole diversity of wetland birds is amazing here,” Becker said. “We have a real diverse array of duck species, especially early in the season. We also have a SEE PAGE 18

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number of shorebirds like long-billed curlews.” When watching birds, people should give the animals plenty of room. “Enjoy, but don’t disturb,” Becker said adding that it is important to be cautious of nesting birds. “A good rule of thumb is that if you know they are there on their nests, then give them some space.” Becker said if an animal flushes or is startled when a person approaches, it is a good indication the person is too close. “That’s pretty much across the board, for all different species,” he said. People should avoid handling the eggs or approaching nests because predators might follow the scent straight to the clutch. “You are kind of creating a path and some predators are adept at checking things like that,” he said. Trumpeter swans are one particular species of interest in Mission Valley. The elegant ivory birds are now commonly found in glacial potholes, reservoirs, lakes and other bodies of water, but that wasn’t always the case. In the 1900s, the population of trumpeter swans around the Mission Valley was in decline likely because of subsistence hunting and a strong market for pelts and feathers. Hudson Bay Company records indicate that between 1823 and 1880 more than 108,000 swans were harvested by the company, with many of those presumed to be trumpeter swans. Habitat on the Flathead Reservation was also transformed from wetlands into farmland during the early 1900s. For about a century, the swans were absent from the valley until a pair nested in 2004 as a result of work done by a

reintroduction program. Since 1997, the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes, Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service have partnered to restore the trumpeter swan population through the program. Nineteen birds were transplanted from southern Oregon onto the reservation that first year, and trumpeter swans continue to be released into the wild. The population has steadily grown with 105 nesting attempts producing at least 294 fledged trumpeter swan cygnets. The introduced birds usually are tagged with red neck bands with white lettering. Reporting banded birds to the tribal Natural Resource Department gives biologists information to input into an extensive database used to keep track of the birds.

R E C R E A T I O N A L Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks are available at any of the following locations: POLSON • CSKT Division of Fish, Wildlife, Recreation, and Conservation 406 Sixth Ave. E. in Polson (Behind Linderman School)

Recreational activities on the Flathead Indian Reservation including hiking, picnicking, swimming, photography, camping, fishing and boating require various permits and licenses. Non-tribal members are not allowed to pick berries and mushrooms on tribal lands. Permits, fishing and recreation regulations of the 1 8

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“We are always interested in what people see,” Becker said. “The thing we are really interested in is if, around July, people have nesting pairs on their property. We’d really like to have them contact us because it helps us see their productivity and how they are doing.” Young cygnets will arrive mid-summer and are a gray hue - markedly different than their ivory parents. Since the birds seem to have gained a strong foothold in the valley, Becker is unsure of how many more batches of trumpeters will be introduced in Mission Valley. “It’s pretty neat to put something back on the landscape and have it stick and thrive,” Becker said.

VJ

P E R M I T S

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BURGERS Royal burger cheese dx & fries . . .$5.65 Dbl. 1/3 Lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8.05 Tri. 1/2 Lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$10.45 Cheeseburger Dx. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.80 Dbl. 1/3 Lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6.20 Tri. 1/2 Lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8.60 Cheeseburger Plain . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.65 Dbl. 1/3 Lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6.05 Tri. 1/2 Lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8.45 Hamburger Dx. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.30 Dbl. 1/3 Lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.20 Tri. 1/2 Lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7.10 Hamburger Plain . . . . . . . . . . . .$3 .15 Dbl. 1/3 Lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.05 Tri. 1/2 Lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6.95 BERNIE BURGER . . . . . . . . . . .$5.00 Cheese Dx w/Ham DBL 1/3 lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$7.40 TRI 1/2 lb. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9.80

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BLT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.00 Garden Veggie Burger . . . . . . . . .$4.25 Steak Sandwich . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.15 Pork Sandwich . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.90 Chicken Burger . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.40 Hot Fish Sandwich . . . . . . . . . . .$4.25 Shrimpwich . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.25 Grilled Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.75 Grilled Ham And Cheese . . . . . .$3.95

SPECIALTIES Shrimp Dinner . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9.00 Seafood Dinner . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9.00 Oyster Dinner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$9.00 Chicken & Chips . . . . . . . . . . . .$5.85 Fish & Chips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$6.10 Foot Long Hot Dog . . . . . . . . . .$3.60 Foot Long Hot Dog w/Chili . . . .$4.35 Foot Long Hot Dog w/Chili & Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.85 Burrito . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.85 Corn Dog . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.85

DRINKS Coke, Diet Coke, Sprite, Dr. Pepper, Root Beer, Lemonade, Orange, Iced Tea 12oz . . . $1.00 16oz . . . $1.25 24oz. . . $1.50 32oz . . . $1.75 Malts, Shakes, Sodas, Floats & Spins . . . .16oz $2.95 24oz $3.45 Coffee & Tea . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12oz $1.00 Hot Chocolate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .12oz $1.00 MILK . . . . . . . .12oz $1.50 16oz $1.75 24oz $2.25 32oz $2.50 Huckleberry Shakes . . . .16oz $4.45 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .24oz $4.95 Frozen Huckleberry Lemonade 16oz. $2.75 with ice cream $3.50 Huckleberry Sundae . .$3.75 Huckleberry Sundae Deluxe . . . .$4.00

DESSERTS Hot Fudge Sundae. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Plain $2.75 Deluxe $3.00 Sundaes Plain . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $2.25 Sundaes Deluxe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.50 Black And White Sundae . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$3.00 Cones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Small $1.35 Large $1.85 Dip Cones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Small $1.85 Large $2.35 Big Wheel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.25 Soft Ice Cream Quart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.50 1/2 Gallon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$8.50

EXTRAS Tomato . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.50 Cups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.25 Catsup/Fry Sauce/Ranch 1oz $0.15 2oz $0.25 Flavors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.25 Cheese . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$0.50 Patties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.95 Bacon or Ham . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.20 Gluten-Free Buns . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.50

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SIDES Onion Rings 4oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.10 8oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$4.20 Family Fries 14oz. . .$4.70 Potato Salad . . . . . .$1.50

Green Salad . . . . . . .$1.50 Fries 5oz. . . . . . . . . . . . . .$1.85 7oz. . . . . . . . . . . . .$2.35

Prices May Change Without Notice We Accept

50567 Hwy 93, Polson • (406) 883-2620 M O N T A N A

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by KAREN PETERSON VALLEY JOURNAL

The dot on the small screen shows that the treasure is only feet away, and the excitement of finding it is building, but the problem is that it’s hard to stop after finding just one. “It’s like you’re a kid, and you’re so excited,” said treasure hunter Stefanie Nordberg. “It’s like Christmas morning.” Millions of treasures are hidden worldwide under rocks, in the crook of a tree, inside lampposts, hanging from a branch, and other locations. The treasure, also referred to as a cache, is found through a geocaching game that was developed a few years ago using a

Global Positioning System map program to pinpoint north and south coordinates. The cache container can be the size of a thumbnail or as large as a bucket. The treasure inside is made valuable by the fact that you found it, and it can be anything from toys to keychains. Although ammunition, knives, drugs and food items should not be placed in the cache, and if you take something, the rule goes that you should replace it with something else. Caches also contain a written log so people can sign in and prove that they found it, and there is a whole geo-

caching language of acronyms including TFTC (thanks for the cache), CWTW (cashing with the wife) and TNLN (took nothing, left nothing). People also need to record their find at www.geocaching.com. On the site, folks can rate the cache, give more information about it, and record their own cache finding history. Trey Moran of Polson started geocaching with his son, but he was sad to find that there weren’t any local caches about five years ago, so he planted the first one, which people are free to do. He called it Kerr Plunk in honor of its location.

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Quick Silver • 675-5000 Hwy. 93, Pablo


“This is something you can do by yourself or with family and it costs almost nothing,” he said of his reason for wanting to help the game grow. Now, there are about 1,821 cache locations from Polson to Arlee. A cache is even hidden out at the historic Fort Connah with a history lesson attached to it. “I had no idea it would grow that much,” he said, although he isn’t really surprised; finding a cache is a satisfying hobby. Moran didn’t limit his treasure hunting to local sites. He was in Ireland as he answered questions for this story, and yes, he was going to look for another cache to add it to the almost 2,000 that he has recorded as finding. “I look for one in every place we go to visit,” he said adding that he has been to many countries including Germany, France, and England. Nordberg was also hooked on playing the game. She got a high-end GPS device for her birthday a few years ago to help track mountain locations. She said most people can use their smartphones to find cache coordinates placed on geocaching.com. Individuals hide waterproof geochaching containers they design at their chosen location and post the coordinates on the site for others to find. A free geocaching

app is also available. “People can geocache in any style,” she said. “They can drive, hike, find urban caches. There is something for everyone.” But, she warns people to be prepared to find an occasional cache that has been “muggled.” “That means that someone messed with it or stole it,” she said of the actual term for the occurrence borrowed from the Harry

Potter books. Geocachers are also an environmentally conscious group of people overall while out geocaching. “We like to bring in a trash bag and take any trash we find out,” she said. And there is an acronym for that, too: CITO (cache in, trash out). People also need to be conscious of the environment they are treasure hunting in by doing things like not tearing up shrubbery or breaking branches. And people shouldn’t forget to buy a Tribal Conservation Permit to find caches in tribal wilderness. The Polson Geocachers Club can be found on Facebook for anyone who needs help finding a local cache or wants to share. GPS technology was originally a military defense project, and in 2000 the government lifted selective precision for civilians. That increased the precision from 330 feet to just 66 feet. People started playing with it to test its accuracy. According to the Geocaching website, the first container was put out in the woods by Dave Ulmer. He shared the coordinates to see if people could find it. Within days, people started locating the container, and the game soon developed.

VJ

Take a stroll down Memory Lane!

36094 Memory Lane, Polson Hill • 883-6804

www.miracleofamericamuseum.org • open year-round • over 150,000 items M O N T A N A

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The large orange sign sitting alongside Highway 93 in Ravalli bears a simple message: all watercraft must stop. Ignoring the heed is tempting, but is also illegal and could undermine the multi-layered extreme measures organizations have put in place in recent years to prevent aquatic invasive species from wreaking havoc on the ecosystem and economy of the Flathead Basin. Anything that floats – boats, kayaks, canoes, paddleboards, inflatables, etc., need to step on the brakes and pull over or run the risk of a citation. The five-minute stop at the inspection station might seem like an inconvenient delay for enthusiastic lake-goers, but it’s a small price to be paid to make sure the crystal blue waters and world class fishery aren’t harmed by disruptions in the ecosystem. The quick scan is done by trained individuals who can spot tiny plants or animals that could lead to an infestation. Two mussel-fouled boats detected April 1 on the third day of operations in the park-

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ing lot of Salish Kootenai College’s Joe McDonald Health and Fitness Center reinforced the need for this year’s early opening. Although the boats had been decontaminated in Arizona, they were still fouled with mussels. In many cases a second

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decontamination is necessary to ensure that mussel-fouled boats are safe to launch in Montana waters, according to Erik Hanson, Aquatic Invasive Species Consultant for the Flathead AIS Work Group. “Decontamination is not always 100 percent. It is critical for boats to be


held after decontamination to ensure that they are actually mussel-free,” Hanson said. The Flathead Basin Commission operated the Pablo station until Fish, W ildlife and Parks took over inspections mid-May at the Ravalli location. For locals who travel only to Flathead Lake without visiting another water body, a sticker certifying inspection is available to further expedite the process. Among the species that inspectors are checking for are zebra mussels. The mussels filter large amounts of nutrients from the water – something that could disrupt the food web and spell disaster for species in Flathead Lake that have worked to carve out a niche in an already low-nutrient body of water. The mussels also form a secreted layer of shells on everything that comes within its path. This can completely block pipes and cause financial devastation. On a 2013 visit to a checkpoint in Ronan, Gover nor Steve Bullock made

it clear that the projected $80 million price tag for a theoretical infestation of zebra mussels was too much for the state coffers to handle. Montana Fish, W ildlife and Parks Aquatic Invasive Species Coordinator Allison Bagley said that the inspection measures have worked so far. Montana is not one of the 29 states battling zebra mussels, or the larger but similar quagga mussels. There have been close calls, however. In 2011 a boat carrying zebra mussels was intercepted just before it launched in Flathead Lake from a ramp near Dayton. There were three vessels caught carrying zebra or quagga mussels last year. The range of the mussel species is spreading closer, with fouled boats coming from Lake Powell in Utah. Invasive species of plants also remain a concer n. Eurasian watermilfoil can crowd out native species and is already found in Flathead Lake and the greater Flathead Basin. “Be sure that the plug on your boat is

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pulled between water bodies,” Montana Fish, W ildlife and Parks Aquatic Invasive Species Specialist Linnaea Schroeer said. “Don’t be carrying any water in live wells or in a bucket or any other container in your boat. Standing water can carry microscopic larvae of invasive species. It can carry viruses that cause fish diseases and fragments of plants that can start new populations. I think a lot of people don’t understand the danger of moving even a small amount of standing water.” Fragments of plants and standing water are the easiest to handle when discovered by inspectors. The offending substances will be removed, and travelers can get back on the road quickly. If invasive mussel species are found, boaters can face hours or days of delays. The best way to prevent delays is to thoroughly clean boats immediately after they are removed from the water, so problems don’t arise later.

VJ

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Say “Montana” and most people nationally or even globally think Glacier National Park. So naturally Glacier National Park is a major draw to the area, with about 2.4 million visitors annually. “Glacier National Park welcomes visitors from across the country and around the world,” Superintendent Jeff Mow said. “We are delighted to share the story of this place and the experiences it provides.” People have flocked to the area since President William Howard Taft proclaimed Glacier the nation’s 10th national park in 1910. More than 700 miles of hiking trails provide access to a unique mix of mountains, lakes, valleys, glaciers and waterfalls within the 1,583-square-mile breathtaking wilderness area. The Glacier Park website provides information — maps, webcams of sites, photos and hours of operation — at www.glacierparkinc.com or visit the Montana website at visitmt.com/national_parks/glacier. But don’t just look through the photos and check out the webcams and think you’ve seen Glacier.

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There’s something about the pine-scented high country air, muddy hiking trails that make your muscles work, interesting rocks and clear lakes that just can’t be distilled onto a website. The rolling gait of a grizzly bear or a resting mountain goat on the side of Going-to-the-Sun Road can be photographed, but there’s just something about hearing the sheep’s delicate breathing and hoping you’re far enough away from the bear. Glacier is home to many species of wildlife from grizzly bears and moose to elk, wolves, deer, black bear, big horn sheep, mountain lions and coyotes to smaller mammals such as marmots, picas, badgers, porcupines, wolverines and lynx. Birds — 260 species from meadowlarks to bald and golden Eagles and harlequin ducks — also live in the park. One of Glacier’s highlights is Going-ToThe-Sun, a 50-mile engineering marvel climbing to 6,646 feet elevation that takes people through the wilderness to Logan Pass and down the other side to St. Mary. It carves its way along the edge of mountainsides and seems hardly large enough for two vehicles to meet. Vehicles with large mirrors should fold them in - some-

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times the road is littered with mirror frames and pieces from those who didn’t. Going-To-the-Sun Road is plowed each spring, with short stretches opening along the way. The entire road is generally plowed by mid-June, but travelers must check Glacier’s website for daily plowing status updates. The latest possible day for visitors to drive the entire length of Going-To-The-Sun is Oct. 16, but the road sometimes closes earlier due to weather. The iconic Glacier National Park red buses offer tours for those who would prefer not to drive. A free shuttle is also available every 30 minutes from July 1 through Labor Day for those who’d prefer to avoid traffic and parking, and a separate shuttle for bicyclists opens this year. Check the website for specifics. Because it’s located on the border of Montana and the Canadian provinces of Alberta and British Columbia, Glacier National Park connects with Canada’s Waterton Lakes National Park to form the Waterton-Glacier International Peace Park. 2016 also marks the Centennial of the National Park Service, which turns 100 on Aug. 25.


