Page 1

JAPAN SPECIAL THE OPTICAL PERSPECTIVE ON NIPPON

DESIGN WALK IN PARIS FACE TO FACE WITH PASCAL JAULENT

MODO IN SOHO A DOWNTOWN NEW YORK INTERVIEW

STYLIST’S OWN FOUR INSIDERS PROVIDE STYLING UPDATES

GO SEE IN KOBENHAVN A MODEL’S TRAVEL DIARY

HITTING THE STREETS SPECTR PHOTO SHOOTS IN NEW YORK, SÃO PAULO, CAPE TOWN, HAMBURG, DUSSELDORF, BERLIN...

GERMAN ENGLISH Nr 17 – ii/2016 EURO 15,–


design by 路 made by


/a n d y w o l f e y e w e a r

/a n d y w o l f o f f i c i a l


MODO.COM | T +39 02 4399 8986 | E EUROPE@MODO.COM

6.8 grams flexible colorful


E D I TO R I A L

is the new

Spiritually speaking, some theories maintain that humans evolve in seven-year cycles. Every seven years, we are renewed and enter a new stage in our lives. In today‘s age of consumerism, these changes are mostly signaled by outward appearances: a new car, a new partner, a new job or style of dress can serve as expressions of our personal development. The magazine you are reading is subject to the same cycles. Seven years ago, we set out to develop a magazine to showcase the entire eyewear universe. We opted for the name Eyewear, an analogy to our other publication; a footwear magazine named Sneakers in the same vein of Wysiwyg – What you see is what you get. In our editorial approach, Eyewear always puts the main focus on what‘s essential – the actual glasses. But our magazine deals with topics beyond just mere products. Eyewear is about so much more than just the materials and processes involved. That‘s

why Eyewear has always covered aspects such as fashion and design, together with the people behind the brands and the products; their drive and their creativity, their will to create something extraordinary. It‘s about brands, images, visions. Supplemented by inspiring photographs and artful backdrops, those are the kinds of stories we all live for: From the models displaying eyewear on sets around the world, to stylists choosing the perfect wardrobe, all the way to make-up artists fine-tuning their appearance and the photographers behind the lens who capture it all for your viewing pleasure. By definition, we are a special interest magazine, which allows us to dig deep into the stories we cover. But we‘re also free to let our gaze wander a bit to the right and left, and off the beaten path, which our readers seem to enjoy. Looking ahead into the future, we want to continue this journey, but after seven years, the cycle is shifting towards renewal. 22


E D I TO R I A L

The name Eyewear no longer lives up to our approach. So while the editorial approach continues on its evolutionary path, it‘s time to shed some skin: Eyewear is changing its name to Spectr. But why Spectr? The easiest response is that we all really like how the name sounds: short, confident – a good match for our magazine. We think Spectr is upscale and exclusive, much like the eyewear we‘re showcasing. Need more interpretations? Okay, to give a very product-oriented explanation, Spectr also represents Spectacles, thereby covering the actual category we‘re here to celebrate: eyewear. Spectr also stands for the full spectrum of stories, people, and experiences our magazine sets out to cover. It‘s a spectrum including fashion, design, photography, and stories full of passion and dedication. Last but not least, there‘s a literal angle:

Spectr also sounds like specter; a ghost or phantom, if you will, with an air of mystery and fascination that‘s very much our style, and very similar to the fascinating products that keep drawing us – and our readers – into the whole wide world of eyewear. Welcome to Spectr.


Harry S. - Designer - wearing ‘Harry S.’ Awright? Harry hails from merry old England and crossed the channel to join our design team, which we think is positively smashing. Being British, Harry enjoys tea, a good bargain, talking politely about the weather, bangers & mash and losing at cricket. Before he dies, Harry would like to play a live DJ set for the Queen. Just quietly, I reckon Betty would go off. Innit.

Meet the faces behind the glasses at www.ic-berlin.de/crew


WELCOME To Issue 17

Around the World „Around the World“ is not only hands-down our favorite Daft Punk song, but has pretty much been our modus operandi ever since our very first issue. And don‘t be fooled by the endless loop of the chorus in Daft Punk‘s somewhat monotonous club hit from 1997 – it‘s not monotony we‘re after. We‘re going around the world in search of something new to enjoy and strive to aim our cameras at sights unseen. For the current issue, our photographers and stylists have once again been racking up bonus miles on international

photo shoots, including a carnival school in Sao Paolo and New York City‘s model scene. Cape Town has always been a favorite of ours, and we present two photo shoots from the vibrant South African city, followed by a short excursion to Naples and a Go-See Shoot in Copenhagen. Back home in Germany, we unearthed some marvelous locations, including the Pan-Am Lounge in Berlin, a historic villa in Wiesbaden, and an industrial wasteland in Duisburg, among others.


HAMBURG DUISBURG

BERLIN

DUSSELDORF WIESBADEN MUNICH

COPENHA

PARIS NEW YORK

NAPLES

Sテグ PAOLO CAPE TOWN


AGEN

TOKYO

So yeah, we‘re in search of all the variety we can get. And here‘s another major difference between Daft Punk and this magazine: We‘re all about shining a spotlight on interesting faces, as opposed to hiding them behind masks. And what better place to really portray people‘s personalities than visiting them in their own habitat? That‘s why we visited Giovanni Lo Faro at Modo headquarters in Soho, New York, went for a stroll with Face à Face founder Pascal Jaulent in the Parisian Le Marais borough and met Morten Gammelmark at copenhagen specs tradeshow. Meanwhile Thomas Akiyama of eyewear brand Makellos shared some inside perspective on the Land of the Rising Sun for our Japan Design Special, which introduced us to a nice selection of dedicated opticians in Tokyo. Around the world, around the world. Good luck getting that song out of your head now, we hope you‘ll enjoy this new issue.


INSIGHT – MEET THE PEOPLE BEHIND THIS ISSUE The name may have changed, but we‘re once again starting things off by showcasing three creative minds responsible for making this issue another success – and send big thanks to them and the entire team. After all, we couldn‘t publish our magazine without the initiative and dedication of all the photographers, stylists, models, and hair & make-up artists who always go the extra mile to make it happen.

Anyone who‘s ever experienced one of our photo shoots knows what it‘s like when all these pros spring into action. In this issue‘s Insight segment, we‘re highlighting the co-publisher and editor of our sister publication, Sneakers Magazine, Holger von Krosigk, together with photographer Angelika Buettner, and stylist Jennifer Kalaitzis. Here we go...

HOLGER VON KROSIGK, CO-PUBLISHER & SNEAKERS-EDITOR Usually, Holger von Krosigk‘s day revolves around products worn, not on the face, but slightly below the ankle line: The sneakers expert and former pro skateboarder is a co-publisher behind Sneakers Magazine, and part of our editorial offices in Cologne. His job frequently takes him around the world on missions for brands such as Nike, adidas, and New Balance. For a recent product release event, the 41-year-old traveled to New York, where he met up with Modo Eyewear‘s Giovanni Lo Faro. After a meet and greet at the company‘s stylish Broadway offices, Holger shot the photos for this issue‘s Modo Brand Profile, followed by fennel soup and homemade pasta at Giovanni‘s favorite Italian spot around the corner...


INSIGHT – MEET THE PEOPLE BEHIND THIS ISSUE

ANGELIKA BUETTNER, FOTOGRAFIN

JENNIFER KALAITZIS, STYLISTIN

This issue marks the second time we feature the works of Angelika Buettner. The well-traveled photographer enjoys a reputation for sensitive, dramatic images full of feminine aesthetics informed by her love for artistic diversity. Much like her last shoot in 2015, this issue brought her to freezing New York City in Spring – but with a major surprise: On the morning of the photo appointment, she was surprised by the New York Marathon – and all roads were closed, forcing Angelika to unload her photo equipment from the car and hop on the Metro, right at the height of rush hour. But despite the slight turbulence and rather „rushed“ subway trip, the shoot went smooth as butter (quite a feat in itself, with nine models on set!). For the results, witness all the fresh new faces captured in Angelika‘s unique style in our spread NY Social Hub. Shot above the New York rooftops, it‘s a new spin on “high” art.

How do you tell stories without using words? Answer: With style. Fashion is a language of its own, and Jennifer speaks it fluently – as we could see during a recent fashion shoot in Dusseldorf. As it turns out, fashion and storytelling have been Jennifer‘s main passions ever since her childhood in an artist family. Her upbringing might also be the reason why, after earning her degree in Literature and Media Studies, she enrolled in the Fashion Styling Program at Saint Martin‘s College in Central London. As the author of inspired outfit concepts, Jennifer tells her fashion stories in the name of national and international magazines, as well as brands and advertising clients. For our 17th issue, she supplied her unique perspective in telling the story of The Matrix and the Carrera Collection Shoot.


IMPRESSUM EDITOR IN CHIEF

Sacha Tassilo Höchstetter

Spectr is published three times

Stefan Dongus

Stefan Kapfer

per year.

dongus@spectr-magazine.com

Det Kempke

m: +49.(0)151.14271817

Caro Ross Raphael Schmitz

LAYOUT

Holger von Krosigk

Caro Ross

Lukasz Wolejko-Wolejszo

ross@spectr-magazine.com

PUBLISHER CONTRIBUTORS

Monday Publishing GmbH

Dirk Vogel

Kamekestr. 20-22

Piera Montenero

50672 Köln

Enting Zhang

t: +49.(0)221.945267-11

PROOFREADING

www.spectr-magazine.com

Franca Rainer

TRANSLATION English Version Dirk Vogel

ONLINE EDITOR

f: +49.(0)221.945267-27 www.facebook.com/spectrmagazine

This magazine and all its contents may not be re-used, distributed or stored in electronic databases in any way without prior written permission from the publishers. All inquiries regarding the usage of copyrighted materials, as well as the reproduction of excerpts in other formats must be directed to the publishers. The opinions reflected in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the publishers. All rights reserved.

CEOS Stefan Dongus, Holger von Krosigk

DISTRIBUTION

JAPAN SPECIAL

JAPAN SPECIAL

ESSENTIALS AUS DEM LAND DER AUFGEHENDEN SONNE

THE OPTICAL PERSPECTIVE ON NIPPON

DESIGN WALK IN PARIS

DESIGN WALK IN PARIS

FACE TO FACE MIT PASCAL JAULENT

FACE TO FACE WITH PASCAL JAULENT

MODO IN SOHO

MODO IN SOHO

A DOWNTOWN NEW YORK INTERVIEW

A DOWNTOWN NEW YORK INTERVIEW

STYLIST’S OWN

STYLIST’S OWN

PROFI-EINKLEIDER ZEIGEN IHRE LIEBLINGS-OUTFITS

FOUR INSIDERS PROVIDE STYLING UPDATES

GO SEE IN KOBENHAVN

GO SEE IN KOBENHAVN

A MODEL’S TRAVEL DIARY

A MODEL’S TRAVEL DIARY

Piera Montenero

DPV Network GmbH

press@spectr-magazine.com

Postfach 570 412

German

22773 Hamburg

PHOTOGRAPHERS

dpv-network.de

cov e r-photos ULRICH HARTMANN s t ylin g JOCHEN POHLMANN h air & m ake -up THEO SCHNÜRER re touch STEPHANIE WENCEK mod els MICHAEL LOVE & NINA MILNER a t ICE MODELS

Tomaso Baldessarini Marie Bärsch

PRINT

Angelika Buettner

F&W Mediencenter GmbH

Stefan Dongus

Holzhauser Feld 2

Daniela Glunz

83361 Kienberg

Ulrich Hartmann

fw-medien.de

Carina Jahn

HITTING THE STREETS

HITTING THE STREETS

SPECTR SHOOTINGS IN NEW YORK, SÃO PAULO, CAPE TOWN, HAMBURG, DÜSSELDORF, BERLIN...

ENGLISCH DEUTSCH 17

SPECTR PHOTO SHOOTS IN NEW YORK, SÃO PAULO, CAPE TOWN, HAMBURG, DUSSELDORF, BERLIN...

EURO 15,–

D: 9,– € | AT: 11,– € 4 192153 509007

GERMAN ENGLISH Nr 17 – ii/2016

Nr 17 – ii /2016 CH: sfr 14,50

English

gl a ss e s MODO »680 « & ØRGREEN »3 F ee t Hi gh«


l e f t

a n d

r i g h t :

c a z a l

8 0 2 8

|

m i d d l e :

c a z a l

8 0 3 3


INTERVIE W

MODO –THE GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE

In New York with Giovanni Lo Faro t e x t DIRK VOGEL , por tra it HOLGER VON KROSIGK , s t ills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ


INTERVIE W

On paper, New York-based eyewear company Modo not only looks impressive, but downright intimidating: Founded in 1990 by entrepreneur and design aficionado Alessandro Lanaro, the style-driven brand with offices in Soho, Milano, and Stockholm is home to house brands Modo and Eco – together with upcoming labels Derek L am, Jason Wu, and 7 For All Mankind – distributed in over 50 countries, and cherished by celebrities including Leonardo DiCaprio, Sheryl Crow, Reese Witherspoon, and Jessica Alba. Not exactly the Little Leagues, right? But instead of lording it over the eyewear industry from high upon an Ivory Tower, Modo maintains a humble outlook and respect for the craft, as we learn upon meeting the company’s managing director, Giovanni Lo Faro at their sleek Soho headquarters. “We want to be a brand that’s not out of this world, but connected to the everyday lives of people. Yes, we are design-oriented and into sophisticated things, but we don’t want to be the guys that are to cool for school,” said the native of Northern Italy who joined Modo as a partner in 2006, and now divides his time between New York and Milan with deep hooks into all aspects of the company. For this issue’s interview, here’s the soft-spoken Italian about Modo’s ecological and social mission, innovation with a sense of purpose, and the importance of designs that “whisper” rather than shout from the rooftops.


INTERVIE W

Hi Giovanni, the title “managing director” sounds a bit broad in such a multifarious, multinational company. What exactly is your role at Modo? I am a partner in the company, involved in all sides of the business, and primarily in expanding it outside of North America. I met Modo founder Alessandro [Lanaro] in 2003, a time when I was in Milan working in a consulting startup and exploring projects in furniture design with some friends. When Alessandro told me he was looking into expanding the company outside North America, I was intrigued by the idea. We stayed in touch and I joined the company in early 2006 in New York, after spending some time in Madrid for a Master’s in Business. Two years later we opened our office in Milano. Alessandro and I work with the design team and make decisions with them, so I’m directly involved in brand identity and marketing aspects. And although I’m not a designer, I’ve always craved to have something design-related in my life. The main reason why I joined Modo really was my interest in design. Speaking of design, when was the very first time you looked at a product or object and realized the importance of design? Probably when I was a very small kid, at age 3 I could already recognize all the dif-

ferent types of cars on the street and point them out to my dad and grandfather. That was perhaps the first time I was struck by design. It always remained a side passion in my life. Now this side passion has brought you to a pretty plush office in New York. Are you fully based here in the city now? Officially, I am in between New York and Milano, but it fully depends on the season. My family is here in New York as of recently, so we are spending more time here. I love both cities, though. I was born two hours south of Milan on the coast, so when I initially joined Modo and we talked about launching the company in Europe, Milan was just a logical choice. And Modo now also has offices in Stockholm, what is the connection? The three cities are really part of the company’s evolution, and I think a strong competitive advantage. The design office we now have in Stockholm was opened because Alessandro moved his family there after 25 years in New York, since his wife is Swedish and he wanted his kids to grow up in Europe as well. But it’s also a story of three cities that are very much connected to design. This is what we live and breathe every day. We are both entrepreneurs and Alessandro is a big inventor.


