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GERMAN ENGLISH FRENCH Nr 18  – iii/2016 EURO 15


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I N S P I R E D B Y N A T U R E ’ S E F F O R T L E S S B E A U T Y.


SALTO P TI C S .CO M


E D I TO R I A L

22


E D I TO R I A L

photo HOLGER VON KROSIGK

Je m’en fous / I don’t care / Ist mir egal.

And just to get it straight from the start: We’re not sure if this will

Living in a time where the number of burnout cases is drastically sky-

be a regular institution, it’s more of a spontaneous decision. A bit of a

rocketing, aren’t we best advised not to take life and all its challenges

love letter to our neighbors across the border who have had such a

all that seriously? I think we are. The constant drive to perform and

significant influence on European culture and its underlying values,

exhibit the utmost correct conduct towards others and ourselves is

not to mention their delicious wines, breads and pastries. It’s our

most of all one thing: totally exhausting! Most people would do well

pleasure and privilege to indulge in some francophilia with this issue.

by taking some time out by saying, “I don’t care!” But then again, is

Matching the trifecta of languages, we’re releasing this issue with

not taking life seriously just a mere surface patch? Perhaps it is to some

three different faces on the cover. The casting and photo shoot happened

extend, and we need to carefully weigh when and to what extend we

in Berlin, where we took up residence for an entire week in a pop-up

indulge in this attitude. At any rate, we could all start by not taking

photo studio. On that note, thanks to everyone who dropped by and

ourselves too seriously. The French spirit of Je m’en fous – or “I don’t

worked with us. We really enjoyed working and living outside our

care” – is the key to a more relaxed, healthier and pleasant existence.

habitual environment – and will happily do it again for our upcoming

Implementing it in your day-to-day life can rapidly increase your

issues. The list of eligible cities is huge – we’re considering a pop-up

quality of life, trust us. And melodically, no other language does Je

photo studio in Tokyo this autumn… and perhaps in New York next

m’en fous better than French; true music to the ears.

spring? Or should we head to Copenhagen? Or Barcelona? Who

But what are we actually trying to say? To not give a hoot about

wants to join us?

anything at all? No, of course not. There are some things we cannot

For this issue, we also spent some time in the greater Los Angeles

afford to ignore. For instance the question that kept popping up during

area, where we did a photo shoot in Santa Clarita and found the time

the recent Paris eyewear tradeshow: Why don’t you publish your

to interview Garrett and Larry Leight at glco as well as David Rose at

magazine in French? I was tempted to answer with another question,

salt. for

namely: “Where would people need it? Oh sure, in France… but

lots of insights, lots of style, lots of personality, and lots of eyewear.

where else?” Well, that kind of not caring may have been a bit harsh,

Not to be taken too seriously, but thank you very much for caring!

and we’re sorry. So for our 18th issue, we’re extending a hand to our

SD

French readers by introducing the French edition of SPECTR.

23

a Design Talk. Next to these locations, our current issue offers


www.ic-berlin.de

no adverts, just buy our glasses | Ralph wearing ‘Panorama’


AARHUS.AMSTERDAM.BERLIN.COLOGNE.COSTA MESA. FLORENCE.GÜTERSLOH.LOS ANGELES. MUNICH.NEW YORK.SALONIKA. SANKT PETER ORDING.SANTA CLARITA.SAO PAOLO.

KARMOIE »Captain«


EDITOR IN CHIEF Stefan Dongus dongus@spectr-magazine.com m: +49.(0)151.14271817

EDITOR Astrid Spiering press@spectr-magazine.com

LAYOUT Caro Ross ross@spectr-magazine.com

CONTRIBUTORS Dirk Vogel Piera Montenero Enting Zhang Tamara Asmuth Astrid Spiering

PHOTOGRAPHERS Philippe Arlt Angelika Buettner Stefan Dongus Burkhard Henrichs Sacha Tassilo Höchstetter Stefan Kapfer Sabine Liewald Michael Mann Andrea Miliotti Marie Schmidt Raphael Schmitz Silberwald

TRANSLATION ENGLISH Dirk Vogel

TRANSLATION FRENCH Franca Rainer

PROOFREADING Franca Rainer

PUBLISHER Monday Publishing GmbH Kamekestr. 20-22 50672 Köln t: +49.(0)221.945267-11 f: +49.(0)221.945267-27 www.spectr-magazine.com www.facebook.com/spectrmagazine

GÖTTI »Camil« & »Caja«

CEOS Stefan Dongus, Holger von Krosigk

DISTRIBUTION DPV Network GmbH Postfach 570 412 22773 Hamburg www.dpv.de

PRINT F&W Mediencenter GmbH Holzhauser Feld 2 83361 Kienberg fw-medien.de SPECTR is published three times per year.

cov e r-photos STEFAN DONGUS s t yli n g JOCHEN POHLMANN h ai r & m ake - up MARKUS KOPP re touch GLAMTOUCH mod els SARA a t TUNE, DAV Y a t CORE MANAGEMENT & EKATERINA a t MOST WANTED DEUTSCH ENGLISCH FRANZÖSISCH Nr 18 – iii /2016 D 9,– € | AT 11,– € CH sfr 14,50

GERMAN ENGLISH FRENCH Nr 18 – iii/2016 EURO 15

German Version

English Version

ALLEMAND ANGLAIS FRANÇAIS Nr 18 – iii/2016 EURO 15

French Version

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This magazine and all its contents may not be re-used, distributed or stored in electronic databases in any way without prior written permission from the publishers. All inquiries regarding the usage of copyrighted materials, as well as the reproduction of excerpts in other formats must be directed to the publishers. The opinions reflected in this magazine do not necessarily reflect those of the publishers. All rights reserved.


MARIE SCHMIDT, PHOTOGRAPHER Sony and Schwarzkopf have worked with her. The same goes for photographic magazines Hong Kong, Men’s Folio Singapore, and C-Heads Magazine. And we at SPECTR have also just joined the list of clients of Marie Schmidt, the highly talented and professional photographer who’s built quite the track record at only 29 years of age. A go-getter from the start, Marie lost no time after graduating from German high school and went straight into advertising photography. After several internships and assistant gigs, she founded her own business under the name Studio4 right around the corner from our offices in 2013, specializing in beauty, fashion, and portrait photography. We’re really excited to enlist her services for this issue on a few high-profile shoots: In sunny Los Angeles, she not only captured father and son power team Garrett and Larry Leight, but also David Rose, designer at California brand salt. And before she could finally pack it in and fly home, we also convinced her to lend her vision to this issue’s Backyard photo shoot, because with Marie’s busy schedule, you never know when you get another chance.

MARKUS KOPP, HAIR & MAKE-UP ARTIST Not many people in the fashion world can boast a Medal of Honor from the Swedish Crown for their efforts. For Markus it’s the ultimate proof that he not only plays nice with international top models, but also with bona fide royalty. The master hairdresser and director of the Schwarzkopf Academy Hamburg has spent the past 20 years making really good looking people

INSIGHT

SPECTR Employees of the Issue #18

appear even more beautiful. In his job and private life, Markus enjoys

Our second issue since relaunching under the name SPECTR once again pushed our team to

traveling and exploring new locations. His work as a hair & make-up artist

the limit. It’s no walk in the park filling 230 pages with great photos, enlightening copy, and

has brought numerous assignments from glossy magazines such as Vogue,

stylish designs. Actually, it’s a ton of work and practically impossible without the dedication and

Elle, Glamour... and now also SPECTR Magazine. For this issue’s Secrecy

passion of everyone involved. At this point, we would like to extend our sincere gratitude to

photo shoot, he made the trip from Munich to our pop-up photo studio

everyone who had a hand in this issue, because none of this would be possible without them.

in the German capital. Judging by the look of our trifecta of covers for this

As our employees of the issue, we would like to introduce graphic designer Caro Ross, hair

issue, it was well worth the effort. And as we have learned, the secret of

and make-up artist Markus Kopp, and photographer Marie Schmidt.

his success – although challenging for photographers at times – is treating every model’s hair in just the same way: Nothing less than perfect will do.

CARO ROSS, GRAPHIC DESIGNER Caro is in charge of designing this magazine – and we couldn’t be happier. Because the 26-yearold could have easily stayed in the UK after finishing her design and PR studies. But ever since she returned to Cologne, she has made herself indispensable at our offices one year ago. From issue #16 onward she has cultivated the look of our magazine, newsletter, and website with a keen eye for detail and powerful design language. Any stylistic improvements during the relaunch of SPECTR can be fully credited to Caro, who also quietly exerts an influence in other areas. On any given day, she helps complete editorial texts, organize photo shoots, and also look after our sister publication, sneaker s, all the while casually humming and singing whatever jazz or soul song is going through her head at any given time. A true all-round talent and MVP, we’re glad to have her.


CONTENT

44 CHATROOM

106 SECREC Y

172

THE C AGE

72 LOW TIDE

140 JOUR FIXE

200

BACK YARD

92 UNFR AMED

152 SO HOT NOW

210

BY A NGE L IK A BU E T T N E R

BY ST E FA N K A P F E R

BY M IC H A E L M A N N

BY ST E FA N DONGUS

BY A N DR E A M IL IOT T I

BY SA BI N E L I E WA L D

BY SAC H A TA SSILO HÖC HST E T T E R

BY M A R I E SC H M I D T

UPRIGHT BY PH IL I P P E A R LT


CONTENT

34 INSPIRED BY NATURE

132 SIREN’ S CALLING

42 + 104

164 BR AND PROFILE

SA LT.’S DAV I D ROSE

DESIGNER PAGES R A L PH A N DE R L & SE RGIO EUSE BI

K BL COL L EC T ION SHOOT

KOMONO GOE S OP T IC A L

56 THE FRENCH CONNEC TION

166 CURATED SHOPPING

60 SUN TAT TOOS

184 MARKUS T

62 LIK E FATHER, LIK E SON

190

THEME SHOOT

86 TITANIUM MEE T S NATURE

192

MULTI DIMENSIONAL UNIVERSE

88 GROWN UP

198

HORN MEE T S INNOVATION

SU Z Y GL A M GOE S A MST E R DA M

118 UNIVERSUS COLLEC TION

222

ARTIST COOPER ATION

122 NINE E YE WE AR

228

DROP THE PRESENT

A N DY WOL F GOE S M E TA L

M A RT I N & M A RT I N

GLCO – C A L I FOR NI A N E Y E W E A R DY NA ST Y

HOF F M A N N T I-L I N E

BY A DR I A N M A RW I T Z

L IGH T W E IGH T LUXU RY VS . SOPH IST IC AT E D V ISI BIL I T Y

126 FLE YE COPENHAGEN

N E W: FAC E | ST Y L E S | C A M PA IGN

M AGA SI N, COLOGN E

TA L K I NG DE SIGN ON T H E M E TA-L E V E L

ROU N D | ROU N D

GÖT T I GOE S 3D

ROL F SP EC TAC L E S MONOC E ROS COL L EC T ION

E T NI A BA RC E LONA X J E A N-M IC H E L BA SQU I AT

BY BU R K H A R D H E N R IC HS


c a z a l

9 8 6


D E S I G N TA L K

INSPIRED BY NATURE salt. Designs By David Rose DAVID ROSE Age 47 | Born in California | Professional Education High School | Worked for Optical Shop of Aspen (OSA) & Oliver Peoples | Designer since 2006 | Passion Outdoors | Sports Surfing, Running, Cycling, Fishing 34


D E S I G N TA L K

California-based eyewear brand salt. commands a unique position among today’s top-shelf independent labels: On one hand, the company’s frames are exclusively available at only the finest optical stores. On the other hand, the brand from Costa Mesa cultivates a deep, down-to-earth connection to nature. salt. designer David Rose calls this delicate balance between fashion and reductionism, “fashionable, but not in a flashy way.” Although the California brand feels most at home in a cosmopolitan environment, its fundamentals and design inspirations are forever rooted in nature. This is also a reflection of David Rose’s upbringing and personal environmental background. It’s also highly interesting to note that his frequent excursions into the great outdoors always yield a fresh bounty of new design ideas. Which is actually not that unusual, keeping in mind that David came into eyewear design via various detours. Going with the flow, for this spectr interview and photo shoot we accompanied the self-educated designer into his natural getaway close to the company headquarters. Here’s a first-hand look at where fresh ideas grow – and the road that led salt. to where it is today – as David provides a glimpse into his personal design process.

photo MARIE SCHMIDT, s t il l s RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

David, thanks for taking us out here. Please give us a short introduction – some hard facts. I was born and raised in Southern California and currently reside in Costa Mesa, California.

What is your professional background? How did you come into eyewear design? I started working at Optical Shop of Aspen in 1998 as a warehouse worker, picking, packing and adjusting frames. I had no optical background whatsoever, other than I loved eyewear. I still have the first pair of skiing sunglasses that I purchased when I was ten. In 2002 I moved to Oliver Peoples and handled all of their manufacturing for brands like Oliver Peoples, Paul Smith, and Mosley Tribes. It was a multi-faceted role where I took the information from the designer and transferred all the specifics to the manufacturers. As my interest in eyewear design grew, I started soaking everything up like a sponge. I didn’t do any designing for Oliver Peoples but the knowledge I gained in manufacturing and design process was invaluable. The first time I started designing was in 2006 with salt. 35


D E S I G N TA L K

What was your motivation to join salt. ? In 2005, Oliver Peoples was purchased by Oakley. So things were beginning to shift a bit. People I worked with for a long time, and respected, were leaving and the dynamics changed. I wanted something new. One day, I was talking to a friend of mine, Ron Smith. He used to work at Mosley Tribes as a sales manger and was consulting for salt. at the time. We eventually started talking about design and he asked me if I would be interested in designing for salt. They

asked me to come and meet them and eventually offered

me the job. Of course I said yes.

