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The Village of New Albany Village Center Strategy March 2011 Prepared for the Village of New Albany by MSI Design


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table of contents

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INTRODUCTION PLANNING FOUNDATION PLANNING PRINCIPLES PLANNING CONCEPTS ROSE RUN “REDUX” ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER FOUNDERS PARK HEALTHY NEW ALBANY FIELD HOUSE/ PRACTICE FIELDS STORMWATER MITIGATION STRATEGY SUSTAINABLE STREETS RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVES ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS SIGNAGE MARKET SQUARE COMMONS IMPLEMENTATION APPENDIX A - ECONOMIC ANALYSIS


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introduction

Introduction The Village Center Strategy builds on past planning efforts to provide a strategic guide to investment and development within the Village Center. This strategy is based on past strategic planning efforts which focused on big-picture issues, guiding growth and establishing a vision for the future (see page 6). The Village Center Strategy seeks to take this strong planning foundation and outline the specific strategic steps and projects that will transform the Village Center. This plan also coordinates public and private investment to effectively and efficiently achieve the community’s vision. By focusing on critical next step projects, the Village Center Strategy aims to turn this community vision into action.

The Strategy To guide the Village Center Strategy, the Working Group developed a set of Planning Principles. These establish community goals, define actions and provide benchmarks for successful implementation. Using these Planning Principles, MSI Design collaborated with the Working Group to develop Planning Concepts that will lead to strategic reinvestment in the Village Center. These concepts were vetted with the focus groups and measured against an economic study to determine which investments would have the greatest impact. The implementation portion of the Village Center Strategy includes preliminary cost information to aid in prioritization of projects.

Process MSI Design developed the Village Center Strategy over a ninemonth process working with a core group of Village of New Albany elected officials and administration. This Working Group met on a bi-monthly basis to review planning principles, concepts, projects and cost estimates. To gain input from constituents, three focus groups were convened. These focus groups consisted of Village residents, Village employers and employees, and an interested stakeholder group including representatives from organizations such as the Chamber of Commerce, the New Albany Company and New Albany Plain Local Schools.

Using This Report Following this introduction, this report details the Planning Principles that were developed along with the Working Group. These principles set the framework for the development of the Planning Concepts and are explained in detail.

Several times throughout the planning process, presentations were given to the Village Council to provide progress updates and to share ideas with the public. A presentation was also made to the Chamber of Commerce.

Each concept is fully described, highlighting the relevant plan elements and development factors. Where applicable, end notes are provided (see Appendix A) that highlight economic analysis elements that support each Planning Concept. A timeline and cost estimate is also provided to aid in project prioritization. Each concept is also evaluated against the Planning Principles. The implementation section of the plan summarizes the Planning Concepts and provides a prioritization matrix to guide improvements within the Village Center.


1998 Village of New Albany Strategic Plan

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planning foundation

2001 VILLAGE OF NEW ALBANY STRATEGIC PLAN

2003

Planning Efforts

ROSE RUN GREENWAY CORRIDOR

Numerous plans have influenced the development of the Village Center over the past 12 years. These plans have set a strong planning framework for the Village Center. As the planning team developed the Village Center Strategy, it was helpful to revisit these plans and build upon these efforts in the creation of a transformative strategy for the Village Center.

2006 VILLAGE OF NEW ALBANY STRATEGIC PLAN UPDATE

2006 VILLAGE OF NEW ALBANY VILLAGE CENTER PLAN


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Big Ideas Create a balanced land use plan with residential, commercial and office districts Continue commitment to creating a community with high aesthetic character Provide a range of housing prices and office space opportunities Clearly mark gateways to the community Ensure compatibility of land-uses along the border of the study area with those inside the Village Develop more parks and preserve open space Connect and expand the leisure path system Create a vital Village Center with a mix of uses Create a manageable flow of traffic Big Ideas Develop a thriving Village Center recognizing it is the emotional and practical heart of New Albany Develop strong neighborhoods based on interconnectivity, pedestrian orientation, proper scale, high quality architecture, and proximity of parks and open space. Develop a strong tax base to benefit all residents and all those who work in New Albany Develop a quality system of parks, trails, open space, and recreational opportunities Continue to improve the quality of development in and around the village Develop a Village with a variety of housing types and options Big Ideas Preserve and enhance the natural elements of the Rose Run Greenway Corridor Lessen impacts of past poor development decisions on the riparian corridor Improve stormwater capacity and stormwater management practices along the riparian corridor Complete natural and pedestrian linkages throughout the corridor Develop a park amenity to serve Village residents and visitors Attract visitors to the Village Core parks and businesses