INTERVIE W

breathe this fresh air in these three very different cosmopolitan cities that are very active in design. I would say it’s a unique advantage we have over other companies, always being connected to new trends and inspirations. On that note, where do you find Pa p e r-T hi n » 4 4 0 4 « inspiration? Every day! Here in our Soho office, we share a building with one of the biggest modeling agencies in New York. So just in our building every day, we get to see the beautiful models and how they dress, which gives us an idea of what is going to happen in fashion over the next seasons. The same thing in Milan and Stockholm – we are in the center of the city and connected to the latest in creativity and design. And they’re also cities with a strong heritage for minimalistic design – which is really what we are about here at Modo. Good point, let’s talk about the company history and heritage. What makes Modo what it is Yes, we have to travel a lot and it is pain today? ful sometimes as it costs time and energy. The key concept has always been funcBut at the same time, we constantly get to tional, minimalistic design. Style always

So the fact that we move between cities that are so connected to design allows for a very spontaneous connection. You must really be racking up some miles in between offices and visiting shows…


INTERVIE W

connected to function, but not necessarily level of quality for this type of price point. going be-yond it. We’re still very much And with a sartorial approach, based on true to Modo’s original tagline from 1990, individualism – not the fashion brand telling you what is cool, but the consumer “Eyewear for the Individual.” finding their own styles and offering them How does that kind of philosophy differentithe best possible quality and craftsmanate you from, let’s say, a fashion brand? ship. So with our next evolution in R&D, With a fashion brand, it’s very much about we continue our focus on classic and tradibeing part of a group that defines a certional constructions, but now tain style. We rather want moving into innovations that to be a brand in which you “I love style »4404«, as make a functional difference define your own individual it fits perfectly with the to the user. style and use our glasses to concept of Paper-Thin. So Paper-Thin is really the express yourself, with their The look is very retro, unique combination of style start of more innovations to with the round shape connected to function. It’s come? and the double bridge, really minimalistic, inspired while the construction is With Paper-Thin we found by architecture that always that we can mix retro style extremely modern and serves a purpose rather than functional. The gold and with high technology, with just decoration. And we also black option has received a concept that is more funcwant to be easy to wear and tional – the form and color a lot of attention and approachable, which is also and warmth of a plastic frame many in our team are reflected in our communicawith the lightness and flesporting it.” tions. xibility of a metal frame. Recently you have been pushing innovations Modo Lab and our R&D has evolved the and patented technologies, like the PaperPaper- Thin constructions into additional technologies, like last season’s Metal Thin Titanium collection. Is that the next Core Acetate (MCA), an acetate frame that step in the positioning? looks traditional but with the support of Research and development is really one a high-technology core. Essentially it’s a of the latest evolutions for our company. thin sandwich of plastic with a thin layer When we started Modo, the concept was of metal inside it that achieves the thinnest very much about offering an unparalleled


INTERVIE W

acetate frame we know about at only 2.8 mm instead of the usual 4 mm. But with the necessary resistance to keep its shape. Your favorite style of the Paper-Thin collection? It’s the »4404«. Your current “baby” is the VS1 collection in cooperation with Italian industrial designer Valerio Sommella. What is the story? It’s a capsule collection with a bit of a different approach, because the usual collaborations are with other brands and famous names. Valerio Sommella, hence the name VS1, is also working with well-known design brands like Alessi. He never designed eyewear before, so he is outside the box we work into every day. We told him take the Paper-Thin concept and play with it as much as he likes, and the result is a capsule collection that is still an evolution of our brand DNA, but a bit more directional in terms of design and with a strong color statement and design language. When it comes to retail, how do you help shops and boutiques tell the VS1 story? With a very selective distribution model, working with the top opticians and boutiques and a slightly different marketing strategy. With Valerio and our in-house creative team, we created a dedicated advertising campaign and point of sale ma-

terials, so that VS1 can sit next to the main Modo collection, or stand on its own. In both cases you can feel the family feeling, as it remains a capsule within the Modo brand. A gentle touch, if you will? We prefer to whisper more in what we are doing and not shouting about it. Our design is less “in your face” and more about subtle details. Many times we get criticized for being too delicate at what we do. But I kind of like it this way and think our customers, the ones who are more discerning, really understand what we are after. A lot of big name celebrities are apparently hearing the whispers. Do you find them or do they find Modo? Well, to drop just two names, Leonardo DiCaprio and Sheryl Crow both paid for their glasses. We are very proud of saying that, as we are not just gifting celebrities day and night, which we sure have done, but these two important people wellknown for their tastes actually came and bought our frames. That must feel great. And beyond the products, you also pursue a sense of mission with your company? When we launched the Eco brand, we pledged to plant a tree for every frame purchased. So far we have reached almost


INTERVIE W

1.5 million trees planted around the world, And finally, what will you be doing five minuwhich is a strong achievement, and later tes after the interview? we brought the same way of thinking with Nail down a few more projects, because it’s an intense period as we are fully in Modo’s “Buy a Frame - Give Frame” and the season and growing strongly. Then go have now given several hundred thousand home and pick up my son. We also like frames to people in need. We don’t want to that time outside of work, you know, when be too cheesy or intense about it, but feel it we can. is important to have mission in the world apart from just having a business. And ma- Thanks for the interview, Giovanni. king a tangible impact beyond it.

“The VS1 »Stendhal« is an exciting and standout sunglasses model with an oversized feminine round shape.”

“The VS1 »Vetra« is a one-of-a-kind unisex frame. I love it for the unique rounded shape, and silver titanium with a contrasting white rim.”

V S1 » S t e n d h a l«

V S1 »Ve t ra «


Thomas Kretschmann for MAYBACH - ICONS OF LUXURY

ACCESSORIES

EYEWEAR

LEATHER GOODS

SADDLERY

MAYBACH Icons of Luxury GmbH | Germany | www.maybach-luxury.com www.facebook.com/maybachluxury | www.twitter.com/maybachicons | www.instagram.com/maybachluxury

„Maybach“ and the „MM“ logo are subject to intellectual property protection owned by Daimler AG. They are used by MAYBACH Icons of Luxury GmbH under licence.


BY ULRICH HARTMANN a ss i s t a nt RENÉ PFERNER s t ylin g JOCHEN POHLMANN h ai r & m a ke - up THEO SCHNÜRER a t BLOSSOM MANAGEMENT with CHANEL & REDKEN mo d el s NINA MILNER & MICHAEL LOVE a t ICE MODELS re touch SOPHIE SCHWARZENBERGER ca r h i re MARCUS HOELPER loca t ion CAPETOWN


LEISURE SOCIET Y »T ilm a n « d re ss JOSEPH


PERSOL » 8 6 49 « sh i r t COS


LEISURE SOCIET Y »A nt i b e s« top FR ANZISK A MICHAEL , sk i r t ISABEL DE HILLERIN


ØRGREEN »Moon S a fa r i « pu llo v e r Y3

ØRGREEN »3 F e e t H igh « d re ss TIM L ABENDA


ØRGREEN »3 F e e t H igh « d re ss TIM L ABENDA


MODO »680« sh i r t COS, shor t s OUR LEGACY


MODO »680« pu llo v e r Y3

MODO »680« d re ss TIM L ABENDA


BURBERRY »3 0 8 5 - Q « sh i r t COS, p a n t s DRIES VAN NOTEN, s a n d a l s BIRKENSTOCK


ANDY WOLF LOVE » E loi s e « d re ss JOSEPH


winner


l o v i n g str angers welcome to our

p a r a l l e l u n i v e r s e

d e s i g n e of the mont n o v e m b e 2 0 1

r h r 4


L A B E L U P D AT E


L A B E L U P D AT E

HAPTER

3 Years / 3 Steps t e x t DIRK VOGEL

It’s always been about discovery for Italian brand Hapter, ever since co-founders Eric Balzan and Mirko Forti found a pair of World War I military mountain goggles in a glacier near their hometown in the Dolomite Mountains, inspiring them to create their own line of eyewear. Through trials and tribulations, Hapter created a unique process for manufacturing frames inspired by their mountainous environment and the “haptic” feel of textured materials. Celebrating three years in the business, Hapter announces three major milestones. First of all, the brand recently launched a com-

pletely redesigned website. At www.hapter.it visitors find a brand new documentary film detailing the unique production process: The film Uncovered is a curtain drawn back on Hapter’s detail-oriented manufacturing method for the TXTL001 collection, forging together surgical-grade stainless steel frames with military-inspired textile fabrics by iconic Italian manufacturers Cerruti Woolen Mills. Secondly, the brand recently brought its entire manufacturing chain in-house by setting up “Hapterìa”; a workshop in Belluno, their secluded Italian village nestled amidst the Italian Dolomite Mountains. Housed in-


L A B E L U P D AT E

»M 02 M « C oll e c t ion T X T L 0 01


L A B E L U P D AT E

side the ancient burg of Borgo Prà, locally famous for its century-old tradition for sword production, “Hapterìa” provides the perfect backdrop for pioneering new manufacturing techniques. “At the beginning it always seems what we have in mind cannot be done, but then we start thinking with our reckless and unspoiled ideas, and a concrete design contribution, until we work it out and make it reality,” said designer and co-founder Eric Balzan. On that note, the third milestone is the introduction of the next product innovation:

Hapter’s new RBBR001 collection continues the tradition of forging opposites together. Using 500-year-old blacksmithing techniques applied to Hapter trademark production process, RBBR001 combines meticulously textured rubber – thus the name RBBR – with lightweight stainless steel, this way achieving a super-slim and at the same time highly functional design with special haptic feel. With this said, after three years the journey of discovery continues for Hapter. Stay tuned for more.


ST YLIST’ S OWN

“Stylist’s Own” is a term often found in the credits for a photo shoot, when the stylist brought in products and accessories from his or her own collection – often some time-proven favorites. In this issue‘s shoot, the stylists‘ own faves are not making models look better, they are rocked by the stylists themselves. Action!

photos STEFAN DONGUS

Rolf Buck

01

gl a ss e s LUNET TES KOLLEKTION b a g p a c k JOST sho e s VI-LITE VIBR AM G so c k s FALKE p a nt s SECOND HAND j e a n s sh i r t MONKI v e s t MONKI ja c k e t HANDMADE BY R APHAEL HÖPFNER h a t REINHARD PL ANK r i n g OPENING CEREMONY b ra c e l e t TINA LILIENTHAL e a r r i n g SPITALFIELDS MARKET

“Obsessed with fashion – style with a smile” www.rolfbuck.de


GO SEE

GO SEE IN KOBENHAVN

A Travel Diary from Marijana Jurcevic photos STEFAN DONGUS, re touch STEPHANIE WENCEK , mod el MARIJANA JURCEVIC a t MOST WANTED MODELS

IC! BERLIN » S op h i a P. «


GO SEE

What could be more exciting than visiting the world’s greatest metropolitan cities? And when it comes to Europe’s top cities, Copenhagen is definitely up there with the best of them. Especially when the hottest Scandinavian eyewear tradeshow, Copenhagen Specs, shows an international mix of brands in a historic locomotive venue in the heart of the city. With so many brand new eyewear models on display, we decided to take the trip in early March. And we brought models of our own – but we‘re not talking about eyewear only. We took the lovely Marijana Jurcevic from Berlin along to the tradeshow to model the latest eyewear styles. And if you ever wondered what a trip to Copenhagen Specs looks like through the eyes of a model, here’s Marijana’s travel diary: 40 hours in Copenhagen, the photo model perspective.


GO SEE

GÖTTI »Ta m al- S «

Day 2, 8:50 PM, on an Intercity train from Frankfurt to Stuttgart. I’m on my way back from a weekend trip to Copenhagen, trying to decide what is stronger: My tiredness and the wish to just close my eyes for a few moments, or the need to write down what I experienced over the past 40 hours. My sense of mission prevails – and I also need to show up for the next job tomorrow – so I’m using the chance to jot down my impressions while they’re still fresh. But let’s start from the beginning, because our story really starts twelve days earlier.

SA LT. »B row e r«


GO SEE

CPH – 5 days ago I get to pick a list of frames from the editorial office‘s inventory that suit my style. I end up going with a majority of rounded frames... They’re just really my thing, you know.

CPH – 12 days ago When I see a listing “Model wanted for Copenhagen” on Eyewear Magazine’s Facebook, I respond in an instant. This could be a great break from the usual routine of fashion shoots. And Copenhagen, of course, is also a huge attraction. The Danish fashion and design metro-polis has been on my list of places to visit for a long time now. Let’s hope I can come out on top against the competition, looks like a lot of people are responding to the Facebook callout.

Here are my choices: • The super light and stylish Modo »4404«. • The Ic! Berlin »Sophia P.« – a perfect circle. And hip. • Götti’s »Tamal-S« model – also perfectly round and just gorgeous. • The Reiz »R20 T.04 B1«. It doesn’t get more sophisticated. • Also Ørgreen’s »Propellar« – exactly how I imagine cool, Danish design. • The »Barrantes« model by Andy Wolf – a statement for self-confident wearers. • During the tradeshow, I will also pick up the »Brower« by Salt. Classic. Thin lines. Outstanding.

CPH – 1 day ago Just one day before my departure I’m booked for a modeling job in Stuttgart. Born and CPH – 10 days ago raised as a local in the city, I use the opportuApparently I’m projecting the right attitude nity to go out for the job, as only two days later, my telepho- on the town with some old friends. Unforne rings. Copenhagen is a go! I’m really happy. tunately, I end up losing track of time for a bit,


GO SEE

and my train to Frankfurt airport is leaving at 5:00 AM the next day – much too early for my tastes. Big shocker, one hour of sleep will have to do for the night.

CPH, Day 1 10:15 AM At Copenhagen Airport I meet up with editor Stefan. I hope he doesn’t notice that I’m completely sleep deprived and really just longing for some shut eye right now. I’m really glad to hear that he’s also had a long night and not exactly looking to start shooting photos right away. This gives me an opportunity to get some rest and bring my appearance up to par for photo shoots. Copenhagen, here I come.

1:30 PM The photo shoot is on. After each new frame, we change locations. And the city has enough backdrops to fill an entire magazine. I almost wish we brought more glasses. Stefan is really excited about his new camera, and it does look pretty cool. We shoot the Modo, Ic! Berlin, Götti and Reiz frames. I’m also getting creative with my phone, after all, this 12:30 PM much action begs to be captured on InstaThe weather is miserable, wet and cold and gram and Snapchat, somehow a must these somehow the sun is not really showing in the days... sky. But since the forecast for Sunday is even worse, we head straight to the harbor from 4:00 PM our hotel. For me as an architect, the city is a We’re gradually making our way towards real design showcase – one building is more the Locomotive Venue, where copenhagen amazing than the next, the perfect backdrop specs tradeshow is happening this weekend. for shooting photos. Except, I wish it wasn’t Right upon walking in the door, I can’t help so cold... but notice that the eyewear industry really


GO SEE

MODO »4404«

is one big family. Everyone seems to know one another. We use the backdrop of the old industrial buildings to capture the Ørgreen frames, before finally heading to the warm indoors. We get the tour from Morton, the founder of the tradeshow, who leads us through the building. The atmosphere is great. Wait, here’s a cool background to catch the Salt. frames. Then it’s lots of small talk, and I make sure to chronicle everything on Snapchat. Stefan seems a tad bit annoyed, but hey, tough life.

ØRGREEN »P rop e ll a r«

6:00 PM We catch an Uber (works excellently in Copenhagen) to Vesterbro, Copenhagen’s bohemian quarter, where we explore trendy


GO SEE

cafés and shoot the final frames of the day, the Andy Wolf model. Then it’s off to the hotel for a quick stop. 8:30 PM We join 200 tradeshow visitors at BioMio restaurant in the Foodpacking District. Morton rented out the entire venue and we have a seat at his table. To my left is a resident optician, to my right a British eyewear designer by the name Claire Goldsmith, or

something like that – both are extremely delightful. The food tastes amazing. So does the Moscow Mule, and the one after that. 11:15 PM Folks are getting restless at BioMio. We join lots of other guests heading over to the Ørgreen-Party at Blume, a popular club downtown. The Moscow Mule is a bit sweeter here, but you can get used to it quickly. I meet lots of interesting people, but by the end of the night can’t remember any of their names. Everyone wants to know about the nature of my connection to the magazine. After the fifth drink I simply respond that just


GO SEE

bought it, which attracts some suspicious looks, but sure beats rehashing the same old explanation. Over all this dancing I forget to shoot more Snapchats, but you can’t win ‘em all. 02:45 AM Batteries are empty. Uber. Hotel. Down in the lobby some guys try to interest me in some beer brought in from Bavaria. Their faces look somewhat familiar. Stefan hesitates. I’m out. Good night.