Sounds like a dream offer. With salt. being located in California, does the sunny weather affect the company philosophy in any way? Well, the sunny weather doesn’t hurt – that’s for sure. It definitely

SALT.

draws you outdoors probably more often then other regions of the

»A v i a t o r S t r i k e r «

world.

But don’t these outdoor options conflict with people’s work performance? We have a unique blend of people that each contribute qualities such as loyalty, a hard-working ethic, intelligence, respectfulness, and varying perspectives. Everyone here wants to see the brand succeed. There is a willingness from each person to put in the extra effort to make sure this happens.

We get the impression from talking to other salt. employees that their commitment to the company is a bit higher than elsewhere. How come?

SALT. »Br idges«

salt. is

actually a smaller company which lends itself to deeper

connections with and between the employees. Everyone pretty much wears multiple hats, which also lends itself to creating an atmosphere for more personal connections and contributions to

SALT.

the company. It creates a sense of ownership with the successes

»Z u c k e r «

versus failure of salt. As a result, there is a genuine personable attitude amongst the employees. They enjoy what they do.

Do you work in a design team or are you the only designer? I’m the only designer at salt. However, I really enjoyed the process of collaborating on a couple of aviator designs with aether apparel. aether

is a high-end technical apparel maker based in California.

The result of the collabo was a timeless but technical piece of eyewear. We’re also doing a case and frame concept with briefing luggage later

SALT.

this year.

Let’s talk about your approach. Working as an autodidact and a “lone wolf” designer, would you say that your design process is special?

» M u rd o c k «

36


D E S I G N TA L K

I’d like to think so, however, I’m not super familiar with the design processes used by others. So it’s hard for me to comment.

But you might imagine the difference?

In what way is your natural approach reflected in your brand communications? Our ties to nature play a major role in our communications. Pairing

Most of my education is visual or from personal experience. I take

frames with a shot from nature, or a frame with friends in nature.

a lot of my inspiration from being outdoors at the beach, in the

Also, like most of our quadrant picture collages, we use images that

mountains or desert. For me, the purest form of design comes

depict the sea, air, land and timelessness – which is where the name salt.

from the shapes and colors that nature provides us. I love to store up ideas while exploring, and then realize those elements into my designs. I don’t know how different it is from others, but that’s my personal process.

Inspiration from being outdoors... how exactly does that translate into your actual eye-wear products? It varies. It’s not as literal as going out into nature and finding

comes from.

So the acronym salt. is at the same time part of the brand’s philosophy? That makes salt. something different than your typical fashion brand, right? Well, I have always tried to be fashionable – but not in a flashy way. I want to be unique, original and have a cool individual style. I’ve always considered bigger high-end fashion a little extravagant and a

shapes that are round or square, or something. But there are certain things such as how colors play off each other and blend and separate and coexist. That’s what I bring back into making design choices.

So your inspiration revolves mainly around colors? No, the inspiration isn’t always around colors. For instance, I used a well-balanced water drop on a blade of grass to design our latest beta titanium temple tip end. And in the past, I’ve used a half-crescent moon to design a custom hinge mount.

Speaking of beta titanium, what about your materials? Are they also influenced by nature? Well, maybe indirectly. Keeping with an active outdoor influence, using lightweight performance materials

Guided by outdoor inspirations: David doing field work.

such as titanium and beta titanium ultimately gives you that lighter,

bit too costumey for my tastes.

stronger, and more comfortable fit and feel.

What is special about your materials and finishes? Haven’t materials become rather standardized at this point? Material choices may have a certain standardization about them right now. But creativity comes in the use of application. It’s like a big salad – the lettuce is standard like the acetate or titanium material, but the combination of what you add to the lettuce is what makes it yours such as coloring, contouring, and or finishing.

Where do you find the best inspiration for your creative recipes? In the mountains or by the sea? There isn’t one more important or more influential than the other. They are all equally valuable.

But you must have some favorites... What are your Top 5 inspiring places and activities? White-water rafting on the Rogue River in Oregon, snowboarding in Utah, running in the hills in El Moro, California, camping in the Sierra Mountains, and surfing anywhere. 37

Compared to high-end fashion, how do you see the position of your label? Luxury brands come at it from a different philosophy, including their use of models. salt. tries to keep the brand more aspirational, but also approachable and attainable.

Is this a unique position on the market or are there other brands close to salt.? I don’t think there is a particular brand like salt. in the eyewear industry. I mean, every brand has its own uniqueness. Often it’s based around people who are creating the experience and how they participate in that culture or environment. At salt. we focus on simple, yet meaningful things like nature or travel, which then contribute to the development and inspiration of our creative output.

What else would you say is unique about salt. eyewear? Well, for us it’s always fit first. That is very important to me. Once that is set and figured into the design, I move on to the next step,


D E S I G N TA L K

SALT. »Rober t«

concept by using titanium and beta titanium as materials.

Do you think that salt. consumers are different than most of the others? I believe our customers like our laid-back sensibility. They are looking for quality with long lasting style and function, together with useful

SALT.

technology and longevity.

»Lee«

Is it important for customers to show their commitment to nature? No, there are no prerequisites to wearing our frames.

Let’s talk about the new collection. Is it dedicated to a special theme?

which is figuring out what material to use and how to contour. But

I would call it minimal utility mixed with contrast textures and

for me it’s definitely about designing from the fit out.

What are the most important technical features of salt. glasses? We utilize polarization. Every pair of salt. sunglasses is 100% pola-

colors.

What has changed compared to previous collections? This time there’s more use of combinations between materials.

rized. I think we’re the only brand in our category that is able to say that, which is a strong statement. Titanium and beta titanium have also become a staple for salt. aviators. With titanium and beta titanium being classic, tried, tested and sturdy materials, they are

We couldn’t help but notice that the names of the new models are all inspired by characters from the comedy Airplane? For a brand with strong natural roots that’s a bit surprising...

starting to show up regularly in our optical frames as well.

It’s just our way to have fun with the frame names. For example,

Out of all your collections, both sun and RX, what is your favorite model?

Airplane is a reference to AIR – the entire movie takes place in the air. Another example is The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou. That

For me it’s the »Kramer«. It’s a mix of vintage and modern with a

movie takes place primarily in the SEA. In some way, I’m always

little bit of Americana eased into it.

choosing a reference to sea, air, land and timelessness.

And which model s the most successful one?

Speaking of time – we’ve reached the end of our interview. Finally, which spot is next on your list of places to visit and be inspired by?

In optical frames, the »Zissou« and in sunnies the »Taft«.

What’s your explanation for this popularity? II think the »Zissou« has a smart and professional look that will

Iceland!

always be appealing. And the »Taft« has a different take on a vintage 38

Great choice. We’ll see you there!


l o v i n g str angers welcome to our

p a r a l l e l u n i v e r s e

d e s i g n e of the mont n o v e m b e 2 0 1

r h r 4


D E S I G N E R PA G E

FROM PERSON TO BRAND Behind many eyewear labels there is one person or several individuals who are particularly relevant for the brand’s external persona. And when that person strikes a special appearance wearing his or her outfit of choice, we’re happy to dedicate an entire page in our new segment, Designer

IC! BERLIN

Page. In this issue, we’re fea-

»Maik O.«

turing the fully decked-out Ralph at ic! berlin and Sergio at kuboraum.

p a n t s MILITÄR- MEIS TER j a c k e t ÖZ TÜR K , AT FLE A MAR KET KR EUZBERG b a g LOUIS VUIT TON FOR ALDI SUISSE – LIMITED C APSUL A- COLLEC TION r i d i n g b o o t s R ICK Y SAR K ANY u n d e r p a n t s HER MES s t o c k i n g s NET TO photo STEFAN DONGUS

42


s t yl in g VIVIANA RODRIGUEZ a t CREATIVEMANAGEMENT.COM h air & m ake - up STEFAN KEHL mod els BARA a t WOMEN360 MANAGEMENT NY, ADAM, BENJAMIN & MILES a t VNYMODELS.COM d i git al a ssi s t a nt SARI MORGANSTERN photo a ssi s t ant ZORAN JELENIC pos tp ro duc tion BENEDIKTE MESLIN loca tion HOTEL “CONRAD NEW YORK” 102 NORTH AVENUE, NYC


» m o d . 8 8 5 -2«

-

c o a t LUCIO C A S TRO, d e n i m p a n t s R AG & BONE , p o l o OR IGINAL PENGUIN, b o o t s COLE HA AN

» m o d . 8 8 7-1«

-

p a r k a Z AR A , s h i r t HEIKE , p a n t s Z AR A , s n e a k e r s H& M


»T T 45 «

-

c o a t NUDE , l e a t h e r s k i r t NUDE , t o p H& M, s h o e s IV Y KIR ZHNER

» E X4 01T 51«

-

s u i t J. HILBUR N, s h i r t J. HILBUR N, s h o e s FLOR SHEIM


»Wa n j «

-

s w e a t e r NUDE , l e a t h e r s k i r t HEIKE , p u r s e CHANEL


»Milan«

-

p o l o s w e a t e r DAVID HART, p a n t s J. HILBUR N, h a t S TET SON


CONRAD NEW YORK Exklusive spectr Photo Shoot Location Doing it big in the Big Apple. For this exclusive SPECTR photo shoot in Downtown Manhattan, photographer Angelika Buettner and team found an exclusive location: Renowned for its modern architecture and breathtaking views, the Conrad New York hotel provided the perfect backdrop for capturing the latest in eyewear design. Located at 102 North End Ave in the heart of lower Manhattan, the hotel is steeped in high-end design and surrounded by New York’s most prominent and artistic hot-spots, including Tribeca and SoHo. With its 463 suite rooms, the Conrad New York boasts a special kind of charm and chic, including fantastic views on nearby Hudson River Park. The views are best enjoyed from the Conrad’s Green Roof: Sixteen floors above the hustle and bustle of Manhattan, the roof offers a quiet oasis. Guests can kick back with a drink from the striking rooftop bar and enjoy an endless, magnificent view over Manhattan. Needless to say, Angelika and team found plenty of inspiration at this iconic hotel. Thanks for the hospitality. Visit the Conrad New York at www.conradnewyork.com

55


L A B E L U P D AT E

ANDY WOLF GOES METAL The French Connection s t ills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

andy wolf invites audiences into a world of contemporary design that

transcends established boundaries. For its latest offering, the Austrian label introduces a world premiere: the first all-metal frames, hand-made at a small French manufacture purchased solely for producing the new line. As a new addition to the andy wolf line-up, the metal frames complement existing collections Love and Soul, thereby taking metal beyond the label’s White Heat line of frames.

» 4719 «

» 4721«

56


L A B E L U P D AT E

Ten years ago in 2006, the andy wolf barged onto the global eyewear

stage. Right from the start, the three company founders – namely Andreas (Andy), Wolfgang (Wolf), and Katharina – pursued the same goal: creating classic and individualized designer frames for that special customer. Ever since its beginnings, the label has placed great emphasis on quality, represented by the seal of quality, “Hand-Made in Austria.” The production of one single frame involves 50 employees going through 90 assembly steps in the label’s in-house workshop in the Steiermark region. Quality beats quantity at andy wolf: Every single frame undergoes a seven-day polish to achieve a premium finish. Overall, producing one frame can take

» 4711«

up to an entire month. With this much love for detail, every single pair of glasses has its own origin story. What’s more, the label has always trusted in using sustainably produced resources, including acetate sourced from hardened cotton fibers. The “natural acetate” is one example out of many for andy wolf’s commitment to fair conditions and the environment. Rounding out the offering, the label cultivates perfectly contoured fits for optimal comfort. This has garnered the attention of countless celebrities – including eyewear aficionados Demi Lovato and Lady Gaga – and made the label a constant presence on the fashion events circuit. And because fashion is all about constant change and reinvention, andy wolf

» H u m p h re y v a n K n e e f e l «

is pursuing a new direction

with key new styles. For the first time in brand history, the label introduces 100% metallic frames to its offering. To talk about the when, how, and why of this bold decision, we sat down with designer and CEO Katharina Plattner in our SPECTR Label Update.

57


L A B E L U P D AT E

Hello Katharina, how has andy wolf developed over the past few years?

Well, our offices and sales, marketing, and design departments will remain here in Hartberg. That’s not going to change. Additionally,

Stagnation is a total no-no for me, which is why andy wolf is always

our production site in France subscribes to the same high andy wolf

moving and changing as we go along. During the last year, we split

quality standards. And we also benefit from the vast know-how of

our collections into three separate lines and also launched our first

our French employees about working with metal to offer our clients

line of POS-furniture with an eyewear frame paternoster. This year

high-grade metallic eyewear under the andy wolf label. As the only

saw the expansion of our PR-office and showroom in Berlin. And to

side note, we had to enroll our production manager into French lan-

complement our own acetate manufacture in the town of Hartberg,

guage classes so that he can communicate with the factory better.