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The river beckons, seemingly still on the surface. The paddle boarder slips inside, water swirling around ankles and current enticing the stranger to join the watery parade. Quietly centering her balance on the board, she gently dips the paddle into the river, effortlessly propelled by the current. A beaver floats alongside; fish find refuge in her cool shadow; a moose and her calf stay resting in the morning sunshine, undaunted by the silent intruder. “If I had come up in a noisy boat, they would have run,” said Michelle Wiggins, who also teaches yoga and Pilates on paddle boards. “Because you are using your body to keep your balance, it really centers you and helps you to be in the present … surrounded by nature, the beauty of the gift we have — water, fresh air, gorgeous forest.” Paddling through water while standing on a raft or in a canoe has been a means of travel throughout time for river-based cultures, but the popularity of modern stand up paddle boarding grew out of Hawaii early in the 21st century, allowing surfers to paddle out further and ride waves longer. Now its popularity is growing in the mainland. Some of these newbies to yoga and Pilates on the water are Janet and David

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“It really centers you and helps you to be in the present.” M i c h e l l e W i g g i n s , i n s t r u c t o r

Caselli, who just bought their first boards. Janet and David own Caselli’s Massage and Pilates Studio and figured they would test their skills on Flathead Lake this summer. “Pilates is a great way to build core strength, which is important for our backs as we get older,” Janet said. Janet and David are huge advocates for health and longevity. They encourage new users to go at their own pace and to establish a strong core before doing Pilates on the water. “With the paddle board, you have to center yourself on the board and the water,” Janet said. “If you don’t have balance, you will tip over … which would feel good if the weather is nice.”

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Stand up paddle board enthusiasts can be seen on Flathead Lake in early spring soon as the ice melts in Polson Bay, but the majority of participants prefer to forego the wetsuit and paddle in warmer summer months. Flathead Raft Company in Polson is in its fourth season of providing rental SUPs. The watersport adventure company along Highway 93 has watched the demand grow each season. “The first year people asked for them, we didn’t really know what they were,” owner Tammy Fragua said. During the 2014 summer season, there were days all their SUPs were rented out. “People come here on vacation. They have their own paddle board, but they can’t put them on an airplane to get here. So they rent boards and take them to their cabin for a weekend, or a week,” she said. Fragua recommends rookies learn on the calm waters in Polson Bay. The loveliest times are in early morning and late evening, she said. “It’s a pretty easy sport to learn — unless you are really tall and your center of balance is really high. Most people get it pretty easily,” she said. With a little experience, boarders can paddle Flathead River from Buffalo SEE PAGE 26

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Bridge to Sloan Bridge. “That’s a pretty mellow paddle,” Fragua said. For the adrenaline seekers, Flathead Raft Co. offers guided white water paddling excursions, “but that’s pretty extreme,” Fragua said. A personal flotation device is required by law when paddling on Flathead Lake; Lake County Sheriff’s deputies patrol the water by boat and will issue citations and make the boarder leave the water if the boarder does not have a PFD. The raft company provides a Coast Guard approved life vest with every rental, as well as a board leash to keep it tethered to the paddler, and an adjustable paddle. For those wishing to purchase their own, a basic stand up paddle board will cost about $700$1,000. Most are 9-12 feet in length with foam core layered

P A D D L E FLATHEAD LAKE — Bring a kayak, canoe, paddleboard or other human-propelled watercraft on Sunday, July 10 for the second annual Paddle for Clean Water Poker Paddle. Last year’s event sold out, so register now on the Flathead Lakers website, Flatheadlakers.org The event is limited to the first 150 paddle crafts to sign up. Participants start from Kings Point and paddle a 3.6-mile course to

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five designated island stops, collecting one playing card at each location. The boats will launch between noon and 1 p.m. followed by late lunch and entertainment until 6 p.m. The registration price will be $45 per person ($47.57 with registration fee) before June 1 and $50 ($52.74 total) beginning June 1. Prizes will be awarded for best and worst hands and there will be raffles and give-

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with fiberglass fabric and covered with a resin epoxy. The more expensive the board, the more complex the construction, using higher-grade composite materials that produce a lighter board. Inflatable SUPs are also available to purchase. Paddles, similar to canoe paddles but longer and slightly bent, are usually purchased separately. Most manufacturers recommend purchasing a paddle 6 to 10 inches taller than the person who will be paddling. Ankle leashes usually are sold separately and designed specifically for intended use — surf, flat water or rivers. Wiggins will also schedule trips for groups and bring all the boards. “It’s relaxing and tranquil,” Wiggins said, “and you get to take in the beauty around you and below you.”

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W A T E R aways at the event. Participants will enjoy a catered picnic dinner and beverages by Flathead Lake Brewing Company and live entertainment will be provided by Dark Horse Band. Proceeds benefit Flathead Lakers Student Education Program and community work to support clean water. Contact Dana at 303-668-4535 or dana@flowswimmers.com


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Bay is the largest island in the lake at 2,163 acres. It doubles as a wildlife refuge and state park that is noted for its herd of Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep and several wild horses. Bird Island is located near the Narrows, a small group of islands easily visible from Polson, along the northern part of Polson Bay. The island is owned and managed by the Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks and the Flathead Lake Biological Station as a bird refuge. Geese, osprey, herons and eagles frequent Bird Island. Cedar and O’Neil islands are also managed by the state. Melita Island is a 64-acre island near Big Arm that is owned by the Boy Scouts of America and serves as a summer camp for

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` the organization. ^ • Selis Ksanka Qlispe , formerly known as Kerr Dam, was built between 1930 and 1938 and raised the elevation of the lake by approximately 10 feet, which brings it to 2,893 feet above sea level at full pool. Three turbines within the dam produce 194 megawatts of power, enough to power more than 145,000 homes. The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes became the first native government in the United States to own a dam after the transfer of ownership of the dam was complete in September 2015. If runoff conditions in the mountains don’t warrant flood threats, the lake level is brought to full pool by midJune. SEE PAGE 28

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The striking azure of the water is what grabs the attention of most northbound travelers as they top the ascent of Polson Hill and look down at Flathead Lake, but the sparkling body grows more translucent as people grow close. When unobstructed by waves, the clearness reveals every outline of objects along the bottom, which can sometimes give the illusion of shallowness. Don’t be fooled: the deepest part of the lake is 370 feet — the length of approximately 10 standard school buses parked end to end. Average lake depth is 167 feet, greater than that of the Persian Gulf. • Flathead Lake is one of the 300 largest natural lakes in the world and is the largest natural freshwater lake in the western United States. The 197-square-mile water body is known for its impressive size in the current era, but it was actually part of a much larger lake called Lake Missoula that existed an estimated 15,000 years ago. Lake Missoula was created by a 2,000 feet tall ice dam of the Clark Fork River. Lake Missoula was the largest documented icedamned lake in the world. It covered 3,000 square miles. A sign at the National Bison Range’s Red Sleep Drive designates a high water mark of Lake Missoula and ripple marks from the lake’s former surface are visible in the surrounding hills. Flathead’s remnant size is still significant. It takes approximately 2 hours to drive the 82 miles of roadway around the entire lake without stopping, not accounting for traffic. • Flathead Lake contains 10 islands of various sizes and ownership. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks manages four of the islands. Wild Horse Island near Big Arm

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Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest watersheds. FROM PAGE 27

• Summer brings a myriad of different boats to Flathead Lake. Sailboats, motorboats, kayaks, stand-up paddleboards and other types of watercraft teem in the warm months. In days of yesteryear, there were other types of vessels that frequented the lake for less recreational purposes. Historian Paul Fugleburg wrote “Flathead Lake Steamboat Days,” a book about the era of the steamboat in the late 1800s and early 1900s. Steamboats carried passengers and freight on the lake during that time. Native tribes also traversed the lake via canoe. The Pend d’Oreille self-identified as “people who live along the broad water.” Broad water meant Flathead Lake. • Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest watersheds. Studies at the Flathead Lake Biological Station show that water quality in Flathead Lake is among the best in the world. In spite of its renowned purity, studies at the Bio Station show the water quality of Flathead Lake has declined over the last decade due to the combined effects of increased pollution from human sources, erosion of the shoreline caused by dam operations and introduction of nonnative biota (flora and fauna). • The lake’s major tributaries are the Flathead and Swan Rivers. Numerous small streams flow directly into the lake at its shoreline, particularly on the wetter East Shore. • Maximum flow in the Flathead River generally occurs during spring freshet between May 15 and June 10, creating a plume of sediment that covers the lake surface. • Due to its massive volume and normally active winds over the surface, Flathead Lake does not freeze over most winters, although the bays often have winter ice cover. The lake did freeze over in the winters of 1978-79 (all winter), 1987-88 (all winter), 1988-89 (March only) and 1989-90 (January only). • The first wagon trail in the 1880s from Polson to the north end of the Lake followed the west side of the lake and was steep and hazardous. At some places, wagons had to be lowered by ropes. In 1911, work started from the south end of the Lake to build an east shore road with the work primarily done by convict labor. It was completed in September of 1946. • Average surface temperatures of the lake range from 2.3° C (36°F) in mid-January, to 13.5°C (56°F) in mid-June, to 20.3°C (68°F) in mid-August. • Of the 25 fish species most commonly found in the Flathead River-Lake ecosystem, 10 species are native and 15 have been introduced. The native species include redside shiner, peamouth minnow, squawfish minnow, largescale sucker, longnose sucker, sculpin, bull trout, cutthroat trout, pygmy whitefish and mountain whitefish. Lake trout, lake whitefish and yellow perch are the most common non-natives and have increased in abundance since 1970, whereas native species have declined. Each spring and fall, the Mack Days fishing tournament offers anglers prizes for catching and removing non-native mackinaw trout from the lake. The event is sponsored by the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and sanctioned by Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks.

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H O T

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H O M E S T E A D E R

D AY S

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It’s hard to describe the magic of rodeos — they are a glimpse through the softened lens of time. Except for the model year of the pickups, the horse trailers, the style of hats and horse’s tails, it could be 50 or 75 years ago. Even if you’ve lived in Montana your whole life and gone to hundreds of rodeos or if you are traveling through and never been to a rodeo, there’s something tempting about the sport. Maybe it’s the smell of grilling burgers, the rhythmic thud-thud of horses hooves on powdery dust or the glittery sparkle of rodeo queens carrying flags. All rodeo events evolved from the ranching culture. Cowboys in the old West picked up knowledge from the Mexican vaqueros. To accustom horses to being ridden, bronc riding was a necessity since all ranch work was done on horseback. Barrel racing demonstrates a horse’s speed and agility and

the athletic ability of both cowgirl and horse. Sick cows and calves needed to be doctored so calf roping and team roping evolved - requiring speed, skill, practice and a well-trained horse. The fearless, devil-maycare attitude of cowboys probably led to bull riding. The Pro Rodeo Hall of Fame gives the Prescott Arizona rodeo credit for setting up all the modern rules. Yet other sources say Deer Trail, Colorado, in 1864 was the site of a showdown, where two groups of cowboys from neighboring ranches showed up to see the best everyday cowboy. In today’s rodeo, stock — a bull, bronc, calf or steer — is drawn for each contestant usually by a judge. Cowboys talk to other cowboys to get information about the animal they’ve drawn. They’ll know which calf runs straight and true and which bull spins to the SEE PAGE 30

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also score points in their rodeo association. The highest scorers are eligible for the finals in that association. The contestants travel from rodeo to rodeo paying their own expenses. 2. In bronc riding, a cowboy’s spurs need to be over the point of the horse’s shoulders when the horse exits the chute. Today’s spurs have to be dulled and they don’t break the skin or hurt the animal. 3. It looks like the calves are being strangled in the calf roping, but they really aren’t. It beats being a hamburger. 4. The flank strap put around the loins of a bucking horse or bull is lined in sheep’s wool and required to have a quick release buckle so it’s easy to get off. 5. Most of the “rough stock,” rodeo lingo for broncs and bulls, are not wild. They are just animals that don’t like to be ridden. They work for eight seconds a day, sometimes a week. 6. The bullfighters have a dan-

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left and then goes straight. If it’s your first rodeo, get a program when you pay for your ticket. The ticket and program money helps hardworking volunteer local rodeo committees pay for getting a stock contractor, who supplies the bucking horses, bulls, calves and steers. The program will have the order of events, the names of the contestants and, for broncs and bulls, their names, too. Spectators enjoy the grace of the horses, the fearlessness of the competitors, the antics of the rodeo clowns, the bravado of bullfighters, the heart-pumping country music and the energy of the crowd. Here are some things you might want to know. 1. The cowboys and cowgirls gathered for the rodeo pay entry fees to compete and hopefully win some prize money. When they win, they

Twice But Nice Ronan

gerous job; they are in the arena to keep bucking bulls from hurting a cowboy if he gets bucked off. The clown/barrelman tells jokes and gets the crowd involved. Both bullfighters and clowns will wear baggy pants and paint on their faces. 7. Riders on “rough stock,” bulls or broncs, need to ride for eight seconds. You’ll know when that is because a horn will sound in the arena. 8. Cowboys are scored on spurring, getting a rhythm with the horse or bull, staying on for eight seconds and not touching the animals with their left hand. 9. In the calf roping, steer wrestling and team roping, contestants start behind a rope barrier. If the roper or steer wrestler starts the horse too soon, the piece of string on the barrier breaks and the ride has 10 seconds added to the time. 10. For other questions, just ask the folks around you.

Conveniently located!

R O D E O S J u n e 1 0 - 1 2 — Hot Springs Homesteader Days Celebration, Hot Springs J u n e 2 4 - 2 5 — Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo, Polson J u l y 4 — Arlee Rodeo, Powwow grounds J u l y 1 0 — Drummond PRCA Rodeo A u g . 1 1 - 1 3 — Missoula Stampede PRCA Rodeo A u g . 1 8 - 2 0 — Northwest Montana Fair and Rodeo, Kalispell A u g . 2 5 - 2 7 — Indian National Finals Flathead River Rodeo, Polson Rodeo/Fairgrounds

Chances are you might be sitting by a rodeo family or an old rodeo hand.