Big Ideas Create a community which is economically and environmentally sustainable for current and future residents Protect the environment, manage stormwater and preserve riparian corridors Develop a thriving Village Center Develop strong neighborhoods based on interconnectivity, pedestrian orientation, proper scale, high quality architecture, and proximity of parks and open space. Develop a strong tax base for all residents and all those who work in New Albany Continue to develop a quality system of parks, trails, open space, and recreational opportunities Big Ideas Create a focal point for Old Village Center Balance parking needs with good design Clearly mark gateways and focal points within the Village Center Create a stormwater strategy for the Village Center Encourage higher density and mixed- use development near the Village Center Improve the connectivity between the Village Center and the rest of the community Implement streetscape improvements on Main and High Streets within the Village Center Establish an open/ civic space within the Village Center Create quality design and a pedestrian friendly environment

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Plan Outcomes Established a guide for the growth of New Albany Established the thoroughfare plan and future road network Established land-use regulations for New Albany Defined an open space strategy Strengthened riparian corridor standards in conjunction with the Rocky Fork Accord

Create a strategy to ensure development is served by water and sewer services Provide a safe, efficient, and attractive network of streets based on interconnectivity and proper Village design.

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Plan Outcomes Expanded business campus Designed more areas for park land Analyzed the Village core Established a street classification system Created a Leisure Trail Master Plan

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Plan Outcomes Laid the foundation for the Ealy Park Grant and park development Developed Ealy Park Restored the stream corridor at Ealy Park Improved pedestrian linkages over Rose Run on Market Street Established the concept for the Green Village Spine Outlined the design for Founder’s Park

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Develop a Village with a variety of housing types and options Create a strategy to ensure development is served by water and sewer services Plan Outcomes Established implementation strategies for office, residential, gateways, roadway corridors, green corridors, utilities, and thoroughfare planning Introduced the concept of Green Gateways which led to the construction of several roundabouts Established sustainability goals Established office development standards Clarified land use development standards for districts

Plan Outcomes Determined build-out densities Created the basis for the Form-Based Code with an analysis of block sizes, block coverage, building massing, and corridor character Refined the street topologies for the Village Center Created a hierarchy of streets Identified redevelopment opportunities Compiled an overall vision for the Village Core


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planning principles

The Planning Principles embody community goals for the future of the Village Center. These foundational principles address sustainability, economic development, arts and culture, health and wellness, and education and technology, providing a guide for future investment in the Village Center. These Five Principles not only reflect community goals, they also outline a series of actions and benchmarks for planning concepts. The principles and the corresponding actions and benchmarks are discussed on the following pages.


GREENING NEW ALBANY: Commitment to Green Sustainability

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LASTING CORE: Economically Sustainable Development

CULTURAL INFUSION: Enhancing the Seeds of Arts and Culture

EMBRACE HEALTH: Focusing on Health and Wellness Opportunities

TEACH & LEARN: Integrating Education and Technology


Actions

Benchmarks

• Utilize green stream corridor as true amenity • Implement the Village Center Stormwater Mitigation Strategy • Implement a green streets approach • Pursue partnerships for environmental research center • Connect trails system to city-wide and regional trails • Pursue a greenspace levy • Coordinate open space needs for schools with goals for Village open space

• Successful public amenities are created • Stream corridor is preserved • Educational opportunities are enhanced • Long-term open space protection is achieved • Stormwater quantity and quality is managed sustainably on a regional basis

Actions

Benchmarks

• Evaluate potential return on public investment strategies • Require high quality buildings and site design that matches the surrounding character • Streamline regulatory impediments to new development (Formbased code). • Concentrate density both in and within the Village Center • Consider development incentives • Realize the value of downtown open space as a development catalyst

• Increased development while maintaining quality urban form • Increased mix of uses • Increased revenue for the city with limited increase in cost of services. • Increased number of employees and residents in the Village Center • Demonstrable results of public investment

Actions

Benchmarks

• Leverage the performing arts center programming crossopportunities throughout Village Center public spaces • Leverage performing arts center mission with new business development in Village Center • Provide gathering places and cultural amenities including ‘third places” and daily use public areas • Integrate art directly into the fabric of the Village Center • Establish an Arts Commission

• Village Center becomes a cultural events destination • Reputation as an arts community is established • Downtown vibrancy increases as a result of destination users • Businesses capitalize on cultural destination users