That sounds like an ambitious undertaking. Why did you decide on adding metal to the line?

we also purchased a small factory in the French town of Jura that specializes in manufacturing metal eyewear.

An entire factory solely for producing metal frames, and located in France – that sounds ambitious.

We think that metal is an exciting material and a great supplement to our existing collection. On top of that, there are lots of different

Yes, it probably does. When we founded andy wolf, we took the

finishing options and we have already embossed some sample mo-

long-term perspective and secured our own acetate manufacturing

dels with a special look and surface feel.

Will you be introducing the new material as a stand-alone metal collection?

site in the heart of Austria. Now we wanted to expand our portfolio with our own metal production, which was not feasible because of spatial constraints in Hartberg. We had been on the lookout for a

We have already divided the andy wolf collection into three separate

metal frames manufacture that suits our demands for some time, and

lines that represent their own form language. Soul is our classic line

finally found the right match in Jura.

with established eyewear shapes in quiet color palettes. The Love

What kinds of benefits come from having your very own manufacture?

collection includes extravagant frames in exciting color combinations, while White Heat represents purist metal frames with nose

Our production site has built years of experience in manufacturing

bridges and temples crafted from acetate. So we’re not going to add a

metal eyewear frames. This unlocks a great degree of know-how and

fourth line to the portfolio, but rather integrate the new metal styles

love for metal as a material that we can leverage.

in shapes that fit the Love and Soul lines.

How do you maintain your high quality standards across different countries and factory divisions?

What will the actual launch collection look like? The initial metal frames will for the most part consist of classic shapes and colors from the Soul collection. This allows us to get a feel for how the market will respond to these glasses. For upcoming tradeshows, we will also be increasing our focus on Love frames in our tried-and-tested andy wolf look.

How about the mix between prescription frames and sunglasses? And what kind of shapes will feature in the collection? Our first metal collection will consist of 13 prescription frames and five sunglass styles. Shapes will draw from a well-rounded mix of rounded, panto, and square frames in an assortment of sizes.

Will the new material also unlock new color concepts? The color concept of our first metal eyewear collection will be composed of understated colors such as gold, antique gold, rosé gold, silver, and black.

Sounds exciting. When and where will you premiere the frames in real life?

ANDY WOLF

We will be presenting the frames for the first

» 4710 «

time at Silmo 2016 in Paris. We can’t wait to see how our customers are going to respond.

www.andy-wolf.com 58


F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

MARTIN & MARTIN Sun Tattoos For Neo Avant-Garde photo MARIE SCHMIDT, s tills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

For the past few years, Cologne-based Martin & Martin has built

Resulting from the elaborate frame design, the form language is

a reputation for understated frame styles with a predominant focus

one of avantgarde and refinement. At the same time, the “tattoo”

on prescription eyewear. Now it’s time to go back to the wild

patterns contrast nicely with the rather subtle choice of materials

experimentation of the brand’s early beginnings – enter the new

– another Martin & Martin calling card – that are hand-processed

sunglasses collection. For inspiration, the designs draw heavily

in Germany.

on the currently ubiquitous tattoo trend. But for a special twist,

Now all you need to do is spend a few hours lounging at a coffee

Martin & Martin finds beauty in all things non-permanent: the

shop with your head following the course of the sun – and there

collection is banking on sun tan on the skin instead of ink under-

goes your “sun tattoo.” At the same time, the use of antireflective

neath.

coating on the back surface of the lenses helps keep a close eye

Marking the skin’s surface with “sun tattoos,” the new sun-

on the action. The unique combination of cool shades and edgy

glasses collection features patterned ridges in the frames, which

solar-powered tattoo studio is now available at fine optical stores.

leave tiny imprints from UV-light. The design is a master class in simplicity and reductionism. The rather generously sized frames www.martinxmartin.com

are parted in a way that constantly exposes the skin to sunlight.

60


F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

»Nick«

»Norber t«

»Nadja«

»Nele«

61


INTERVIE W

GLCO: LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON

Larry and Garrett Leight – a Californian  e yewear dynasty int e r v ie w STEFAN DONGUS, photos MARIE SCHMIDT, s tills SILBERWALD

64


INTERVIE W

65


INTERVIE W

Father and son relationships can be difficult. Just take the story of Laius and Oedipus, or for a more contemporary example, Darth Vader and Luke Skywalker, all bloody messes in their own right. Things can get especially heated when father and son are working in the same trade. “Never mix family and business,” is an old saying – for a good reason – conveniently thrown to the wind by Garrett and Larry Leight. Because earlier this year, the two Californian eyewear designers decided to join forces and work together under the same banner. What makes the Leight’s father-and-son dynamic even more special is that both men are rather strong-willed characters. Each has built a successful business by doing things his own way, which now opens up an enormous amount of freedom and creative potential in their work at garrett leight california optical, or in short, glco. At this point in time, the Leights range among the preeminent dynasties within the eyewear business. Larry Leight created the formula for the quintessentially cool California eyewear label with Oliver Peoples. He cultivated a unique style and also earned the spoils as a businessman. At a rather young age, Garret created also his own eyewear label, glco, embraced by over 800 partner opticians worldwide, and counting. Now the two have crossed paths again, with the father joining the son’s business. The eyewear business is watching as the founder of Oliver Peoples lends his design chops to glco. And as if that wasn’t enough, the two are already setting goals beyond the brand platform. With their new label mr. leight, Garrett and Larry will pursue their creative visions with products positioned in the premium price range. For the when, why, and how, spectr dropped by the Venice Beach offices of glco to talk to Mr. Leight – both junior and senior. Welcome to the Big Leagues.

to this success?

THE WAY OF THE SON

GL: First and foremost, we focused on creating high quality proWith glco, Garrett went from the bottom to the top of the charts

ducts and original designs for a great price. We focused on every

practically over night. The cool California indie label was only founded

detail of the frames from custom hinges to custom core wires,

in 2011, but has already become a mainstay among celebrities and

laser engraving, glass lenses, and even some custom acetate. The

avant-garde opticians.

history of Oliver Peoples and its excellence in quality and style not only taught me but forced me to live up to it. Then we paired that

Garrett, what was your initial motivation to start your own eyewear label?

with our true Venice Beach DNA and aspirational lifestyle into our marketing and people could visualize what it meant to be a part of

Garrett Leight: I was just very passionate about having my own

our brand.

Can you break glco’s philosophy down to five keywords?

company. I wanted to prove to myself and others that I have good

GL: Quality, style, value, service, California.

ideas and I could be a leader and create something that I could call my own. After working for Oliver Peoples for two years, I felt I had learned enough and I saw an opportunity to create something

How come so many celebrities wear your frames? Are you wellconnected in the show business or do they just drop by the store? GL: Celebrities are no different from any human except that more

special within the eyewear industry. So I went for it.

Then things happened rather quickly. glco became an internationally renowned brand in the blink of an eye. What contributed 64

people know them. At the root, they want to look good and they’d like for people to notice them. I believe they genuinely like the


INTERVIE W

»McKinley«

GARRETT LEIGHT CALIFORNIA OPTICAL Founded 2011 | Located Los Angeles | Number of opticians worldwide 800 | Own stores In Venice, San Francisco, Hollywood und New York

designs we make and word of mouth is the strongest form of adver-

THE WAY OF THE FATHER

tising. And in Los Angeles, at this point, it’s safe to say it’s cool to Young Garrett could hardly have chosen a better role model. His father,

have a pair of glco glasses.

You did not start out completely from scratch. What kind of support did you get from your father, Larry Leight, while building glco?

the grand seigneur behind Oliver Peoples, is one of the luminaries of the eyewear business. Even after selling the label he founded in 1986 to Luxottica, Larry still kept the reigns as the head designer until the very end.

GL: I’m lucky enough to not have to grow up like my father did with nothing. My parents worked their ass off and created a successful company. I was lucky enough that my parents had given me shares in Oliver Peoples when I was 5 years old, and when Oliver

Mr. Leight, your son’s rather young eyewear label represents ultra-cool California style. Does that take you back to your own beginnings with Oliver Peoples?

Peoples sold in 2005, that put money in my bank account. I invested

Larry Leight: We were so excited about our ideas and our strategy it

all of that money in my company. I am so fortunate that my parents

gave us chills throughout our bodies everyday. We knew that consu-

did that for me. Outside of that, my father didn’t contribute to the

mers who care about their appearance and their style would really

building of glco. Other than being a supportive dad who encouraged

be drawn to our creations. We still went into with no expectations

me and inspired me through his journey.

of sales but only focused on building our dream and effecting people‘s life with our eyewear. We believed in ourselves like Mohammed Ali believed he was the greatest. 65


INTERVIE W

LARRY LEIGHT Age 65 years | Professional Education and career Bachelor of Arts in Ophthalmic Dispensing from Los Angeles City College; Co-Founder and Creative Director of Oliver Peoples 1986-2015; Designer and Board Member at Garrett Leight, LLC | Passion Surfing, family and eyewear

decision today?

That must have been a turbulent time. With all the passion you invested into the brand, why did you decide to sell it?

LL: I could have made a different decision. One of the most rewar-

LL: Because that’s the American Dream. Coming from nothing, I

ding feelings coming from the beginnings of Oliver Peoples up until

never imagined that I would be in a position to sell my company.

we sold the company was how much enjoyment and excitement

There was such a high level of interest, it just made a lot of sense

the employees had each day. They never watched the clock, it was

and felt like the ultimate accomplishment at that time.

as if they owned it. And when I started for glco, this is the biggest

After selling Oliver Peoples you also made the switch to Luxottica. What were your responsibilities?

thing I noticed. The company is so inviting and has a similar feeling

LL: I was the Designer and Creative Director of Oliver Peoples, Paul

end, I don’t really regret selling the company. I am right where I am

Smith, Stella McCartney, and Mosley Tribess.

supposed to be, with that same feeling, in the best company.

What was it like working within a global organization such as Luxottica?

and experience that Oliver Peoples had all those years ago. So in the

After your contract ended this year in January you could have easily retired and enjoyed life, right?

LL: I learned many things about myself and business from the

LL: I enjoy designing eyewear and being in the industry. It makes

relationship with Lux’ and grew my experience in a different way

me happy and I feel I have a lot to contribute and I’m just not ready

than I had ever been exposed to. The company grew year over year

to retire. In fact, I feel much more inspired today working at glco

to their expectations and was ultimately successful.

than I have in a while.

More than ten years have passed. How do you feel about the 66


INTERVIE W

» G ra n t C l i p 4 6 «

What kind of reservations came into play?

FATHER AND SON – ON THE SAME PATH

GL: I had my doubts at first that my dad would want to do a lot 2016 – Larry joins his son Garrett’s company. Experience meets youth-

more than just design. But in just a short six months he’s been

ful exploration – a meeting between the best of old and new. “The son’s

really incredible. Really respectful of my young team. He is here to

the boss, but dad’s the expert.”

mentor our Head Designer Elena Doukas for as long as he can so we can carry on the tradition. He’s happy in that role, and so far it

Whose idea was it to bring Larry to glco?

has been an excellent decision.

GL: I know my dad so well. I understand his talent and his experience,

LL: At this stage in my life this is my dream job. I get to give back to

but I can also see that he isn’t done. I think some of his best years are

an industry and a product that I love so much. And the fact that I’m

still ahead of him. He is so passionate and feels confident in his de-

passing on what I know to my son’s company is almost unbelievab-

sign skills in eyewear. So I had to find a way for him to work with us.

Larry, what was your initial response to your son’s proposal?

le and surreal.

But what about the common saying to never mix family and business...

LL: It was so exciting but I just had so many thoughts. It didn’t happen in one day. It was a few months of conversations about how

GL: We do different things and have the ultimate respect for each

it might work. There is no single company that exists that makes

other. There is no ego here and we know what we know – and what

eyewear, regardless of Garrett being my son, that I would rather

we don’t know we leave to the other. And it’s not just one or two

work with.

people that make a company. We have many talented people that 67


INTERVIE W

» K i n n e y 47«

glco is a rather young and modern label. In how far does Larry

contribute to the success of this company.

In what ways are father and son alike – and where are your differences?

as a veteran of the business fit into the picture? LL: I would use Karl Lagerfeld as an example. Is his age a hinderance

LL: I think we might be the same person but at different stages of

to his success at Chanel? In age I may be older, but my heart and

our lives.

mind feel 50 years younger. Inspired by this incredible company

Really? Which are the shared character trades between the two Mr. Leights?

with great energy, it makes my job even easier.

Let’s ask the son... Are Larry’s skills too “old school” for glco?

LL: I don’t think either of us pays too much attention to ourselves.

GL: I don’t really see it that way. Designs are timeless, trends come

We’re too focused on what we are trying to achieve. But this may be

and go and then come back again. He started in this industry over

a question for someone who watches us every day.

forty years ago, so he has seen a lot of things come and go. And also

How do you split the jobs between father and son at glco?

in his defense, my dad is really current. He is completely adept at

GL: The easiest way to explain it is, I run the company as CEO. I

using all of today’s platforms.

make the decisions as to where and how we spend our money. My dad and Head Designer Elena Doukas do the day to day design work

Speaking of timeless designs, what has remained unchanged in the design segment over the past 20 years?

and ultimately when they feel strongly about something, I listen to

LL: The goal has not changed. It has always been to effectively

them. The design department has a lot of power here because I have

impress the most influential people that are your target audience.

always put an emphasis on the collection leading the way.