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C E L E B R A T E Several powwows are held each year on the Flathead Indian Reservation and two of them are happening this summer with the 118th Arlee Celebration and the Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow. The public is welcome to attend both. Powwows have been an important part of the Salish, Kootenai and Pend d’Orielle Tribes’ and other Indian tribes’ lives for centuries as a celebration with singing, dancing, socializing, education, craft work, and feasting. Many Native Americans travel hundreds of miles each year to participate in this important tradition because the powwow trail is much more than just entertainment; it’s a way to honor their ancestors. Various dance styles are performed, including Intertribal dance, where everyone is welcome regardless of dress; War Dance, where each warrior dances his own style to a wide range of songs with fast and slow tempos; Women’s Traditional Dance, consisting of women remaining stationary with a slight movement of the feet; Men’s Traditional Dance, in which the dancers tell stories through dance about battles or hunting. The Round Dance is a social dance that is meant to have everyone participate; Scalp Dance is done by women dressed in men’s

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clothing; Prairie Chicken Dance resembles the movements prairie chickens use for mating or fighting. Some “newer” dances include Fancy Dance, where dancers are dressed in colorful regalia and dance in less restricted styles; Jingle Dance, where women dance in jingle dresses festooned with 365 metal cones or jingles; Grass Dance, a plains Indian dance where dancers move in swaying motions that move the fringes on the grass dance outfits; and the Owl Dance, which is a social dance where couples dance together in a circular motion with men on the outside circle and women in the inside circle. The Arlee Fourth of July Celebration, a week-long event held close to the first week of July, first coincided with the traditional mid-summer break in the hunting and gathering cycle of the Salish and Pend d’Oreille Tribes in the late 1800s, but the road to maintaining the celebratory tradition was fraught with obstacles set up by the federal government. The government policy of assimilation put such traditions on the fast track to elimination. However, through often-clandestine tenacity, that did not happen. Indian people continued to practice traditions despite federal policies aimed at eliminating them. M O N T A N A

This year, the Arlee Celebration runs Wednesday, June 29, to Monday, July 4. The official opening of the celebration will begin with a grand entry that includes an honor guard bearing the flags of the Salish Nation and America. A procession of dancers follows the honor guard. A Flag Song is sung in honor of the flags, then a prayer is said to complete the opening ceremonies. After a Veterans’ honoring ceremony, the dancing begins in earnest. For more event information, go to www.arleepowwow.com On the third weekend in July, the Flathead Indian Reservation hosts the Kootenai Tribes’ annual celebration, the Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow. This year’s three-day celebration at the Elmo Powwow Grounds starts on July 14 and ends on July 17. Campers night is on the 14th. Grand entry for the powwow starts on the 15th at 7 p.m. The Indian social gathering in the west shore community of Elmo features drumming, dancing, traditional dress and food. There will be dance contests with numerous categories, a drum contest, and traditional games. Visitors are welcome and asked to respect the dance area by staying off of it, and leaving front row seating for tribal elders. S U M M E R

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R I P E

When traveling through Western Montana, one might want to indulge with a sweet treat while enjoying the impeccable view. Flathead cherries are a staple snack, thanks in part to the ideal climate found on the lakeshore, and the Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival, which brings people together to celebrate this tasty fruit. Held each July, the event has grown into one of the largest festivals in the state, drawing crowds of around 8,000. In addition to showcasing local stores, products, the area’s natural beauty, and recreation opportunities, the event brings more sales than any other weekend to local businesses. Founder of the the Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival, Jackie Cripe, enjoys the people the most. “It is a highlight of the summer,” Cripe said. “I really enjoy seeing all the familiar faces and getting to meet visitors that are enjoying the day.” This year’s festivities kick off

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at 9 a.m. Saturday, July 16 and the following day at 10 a.m. Families and friends can enjoy a variety of activities while browsing the more than 110 vendor booths set up for the event. “We have a lot of fun events planned this year,” Cripe said. “One of the newest ones is bungee jumping and bouncy castles, which I think will be a hit.”


C E L E B R A T I N G

Fisher Painting

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Justin Fisher 270-7590 www.fisherpainting.net On Saturday, bagpipers will entertain the crowd beginning at 1 p.m. before the kids’ cherry pit-spitting contest at 2 p.m. Following that, adults can race to tie a cherry stem in their mouth at 4 p.m. On Sunday, those who dare can enter their best food item made from cherries, such as cherry BBQ, cherry glazed bacon, or even homemade cherry ice cream. Judges will pick the best and most unique cuisine at 1 p.m. A children’s pie-eating contest starts at 3 p.m. Adults can get their chance to gorge on a cherry pie at 3:30 p.m. All of this will be going on while the Shamrockers are strolling the street, playing music for enjoyment. The festival is a fun family atmosphere and at the same time, raises awareness about the cherries, according to Cherry Grower Ken Edgington. “Most people can’t even believe we can grow cherries in Montana,” Edgington said.

Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival When: Saturday, July 16 from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Sunday, July 17 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Where: Downtown Polson Cost: Free general admission

Fast-draining soil and the warmer climate caused by Flathead Lake’s close proximity create an ideal growing environment, according to Edgington. Cooler nights cause the fruit to hang on branches longer and the cherries build up more sugar, making for a sweeter cherry. People can pick up the fruit from myriad roadside stands along the lake, or in grocery stores primarily in the Pacific Northwest. Some cherries make their way as far as Florida or Korea, and are almost always sold as fresh pack (with their stems on.) “Each year, growers strive for a better product,” Edgington said. “We’re doing this as a labor of

love.” Cherries are particularly susceptible to the elements and sometimes get a late start depending on how cool and wet the spring is. With all the early rain, Cripe is confident the cherries will be abundant and ripe just in time for the festival weekend. “Sometimes we have cherries, and sometimes we don’t,” Cripe said. “However, this year we will have more cherries than ever. Cherries from other areas are never substituted, she said; the festival is loyal to local ones. Flathead cherry products are always available. Cherry festival details can be found at www.flatheadcherryfestival.com

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F A R M E R S This summer, markets in Lake County are offering more than locally crafted items and fresh grown produce. As if those weren’t enough to entice the senses, there will be friendly faces, great products, and a chance to learn how to preserve and prepare the season’s bounty — skills that many have lost in recent generations, but are making a cultural comeback. RONAN If visiting the area on a Thursday, be sure to stop in at the Ronan Farmers Market, located in front of a coffee and flower shop on the corner of First and Main Street, just a block west of Highway 93. In its fifth season, the cash-only market runs from 3 to 7 p.m. on Thursdays, May 5 to Sept. 1. Market Master Ronna Walchuk said that when people stop in Ronan they are struck by how “real” the town is. “This is the last of the best places in Montana. It is not developed like most places. It’s homey,” Walchuk said. POLSON Rumored to be one of the first farmers markets to incorporate in the state of Montana, the Polson Farmers Market runs from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Friday from May 6 to Oct. 14 at Main Street and Fourth Avenue. The market boasts a grand view of Flathead Lake. It accepts cash, debit, credit, and SNAP benefits, which stands for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. Some individual vendors accept Farmers Market Coupons 3 4

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from WIC, a Women, Infants and Children benefit program. The Polson market is part of a region-wide group of markets that also have a matching incentive program for those with SNAP benefits. For every $10 spent at the market, $10 is matched to purchase locally grown and healthy fruit, vegetables, seeds, eggs and meat. The market has coordinated with the Flathead Reservation Extension Office and Salish Kootenai College to bring six selfsufficiency classes to those with SNAP benefits, or anyone else who wants to hone their rusty gardening, food preservation, or fresh cooking skills, mostly on Tuesday afternoons throughout the summer. For more information on the classes, visit the market’s website: polsonfarmersmarket.com/freshsnap ARLEE The Arlee Farmers market is located at Pow Wow Junction along the northbound side of Highway 93. When traveling southbound, turn left on North Couture Loop and cross the highway to reach the market. In its second year at this location, the market operates Fridays from 4 to 7 p.m. June 3 to Oct. 1, which will culminate with the Arlee Fall Festival. The market is located just outside a German-style bakery and a variety of stores unique to Arlee. The market accepts cash and debit/credit cards. The Arlee market is partnering with Shelly Fyant, a Confederated Salish Kootenai

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Tribal Councilmember, and the CSKT Environmental Protection Division to teach healthy food preparation classes at the Community Center in Arlee. The classes, in conjunction with the farmers market, will go on once a month until September and will cover such topics as garden planning, what to plant in western Montana’s region, fresh cooking, and Tribal traditional food gathering. After the market has ended, classes will continue until April 2017, with the assistance of a grant. “Our goal is to get (community members) inspired to eat healthy. The enthusiasm is there,” Julia Longacre, market boardmember said. Many of the vegetables now making regular appearances at markets across the nation haven’t been popular since the 1800s, leaving many Americans needing a refresher course on their preparation. One such vegetable is Kohlrabi (pronounced kohl-rah-bee), a relative of broccoli. Arlee market boardmember Roy Mills makes a delectable and healthy rue — French for gravy — out of the vegetable. He wants to teach local residents and visitors that the alien-looking green vegetable can be prepared in various ways. “It’s delicious,” Mills said. Mills added that the classes held in Arlee at the Community Center would “evolve through the season,” to keep the classes relevant to what’s currently being harvested.


Polson Main Street

Flathead Cherry

Festival

Large tent for shade and seating.

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Kids activities!

July 16 & July 17

Great selection of vendors • Flathead cherries • Cherry quilts on display in store windows Homemade cherry pies • Unique arts & crafts • Entertainment • Sidewalk sales and specials

Fun for the whole family Saturday, July 16 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. 9 a.m.

Vendor booths open

1 - 4 p.m. Live music by the Great Scotts Bagpipers 2 p.m.

3 p.m.

Adult Cherry Pit Spitting Contest in front of Cove Deli and Pizza

4 p.m.

Cherry Stem-tying Contest in front of Cove Deli and Pizza

Children’s Cherry Pit Spitting Contest in front of Cove Deli and Pizza

Sunday, July 17 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 10 a.m. Vendor booths open 1 p.m.

Judging of Most Unique Food Made With Cherries Contest in front of Cove Deli and Pizza - please bring your recipe and 4 samples for judges to taste

3 p.m.

Children’s Pie Eating Contest in front of Cove Deli and Pizza

3:30 p.m. Adult Pie Eating Contest in front of Cove Deli and Pizza

Win gift certificates from downtown merchants! For Vendor space visit our website: www.flatheadcherryfestival.com Questions? Call (406) 883-3667 or email: pcf@flatheadcherryfestival.com

More cherry products than ever before! Proudly sponsored by the Polson Business Community and Flathead Lake Cherry Growers, Inc.

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A M E R I C A N A An enormous collection of Americana memorabilia makes the Miracle of America Museum a unique stop along Highway 93, aptly situated off Memory Lane. Tangible pieces of history are preserved both indoor and out, where an entire village is created from local barns, one-room schoolhouses and shops. There’s also modern pieces created from recycled metals and welded together by director Gil

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Mangels. Many of the outdoor displays, designated by a green oval sticker, are hands-on and interactive. Mangels’ passion for collecting historical items began as a child, when he found his first arrowhead poking up from the ground. “I started collecting arrowheads, stamps … it became a hobby that got out of hand,” he said. A vast array of vehicles restored by

Mangels is also displayed, and a working mini-train delights visiting youngsters. New this year in “Area 51” is an alien autopsy room with a prop used in a documentary about Roswell, New Mexico. The room is located adjacent to the two UFOs. Mangles encourages a new generation to become involved and help keep this history alive. “It’s a worry to me that it could be lost,” he said.

To Kalispell & Glacier Park

Main St.

Highw

ay 93 To Missoula

Specialty Shops and Restaurants on Highway 93 in the Heart of Polson Polson Business Community 3 6

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C O M E D Y , The Port Polson Players, in association with Mission Valley Friends of the Arts, promises The Players 41st summer theatre season has something for every taste, including a comedy, a mystery and a musical. The air-conditioned comfort of the theatre includes pre-show and intermissions on the immaculate “old nine” of the Polson Golf Course. Kicking things off is Neil Simon’s hilarious comedy, “Fools.” The laughs come fast and furious, as we expect from America’s master comic playwright, but with a twist. Long ago, the Russian village of Kulyenchikov was cursed with stupidity. And boy, did it take. Now, 300 years later, it’s up to teacher Leon Tolchinsky to educate the village and break the curse. But, there’s always a catch, right? And this one brings screams of laughter right up to the end. “Fools” plays three weeks, June 30 – July 17. Next up, the psychological thriller “Shadows on Oak Island,” by Garnet Hirst and Deborah Preeper, probes the themes of guilt, betrayal and obsession. Renting a cabin from Oak Island’s chatty guardian, a young archeologist and her belligerent husband hope to solve the mystery of the Holy Grail, believing the discovery will reunite them with their dead son. Truths are systematically unraveled as the couple descends into the chilling and inescapable spell of Oak Island itself. This regional premiere of “Shadows on Oak Island” runs July 21–Aug. 7. Finally, the Players present another regional premiere, “Guys on Ice – The Ice

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Fishing Musical,” with music by James Kaplan, book and lyrics by Fred Alley. Lloyd and Marvin are Wisconsin ice fishing buddies whose fame as anglers is legendary. Today the pair is awaiting a visit from the producer of a local fishing TV show. As they wait — and fish — we become privy to the pair’s comical and complicated lives, their loves and disappointments, and a ton of great gags, accompanied by a lively score, with tunes like The Wishing Hole, Fish is the Miracle Food, The Beer in the Bucket and Ode to a Snowmobile Suit. And of course, let’s not forget Ernie the Moocher. Guys On Ice wraps up the summer season Aug. 11–28. All shows are performed at the beautiful Log Theatre on the Lake, on the Polson Golf Course, in Boettcher Park. Curtain time is 8 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday nights, with Sunday matinees at 2 p.m. (Note that each show opens on a Thursday.) Reservations can be made by calling the

Authentic Mexican Food • Daily lunch specials • Children’s menu • Combinations • Full bar

• Seafood • American food • Specialties • To Go orders

Outside dining and great views

ic mus Live ay Frid ! t Nigh

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theatre box office at 406-883-9212 or by visiting portpolsonplayers.com. Tickets are $18 for adults and $17 for students and senior citizens, with family discounts and group rates available; the Players accept cash, check, MasterCard and Visa. Concessions are available and the theatre is handicap accessible. Informative updates can be found by following Port Polson Players on Facebook.

Mission Mountain

NRA Rodeo

Friday & Saturday, June 24 & 25 Youth events begin at 6:30 p.m. Rodeo 7:30 p.m. both nights! Food & Beverage Concessions Available

Polson Fairgrounds Arena 883-1100

for more information - www.polsonfairgroundsinc.com

Open 7 days a week, 11 am - 9 pm

*Present this ad at gate for one free child’s admission* Limit one per family.

110 Main St. #10, Polson • 883-5854 • www.fiestaenjalisco.net

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Montana Shakespeare in the Parks will perform William Shakespeare’s “The Comedy of Errors” Sunday, August 14 at 6 p.m. The performance will take place at Palmer Park west of Charlo off Highway 212. The performance is free and open to the public. Audiences are encouraged to arrive early with chairs, blankets and picnics. The company features 10 professional actors selected from national auditions who tour without technical assistance to bring live theatre to mostly rural communities. Montana Shakespeare in the Parks is an outreach program of Montana State University’s College of Arts and Architecture. For more information on the plays and a complete tour schedule for 61 communities, visit the company’s website: www.shakespeareintheparks.org.