Actions

Benchmarks

• Collaborate with the schools in solving the athletic facilities/ practice fields space issue • Enhance the ability to host recreational events in the Village core • Provide health/fitness center in the Village Center • Connect trails system to city-wide and regional trails system

• Village Center becomes a health and wellness event destination • Reputation as a health and wellness community is established • Businesses capitalize on health and wellness destination users

Actions

Benchmarks

• Provide environmental awareness signage in Village core • Pursue partnerships for environmental research center

• Extended Learning Campus collaboration throughout Village core • Heightened public awareness and understanding of Village planning and green efforts


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planning concepts

Using the foundation of the Planning Principles, Planning Concepts were developed to turn the community’s common goals into actionable projects that advance the economic development of the Village Center. Many of the concepts address multiple Planning Principles and all of them will contribute to a vibrant, active and sustainable Village Center. In the this section, each of the Planning Concepts is further defined, including how they fulfill the established Planning Principles. It is expected that the prioritization of each of these Planning Concepts will evolve over time given funding, demographic, and political considerations.


ROSE RUN “REDUX” Enhancing the Rose Run corridor in the Village Center Principles Met

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ENVIRONMENTAL CENTER Providing an opportunity for research and education Principles Met

FOUNDERS PARK Creating a true Village Center gathering place Principles Met

HEALTHY NEW ALBANY Integrating wellness into the Village Center Principles Met

FIELD HOUSE / PRACTICE FIELDS Meeting school and community recreation needs Principles Met


STORMWATER MITIGATION STRATEGY Approaching stormwater quality and quantity comprehensively Principles Met

SUSTAINABLE STREETS Retrofitting Village Center streets with sustainable infrastructure Principles Met

RESIDENTIAL ALTERNATIVES Diversifying the housing options within the Village Center Principles Met

ENVIRONMENTAL AWARENESS SIGNAGE Raising awareness about environmental improvements in the Village Center Principles Met

MARKET SQUARE COMMONS Transforming Market Square into a destination and community gathering space Principles Met


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rose run “redux”

enhancing the rose run corridor in the village center 18

description The Rose Run corridor is a historic natural feature in the Village Center, providing a connection to nature and acting as a source of civic pride. While environmental connection is important, currently Rose Run acts as a physical barrier between the school campus and Market Square. It is possible to preserve this natural corridor and its environmental riparian aspects along with the proposed modifications to provide better visual and physical access. Providing this enhanced natural amenity will also have positive economic development potential for the Village Center1. Improvements for Rose Run focus on improvements to connections and pathways along the corridor. This includes new pathways, increased and improved bridge crossings, and enhanced crosswalks across Dublin-Granville Road. In addition to physical connections, the corridor will be improved visually by thinning the vegetation canopy and adding open spaces.

elements • improved trails • increased/improved bridge crossings • lighting • pedestrian crossing improvements to Dublin-Granville Road • “thinning” of the visual vegetation canopy • riparian improvements • art installations

development factors • must include crossing upgrades to Dublin-Granville Road • urban design goals of connectivity, both physical and visual, will need to be balanced with the need to maintain and enhance the riparian environment of the Rose Run Corridor • connections to Ealy Park are vital for success of the overall park corridor

Art installations within these open spaces and pathways will further enhance the Rose Run corridor by establishing an identity. This “art-in-the-landscape” concept could also extend the offerings of the McCoy Center and a potential sculpture park at the Phelps House. Improvements here could also be linked to the future development of an Environmental Center (see page 22) and to the current stream mitigation efforts at Ealy Park.

timeline/cost • near term (1-2 years) • approximate cost $1.85 million


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environmental center

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description Environmental studies have long been at the forefront of the continued efforts to restore and enhance the Rose Run corridor. The New Albany-Plain Local School District has one of the most successful and widely-recognized environmental studies programs in the state, providing an unparalleled opportunity for research, learning and stewardship. Building off this success, the proposed Rose Run Environmental Study Center will further advance riparian corridor and stream headwaters study and provide a venue for community environmental education and outreach. The center should borrow elements of successful local examples, such as the OSU Olentangy River Wetland Research Park and the Grange Insurance Audubon Center. Using green design and landscape approaches, such as building a LEED certified building and a pervious parking lot as part of the Environmental Center, would help to both minimize the center’s environmental impact and provide a showcase for green methods.

elements • environmental center building • trails • lighting • “green” parking lot • riparian improvements

development factors • concept works best along the Rose Run Corridor • concept studies based on 8,000 square foot facility, but final programming needs will determine actual size • programming needs will depend on identified research partners and associated community needs that could be combined in this facility