There is no one singular trend or style that is the same as twenty 68


INTERVIE W

»Clubhouse 50«

GARRETT LEIGHT Age 32 years | Professional Education and career Journalism Degree from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo; CEO and Founder of Garrett Leight, LLC | Passion Sports, family, and business

years ago. The library of designs I’ve accumulated over the past

limited edition assortment of special handmade designs. mr. leight,

forty years just helps me to decide what to apply to make my new

by definition, is the collaborative skill set and vision of me and my

designs current and have the same impact.

father.

Who had the initial idea for mr. leight? GL: It was created like any father and son moment might be INTRODUCING... MR. LEIGHT

created: together and evenly. Each of us has inspired each other to make it what it’s going to be. And we are still working on many

The cross-generational creative storm between father and son is already unleashing energies well beyond the label glco. With their new capsule collection mr. leight, the two are realizing their own creative visions

things.

Before the interview you briefly mentioned that you approach new projects as curators. How does that materialize in practice? GL: I see us having a variety of collections that cover many different

within the eyewear business.

things that we believe in. Bringing those to market essentially is a

While we’re on the subject of designs, what’s the story behind mr. leight? GL: In order to build the company that I want, we need to be all

curating project that my father and I work on together. So far we’ve been approached by some incredible companies with values that we have alignment with.

things to all people. We cannot do that by simply having one collection of glco. The mr. leight collection will be a high-end luxury 69

What are your criteria for choosing collaboration partners? And who exactly are you in talks with?


INTERVIE W

GL: Unfortunately, it will be a few years before the projects we are

ness and mine. We are only as strong as the retail partners we have

working on come to life and I cannot mention who they are at this

had over the last 30 years. We respect them and certainly owe a

time. But the criteria are based on things that we genuinely believe

lot to them – and ultimately we want to make all of them happy.

in. I want to bring manufacturing back to America. And not basic

We plan on working with the opticians that understand us and our

manufacturing. I want to help build factories that can develop the

goals the most.

How does mr. leight stand out in terms of manufacturing and materials?

same quality that we see in Japan, China, Italy, and other places. That’s one example of something both my dad and I believe in.

LL: We are just developing a way of experiencing a frame that we

And there are people out there that believe it as well.

Do you already have an idea of the price segment covered by mr. leight?

have never thought of before. I discovered many new ideas that are simple but functional and wearable and add value to the end user.

That sounds exciting. When will mr. leight arrive in retail?

GL: It’s undetermined as we are still in a prototyping phase. One

GL: When it’s perfect. We are hoping for summer ’17. But a first

can expect luxury prices above $600.

And who is your target group?

collection takes a very long time. We started in March, and in my

LL: People who appreciate technology and art and style. People who

experience, it’s about 18 months for a first collection. We are trying

look at products as an experience and see the value in something

to do it in about 14 months.

We’re excited. And finally, what is your long-term vision of glco and mr. leight?

special. Stylish people that want to be part of a story that inspires them. Something real, something authentic.

How many collections will you be releasing per year?

GL: Always, the vision is personal happiness for myself and the

GL: It will not be released in a typical collection format. We are

ones that I love, above everything else. But as a competitor and passi-

releasing frames in small series throughout the year that will be

onate business man, I want people to acknowledge our family as

categorized by certain details, whether that’s design-oriented or

one of, if not the most important family in eyewear history. If we

engineering. Each series will be different.

ranked eyewear designers like basketball players, then my dad and

So it’s safe to say you’ve already defined your sales targets?

I want to be Jordan and Kobe. But we can only do that by creating

GL: Yes, to sell every unit within one day like Kanye West. At this

something truly special. Not just a couple eyewear collections

time we do not have any expectations on this. We will monitor the

like Oliver Peoples and glco, it’s not enough. We want to make a

demand and act accordingly. If we can’t deliver because demand is

bigger difference in the industry then just being acknowledged for

too high, then we’ve achieved our goal. Our only target right now

designs.

is to impress our target audience with design.

LL: I’m very inspired. I can’t remember a time where I felt this

What kind of opticians will you be working with?

motivated.

Thank you both!

GL: Opticians are responsible for building both my father’s busi70


c re a t i v e d i re c t ion CLAUDIA FELSER PRODUKTION H60 h a i r & m a ke - up EVA MARIA PILARTZ a t 21AGENCY.DE s t yl i n g SABINE BEERHOLD mo d el s JILL a t PLACE MODELS, INGA a t MODEL POOL & NILS a t PLACE MODELS p os t p rod uc t ion H60STUDIO loca t ion SANKT PETER ORDING


» J a r re t t «


»Blink 694«


»Lor na«


»T i l m a n «


F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

HOFFMANN TI-LINE Titanium meets Nature

HOFFMANN NATUR AL EYEWE AR »T 82 03 « & »T 8 2 01«

86


F E AT U R E C R E AT U R E

s t ill s RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

For several decades, the German premium label hoffmann natural eyewear has

been focusing on natural materials and high-end eye-

wear, handmade with a love for detail. Almost 40 years ago, back in 1978, the company was founded in a small town in the German Eifel region. Ever since then, the brand has cultivated its own form language in close alignment with the use of natural resources. These fundamental principles have been part of hoffmann’s unique DNA ever since. Even today, all frames are the results of meticulous craftsmanship and made 100 percent in Germany. All hoffmann collections

implement only high-grade natural materials

such as precious woods, natural horn, and slate. Through the combination of these materials with their unique, naturally grown surface structures, every single frame becomes a one-of-a-kind original. Thereby, hoffmann frames naturally enhance the personality of their wearers without the need for highly visible logo placement.

»T 82 03 «

But despite its nature-oriented brand DNA, hoffmann natural eyewear is

not averse to technical challenges. A premium example of

the brand’s innovative capacities is the most recent release: In the Ti-line collection, hoffmann has achieved a blend of natural horn and titanium. This unique mix of materials affords extremely light weight, delicate, and distinguished frames with their own aesthetic – a style statement of the highest order. Aside from their strikingly light weight, the frames in hoffmann’s Ti-line collection are anti-allergenic, flexible and extremely comfortable. Horn meets titanium – it’s a clash of high-tech and sustainability that reflects the current zeitgeist. The collection comprises several variations on models in current shapes, including women’s, men’s, and unisex frames. In some models, the front part of the frame is composed entirely of natural horn or wood, in other frames the midsection is also blended with titanium. Three matted precious metal colorways are available in various pairings of horn and wood colors. The collection is aimed at quality-conscious individuals with an expressive personality. And true to hoffmann’s style, the brand opted against visible logo placement on the outside of the temples. The official public premiere of this successful blend of natural materials and titanium will take place at this year’s Silmo in Paris. Here’s our SPECTR sneak peek at the Ti-line collection. .

»T 82 01« www.natural-eyewear.com

87


L A B E L U P D AT E

SUZY GL AM » S u z y G l a m ro c k s t h i s t o w n «

photos MICHAEL MANN

Suzy Glam Goes 88


L A B E L U P D AT E

SUZY GL AM » S u z y G l a m b re a k s r u l e s «

In today’s independent eyewear scene, Susanne Klemm and Etienne Frederik range among the most prominent new faces. Better known as the masterminds behind eyewear label suzy glam, which they founded three-and-a-half years ago, the two trained opticians celebrate their love for artful designs and passion for eyewear. Their love of entrepreneurial independence and complete creative freedom is also reflected in suzy glam’s company philosophy: “Better small and independent, than large and controlled by outsiders.” When it comes to the design language, suzy glam frames are bold, self-confident and highly genderspecific. The spectrum includes extremely feminine as well as extremely masculine shapes, which both share the same fundamental traits: hand-made, threedimensional frames with excellent fit. For Susanne and Etienne, the design of their products is always the main focus, not the production process. “Technology should always support the design process, but should not become the end goal of development.” Speaking of development, the Dutch label has undergone a significant evolution as of late.

Amsterdam 89


L A B E L U P D AT E

Susanne and Etienne recently decided to move their office from the town of Utrecht to Amsterdam. Why? For once, the two opened an official suzy glam Flagship Store in their nation’s capital as the perfect platform for showcasing their collection to urban audiences. Plus, they always wanted a larger workshop for their creative exploits, which is now provided by the open space in the back of the store, fully visible to customers. By combining retail and product development in a transparent setting, the new set-up not only lets customers experience the entire product range but also makes them see the process from design sketch to finished product with their own eyes. But there’s more: The store also serves as a full-fledged gallery space. Next to the entire suzy glam collection, it will rotate guest collections from other brands at regular intervals. “The labels we choose for our store always have an aura of cool and originality.” And whether it’s brands such as Tarian, 8000, or Gentle Monster, they also offer strong contrasts to suzy glam’s brand DNA. From a sales perspective, this extra reach also brings in some new customers. “It really makes our showroom more interesting.” At the same time, Susanne and Etienne placed great emphasis on the store’s design and vibe as the perfect symbol for the world of suzy glam. In the bigger picture, the move to Amsterdam also enabled the label’s growth and self-realization. “We are really fortunate to be free from the demands of the market. We’re doing our own thing, exactly what we enjoy the most: designing beautiful eyewear.” Since its inception, the label has built a loyal base of devoted followers. This is also due the fact that popular models become constant staples in the line-up, thereby constantly influencing the brand’s public persona. Another constant lies in the brand’s form language, which transcends seasons and collections. In terms of materials, the brand stays true to acetate, although the current trend is headed towards metals. “For our three-dimensional design language and design process, acetate is the perfect raw material.” Keeping things moving, the two founders constantly expand their core collection with new styles. As a result, the current collection is already double the size of the brand’s initial offering. For this season’s special twist, suzy glam is drawing on “pebble shaped frames”.

The new frames are reminiscent of softly polished stone pebbles, while the soft colorways are also inspired by nature; including Forest, Moss, Sea & Thunder. As suzy glam moves forward, their mixture between proven sellers and new, highly visual styles is guaranteed to keep things interesting – as a vist in the new Amsterdam flagship store will attest. www.suzyglam.com

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s t yl i n g BODO ERNLE a t NINA KLEIN h a i r & m a ke - up AMÉLIE GOLDSTAUB p os t p rod uc t ion STEFANIE WENCEK mo d el s GREG NAWRAT a t PANDA MODELS & FLORIAN H. a t PMA MODELS loca t ion BERLIN


»Neue M3«

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s u i t TIGER OF S WEDEN, t u r t l e n e c k UNIQ LO


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D E S I G N E R PA G E

KUBOR AUM » M a s k Z 13 « i n h a m m e re d a n d h a n d c ra f t e d b ro n z e w i t h p o rc e l a i n n o s e p a d s

p a n t s A DICIANNOVEVENTITR E / A1923 j a c k e t A DICIANNOVEVENTITR E / A1923 s h o e s A DICIANNOVEVENTITR E / A1923 r i n g s AMY GLENN, DETA J, R ENÉ TALMON L’AR MÉE photo STEFAN DONGUS

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COLLEC TION CHECK

ADRIAN MARWITZ Universus Collection

s t il l s SILBERWALD

ADRIAN MARWITZ »Universu s No. 5«

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COLLEC TION CHECK

As a relatively young brand, adrian marwitz cultivates an unmistakeable, purist design language. The collections consist of high-grade, modern frames crafted from block titanium according to high manufacturing standards. Entirely “Made in Germany,” adrian marwitz glasses

adrian marwitz is known as a talented indepen-

are lightweight, extremely robust and highly flexible for outstanding

dent designer who pursues his unique vision with high-powered creative drive. In 2013, he took things to the next level by launching his own eponymous eyewear label. adrian marwitz has built a reputation for contemporary designs and quality, which is in line with a time-honored family tradition.

longevity. For added style, the titanium frames are colored by using a proprietary coating technology. The technology is the result of extensive research and development efforts, which are garnering the brand some attention: This year, Adrian was honored with the German Design Award in the Lifestyle and Fashion category. He has also clinched a nomination for a high-profile award next year, fingers crossed. With all these new developments, it’s high time for a SPECTR interview – much has happened since the last time we featured Adrian – especially since adrian marwitz has freshly launched its latest offering: The Universus collection is an extension of the Loving Strangers line,

Back in the old days, Adrian’s grandfather was already the founder and

based in the symbolic power of love, compassion and unity in the modern

co-owner of eyewear factory Marwitz & Hauser right outside the town

world. We sat down with Adrian for this issue’s Collection Check to get

of Stuttgart, Germany, in 1918. Keeping the spirit alive, Adrian’s father

behind the genesis of his latest offering.

continued the tradition under the name Marwitz Berlin. So it’s safe to say that entrepreneurship is a fundamental part of Adrian’s DNA, next to the meticulous focus on adding his own signature style to anything he touches.

»Universu s No. 3«

» U n i v e r s u s N o . 2«

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COLLEC TION CHECK

Adrian, how has your label developed over the past few years? It’s very nice to see that there are more and more optical boutiques out there who can identify with a product, an idea, and most of all, a brand. My brand is a way to communicate my personal philosophy to end consumers. That’s the fundamental aspect for me and what I’m most proud of.

You’re known as a frequent traveler. Where are you headed? What are your plans for the future? New campaign, new collection. The fundamental principle has remained the same, and will stay unchanged: titanium, urbanity, inter-

ADRIAN MARWITZ

nationality, quality, and love continue to be our five foundations.