Shop Fresh • Buy Local

745-2190

Polson Farmers Market

Soaps

Plant Starts

Jewelry

Fresh-cut Flowers

... and much, much more!

EBT/Debit/Credit accepted

To our wonderful customers: Please don’t park in the First Citizens Bank parking lot. Thank you.

Check us out on Facebook!

3rd Ave. West • Downtown Polson For information call Market Master Lou Anne 675-0177 or Bill 261-5700

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93 y.

Wood Working

Bedding Plants

Hw

Cheese/Honey

Baked Goods

of f

Fresh Eggs

Jams & Jellies

Tires Tune-ups Alignments Shocks Batteries Oil changes Air conditioning

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Fresh Meats

Fresh Produce

• • • • • • •

Fo au r to al l ne y ed ou r Ju s!

Visit us every Friday from 9 a.m. until 1 pm., May through mid-October

Mountain View

Cenex Convenience Store

6 a.m. - 10 p.m OPEN EARLY

OPEN LATE

St. Ignatius • 745-3634


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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1 • CHARLO — The last day of school for Charlo schools is Wednesday, June 1.

THURSDAY, JUNE 2 • CHARLO — The Ronan Chamber of Commerce will hold a general meeting on Thursday, June 2, at noon at Allentown Bar and Restaurant. • DAYTON — The last day of school for Dayton schools is Thursday, June 2.

FRIDAY, JUNE 3 • POLSON — A reception will be held Friday, June 3, from 5-7 p.m. at the Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main Street, for the “Beauty and the Beast” art show artists and

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their work. • ST. IGNATIUS — The final day of school for St. Ignatius schools is Friday, June 3. • POLSON — The final day of school for Polson schools is Friday, June 3. • HOT SPRINGS —Hot Flash Blues, a ladies’ dance band, will play at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

SATURDAY, JUNE 4 • RONAN — The Garden of the Rockies Museum will hold a Flea Market, Craft Fair, Yard Sale at their Round Butte Gym across from the VFW on June 4, from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Do you have yard sale items but not enough room to hold your own sale? Ten-foot spaces will be avail-

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able inside and out for $10. All proceeds go to the operation of the museum. Call 406-676-3261 as soon as possible to reserve your spot. • POLSON — Providence St. Joseph Medical Center celebrates 100 years with a Centennial Golf Scramble at Polson Bay Golf Course on Saturday, June 4, with registration at 8 a.m. and shotgun start at 9 a.m. This will be an 18hole/four-person scramble with an entry fee of $100 per team, which includes golf/golf cart/tee-prizes and lunch. For more information call 406-883-8230. • CHARLO — The Ninepipes Museum of early Montana, located just south of Ronan, invites local artists to showcase their artwork

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on the first Saturday of each month, June-October, in the gift shop at the museum. Heather and Matt Holmes are guests for June 4. • HOT SPRINGS — John Kelley will play the blues at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — Come gather some wisdom from the experts at Delaney's Nursery through their spring seminar series. On Saturday, June 4, at 10 a.m. learn about "Hummingbirds, Butterflies and Bees—How to design your garden to attract our seasonal favorites." Delaney’s is located at 40514 Highway 35. Seminars are free and open to the public. Call 406-883-2612 for more information. SEE PAGE 40

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reading program participants who finish all 8 levels. Those wanting to participate in the library’s big events on Thursdays need to register for those activities ahead of time on this day. For more information contact the library at 406-8838225. • POLSON — June 6 is the first day of the free breakfast and lunch Summer Food Service Program in Polson. Cherry Valley School, 107 Eighth Ave. W, is the site for the program. Breakfast will be served from 7:30-9:30 a.m. and lunch from 11 a.m.-1:15 p.m., MondayFriday. All children 18 years old and under eat for free. The program ends on Aug. 5.

SUMMER CALENDAR FROM PAGE 39

SATURDAY, JUNE 4 (CONTINUED) • NINEPIPES — Kids Fishing Day at the Ninepipes Pond takes place on Saturday, June 4, from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Three age groups are included: 6 years and under; 7 to 9 years; and 10 to 13 years. There will be a fish identification test and a raffle drawing for a Makita tool set. Five-dollar raffle tickets are available at WBC or from Jason McDonald by calling 406-3817574. There will be limited fishing poles, tackle and bait provided for kids who do not have fishing equipment. The pond will be stocked with rainbow trout. For more information go to: www.facebook.com/kidsfishingdaymt.

TUESDAY, JUNE 7 • POLSON — Missoula Self Help Law Center will be in Polson on Tuesday, June 7, at the North Lake County Public Library from 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. They will provide services on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Walk-ins are welcome all day or to schedule an appointment please call 406258-3428.

MONDAY, JUNE 6 • RONAN — The Ronan City Council will meet at Ronan City Hall on Monday, June 6, from 6-7 p.m. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library begins registration for their summer reading program, “On Your Mark, Get Set, Go Wild,” at 10 a.m. on Monday, June 6. Children, teens, and adults each receive a reading record at registration, with eight reading benchmarks they need to achieve (for a total of 32 hours of reading or reading to your child). Prizes, coupons and raffle tickets are awarded and we’ll be partnering with Bob Ricketts to offer free Happy Hippo rides to all

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8 • ARLEE — The last day of school for Arlee schools is Wednesday, June 8. • PABLO — All community members are invited to Open Office Days for USDA Rural Development from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. on June 8 at Salish Kootenai Housing Authority. USDA Rural Development provides loan and/or grant programs for homeownership, rental assistance,

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home repair and rehab, essential community facilities, water and waste facilities and business expansions and acquisitions. For more information, call Mary Driscoll at 306-675-4491, ext. 1517.

THURSDAY, JUNE 9 • RONAN — The final day of school for Ronan schools is Thursday, June 9. • RONAN — Ronan Middle School will serve kid-friendly meals for lunch and breakfast Monday-Friday (excluding July 4th) from June 9Aug. 19. Breakfast will be served from 8:15-10:30 a.m. and lunch from 11:30 a.m.-12:55 p.m. There is no cost to children 18 years old and younger. Adult meal prices are $2.50 for breakfast and $4 for lunch.

FRIDAY, JUNE 10 • POLSON — The Polson Splash Softball ASA tournament will be held at the softball complex between June 10-12. For details, visit: www.montanaasasoftball.com. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy Andrea Harsell playing Roots ‘n Rock at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • HOT SPRINGS — The 67th annual Homesteader Days celebration begins on June 10 with arts, crafts and food booths on Main St. from noon to 5 p.m. At 6 p.m. the annual alumni basketball game takes place at the Hot Springs High School gym. Fergie’s Pub will host the Good, the Bad and the Ugly playing classic rock music. For general information call 406-7412662; car show call 406-741-3630;

SATURDAY, JUNE 11 • ST. IGNATIUS — A spay/neuter clinic will be held on Saturday, June 11, and Sunday, June 12. The clinic is free for households meeting low-income guidelines. If you have questions, please call 406-8835978. • RONAN — Ronan District Library will have a special Father's Day craft gift making event from noon-3 p.m. on Saturday, June 11. If you have questions call the library at 406-676-3683. • HOT SPRINGS — A breakfast fundraiser for the Hot Springs Library will take place from 8-11 a.m. at the Tribal Nutrition Center on Spring Street. Enjoy the Homesteader Days Car Show at 9 a.m. by Valley Bank. The Skunk Alley Run, a 3K & 10K run begins at 9:30 a.m. Meet at Wall Street Place. From 11 a.m-4 p.m. there will be fun jumps and games at Hot Springs City Park. Tom Clontz will provide live country western music from 10 a.m.-noon on the Main Street stage. An ice cream social takes place at the Senior Center at 11:30 a.m. followed by a Kiddy Parade on Main Street, kiddy games in the park, and a ducky race at noon. The LaRue Hot Springs Museum with historic Hot Springs exhibits opens at noon. From 1-3 p.m. Andrea Harsell will provide Americana music on stage on Main Street. Car show judging and classic rock D.J. is on stage from 3-4:30 p.m.

Sandwiches Pizza Hard Ice Cream

Polson Community Church

11 3rd. Ave. W. Downtown • Polson www.CoveDeli.com

Sunday Services:

Join us on

883-0434

1814 First Street East, Polson www.polsoncommunitychurch.com • 883-0260

(June, July, & August) Worship - 10 a.m. Seekers - 8:45 a.m. (September-May:) Worship - 11:00 a.m. Seekers - 9:45 a.m.

16 flavors of Montana made hard ice cream

Pastor Russell Barber Locally owned since 2003

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rodeo 406-741-5707.

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J SATURDAY, JUNE 11 (CONTINUED) Rock music will be performed by Alex Boey from 4:30-6:30 p.m., Southern Comfort from 6:45-8:45 p.m., and from 9 p.m.-1:30 a.m. Voodoo Horseshoes will entertain. Enjoy a rodeo on Broadway, east of the school at 6 p.m. • POLSON — Come gather some wisdom from the experts at Delaney's Nursery through their spring seminar series. On Saturday, June 11, at 10 a.m. learn about "Soil Composition —Transform your soil into rich growing medium." Delaney’s is located at 40514 Highway 35. Seminars are free and open to the public. Call 406-8832612 for more information.

SUNDAY, JUNE 12 • HOT SPRINGS — The Masonic Lodge will host a pancake breakfast from 7:30-11:30 a.m. The LaRue Museum will be open from noon-4 p.m. A gospel hour will take place on the Main Street

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Stage with Andrea Harsell from 11 a.m.-noon. The Grand Parade takes place at noon and will feature Great Scots, pipes and drums. A Homesteader reunion will take place at the Senior Center at 1 p.m. At 2 p.m. the rodeo takes place on Broadway, east of the school.

MONDAY, JUNE 13 • RONAN/PABLO — Ronan School District #30 will offer summer camps in Ronan and Pablo, June 13-20, for students entering grades first-eighth. Topics may include art, swimming, naturalist, SpectrUM science and more. Call 406-6763390 x 7728 for more information. • RONAN — Ronan Middle School will offer Summer School June 1330, Monday-Friday, from 8:30 a.m.–12:30 p.m. Summer school will include literacy and math instruction for students entering grades sixth-eighth. Call 406-6763390 x 7728 for more information. • LAKE COUNTY — The Flathead

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Reservation and Lake County Boys and Girls Club will operate a summer program at both their Polson and Ronan sites Monday-Friday (not July 4) from 8 a.m.-8 p.m. The cost is $25 per month or $75 for the entire summer program, which runs June 13-Aug. 26. Applications may be picked up onsite or at: www.flatheadbgc.org. The school feeding programs will provide breakfast and lunch and the club will provide a snack and dinner. Activities include: art, technology, swimming, fitness, gardening, photography, robotics, reading, character development, hiking and community service. Additional activities include: Ninepipes Museum, library reading program, camping in Glacier Park, summer Brain Gain program, SMART moves program. Call 406-883-0521 for more information. • PABLO — Salish Kootenai College, "Making Fitness Fun Program" (open to youth 7 years and older) begins June 13 and

goes from 8:30 a.m.-noon Monday through Thursday, all summer long. The program will be held at the Salish Kootenai College Joe McDonald Gymnasium. Physical activities will be provided between breakfast and lunch. Activities include: swimming, kickball, football, basketball, dodge ball, Native games, volleyball, soccer, Shinny, bike riding and gardening. Activities are intended to keep kids busy and active during the summer months. Transportation from SKC is provided Monday through Thursday to Ronan and Polson Boys and Girls Clubs daily at about noon. Contact Mike Tryon or Paul Phillips at SKC for more Information: 406-2754916 or 406-275-4917. • YELLOW BAY — Flathead Lake Biological Station will present “Data and Donuts” Monday, June 13, from 10-11 a.m. at the station. Call 406-982-3301 ext. 229 for more information. SEE PAGE 42

Available at both locations!

676-3301 63802 U.S. Hwy 93 S., Ronan

883-2498 50331 U.S. Hwy. 93, Polson

Find fast fresh food at our Super One Foods or Harvest Foods Delis Grab any one of our featured value meals or any of our sides and don’t forget the dipping sauce.

Breaded fresh daily! M O N T A N A

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E and checks to: Polson Chamber of Commerce. (See related information about ‘Chamber Blast’ on June 25 date.)

SUMMER CALENDAR FROM PAGE 41

SATURDAY, JUNE 18

MONDAY, JUNE 13 (CONTINUED) • PABLO — The first day of the free summer food program at Salish Kootenai College Joe McDonald Gymnasium begins June 13 and is open to kids ages 18 and under. Kids don't have to be a part of Making Fitness Fun Program to eat. Breakfast is served from 8:3010 a.m. and lunch is from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Monday-Thursday. • RONAN — The Ronan District Library Summer Reading Program starts on Monday, June 13, and anyone of any age can register and read. Attendance at the Storytimes Program is not required for participation, just sign up and receive a reading log. The last day for participants to turn in their reading logs is Thursday, August 11. The Summer Reading Picnic and Prize Drawing

is Saturday, August 13, from noon3 p.m. Visit RonanLibrary.org or call 406-676-3682 for more information.

THURSDAY, JUNE 16

FRIDAY, JUNE 17

• POLSON — Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour meets on Thursday, June 16, from 5-7 p.m. Your host will be Mission Valley

• POLSON — The registration deadline for the Polson Chamber of Commerce’s annual 'Chamber Blast’ is June 17. Send registration

We welcome our visitors to experience a friendly country store in the St. Ignatius Amish Community.

DISCOVER THE LOCALS’ SECRET. Bulk Foods Sandwiches Hickory Rockers Wind Chimes

Large Jam - Salsa Selection Area’s Largest Deli Meat & Cheese Selection Groceries Rhythm Clocks SERVING ICE CREAM CONES AND SANDWICHES

COME AND EXPERIENCE THE DIFFERENCE. www.mission/general/store/.com Hours: Mon-Fri. 9-5:30 • Sat. 9-5 • Closed Sunday • (406) 745-7200 61307 Watson Rd. • St. Ignatius, MT ~ Turn East on Airport Rd. to Watson Rd. (Follow Signs) 4 2

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Physical Therapy, Nunlist Enterprises, Caselli Therapeutic Massage located at 51657 Highway 93 E. See you there.

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• POLSON — Come gather some wisdom from the experts at Delaney's Nursery through their spring seminar series. On Saturday, June 18, at 10 a.m. learn about "Pesticide Use and Selection — when, how and why you use organics or synthetics." Delaney’s is located at 40514 Highway 35. Seminars are free and open to the public. Call 406-883-2612 for more information. • DAYTON — Mission Mountain Winery encourages all summer gourmets to attend our free “Ice Cream Social” event on Saturday, June 18, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The staff and winemaker have collaborated in producing some sorbet and ice cream treats: Muscat Sorbet and vanilla ice cream with Cocoa Vin Chocolate Port.