This project will allow collaboration between the Village of New Albany and the New Albany-Plain Local School District in the near-term, with long term intentions of a larger collaboration with local research institutions. It will also directly engage the public in learning about the environmental importance of the Rose Run corridor by providing life-long learning opportunities.

timeline/cost • Site selection and land acquisition are primary factors in timeline - likely medium to long term (2-4+ years) • Approximate cost (not including land acquisition): $3.46 million


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founders park

creating a true village center gathering place 24

description Founders Park creates a true Village Center gathering place for festivals and events as well as a destination for daily use. Central to this new park is an amphitheater that complements the McCoy Center by offering a space for outdoor arts performances. Historic elements are also integrated into the design, with a new Veterans Memorial that provides a peaceful place of reflection, and a restored Founders Cemetery that honors early inhabitants of the Village. A plaza connects the new park to the Rose Run, providing a bridge crossing, riparian improvements, trails and lighting. These river and trail connections would be enhanced with the construction of a trailhead that provides a shelter, restrooms, bike racks and a “green” parking area. Taken together, these improvements will create a new gathering place and maximize the economic development potential of the Village Center1.

elements • amphitheater • plaza and Rose Run connections • Veterans’ Memorial colonnade • restored Founders Cemetery • trail head with shelter, restrooms, bike racks, green parking area • gateway bridge toward the McCoy Center • relocated “green” Village Hall parking lot

development factors • the proposed location of Founders Park is somewhat disconnected from the heart of activity in the Village – requires Village acquisition of the gas station to connect • the park would require relocation of the Village Hall parking area which could allow installation of a pervious-paving system in keeping with the Village’s green initiative • The land south of Rose Run is under Village ownership, but the land north of the river is privately held

timeline/cost • Village controls land for the potential phase I area, but additional land acquisition is a primary factors in overall timeline - likely medium to long term (2-4+ years) • approximate cost Founders Park (south of Rose Run): $2.24 million • approximate cost Founders Plaza (north of Rose Run): $1.43 million • approximate cost Trailhead (north of Rose Run): $0.99 million


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healthy new albany

integrating wellness into the village center 28

description As mixed-use retail development is considered in the Village Center, the development of health and wellness facilities within this area ties in with the larger concept of “deconstructing” the typical approach to a community recreation center. Locating these active uses within the Village Center will create another attraction and could spur additional private investment and enhance the retail/restaurant marketplace2. A health and wellness center on the upper floors of a mixeduse development in the Village core might include aspects of a community center such as fitness classes and gym equipment. Large-scale space needs, such as basketball/volleyball courts, indoor fields, and an indoor track, could be accommodated in the Field House (see page 32) at another location.

elements • health and wellness facilities • associated retail redevelopment

development factors • there would likely need to be some level of private/public partnership in the identification and operation of a health and wellness center site within the context of a larger development project • having a fixed tenant such as a health and wellness center with some level of public funding would greatly facilitate the ability to develop the next phase of Market Square mixeduse plan • this project is compatible with development of a separate field house in an effort to target health and wellness needs with a phased, “deconstructed” recreation center approach

timeline/cost • successful collaboration between the public and private sector will determine the implementation schedule - likely medium term (2-4 years) • approximate cost: TBD


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field house / practice fields

meeting school and community recreation needs 32

description elements The New Albany Plain Local Schools campus has a severe shortage of playing and practice fields. Designed as a unified campus that includes all grade levels, the number of fields is drastically fewer than would be present had the schools been built separately. As the campus has built out and the student population has increased, there is a need for the schools to build more fields. With this need comes an opportunity to build practice fields and a field house on the ground located east of the Village Center commonly referred to as “Ganton.” As outlined in the 1998 NACo PUD zoning, Ganton has vested rights to build 294 single-family houses. Since there has been some sentiment expressed to use this site in a less intense manner, those density credits could be transferred in to other areas of the Village Center. This would allow the density of the Village Center to increase in better strategic locations closer to the heart of the core and nearer to planned improvements. A field house here might include basketball/volleyball courts, indoor fields, and an indoor track which would allow the other aspects of a community center such as fitness classes and gym equipment to be located in a smaller facility in the Village core. This ties in with the larger concept of “deconstructing” the typical approach to a community recreation center. It also allows for an incremental approach to building these facilities which could be less costly and more adaptable to public/ private development partnerships. In addition, the burden of traffic and parking needs would be more equitably dispersed into the overall downtown street network. Considered as a collaboration between the schools and the greater community, this development would allow the schools to meet their space issues and provide additional amenities for residents.