CPH, Day 2 10:20 AM Well rested – up and at them. I skip breakfast at the hotel since check out is at 11:00 AM. Fortunately, we’ve shot plenty of photos yesterday, because the weather today proves to be even worse. It’s actually snowing. So we head to a cozy café to start the day off right. 2:40 PM Making our way around town, we happen upon a sightseeing boat about to depart at Gammelstrand. We hop on board and spend the next two hours under the boat’s


GO SEE

REIZ »R 20 T. 0 4 B1«


GO SEE

ANDY WOLF WHITE HE AT »B a r ra nt e s«

Marijana Jurcevic, Berlin 31 years 176 cm Most Wanted Models Mari Jana memarijana memarijana

glass roof learning all kinds of trivia about Copenhagen from the audio guide, including a short stopover in the scenic Nyhavn neighborhood. Very relaxed. Seeing a city from the water makes it look even better.

4:30 PM We depart in Christianshavn and head over to the Copenhagen Food Market. In terms of individual offerings and vendors, this is a league above what I’m used to at Markthalle Neun in Berlin. Every single stand looks entirely different. Every vendor marches to his own drum. I hook up some sweet potato fries. Snapchat time.

5:15 PM We’re not going to make it Christiania today, but from what I’ve heard it’s not that great anymore due to weekly raids by the police. It’s always nice to leave some things for your next visit. We hit an Uber to the train station and head to the airport. My flight leaves at 6:45 PM. Despite the bad weather, Copenhagen has made a lasting impression on me. The Danes are very friendly people. The non-Danes are super friendly as well. Everything is permeated by design: the fashion, the architecture, the food, and naturally, the eyewear. I can’t wait to come back – but during the summer.


IN DUS T R Y INSIGH T

photo STEFAN DONGUS

When it comes to staying updated on the latest eyewear styles in Scandinavia, tradeshow copenhagen specs is the “place to be�. The rather young tradeshow is generating major buzz and attracts visitors beyond the Northern hemisphere. We wanted to learn more about the unique format and spoke to Morten Gammelmark, who also shared some reasons why Copenhagen is always worth a visit, even outside tradeshow season.


IN DUS T R Y INSIGH T

MORTEN GAMMELMARK COPENHAGEN SPECS Hi Morten, this year the show at the old locomotive workshop, Lokomotivværkstedet, opened its doors for the third time. What was your initial idea behind this show? I created copenhagen specs out of love for the eyewear industry. I really love the different styles of design, the different materials, and the stories behind the brands. But I didn’t want to create “just” another eyewear show out of many... What is different compared to other shows? Our main focus is on the products, so booths have to be open. And we have our own overall design parameters with the wooden back walls and small, open booths. At copenhagen specs, every exhibitor is equal no matter how big a company. There is one DJ playing music, instead of

everyone playing their own, and the over 100-year-old Lokomotivværksted just creates a unique atmosphere that you can’t find anywhere else. Everyone from the eyewear industry is welcome in a friendly atmosphere. Is this a purely Scandinavian show? The main goal is to become the show every Scandinavian optician has to visit. However, as the years have gone by, we have visitors from all over the world. This year we had visitors from more than 20 countries – as far away as Japan, Australia, Sri Lanka, Canada. For the official dinner party, you booked the complete BioMio restaurant. Why did so many people show up? We were 215 people from copenhagen


IN DUS T R Y INSIGH T

at the restaurant – a great mix of exhi- Copenhagen? bitors and visitors. So many came because Christiania, Amager Strandpark (the new a big part of going to a show in Denmark is beach in Copenhagen), Papirøen (“Street the social networking. At dinner you finally food heaven”), Værnedamsvej, and Langelfind the time to talk to old colleagues and inje (The Little Mermaid). other exhibitors and visitors. Now that the show is done... will you enjoy Why should future show visitors spend at your ten month holidays? least two more days in your city? (Laughs) Of course not! I will have a week They should at least spend a day at the off and then I will start planning the show show. The booths are open and not that for 2017, talk to the exhibitors and visitors big, so within a short time you can get an to figure out how to make the show even overview of all the new trends in eyewear. better next year. It’s very important to lisThen visitors can use a day or two to exten to all the advice from my partners. They perience the fantastic city of Copenhagen. are the main ingredients in the show – not The great food, the tourist attractions, and me. If they are happy, I am happy and have the shopping venues. succeeded with the show. What are your TOP 5 places to visit in specs


FACE À FACE »P i x e l 1« b i k i ni RVCA , b ra c e l e t SWAROVSKI, b a c k p a c k BILL ABONG

FACE À FACE » S wi m m 3« s w i m s u it COUNTRY ROAD, r i n g SWAROVSKI


BY MARIE BÄRSCH h air & m ake -up KATI MERTSCH mod els ELLEN & MORGAN a t BOSS MODELS CAPETOWN pos t p roduc tion DGTL-CRAFT car RETRORENTALS CAPETOWN loca tion CAPETOWN


IC! BERLIN » S of i a P. « s w i m s u it COUNTRY ROAD, r i n g SWAROVSKI, b ra c e l e t SWAROVSKI


IC! BERLIN »Ma i k O. « b i k i ni DIMITRI, b ra c e l e t SWAROVSKI


CAZAL »958 « b i k i ni BILL ABONG, b a c k p a c k BILL ABONG


CAZAL »9 0 62« b i k i ni VINTAGE , b ra c e l e t s SWAROVSKI


BOZ »N a pl e s« b i k i ni BILL ABONG, b ra c e l e t SWAROVSKI


J . F . R E Y 19 8 5 »V ip e r« b i k i ni top H& M, b i k i n i b ot tom VOLCOM, b a c k p a c k BILL ABONG


FHONE » C rosb y « s w i m s u it COUNTRY ROAD, b ra c e l e t SWAROVSKI


CONTEMPORARY FASHION TRADE SHOW

28 - 30 JUNE 2016 ARENA BERLIN

WWW.SEEKEXHIBITIONS.COM


BY SACHA TASSILO HÖCHSTET TER a ss i s t a nt RAFAEL AVANCINI s t yl i n g LUCIANO BORTOLOT TI a t BESOCIET Y h a i r & m a ke -up PAULO FILATIER & ANDRÉ MAT TOS mo d el s MARI MARIANO CALAZAN a t WAY MODEL MANAGEMENT & VICTORIA SCHONS a t ELOMANAGEMENT s p e c i a l t h a n k s to A .C.A . E .S.M. CAMISA VERDE E BRANCO loca t ion SÃO PAULO

FLEYE »Pe t r i « d re ss ROBER DOGNANI, s a n d a l s VITOR ZERBINATO


SA LT. » E l k i n s« d re ss SAMUEL CIRNANSK

SA LT. »Ta f t« d re ss AMAPO


KBL

KBL

»J a m a i c a B a y «

»R e a l L o v e «

t re n c h co a t VITOR ZERBINATO

d re ss ROBER DOGNANI, sho e s CARMEN STEFFENS


OLIVER GOLDSMITH

OLIVER GOLDSMITH

»K e w «

»H a m ps t e a d «

t re n c h co a t VITOR ZERBINATO, s a n d a l s SANTA LOLL A

d re ss SAMUEL CIRNANSK


MOSCOT

MOSCOT

»F ra n k i e «

»Z e v «

d re ss TAR ANTUL A PAR A CASA JUISI, s a n d a l s SANTA LOLL A

d re ss VITOR ZERBINATO


SA LT. »F e t e r m a n « d re ss TAR ANTUL A PAR A CASA JUISI


ORIGINALS COLLECTION ORIGINALS COLLECTION ORIGINALS COLLECTION ORIGINALS COLLECTION a. Notfrom derived from something else; and unusual: a. Not derived something else; fresh andfresh unusual: a. Not derived from something and unusual: an original notfresh anelse; adaptation a. Not derived from something andfresh unusual: an original play, notplay, anelse; adaptation an original not an adaptation an original play, notplay, an adaptation b. An authentic work of art b. An authentic work of art b. An authentic work of art b. An authentic work of art c. Awith person with a creative or personality unusual personality c. A person a creative or unusual c. Awith person with a creative or personality unusual personality c. A person a creative or unusual

ORIGINALS COLLECTION ORIGINALS COLLECTION a. Not fromelse; something else; fresh and unusual: a. Not derived fromderived something fresh and unusual: original not an adaptation an original an play, not anplay, adaptation b. Anwork authentic b. An authentic of art work of art A person withoraunusual creativepersonality or unusual personality c. A personc. with a creative

Dj Testing some records at atParadiso Store. Picture Aaron Smith. wz:Awwz: Testing some at atParadiso Store.Store. Picture by AaronbySmith. Awwz:records Testing some records Paradiso PictureSmith. by Aaron Smith. Dj Awwz:Dj Testing some records Paradiso Store. Picture by Aaron Dj Awwz: Testing some records at Paradiso Store. Picture Aaron Smith. Wears Ferlandina CLGD , from Etnia Barcelona Originals All Rights © bySmith. wwz: Testing some records at Paradiso Store. Picture by Aaron andina CLGD , from Etnia Barcelona Originals Collection. All Rights Reserved © Reserved Wears Ferlandina CLGD , from Etnia Barcelona OriginalsCollection. Collection. Wears Ferlandina CLGD , from Etnia Barcelona Originals Collection. All©Rights Reserved © All Rights Reserved

Wears Ferlandina CLGD , from Etnia Barcelona All Rights erlandina CLGD , from Etnia Barcelona Originals Originals Collection.Collection. All Rights Reserved © Reserved ©


THE RE ASON WHY

THIRTY-NINE, NINETY. In euros, 39.90 is the exact cheap price to catch a budget flight from Berlin to Naples, Italy, where we shot this picture. In Germany, 39.90 is also the title of the Jan Kounen movie 99 Francs (2007) about the life and times of highflying advertising creative Octave Parango, who is at the top of his game – both professionally and in terms of womanizing – but still veering out of control. A famous photographer had recommended this movie when I was just starting out in my career, and somehow it has occupied a dear place in my heart ever since. It reflects so many aspects of the life as a creative professional I’m sure many of us can relate to. And although the movie was set in Paris, I chose Naples for this shoot as a tribute to 99 Francs, probably because the city radiates the right amount of creative chaos and rugged charms. The modern, upscale design of Alain Mikli eyewear posed the perfect contrast to the Naple’s often run-down cityscapes. Go see the movie if you have a chance and book a flight to Naples – or both. You won’t regret it.

photo LUKASZ WOLEJKO -WOLEJSZO a t COSMOPOLA s t yl i n g FABIANA VARDARO a t BASICS BERLIN h a i r & m a ke -up FABIANA AMABILE mo d el MARC-OLIVIER SOULACROUP a t NOLOGO


THE RE ASON WHY

ALAIN MIKLI »A03 057«


ANNIVER SARY

J. F. REY LIMITED EDITION 1985 Coming from the 80s

» O f f ic e r«

»V ip e r«


ANNIVER SARY

photo RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

One year after celebrating his 30th brand anniversary, Jean-François Rey is injecting the eyewear market with fresh retro styles: The new 1985 Collection is a throwback to the wild eighties, a time when company founder J.f.Rey laid down the design DNA behind his eponymous brand. As an homage to iconic eyewear styles from the year 1985, the French designer is bringing back some

iconic models with a contemporary touch. And did we mention that supplies are limited? Each model is only available in a run of 500 pieces, while the retro shapes are crafted using latest materials for the ultimate in comfort, quality, and lightness. In this issue‘s Anniversary feature, we get up close and personal with two select models from the limited 1985 Collection line-up.


ANNIVER SARY

Elegance with a bite: For the »Viper« model, J.f.Rey is drawing on the cool elegance of the famous snake species. The petrol-black color structure is reminiscent of snake skin, while the ornamental wire above the crossbar and around the lenses creates golden accents and a classic look in combination with coffeebrown tinted lenses. On the other side of the spectrum, the »Officer« model marches to a more classic drum. The fully golden wire frame and slightly beige acetate coating lend an air of

official status to the glasses. But it‘s not “official” to the point of boredom: For an extra spark of flair, the color dots in black and dark brown contrast nicely with the overall transparent colorway like countless miniscule flower petals. The release of the eighties-inspired retro frames will be accompanied by a coffee table book featuring the photography of Joëlle and Jean-François Rey for an inside look into the history of the brand. The eighties have never looked more alive.


OWP Brillen GmbH, www.metropolitan-eyewear.de


BRAND PROFILE

BROOKLYN SPECTACLES Glasses from the  “new”  New York photo RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

»T h e Ma k e r«

Back in the old days, New York City was all about Manhattan and Wall Street and the cosmopolitan charms of the Big Apple. This left neighborhoods across the East River, mainly Brooklyn, playing second fiddle for a long time. But as we all know, those days are over and Brooklyn has emerged as a global fashion and design hotbed – just don‘t

call it the Hipster Capital of the World, please – supplemented by a thriving scene of galleries, boutiques, museums, and design agencies. In this new wave of creative expression, the Williamsburg neighborhood is becoming a focus for start-up companies and independent labels gravitating around Bedford Avenue as its main artery.


BRAND PROFILE

»T h e Wa n d e re r«

Right in the heart of Williamsburg is where upcoming eyewear brand Brooklyn Spectacles has set up their flagship store. The company was founded in 2012 by Jenny Ma, co-owner of New York optical stores Luxeye Optical as an homage to Brooklyn: Jenny Ma‘s love for her borough looms large over the collections, as every single model is named after streets and locations in this young,

energetic, and vibrant part of town. From a design perspective, Jenny Ma creates her eyewear for creative minds in search of frames that express their personality. The recently launched Wood Collection has been well received all across the world, featuring wood-like structures on acetate frame surfaces for an incredibly soft appearance in modern and lightweight frame designs.

»T h e L e a d e r«


D E S I G N TA L K

FACE-TO-FACE WITH FACE À FACE Design Walk with Pascal Jaulent photos STEFAN DONGUS, s tills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

When it comes to brands with a clear market positioning, Paris-based label Face à Face sets a shining example: Their playful designer frames can be found at select optical boutiques around the world as the darlings of a predominantly female audience. Out on the streets, the striking Face à Face designs can be spotted instantly, not just because of their generous shapes but also their intense colorways. It‘s no a “girls only” brand, either, as the line-up also features masculine models, supplemented by the in-house label Alium with a penchant for strong designs crafted from lightweight aluminum. Rounding out the offering, the two other labels in the portfolio of design company Architectures include Woow and Bocca, both with their own respective brand identities and design DNAs. For the inside perspective on the company, we follow art director and president Pascal Jaulent on a leisurely afternoon stroll around the winding alleys of his favorite neighborhood Le Marais. And to make this a truly unforgettable day, the 56-year-old threw in a visit to the Picasso Museum, some real-life home cooking, and a historic timeline of the aristocratic district, all narrated while switching fluidly from English to German, and – forgetting our somewhat challenged vocabulary – to French. Here‘s our Design Walk and Talk with Pascal Jaulent.