J SUNDAY, JUNE 19 FATHER’S DAY • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy boogiewoogie music on the piano played by Wayo at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

MONDAY, JUNE 20 SUMMER SOLSTICE • YELLOW BAY — Flathead Lake Biological Station will present “Data and Donuts” Monday, June 20, from 10-11 a.m. at the station. Call 406-982-3301 ext. 229 for more information.

TUESDAY, JUNE 21 • RONAN — Ronan District Library is closed on the third Tuesday of each month. • POLSON — Missoula Self Help Law Center will be in Polson on Tuesday, June 21, at the North Lake County Public Library from 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. They will provide services on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Walk-ins are welcome all day or to schedule

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an appointment call 406-258-3428.

FRIDAY, JUNE 24 • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy Celtic music by Skippin’ a Groove at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — Mission Mountain NRA Rodeo is on June 24-25 beginning at 6:30 p.m. There will be youth events including mutton bustin' and mini bull riding at 7:30 p.m. Events include bareback, steer wrestling, saddle bronc, team roping, tie down roping, ladies’ and youth barrel racing, ladies’ and youth breakaway roping and bull riding. Food, beverage and beer garden concessions will be available. There will also be live music after the Friday night performance. (Free vendors fair, no food items.) Call Sharon at 406-261-2861 or 406-253-2010 for more information

SATURDAY, JUNE 25 • CHARLO — The Lake County Conservation District will sponsor a “Country Living” workshop on June

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25 from 9 a.m.– noon at the United Methodist Church in Charlo. Topics to be covered include: gardening, landscaping, orchards, pollinators, wildlife, forest health and fire awareness, grazing, weed identification, and 310 permits. There will be coffee and snacks, door prizes and lots of useful information. Register by contacting Chris Malgren at the LCCD 406-6762841 or cmalgren@ronan.net or register at 8:30 a.m. the day of the workshop. See you there. • POLSON — The Polson Chamber of Commerce annual “Chamber Blast” is on Saturday, June 25, at Big Sky Sporting Clays. We will start with a quick beginner's shooting clinic, followed by a shooter's safety briefing prior to the Sporting Clays Tournament. There will be a barbecue lunch and awards ceremony from 12:30-1:30 p.m. The cost is $110 per shooter, $330 per three-person team. Bring shotgun, eye protection, and ear protection. No experience necessary. The reg-

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istration deadline is June 17. Send registration and checks to: Polson Chamber of Commerce. • POLSON — Learn more about dog behavior and your relationship with your best friend. Take a free class on Saturday, June 25, from 2-3 p.m. at Mission Valley Animal Shelter. This class is on “What Am I Feeding My Dog?” This class is open to everyone age 8 and over. Call 406-883-5312 for details and register. • ST. IGNATIUS — The 22nd annual Fireman’s Picnic takes place on Saturday, June 25, at the Old Town Field, across from Cenex. A dinner of pulled pork sandwiches, hamburgers and hotdogs will be available along with a live auction of items created by local artists and craftsmen. To donate auction items call 406-745-4190 or 406-7454266. Bring your residential fire extinguisher for a free refill. Smokey Bear will be available for pictures with the kids, if there are no fires. SEE PAGE 44

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Wednesday-Saturday, July 1-17, at 8 p.m., Sunday matinees are at 2 p.m. The Theater on the Lake is located on Highway 93 S at Boettcher Park. For reservations call 406-883-9212 or go to: portpolsonplayers@centurytel.net.

SUMMER CALENDAR FROM PAGE 43

MONDAY, JUNE 27 • YELLOW BAY — Flathead Lake Biological Station will present “Data and Donuts” Monday, June 27, from 10-11 a.m. at the station. Call 406-982-3301 ext. 229 for more information.

SATURDAY, JULY 2 • ARLEE — The 118th annual Arlee Celebration powwow continues with “Powwow Trail” Run/Walk at 9 a.m. Grand Entry is at 1 p.m. and again at 7 p.m. Visit the website: arleepowwow.com for more information. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy a barbecue and then Chris Kennedy performing on his guitar with vocals at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29 • ARLEE — The 118th annual Arlee Celebration powwow begins Wednesday, June 29, and ends Monday, July 4. All events are open to the public and free of charge. Arts, crafts, stick games, dance competitions, Native American and other ethnic foods will be available. Absolutely no alcohol, firearms, unleashed dogs or motorcycles are allowed in the camp area. The event takes place on Powwow grounds on Powwow Road in Arlee. Wednesday is “Camp Day.” Visit the website: www.arleepowwow.com, for more information.

SUNDAY, JULY 3 • POLSON — A free Jared Blake concert will take place at Sacajawea Park for Boys and Girls Club and Bikers Against Bullies, USA. This event includes fireworks and special surprises. Go to: www.andersonbroadcasting.com for more information. • POLSON — An open house will take place at Flathead Lake Cheese, 208 First Ave. E on Sunday, July 3, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. There will be tours and tastings. For more information call 406883-0343. • ARLEE — The 118th annual Arlee Celebration powwow continues with Native American Mass at 10 a.m. and Grand Entry at 2 p.m. Visit arleepowwow.com, for more information.

THURSDAY, JUNE 30 • ARLEE — The 118th annual Arlee Celebration powwow continues with a Memorial at 7 p.m. and a Stick game at 8 p.m. Visit the website: arleepowwow.com, for more information.

FRIDAY, JULY 1 • POLSON — The Port Polson Players in Association with the Mission Valley Friends of the Arts present “Fools,” a comedy by Neil Simon. Shows will take place

MONDAY, JULY 4 • YELLOW BAY — The Flathead

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Lake Biological Station will present “Data and Donuts” Monday, July 4, from 10-11 a.m. Call 406-9823301 ext. 229 for more information. • POLSON — Join the July 4th Parade in downtown Polson beginning at noon. Parade entry forms are available at the Chamber office and must be returned to the Chamber office by July 3. The parade begins at Cherry Valley Elementary School, heads down Main Street, turns at Third Ave. and ends on the following block. Stop by the Chamber office at 418 Main Street before the parade and purchase a glass of fresh lemonade, all proceeds support the Community Fireworks Show. For more information call 406-8835969. • ARLEE — The 118th annual Arlee Celebration powwow continues with Old Style Day, Snininpmncuyn (Snake Dance and Honoring Veterans). The Arlee Open Rodeo will be held at the Arlee rodeo grounds beginning at 2 p.m. This popular rodeo features a mix of local and regional cowboys and cowgirls competing in traditional rodeo events. Competition Grand Entry begins at 7 p.m. Call 406726-3762 for more information or visit the website: arleepowwow.com. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy retrocountry music played by Barnaby Wilde at the Symes Hotel from 810 p.m. • ARLEE — The Arlee Volunteer Fire Department will host its annual pancake breakfast from 7-11 a.m. at the old Arlee Fire Hall. The cost is $5 per person and it’s all you can eat. There will also be a silent

Locals & Visitors alike...

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auction ending at about 10:30 a.m. For more information, call 406-2104144. • ARLEE — The Arlee Jocko Valley Museum, run by the Arlee Historical Society, opens for the summer July 4 and will be open every other Saturday from 2-4 p.m. or by appointment, until Labor Day. The museum has many historical displays including many photographs of Native and homesteading families. There are hundreds of obituaries with genealogy information. There is also a military display commemorating those who have given their lives for this country. The Arlee Museum is located at the corner of Bouch and Fyant (by the grade school). For more information or to arrange a viewing appointment, call 406-726-3167.

FRIDAY, JULY 8 • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy “Coffee Shop Contemporary” music by Pamela Vankirk at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

SATURDAY, JULY 9 • CHARLO — The Ninepipes Museum of early Montana, located just south of Ronan, invites local artists to showcase their artwork on a Saturday of each month, June-October, in the gift shop at the museum. Mother and daughter, Jacki and Sarah Goedert, are guest artists for July 9. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy boogiewoogie music on the piano played by Wayo at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • CHARLO — The Ninepipes Museum of Early Montana will hold a Cultural Arts Fair on the museum


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phy), and Gitti Miller (basketry) from Saturday, July 9-Monday, Aug. 22. • BIGFORK — Mission Valley 3-on3 will host three basketball tournaments over the course of the summer. The sixth annual Bigfork Battle in the Bay 3-on-3 Tournament will be held July 9 in the Bigfork High School parking lot. Last year, 98 teams competed in the Bigfork Battle. For more information, visit missionvalley3on3.com, Facebook.com/missionvalley3on3, or Twitter.com/missionvalleybb.

SUNDAY, JULY 10 • FLATHEAD LAKE — Bring your kayak, canoe, paddleboard or other human-propelled watercraft and join us in the Narrows on Sunday, July 10, for the second annual

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Poker Paddle. Register now on the Flathead Lakers website: Flatheadlakers.org. Early Bird price is $45 before June 1, $50 after that. Proceeds benefit Flathead Lakers’ Student Education Program and community work to support clean water. Call Dana at 303-6684535.

TUESDAY, JULY 12 • LAKESIDE — A boat tour will take off from Lakeside for an afternoon cruise to one of the Biological Station’s Flathead Lake monitoring sites. Join FLBS researchers for appetizers, beverages and an overview of Flathead Lake ecology and the FLBS Research and Monitoring program. Reservations are required since limited space is

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available. For more information or to RSVP, email Tom Bansak or call 406-982-3301 ext. 229.

THURSDAY, JULY 14 • ELMO — The Kootenai Tribe, also known as the Ktunaxa Ksanka Band, welcome all nations and the general public to the 37th annual “Ksanka Standing Arrow Powwow” at Elmo Powwow Grounds Thursday, July 14-Sunday, July 17. It is an Native American gathering featuring drumming, dancing and traditional dress. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library will hold Movie Day on July 14 and go to the Showboat Cinema in Polson and watch the “The Parent Trap.” For more SEE PAGE 47

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information contact the library at 406-883-8225. • RONAN — Entry deadlines for Lake County Fair 4-H entries is Thursday, July 14, at 4 p.m. at the Lake County Fair office. No late entries will be accepted.

FRIDAY, JULY 15 • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy John Kelley playing the blues at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — A reception will be held Friday, July 15, from 5-7 p.m. at the Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main Street, for artists from the exhibit “Exceptionally Eclectic.”

SATURDAY, JULY 16 • POLSON — Mark your calendars for a fun-filled weekend called “Live History Days” at the Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane, on July 16 and July 17. There will be ice cream, rides on two trains, Army rigs, spinners and wood carvers, a sawmill in action, a jet trainer cockpit, a blacksmith shop, whirling flywheel engines, a

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tennis ball cannon, a one-room schoolhouse and historic movies. Fiddlers, pickers, singers and accordions will provide listening and dancing entertainment on Saturday. Join the fun, sell your wares and be a part of history. We welcome new exhibitors and volunteers. Vendors must have a direct link to things historical i.e.: soap making, broom making, pottery, beading, etc. For more information, contact Gil at 406-883-6264 or www.miracleofamericamuseum.org. • ST. IGNATIUS — The 2016 Buffalo Run in St. Ignatius, will take place on Saturday, July 16. It is a 1-mile Fun Run, 4-mile run-walk, 7mile, and a half-marathon. The halfmarathon starts promptly at 7 a.m. All other races start at 8 a.m. The races start on Main Street in front of Gambles. Entry deadline is July 12 and forms are available at: stlukehealthnet.org. • HOT SPRINGS — Hot Flash Blues, a ladies’ dance band will play at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — The Boys and Girls Club of the Flathead Reservation and Lake County will sponsor the third annual Polson Mud Run on Saturday, July 16, at 9 a.m. (to

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open the Cherry Festival). This is a fun-filled, muddy 5K obstacle course held at the Polson Fairgrounds. Registration can be found on flatheadbgc.org. • POLSON — Polson Main Street Flathead Cherry Festival will be held Saturday, July 16, from 9 a.m.- 6 p.m. and Sunday, July 17, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and promises more cherry products than ever before. Come enjoy the great selection of vendors, Flathead cherries, homemade cherry pies, cherry quilts on display in store windows, unique arts and crafts, entertainment, sidewalk sales and specials all weekend long. In front of the Cove Deli and Pizza the children’s cherry spitting contest will be held at 2 p.m. and the adult contest is at 3 p.m. Then at 4 a cherry stem-tying contest will be held. For more information call 406-883-3667. • PLAINS — Mission Valley 3-on-3 will host three basketball tournaments over the course of the summer. The first annual Plains Wild Horse Shootout will be held July 16 to benefit the Wildhorse Sports Association, a local charity developing a new sports complex for Plains and Sanders County. For

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more information, visit missionvalley3on3.com.

SUNDAY, JULY 17 • POLSON — The second day of the Flathead Cherry Festival includes a contest in front of the Cove Deli and Pizza to determine the most unique food made with cherries. Bring four samples for judges to taste. A children’s pie eating contest will take place at 3 p.m. and the adult pie-eating contest begins at 3:30 p.m. Call 406883-3667 or go to www.flatheadcherryfestival.com for more information. • LAKE MARY RONAN — Kootenai Christian Senior Camp for students entering grades 10-12 will be held July 17-22. The camp offers swimming, boating, fishing, sports, plus Bible study, daily devotions and group worship times and will be held at Lake Mary Ronan. Register at www.kootenaichristiancamp.org or call Jonathan Larsson at 406745-4667.

TUESDAY, JULY 19 • RONAN — Ronan District Library is closed on the third Tuesday of each month. SEE PAGE 48

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Y • POLSON — This 3-on-3-basketball tournament is played in the streets of downtown Polson, July 22-24, just a slam-dunk away from beautiful Flathead Lake. Join one of the most fun and popular athletic events in Montana. Financial support provided mainly through team fees and corporate sponsors has enabled 3-on-3 to donate its net proceeds to local charities. Play hard, laugh a lot and lend a hand to this charitable event. For signup information go to: www.flatheadlake3on3.com.

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THURSDAY, JULY 21 • POLSON — The Port Polson Players in Association with the Mission Valley Friends of the Arts present “Shadows On Oak Island” a mystery/thriller. Shows will take place Wednesday-Saturday, July 21-Aug. 7, at 8 p.m., Sunday matinees are at 2 p.m. The Theater on the Lake is located on Highway 93 S at Boettcher Park. For reservations call 406-883-9212 or go to: portpolsonplayers@centurytel.net. • RONAN — On Thursday, July 21, open class entries for the Lake County Fair are due at 4 p.m. in the Lake County Fair office. • POLSON — Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour will be held on Thursday, July 21, from 5-7 p.m. Your host will be KwaTaqNuk

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SATURDAY, JULY 23 Resort and Casino located at 49708 Highway 93 E. See you there.