»Universu s No. 4«

But you’re also not one to shy away from new influences... Despite a certain wealth of experiences I always find myself confronted with new challenges. That will never change, but it’s also what keeps the job super exciting.

So now there’s a new exciting adrian marwitz collection called “Universus.” What led to the underlying concept behind the new line? Universus is the sunglasses sibling to our Loving Strangers collection. The idea behind both collections stems from the current global crisis

How about material choices and comfort? Always titanium, always comfortable - simply adrian marwitz!

What is the form language of the Universus collection?

situations. Loving Strangers and Universus embody the desire for

“Spaced out,” but still very fashion-oriented.

a peaceful, “unrealistic” parallel universe. Our world has changed

You already mentioned silver. What are the colorways of the collection?

dramatically in 2015. Whenever we see or hear the news, we feel overwhelmed by all the negative news surrounding us. So why not

These are all colors that have already been used in the Loving Strangers

just close your eyes and dream yourself into a different universe?

That sounds like a worthy cause. What’s your message behind Universus?

collection; including double-brown, double-black and double-blue. Most of the lenses are reflective, which also makes the design language

It would be amazingly beautiful, if we were only surrounded by

in this collection highly intriguing.

“loving strangers.” No war, no terror, no hate – just mutual love and support. Why aren’t people able to achieve that in today’s modern

How many different frames will be released? For starters, there will be four frames in four to six different colorways.

age? It may sound like a bit of a dream, but that’s just what it is:

Will the models be catering to a defined gender focus?

A dream, a wish, and illusional all at the same time.

How does this approach reflect in the collection’s campaign?

Nope.

When and where will the collection be released?

That being different is nothing negative, as long as everyone works together and all involved hold no prejudice. We have visualized this

At global optical boutiques that are already part of our customer network, or want to join us in the future.

rather abstract in our campaign: The concept is silver, not black or

Are some of the campaign materials already finished?

white – just different!

And how does this philosophy blend with designs in the Universus collection? Our era has been transformed, a new universe has been created. So

The campaign is basically the Loving Strangers campaign. We are consistently expanding it, but adrian marwitz also has some surprises in store for the future.

our glasses are “spaced out,” if you will. We took the design highlights www.adrianmarwitz.com

from our RX-glasses and over-exaggerated things a bit. 120


BRAND PROFILE

NINE EYEWEAR Lightweight Luxury VS. Sophisticated Visibility photo SANNE BERG, s til ls RAPHAEL SCHMITZ

Founded in 2010, nine eyewear is part of a young generation of new eyewear brands. But behind the scenes, the label is backed by the expertise of an industry veteran: Founder Jens William Sørensen has been part of the eyewear business since the early 1990s. As the European distributor for brands such as okio and bada, he not only gathered valuable business experience, but also hands-on insights into eyewear design and manufacturing. Over the years, the market was flooded by new brands, making it hard for Jens’ two distribution labels to be recognized, which he also attributes to lack of a unique brand DNA. All that changed with his own label, nine eyewear. At a time when many labels are making lightweight and almost invisible spectacles, Sørensen decided to produce glasses that are ultra-lightweight but also noticeable with sophisticated style. Here’s more about the Danish brand in our spectr brand profile.

NINE EYEWEAR »2331« & »233 8 «

122


BRAND PROFILE

you see a tendency of creating timeless classic design, which I find

Jens, would you consider yourself a typical Dane?

very typical for Danish design.

Yes!

And looking at your own label, what is your special ‘Danish’ design approach?

Why? Look at me – I am tall, blond, and totally into creation and design.

When designing eyewear, I balance between the aesthetic design

Does it get more Danish than that?

Probably not. So, nine eyewear started because you were missing something at the labels you distributed, right?

and a sublime functionality. I prefer to see nine eyewear as the accessories that highlights your

You could say that we ended up asking ourselves, “would it be

personality in a sophisticated way, instead of creating your perso-

possible to combine comfort and light weight with a simple, yet still

nality. As I see it, that should never be our business.

visible design that made a difference from all the ‘invisible’ frames?“

Speaking of design, is nine eyewear a typical Danish brand?

Highlighting the personality instead of creating it... what’s the difference?

Danish architecture and design have always been known for sim-

We set out as a goal to become the eyewear that you forget that

plicity, functionalism and aesthetic design. We have many great

you are wearing. I know it sounds bizarre for a brand wishing to be

designers in Denmark. We all know Arne Jacobsen, Poul Henning-

unnoticed by the customer, but that’s actually when I feel that we

sen, Verner Panton, and Jørn Utzon. Also in the clothing business,

have succeeded. The philosophy of nine eyewear is to create pieces

we have many great designers like Malene Birger, Mads Nørgaard

of eyewear that are immensely pleasant to wear, just as if you are

and Sand just to mention a few. When you look into these designers,

wearing your favorite pair of jeans. You just don’t want to take them

123


BRAND PROFILE

NINE EYEWEAR off. The use of lightweight material, rubber sleeves and flexible

»2337«

beta titanium are the reason why we are able to design eyewear so comfortable, it doesn’t leave any marks or headaches. nine eyewear is ultra-light titanium eyewear without superfluous details.

Light weight vs. visibility? How can you balance these contrary criteria? That is obviously the hard part. When you decide to name your brand after the weight of your product, you kind of limit your options significantly. For me it is a constant reminder that we need to be on

What gets you excited about their business values? The Japanese have a value they call “Monotsukuri,” referring to the precision hand craftsmanship Japan has been historically famous for,

the forefront of developing techniques for a new level of upscale material and finish. A good example is our bestselling line: nine 3rd. We needed a plastic line in the collection, and personally I have always admired the beauty of acetate. However, as acetate is a heavy and rather stiff material, we had to look for something else for our

in perfecting a specific skill. I believe, that this is one of the reasons why Japanese manufacturers are able to achieve their high quality standards.

And how about the values behind your own work philosophy? Being a Dane – you know, as living in the happiest country on

collections. We found the perfect match in transparent polyamide. Combined with titanium temples, this ultra-light and flexible material enabled us to make really cool and durable frames, even lighter

earth – we have obligations to our manufacturers, our employees and certainly also our end-consumers. This is important to me personally. At nine eyewear we work by our Code of Conduct and I also expect

than those made purely out of titanium.

for our manufacturers to do so. The Code of Conduct is a set of rules

The mention of titanium instantly brings to mind Japanese manufacturers?

that I have written to outline the responsibility and proper practice

When I set my mind to create lightweight luxury eyewear, I instantly knew Japan was the only place to meet the high standard I needed

that we adhere to in our work. I am very proud of the fact that using Japanese manufacturers goes hand in hand with our principles.

Will you stick with titanium foreve?

to fulfill my expectations. Having worked with Japanese manufac-

The nine 3rd line works fantastic for us by combining the need for

turers for more than a decade, I knew that I was already in contact with the best of the best. Through the following year of making and testing samples, I completely lost my heart to the sublime Japanese craftsmanship, their way of thinking and also their high standard of business values.

plastic and lightweight frames and especially our wearers love them. Titanium is a great material, but we are always looking out for new ways to optimize our products.

And finally, what’s special about the new collection? At Silmo we will launch a new line as part of the classic and original part of the nine eyewear collection. nine eyewear has always been dominated by larger and more Scandinavian looking shapes, which is why we are adding a more retro-looking line to complete the range. It will be a subtle mixture of a refined basic, in vintage colors, though still combining the classic look with our flexible titanium features.

Sounds interesting. Thanks for the interview, Jens.

NINE EYEWEAR »233 0 « & »2333 « 124


MO ODBOA R D

Something new is happening in the state of Denmark: This year, Danish eyewear label fleye added Christian Leicht as the new CCO, ready to take the premium brand in a new direction. fleye’s founders and staff drilled down on fundamentals to create a new brand identity that will reach into all segments of the company. The concept of “trust” has become the basis of the brand’s DNA and will feature heavily in upcoming campaigns. Overall, the transformation will not only affect abstract concepts and communications, but also corporate design and products. The new fleye is much more bold, purist, and modern – but let’s hear it from Christian Leicht in our spectr Moodboard. 126


MO ODBOA R D

FLEYE COPENHAGEN New: Faces. Styles. Campaign.

»Dupont«

photo STEFAN DONGUS, s t il l s SILBERWALD, ca mp a i gn im a ge s SILVIA CONDE

Christian, you were working with Mykita eyewear for over ten years, now you joined Danish label fleye. How come?

Will there also be a new brand philosophy? Yes, we really spent some time realizing what makes fleye unique and what motivates us. The

Yes, for many years I was a part of actively direc-

work environment at fleye is rather family like

ting the course of Mykita as the Global Sales

and friendly. Good relationships are not only

Director and the team, customers, and brand

extremely important to us, but also a source of

have become dear to my heart in the process.

positive energy. We are all individuals, but also

So it was an intense and quite lengthy decision-

able to exist in relation to our peers. And basis

making process, and certainly no easy feat. But

for functional relationships is mutual trust. I’m

ultimately I realized that I need a new challenge,

really excited that we have found a common

something that also lets me take on more respon-

source of inspiration for our daily work: “We

sibility on a content level. I am now in charge of

believe in building trust” means that the process

our Brand, Product and Sales departments. Our

of trust-building efforts is the main focus of our

brand is already an institution in Scandinavia and

work. It may sound mundane, but for us it’s a

very successful. Together with the team I now

rather strong compass to steer our daily decisions

want to position fleye more strongly as a high-

into the right direction.

end brand on a global level. 127


MO ODBOA R D

» L a c ro i x «

»Sadik u«

Will your products also look different in the future?

allow, and we’re hoping to present some patented solution as early

Overall, our product design is going to be somewhat more stream-

as next year. In order to further express our creative and fashion-

lined and purist, but at the same time more fashionable and emotional.

oriented approach, we’ll also be expanding our sunglasses offering.

Round and deep shapes, square-rounded lenses, especially combined

All products will continue to be anti-allergenic and offer the highest

with double bridges will define a new, urban look. We will continue

comfort to wearers, always true to our motto: “Never lose on fit.”

You’re also known to play with materials. Will you be showcasing new material combinations?



our established path of creating a USP through interesting material combinations such as carbon, wood, and titanium. This will

Sure, we’re also trying to live up to our mission to innovate by

see us investing into product development as much as our means 128


MO ODBOA R D

»Kani«

»Emmet«

constantly introducing new materials and combinations. This past season we already blended ultra-light carbon with warm wood in

minimal thickness. The contours are getting slimmer and lighter, but without losing expressiveness.

You mentioned colorways – what’s new in that segment?

a series of frames that unlock entirely new aesthetic possibilities. This season we’re taking the next step by combining carbon with

In terms of colors, we’re dialing down the intensity for a more mini-

dyed wood, thereby opening up an entirely new color spectrum for

malist approach. We’re bringing in rather elegant combinations such

a material that tends to be rather limited in its natural colorways.

as indigo blue with black or blue titanium with rose gold. In the acetate

As a further material innovation, we’re presenting acetate with an

segment, we’re combining dark burgundy red with caramel and

extremely high density, which allows us to reduce the frames to a

crème rose. For our new carbon-wood frames we’ve created a new 129


MO ODBOA R D

» K o n g a a rd «

With all these changes, what happens when customers like the “old” fleye better than the new version?



process to dye the wood in dark blue, green or purple – all without covering the natural wood grain structure.

Will some previous styles be discontinued in your new collection?

That’s a great question. Every optician probably asks himself the

Naturally, that’s the way it has to be. It’s much like in a garden where

same thing before changing his store layout. But I have yet to meet

you can’t just keep planting new seeds, but you also need to weed

an optician who’s regretted a remodel in hindsight. Of course there

out some withered flowers. For the current collection, we wanted

will be customers who would have liked to keep things as they

to emphasize a clear form language with character-oriented models

were. But I’m also convinced that the new positive energy within

that represent a certain type of wearer. That led to a departure from

the company will shine through our products and the corporate

certain shapes.

identity all the way to the customers. And I’m sure most customers

How many new models are you introducing?

will welcome the changes. We will continue working with all our

This season, there will be 50 new models across our various product

passion to win the customer’s trust again and again with our inno-

families. The main focus will be on our Carbon Collection and the

vative and expressive designs and high standards on a quality and

Contemporary Acetate Collection. The majority of the line-up will be unisex frames and there’s an equal number of gender-specific frames for men and women. And 15 new styles are sunglasses. 130

service level.

Thank you and good luck.