• practice fields • field house • associated parking and open space

development factors • the Schools have a field shortage and would prefer to meet the need near the current Village Center campus rather than out at the fringes of the Village • the field house facility has the potential to bring additional activity and visitors into the Village core by hosting travelling tournament events • this project is compatible with development of a separate health and wellness center in an effort to target health and wellness needs with a phased, “deconstructed” recreation center approach

timeline/cost • successful collaboration between the school district and the Village needed to determine timeframe - likely medium to long term (2-4+ years) • approximate cost: TBD


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stormwater mitigation strategy

approaching stormwater quality and quantity comprehensively 34

description The recently completed Village Center Stormwater Mitigation Strategy creates a comprehensive plan for dealing with existing and future water quality and quantity issues within the Village Center. Instead of dealing with stormwater issues on development-by-development basis, this plan looks for watershedwide solutions. This proactive approach both addresses environmental issues and helps to facilitate development. The plan calls for a mix of traditional and sustainable stormwater methods to improve water quality and find key storage locations for water quantity. The planning analysis identified five priority stormwater improvement sites that will mitigate existing and future stormwater issues. These are areas where immediate implementation of new stormwater practices would provide the most benefit to the stream corridor (biology and ecology) and to the Village (economic development). These five improvement sites and proposed solutions are: 1. Market Square: Wetland basin to address both quantity and quality to satisfy current requirements and development of phase two of the development program. 2. Rose Run Stream Restoration: Creation of a stream corridor protection zone to create a riparian corridor that accommodates additional vegetation and slows stream flow during large events. 3. 2nd and 3rd Streets: Use of pervious pavers and other green infrastructure to treat and store stormwater from streets and adjacent properties. Improvements to 3rd Street are underway currently. 4. Miller Avenue: Install a regional detention basin and encourage integrated green infrastructure as part of any future redevelopment. 5. Rose Run Floodplain Enhancement: Install a regional detention basin and encourage green infrastructure as part of any future redevelopment. Also creates a naturalized preserve to accommodate temporary storage and mitigate downstream flood impacts.

elements 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

Market Square Stormwater Wetland Basin Rose Run Stream Restoration 2nd and 3rd Street Green Streets Miller Avenue Stormwater Detention Basin Rose Run Floodplain Enhancement

development factors • prioritization is based on the following factors: whether improvements are necessary for remediation of an existing stormwater issue, provide an immediate environmental impact, needed if development occurs, needed to encourage development, and/or the ease of completion • grants, public-private partnerships, and cooperation of property owners will influence the successful implementation of some of these improvements

timeline/cost • ongoing implementation will typically occur in conjunction with a related development project (public/private partnerships possible); likely near to long term (1-4+ years) • approximate cost: per project


1. market square wetland basin

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sustainable streets

retrofitting village center streets with sustainable infrastructure 36

description As part of a comprehensive approach to stormwater management, the Village Center Stormwater Mitigation Strategy recommends sustainable retrofits to Village Center streets. This will allow for the inclusion of sustainable infrastructure solutions that can be implemented within the right-of-way to address stormwater treatment. While there are numerous sustainable infrastructure options, the green street retrofits focus on the solutions that are most applicable to streets within the Village Center. These solutions include: • Curb Extensions: Extends curb into parking lane of the street to create a landscaped area that treats stormwater and provides temporary storage and some infiltration. • Street Planter: Stormwater planters between the sidewalk and curb that treat, retain and infiltrate runoff. • Tree Lawn Swale: Variation of street planter installed in an excavated area behind the curb in the tree lawn. • Silva Cells: Used tight urban conditions, Silva Cells are modular subsurface integrated tree and stormwater systems that hold soil, while supporting traffic and pedestrian loads beneath paving and hardscapes. • Permeable Pavers: Permeable pavers allow for stormwater to infiltrate between the spaces of bricks. Stormwater is stored in the subgrade and allowed to infiltrate.

elements • 2nd and 3rd Street pervious paver sustainable streets • Main Street improvements • retrofits to other Village Streets, as delineated in the Village Center Stormwater Mitigation Strategy practices

development factors • success in meeting quality goals will require storm facility creation in concert with sustainable streets practices • pilot projects already underway • long-term goals are to incorporate some form of these practices throughout the Village Center roadway network

