Issuu on Google+

Project7:Layout 1

11/7/13

2:54 PM

Page 1


Project8:Layout 1

11/7/13

3:12 PM

Page 2


MI 3-13 TOC:Layout 1

11/7/13

1:27 PM

Page 3


MI 3-13 TOC:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:22 AM

Page 4


MI 3-13 TOC:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:23 AM

Page 5


MI 3-13 TOC:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:25 AM

Page 6

CONTENTS

VOLUME 25 • ISSUE 3 2013

PUBLISHER

James R. Baker ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Katie Sauro SALES MANAGER

Katie Higgins SALES

Eric Iles PRODUCTION MANAGER

John Rusnak DESIGNERS

Dawn Carlson Christina Poisal Beth Harrison WEBMASTER

Jon Hines

48

OFFICE MANAGER

Audra Higgins INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER

FEATURES 10 36

Lois Sanborn

INK & BEYOND STAY THIRSTY: WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM INTERESTING PEOPLE

IT’S TIME TO COMMERCIALIZE SEATTLE Media Index Publishing Group

44 OREGON FILM

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE:

NEW iOPIF APPLICATION INCLUDES POST-PRODUCTION AND VIDEO GAMES

P.O. Box 24365, Seattle, WA 98124-0365 1201 First Ave. S., Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98134 (206) 382-9220 • (800) 332-1736 Fax (206) 382-9437 Email: media@media-inc.com www.media-inc.com Display Advertising. Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. Advertising confirmation deadline is the 30th of the month prior to issue publication. Advertising mechanicals are due the 5th of the month

70 BREAKTHROUGH: FIVE TIPS FOR BRAND MESSAGING THAT RESONATE IN TODAY’S MARKETPLACE

of issue. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publishing Inc. and will not be returned. Subscriptions. Annual subscriptions to Media Inc. (4 issues) are $25 (+$2.20 if sent to WA address); two-year subscription is $37.50 (+$3.30 if sent to WA address). Send check or money order to Media Index Publishing Inc., or call (206) 382-9220 with VISA or M/C. Back issues of Media Inc. are available at Media Index Pub-

72 THE STRUCTURE OF SOCIAL MEDIA

lishing Inc. offices at the cost of $5 plus tax. Copyright © 2013 Media Index Publishing Group. All Rights Reserved. No part of this publication may be copied by any means, electronic or mechanical, including photocopying or recording by any information storage or retrieval system, without the express written permission of the publisher. Printed in USA

6

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013


MI 3-13 TOC:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:33 AM

Page 7


MI 3-13 TOC:Layout 1

11/6/13

3:06 PM

Page 8

CONTENTS 14 16 17

PPI ASSOCIATION PRESENTS PRINTROCKS! A GUIDE TO FULFILLMENT PRICING NO MORE PASSING THE BUCK: EXPAND YOUR OFFERINGS BY PARTNERING WITH AN OUTSIDE COMPANY

THE HALL OF GIANTS: THE STORY 48 OF FREMONT AND ITS TROLL

POSTING 74 WILD THE SAVVY MARKETER’S WILD CARD HEART OF 75 THE THE MATTER

ADVERTISING AWARDS: 76 AMERICAN ANNUAL COMPETITION GETS A NEW NAME

52 THE INLAND ALTERNATIVE FOR INDEPENDENT FILM IN WASHINGTON

78 ROSEY AWARDS COMING SOON SPOTLIGHT AWARDS: 79 PRSA RESER’S AND RADIANCE COMMUNICATIONS QUE-UP FOR BEST IN SHOW

THE RECORD: 82 ON MEDIA INC.’S Q&A SERIES WITH MCNAMARA SIGNS

COMING ATTRACTIONS: 54 FALL FILM FESTIVALS FACE-TO-FACE IS 56 STILL THE BEST FOR CREATIVE

58 GAME-CHANGING GEAR: THE MoVI M10 8

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

22

MEDIA INC. INDUSTRY LISTS 22

PRINT/VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS

64

POST-PRODUCTION SERVICES

80

PR FIRMS


MI 3-13 TOC:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:37 AM

Page 9


MI 3-13 PPI - cover story:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:39 AM

Page 10

INK & BEYOND STAY THIRSTY:

WHAT WE CAN LEARN FROM INTERESTING PEOPLE By Jules VanSant, Inspiration Catalyst and Print Communications Executive

t may seem a little cliché, but we all know the popular commercials promoting Dos Equis Beer starring “The Most Interesting Man in the World” (TMIMITW). He’s grayed and weathered, having been around awhile, and could be seen as a dirty old man, a has-been. Yet there is something about his drive for adventure, attitude towards complacency, engaging presence and attraction from younger women that intrigues us. And when he drinks beer, which isn’t always, he prefers Dos Equis, as do all those in the room around him. So when someone wants to create sales, share information, brand and more, do they prefer your business to others? The business of visual communication in print has been around a long time. It’s the stable, sometimes sexy, sometimes simple, and steady way for sharing information. It’s reliable. We’ve seen it wane in the past 20 years to a place where it’s playing second fiddle to digital messaging, yet it’s not going away. So ask yourself—when someone wants to use print, where do they go? What do you have to offer? Has your business found a renaissance, building on past experience to be exciting, or are you operating as you always have, hanging up the towel and grabbing a walker? How do you attract new clients and stand above the rest? What do you have in the mix to engage the buyers of today?

I

BE LEGITIMATE TMIMITW puts his money where his beer goes— he knows his limits, yet pushes it with purpose, and isn’t afraid to brag about it in a very cool way. You buy the fact that he actually did all those exciting things and can’t wait for more. I recently attended a lecture from best-selling author Malcolm Gladwell. He discussed his latest book, David and Goliath. This title, as with all his previous books, dares us to reshape how we think about the world around us. He challenges our perspective through reflection on history, psychology and powerful storytelling. The underlying message throughout his lecture was to be legitimate. 10

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013


MI 3-13 PPI - cover story:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:42 AM

Page 11

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

11


MI 3-13 PPI - cover story:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:42 AM

Page 12

When working with your clients to reach a higher level of engagement, remember to incorporate the following ideas: • Make an impact. Embrace integrated solutions. Be creative and offer an “above the bar” deliverable from what is expected (as long as you can legitimize it). • Evolution vs. revolution. Don’t just evolve, but revolutionize how your markets see you. Don’t be intimidated by technology or change, but show how you’re on top of it through your marketing, branding, services and culture.

“Focus on the right strategy rather than razzle-dazzle tactics.” — Peter Drucker What does that mean? Gladwell writes, “When people in authority want the rest of us to behave, it matters—first and foremost—how they behave.” He calls this the Principle of Legitimacy. In David and Goliath, he explains that “legitimacy” is based on three things, one of which is that the rules of conduct have “to be predictable. There has to be a reasonable expectation that the rules tomorrow are going to be roughly the same as the rules today.” Have there been moments when you’ve been in a position of authority and you didn’t operate at the level you expected of others? Those slips are bigger than you think—and they can lead to the downfall of any giant. Own it, follow through, don’t give up, and make sure those around you know what you’re capable of. Don’t think you’re too small, too old, too limited. Find your strengths and stick with them. BE POPULAR TMIMITW obviously understands that having friends matters. His popularity branches off his ability to think outside the norm and be a great storyteller. Barb Pellow with InfoTrends was a keynote speaker at Printlandia: Ink & Beyond. During one of her sessions, she discussed which areas of communication will be in demand and how those involved in print are best positioned to capitalize on integrated marketing, grow their business and develop great stories to share with current and future clients. The more media channels you engage with the print you already supply or purchase, the greater results. 12

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

• If you don’t use it, lose it. Find what works for you. Harness the power of your vendor and industry partners to raise the bar for your customers’ projects. Data, paper, print treatments, die cutting, augmented reality—there’s so much you can do! Check out Printing Industries of America’s Integrated Print Center for white papers, videos, blogs and more to become more popular within your circles and inspire new relationships. HAVE A VISION When you start to understand the opportunities within the industry of communication and how print fits in, then it’s time to set course. TMIMITW, in his tongue-in-cheek way, understands what he can do and wants to be. Whether he is disarming a bomb or wrestling a lion, his adventures are interwoven with purpose and vision. To ensure success means once you have a vision, you need to work it. TMIMITW doesn’t let others cast doubt on anything he chooses to do. Ryan Sauers, Sauers Consulting, shared during Printlandia 2013 his simple “How to Make a Vision Work” list. To obtain desired results, you need to: • State it simply. • Cast it convincingly. • Repeat it regularly. • Celebrate it routinely. • Embrace it personally. • Live it daily. Own who you are and practice it every day. From the administrative staff to the production department, billing, sales and CEO—everyone within your company needs to share the vision for success to be seen as innovative and interesting enough to do business with. But be sure to stay humble. DRINK UP! Go out there and quench your thirst! TMIMITW fell in love with Dos Equis during his short jail stay in Guadalajara. The ideas we gain from others’ experiences should cause us to pause and be inspired to move forward. Be, see and practice what you want to be. From adversity comes real opportunity—someone will win, have the glass in hand and the followers waiting for their next move. Will it be you? Have a vision, be a trend in conversations, own your brand, and stay thirsty, my friends.