D E S I G N TA L K


D E S I G N TA L K

taurants. We founded our company 21 years ago not »Misha 1« very far from here and I try to preserve some of the neighborhood‘s avant-garde spirit in our collections. Let‘s start from the beginning: You studied economics and worked for big companies like Nestlé and Dior. How come you ended in the eyewear business? I liked working for Nestlé and Dior, but these companies were simply too big to me – too big for allowing a young guy to confront himself with »Adict 3« what I thought could be the real business life. I left Dior after five years as the controller of the Maison de Couture. I had the chance »Philo 2« to work as the manager of Lafont, which gave me a chance of getting to know the eyewear market closer F a c e à F a c e . L o v ely color s . . . thanks to Philippe Lafont. And I loved this universe, as it is incredibly international, technical, Pascal, it‘s nice to meet you face-to-face in fashionable, and above all, very human. the Le Marais. Is this your favorite area? Later on you started your own company. Indeed, Le Marais is one of the oldest historical areas of Paris and managed to retain What was your initial motivation to do this? One of my passions is architecture, and most of its original flair. It has become a modern architecture especially. When I home for many artists, designers, craftstried to gain an understanding of eyewear man shops, as well as small cafés and res-


D E S I G N TA L K

Keeping in mind that the process of choodesign, I quickly realized the many parallels sing eyewear for yourself is an initial face in the ways architects and eyewear designers to face, the brand Face À Face has a strong go about their work. And I wanted to psychological background. Our eyewear is create a platform to live and express these a piece for one’s temperament; a personal insights. object meant to express more than words. Is this parallel also the reason why you have Another essential dimension is the manuchosen Architechtures as the name for your company? Yes, our company’s name Architechtures comes from this original concept, since before deciding our »Marty 2« collection’s name Face À Face, I had to create the legal entity with a company’s name. In today’s fashion and design world, quite many people refer to architecture, but 21 years ago, that was quite a new perspective. Speaking of today, there are many eyewear brands on the market, but Face À Face is holding a unique proposition. How would you describe it? Face À Face is about a modern, artful harmony uniting avant-garde concepts and shapes designed according to an in-house created golden » Sharp 2« ratio with emotional expressiveness. Many feminine shapes are designed to express seduction and audacity, men’s frames are shaped to . . . with thre e -d im e ns ion a l a n d b ol d sh a p e s . express strength, for example.


D E S I G N TA L K

I am 56 now and the constant through these years has been that I am a very active person. I‘m always ready for the next thing, since experience in a fresh mind is constant reminder of what is possible and exciting out there. Just an observation: You look much younger. After such a long time at work... what do you like the most in the eyewear business? The people. If you do not like people, don’t do this job. What exactly is your job at Architechtures? Besides running the company, I would define my job as Creative Director. These responsibilities include so much more than just creating a design for a simple frame. What is your approach to design? Design is about experimentation, challenging new horizons, a constant search for novelty How many styles do you have to design over the course of, let‘s say, one year? My team and I are designing more than 100 models every year. »K 4« Why work with a team – is designing all these frames too much on your own? A l i u m : T he n a m e s a ys it . Of course! That‘s why I am S t ron g d e s i gn s w ith g re a t vol um e . working with a wonderful in-

facturing: Ever since the beginning we have stayed true to our manufacturers in France and Italy, because a unique product gets its finish from a skilled and experienced hand. While talking about experience and keeping in mind that you have done quite a lot before you started the company 21 years ago – is it correct to assume that you must be well into your fifties?

»Ray 2«


D E S I G N TA L K

ternal team and some freelance designers, all very talented. But as a perfectionist, I go through every detail with every single one of them. Why do you think it‘s important to work with freelance designers? Creation needs fresh air, new blood and freelance designers help me and the internal team to challenge the usual make and bring in some common sense, and good taste. Would you say that the eyewear design process is underestimated? Combining the technical commitments, the trend and fashion dimension, the newness of the concept, the human dimension, the unfailing ability of the eye to see any fault, all this makes eyewear design very demanding. But I do believe that everyone underestimates the sum of knowledge, skills, techniques, and talent required for any creation or production. Which design elements are the signature features of Face À Face? Many of our features can be found in the creation of architectural projects, including function, transparency, comfort, newness, B : S e x y le g s . art, aspects, colors, proportions. Going deeper into this, in what way would you compare the brand‘s eyewear to architecture? The most conceptual answer would be: the fundamental approach to seeing eyewear as a project. Shaping your universe, shaping your look and personality. Which characteristics can be found in the glasses that resemble “French” design occa

style? All of us are very cultural animals and I have to admit that I reproduce and filter all these elements that I have been raised and live with. It‘s really all about Paris – a taste for the new and the beauty, a certain attitude, an expression of specific French cultural values for women and men, certainly a skill at creating a certain feminine ideal, also largely influenced by my Paris fashion background. Does this background also explain your well-known propensity for exceptional color-concepts? I am member of the Comite Français de la Couleur, a French inter-professional association active in color research, trends, symbolism. This dimension is extremely important in my work. Aside from colorways, what do you think sets your frames apart from others? What makes the brand so unique? I really hope that all the conceptual and creative elements that I mentioned in the interview amount to quite an interesting background. Would it be ridiculous if I tell you that I am trying to give a soul to the frames, a presence that will positively expresses the wearer and tell more than words? Ever since the founding of the company, what has changed style-wise? Maybe you can call it maturity. Would you say that at this point in time, Face À Face is a fashion label? I would be proud if I could give that dimension to Face À Face. Fashion is not


D E S I G N TA L K

futile; it does express your identity and lets you be part of today. It is essential, especially for young people. Fashion is youth. With your distinct styles and various colors... is Face À Face a feminine brand? Avant-Garde fashion, colors, aspects – all these are rather feminine values, whereas men tend to be more into technology, performance. That‘s probably why we sell more women’s frames, and the offering of Face À Face is more known for feminine frames. But we are recently seeing a strong increase in men’s acetate frames. I believe strongly that creativity is equally a men’s and women’s dimension. Your line-up not only covers men and women‘s eyewear, but also different aesthetics through a distinct selection of labels. Please explain the idea behind this multibrand-strategy. Nadine Roth and myself have been working constantly on new stories, new collections. As a result, we have created three more collections over the last five years: Woow, Alium and Bocca, all based on very different strategic concepts. What are the key characteristics of these three brands? Starting with Alium, since Face À Face is mainly selling to women, I developed Alium on the basis of performance, technology and an athletic spirit. Alium frames are twice as light as titanium and feature exceptional flex hinges for comfort, backed by unique technical solutions for functional issues. And Bocca was a follow-up to a creation

project initiated by the magazine LYF, where I expressed the surrealistic Mae West sofa of Salvador Dali in eyewear frames. And I turned it into a reference product, a coup de coeur, a frame whose temples are in the shape of legs that provide a new dimension to the frame. With Woow we aim to reach younger people. We created Woow five years ago on a more graphic and fashion driven, simple design aesthetic. Frames are less expensive, yet colorful and produced according to high quality standards. It‘s a strong and new project for our teams. All your frames are exclusively produced in France and Italy. Is that just for quality reasons? Face À Face frames are highly recognizable and the make is part of the tactile experience. This has led us to built from scratch a small factory for the finishing of our metal frames, which allows us to stay unique. Along the same strategy, we stayed true to our time-proven manufacturers in France and Italy. On that note, which countries love your products the most? Our main market is the US, where we make approximately 40 percent of our turnover. France comes at second with approximately 15 percent of our turnover. How do you explain the fact that your brands are so successful in the US? Our American opticians like to buy a concept, together with its origin, its coherence over the years, its quality and capacity to meet the general trends – not only fashion


D E S I G N TA L K

trends, but also lifestyle and what I would name the spirit of the time. Does that require running a separate logistics company abroad? We opened an office in San Francisco almost 18 years ago in order to service our American cus»Hip 2« tomers the best way. But we keep the central stock in Paris and all orders are shipped daily to everywhere in the world from this central stock. That gives us the chance to provide the best possible service on orders. The US also means Hollywood, are there any celebrities wearing Face À Face? Many celebrities wore our frames while appearing in famous movies, »Hip 1« to mention few of them: Sandra Bullock, Ellen the new media are key for the last sunglass Barkin, Jude Law, Sarah Jessica Parker, collection, with models named »Twitt«, Quentin Tarantino, Catherine Zeta Jones, »Pixel«, and »Movie« for example. We also Julia Roberts, and Susan Sarandon, among let ourselves be inspired by the graphic others. palette of the 1930s in Paris art circles for That‘s quite a track record and surely a some optical models. Most of all, I let all of source of inspiration. What were the inspimy centers of interest interfere and blend rations for your latest collections? Do they together. have themes? We drew on various sources of inspiration: In what way are the new collections diffe-


D E S I G N TA L K

Mod e r n a tt it u d e a n d a h i s tor ica l b a ck g roun d : Pa scal i n L e Ma ra i s .

rent to the previous ones? New collections are always bound to be different. The creative process is never-ending and follows the rhythm of the world. But they will also always remain true to our spirit. And in closing, what are your personal eyewear trends for 2016 ? Refined and bold, subtle and expressive of a Paris chic at the same time. A complex and exquisite time, much like this interview (laughs). Thanks for your insights and the tour of le Marais.


Handcrafted Eyewear | California Heirloom Design | Style: Swinden


GLCO

GLCO

GLCO

» C ordo v a «

»Pa lom a «

top VARPU R APELI, t rou s e r s MODELS OWN, sho e s DR MARTENS

» G ra yson « j e a n s NEUW, sh i r t JEROME PIERRE ( AGNÉS B), ja c k e t AGNÉS B, b o o t s H& M

-

GLCO »W il son «

je a n s TOPMAN, sho e s ALDO, top H& M, ja c k e t H& M

je a n s MAVI, sho e s NIKE , ju m p e r BOOM BAP


GLCO »Sable« j e a n s MAVI, sho e s BERENIK , top L AYANA AGUIL AR , ja c k e t LEVIS

GLCO » C a b r illo « j e a n s MAVI, sho e s AGNÉS B, sh i r t CWST, ja c k e t LEVIS

BY ANGELIK A BUET TNER pos t-p ro d uc t ion BENEDIKTE MESLIN PARIS s t ylin g wom e n MELISSA INFANTE a ssis t ed b y KIRSTIN RITCHIE s t ylin g m e n TATIANA CINQUINO a t WILHELMINA ARTISTS IMAGE BOARD m a ke -up MARI SHTEN u sin g MAC COSMETICS a t BRIANBANTRY a ssis t ed b y PHOEBE GOULDING h a ir STEFAN KEHL a t FAME-AGENCY GERMANY a ssis t ed b y MARK PONG a ssis t a nts RAINE MANLEY-ROBERTSON & RODRIGO HERGANGES mo d els SONYA , EMILY, REAGAN, ESTHE, HUAN, EMMANUEL , FRANCISCO, JAKE DIETRICH, CALEB a t WILHELMINA NYC lo ca tion DUNE STUDIO NEW YORK


YO H J I YA M A M O T O

YO H J I YA M A M O T O

»Y Y 70 0 6 «

»Y Y 5012«

sho r t s PL AC , top AGNÉS B, ja c k e t PL AC , h a t STETSON

sk i r t L AYANA AGUIL AR , d re ss/ top L AYANA AGUIL AR


YO H J I YA M A M O T O

YO H J I YA M A M O T O

» Y Y 5 011«

»Y Y 5010 «

sho e s BERENIK , j e a n s LEVI, ju m p e r PAMPLE MOUSSE

b oot s ALDO, je a n s PL AC , ju m p e r RELIGION


PA P ER S T Y L E »M e r z « top H& M, j e a n s LEVI

je a n s LEVI, top LEVI

PA P ER S T Y L E

PA P ER S T Y L E

PA P ER S T Y L E

»M e i «

»F öi a «

»A u r il«

j e a n s EARNEST SEWN

je a n s LEVI

d re ss & shor t s L AYANA AGUIL AR


PA P ER S T Y L E »M e r z « top L AYANA AGUIL AR


ESPRIT » E T 17502« d re ss L AYANA AGUIL AR

ESPRIT » E T 17501« d re ss L AYANA AGUIL AR

ESPRIT » E T 1750 0 « top & sk i r t L AYANA AGUIL AR


ESPRIT » E T 1750 4 « d re ss L AYANA AGUIL AR

ESPRIT » E T 17497 « d re ss L AYANA AGUIL AR


ETNIA BARCELONA

ETNIA BARCELONA

ETNIA BARCELONA

»Mi ss ion D i s t r i c t«

»W illi a m sb u rg «

»F e rl a n d i n a «

t rou s e r s DAVID HART, sh i r t AGNÉS B, ja c k e t JEROME PIERR ( AGNÉS B), sho e s ALDO

sho e s ALDO, t rou s e r s DAY, top DAY

shor t s WON HUNDRED, sho e s FLORSHEIM ESQUIVEL , ja c k e t DAVID HART, v e s t WON HUNDRED, sh i r t WON HUNDRED


ETNIA BARCELONA

ETNIA BARCELONA

ETNIA BARCELONA

»Mont a u k«

»B o q u e r i a «

» S hore d itc h «

d re ss PAMPLE MOUSSE ja c k e t 2ND DAY

top YUXIN lon g w a i s t co a t DAY

ja c k e t YUXIN h a t ALDO


FLEYE

FLEYE

FLEYE

» E i k«

»Sia«

»J a n a «

sho e s ALDO, t rou s e r s EARNEST SEWN, top EARNEST SEWN

t rou s e r s L AYANA AGUIL AR , top L AYANA AGUIL AR , sho e s BEREKIN

d re ss L AYANA AGUIL AR , sho e s BEREKIN


FLEYE

FLEYE

FLEYE

»Jo «

»Ma k i «

»K a m m a «

b o o t s H& M, j e a n s EARNEST SEWN, sh i r t WON HUNDRED

sho e s AGNÉS B, je a n s MAVI, top CWST, ja c k e t LUCIO CASTRO

sk i r t L AYANA AGUIL AR , top PAMPLE MOUSSE , sho e s ALDO


COLIBRIS

COLIBRIS

»K a s p a r«

»R osa «

d re ss L AYANA AGUIL AR

ja c k e t L AYANA AGUIL AR


L.G.R

L.G.R

»Ma u r it a ni a «

» S cor pio «

d re ss MANOKHI sho e s URBAN OUTFIT TERS

t rou s e r s WON HUNDRED sh i r t WON HUNDRED ja c k e t WON HUNDRED


INVU »T 26 01D « d re ss L AYANA AGUIL AR sh i r t SHIRT


J A PA N S P E C I A L

por t rait s TOMASO BALDESSARINI

KONNICHI WA

JAPAN SPECIAL Japan Travel Guide | Eyevan 7285 Collection Shoot | Tokyo Optical Guide


J A PA N S P E C I A L

JAPAN TRAVEL GUIDE An insight of    Thomas Akiyama Japan is an incredibly exciting country – maybe the most exciting in the world – and one of the most diverse places you will ever visit. People tend to forget that the Land of the Rising Sun offers far more than just the capital city, Tokyo. Actually, Nippon comprises four large and thousands of smaller islands spread across the Pacific Ocean from North to South over 2,400 kilometers. It‘s quite a stretch, also reflected in the climate: The Southern isles around Okinawa are part of the tropical climate zone, while the northernmost of the great islands, Hokkaido, is under the influence of Siberian climate patterns. So without ever leaving Japan, you may enjoy Hawaiian style beach vacations or skiing on ultradry snow reminiscent of the Rocky Mountains – whatever tickles your fancy. Preparation is key when it comes to visiting Japan, because finding your way around can be tricky. Signage in Japanese symbols is an enigma to Western eyes and the English language is far less common than one would think. But preparation also applies to advance knowledge of culturally engrained rules and etiquette governing daily life. And who could better explain these intricate cultural peculiarities than someone who grew up at the intersection of Western and Japanese culture? Meet your new Japan travel guide, Thomas Akiyama, German-Japanese hybrid and founder of Berlin-based quality eyewear label Makellos.