The permeable paver street currently being constructed on 3rd Street is a pilot project that has been designed to handle stormwater within the right of way and a considerable amount from adjacent properties. This additional capacity allows for stormwater credits for future development. The retrofits outlined here should be immediately extended to planned Main Street improvements and then to other Village streets as future roadway improvements are made.

timeline/cost • ongoing implementation will typically occur as infrastructure is updated, replaces, or newly constructed - public/private partnerships possible - likely near to long term (1-4+ years) • approximate cost: per project


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residential alternatives

diversifying the housing options within the village center 38

description elements The Village Center must incorporate housing in a mix of types, sizes and densities. In order to have all-day activity and the social and economic investment needed to support essential Village core entertainment, restaurant and retail offerings, more housing units are needed. Identified through this and previous planning efforts, that number should be from 1,500 to 2,500 units. An economic analysis of how this residential development would boost the Village’s tax base can be found in Appendix A3,4. Having housing at in a diversity of types and sizes will create opportunities for people with a variety of lifestyles to live in the Village core. That might include residents who want to stay in the community without maintaining a large single-family house (those aging-in-place and empty nesters), those starting their careers (young professionals), or those who work in or near the Village but do not need or desire the housing elements that commonly accompany children in the home (childless singles or couples). This type of housing is often described as “tax positive”3. The common factor in this housing will be the focus on development within the context of quality urban form. This will further establish the pedestrian-based nature of the Village Center and continue to improve both the tangible and intangible aspects that give the area a special character.

• mix of types, sizes and densities • typically at a higher density per acre than other areas of the Village • variety of types within the context of quality urban form

development factors • total units numbered at 1,500 to 2,500 • detached (single family) units at a neo-traditional scale of under 2,500 square feet and of small lot sizes - resulting density from 3-6 units per acre • townhouse style in a wide range of square footages from under 1,500 to 4,500 square feet - density from 4-12 units per acre • attached housing in residential-only flats structures or in mixed-use applications with upper story residential and ground floor retail of 750 to 2,000 square feet - density from 6 to 15 units per acre

Previous efforts have been a good start with the larger-scale townhouses at Keswick, the urban character of Richmond Square and the mixed-use efforts at Market Exchange. More extensive efforts are needed, however, to create both all-residential and mixed-use upper story residential projects. The Village can consider methods to support Village core residential through the continued upgrade to roadway and stormwater infrastructure or through tax incentives. timeline/cost • ongoing implementation will depend on housing development projects over time - likely long term (4+ years) • approximate cost TBD


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Existing Residential Alternative Planned Residential Alternative Planned Mixed Residential Alternative


environmental awareness signage raising awareness about environmental improvements 40

description The Village of New Albany has been a leader in green initiatives for over a decade, but the residents and greater community are unaware of the improvements and investments that have been made. Environmental signage will identify and provide wayfinding for existing parks, sites and trail heads, and will also focus on environmental education and health information. The signage will identify green elements within open spaces, stream restoration efforts, and other natural features. In addition to providing information on health and wellness activities and the benefits of exercise, this signage will include trail identification and wayfinding to encourage health and exercise on a daily basis.

elements 5 signage types: • park entry • trailhead and directional • trail maps • environmental / health information • trail orientation markers

development factors • the signage package has been developed, but it will have to be implemented over time as budget allows • sponsorship opportunities are being explored to speed installation of the signage system

timeline/cost • under design - near term (1-2 years) • first phase cost: $30,000


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market square commons

transforming market square into a community gathering space 42

description Throughout this planning process, the area identified as Market Square Commons was repeatedly cited as the de facto center of the Village. The improvements suggested for Market Square Commons make the area more of a destination for Village residents and visitors and provide an attractive public gathering space that will enhance both the community’s image and the economic viability of Market Square and the Village Center1,4. The improvement concept for Market Square Commons includes a central gathering place with tables, gardens and reading nooks. An interactive fountain could form the “activity magnet” for parents and young children. The surrounding roadways are replaced with brick, which also extends across Market Street. This change in material and texture will impose a pedestrian-first feel for the plaza area. Furthering this concept, the roadways looping the central commons area could be temporarily closed for special events. Areas in front of the library are also contemplated for improvements to complete the entire area as a destination. A reworking of Keswick Commons across Market Street would complete the design and greatly add to the finished nature of the overall space. This project could serve as the catalyst for development through daily activity, weekend gatherings, and special events.

elements • central gathering place with tables, gardens and reading nooks • fountain/splash pad • brick roadways • library entry improvements • revamped Keswick Commons

development factors • this area is a center of activity that could become a stronger destination • due to significant public ownership, these improvements could be done quickly • some collaboration as to the public and private portions of the project will be necessary

timeline/cost • funding is only impediment to implementation • approximate cost: $3.4 million - likely near to medium term (1-4 years)