MI 3-13 PPI - cover story:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:43 AM

Page 13


MI 3-13 PPI Print Rocks:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:44 AM

Page 14

PPI Association Presents PrintROCKS! PRESTIGIOUS AWARDS ACCEPTED BY TOP PRINTERS IN THE REGION AT THE PRINTLANDIA ANNUAL CONFERENCE acific Printing Industries (PPI) Association announced the winners of the sixth annual PrintROCKS! Awards at the Woodmark Hotel, Yacht Club & Spa in Kirkland, Washington. The awards celebrate printing excellence in the Pacific Northwest (including Alaska and Hawaii) and acknowledge the outstanding work by talented and dedicated individuals within PPI’s six-state region. The top honor, the Best of Show trophy, went to Premier Press in Portland for their MJ 50 Years Book. The firm also received a Best of Division award within their respective company size category, as well as Best of Category for eight entries. Other top division winners included B&B Print Source in Tigard, Oregon, and PrintWest in Woodinville, Washington. See a list of winners at right. All 2013 winners will be entered into the 2014 Printing Industries of America’s international Premier Print Awards competition—the largest and most prestigious print competition in the world. More than 200 entries were assessed this year by three judges. All three were very impressed with the outstanding work that was submitted. Jules VanSant, PPI executive director, noted: “It’s awesome to see all the excellent work entered by this year’s PrintROCKS! participant companies. The quality and originality of each of the submissions, from firms small and large, is always exciting to see. Once more, we’ve shown that Print ROCKS! and is alive and well in the West. Everyone involved should be very proud.” In addition to celebrating the talented companies across the region, this year’s PrintROCKS! Competition was the second to include a student poster design portion. Three of many outstanding entrants have earned a scholarship, as well as recognition from PPI: First Place – Amy Meyer, Pacific Northwest College of Art; and Second Place – Karla Ramaila, and Third Place – Emily Irwin, both from Admiral Arthur W. Radford High School in Honolulu, Hawaii. Congratulations to the winners! The PrintROCKS! Awards recognize those responsible for the creation and production of print communications in the region. The competition rewards companies and individuals who produce the best in print media. A slideshow of all the winners can be viewed at www.ppiassociation.org and at www.ppiprintrocks.org.

P

Pacific Printing Industries Association (PPI) is the non-profit trade association serving the broader graphic communications industry in Oregon, Washington, Montana, Idaho, Alaska and Hawaii. Their purpose is to provide support and services that help our member companies become more successful and profitable in their businesses through local, regional and national resources for all within their organization. 14

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

PPI’S UPCOMING EVENTS What’s Next Starts Now Luncheon w/Kodak, Great Western Ink & PPI Wednesday, Nov. 6, 11:30am Harley Davidson in Renton RSVP@ppiassociation.org What’s Next Starts Now Luncheon w/Kodak, Great Western Ink & PPI Thursday, Nov. 7, 11:30am Velo Cult Bike Shop in Portland RSVP@ppiassociation.org Mergers & Acquisitions in Print - Circa 2014 Breakfast w/ New Direction Partners & PPI Tuesday, Dec. 3, 8:30am Xerox Corporation Offices in Tukwila

RSVP@ppiassociation.org Print is on a Roll! PPI Holiday Constructive Cocktails & Bowling Tuesday, Dec. 3, 6pm Acme Bowl in Tukwila RSVP@ppiassociation.org Mergers & Acquisitions in Print - Circa 2014 Breakfast w/ New Direction Partners & PPI Thursday, Dec. 5, 8:30am Xerox Corporation Offices in Tukwila RSVP@ppiassociation.org Print is on a Roll! PPI Holiday Constructive Cocktails & Bowling Thursday, Dec. 5, 6pm Hollywood Bowl in Portland RSVP@ppiassociation.org