J A PA N S P E C I A L

Thomas Akiyama’s “Japan Travel Guide”

these are attributes also used by Germans to describe Japanese people. All over Europe, Germans are esteemed and First things first, being born respected, but not necessarily as the son of a German mowell-liked. The same applies ther and Japanese father to Japan and their Asian is not a Golden Ticket to neighbors. In terms of menbeing equally at home in tality, the Japanese regard both cultures. When you‘re the Germans as their closest born in Germany and raised kin. The German language in Tokyo, you‘ll always be is regarded as cool, German considered at Japanese kindergarten and later at school words are trendy – especially in Tokyo. as one thing: a Gaijin, meaSeen through Western eyes, ning a foreigner. Ironically, the same happens when you Japanese people often appear return to Germany and enter mysterious and enigmatic. But their stoic outside calm a German school. And since often conceals turbulent children tend to have a notemotions beneath the surso-subtle way of pointing out that you‘re different, you face. With a large amount of discipline and industriousstart evangelizing about the positive accomplishments of ness, they strive for per„your country“ quite early on. fection in all efforts. The country and the people are One of the biggest clichés about Japan depicts a country regarded as incredibly friendly, but the rules of conduct torn between tradition and are so complex, that a stranthe modern world. But despite the emphasis on Japan‘s ger can‘t possible know, let alone understand, them all. mysteries and differences Nevertheless, every visitor to Western culture, the pato Japan is stepping into a rallels are hard to overlook. minefield of cultural peculiEspecially when it comes to arities. But no need to sweat German and Japanese culthe small stuff, your Japanese ture, which are highly compatible. Japanese people love hosts are not expecting you as a Gaijin to have the slighGermany. Germans are regarded as disciplined, indus- test clue about Japanese contrious, and reliable. And all of ventions. At the same time,

imagine the pleasant surprise when you show awareness of the Japanese Code of Conduct illustrated in this article.

Makellos.Potsdam In 2013, Thomas Akiyama and trained optician Stefan Scharnbeck started their design label Makellos.Potsdam with the goal of blending Japanese minimalism with German craftsmanship. Striving for perfection, the designers cultivate a Japanese aesthetic in their pursuit of elegant, uncomplicated, and lightweight frames. All collections are named after locations within the town of Potsdam right outside of Berlin: sans.souci represents clean, delicate lines and lightness; the babels.berg glasses feature titanium coating; the cecilien.hof collection is focused on lightweight acetate frames; and einstein. turm revolves around proprietary hinge technology and striking color contrasts. German quality meets Japanese spirit.


J A PA N S P E C I A L

hands. Also make sure to align the card so the recipient can instantly read it – don‘t hand it upside-down – and Greeting slightly bow after the handJapanese people salute each off. Never stuff a business other by bowing, and only shake hands to respect Wes- card that was just handed to you into your pants or tern cultural conventions. jacket pocket, and don‘t Direct eye contact is to be avoided. As opposed to Wes- ever scribble notes on one – a huge no-no. The person tern culture, where direct with the higher rank – or the eye contact counts as a sign of honesty and openness, it‘s oldest person – has the privilege to hand the card to the considered intrusive, rude, lower-ranking or younger and intimidating in Japan! person. So unless the higherranking person initiates the Shoes off exchange, it‘s not going to Upon entering a home or a building, take your shoes off. happen. The same applies to temples. Tattoos There are usually slippers Back in the days, tattoos provided for guests. were inextricably linked Exchanging business cards to organized crime and the Business cards over there are Yakuza mob. Many of Japan‘s bath houses, called Onsen, usually bilingual: Japanese deny entrance to tattooed on the front, English on the guests, the same applies to back. Always hand out and swimming pools and gyms. receive the cards using both Japanese Code of Conduct

The Onsen is even off-limits for people who wear tattoos for fashion reasons, which has boiled into a generational conflict over the past years. Tattoos are considered fashion statements by a growing number of young Japanese people. And the influx of international guests – and concerns over losing a lucrative source of income – is currently effecting a paradigm shift in those rigorous bath house rules. For tattoos smaller than 8 x 10 centimeters, white band aids are provided as cover-ups. Hai The Japanese word “hai” means yes. It‘s considered appropriate etiquette during conversations to signal the speaker your undivided attention by nodding or saying “hai”. That‘s all there is to it; saying “hai” does not imply understanding or agreement.


J A PA N S P E C I A L

Kyoto

Top Spots

Without a doubt the most beautiful city in Japan – a fact that actually saved its life. Allegedly, Kyoto was on top of the list of targets for a nuclear strike during World War II, but the US – influenced by the US Secretary of Defense who knew the place from personal visits – spared the town because of its beauty and high culture. Kyoto remains a treasure trove of traditional Japanese heritage and belongs on every bucket list of places to see during your lifetime.

Tokyo The Tokyo metropolitan area is home to an estimated 37 million people. It‘s one of the world‘s largest cities and surely one of the most exciting: Futuris-

tic streets, flashing neon lights and gigantic highrises characterize the urban landscape. At the same time, Tokyo retains traditional sights such as temples, shrines, gardens, and hot springs. It‘s a whole new world compacted into one city, offering everything from fish markets, the Emperor‘s Palace, Shibuya, and countless parks and museums.

Sapporo Known as the name of a beer brand, the town of Sapporo lies 1,176 kilometers North-East of Tokyo. In 1972, Sapporo hosted the Winter Olympics and attracts international visitors with the annual Yuki Matsuri snow festival, when artists transform the

entire town into a magical winter wonderland. Work on the elaborate ice sculptures already commences seven weeks in advance of festivities, which also include ice palaces that are ten meters in height and 30 meters in length, on average. Every year, over 38,000 tons of snow are turned into art.

Fuji-san Japan‘s highest mountain attracts hundreds of thousands pilgrims every year. Due to its significance as a “holy site and source of artistic inspiration,” Fuji has been included into the UNESCO World Heritage. A miracle of natural symmetry, the mountain radiates a sense of beauty and dignity even from far away – “design” at its very best!


J A PA N S P E C I A L

EYEVAN7285 Relaunch of a Japanese eyewear tradition p rod uc t ion SAYURI BLOOM photo DANIELA GLUNZ m ake - up JULIA JUNGLAS a t BALLSA AL h a i r CHRISTIAN OLIVIER a t BALLSA AL & DENNIS BRANDT a t BIGOUDI mo d el s SVETA a t CORE MANAGEMENT & ENZO a t PMA MODELS s tills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ


J A PA N S P E C I A L

»141« w o ol d re ss MTFM WEEKDAY, b a g MINA VAT TER , f u r ja c k e t LORDS& FOOLS

»316 « sh i r t PATAGONIA , p a nt s TOMMY HILFIGER , sk u ll r i n g NICOLE KORNELLI


J A PA N S P E C I A L

The story of Eyevan dates back over a century to the year 1911, when the Yamamoto Optical Lens Manufacturing Co was founded with a focus on protective eyewear. Joining forces with fashion label Van Jacket in 1972, Yamamoto Optical launched Eyevan as its first optical brand, cementing its spot among the mainstays of Japanese eyewear design. The first collection, consisting of 27 models available in a total of 42 variations between models and colorway instantly became a hit with young, fashion-minded consumers. And with both the design and manufacturing of the eyewear handled entirely in Japan, the brand reflected the utmost in tradition and craftsmanship. The brand‘s great breakthrough happened in 1985, mostly because Eyevan ranged among the first labels to take eyewear beyond the realm of mere visual aid into the world of fashion. Combining functionality with a progressive sense of design,

Eyevan managed to walk the line between use value and fashionable flair. During the Optic Fair West tradeshow in Anaheim, California, the brand garnered lots of attention among visitors and the media, including a feature on the new wave of Japanese eyewear designs in the New York Times. The community of Eyevan wearers soon grew, including a broad spectrum of personalities from fashion-forward to businessminded individuals. Hollywood stars also took notice and represented the iconic Japanese brand, with famous early adopters including the likes of pop diva and style icon Madonna. Today, design and production still remain rooted in Japan, while the brand has long-since become an international household name. Eyevan‘s television commercials and stylish brand books continue to push the boundaries and garner wide-spread attention, always emphasizing two major factors: Eyevan represents Japan – and

Eyevan is at the intersection of technology and craftsmanship. Drawing on its successful history, Eyevan started a brand re-launch in May 2013, and now conducts business under the name Eyevan 7285. Behind the numbers lies a reference to the brand‘s storied history, and two milestone years in particular: The year 1972 as the founding year of the brand, and the year 1985 as the arrival on the international eyewear stage – summed up as ‘7285’. But when it comes to style and quality, Eyevan 7285 seamlessly continues the legacy of its predecessor. Traditional Japanese craftsmanship is still at the heart of the company‘s offering, while the design DNA still echoes the original aesthetic from over 40 years ago. For inspiration, Eyevan 7285 unearthed some original, hand-drawn design sketches from the company‘s archives as the basis of new models and reinterpretations of past favorites. These time-proven


J A PA N S P E C I A L

classics have now been rereleased in a new collection with a focus on detail and precision: The collection consists of eleven models in a total of 46 variations between models and colorways. All frames are crafted from high-grade materials in traditional Japanese manufacturing processes. The new Eyevan 7285 collection is available at opticians all over Japan, as well as select innovative opticians and boutiques around the world who appreciate timeless elegance in a new interpretation.

»141« The »141« marks a completely new approach for Eyevan 7285: As the first rimless frame design, the acetatecoated metal frame is positioned behind the glasses, with only two tiny screws securing the connection. The resulting consistent profile and exposed lenses lend the »141« a harmonious silhouette. Carefully appointed ornamentation around the metal temples and edges make this vintage style frame an instant classic.

»141«


J A PA N S P E C I A L

» 8 01«

»801« The »801« is the very first foldable frame created by Eyevan 7285. Every single element of this unique construction is crafted from titanium and beta titanium. And as the counterpart to the sunglasses model »801«, the brand also offers the »800« reading glasses style. Both models ship in a uniquely contoured aluminum casing for an upscale finish.


J A PA N S P E C I A L

»742«

»742« The »742« marks the brand‘s first use of polarized lenses. As opposed to the historic predecessor, the »137«, the new iteration features acetate temples with flexible tips for easy adjustments to individual specifications. All screws are crafted from high-grade beta titanium. The carefully chosen mix of individual parts creates a three-dimensional interpretation of the time-honored classic.


J A PA N S P E C I A L

»553«

»316 «

»553« Much like its predecessor, the »553« is built on a metal frame covered by an acetate coating. The model‘s most striking feature lies in the ultra-thin temples, covered by ornamentation at the tips for a classic, up-scale look.

»316« The »316« is an eye-catcher due to its unique design. The metal core and nose pads are crafted from beta titanium, while temple tips and coating are made from acetate in a process perfected back in 1980. The unmistakable, minimalist design of the »316« is a study in timeless elegance.


J A PA N S P E C I A L

TOKYO OPTICAL GUIDE

Bi g in Ja pan - IOF T e xhi b ition ce nt e r

A Japanese Must-Shopping Experience photos STEFAN DONGUS

We love the hustle and bustle of a thriving metropolis – especially when it welcomes visitors with a unique take on fashion, design, and culture. Tokyo continues to raise the bar in all of these areas, but at the same time can be quite demanding on visitors: Starting with proper use of chopsticks, to follow social rules and etiquette, handling money and finding your bearings amidst unfamiliar signage – it‘s easy to feel lost in translation in this Mega City. At the same time, Tokyo happily rewards your efforts with a wealth of unforgettable impressions and experiences. And when it comes to design, Tokyo is part of an elite league of cities and serious contestant for the world championship title – not just for eyewear. What‘s more, the streets are always clean, trains run on time, and people are constantly friendly, which not all of the world‘s major metropolitan cities can rightfully claim (we‘re talking to you, New York and Paris!).


J A PA N S P E C I A L

Yoyogi Park

Harajuku

Masunaga

Lun ettes du Jura Gran de

Doitsu M eister Gan kyouin Blinc

Factory900

Om

ot e

Blinc Vase

sa

nd

o

Ao ya m

Ca ts

Mykita

a

Lun ettes du Jura

tr

ee

t

do

ri

M eiji-Jing u mae

Omotesa n do

Aoyama

Globe Specs

Moscot 999,9

Optical Tailor Cradle 999,9

shibuya Shib uya

The West is the best One of Tokyo‘s most peculiar characteristics is the absence of a clearly distinguishable city center. Instead, several neighborhoods have become centers of their own for different themes: If you‘re looking for fashion, take a stroll around the Western part of town. This

Mo d e r n urb a n i t y ...

is where international designer labels have set up shops, next to a vibrant scene of small independent boutiques as well as the city‘s finest opticians. Getting around on foot is the best way to cover as many stores as possible, as the density of retail spaces is rather high and not much space is wasted.

.. .amon g cozy , f r ie n dly n e i g hborhoods .

You‘ll also get a walking tour of Western Tokyo‘s incredibly diverse architecture, with game-changing buildings and an unrestrained variety of styles as far as the eye can see. All opticians featured in this guide have set up shops in the triangle between the vibrant Shibuya neighborhood, hip Harajuku and upscale Aoyama – all intersected by the pompous Omotesando avenue. And regardless of neighborhood and location, all opticians have one thing in common: They‘ll greet you with incredi-


J A PA N S P E C I A L

ble hospitality and politeness. If you do experience a rather muted reception, it‘s most likely because of a sense of shame about lacking adequate English language skills (perceived as a major embarrassment). But rest assured, they‘re happy to see you!

Shibuya Crossi n g – don ‘ t ge t los t .

Let‘s go Our shopping spree starts at legendary Shibuya Station, right next to the world famous Shibuya Crossing. This unique crosswalk lets all pedestrians cross at the same time from all directions, while traffic comes to a complete standstill. With up to 15,000 people crossing the intersection during one interval, it‘s a sight to remember. Don‘t get lost among the gigantic LCD-screens, billboards, and neon signs, and withstand the temptation that is Shibuya 109 department store – this is an eyewear tour! For the perfect warmup, we‘ll visit the 999,9 Flagship Store, where visitors get a hands-on introduction to

Japanese crafts-manship. The local eyewear label enjoys a loyal following here in Japan, while still being an inside scoop in the West. You‘ll see that 999,9 with its focus on high-grade materials, precision manufacturing and attention to detail is the epitome of Japanese eyewear labels, and the perfect start of our tour. From small craftsman label we move on to one of the major players in these parts: Globe Specs. If you‘re lucky, owner Tetsuya Okada will give you a personal welcome. Formerly a banker here in Tokyo, he has become an eyewear institution with an incredibly decorated store. No need to bother listing specific labels – they‘re all here, from Japanese classics all the way to leading European designer brands. Although the cozy couches would be the perfect place to rest your eyes, it‘s time to move on. Too much to see...

Te t s uya Ok a d a | G lobe Sp e cs .

From Globe Specs we head East all the way to Cat Street. Once you turn the corner, you‘ll feel as if transported into an entirely different city. The buildings are lower and a sense of calm pervades. Hard to believe that the bustle of Shibuya is merely a ten-minute walk away. But Cat Street packs some punch of its own: This is where all major street wear and athletic brands have set up their flagship stores. Eyewear enthusiasts will feel right at home in the parallel street to East, where the Factory900 flagship store, and a bit down


J A PA N S P E C I A L

Shopping in Tokyo

S i g n a t ure B uil d in g b y s t ar a rchit e c t Ta d ao A n do.

the street, the Mykita store await. Speaking of Mykita, the Berlin-based label brings its A-game by displaying its entire main collection next to all collaboration projects. Our guide is no other than CEO Moritz, who happened to be in town for an entire week. As we say our goodbyes, we take the opportunity for a stroll down Omotesando avenue, one of the prettiest streets in the entire city (perhaps the world).

F rom B e rli n to Tok yo: My k i t a Fl a g s hips tore .