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

KBL

Siren‘s

BY PA S C A L A L BA ND O P ULOS s t yl in g DORA KETIKOGLOU a t TEAM AGENCY a ss is t e d b y BELLA KALYMNIOU h air & m ake - up MARIANA VLASIDOU mod els KALLIOPI SENDROU a t TEAM AGENCY & CALLUM a t PRINCE loca tion THESSALONIKI 132


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

KBL »Endless Summer«

-

t o p IOANNA KOUR BEL A , s k i r t TOP SHOP

»Jamaica Bay«

-

s h i r t HOBO S TOR E

Calling KBL is one of those fresh new labels that have become a favorite

every frame features a proprietary hinge technology, an engraving of

among many savvy opticians over the past few years. The initials

the Empire State Building in the temple tips, as well as a large variety

KBL are reflective of the company philosophy: “Kind of Bohemian

of shapes and colorways. This issue’s SPECTR Collection Shoot by photographer Pascal

Lifestyle.” Some of the frames are named after the world’s greatest metropolitan cities and artist neighborhoods, including King’s Cross,

Albandopulos captures the world of KBL in all its color, expressiveness,

Wynwood, and Liberty Island. For the special KBL signature touch,

style and coolness. As the backdrop for the collection’s highlights, 133


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

KBL »Bar r ios«

-

s h i r t & b e r m u d a GIO ‘S

» N i e u w A m s t e rd a m «

-

t o p & b o t t o m TEEM, n e a c k l a c e MALENE BIRGER

KBL »To p G u n «

-

s h i r t & b e r m u d a GIO ‘S

»W i s h L i s t «

-

t o p & s k i r t TED BAKER

the German-Greek photographer and his team chose urban locations

just as broad and diverse, supplemented by extravagant reflective lens

in the town of Thessaloniki. The graphic interplay of concrete city

tints. Kind of Bohemian – definitely kind of cool.

architecture and rugged stone walls are the perfect match for KBL’s urban vibe. In terms of shapes, the frames run the entire gamut – including round, square, panto, and aviator styles. The colorways are 134

www.kbleyewear.com


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

KBL »W i s h L i s t «

-

t o p & b o t t o m IOANNA KOUR BEL A

KBL »W i s h L i s t «

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t o p & s k i r t MCQ b y ALE X ANDER MCQUEEN, b o o t s JEFFR E Y C AMPBELL 135


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

KBL » B l a c k b i rd «

-

t o p S T YLIS T S OWN, b o t t o m TEEM, n e c k l a c e MAR IA MA S TOR I

KBL

KBL »Bar r ios«

-

»To p G u n «

b o m b e r GIO ‘S , t ro u s e r s SEVEN DENIM

b l a z e r ALTA TENSIONE INDUS TRY, s h i r t HOBO S TOR E , t ro u s e r s SEVEN DENIM

-

»W y n w o o d «

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d r e s s DOLCE DOMENIC A 136


ar t d i re c tion & s t ylin g DIJANA ŽERAVICA h ai r & m ake - up SERENA PALMA mod els DINA K. a t WAVE MANAGEMENT ITALY & KIHOKO a t NO LOGO MANAGEMENT ITALY re touch LAURA DARIA PEZZINI v i d eog ra phe r DANIELE TRENGIA loca tion OPERA DI FIRENZE | PIAZZA VIT TORIO GUI | ITALY


» J o y 1«

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v e s t S TR ENESSE , s h i r t WUNDERWER K , s k i r t YOJIRO K AKE


» 6 5 43 «

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t u r t l e n e c k TIGER OF S WEDEN, v e s t BY MALENE BIRGER , p a n t s S TR ENESSE , w a t c h G -SCHOCK


» 8 702«

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s w e a t e r WUNDERWER K , d r e s s TOMMY HILFIGER WOMEN


» R i n a l d o P. «

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s h i r t YOJIRO K AKE , b a c k p a c k MCM, p a n t s AUGUS TIN TEBOUL


´ » 8 033 «

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b l o u s e S TEFFEN SCHR AUT, d r e s s BAUM UND PFER DEGARTEN

»70 5 8 «

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d r e s s BAUM UND PFER DEGARTEN, b l o u s e FA SHION UNION, j a c k e t DAY BY MAR LENE BIRGER


s t ylin g JOSEF STOCKINGER a t LES ARTISTS a ssi s t e d b y CHRISTOPHER KINDLE a t LES ARTISTS h air & m ake -up GABRIELA SPECKBACHER a t LES ARTISTS w i t h SHU EMURA & ALISA KOLB a t LES ARTISTS w i t h DIOR mo d els THERESA SCHRECK a t TUNE MODELS & TORI a t TUNE MODELS lo ca t ion MUNICH


»V i b ra t i o n 45 45 «

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d r e s s BAUM & PFER DEGARTEN, c o a t TIM L ABENDA


»A l b a t ro s «

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t u r t l e n e c k BOHOO, t o p S TEFFEN SCHR AUT, p a n t s BRUNO MANET TI


»Nick«

-

s w e a t e r & p a n t s MAR INA HOER MANSEDER , b l o u s e BAUM & PFER DEGARTEN, s c a r f PA SSIGAT TI

»Nick«

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b l o u s e S TEFFEN SCHR AUT, c o a t PATR IZIA PEPE , t u r t l e n e c k BOHOO, b a g BENEDET TA BRUZZICHES


»A n g e l s «

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p u l l o v e r TIM L ABENDA , b l o u s e S TEFFEN SCHR AUT


BRAND PROFILE

KOMONO GOES OPTICAL Big news from the label inspired by “small things”

KOMONO »B eaumont«

s t ills SILBERWALD

The story of Belgian eyewear label komono began with the shared

Behind the label is a tight community of like-minded enthusiasts. The

vision of two long-time friends who were out snowboarding in the

komono website describes them as: “A community of dreamers and

mountains when they decided to start a new project: Their own eye-

designers dedicated to perfectly timed accessories, and rooted in the

wear label – different from the rest.

Belgian tradition of fierce dedication to quality and craft.”

Raf Maes, the creative perfectionist in the dynamic duo, has had

In line with this concept, the brand name komono is a Japanese term

a passion for design and architecture ever since he was a youth. He’s

that literally translates as “small things.” But when it comes to style

always been inspired by things others would pass by without noticing;

and aesthetics, the small things in life can have a monumental impact,

things he would capture with his camera to serve as ideas that would

especially in the realm of eyewear. This approach – a certain focus on

germinate into visions of future concepts. His partner in crime, Anton

essentials – is the driving force behind the komono community. “Its

Jansen, grew up as a free thinker with a fascination for technical sciences.

members share a passion for distilling the best of culture into its simplest

When they joined forces, they dreamed up a new independent label

forms.” In search of inspiration, komono finds new impulses in the

defined by art, design, and fashion.

most diverse areas, including architecture, design, and graphic design.

The two soon found the right project to channel these influences into. Raf and Anton created a concept geared around watches and sunglasses to create a new, unoccupied niche on the market. Right from

KOMONO GOES KONGO In today’s eyewear industry, collaborations with artists have

the start, the brand’s slogan combined the two product segments:

become somewhat commonplace at this point. Keeping things fresh,

“komono is the perfect blend of Vision and Timing.”

komono

With that said, the world of komono goes far beyond mere products. 164

tapped Belgian sound-and-visual artist Baloji for their latest

collabo. The resulting sunglasses collection communicates and


BRAND PROFILE

KOMONO »F ra n k l i n «

implements Baloji’s unique aesthetic as well as the inspiration for his

collection consists of 59 frames, categorized into 13 different styles.

current album. All the elements of the creative cooperation fell into

Material choices – mainly acetate and titanium – are signature komono

place in Baloji’s motherland, the Kongo, where brand and artist worked

style, replete with the usual comfortable fit.

together on a campaign featuring photography and an image video clip.

The colorways of the new optical frames by komono opticals

What’s more, the acetate used in the collection’s frames is based on the

draw from a diverse spectrum – from light, bright tones all the way

precious stone known as Malachit, which is mined in the Kongo.

to compact, expressive and darker colors. Lending the frames an air of

The constant search for inspiration also leads the team to dig deep

originality and mystery, the label plays with contrasts for strong effects:

into the opus of world-renowned modern artists. “Our latest project

“A good mix of champagne, rose, light coloring, in combination with

was dedicated to the surrealist artist René Magritte.” The master’s

concrete, black and caramel demi, ivory demi.” But despite the latest

expressive works provided the impulse for a René Magritte watch

forays into prescription eyewear, the brand’s fundamental DNA remains

collection. “It feels great to give back to whoever inspires us.”

unchanged: komono opticals is defined by high quality standards and a great price-to-performance ratio. For a first look at the new optical frames, make sure to visit Paris eyewear tradeshow Silmo in autumn.

KOMONO GOES OPTICAL

And with all these news, one things is for certain: The brand focused on

For some major news, the label initially created with a sole focus on

“small things” is already creating major expectations.

sunglasses and watches is currently charting fresh waters. For the first time in brand history, komono is setting its sights on the prescription eyewear market – and initial results look highly promising. The optical 165

www.komono.com


C U R AT E D S H O P P I N G

ALLIED METAL WORKS »A 0 01«

jacke t SPARK Z bod y DR . DENIM shor ts MBYM shoe s IV YLEE w a tch CLUSE b racele t SAT YA r i n g s PLIETS.H. ne ckl a ce LUILU backp ack SANDQVIST b i ke HERKULES

MAGASIN, Cologne More than just functional accessories, sunglasses have always had deep

from fashion experts. In the first installment of our Curated Shopping

hooks into the realms of style and fashion. The right pair of shades

segment, we talked to Barbara Petry, owner of Cologne-based fashion

complements – and in many cases, completes – an outfit and adds that

boutiques Magasin Populaire, Magasin 2 and Monsieur Courbet, about

final touch. This is where shoppers are best advised to seek advice

her favorite pairings of sunglasses and outfits. 166


C U R AT E D S H O P P I N G

R AY- BA N »Round Evolut ion«

jacke t LEGENDS p ants MADS NØRGA ARD s hir t GOOD MORNING COLOGNE wa tch KAPTEN & SON backp ack SANDQVIST r in g s SARAH BOSMAN s hoe s ROYAL REPUBLIQ ne ckl ace LUILU

photos STEFAN DONGUS a ss is t ant ASTRID SPIERING s t yl in g BARBARA PETRY t ale nts JANINE ROMANOWSKI & LIZ MARIA 168


C U R AT E D S H O P P I N G

GÖTTI » D a re l l - S «

ja c ke t OAK WOOD sk i r t SAMSØE SAMSØE sh i r t GOOD MORNING COLOGNE w a t ch KAPTEN & SON b a c k p a c k BECKSÖNDERGA ARD r i n g s SARAH BOSMAN shoe s ROYAL REPUBLIQ b ra cele t SAT YA JEWELRY

170


p rod uc t ion FUEGO PRODUCOES E FOTOGRAFIA LTDA-ME h a i r & m a ke - up PAULO FILATIER & ANDRE MAT TOS s t yl i n g DAVID POLLAK mod el VIVIANE ORTH a t JOY MODEL MANAGEMENT lo ca t ion SÃO PAULO


» R B 35 4 8 N «

-

j a c k e t K APPA


»Va l e n c i a 5 4 «

-

d e n i m j a c k e t JE ANS WR ANGLER , j a c k e t PUMA , p a n t s ADIDA S


»We s t o n «

-

j e r s e y NE W ER A , b o o t s TANAR A , n e c k l a c e ROB, g l o v e s HAR LE Y DAVIDSON


C H A R M A N T G M B H E U R O P E | W W W. C H A R M A N T. D E | E T 1 7 5 1 9


BEHIND THE SCENE S

TALKING DESIGN ON THE META-LEVEL Inside markus t´s transparent workshop photos STEFAN DONGUS

All designs are created in-house: Eyewear, lighting fixtures, and the “longest desk in Europe”.

Two years ago, Markus purchased the sprawling grounds for his new

also adding new machinery.

headquarters – listed as a monument conservation site – and poured

But beyond process optimization, the standout feature of the new

lots of creative energy into the renovation and re-model. Aside from his

company headquarters is the underlying design language apparent in all

love for historic buildings, Markus also made the decision for economic

parts of the operation – from the CEO’s office into sales and production.

reasons. His label markus t has seen rapid growth, to a staff of current-

Every department is furnished with the same cabinets, the same desks,

ly 80 employees, which necessitated constant office expansions over

and the same lighting fixtures. In other words, there’s no hierarchical

the years. The operating phrase here is “necessity,” because resulting

privilege when it comes to furniture at markus t, and all interior designs

workflows and internal structures often left much to be desired. “At

were created in-house. As a side project beyond their day-to-day work,

some point we were just in way too tight quarters,” said Markus.

Markus and his employees went the extra mile to create a progressive

Moving into the new site provided a clean slate; a chance to plan work

and fully decked-out workspace that is a true standout in the optical

processes in administration and manufacturing from scratch, while

industry. 184


BEHIND THE SCENE S

Markus Temming has been following his passion for product design for some time now. And his talent is undeniable. With his eponymous eyewear label, markus t, he’s been supplying the global eyewear business with quality products Made in Germany since 1999. But until recently, his design pursuits beyond the world of eyewear have largely gone unnoticed. That is about to change, after the label recently moved into a new company headquarters – remodeled according to Markus’ vision – with a transparent concept inviting visitors to glimpse into the production process of markus t eyewear. spectr had the privilege to tour the new center of the markus t eyewear world – and came back quiet impressed. The former schnaps distillery outside the German town of Gütersloh has been restored with a love for detail and the overall vibe is more of a wellness getaway hosting yoga retreats than an eyewear manufacturing site in the traditional sense. Then again, “traditional” has never applied to Markus and his approach...