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implementation

This plan has identified ten Planning Concepts that will drive reinvestment and redevelopment in the Village Center. To guide the implementation of these planning concepts, this section identifies aspects of each potential project that will help determine community priorities. For each planning concept, the matrix on pages 54-57 outlines whether land acquisition is required, provides an estimated cost of the improvements, and summarizes each of the projects.


rose run “redux�

54

environmental center

founders park

health and wellness center

field house/ practice fields


near

medium

long

near

medium

long

near

medium

long

near

medium

long

near

medium

long

near

medium

long

action items -prepare scoping study -prepare schematic design plan

action items -prepare scoping study -prepare site evaluation study -prepare programming evaluation -acquire site cost $3.46 M, Not including land acquisition.

action items -prepare scoping study -prepare schematic design plan -relocate Village Hall parking -acquire phase II sites cost Park: $2.24 M Plaza: $1.43 M, Not including land acquisition. Trailhead $0.99 M, Not including land acquisition.

action items -prepare scoping study -prepare site evaluation study -identify operator/partner cost TBD

action items -refine needs evaluation with Schools -prepare programming evaluation for field house

timeframe

cost $1.85 M

cost TBD


stormwater mitigation strategy

56

sustainable streets

residential alternatives

environmental awareness signage market square commons


near

medium

long

near

medium

long

near

medium

long

near

medium

long

near

medium

long

near

medium

long

action items -establish public/private partnership for near-term project -implement in conjunction with future development cost

action items -implement retrofits to infrastructure during repair or upgrade -require in new roadway construction cost TBD per project

action items -continue to improve Village Center infrastructure -consider incentives cost TBD

action items -continue to improve Village Center infrastructure -consider incentives cost Phase 1: $30,000

action items -prepare scoping study -prepare schematic design plan

timeframe

TBD per project

cost $3.4 M


58


appendix a

As part of the planning process, the Village of New Albany engaged professor Mark S. Rosentraub, PhD from the University of Michigan to perform economic analysis on the planning concepts that were developed. Professor Rosentraub used economic indicators and market conditions to assess the economic impact of proposed private and public sector investment. The resulting studies analyze the impact of residential development on property tax revenues, the influence of investing in open space enhancements on private investment, and the potential of the retail and restaurant marketplace. Excerpts from Professor Rosentraub’s reports are included here as end notes that were delineated in the appropriate planning concept sections in this report. To obtain the entire content of his reports please contact the Village of New Albany.


appendix a economic analysis 60

Some communities mindful of intra-regional competition have emphasized parks and open space with a very limited number of restaurants and retail outlets for new town centers. Other communities have focused on a more intensive mix of retail outlets and restaurants. Choosing the mix that will succeed for a community and investors requires careful assessments of regional market conditions. It is also important to underscore that both strategies (green space and limited retail development v. a mix of more extensive retail operations and restaurants) can both be quite successful. 1

A mix that elevates the availability of open or green space has also succeeded in anchoring a desirable mix of new residential development (single family homes as well as townhomes and condominiums). This point may be particularly important if it was determined that there are limited market opportunities for restaurants and specialty stores in New Albany as a result of nearby competitors. If the regional market is saturated with regard to retail development there are still development options for the village center that emphasize open space with a smaller retail footprint that could be the best policy course for New Albany. Other areas have succeeded in creating new retail/ restaurant destination centers that attract residents, create jobs, and improve the local tax base. ...the population that is likely to live in upscale cluster homes and throughout New Albany has the exact demographic makeup that will appeal to restaurant owners. With a growing interest in innovative chefs, neighborhood based, higher quality restaurant venues, and family restaurants are quite popular. A village center location in New Albany could be a favored and profitable location. Not being part of a lifestyle center or mall creates a certain cache for some restaurants. 2

At the current time there are approximately 351 residents per retail boutique store in New Albany and this density is lower than that found for every other retail area and comparison city (for which data were available). The only exception involved Chagrin Falls, Ohio. The town center in Chagrin Falls, however, has succeeded in becoming a regional destination and benefits from the driving times to other retail alternatives. The nearest life-style center is a 25-minute drive from Chagrin Falls and its higher levels of traffic create a distinctively different market “feel� and as a result a niche market has been created and sustained.