FRIDAY, JULY 22 • ST. IGNATIUS — The 34th “Good Old Days” celebration will take place all day on Friday, Saturday and Sunday, July 22, 23, and 24 at the St. Ignatius Good Old Days

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Park. Friday family night will start with a barbecue dinner, followed by entertainment and fireworks. Saturday will be a pancake breakfast, parade, fun and games in the park, lots of special events and food. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy Americana music by Mark Chase at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

• HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy piano playing and vocals by Craig Barton at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

SUNDAY, JULY 24 • POLSON — Lake County Fair will hold a shotgun event at Big Sky Sporting Clays, 42295 Irvine Flats Road in Polson at 10 a.m. • LAKE MARY RONAN — Kootenai Christian Intermediate Camp for


J students entering grades 7-9 will be held July 24-29. The camp offers swimming, boating, fishing, sports, plus Bible study, daily devotions and group worship times and will be held at Lake Mary Ronan. Register at: www.kootenaichristiancamp.org or call Kelvin Jones at 406-370-1117. • ST. IGNATIUS — Chapter 1122 of the Experimental Aircraft Association will host a Fly-In at the St. Ignatius Airport on Sunday, July 24, and admission is free. The public is invited to join pilots for an exciting day of aviation activities, beginning with a pancake breakfast at 8 a.m. There will be static displays, float-planes, antique aircraft, experimental airplanes, and homebuilts.

MONDAY, JULY 25 • RONAN — The Lake County Fair begins in Ronan. The mini-horse show is at 8:30 a.m.; the horse show is at 11:30 a.m. and interview judging will take place at noon.

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TUESDAY, JULY 26 • RONAN — 4-H dog obedience and showmanship/rally and agility will take place at the Lake County Fair from 8 a.m.-2 p.m.; large animal check-in is from 3-7 p.m.; 4-H family style dinner is from 5-8 p.m.; non-perishable open class check-in is from 5-8 p.m.; 4-H and open class poultry/rabbit check-in is from 6-8 p.m. and from 6-9 p.m. large animal weigh-in takes place.

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27 • RONAN — The Lake County Fair Livestock Barns will be open to the public 9 a.m.-8 p.m. Wednesday, July 27 to Saturday, July 30. • RONAN — Lake County Fair judges’ orientation begins at 8 a.m.; perishable open class is from 9 a.m.-noon; swine showmanship/judging is from 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; llama/alpaca showmanship/judging begins at 10 a.m.; cat show is at 3 p.m.; open class judges’ orientation at 5 p.m.; 4-H family style dinner and enter-

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tainment from 5-8 p.m.; open class judging from 6-9 p.m.; market beef judging at 7 p.m. • HOT SPRINGS — Getting ready for the Blues Festival music will be provided by Too Slim and the Taildraggers at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

THURSDAY, JULY 28 • POLSON — The North Lake County Public Library will hold its annual “Bug Race” at the VFW on July 28. For more information call the library at 406-883-8225. • RONAN — Lake County Fair judges’ orientation takes place at 8:30 a.m.; sheep showmanship at 9 a.m.; market sheep judging at 11 a.m. followed by market goat judging and goat showmanship; 2 p.m. dairy showmanship/judging; 2:30 p.m. poultry showmanship/judging; 4 p.m. fashion revue; 5 p.m. entertainment; 5:30 p.m. buyers’ recognition dinner; 7 p.m. market livestock sale.

FRIDAY, JULY 29 • RONAN — Friday at the Lake County Fair begins with an 8:30 a.m. judges’ orientation; sheep and beef breeding at 9 a.m.; 11:30 a.m. rabbit showmanship and judging. Mission Mountain Quilt Guild will hold their show at 10 a.m. The Lake County Fair has a new addition to the schedule with a 4-H project costume competition at 2 p.m. on Friday afternoon. It should be entertaining for the participants and spectators alike. The day ends with a 5-7:30 p.m. 4-H open class talent show; a 7:30 p.m. beef showmanship; and a 9-11 p.m. 4H Ambassadors’ Dance. • HOT SPRINGS — Hot Springs Blues Festival is a two-day fun festival at the Symes Hotel with John Kelley providing electrical revival music from 8-10 p.m. There’s beer, camping, vendors and soaking fun. Call 406-741-2361 for more information. SEE PAGE 50

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SATURDAY, JULY 30 • POLSON — The MSU Scholarship Golf Scramble and Barbecue event is scheduled for Saturday, July 30. This event is a fundraiser for the MSU Bobcats’ Scholarship Association. This will be a great event for all MSU alums and families. For registration and information, call 406-883-8230. • HOT SPRINGS — Hot Springs Blues Festival at the Symes Hotel enters its second day and includes music from: Rafael Tranquilino, Mike Bader Band, Zeppo, Kevin Van Dort. There’s beer, camping, vendors and soaking fun. Call 406741-2361 for more information. • RONAN — The large animal round robin is at 10 a.m. and the small animal round robin is at 11:30 a.m. The Lake County Fair will have the first-ever ranch rodeo. It begins at 1 p.m. The small-fry stock show and ranch rodeo dinner and awards are at 5 p.m. At 7:30 p.m. there will be an arena dance to the band Exit 53 from Billings.

W AT E R entering grades 4-6 will be held Aug. 1-5. The camp offers swimming, boating, fishing, sports, plus Bible study, daily devotions and group worship times and will be held at Lake Mary Ronan. Register at www.kootenaichristiancamp.org or call Jonathan Larsson at 406546-1117.

TUESDAY, AUG. 2 • POLSON — Missoula Self Help Law Center will be in Polson on Tuesday, Aug. 2, at the North Lake County Public Library from 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. They will provide services on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Walk-ins are welcome all day or to schedule an appointment please call 406258-3428.

SUNDAY, JULY 31 • RONAN — The Lake County Fair will have an MBHA barrel race from noon-4 p.m. and breakaway roping for the ladies will follow.

THURSDAY, AUG. 4 • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy Rockin’ Blues music by the Tracy Fordic Band at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

MONDAY, AUG. 1 • RONAN — The Ronan City Council will meet at Ronan City Hall on Monday, Aug. 1, from 6-7 p.m. • RONAN — Stall cleaning will take place at the Lake County Fair Grounds from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Aug. 1 - Aug. 2. • LAKE MARY RONAN — Kootenai Christian First Chance Camp for students entering grades 1-3 will be held Aug. 1-3. The camp offers swimming, boating, fishing, sports, plus Bible study, daily devotions and group worship times and will be held at Lake Mary Ronan. Register at www.kootenaichristiancamp.org or call Kim Beaudin at 406-461-4803. • LAKE MARY RONAN — Kootenai Christian Junior Camp for students 5 0

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FRIDAY, AUG. 5 • RONAN –– The Ronan Pioneer Days Celebration will be held Friday, Saturday and Sunday, Aug. 5-7. Ronan Pioneer Days is a community event with fun for the whole family. From 8 a.m.-noon there will be a fishing derby. Happy hour with the Ronan Pioneer Days Company begins at 5 p.m. Bulls and Broncs Rodeo starts at 7:30 p.m. and the street dances at the Valley Club, Pheasant Lounge, Second Chance Saloon and the 325 Bar all begin at 9 p.m. There will be plenty of good old-fashioned entertainment. If you have questions or want more information, call 406-675-0177. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy classic

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rock and originals by Jimni at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

SATURDAY, AUG 6 • RONAN –– The second day of Pioneer Days begins bright and early with a pancake breakfast served at the VFW at 7 a.m. The 3on-3 Basketball Tournament starts at 8 a.m. along with the 36th annual Mountain Classic Run (5K and 10K). A co-ed softball tournament takes place at 9 a.m. At 10 a.m. there will be a car show. The Kiddie Slicker Rodeo begins at noon and includes: kids sheep riding, kids sheep dressing, calf cash race, a pig scramble and more. The Open Rodeo and Ring of Fire begins at 7:30 p.m. Another night of street dancing takes place at the Valley Club, Pheasant Lounge, Second Chance Saloon and the 325 Bar at 9 p.m. If you have questions or for more information, please call at 406-675-0177. • POLSON — The 14th Annual Water Daze 1-Mile Swim will take place on Saturday, Aug. 6. Swim from Salish Point, through the pristine waters of Flathead Lake, to Boettcher Park with the backdrop of the Mission Mountains. Registration will open at 11 a.m. with a 1 p.m. start time. Swimmers will be provided transportation to KwaTaqNuk from Boettcher about 30 minutes prior to the start of the race. Local kayakers and emergency personnel will be along the racecourse for safety and support. Since the beginning, Water Daze has been an essential part of the Mission Valley Aquatics mission, outreach and fundraising campaign. There is beautiful scenery, clear water, great food and friends

— all in support of the Lake Monsters Swim Team and Mission Valley Aquatics. See you there. • YELLOW BAY — The Flathead Lake Biological Station will hold an open house on Saturday, Aug. 6, at 1 p.m. The Flathead Lake Biological Station’s annual open house provides an opportunity for the interested public to learn more about the ecology of Flathead Lake and its watershed, as well as FLBS and its research around the globe. The open house allows FLBS scientists to showcase the breadth of their activities, as well as show examples of how ecological research at FLBS benefits Flathead Lake and subsequently area visitors and residents. • CHARLO — The Ninepipes Museum of early Montana, located just south of Ronan, invites local artists to showcase their artwork on the first Saturday of each month, June-October, in the gift shop at the museum. Janet McGahan is guest artist for Aug. 6. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy classic rock provided by the Good, Bad, and the Ugly at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — The reading portion of North Lake County Public Library program will end on Saturday, Aug. 6, at 4 p.m. • POLSON — Please join the 8th annual “Smokin' On The Water” barbecue cook-off on Saturday, Aug. 6, from 11 a.m.-6 p.m. at the KwaTaqNuk Resort. Cash prizes and trophies awarded in all barbecue categories. We hope to see you there. For more information contact the Polson Chamber of Commerce. • RONAN — Mission Valley 3-on-3 will host three basketball tournaments over the course of the summer. The 21st annual Ronan Pioneer Days 3-on-3 tournament will be held Aug. 6 at the Ronan High School parking lot. For more information, visit: missionvalley3on3.com, Facebook.com/missionvalley3on3, or Twitter.com/missionvalleybb.

SUNDAY, AUG. 7 • RONAN –– The final day of the Ronan Pioneer Days celebration begins with a volleyball tournament


A at the City Park at 9 a.m. The Big Parade theme is “Back in Black.” Registration begins at 10 a.m. at Round Butte Mini Storage. The parade down Main Street takes place at 12:30 p.m. The Open Rodeo and Wild Buffalo Riding event begins at 3 p.m. Family Karaoke Night begins at the Valley Club at 6:30 p.m. If you have questions or for more information, please call at 406-675-0177.

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• POLSON — The Port Polson Players in Association with the Mission Valley Friends of the Arts present “Guys On Ice” a musical/comedy. Shows will take place Wednesday-Saturday, Aug. 10-28, at 8 p.m., Sunday matinees are at 2 p.m. The Theater on the Lake is located on Highway 93 S at Boettcher Park. For reservations call 406-883-9212 or go to: portpolsonplayers@centurytel.net.

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• HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy hillbilly rock and roll by Badgerhound at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — Join the Summerfest on Flathead Lake, Friday, Aug. 12, from noon-5 p.m. There will be a car show, a poker run, and from 8 p.m.-midnight free live music and dancing at the Finley Point Grill. For more information call 406-8835255 or go to: andersonbroadcasting.com.

• ST. IGNATIUS — Wings For Wishes Over Montana is a radio controlled airplane fun fly event (R/C air show) designed to benefit The Make-A-Wish Foundation of Montana. This year’s event is on Saturday, Aug. 13 and Sunday, Aug. 14. We have a new home at the St. Ignatius Airport where there is plenty of parking and plenty of pit area and with over 2,000 feet of paved runway. Model aviation pilots come from far away for this twoday, fun-filled fundraising event. A valid proof of Academy of Model Aeronautics membership must be shown at registration. As always, spectators are free. Please have all dogs on leashes. All of the funds raised will go to Make-A-Wish Montana. Visit www.wingsforwishes.weebly.com for more details. • RONAN — The Ronan District Library’s Summer Reading Picnic

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and Prize Drawing is Saturday, Aug. 13, from noon-3 p.m. Go online at RonanLibrary.org or call 406-676-3682 for more information. • POLSON — The 45th Annual Sandpiper Art Festival will be held Saturday, Aug. 13, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. on the Lake County courthouse lawn. Begun in 1971, the Sandpiper Art Festival is a popular one day juried show featuring original art and original crafts. Taking place simultaneously with the Annual Car Show (one block away), the Sandpiper Art Festival is typically attended by several thousand visitors. The Festival provides exhibitors an opportunity for sales and exposure to new, potential patrons. The Festival offers live entertainment throughout the day, onsite food vendors, and an onsite ATM for the convenience of SEE PAGE 52

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For more information on the plays and a complete tour schedule, visit the company’s website: www.shakespeareintheparks.org. • POLSON — The final day of Summerfest is Sunday, Aug. 14, and includes lots of water activities to see and do on Flathead Lake. For more information call 406-8835255.

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customers and exhibitors alike. Please visit: www.sandpipergallery.org for more information and the application forms for artists and food vendors. • POLSON — The fun of Summerfest continues on Saturday, Aug. 13, starting at 9 a.m. with the Car Show on Main Street, the Sandpiper Art Festival, the Family Fun Day fundraiser for Lake County Search and Rescue at the Sports Complex (Kerr Dam soccer fields) and 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Poker Walk with seven local businesses. For more information call 406-8835255 or go to: andersonbroadcasting.com. • HOT SPRINGS — UL’ Fire Tribal Dance will entertain with belly dancing at the Symes Hotel from 810 p.m.

TUESDAY, AUG. 16 • RONAN — Ronan District Library is closed on the third Tuesday of each month. • POLSON — Missoula Self Help Law Center will be in Polson on Tuesday, Aug.16, at the North Lake County Public Library from 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. They will provide services on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Walk-ins are welcome all day or to schedule an appointment please call 406258-3428.

THURSDAY, AUG. 18 • POLSON — Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour (SPLASH) will take place on Thursday, Aug. 18, from 5-7 p.m. Your host will be Whitefish Credit Union located at 110 Third Ave. E. See you there.

SUNDAY, AUG. 14 • CHARLO — Montana Shakespeare in the Parks will perform William Shakespeare’s “The Comedy of Errors” Sunday, August 14 at 6 p.m. at Palmer Park west of Charlo, during its upcoming summer tour of 61 communities throughout Montana, northern Wyoming, eastern Idaho, western North Dakota and eastern Washington. The performance is free and open to the public. Audiences are encouraged to arrive early with chairs, blankets and picnics.