Much like in his eyewear designs, Markus placed special emphasis

parent – via glass walls. Markus calls this a “transparent workshop”

in the use of materials during the renovation. After all, the new offices

and invites all opticians to come visit the new site to get a glimpse into

are a true reflection of the brand’s philosophy. Materials are high-grade,

the “on demand” production of markus t eyewear. During the move,

lightweight, and all the while robust. All cabinets and desks throughout

the company also got rid of its warehouse. From now on, all frames are

the entire building are crafted from sheets of CDF, while the lighting

produced in weekly runs based on orders.

fixtures – assembled from screw-less components like the brand’s eye-

The resulting overall atmosphere is that of a showroom, but in this

wear frames – appear to levitate above the work stations. On that note,

case not only showcasing the final product, but also every single meti-

the entire workspace is furnished entirely without the use of veneers,

culous step that goes into its creation. In the bigger picture, the former

solely from raw materials. Adding the final touches to the interior de-

distillery is also a showcase for the brand’s own blend of designer

sign are exposed brick walls, light concrete floors and large-sized glass

furnishings, which will also be made available commercially sometime

panels. Every single office and production space is exposed – made trans-

soon. Let’s take a look around...

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BEHIND THE SCENE S

MARKUS T 1999 - 2016 In the optical business, Markus Temming has been known for pushing the boundaries for some time now. Since 1999, the innovative designer has been creating exclusive eyewear under his eponymous label, markus t. With manufacturing sourced 100% in Germany, the label’s signature style is at the intersection of intelligent technology and progressive design according to the highest quality standards. Over the years, markus t has pioneered – and perfected – several technical processes that have lent his glasses a unique look, far beyond the mainstream. The most striking detail of his glasses, hand-made at a workshop in Westphalia, Germany, is the screw-less hinge construction: Developed by Markus Temming himself, the proprietary block hinges not only offer a viable alternative to regular screw hinge constructions, they

Transparent workshop: Up close and personal with high-tech.

also eliminate the need for follow-

Hello Markus, you have a lot going on right now. Why did you move your company HQ?

How much of Markus Temming’s input went into the new company building?

Soon after launching my independent business in 1999, I was already

One hundred percent! I was involved in building the entire new

playing with the idea of repurposing the former schnaps distillery in

workshop as the main designer and source of ideas. From the overall

the town of Isselhorst. On my daily commute to work I kept passing

concept all the way to the tiniest light switch, I was able to pour all

the property dating back to the year 1689. I was really fascinated by

my passion and ideas into the process. I also had the chance to design

all the different building components that had been added over the

the furniture and lighting fixtures. The result is a space that not only

years markus t was in a position to expand and open up more space

carries my design signature, but also offers plenty of space for living

for creative ideas. The property had been available for several years at

our company philosophy: team spirit, family friendly atmosphere,

that point, so we seized the opportunity to move in.

creative work – a place where people can feel comfortable. With the

What led to the idea of expanding your operation?

necessary quiet for contemplation, but also vibrancy for inspiration.

philosophy of maintaining growth and reinventing ourselves. In

It’s really not that common for an eyewear designer to take over the reigns of a building’s interior, much less provide his own designs. Are you bored?

the eyewear business, it’s important to build a strong, self-confident

No, not at all, but I’m just having a blast with designs. It’s my

The label markus t has been growing steadily, so expanding the workspace was a necessary investment. It’s also in line with our company

position to stand out on the oversaturated market. Our main keys to success have been the steady improvement of design and technology as well as constant flow of novelties. 186

passion and doesn’t feel forced at all.

But then again, wouldn’t your time be better invested in other areas?


BEHIND THE SCENE S

up tightening at the optical store. In his choice of materials, markus t is focused on quality

and long-lasting performance. From the start, high-quality titanium has been at the center of the collection, mainly due its combination of features: titanium is anti-allergenic, ultra-light, and known for longevity. From a manufacturing perspective, titanium also lends itself to the smart and progressive frames the label is known for – the perfect symbiosis between materials and aesthetics. When Markus Temming and team wanted to offer the same qualities in frames crafted from plastics, they searched the entire market for a material to fit the bill. But no such luck. Ultimately, the label developed and patented its own kind of polyamide – known as TMi – that has earned a great response among markus t’s loyal followers.

Open space and job rotation: Production designed in the same style as administrative offices.

People could see it that way in the traditional sense and I get the occasional hint from my employees to that extend.

But you’re not listening?

It’s also rather peculiar that the manufacturing segment looks exactly like the administrative offices. Yes, I wanted to make a point of the fact that our company doesn’t

Next to my personal enjoyment, taking product design beyond the

have any “second class” workspaces. The employees on the pro-

realm of eyewear opens up some clear advantages. By diving deep

duction end make a contribution just as valuable as those in sales

into the creative process behind other kinds of products, you get ideas

and marketing. For lunch we all take our meal in one single kitchen,

that can come in handy for implementing into eyewear. The designs

which increases team-building.

Well, the production segment seems really tidy.

cross-pollinate.

Is the new location supposed to positively impact morale?

We try to keep work stations as clean as possible. And it’s not just

It goes far beyond the mere company level, since I also put great

self-serving, since we practice “job rotation.” We don’t want our

emphasis on developing the concept behind the new estate. On

manufacturing employees to keep performing the same tasks, day in

about 8,800 square meters, the areal is home to an energetic mixture

and day out. Instead, they have the chance to tackle new jobs at new

of work, housing, and play. In the multi-faceted architecture of the

workstations throughout their work day. This makes work much

former distillery, every single building component radiates its own

more enjoyable for individual employees and makes them more

sense of individuality. With the company markus t at the center, the

flexible.

Will the building’s underlying interior design concept be implemented in other areas?

property will be home to numerous others, including restaurants, a barbershop and a car sharing company. The company grounds of markus t will be alive with action 24/7.

Yes, in multiple ways. We’re working on POS-modules for our opti187


BEHIND THE SCENE S

A feel-good work environment – dog approved.

cians and our own store in the town of Bielefeld will receive the same

tion and M3 Collection. We put a strong emphasis on form language,

look soon. Our future tradeshow booths will also be modeled on our

design, and functionality. The technical characteristics are more

new HQ at the former distillery.

balanced than ever. We have updated our screw-less hinge in terms

The new headquarters will also be open to visitors. What is the motive?

of functionality and put a stronger focus on the visible, reductionist technology. Other key characteristics include our patent-pending

Yes, we’re running a “transparent workshop.” This means that end

coloring process and the modified edition of our TMi polymer for the

consumers and the public can schedule an appointment to dive

upcoming autumn collection.

Will there be a new color concept behind the new markus t collection?

into the universe of the markus t eyewear workshop. Our guests can see all the ins and outs of production right here on-site.

And are opticians welcome as well?

We are staying true to the existing color concepts at markus t,

Yes, the “transparent workshop” is also open to all our customers.

including signature colors such as grey or purple. Having our own

Next to visiting our production site, opticians are also invited to see

coloring process allows us to respond quicker to trends while

the workshop’s new showroom where they can check out all our

continuing to experiment with new colors beyond our classics to

latest collections, talk to our representatives and place orders.

integrate within our overall concept.

Speaking of new collections, which technical developments will be featured in the new markus t line? First of all, we revolutionized and expanded the existing M1 Collec188

Thanks for the interview and showing us around as some of the first visitors at your new workshop.


T H E M E SH O OT

COBLENS »Landefeuer« The main eye catcher in this subtle coblens model is the

ROU

green-gray tint of the lenses. A modern, rounded metal frame with a polished silver finish completes the look, accentuated by a straight nose bridge as an of-the-moment design twist.

LINDBERG » 6 5 41« The lightweight, delicate lindberg »6541« model blends upscale style with comfort. The combination of a premium, dark-gray titanium frame with thin, golden metallic temples creates a highly individualized form language.

GÖTTI »Quent in« This stunningly modern götti pieces shimmers in a premium copper-brown colorway. Titanium as the frame material achieves ultra-lightweight comfort. Composed of a single straight line, the nose bridge melts into the rest of the frame, injecting the overall design with a hefty dose of originality. 190


T H E M E SH O OT

CLAIRE GOLDSMITH

D

»Robinson« This round claire goldsmith design scores major style points

N

with subtle curvatures as well as color blocking on the frame and temples. In this timeless frame, the color contrast between Crystal and Tortoise achieves a soft, classic symbiosis.

TAVAT »SC004« The tavat »SC004« is a compact design with original flavor. The frame revolves around a carefully crafted blend of materials: titanium and acetate join forces to create an extravagant aesthetic. Processed with a special wiping technique, the titanium assumes an interesting color composition in “white-lilac”.

ROUN ph

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GLCO »W i l s o n « glco presents

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a feminine, roun-

ded metal frame guaranteed to

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turn heads with its bright-pink

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acetate coating. The playful,

ITZ

silver details on the temples and hinges create shiny sparkles around the eyes. 191


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

GÖTTI »Clapp«

GÖTTI »Car mel«

192


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

For more than 20 years, Swiss-based eyewear label götti has built a reputation for keeping things interesting with a constant flow of new technical features. The driving force behind this output is founder Sven Götti, a designer and tech aficionado who created the brand in 1993. Cultivating a form language of extravagant, purist, and streamlined designs, götti

has been making a mark on the eyewear scene by blen-

ding innovative technology and modern shapes. The motto: “Design starts in the head and comes from the heart.” On the product level, götti is textbook case of high-grade Swissness – all products are designed in Switzerland and manufactured in leading eyewear workshops in Germany, Austria, and Japan. The resulting frames provide top-shelf quality and longevity, injected with götti ’s signature combination of technology and timeless designs. In order to achieve their upscale finish, götti collections rely on complex manufacturing processes, many of which solve complicated technical challenges. With its latest Dimension Collection the Swiss brand is pushing the boundaries with a high-tech 3D-printing process. How did it get from concept to store shelf? This issue’s SPECTR Design Talk with Sven Götti has the details. .

photos STEFAN DONGUS s t yl i n g BODO ERNLE h a i r & m a ke - up GITA KURDPOOR mo d el s TIA a t MODEL POOL & SISSI a t PS MODELS

193


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

götti keeps delivering surprising new innovations at a constant

rate, with the Spin & Stow concept as a major example. Now you’re implementing future-facing 3D-printing technology into frame manufacturing. What led to this decision? I wanted to create a new world within the brand while expanding the current collection. götti represents purist, streamlined design. With the Dimension Collection, we’re going one step beyond, drawing inspiration from today’s technological dynamic and rapidly changing trends. It’s a world where fashion, art, and novel constructions blend into a new lifestyle product. Additive production methods are a forward-looking approach to eyewear manufacturing. Plus, if you stop evolving and experimenting with new technologies, you’ll sooner or later be overtaken by progress. So for this line, we’ve created an entirely new design and development department within the company to dive deep into the development process.

How can we imagine the day-to-day work in this development unit? Our day-to-day work is highly dynamic and constantly moving forward. The most important thing is never losing sight of the big picture. Our focus lies with the evolution and individual essence of our frames. The interplay of analog and digital, the perception of illusion and reality, the adaptation to new circumstances – the Dimension Collection delivers on all these points. It’s a collection that harmoniously blends these apparent opposites.

How would you define the Dimension Collection’s form language? It’s defined by the fascinating interaction between precise construction and sensual surface feel. Today’s technology unlocks new possibilities and room for creative playfulness in the design process. The form language is inspired by sophisticated street style and current social movements. The collection contains our signature delicate pieces but also dominant, bold frames. The new frames lend a clean and at the same time highly expressive look to the wearer – very fashion forward.

In how far is the signature götti design DNA featured in the new collection? All götti wearers share a love for design. Additionally, we implement our thoughts on modernity, functionality, lightness, and form fit into our designs. The new frames open up various dimensions while staying true to our constant design philosophy.

In terms of gender, what’s the Dimension Collection’s target group? The Dimension Collection makes a statement about current events. We are experiencing an acceleration and fast dynamic in everyday life, which comes with a new set of challenges. Young, internationally active, and trend-conscious people have a positive take on these constant changes. They keep rediscovering themselves over and over. They travel a lot, stay updated on events and know exactly what they want. These self-confident customers view eyewear as a medium for individual expression. We picked up on these trends and offer our own interpretation in an authentic collection equally aimed at men and women.

194

GÖTTI »Camil«


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

Where does the new götti collection draw inspiration in terms of colorways? We’re playing with subtle influences from urban architecture and raw nature. The resulting color spectrum is a powerful expression of soft, earthy nuances such as Moss, Stone, Brick, and Mocca. Overall, the new prescription frames and sunglasses will be produced in six colors.

And how many different models will be available overall? Twelve prescription frames and twelve sunglasses in a total of six colors. As an added benefit, customers may choose almost all prescription frames as sunglass versions.

How do you feel about the revolutionary impact of 3D-printing on the eyewear business? Until now, entire industries were reinventing themselves through 3D-printing. But what we are currently seeing is that the eyewear industry is in return revolutionizing certain parts of the 3D-printing segment. Some manufacturers that offer 3D-services to various industries are aligning parts of their manufacturing completely to the specific demands of the eyewear business. That’s a pretty exciting new development.

What’s the impact of parameterized design in this process? The term parameterized design describes the design of physical objects via computer. Every geometric body – either simple of highly complex – can be defined via geometric parameters such as points, edges, surfaces, and volumes.

And what are the exact stages in this process? The design process begins with a 2D-design of the shape of the glasses, which is then turned into a complete frame on the computer. Once I’m happy with the design on screen, we go into prototyping via 3D-printer. The actual glasses are then manufactured via an SLSprocess, followed by vibratory grinding and coloring.

What are the special materials involved in 3D-printed eyewear? We’re currently working with laser-sintered polyamide. But we’re always keeping our eyes open to see which new standards establish themselves.