Yoyog i Park .

Culture VS Commerce: A quick detour Before hitting up the next optician, we would like to steer all culturally inclined Tokyo visitors to take a small detour to visit the Meiji Shrine in Yoyogi Park. And for a stark contrast, go see how Japanese youths like to handle their shopping at Takeshita Dori – another out-of-this-world experience. This commercial street is as loud and bright as they come, and afterwards you might be ready for the more upscale shopping experience offered at premium mall Omotesando Hill, designed by famous architect Tadao Ando.

Visitors are best advised to board their plane to Japan with an empty suitcase, as shopping opportunities abound: The Japanese capital offers countless top notch concept stores which not only encourage treasure hunting, but also provide unique opportunities to stock up on quintessential Japanese goods. Supplementing the shopping experience, all these stores offer their own striking interior decorations and interiors, which also goes for the city‘s optical shops. In order make the most of Tokyo‘s optical offering, we suggest setting aside an entire day, ideally even two days, to roam the local optical scene. And to put a special spring in your step, we have compiled our unique Tokyo Optical Guide with all the essentials you need to keep your eyes open on shopping trips. Grand boulevard Omotesando This mall also features a Lunettes du Jura store, where, as fate would have it, we happen to run into designer Marion Frost, who is right in


J A PA N S P E C I A L

Barton Perreira in all of Japan. Crossing the main street, we enter Doitsu Meister Gankyouin where we are suddenly greeted in German! As it turns out, owners Hiroki and Stephanie Nakanishi have resided in Germany for a long time, and also earned their certificates as Master Opticians – thus the term Meister – We follow the streets further to the East and take the North- over there. This type of craftsman qualification atern route down Aoyama Dori. Only a few steps into the street, we enter the Blinc Vase store, home to numerous Japanese labels such as Eyevan 7285 and Native Sons “Of course we speak Ger man”. as well as a hand-picked selection of Western labels such as Reiz, Mykita, and GLCO. Back out on the street, we head further North to reach the main store of Blinc, only a few feet away from Aoyama Dori. Our friendly hosts are store manager Naoto Yazawa and technical manager Yasu Kato, who lead us through the generously sized store with its broad selection – more extensive than Blinc Vase – including well-familiar brands such as Linberg, Ørgreen, Cutler & Gross, L.G.R, Clayton Franklin, and Lunettes Kollektion. Here at Blinc, the team also takes great pride in having been the first official the middle of a trunk show displaying her latest goods to Japanese customers.

tracts a broad international customer base, with clients hailing from all over Japan as well as Singapore and Hawaii. Next to some labels we already encountered on our tour, the store boasts an extensive selection of German brands such as Rodenstock and Flair. One of the standout brands with premium counter space is German brand Herrlicht, for which Hiroki and Stephanie head Japanese distribution. Only a few feet away, we enter the Masunaga store, another big league label – not just in Japan, but with an


J A PA N S P E C I A L

Ma sun a ga - t ra d i t ion a l l a b el in mo d e r n am b ie nce .

especially large presence over here. Founded in 1905, the brand‘s more than 100 years of craftsman tradition shine through in the flagship store. The purist, light-filled store interior with its steel beam facade extends over two stories of retail space, and ranges among the must-see locations on any optical tour of Tokyo. Speaking of stores that cover several stories, our next stop is Lunettes du Jura Grand

B l i nc x 2 : Na oto Ya z a wa & Ya su K a to.

on Aoyama Dori. Despite the generously sized interior, every angle is covered with top notch eyewear brands, a real selection of the whois-who in modern optical design. Manager Satoru Koyama proudly display their highly international selection, including glasses from ic! berlin, 3dpi, Bellinger, Ørgreen, Face à Face, Reiz, J. F. Rey, and Frost, among others.

Snack break: Good food, fast Next up, we head down Aoyama Dori towards the South. Along the way, we suggest a quick visit to a real food market in a backyard to soak in some Japanese hospi-tality and organic treats in a friendly, creative atmosphere.

T he A oyam a Dor i re wards t he vis u al s e n s e s with its s p e c t a c ul ar archit e cht u re .

Final spurt Freshly recharged, we hit up the Moscot flagship store, a true embassy for American eyewear tradition and full of lavishly appointed details. Only a few steps down the road we enter the optical tailor store Cradle, another must-see on every tour. Store manager Masashi Keino leads us around the large store and points out a broad selection featuring some of the already mentioned brands next to labels such as prodesign, Thiery Lasry, Tom Ford and Chrome Hearts. Asked about major sellers at Cradle, Masashi

Mos cot Fl a g ship Store


J A PA N S P E C I A L

The Japanese secre t to e te r nal youth: Gree n tea instead of coke. You can find ve nding machines e ve r ywhe re.

points out Dita and Thom Brown next to their house brand Effector, which has also been picked up by other eyewear stores. Leaving Cradle, we set our sights on returning to Shibuya. But for those who would like to spend their evening in the energetic Roppongi neighborhood, there‘s a chance to end the tour where it started, at another 999,9 store and maybe spend some time on the couch. Your feet probably need a rest and some time to digest all of the day‘s impressions and unique experiences, hey, maybe with a drink.

B a uh a u s in R oppon g i a t m i dni g ht – no com m e nt !

O mot e s an do

Ma s a s hi K e ino f rom O pt ical Ta ilor C ra dle .

After shopping party After the tour, it‘s the after party – and if you‘re still up for it, we highly recommend stopping by Bauhaus club for a taste of the nightlife. The kind of scene here around midnight is hard to put into words: Live music from another universe and a roaring dance floor offer the perfect ending to an incredible walking tour of Tokyo‘s unique optical scene. Kanpei! IOFT When it comes to choosing a timeframe for your visit, we recommend October for its pleasant climate and the opportunity to combine the trip with a visit to ioft, Tokyo‘s major optical tradeshow. The event also draws leading international eyewear designer, who are also making the rounds visiting optical stores. Some even set up trunk shows in stores to display their latest goods – a rare opportunity for a face-toface. In short: Come ioft time, the entire city revolves around eyewear!


J A PA N S P E C I A L

DOMO ARIGATO

SAYONARA


ST YLIST’ S OWN

Yvette Jack

02

s u n gl a ss e s LE SPECS fa k e f u r ja c k e t MARC JACOBS top IVORY STUDIO d e ni m NEW YORKER VINTAGE sho e s SOPHIA WEBSTER b e lt VERSACE c ro ssb o d y b a g LOUIS VUIT TON n e c k l a c e d i a mon d c ross HENDERSON n e c k l a c e f low e r s TARINA TAR ANTINO e a r r i n g s DIAMONDS WITH CROSS w a tc h BREITLING b a n gl e CARTIER

“Fashion is the armor to survive the reality of everyday life.” http://whyjack.foliodrop.com


www.silhouette.com Special Edition Wes Gordon for Silhouette Mod. 9908 / Š Silhouette


B R O O K LY N S P E C T A C L E S

B R O O K LY N S P E C T A C L E S

»T h e Wa n d e re r«

»T h e L e a d e r«

s u it SUIT SUPPLY, sh i r t & t i e CONR AD HESSELBACH, b e lt & d re ss h a n d k e rc h i e f H& M

s u it COS pu llo v e r & b e lt H& M

B R O O K LY N S P E C T A C L E S »T h e Ma k e r« s u it , sh i r t & d re ss h a n d k e rc h i e f CONR AD HESSELBACH


BY S TEFAN K APFER cre a ti v e d ire c tor CLAUDIA FELSER s t ylin g MICHELE JUNKER m a ke -up CLAUDIA CREUELS p ro d uc tion H60OFFICE .COM pos t-p roduc t ion STEPHANIE WENCEK d i git a l a ssis t ant JAN DÜFELSIEK li gh t a ssis t ant ANNA MARTIN a ssis t a nt CARLOS KRUG mo d els JOSS a t M4 MODELS, MARC a t STARS MODELMANAGEMENT & ETHAN a t IMM lo ca tion DUISBURG


I -SPA X »W il b u r« sh i r t & p a n t s COS, sho e s ZAR A


IMAGO »Hor i z on « pu llo v e r, co a t , p a n t s & sho e s COS


MAKELLOS.POTSDAM »M E 9 036 « pu llo v e r MODEL‘S OWN


MAKELLOS.POTSDAM »M E 5 028 « s u it , sh i r t & b e lt H& M, sho e s ZAR A


METROPOLITAN » 8238 « pu llo v e r, sh i r t & p a n t s H& M


METROPOLITAN » 8235« ja c k e t , sh i r t & p a n t s CONR AD HESSELBACH, b ow - t i e , d re ss h a n d k e rc h i e f & b e lt H& M


OAKLEY »Mil e s ton e 3 . 0 « s u it SUIT SUPPLY, d re ss h a n d k e rc h i e f & sh i r t CONR AD HASSELBACH, pu llo v e r H& M


OAKLEY »Mil e s ton e 3 . 0 « pu llo v e r H& M, p a n t s COS, sho e s HUGO BOSS


COBLENS » S t ra hlt r i e b w e rk« t re n c h co a t H& M, pu llo v e r H& M


NEW TECH

OAKLEY’S EVZERO SPORT COLLECTION Enhanced View // Zero Restriction

» E V Z e ro R a n g e «

» E V Z e ro Pa t h «


NEW TECH

photos RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Every athlete likes some extra tech. As part of the new EVZero Sport Collection – “EV” is short for “Enhanced View” – Oakley is releasing two new athletic sunglasses in Spring/ Summer 2016: The »EVZero Path« is aimed at runners, while the »EVZero Range« is designed with cyclists in mind. Smooth, futuristic, and ultra-lightweight, these shades weigh 15% less than conventional sunglasses. Based on Oakley’s proprietary Prizm technology, the Enhanced View models offer clear vision, more details, and increased contrasts via a unique light filter from Oakley’s legendary R&D lab.


NEW TECH

»EVZero Range« The »EVZero Range« offers all the performance-enhancing features of the Path in a lightweight frame designed for cyclists looking for the ultimate protection from UV-rays, headwinds, and floating objects likely to hit them in the eyes. In terms of frame design, the Range relies on a shape called the Plutonite Toric Shield: Because cyclists tend to ride their bikes in a position hunched over the handlebars, they tend to view the road or the trail with their eyes looking upwards. That’s why the frame’s large glasses extend far beyond the eyes to offer the utmost protection. Meanwhile, the rimless design helps the »EVZero Range« offer surround vision with “zero” limitations from frames at the sides. Perfect for performance cyclists, the »EVZero Range« features a sturdy construction that can withstand impact from small objects without damage. It will be available in the following colorways: Path Planet with Red Iridium Lenses, Infrared with Prizm Road Lenses, Matte SkyBlue with Prizm Trail Lenses, and Matte Black with Prizm Daily Polarized Lenses.


NEW TECH

»EVZero Path« Built from the ground up for runners, these superlight Oakley shades offer an extra edge out in the field. The California-based company created rimless lenses using its very own Polaric Ellipson Geometry to provide runners with increased long distance vision. The flexible Three-Point Fit holds lenses in precise optical alignment, supported by Unobtanium Nosepads for a secure fit, even on broad faces. The patented Three-Point Fit also ensures that the frames remain securely in place, as not to distract runners. The »EVZero Path« will be available in the following colorways: Path Planet with Red Iridium Lenses, Matte White with Prizm Road Lenses, Path Silver with Sapphire Iridium Lenses and Matte Black with Prizm Daily Polarized Lenses.


C A M PA I G N AWA R D

OVER THE TOP BY ARMEN DJERRAHIAN Cazal Vintage Sun Collection

Taking it to higher ground, iconic eyewear brand Cazal introduces the latest 2016 Vintage Sun collection in a look book shot above the roofs of Paris, titled Over the Top. The collection‘s black-and-golden frames with their bold designs are a unique fashion statement, even in a fashion metropolis like Paris. Using the city as a backdrop for the campaign also marks a home game for Paris-born photographer Armen Djerrahian, who now resides in Brooklyn and is known for implementing urban and architectural elements into his works. His images in Over the Top present Cazal‘s often eccentric frame designs in front of essentially Parisian architecture in a mixture that truly lives up to the title.


C A M PA I G N AWA R D


T H E M E SH O OT

DOUBLEBRIDGE 2.0 photo RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

SA LT. » E l k i n s«

LINDBERG » 8702« The team at Lindberg presents the double nose bridge in a cool, athletic variation: The frame is black, supporting the cool overall look together with a dark green tint on the lenses. The otherwise rounded silhouette extends in the upper section while the top nose bridge connects closely to the frame for a modern interpretation of the classic.

Salt. is adding a new twist to the double nose bridge by running it as an applique across the entire upper part of the frame. The combina-tion of gold and black already makes it a classic that‘s never going out of fashion.

MODO »680« Modo stays true to its ultra-light and minimalist design tradition. While the shape of the »680« is reminiscent of classic aviator frames, it‘s a bit rounder and softer on the edges; a look supplemented by the subtle tortoise colorway.


T H E M E SH O OT

The double nose bridge is a detail in eyewear design that transcends trends and seasonal fashions. Known for lending a unique sense of style to classic models such as Ray-Ban‘s aviator frames, the double bridge is having somewhat of a renaissance in new collections from brands such as Salt., Ørgreen and Cazal. But make no mistake: These reiterations are more than mere copies of an established theme, but new interpretations at the intersection between retro and contemporary. Here‘s our rundown of timeproven styles with double the bridge, twice the style.

LEISURE SOCIET Y »T ilm a n « Leisure Society implements the double nose bridge as a subtle detail. The »Tilmann« is available in an all-gold colorway with a sporty twist thanks to the classic bridge design.

CAZAL »958 « Leave it to Cazal to resurrect the double nose bridge as a bold statement. The iconic brand combines circular, silver reflective lenses with a stunning golden frame centered around two bold crossbars for an even bolder look.

SA LT. »Ta f t« While the »Taft« echoes the black and gold colorway of the »Elkins« it riffs on the double nose bridge in a compact shape with reflective lenses as the center of attention.


COL L A B OF T H E ISSU E

IC! BERLIN X DAWID TOMASZEWSKI . Graceful »Grazyna« photo RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Elegant, nimble, graceful – or as you would . say in Polish: »Grazyna«. Introducing: The first featherlight and oversized acetate sunglasses from the successful collaboration between German label Ic! Berlin and Polish fashion designer Dawid Tomaszewski. The timing is more than perfect: With

spring season in full bloom, the model’s subtle colorways such as Caramel Bronze and cool Havanna Teak strike a soft note. Cheeky color dots, a stylistic nod to the bright ‘60s and ‘70s, create vivid accents for a rounded, intriguing overall look. And looking at the frame design, our new favorite piece from

the Ic! Berlin X Tomaszewski can safely be . considered a stylistic classic: The »Grazyna« reflects urban elements and the geometries of Berlin architecture in its three-dimensional frame designs, replete with Ic! Berlin’s signa-

ture screw-less hinges. If you’re looking to hold this graceful tiny . dancer closer, look out for the »Grazyna« in this year’s Prêt-à-porter Autumn/Winter Collection by Dawid Tomaszewski.