The data sets consulted indicate that New Albany has 13 different types of boutique stores. There are some boutique stores in other residential areas that are not present, and while that might appear to create an opportunity, such an investment would seem to require a great deal of confidence that a distinct and loyal market base of customers could be secured. This observation is made even though it must be tempered by the higher home values in New Albany and the resulting probability of more disposable income. Yet the proximity of the two large regional malls and their higher traffic levels still suggests that a challenge would exist for any new retail establishment. The New Albany market offers cautionary support for the potential addition of two to four restaurants with at least one having a family focus. If a family focused restaurant that was different from a fast food operation could not be established then it would be best to add one to three additional restaurants. The price point review suggests a more upscale restaurant is needed to advance the identity of the village center. There is far less reason to believe that there is potential for the expansion of retail space. Success for a new retail operation would be far more dependent on an existing client base or specialty niche that would find the New Albany location to be an asset and particularly attractive.


Adding 1,500 residential units would change the mix of home options and the type of families living in New Albany. These properties traditionally attract individuals who place less demand on cities and school districts for services. Their disposable incomes usually leads to consumption of services from the private sector (e.g., security) or public services that on a per unit basis are inexpensive to deliver (e.g., parks) or for which user fees can be collected. In addition, these homeowners are far less likely to have children reducing the expense for the local school district. As a result of their lower consumption of publicly provided services these homeowners are sometimes described as being “tax positive,” meaning they pay more in property taxes than they consume in locally provided public services. 3

For a 50-unit per year build out plan, it is estimated that assessed property tax base will increase from 1.7 percent to 2.3 percent across the 30-year build out period. If 60 units per year are built it is expected that the new units will account for from 2 percent to 2.6 percent of the assessed valuation of property in the town. If 75 units are sold per year the proportion of the property tax base that is represented by the new residential property will range from 2.5 percent to 3.1 percent across the 20-year build-out period. The construction value anticipated for Market Square Commons was $3.4 million. A net increment of $2.2 million was built into the village’s inventory of commercial properties across a five-year build out period. In this manner conservative perspectives were built into the future projections. This approach was taken to avoid possible criticisms of excessive exuberance in the aftermath of the severe recession, the loss of property values, the languishing high unemployment rate, and the relatively slow pace of the national and regional recovery. 4

While Market Square Commons’ commercial properties are being built and sold or leased, residential development will also take place. As a result, the amount of residential property is increasing at the same time that the commercial property is being added to the base. Indeed, there is even a third factor that is included in the data behind the graph. That third factor is the increment in value of the pre-existing base of residential, commercial, industrial, and public utility properties. As a result, what is illustrated is that while new commercial property is being rapidly added to New Albany’s total inventory of properties, overall commercial property’s proportion of the tax

base increases. There is then a small leveling effect (which appears as a decline because the Y axis scale is small) before the proportion again rises. The addition of the full commercial property build out would mean that at the end of the period studied because of the expansion of the residential component, the overall proportion of assessed property that is commercial will remain largely unchanged from the 2010 proportions of 12.6 percent If the proposed 1,500 residential units are built between 20 and 25 years, and Market Square Commons is built in five years, then the property tax base in New Albany will shift between 4 and 5 percent. If more commercial property developed or if the commercial property developed has a higher value than is assumed, then the shift would be at least 5 percent. For this shift in the property tax base to be realized, however, the increment in the property tax base for residential property related to traditional single family homes must be limited to between 1 and 2 percent per year. If additional permits for residential construction were granted, such that the total assessed value of residential property rises more than 2 percent in any year, the change in the tax base related to townhomes, condominiums, and new commercial properties would decrease from the projected maximum of 5 percent. A desired outcome from the building of townhomes and condominiums is to attract households that do not increase the burden on school districts and other service delivery governments. When that happens, tax revenues are generated, but without additional service demands, the cost of providing services is spread across a larger tax base. Single-family homes can attract families with school-age children and that can mean additional expenses and the need for higher tax rates. The presence of larger numbers of teenagers can also lead to higher law enforcement costs. Every town is challenged to increase the value of properties without increasing the costs for school districts and other governments. The development strategy proposed by MSI can accomplish that objective, and as illustrated here, under conservative assumptions, the property tax base can be shifted by almost 5 percent as full build out occurs. That will indeed improve the fiscal situation for taxpayers and New Albany. For the full benefit to be realized, however, the value of other residential properties cannot be allowed to increase by more than 1 to 2 percent per year. If that occurs, then the fiscal gains resulting from MSI plans would be reduced providing less long-term tax release.



New Albany Village Center Strategy