Do these 3D-materials have any extraordinary characteristics? Our polyamide is lightweight, flexible, and pliable in a thermoplastic way. It’s really empowering for us to work with this new material.

What are some other advantages of this technology? It’s perfectly suited towards letting new creative ideas run wild. We’re also benefitting from short delivery timeframes, allowing us to design smaller series.

Where will you be premiering the new frames? The Dimension Collection will be presented at Silmo in Paris.

Will there be an official campaign in the run-up to the launch? No, the official campaign will only start in spring 2017 when the products are released. Prepare to be amazed!

GÖTTI »Caja«

www.gotti.ch

195


CO L L E C T I O N SH O OT

GÖTTI »Z i n o «

GÖTTI »Camble«

196


D E TA I L S

ROLF SPECTACLES MONOCEROS COLLECTION Horn meets Innovation photo SILBERWALD, t e x t DIRK VOGEL

»Gemini« For many years, horn-rimmed glasses remained the staple of geeks, nerds, and kids who were bullied in the sandbox at the playground. The time-honored classics assumed a certain aura of cool when actor and director Woody Allen made horn-rimmed glasses his calling card. Fast-forward to today and horn spectacles are hipper than ever. Fueling the flames, Austria-based label rolf spectacles is upping the ante: Their latest Monoceros Collection introduces the natural and comfortable material in an entirely new dimension. The frames are completely hand-made in Austria from natural materials – even the screw-less hinges consist of wood – according to a brand-new technique. The frames are created by bending one single piece of buffalo horn around the end of the frame front, which creates a unique form language including varying degrees of thickness across the frame. Every single frame created with the new method – entirely free of metal or plastic components – is one-of-a-kind in terms of the color, grain, and structure of its horn. rolf’s patented tension-free lens-insertion technique provides crystal-clear optics, while the brand also works in close cooperation with its horn supplier to safeguard humane treatment of the animals (which yields better looking horn). In terms of style, the Monoceros collection also raises the bar: The »Gemini« model combines upscale buffalo horn with elaborate design features and clean lines. In black or dark brown, the »Auriga« strikes a smart appearance with its delicately thin frame. Woody Allen was right – horn is “pretty cool” after all! 200


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A R T I S T C O O P E R AT I O N

ETNIA BARCELONA An Homage to Jean-Michel Basquiat s t ills RAPHAEL SCHMITZ, illu s tra tion ENTING ZHANG

When David Pellicer founded etnia barcelona in 2001, he created

creative use of colors has become a calling card of the label. The results

more than just a new eyewear label. He created a niche market with a

are radically different in a colorful and expressive finish, all the while

brand constantly inspired by art, design, and culture. In a way, etnia

living up to the highest quality standards.

barcelona captures the zeitgeist of its Catalan hometown in the shape

Next to bright colors, the true spirit of etnia barcelona comes to life

of spectacles that are creative, artistic, and uncompromisingly modern.

in the use of artistic themes in their collections. While other brands

It’s been a long time coming for the relatively young brand. Back in

eagerly jump on the newest trends, the Barcelona-based brand finds

the day, David’s grandfather, Fulgencio Ramo, already spent several

inspiration by involving a hand-picked selection of artists into their

years working in the factory of a large Barcelona-based sunglasses

creative process. Whether these artists serve as the main motive or

company. Until one day, he had collected enough experience and capital

merely provide the initial spark of inspiration – their stylistic signatures

to take a shot at doing things better at his very own factory in Poble

always shine through in the finished products, which thereby become

Sec. This makes David Pellicer part of the third generation in a family

far more than just the sum of their parts. Previous highlights include

tradition now taken to new expressive heights with etnia barcelona.

collaborations with Japanese nude photographer Naboyoshi Araki,

And instead of emulating other people’s styles, David has set out to

French artist Yves Klein – famous for patenting his own shade of

blaze a new trail – his very own. Most prominently, his playful and

ultra-marine blue – and photo journalist Steve McCurry, known for his 222


A R T I S T C O O P E R AT I O N

ETNIA BARCELONA » B a s q u i a t 03 - I n t h i s C a s e «

moving photographs from war zones across the globe such as Afgha-

many of his works originated from a state of ecstasy in which Basquiat

nistan. For the next chapter, etnia barcelona’s latest collection pays

created a new kind of visual language. And by bringing this visual

a posthumous tribute to a true heavyweight: legendary street artist

language into public spaces, the artist ranges among the pioneers of the

Jean-Michel Basquiat.

graffiti and street art movements. During his lifetime, Basquiat’s work

A pioneer in many ways, Basquiat exerted a lasting influence on

not only caught the attention of contemporary art critics, but also pop

the 1980s art scene like few other luminaries. At the start of his career,

art legend Andy Warhol, with whom Basquiat shared a close friend-

he created a buzz by spraying mysterious symbols and messages on

ship. The two artists collaborated on several influential pieces before

building facades in American artist neighborhoods. His unique style

Warhol’s untimely death in 1987, which weighed heavily on Basquiat.

blended a diversity of artistic approaches with vibrant colors, bold

From the entire lifetime opus of Jean-Michel Basquiat, etnia

lines, and symbols from various different cultures. He found a way of

barcelona – and more specifically creative director Edu Pitarch – chose

drawing more attention to words and slogans by crossing them out.

three particular works for the new Special Collection. Why Basquiat?

Steeped in radical messages, his works became emblems of political

And why these particular paintings? Connecting the dots, here’s the

protest. Basquiat created a discourse around racial conflict in the U.S.

exclusive SPECTR interview with Edu Pitarch about the origins of the

as well as the culture of diaspora. Morbid and surrealistic at times,

collaboration. 223


A R T I S T C O O P E R AT I O N

ETNIA BARCELONA » B a s q u i a t 01 - G l e n n «

Edu, let’s start by talking about etnia barcelona’s philosophy towards cooperations with artists. We love art, we‘re passionate about artists, and we‘re total fans

barcelona brand. If Basquiat was a brand, we can easily imagine him

being etnia barcelona, especially since he was also an ethnic artist.

Please elaborate on that a bit...

of all the artists we think of as rebels. People who have taken an

Basquiat painted not with an aesthetic eye, but as a form of social

authentic stand in life and used art to argue for or against the ways

outcry. He used his art to denounce, demand, criticize the

of society. In a sense, we believe in artists because of how we

established order. In addition to the fact that what he painted had

approach our own work. Because we are also artists who follow our

great importance where he painted it, his format was also key. He

inspiration and do what we love.

was a pioneer in taking painting to the street. Banksy, JR, and any

What was your reasoning for cooperating with the legend JeanMichel Basquiat?

other artist who uses the street to talk to people is imbibing from

Basquiat represents color, graffiti, the street. He was anti-system

You chose three of the King’s paintings for the Special Collection – what was the process of choosing these particular works?

and spoke out against the established order, calling truth to power...

Basquiat‘s legacy. Simply put, he was the King.

We looked for the richest paintings, the most aggressive of his works,

There is no artist who better embodies the values of the etnia 224


A R T I S T C O O P E R AT I O N

ETNIA BARCELONA ÂťBasquiat 0 4 - Fallen AngelÂŤ

and therefore the most colorful. We also had to think about all the

symbol! And so we wanted the graphic to have a presence, but we

possibilities when positioning the graphics on the temples to make

wanted to make it subtle at the same time. We wanted the print

sure the color levels would come out just right.

of the painting to be an almost intimate link between the person

Speaking of doing it right, how did you implement Basquiat’s signature style within this collection?

wearing the glasses and the glasses themselves. Or if you prefer, a connection between Basquiat and his fans.

The truth is that we were inspired by a pair of glasses he was wearing in a photograph we found. The rights to this photograph belonged to an elderly woman in New York, and it was an almost

Is there a special message you want to spread with the collection about 1980s art culture and the turbulent times, as they connect to today?

impossible mission to obtain the rights to use it. But in the end we

The street is now a theme in fashion, graffiti is in fashion, street

did it. We then created four shapes that seemed to us to be in tune

art is in fashion. But art, for us, is on a higher plane than fashion.

with the 1970s to 1980s, and we managed to position the crown

Behind art there are ideas, concepts, arguments. In the end, I think

on the frame front in a very evocative way. For us it was super-

what we wanted to express was an opposition to things that lack

important to include the crown into the design. After all, it was his

substance. The frames are not the most important to us, the story

225


A R T I S T C O O P E R AT I O N

ETNIA BARCELONA » B a s q u i a t 02 - F a l l e n A n g e l «

behind them is. We don‘t like to think in terms of models, we‘ve

course, all components of the frames are designed by etnia barcelona,

said so on more than one occasion. We value what‘s real and

and the graphics are transferred to the acetate. And all of this has to

authentic, people and things that speak the truth. If there‘s not an

be approved by the estate of Jean-Michel Basquiat, which you can

authentic story, or a purely aesthetic idea or concept, we aren‘t in-

imagine is no easy task.

terested. We believe that this is what we‘re about. We want people to understand that we‘re a brand with a soul. Everything we talk about is real, and everything we do corresponds to an idea or a real

The latter sounds particularly complex. Throughout the design process of this collection, was there a part that you enjoyed the most? There will now always be a “before” and “after” Basquiat at etnia

impulse that draws on history, art, or the street.

With that said, what is special about the choice of materials for this collection?

barcelona. The team has really outdone itself, and we‘ve lived

through moments of real stress. No doubt we‘ll have fun at the

First and foremost, just as with all of our sunglasses, these models

launch party in Brooklyn with Beyoncé’s brother and influential

have a mineral crystal lens to make people see better than with

people from the worlds of fashion and art. And we were thrilled

any other brand on the market. Anyone who tries mineral crystal

to see Jay-Z wearing the glasses! That was one of our dreams, and

lenses won‘t ever want to wear plastic lenses again, no matter

we‘ve realized it. Now it’s on to the next thing. But we‘ll tell you

how polarized or whatever else they might be. Our lenses are the

more about what it is some other time...

Rolls Royces of lenses, it‘s that simple. If you understand what a Rolls Royce means in the automobile industry, you‘ll understand www.etniabarcelona.com

what separates our mineral lenses from every other lens. Then, of 226


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ZENTRIERTE SICHTLINIE

OPTIMALER NASENPAD-KONTAKT

JETZT NEU!

TRUBRIDGE TECHNOLOGIE ™

FÜR DIE OPTIMIERTE PASSFORM

©2016 OAKLEY, INC.


THE RE ASON WHY

DROP THE PRESENT

From Past To Future

The present is everywhere. It’s all around us, all the time. As a continuous bridge between two separate worlds, the present connects the past and the future. Thereby, the present ensures a smooth process in the time-space-continuum, but it also has its limits when it comes to creating stark contrasts and unexpected combinations of past and future. Only the worlds of fashion and art can dream up the playful visuals connecting these worlds. In this shoot, photographer Burkard Henrichs draws on retro-futuristic influences to take the viewer out of the present moment, and into a new dimension. His visuals combine vintage eyewear with futuristically styled models at a monochromatic industrial site. It’s a study in contrasts, but also in unexpected harmonies: the vintage glasses do not disrupt the high-tech vibe, but appear strangely at home in this surreal setting, far beyond the mainstream – and out of the present moment.

photos BURKHARD HENRICHS s t yl i n g JILL KRAMER a t 21 AGENCY h a i r & m a ke - up ANJA SCHWEIHOFF a t 21 AGENCY mo d el s SEBIN & FLEMMING a t DOPAMIN MODELS , d i g i t a l a ssi s t a nt THORSTEN STECHER p os t p rod uc t ion STEPHANIE WENCEK ca s t i n g CARSTEN DROCHNER clot h i n g JUST CAVALLI, VERSACE, JOOP g l a ss e s VINTAGE 228


THE RE ASON WHY

229


THE RE ASON WHY

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2017 N O I T N E T AT e kdays: Changed

we

SATURDAY

The ultimate optical trade show is back—exciting, original and sensational. And, for one time only, opti 2017 will start on a Saturday: experience the major industry event opti, with all its variety of trends and technologies, innovations and ideas, information and inspiration!

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28. – 30. 01.2 017 www.opti.de

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The Digital Detox In our busy, hyper-connected times, Digital Detox is the catch-all panacea to all the stresses of communication overload. Totally unplug, be unavailable, and finally get to focus on one thing at the time – sounds relaxing, doesn’t it? There are plenty of suitable getaways in the analog world. Our model prefers this rusty hood of a car outside of Los Angeles to chill the old non-digital way. Or you can pick up a copy of SPECTR, or better yet, subscribe to get the automatic “download” right to your (actual) mailbox. Because here’s the thing: A subscription is the most convenient way to access every issue as soon as it comes out, delivered freshly to your doorstep, neatly packaged. Subscribing to SPECTR Magazine is like a real-life RSS-feed of everything new and exciting from the world’s leading brands and designers. And for opticians, SPECTR offers special packages with multiple magazines. Plus, our Premium Partners can customize their issues with their own logo, creating an elevated gift for their customers. Find

INVU

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spectr-magazine.com. And please feel free to direct all inquiries to press@spectr-magazine.com

photo MARIE SCHMIDT

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SPECTR Issue 18  

Design Talk with SALT. · Interview with Californian eyewear brand GLCO · Suzy Glam goes Amsterdam · Fleye: New faces, styles & campaign · SP...

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