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

BY S TEFAN DONGUS d i git a l op e ra tor CARO ROSS a ssis t a nts GERO TOBER & ENTING ZHANG s t ylin g JENNIFER KALAITZIS h a ir NIUSHA NAHRJOO (TE AM WEIDEMANN) m a ke -up ANNA BORHO a ssis t ed b y Z ARA ES (TE AM WEIDEMANN ) mo d els LOLITA a t M4 & NATHANIEL a t PMA pos t-p ro d uc tion RUTH SPILLER s t ill RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

»118/ S S p r i nt« b ra MARLIES DEKKERS, shor t s CHLOÉ , s to c k i n g s AMERICAN APPAREL

»118/ S S p r i nt« sh i r t JOHN VARVATOS, shor t s JULIAN ZIGERLI, slip - on s THE SHOES


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

CARRERA MAVERICK COLLECTION Racing Rebels feat. Jared Leto »116/ S Rise«

»114/S Vivid«

»115/ S Pace« »113/S Impel« »119/S Agile«

»118/S Sprint«

Over the past 60 years, Carrera has grown into one of the world‘s most recognized eyewear labels. When Wilhelm Anger founded the company in 1956, he drew inspiration for the name from the world‘s most dangerous car race, the Carrera Panamericana. Fascinated by the breakneck speeds of these race cars, Anger took a futuristic approach to eyewear design, also in terms of materials: Since 1964, Carrera manufactures eyewear from Optyl, a proprietary polymer hardened under intense heat, weighing in at 20% less than acetate.


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

»113/ S I m p e l« sh i r t DRIES VAN NOTEN, p a nt s TRINITAS, b om b e r Y-3


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

During the 1970s and 1980s, Carrera built an international profile through collaborations with Ferdinand Alexander Porsche. Drawing on its roots as a brand at the intersection between sports and fashion, Carrera emerged as a main sponsor of athletic events at the time, including the 1988 Formula 1 Championships and Winter Olympics in Calgary. Even today, Carrera continues to walk the line between fashion and sports. The frame designs radiate a casual chic that resonates with stars and artists, including celebrities such as Brad Pitt, Robert Redford, Leonardo Di Caprio and Jared Leto, the singer of 30 Seconds to Mars. Jared is a multi-hyphenate in the true sense of the word: guitar player, singer, and actor – and now also the face Carrera‘s Maverick Collection. In his acting career, Jared is known for going the extra mile for roles, including shedding 18 kilos for his supporting role in Dallas Buyers Club, which won him an Oscar. This type of commitment, unconventional thinking, and penchant for doing things your own way also characterizes the ideal

»114/ S V i vi d « top MISSGUIDED, sk i r t AMERICAN APPAREL , s n e a k e r s CONVERSE , e a r p hon e s MOL AMI


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

wearers of the Maverick Collection – and Carrera found the perfect ambassador in Jared. From a design perspective, the Maverick Collection is built on ultra-delicate frames from stainless steel (only 0.7mm thick) with a matted finish and super light weight. Inspired by 1986‘s original Boeing Collection, the Maverick Collection offers contemporary interpretations of the iconic »N.02« model, most visibly in the downward slope of the top bridge. The Maverick Collection consists of six sports sunglasses (The Impel, Vivid, Peace, Rise, Sprint & Agile), as well as three prescription models (Bound, Beam & Pursue). True to the spirit of Carrera, our Collection Shoot combines the realms of people, sports, and fashion with a blend of tradition and modernity for a racy finish.

»119/ S A g il e « b ra & p a n t y MARLIES DEKKERS, l e a t h e r c a p ST YLIST ‘S OWN


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

»119/ S A g il e « sh i r t H& M, p a n t s MASTERCR AFT


COLLEC TION CHECK

OPTITEKTUR BY REIZ GERMANY Timeless All Age Glasses photos RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Ever since its founding in 1996, designer label Reiz has ranged among the leading manufacturers of quality eyewear in Germany. Backing the brand‘s reputation with a diligent commitment to quality, all frames are hand-made in Germany using the latest in manufacturing techniques – today as much as back in 1996. For its 20th brand anniversary, the company based in the town of Wernau is launching the Optitektur Collection based on timeless designs and delicate geometric lines. Next to time-honored design inspirations, the brand‘s designers Franz Reutter and Jochen Gudbrod also placed special emphasis on the color selection, which is masterfully executed in the gradient Havana tones, including 196 Classic Havana, 200 Havana Olive Gradient and 201 Havana Grey Gradient. The collection also features the special colors 176 Taupe and 194 Grey, but only in limited editions at 50 pieces each per model and colorway.

»Tangente« Flattering and subtle with its slightly rounded contours, perfect to accentuate the wearer‘s feminine features.

»Winkel« The combination of rectangular lenses with rounded corners creates a neat, official overall appearance.


COLLEC TION CHECK

»Oval«

This feminine shape accentuates almost every facial shape with a charming curved top bar.

The petite and classic frame is perfect for every age group, as well as nostalgic-minded collectors who appreciate timeless designs.

»Bogen«

»Kugel«

Extravagant in its combination of straight top bar with oval lenses – the perfect glasses for creative thinkers.

The time-honored tradition of rounded, oversized sunglasses with keyhole bridge is alive and well; especially for fashion-forward wearers.

»Achse«

»Kante« Generous and distinctively shaped, this model is a timeless classic.

»Kubus« Large and distinctly masculine, this classic-inspired eye catcher makes a strong stylistic statement.


B E H I N D T H E C A M PA I G N

PERSOL »P O 8 6 49 S «


B E H I N D T H E C A M PA I G N

MEET THE NEW GENERATION Scott Eastwood for Persol »PO8649S« photos RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

The future of Hollywood pays tribute to the classics: In the latest take on its iconic »649« model, Italian eyewear label Persol combines legendary stylistics with futuristic features. In cooperation with rising Hollywood star Scott Eastwood, the label’s new Spring/ Summer 2016 collection introduces the new »PO8649S« model. With a slimmer profile, lighter overall weight, and a newly designed Victor Flex top bar as the main eye catcher, it’s new – but also typically Persol. Looking back at the original, the »649« came to market in 1957, initially as prescription glasses for street car operators before appearances in classics of Italian cinema made the glasses icons of the silver screen. Often imitated but never duplicated over the years, Persol is staying true to its DNA, as well as its film heritage.


B E H I N D T H E C A M PA I G N

Because even today, Persol remains a darling among Hollywood insiders, including Scott Eastwood, the current face of the ‘Meet the New Generation’ campaign. Never seen his face? No worries, the year 2016 promises to be major for the young actor, who has three starring roles about to hit theaters: “Snowden”, “The Suicide Squad”, and “The Longest Ride”. With his face about to be everywhere, Scott found the time to model for the campaign, with shots including the actor perusing a Hollywood script wearing the »PO8649S« in a classic pose. On that note, the four photographs for the campaign were shot by no other than French photographer Mathieu Cesar. The »PO8649S« will be available in the colorways Havanna, Terra di Siena, Caffè, Black, Light Horn, and Dark Horn.


BY S TEFAN DONGUS d i g i t a l op e ra tor CARO ROSS a ss i s t a nt s GERO TOBER & ENTING ZHANG s t ylin g JENNIFER KALAITZIS h ai r NIUSHA NAHRJOO (TE AM WEIDEMANN) m ake - up ANNA BORHO a ssis t e d b y Z ARA ES (TE AM WEIDEMANN ) p os t-p ro d uc t ion GLAMTOUCH mo d el s VALERIE & JANNIK S. a t M4, GERDA a t NO TOYS & PHIL a t PMA loca t ion DUSSELDORF


GLCO »W il son « d e n i m t re n c h TIGER OF SWEDEN, sh i r t REALIT Y STUDIO, p a n t s UNIQLO


ØRGREEN »Ysa b e l« s u it UNIQLO, pu llo v e r TIGER OF SWEDEN, lo a f e r s SCAROSSO

ØRGREEN »Jo a q u i n« d re ss EDITED, pu m p s KURT GEIGER


KBL »F it z R o y « b o m b e r STUDIO CDG, c u lot t e s UNIQLO, pu m p s GIANVITO ROSSI


ROLF SPEC TACLES »Va nt a g e 03« ju m p s u it JOSEPH, b ra MARLIES DEKKERS

ROLF SPEC TACLES »Da r t 20 6 « p a n t s & sh i r t TRINITAS


R AY- B A N »R B 424 6 -V« b o m b e r Y-3, sh i r t T BY ALEX ANDER WANG, p a n t s PAIGE


LINDBERG »970 4 « ja c k e t BL ANK ETIQUET TE , sh i r t SCHIESSER , p a n t s LEVI‘S


OAKLEY »P itc h m a n R « d re ss TIGER OF SWEDEN, b oot s UTERQÜE


YOU MAWO »Ma n a k a u « p a nt s & t re n c h FRISUR , s a n d a l s CORTEFIEL

YOU MAWO » L a ni n « t re n c h TIGER OF SWEDEN, p a n t s UNIQLO, pu m p s ZAR A


faceaface-paris.com


ST YLIST’ S OWN

Raphael Höpfner

03

s u n gl a ss e s LE SPECS b a g WOLF& MAIDEN sho e s DOCKERS vi n t a g e p a n t s LEVIS lo n g sl e e v e THOM KROM v e s t 2ND HAND ja c k e t VINTAGE r i n g s K ARMA , INDIA SHOP, THRIFT MARKET

“Black is always a good choice.”


C

O

germany@jfrey.fr

L

L

E

C

austria@jfrey.fr

T

I

O

N

switzerland@jfrey.fr


BY C ARINA JAHN h ai r & m a ke - up FRAUKE BERGEMANN-GORSKI s t ylin g YVET TE JACK re touch TOM PERRY mo d el s ANICA a t M4MODELS & LERA a t ICONIC MANAGEMENT loca t ion WIESBADEN


ANDY WOLF LOVE »50 69 « s w e a t e r DIESEL , sho r t s ISABEL MAR ANT, fa u x f u r IVORY STUDIO

ANDY WOLF LOVE » 4531« ja c k e t MARGIT TES, sk i r t GUCCI


R A L P H VA E S S E N »T i r z a « fa u x f u r ja c k e t STELL A MCCARTNEY, l e a t h e r sk i r t MINK PINK , je w e ll e r y IVORY STUDIO


R A L P H VA E S S E N » S op hi e « sh i r t H& M, ja c k e t ISABEL MAR ANT, d e n i m JBR AND


PR ADA » S PR 53 S « s w e a t e r H& M, shor t s ISABEL MAR ANT


DOLCE & GABBANA »DG 4277« s il k sh i r t ETRO, ja c k e t DRIES VAN NOTEN


MUNICEYEWEAR »mo d . 9 « d e n i m o v e ra ll AG

MUNICEYEWEAR »mo d . 7« l e a t h e r ja c k e t JBR AND, d e n i m shor t s JBR AND, b oot s DUNE


MUNICEYEWEAR »mo d . 9 « d e ni m d re ss MIH, ja c k e t IVORY STUDIO


REIZ »R 20 T. 0 6 « d re ss MANGO


REIZ »R 20 T. 0 4 « d re ss SELFPORTR AIT


LINDBERG » 8 6 02« l e a t h e r ja c k e t DOLCE& GABBANA , top R ALPH L AURENT, d e n i m JBR AND

LINDBERG » 8702« d re ss DIANE VON FÜRSTENBERG, s il k sk i r t ZAR A


F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

TITAN MINIMAL ART BY SILHOUETTE

Rimless Clarity

In the year 1964, Austrian eyewear brand Silhouette set out to pursue a lofty goal: To enhance people‘s facial expressions with eyewear. Over the years, the company has made a name for itself with rimless frame designs which indeed lives up to its mission by emphasizing – instead of concealing – the wearer‘s eyes. The technology for rimless frames was introduced in 1999 under the name Titan Minimal Art (TMA), in a design entirely free of bolts and screws. Removing the rim around the lenses not only freed up the full range of peripheral vision, but also added to the wearer‘s comfort. What‘s more, the hand-made frames only weigh in at 1.8 grams for a sense of minimalism and lightness. And although the pieces in the Minimal Arts collection are designed entirely rimless, they still offer a broad selection of shapes and sizes – plus some considerable flair.


F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

»T M A T h e Mu s t«

photos STEFAN DONGUS s t yl i n g JENNIFER KALEITZIS h a i r & m a ke -up TE AM WEIDEMANN mo d el VALERIE a t M4 p os t- p ro d uc t ion GLAMTOUCH


F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

»T M A I con «

»T M A T h e Mu s t«


F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

For proof, look no further than the latest »TMA Icon« model, which relies on colorful rubber accents on the extended titanium temples for a modern look. The frame is balanced for optimal weight distribution and offers dynamically adjustable springs to flexibly adapt to the wearer‘s face. Equally minimalistic, the design of the »TMA The Must« model features delicate titanium temples with a subtle nuance of color for a fresh overall look. For maximum freedom of choice, both new models are available in twelve color variations.


BRAND PROFILE

»D e n a li «

»Ma k a lu «


BRAND PROFILE

YOU MAWO Bespoke High Tech Eyewear photos RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Every person in this world is unique, everyone is an individual. But when it comes to consumer products, most of the choices out on the market turn out to be standardized products in standard sizes featuring standardized designs. So far, one of the few bastions of truly individualized, customized styles are bespoke suits, where tailors go to lengths in taking the measurements and sizing for each customer to achieve that perfect fit. It‘s a tradition several hundred years old, and as relevant as ever in today‘s increasingly personalized marketplace. Faced with the growing consumer demand for bespoke products, the eyewear industry is now drawing on the latest in high-tech to usher in a new era of one-of-a-kind eyewear. Enter a world of lasers, facial scans, and 3D-printers – the future is here. Upcoming eyewear label You Mawo is on the cutting edge of the budding customization trend. The brand‘s business model is based on eyewear specifically tailored to the anatomical contours of each individual wearer‘s face. The advantages are rather obvious: A face is as unique as a fingerprint, so a standardized frame can hardly cover the entire range of variations between wearers. As a starting point, You Mawo offers six basic designs in different styles that can be tailored and fitted exactly to the specifications of the wearer for a snug and comfortable fit. As an inspiration for the brand and its name, the founding team led by Sebastian Zenetti pointed out travel and a sense of adven-


BRAND PROFILE

ture. Accordingly, all individual frames are named after famous mountains and the connection between glasses and wearers is symbolic for the connection between humans and planet earth. The company name also reflects a love for nature: You Mawo is an acronym for Your Magical World. A touch of magic also sparkles in the choices of colorways, with options including black, grey, brown, red, blackberry, olive, navy, and bordeaux. True to the high-tech nature of the operation, the people behind the upcoming label hail from a broad range of different backgrounds, including parametric 3D-design, ophthalmology, additive manufacturing processes (3D-printing), and big data analytics. This mix of different talents is the key to realizing a truly unique and customized eyewear platform, with frames that are individually tailored on one hand, but also on the same consistent level of quality at scale on the other hand. CHOOSING THE BASIC MODEL The six basic designs are the result of an optimization analysis conducted by the You Mawo team on facial scans from hundreds of people. These models are designed in different styles that are further adjusted to the individual wearer‘s anatomy on the computer before manufacturing the actual, individualized frames. Customers choose their favorite model in one of eight available colorways at their optical store. On that note, opticians are central to You Mawo‘s business model, since they not only equip the frames with lenses, but also play an important role in the customization of the frames via an innovative app.


BRAND PROFILE

INDIVIDUALIZING THE FRAMES 1st step: Facial scan at the optical store In order to find the perfect fit for the wearer‘s individual face, the optician performs a scan using You Mawo‘s proprietary infrared 3D-scanning app. Controlled via iPad, the camera scans the wearer‘s face in a matter of 30 seconds. Powered by constant updates, the app also contains the latest eyewear styles and collections, as well as current news from You Mawo. Once the scan is completed, the optician also feeds the wearer‘s choice of basic model, colorway, and additional personal data into the app. The data is then send via the cloud to You Mawo, where the customization process continues. 2nd step: Individual customization at You Mawo HQ The customer‘s facial scan and preference data collected at the optician‘s store is now combined with the basic design in the shape of a 3D-model of the new frame. Drawing on proprietary algorithms, the basic design is adjusted to the anatomical contours of the wearer‘s face. This process is also known as parametric 3D manufacturing. The result is a design that still bears the characteristics of the basic model chosen by the wearer, but optimized with individual sizing and design parameters for the ultimate fit.