FRIDAY, AUG. 19 • POLSON — The sixth annual Flathead Lake Blues Festival will provide two evenings of great music on Friday, Aug. 19, and Saturday, Aug. 20. Friday’s music is from 6 p.m.-midnight, on Salish Point (on the shore of Polson Bay between Sacajawea Park and KwaTaqNuk Resort). Friday’s bands

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are: Robin Barrett and the Coyote Kings; The C.B. Woodbury Band; Polly O’Keary and the Rhythm Method; and Rand Oxford’s All Stars Slam! Tickets for both days are $40 in advance online or $50 at the gate or $20 for Friday only. Camping will be available. For more information, visit: flatheadlakebluesfestival.com. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy Hot Flash Blues, a ladies’ dance band, at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

SATURDAY, AUG. 20 • POLSON — The fifth annual Polson Triathlon will be held on Saturday, Aug. 20, at Riverside Park. The Polson Triathlon is a locally-run, locally-inspired Olympic distance triathlon. Please visit www.polsontriathlon.com for more information. Whether you are an experienced veteran, intimidated beginner or curious spectator, we hope that you will join us for a great day in Polson. Race starts at 8:40 a.m. Race capped at 200 racers. For more information call 406883-4567 or 267-664-3422. • PABLO – The annual Social Powwow at the People’s Center on Highway 93 in Pablo is open to all artists and vendors. This is a social gathering of native dancers, drums, and singers celebrating their different native dance styles. Vendors of native arts and crafts and food will have their goods available. (There will be no contest dancing.) For event times and more information call 406-675-0160. • POLSON — The second day of the sixth annual Flathead Lake

Blues Festival is Saturday, Aug. 20. Saturday’s music is from 4 p.m.midnight on Salish Point. On Saturday the bands playing are: Blue Moon (Missoula); Shufflebums (Livingston); West Coast Women’s Blues Revue (Oregon); and Chris O’Leary’s Band (New York). Tickets for both days are $40 in advance online or $50 at the gate or $25 for Saturday only. Camping will be available. For more information, visit: flatheadlakebluesfestival.com. • POLSON — The second annual Flathead Lake Festival of Art will be held Saturday, Aug. 20, from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sunday, Aug. 21, from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sandpiper Art and Gift Gallery presents its twoday juried show, held at the edge of the bay in Sacajawea Park. The event offers breathtaking views of the Mission Mountains, easy loadin/load-out access, onsite food vendors, and onsite ATM. Flathead Lake Festival of Art is a more critically juried festival, with an emphasis on fine art and fine craft. Fine artists and artisans are invited to apply. Go to www.sandpipergallery.org for more information. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy west coast blues favorites by Polly O’Keary at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

SUNDAY, AUG. 21 • POLSON — The second day of the Flathead Lake Festival of Art is Sunday, Aug. 21, from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. at Sacajawea Park. • HOT SPRINGS — The band Woodblind will perform acoustic music at the Symes Hotel.

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A TUESDAY, AUG. 23 • POLSON — Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main Street, presents “Fresh Perspective,” an exhibit featuring new Sandpiper artists Barbara Shrider (watercolor), Mark Sherman (Raku pottery), Denise Zemke (stained glass), Gail Trenfield (watercolor/photography), and long-time member artist Joanne Simpson (watercolor batik) and invited oil painter and pastel artist Helen Siemers from Tuesday, Aug. 23-Friday, Sept. 30.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 24 • CHARLO — The first day of school for Charlo schools is Wednesday, Aug. 24.

THURSDAY, AUG. 25 • GLACIER PARK — Entrance fees to Glacier National Park, as well as other units of the National Park Service, will be waived on Thursday, Aug. 25, through Sunday, Aug. 28, in commemoration of National Park Service birthday weekend. • POLSON — The Flathead River Rodeo, also known as the Indian National Finals Tour Rodeo is tentatively set to take place Aug. 25, 26 and 27. New sponsors are being sought at the time of publication. For more information call 406-8833636.

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be judged today from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. at the Sanders County Fair.

WEDNESDAY, AUG. 31 SATURDAY, AUG. 27 • POLSON — The annual Rotary Chili Cook-off will be held Saturday, Aug. 27 from 10 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Make sure you purchase your raffle tickets to help the junior golf program. Tickets are only $25 each or 5 for $100. There are six prizes to choose from: $1000 in cash, $1000 in groceries, $1000 in gas, 300-350 pounds of cut beef, a wine cellar of a minimum of 60 bottles of wine or two 2016 season golf passes to Polson Bay Golf Course. Need not be present to win. Tickets are available from Cameron in the Pro Shop at the Polson Bay Golf Course. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy boogiewoogie piano playing by Wayo at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

MONDAY, AUG. 29

FRIDAY, AUG. 26

• POLSON — The first day of school for Polson schools is Monday, Aug. 29. • PLAINS — The 2016 Sanders County Fair buildings open. Open class entries for arts, crafts and photography and home sewing and needlecraft are accepted today from 10 a.m. -8 p.m. (Home Economics Building) Non-preregistered open class entries will not be accepted.

• POLSON — A reception will be held Friday, Aug. 26, from 5-7 p.m. at the Sandpiper Art Gallery, 306 Main Street, for artists from the exhibit “Fresh Perspective.”

• PLAINS — Open class entries for arts, crafts and photography and home sewing and needlecraft will

TUESDAY, AUG. 30

• PLAINS — Open class entries for culinary arts, floriculture and horticulture are accepted today from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. (Agriculture Building) At 1 p.m. livestock, poultry and rabbits open class entries are accepted until 8 p.m. A veterinarian will be on-site to verify the health of all animals. Non-preregistered open class entries will not be accepted. • RONAN — The first day of school for Ronan schools is Wednesday, Aug. 31.

THURSDAY, SEPT. 1 • PLAINS — Open Class entries for culinary arts, floriculture and horticulture will be judged today from 10 a.m.-8 p.m. PRCA Bull Riding will take place in the main arena – Powder River Rodeo L.L.C.– at 8 p.m. Carnival, amusement, and midway concessions will also be available.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 2 • PLAINS — The Sanders County Fair continues with 9 a.m. Rodeo Slack in the main arena – no charge for admission. The buildings open at 10 a.m. At 3:30 p.m. the Chicks-N-Chaps event begins. The PRCA Rodeo takes place in the main arena at 8 p.m. Carnival, amusement, and midway concessions will also be available. • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy country and pop favorites played on the guitar and sung by Chris Kennedy at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

R SATURDAY, SEPT. 3 • PLAINS — The Sanders County Fair continues with a 9 a.m. open class Ranch Horse Show in the horse arena. The buildings open at 10 a.m. At 11 a.m. the Sanders County Fair Parade takes place in downtown Plains. Open class premium money will be awarded to blue ribbon winners at 1 p.m. The 4-H awards presentation will take place in the pavilion at 6:30 p.m. (For information regarding 4-H competitions contact: County Extension Office at 406-827-6934.) The PRCA Rodeo begins at 8 p.m. in the main arena. Carnival, amusement, and midway concessions will also be available. • CHARLO — The Ninepipes Museum of early Montana, located just south of Ronan, invites local artists to showcase their artwork on the first Saturday of each month, June-October, in the gift shop at the museum. Karen Fisher is guest for Sept. 3. • HOT SPRINGS — Jesse B. will play the guitar and provide vocals at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

SUNDAY, SEPT. 4 • HOT SPRINGS — A Labor Day barbecue with Andrea Harsell providing music will take place from 46 p.m. at the city park. • PLAINS — The final day of the Sanders County Fair begins with church services in the main arena at 10 a.m. Buildings open at 10 a.m. The 4-H market stock sale takes place in the 4-H arena at SEE PAGE 55

Friendly service. Fair prices. On-location rental cars.

Brendeon Schoening/Owner 53466 Hwy. 93 • Polson, MT • Office: (406) 883-3041 • Fax: (406) 883-3042

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1 p.m. Open class premium money will be awarded to blue ribbon winners. Demolition Derby begins in the main arena at 7 p.m.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 6 • DAYTON — The first day of school for Dayton schools is Tuesday, Sept. 6. • POLSON — Missoula Self Help Law Center will be in Polson on Tuesday, Sept. 6, at the North Lake County Public Library from 11 a.m.4:30 p.m. They will provide services on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Walk-ins are welcome all day or to schedule an appointment please call 406-258-3428.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 9 • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy blues music provided by John Kelley at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 10 • LAKESIDE — The fifth annual Montana Dragon Boat Festival will be held on Sept. 10-11, in Lakeside. The annual Montana

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Dragon Boat Festival brings family fun, spirited competition and colorful pageantry to Volunteer Park on Flathead Lake in Lakeside, just 10 miles south of Kalispell. For more information about registration and the festival, go to: MontanaDragonBoat.com. • HOT SPRINGS — Pamela Vankirk will provide “Coffee house contemporary” music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — “Worldwide Paintout” will be held on Saturday, Sept. 10, at Polson’s Riverside Park. Local artists join artists around the world for the 14th Great Worldwide Paint-out, sponsored by the International Plein Air Painters Group. Contact Margery Christensen for details on the local event, and visit IPAP for international events. • RONAN — The second annual Harvest Dinner is a celebration of local food and will be held on Saturday, Sept. 10, at 407 Main, from 6-10 p.m. Tickets are $1000 for a corporate table of eight, $50 for an individual and $25 for children 2-12 years old. This is a fundraiser to support Lake County Community Development Corp. For more information call 406-676-5901

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ext. 101. • POLSON — Chapter 1122 of the Experimental Aircraft Association will host the 18th annual Polson Fly-In at the Polson Airport on Saturday, Sept. 10, and admission is free. The public is invited to join pilots for an exciting day of aviation activities, beginning with a pancake breakfast at 8 a.m. There will be static displays, float-planes, antique aircraft, experimental airplanes, and home-builts. Concessions and raffles will be available. • DAYTON — Chief Cliff VFD annual fundraiser is all about “Patriotism” this election year and Dayton Daze will celebrate its 25th anniversary in style on Saturday, Sept. 10. This year also marks the 15th anniversary of 9/11—an event that drew our national community together in an inspiring show of patriotism and solidarity. For that reason, the theme for this year’s event is “Firefighters—the Heart of Patriotism,” and once again the festivities will take place at the Dayton Park. There’ll be a parade, kids’ games, booths, food, rifle raffle and a whole lot more. The entire community gets involved in this fundraiser, including the Dayton Church, Mission Mountain Winery, M O N T A N A

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Dayton Yacht Club and the Idle Spur. So come out and help us celebrate our silver anniversary by waving the stars and stripes, wearing your heart on your sleeve, donning some red, white and blue, or dressing as a firefighter. It’s good wholesome fun for the entire family and benefits a great cause. For more information call Zoe at 406849-5917.

TUESDAY, SEPT. 13 • PABLO – Native American Awareness Week activities take place September 13-16, at the People’s Center on Highway 93 in Pablo. This event is geared towards educating school children about Salish, Pend d’Oreille and Kootenai history, culture and traditions. The week’s activities and events are free and open to the community to participate in. See demonstrations of slicing and drying wild game, fry bread making, hide tanning, drumming and singing, and native dancing. There will be crafts for kids, native games, and tribal language demonstrations. For more information call 406-675-0160. SEE PAGE 56

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THURSDAY, SEPT. 15 • POLSON — Support Polson Late Afternoon Social Hour will be held Thursday, Sept. 15, from 5-7 p.m. Your host is Providence St. Joseph located at 6 Thirteenth Ave. E.

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• ARLEE — Save the date for the 12th annual Festival of Peace and the sixth annual Walk-A-Mile for Peace at the Garden on Saturday, Sept. 17. The all day free event begins at 10 a.m. People are invited to come together to pray for peace and harmony. There will guest speakers, live music, meditation as well as food and craft vendors. Call 406-726-0555 or go to: www.ewambuddhagarden.org/, for more information.

• POLSON — Lake County High School Rodeo, held at Polson Fairgrounds, is tentatively set for Sept. 16-17. Watch as the girls and boys participate in a wide range of rodeo activities: barrels, saddle broncs, goat tying, breakaway and possibly sports shooting. There will be a great concession stand complete with homegrown Montana M O N T A N A

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beef direct from our valley. For more information and to confirm the date, call 406-676-7600 or 406-544-8836. • HOT SPRINGS — Hot Flash Blues, a ladies’ dance band, will provide music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

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TUESDAY, SEPT. 20 • POLSON — Missoula Self Help Law Center will be in Polson on Tuesday, Sept. 20, at the North Lake County Public Library from 11 a.m.-4:30 p.m. They will provide services on the first and third Tuesdays of each month. Walk-ins are welcome all day or to schedule an appointment please call 406258-3428.

FRIDAY, SEPT. 23 • HOT SPRINGS — Tin Cup will provide bluegrass music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

SATURDAY, SEPT. 24 • HOT SPRINGS — Enjoy blues

music provided by John Kelley at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m. • POLSON — Mission Valley Christian Academy will be hosting a fun night under the stars at their Island Dreams Fundraising Auction and Dinner at the Red Lion on Saturday, Sept. 24. You won't want to miss the opportunity for great vacation packages, world class fish sculpture, area certificates and more. All proceeds benefit MVCA. Admission/dinner tickets are $25 each, doors open at 5 p.m. and dinner is served at 6:30 p.m. For more information call MVCA at 406-883-6858. • GLACIER PARK — Entrance fees to Glacier National Park, as well as other units of the National Park Service, will be waived on Saturday, Sept. 24, in honor of National Public Lands Day.


R E G U L A R L Y FRIDAY, SEPT. 30 • HOT SPRINGS — Pamela Vankirk provides “Coffee house contemporary” music at the Symes Hotel from 8-10 p.m.

REGULARLY SCHEDULED EVENTS MONDAYS • POLSON — NAMI Mission Valley/LAC meets the first Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m. at Journey Be Church/Soup’s On, 101 Seventh Ave., W. For more information, call 406-883-1086. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library will host Mother Goose Time, a half-hour program, at 10 a.m., for infants and toddlers. Mother Goose is here and always ready to do nursery rhymes and stories with her friends. The North Lake County Public Library is located at 2 First Ave., E. in Polson. For more information call 406-8838225.

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• POLSON — “Makerspace Mondays” is a program for preschool-aged children through teenagers that takes place from 13 p.m. on Mondays at North Lake County Public Library starting June 6. • POLSON — The Lions Club meets at 6 p.m. each month on the first and third Mondays at the Lake Bar and Grill, 101 Main Street. For more information, call Jan Phillips at 406-370-4714.

TUESDAYS • ST. IGNATIUS — The St. Ignatius Neighborhood Watch chapter meets on the third Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the St. Ignatius Senior Citizens’ Center on north Main Street. • PABLO — The People's Center Performance Dance Circle takes place every Tuesday from 5:307:30 p.m. and is sponsored by SAMHSA. Call for more information and to register at 406-675-0160. • POLSON — The Northwest

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Montana Beekeepers group meets on the fourth Tuesday of each month at 6:45 p.m. at the HUB, 401 Main Street. There will be a potluck followed by a meet and greet. Come with your ideas and questions. Current and prospective beekeepers are welcome. Please RSVP to northwestmtbeekeepers@gmail.com.

WEDNESDAYS • POLSON — The Marine Corps League meets every second Wednesday of each month at 7 p.m. at the VFW on Main Street. For more information call 406-8900964 or usmcfox21@gmail.com. • PABLO — The D’Arcy McNickle Library’s Storytime includes stories, crafts and activities for children of all ages. Storytime takes place on Wednesdays at 10:30 a.m. The library is located on the SKC Campus. For more information go online at RonanLibrary.org or call 406-676-3682. • HOT SPRINGS — Are you affect-

ed by someone else’s drinking? AlAnon can help. Area meetings are anonymous, non-smoking, 12step recovery for family and friends of alcoholics. Come join us. There are no membership dues. Meetings are held Wednesdays at 9 a.m. at Lutheran Church on Wall Street in Hot Springs. • POLSON –– AlAnon meetings take place on Wednesdays at noon in Polson at the Alano Club on Third Ave. W.