BRAND PROFILE

3rd step: Manufacturing in Germany Based on the customized digital design, You Mawo manufacturers a reallife product at its German workshop. The underlying manufacturing process is a high-tech method known as selective laser sintering, already widely used in the automotive and aerospace industry. In an additive process, the frames are laser-printed layer-bylayer from polyamide powder. The material, polyamide, is frequently used in plastic surgery for the design of bone implants. It‘s also perfectly suited for eyewear, which is why You Mawo relies on the advanced polymer as the main ingredient for its 3D-printed frames: About 30% lighter than acetate, polyamide is also more robust and resilient than standard frames at a very light weight for a high level of comfort. In the next step, the surface finish and coloring are added and made permanent by ways of nano-coating, which also adds resistance against dirt and water. The hinges used in all frames are also a proprietary You Mawo technology, attached via two bolts allowing for a quick exchange, if needed. Overall, the production of customized frames requires three weeks before wearers can pick up their bespoke frames at the optician‘s. Personalized, unique, and high-tech – welcome to the future of eyewear.

» L a ni n «

»Ma n a k a u «

In the computer model, experienced opticians are free to customize factors such as: • Overall size of the frames • Nose bridge width • Contact area on nose • Nose pads angles • Nose pads size • Nose pads positioning • Inclination • Temples angle • Temples length • Basic lenses curvature


BY DET KEMPKE a ss i s t a nt RUTH KOBBE p rod uc t ion & s t ylin g ANDREA KADLER h ai r & m a ke - up SONJA SHENOUDA a t BIGOUDI mo d el s JACKY a t MODELWERK & DAV Y JONES a t VIVAMODELS p os tp ro d uc t ion GOSCHA DZIUBEK loca t ion PAN AM LOUNGE BERLIN


NINE »2253« c a rd i g a n TORY BURCH, b o d y INTIMISSIMI, p a n t s ELISABET TA FR ANCHI, r i n g PRIVATE SUITE , n e c k l a c e CAI, sho e s PR ADA BY KILLERSHOES

NINE »2319 « b o m b e r ja c k e t HERR VON EDEN, p a n t s HERR VON EDEN, sho e s DR . MARTENS


MARTIN & MARTIN »Yvon n e « sh i r t STELL A MCCARTNEY BY UNGER-FASHION, sk i r t ST, b ra c e l e t PRIVATE SUITE , r i n g s CAI, b a g FL AMINDIGO


MARTIN & MARTIN »V i k tor« b lou so n ASOS, t u r tl e n e c k UNIQLO, p a n t s TIGER OF SWEDEN, h e a d s e t MOL AMI

MARTIN & MARTIN »V i k tor« sh i r t EDITED, t u r tl e n e c k UNIQLO, p a n t s PINKO, n e c k l a c e TORY BURCH, r i n g CAI


MARKUS T » D3 0 0 0113« s u it & sh i r t TIGER OF SWEDEN

MARKUS T »M 2 16 0313« d re ss VALENTINO BY UNGER-FASHION, b roo c h SONIA RYKIEL


MARKUS T »M 2 16 0313« b l a z e r DRIES VAN NOTEN BY UNGER-FASHION, sk i r t PINKO, sho e s ELISABET TA FR ANCHI, b a g L ABOUTIN, n e c k l a c e & b ra c e l e t CAI INDUSTRIAL REVOLUTION


GÖTTI »Ya shi « s u it & sh i r t TIGER OF SWEDEN, h e a d s e t MOL AMI

GÖTTI »Ya b a « l e a t h e r sh i r t Y VES SALOMON BY UNGER-FASHION, sk i r t TIGER OF SWEDEN, b a g L ABOUTIN, r i n g PRIVATE SUITE


LINDBERG »9825« d re ss ALEX ANDER MCQUEEN BY UNGER-FASHION


LINDBERG » 8 58 0 « ja c k e t & p a nt s TIGER OF SWEDEN, sh i r t TOMMY HILFIGER , sho e s RED WINGS

LINDBERG » 8315« b lou s e CHLOÉ , sk i r t PINK A , b ra c e l e t TORY BURCH BY UNGER-FASHION, r i n g s CAI, b oot s KILLERSHOES


HOFFMANN NATUR AL EYE WE AR »2237 H16 – H10 F H KG « ja c k e t BALLY, n e c k pi e c e ST YLIST´S OWN, b a g BALLY „ AMSTRONG“


HOFFMANN NATUR AL EYE WE AR »316 1115« b ol e ro DRIES VAN NOTEN BY UNGER FASHION, d re ss PINKO, e a r r i n g s BASTARD COLLECTION, b ra c e l e t PRIVATE SUITE


SILHOUET TE » 8153 20 6202« sh i r t TIGER OF SWEDEN, p a n t s BALLY


ST YLIST’ S OWN

Jennifer Kalaitzis

04

s u n gl a ss e s CÉLINE top PARENTIS p a nt s ZAR A b o o t s CHLOÈ w a tc h ROLEX b a n gl e s SAINT L AURENT, EMILS GREATGR ANDSON, VINTAGE r i n g s TOM WOOD, CARTIER , JANE KØNIG, VINTAGE v e l v e t clu t c h TR AVEL SOUVENIR

“Simplicity is the key to brilliance – in every way.”

www.mgmtofstyle.com


SOCIAL HUB

photos STEFAN DONGUS & CARO ROSS, t e x t CARO ROSS

As part of the premiere of the new !Hot Area at opti 2016 tradeshow in early January, we presented our very first Vintage E xhibition. The fancy glass displays were filled with personal favorites from the collections of four internationally renowned vintage eyewear collectors: Lee Yule (London), Christian Metzler (Pforzheim), Matti Piipponen (Helsinki), and Siegfried Schlögl (Vienna) dazzled opti 2016 visitors with their historic pieces. Visitors also embraced the opportunity to pose with these classic frames in our photo booth, and we‘re sharing some highlights in this feature. And since nobody knows these glasses better than their owners, we asked the four eyewear collectors the follwoing seven questions – live and uncut. Here we go. 01 Vintage glasses are just rare. And more beautiful. // 02 Around 1800. // 03 I would say 200 pairs. // 04 Being nice and meeting people. // 05 It was incredible to meet other collectors, see their collections, and do interviews. // 06 Back to the ’80s! // 07 What do you wish to see looking out of your window in the morning? The entire street filled with turtles. And I mean the entire street! Large turtles, small ones – all fulll!

CHRISTIAN METZLER W he n he‘ s not colle c t i n g vi n t a ge e y e w e ar, C hr i s t i an roam s the globe a s an int e r n a t ion al photogra phe r s p e c i ali z ed i n fa shion , mu sic , an d por t rai t shoot s .


SOCIAL HUB

H 01 H

Why collect vintage eyewear?

H 02 H

How many pairs of eyewear do you own?

H 03 H

And how many pairs are you wearing?

H 04 H

What‘s your passion besides vintage eyewear?

H 05 H

What was your personal standout at opti 2016?

H 06 H

You‘re offered a free ride in the DeLorean time machine from Back to the Future. Which target year would you choose?

H 07 H

Ask yourself a question…

LEE YULE A know n st aple i n t he e ye we ar bu s ine s s for ove r 2 0 ye ar s , L ee r uns t he hi ghly s ucc e s s f ul B r i d ge s an d Brows st or e in L ondon‘ s tr e n d in g Shor e d it c h ne i ghborhood .

01 Because vintage eyewear offers the entire history of eyewear manufacturing and design to choose from. // 02 My own collection contains maybe 300 pairs. // 03 I would say over 50 glasses. // 04 Music! I love my music. Jazz, soul, funk, disco and all kinds of electronic music, especially acid house. // 05 It was such a pleasure to meet the guys from your magazine and the other collectors Sigi, Matti and Christian – and to share stories and info about vintage frames. // 06That’s a difficult question. I guess sometime during the mid-1980s, to somewhere I could buy a whole bag of Cazal frames that have eluded me. Especially a »616«, »131«, and a »608«, and some »634«, also there were just so many great Optyl frames and of course some Miklis, too! // 07 Where do you see the future of eyewear design? For the really groundbreaking designs, we will need to look towards the new manufacturing processes like 3D-printing. The mix of materials and increasing ability to feature finer detail will make all sorts or things possible. Exciting times ahead!


SOCIAL HUB

MATTI PIIPPONEN W i th a s ele c tion of s e ve r al thou s and f r ame s , Matti runs vintage st or e R une b e rg in Sil mä l a s i in the hear t of Helsinki , and al so fi nds the time to design hi s own model s .

01 Vintage frames have exciting designs and amazing quality. In today’s eyewear scene, vintage is also the best choice to separate from the others. Before I applied for the School of Optometry in Helsinki, I used to buy old aviators from flea markets. Me and my friends used to wear them a lot in the late ‘90s just because they were so out at that time! What started as a funny thing turned into something more and more serious. // 2 I have around 100 frames in my personal collection. Then I have some thousands of frames in my shop, and some become part of my personal collection. // 03 I wear about 30 different pairs of eyeglasses and sunglasses, and I change my set from time to time. This means that my collection is also changing all the time. // 04 My passions apart from collecting vintage glasses are walking in the forest, playing frisbee golf, and skiing. // 05 My personal highlight was meeting the people for the first time in person that I have known for years from the collector groups. And I was also honored to be a part of the Vintage Exhibition. // 06 A time machine trip? 1992! All the great collector‘s pieces had already been produced. // 07 What is your dream frame? I can‘t name only one frame. With my dream frame, you can go from the ski slope straight onto a red carpet. So it must be very functional, yet glamorous at the same time.


SOCIAL HUB

H 01 H

Why collect vintage eyewear?

H 02 H

How many pairs of eyewear do you own?

H 03 H

And how many pairs are you wearing?

SIEGFRIED SCHLÖGL H av i n g c au ght t he col le c t or s ‘ bu g 1 2 ye ar s a go w ith a B e o i n g »5 7 0 0 « at a L ondon vint a g e st or e , Siegf r ied now sh ar e s his pa s s ion throu gh his blog , Sol a r is V i nt a ge.

H 04 H

What‘s your passion besides vintage eyewear?

H 05 H

What was your personal standout at opti 2016?

H 06 H

You‘re offered a free ride in the DeLorean time machine from Back to the Future. Which target year would you choose?

H 07 H

Ask yourself a question…

01 Because it‘s exciting to discover what inspired people in the past, and how trends and themes repeat themselves, while great design lives on. // 02 No idea, never counted them. Part of the collection is on my blog, the rest has not yet been photographed. // 03 Seven to eight, fitting the style and decade of my coat, hat, or jacket. // 04 Traveling, flea markets, exploring great stores, photographing subway stations, keeping the body moving. // 05 The people who fill the event with creativity and life, as well as the shared passion. opti, Cazal, Munich, DJs, Eyewear Magazine, friends and lovers... // 06 To the year 2070 – is that okay? Just to see what‘s on display at flea markets and what people consider vintage at that time. // 07 Will there still be flea markets and vintage aficionados in 2070? You bet!


SOCIAL HUB

EVERYBODY LOVES VINTAGE International visitors, vintage aficionados and newbies, familiar and new faces, curious minds and interested parties all went on a journey through time together – inspired by the vintage flair of the !Hot Area. And for our photo shoot during our magazine‘s Vintage Exhibition, all guests were free to

pose with their favorite styles. Our vintage collectors offered plenty to choose from, including brands such as Dior, Moschino, Porsche Carrera, and Serge Kirchhofer. Everybody loves vintage – check out the photos from opti 2016.


SOCIAL HUB

SERGE KIRCHHOFER MOSCHINO »M 253«

MOSCHINO BY PERSOL »M M502«

MATSUDA »28 0 9 «

SILHOUET TE » 8 505 Ph a ntom «

CAZAL »951«

UVEX »B i a t hlon b r ill e 20 0 «

MATSUDA »28 0 9 «


SOCIAL HUB

OP TIC AL AFFAIR E FOR L AGERFELD KL

SERGE KIRCHHOFER

DIOR »20 0 4 «

PORSCHE CARRER A »56 0 0 «

CAZAL » 870 «

PICASSO »372 9 «


C H A R M A N T G M B H E U R O P E | W W W. C H A R M A N T. D E | E T 1 7 8 8 3 - 5 3 3


BY S TEFAN K APFER s t ylin g JILL KRAMER m ake - up JULIA HEIERMANN p rod uc t ion H60OFFICE .COM p os t-p ro d uc t ion H60OFFICE .COM d i g i t a l a ss i s t a nt JAN DÜFELSIEK li g ht a ss i s t a nt ANNA MARTIN a ss i s t a nt CARLOS KRUG mo d el s EILEEN a t M4 MODELS & LISS a t STARS MODELMANAGEMENT loca t ion DUSSELDORF


SILHOUET TE »We s G ordon « pu llo v e r NADINE SAHM, ja c k e t & p a n t s JENNIFER PARYL AK , sho e s COS

SILHOUET TE »We s G ordon « sh i r t TIGER OF SWEDEN, c u lot t e CAMEO, sho e s COS


E Y E VA N 7285 »742« ja c k e t JENNIFER PARYL AK , p a n t s COS, sho e s ZAR A , b a g TIGER OF SWEDEN

E Y E VA N 7285 »742« ja c k e t JENNIFER PARYL AK , pu llo v e r TOMMY HILFIGER, p a nt s H& M, sho e s ZAR A , b a g TIGER OF SWEDEN


BL ACKFIN »We s ton « p a nt s CAMEO, ja c k e t JENNIFER PARYL AK , b a g MARION STRELOW

BL ACKFIN »Wa t e rhou s e «


BARTON PERREIR A »A u rora « ja c k e t JENNIFER PARYL AK, p a nt s MARION STRELOW, b a g KNOMO

KERBHOLZ »B e r t hol d « ja c k e t JENNIFER PARYL AK


Gテ傍TI ツサTajo - S ツォ sh i r t MARION STRELOW, b a g MARION STRELOW, p a n t s COS


Die 4 Tage der Optik

vom 23. bis zum 26. September 2016

IHR EINZIGARTIGES MESSEERLEBNIS

silmoparis.com


SPECTR MAGAZINE    DON’T LOOK AT ME It‘s part of every photo model‘s job to say, “Look at me!” They are keen professionals in the art of attracting attention and posing in front of the camera. Always projecting a vibe, always seductive, often downright shameless. Then again, some things are better left tucked away behind the scenes, not put in your face, for everyone to see. After all, Spectr is a Visionary Magazine, and we want our readers to create their own vision from what they see on these pages. They can let their fantasy run freely, pick up images and ideas, and find their own interpretations. Everyone has their own vision. And with that said, we want to make it as easy as possible for our readers to access our magazine, which is where the following option comes in. A subscription is the most convenient way to access every issue as soon as it comes out, delivered freshly to your doorstep, neatly packaged. Subscribing to Spectr Magazine is like a real-life RSS-feed of everything new and exciting from the world’s leading brands and designers. And for opticians, Spectr offers special packages with multiple magazines. Plus, our Premium Partners can customize their issues with their own logo, creating an elevated gift for their customers. Find

OAKLEY »P itchm a n R «

out about all our customization and partner options at spectr-magazine.com. And please feel free to direct all inquiries to presse@eyewear-magazine.com

photo STEFAN DONGUS s t ylin g JENNIFER KALEITZIS h air & m ake -up TE AM WEIDEMANN mod el VALERIE a t M4


photo ULRICH HARTMANN s t ylin g JOCHEN POHLMANN h air & m ake -up THEO SCHNÜRER mod el MICHAEL LOVE a t ICE MODELS

LEISURE SOCIET Y »T ilm an«

OUTRO

Watch Out SPECTR ISSUE 18 SEPTEMBER 14, 2016


SPECTR Issue 17  

Japan Special, Design Walk in Paris, Downtown New York Interview with Modo, Go See in Copenhagen, Spectr Photo Shoots in New York, São Paulo...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you