THURSDAYS • POLSON — A free "Night at the Museum" event takes place at the Miracle of America Museum, 36094 Memory Lane, on the fourth Thursday evening of each month. Programs start at 6:30 p.m. Treats and donations are happily accepted. Call 406-883-6804 if you have questions. • POLSON — North Lake County Public Library invites you to a “Youth Writing Club” on Thursday SEE PAGE 58

Arnie’s Not just oil, ® Pennzoil . Oil change specialists.

Arnie’s Gas & Tire Center 63145 US Hwy 93 • At the stoplight in Ronan

676-0400 “Your Mission Valley Tire Headquarters.” M O N T A N A

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takes place at the People’s Center in Pablo every Friday, all year long, from 1-4 p.m. Local bead workers come to together to work on their projects or to help new bead workers learn to bead. Everyone is welcome. • POLSON — North Lake County Library will have Friday Flicks and Game Days for children and teens on alternating weeks. The North Lake County Public Library is located at 2 First Avenue E. For more information call 406-883-8225. • POLSON — Polson’s Farmers Market will be held every Friday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. through the summer season. The market is held in downtown Polson on Third Ave. W, between Main Street and First Street W. For questions or more information please call 406-6750177. Like Polson Farmers Market on Facebook for more updates. • ARLEE ¬–– The Farmers Market will open Friday, June 3. The market will be every Friday, 4-7 p.m., through the end of September and is located at the Pow Wow Junction Shops, 34306 Pow Wow Road. The Farmers Market in Arlee has fresh produce, pastries, hot food and locally handcrafted items. For more information go to: www.facebook.com/groups/Farmer sMarketArlee/. • POLSON –– Are you affected by someone else’s drinking? AlAnon can help. Area meetings are anonymous, non-smoking, 12-step

SUMMER CALENDAR FROM PAGE 53

afternoons at 1 p.m. starting June 6. Thursdays are also the library’s day for children’s “Big Events.” For more information call the library at 406-883-8225 or go to northlakecountylibrary.org. No Storytime the week of July 4. • RONAN — Ronan District Library’s weekly Storytime includes stories, crafts and activities for children of all ages. Storytime takes place on Thursdays at 10:30 a.m. The library is located at 203 Main Street SW. For more information visit: RonanLibrary.org or call 406676-3682. No Storytime the week of July 4. • RONAN — Ronan Flower Mill, 106 Main Street, is the location for the weekly Ronan Farmers Market held on Thursday from 3-7 p.m. through the summer season. • ST. IGNATIUS — Are you affected by someone else’s drinking? AlAnon can help. Area meetings are anonymous, non-smoking, 12step recovery for family and friends of alcoholics. Join us. There are no membership dues. Meetings take place on Thursdays at 5:30 p.m. at the CMA Church on Third Ave. in St. Ignatius.

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recovery for family and friends of alcoholics. Come join us. There are no membership dues. Meetings are held Fridays at 8 p.m. at the Presbyterian Church on Fourth Ave. E in Polson.

SATURDAYS • RONAN — The Ronan VFW, 35981 Round Butte Road, will serve breakfast from 7 a.m.-noon the first Saturday of every month. Prices are $7 for adults and $5 for children 12 and under. Everyone is welcome. Profits help with VFW expenses and running the car show in Ronan. • POLSON — The first Saturday of each month from 6-9 p.m., a Birthday Bash/Open Mic Night/Potluck will take place at the Co-op HUB, 401 Main Street. Anyone who enjoys playing or listening to live music is welcome and we’re celebrating all birthdays in the month. Bring a cake or food to the potluck. Invite your friends and family for this fun and entertaining event. • POLSON — The Montana Co-op will hold a Farmers/Flea Market every Saturday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m., at 401 Main Street. Buy, sell, trade, or give things away. You may rent a table for $10. Buy and support local merchandising. Reserve a table by calling 406290-2070. Musicians are welcome; come play for tips. Food will be available for purchase.

• POLSON — Soul-food Saturday is a community gathering at the Co-op HUB every third Saturday starting at 5:30 p.m. Community members are invited to share prayers, readings and discussion on a different topic of interest each month. The gathering will be followed by a light meal. Kids of all ages are welcome; supervision is provided.

SUNDAYS • POLSON — Weekly Sunday “Barefoot Church” services are from 1-2 p.m. at the Montana Coop. Come as you are. Bask in the Spirit, no judgment, just love and worship, forgiveness and healing. • POLSON — A “Celebrate Recovery Group” meets every Sunday evening for any hurt, habit, or hang-up, from 5-8 p.m. at the Polson Foursquare Church. All are welcome to attend. For more information call 406-883-9347 or go to: www.polsonfoursquare.org. From 5-6 p.m. dinner is served; from 6-7 p.m. music and teaching/testimonies takes place. From 7-8 p.m. discussion groups gather and dessert is served. All are welcome. • ST. IGNATIUS — AA Women’s Wing and a Prayer Group meets on Sundays at 4 p.m. at the Methodist Church on Post Creek Hill. Call 1-888-607-2000 or go to: www.aa-montana.org, for more information.

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P O L S O N Located at the base of Flathead Lake, 70 miles north of Missoula and 51 miles south of Kalispell, Polson is Lake County’s seat and has a total population of 4,488.*

School District #23 Schools: Cherry Valley Elementary School (grades K-1) Linderman Elementary School (grades 2-4) Polson Middle School (grades 5-8) Polson High School (grades 9-12) Valley View School (grades K-6) Dayton Elementary School (grades K-6) Private School: Mission Valley Christian Academy (grades K-12) Hospital: Providence St. Joseph Hospital Library: North Lake County Public Library

Polson City Commission meetings are the first and third Mondays of the month at 7 p.m. at City Hall. For more information about Polson, visit the Polson Chamber of Commerce: www.polsonchamber.com *

based on 2010 census

Suffering With Pain? Prolozone is a nutritional/oxygen injection technique developed and pioneered by Dr. Shallenberger MD. It is excellent for all forms of musculo-skeletal and joint pain including chronic neck and back pain, rotator cuff injuries, degenerative and arthritic hips and knees, degenerated discs, and shoulder and elbow pain. The good thing about Prolozone is that because it actually corrects the pathology of the disorder, there is a 75% chance for the chronic pain sufferer to become permanently pain free.

Conditions That Can Be Treated With Prolozone

Prolozone works on just about any pain problem you might have, including: • Neck pain • Whiplash • Degenerated or herniated discs • Low back pain • Plantar fasciitis

• Carpal tunnel syndrome • Torn tendons • TMJ syndrome • Sciatica • Heel spurs

• Neuromas • Tennis elbow • Rotator cuff tears • Knee injuries • and virtually any other sports injury

Because Prolozone treatments also result in cartilage regeneration, the technique is also remarkably effective even for severe cases of osteoarthritis of the hip or knee.

The good thing about Prolozone is that it is not just a treatment for pain. The results actually represent a permanent fix.

Mission Healing Arts For any questions or an appointment please call our office. Dr. Katie Carter, N.D. 420 1st Street E., Polson, MT Naturopathic Physician 406.883.4325

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B U S I N E S S Appliance Care 805 Main Street Polson, MT 5960 (406) 883-3904 Eagle Bank 80 Heritage Lane Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-2949 www.eaglebankmt.com East Shore Smoke House 35103 MT Highway 35 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 887-2096 www.eastshoresmokehouse.com

Lake County Construction and Demolition Landfill 39276 Kerr Dam Rd. Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-5412

Polson Chamber of Commerce 418 Main Street Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-5969 www.polsonchamber.com

Pop’s Grill $1.00 fresh, hot coffee 214 Main Street Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-1115

Lake County Transfer Station and Recycling Center 36117 N. Reservoir Rd. Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-7323

Polson Farmers Market Third Ave West Downtown Polson (406) 675-0177 or (406) 261-5700 Check us out on Facebook!

Providence St. Joseph Assisted Living 11 Seventeenth Avenue East Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-1011

Mission Mountain Natural Foods 319 Main Street Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-2847

Polson Flathead Historical Museum 708 Main Street Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-3049 www.polsonflatheadmuseum.org

Napa Auto Parts 49560 US Highway 93 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-5251

Fiesta En Jalisco 110 Main Street #10 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-5854 www.fiestaenjalisco.net

Nifty Thrifty 417 Main Street Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-3443

Glacier Lake Sand & Gravel 37246 Caffrey Road Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883- 3773 www.glacierlakesandandgravel.com

D I R E C T O R Y

93 Discount Coaster Fine Furniture • Dining sets • Sofas • Recliners • Bunk beds

Polson Health 106 Ridgewater Drive Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-3200 www.kalispellregional.org Polson Outdoor Equipment 705 First Street East Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-RENT (7368) www.polsonrental.com

Richwine’s Burgerville 50567 Highway 93 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-2620 www.richwinesburgerville.com Subway 50033 Highway 93 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-9202 Super 1 Foods 50331 Highway 93 Polson, MT 59860 (406) 883-2498 www.super1foods.com

Full Service Lawn Care & Landscaping

• Weekly mow schedules • Leaf & grass clean-up • Fertilizing • Thatching

Discount Prices New & Used Furniture, Appliances and Bedding 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Mon. thru Fri.• 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sat.

63616 US Hwy. 93 S • Ronan, MT 59864

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Commercial & Residential • Licensed & Bonded

(406) 529-2876 • (406) 676-3722


R O N A N Located 56 miles north of Missoula and 14 miles south of Polson along Hwy. 93, Ronan is a community based largely on agriculture with a population of 1,871.* * based on 2010 census

School District #30 Schools: Pablo Elementary School (grades K-4) K. William Harvey Elementary School (grades K-6) Ronan Middle School (grades 6-8) Ronan High School (grades 9-12) Private School: Glacier View Christian School (grades K-9) H o s p i t a l : St. Luke Community Hospital L i b r a r y : Ronan City Library

Ronan City Council meetings are held the first and third Mondays of the month at 6 p.m. at City Hall. For more information about Ronan, visit the Ronan Chamber of Commerce: www.ronanchamber.com

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D I R E C T O R Y

Bagnell Family Dentistry Dr. Timothy Bagnell, DDS Dr. Jon Beard, DDS Ronan, MT (406) 676-8880

Lake Seed Inc. 35822 Spring Creek Rd. Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-2174

Ronan Area Chamber of Commerce Hwy. 93 next to Community Bank Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-8300 www.ronanchamber.com

Valley Bank 63659 Highway 93 S. Ronan, MT. 59864 (406) 676-2000 www.valleybankronan.com

Dobson Creek Coffee Company 319 Main Street Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 261-5845 www.dobsoncreekcoffee.com

Les Schwab Tire Center 63360 Highway 93 Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-7800

St. Luke Community Hospital 107 Sixth Ave. SW Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-4441 www.stlukehealthnet.org

Valley Journal 331 Main Street Ronan, MT. 59864 (406) 676-8989 www.valleyjournal.net

Harvest Foods 63802 Highway 93 S. Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-3301 www.harvestfoods.com

Napa Auto Parts 10 Main Street SW Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-5700

Twice But Nice 229 Main Street SW Ronan, MT 59864 (406) 676-2727

Wright Real Estate P.O. Box 725 63228 Highway 93 S Ronan, MT 59864 www.westernmontanaland.com

Assisted Living at its finest 11 Seventeenth Ave. East Polson, MT • Private Apartments • 24 Hour Care • 3 Meals Daily • Personalized Assistance • Beauty Salon/Barber Shop • Housekeeping/Laundry • Activities

883-1011

Call Marion Cooper or Jennie Jorgenson for a tour.

The Straight Answer People

RV OIL CHANGES ROUTINE OR MAJOR MAINTENANCE • FRIENDLY, HONEST Automative Service

CALL TODAY (406) 676-2886 K-O Auto Inc, & Fast Lube

Providing top quality auto, truck and RV repair for over 20 years! 100 Kennedy St. SE • Ronan M O N T A N A

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P A B L O Located 62 miles north of Missoula and 60 miles south of Kalispell off of Hwy. 93, Pablo serves as headquarters for the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Indian Reservation. Pablo is also home to Salish Kootenai College. Population: 2,254.* Public Schools: Pablo Elementary School (part of School District #30, grades K-4) Private Schools: Two Eagle River School (grades 7-12) Salish Kootenai College (Tribal College) Learn more about the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes by visiting their website at: www.cskt.org Learn more about Salish Kootenai College by visiting their website at: www.skc.edu

B U S I N E S S

D I R E C T O R Y Salish Kootenai College 58138 Hwy 93 Pablo, MT (406) 275-4800 www.skc.edu

Quick Silver Express Highway 93 Pablo, MT (406) 675-5000

* based on 2010 census

C H A R L O Located 55 miles north of Missoula and 5 miles east of Hwy. 93 on MT Hwy 212, Charlo is a small town rooted in farming and ranching with a population of 379.*

School District #7 Schools: Charlo Schools (grades K-12)

B U S I N E S S Ninepipes Lodge/Allentown Restaurant 69286 Highway 93 Charlo, MT 59824 (406) 644-2588 www.ninepipeslodge.com

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Ninepipes Musem of Early Montana 69316 Highway 93 Charlo, MT 59824 (406) 644-3435 www.ninepipesmuseum.org

* based on 2010 census


S T . I G N A T I U S Located 43 miles north of Missoula on Hwy. 93, St. Ignatius is Lake County’s oldest town founded in 1854 by Jesuit missionaries, and has a population of 842.* The Mission Church, more than 100 years old, is adorned with beautiful frescoes and murals and is open daily to visitors. School District #28 Schools: St. Ignatius Elementary School (grades K-5) St. Ignatius Middle School (grades 6-8) Mission High School (grades 9-12)

B U S I N E S S Mission General Store 61307 Watson Road St. Ignatius, MT 59865 Turn East on Airport Rd to Watson Rd (follow signs) (406) 745-7200

St. Ignatius Town Council meetings are held the first Tuesday of every month at 7 p.m. at City Hall. For more information about St. Ignatius visit www.stignatiusmt.com

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Mountain View Cenex 240 Mountain View Drive Just off Highway 93 St. Ignatius, MT 59865 (406) 745-3634

Stuart’s Napa 153 N. Main Street St. Ignatius, MT 59865 (406) 745-2190

A R L E E Located 26 miles north of Missoula on Hwy. 93, Arlee is a developing community grounded in the arts with a population of 636.* Arlee is also home to the annual Arlee Celebration and Powwow.

School District #8J Schools: Arlee Elementary School (grades K-6) Arlee Junior High (grades 7-8) Arlee High School (grades 9-12) Private Schools: Nkwusm School (grades preschool-8) Library: Jocko Valley Library

The Arlee Community Development Corporation meets the second Wednesday of each month, September through June, at 4:30 p.m. at Valley Bank. For more information about Arlee visit www.arleemontana.org

* based on 2010 census

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Open Daily Lunch 11:30 a.m. Dinner 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. (9 p.m. summer) Fri. & Sat. 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. (10 p.m. summer)

Full service bar for your favorite cocktail or 10 Montana Craft Beers on tap, plus 60 of the best beers in bottles

View our menu at:

www.eastshoresmokehouse.com

35103 MT Hwy 35 Just North of Finley Point Rd.

(406) 887-2096

Summer Guide 2016  
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