MI 3-13 PPI Print Rocks:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:44 AM

Page 15

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

15


MI 3-13 Global Fullfillment:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:45 AM

Page 16

A Guide to Fulfillment Pricing By Julie Hiatt Guest Columnist

etting fulfillment pricing: if you’ve ever done it before, just the thought of it can give you a headache. It’s right up there with pricing new insurance, preparing your taxes or even getting a root canal. It wouldn’t be so bad if it wasn’t so confusing or if the fulfillment vendors would structure their pricing the same way. So why is it like this? Why can’t my fulfillment vendor just give me a standard price? Think about when you buy a new car. Do you walk on the lot, go up to the first salesperson you see and ask, “what’s my new car going to cost?” I’m guessing you first tell them the model you want, the options you want and the financing you want; then you can get a price. How odd would it be if all cars cost $50,000, no matter what model or options? If you aren’t looking for the luxury model with all the bells and whistles, you probably don’t want to pay for them. Fulfillment works the same way. Itemized pricing does take more time and it is more complex, but it is the only way you will understand what you are paying for and ensure you are not paying too much. It is also a great way to understand what contributes to higher fulfillment costs and ways to save money without reducing the service to your customers.

G

To calculate your pricing, your fulfillment company will look at these main areas: • The product or literature that needs to be fulfilled. • How much storage space is needed. • How many orders there will be in an average month. • How quickly orders need to be shipped or turned. • What an average order consists of or looks like. • How the items are packed. • How the items will be shipped and through which carriers. • If any assembly is needed. • If any custom programming or integration is needed or if their standard system will suffice.

They then take this information and turn it into labor, storage and system costs. One of the areas that has the most impact on your order price is the quantity of orders in a batch. Let’s say you have 1,000 orders per month. If you are turning orders daily, then you would average 47.62 orders per business day, or most likely 47.62 orders per batch. Now let’s say you have 100 orders per month. If you are turning orders daily, then you would average 4.76 orders per batch; this low amount would probably equate to a high order cost. When picking orders, it takes about the same amount of time to pick 4 or 5 orders as it does 10, or likewise for 15 as 25 orders. The more orders you have in a 16

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

1,000 orders per month 500 orders per month 250 orders per month 100 orders per month Processing Daily

Processing Twice a Week

Processing Weekly

processing batch, the lower the order price. One way of increasing your batch count is to extend the turn time for orders. Say you have 100 orders per month, but instead of turning each day, you turn twice a week; you would then have 12.5 orders per batch. Or likewise, turning weekly you would have about 25 orders per batch. If you have this option, your price would be exponentially lower. The chart above shows how the number per batch increases as the turn time gets longer. When you have determined and communicated your needs, your fulfillment company can work up a custom fulfillment proposal. The proposal should be very clear on how everything will work, what they will do, what they need from you and what the pricing will be. The basic pricing elements are: receiving, storage, order processing, pick pricing, package pricing, assembly and shipping. In addition to this, you also have your cost of packaging materials and freight. Of course, depending on your needs there may be additional areas: system integration, call center, order entry, procurement, inbound freight management, EDI management or integration, and any other custom needs you may have. Remember, any time you can pay for something directly, like packaging and freight, you can save the markup from your fulfillment company. It used to be that fulfillment companies would buy in bulk and get much lower pricing on packaging, but with the U-lines of today, most anyone can get great pricing and availability on packaging. As far as freight, your fulfillment companies may get a bigger discount; just make sure their markup doesn’t negate it. Hopefully this information will help you understand how fulfillment pricing works. Most importantly, remember that in order for your fulfillment company to get you the very best price, they have to know exactly what you need, which means you have to be able to tell them. Think about your needs today and five years down the road. Make sure your fulfillment company will be able to take care of you. If not, you may find yourself going through this process all over again. This information is based on a standard of fulfillment; each client is different and depending on the nature of your product, a different structure may work better for you. If you would like more information or have any questions, you can contact Julie Hiatt at Global Fulfillment (206-405-3350 or www.gloful.com).


MI 3-13 McNamara:Layout 1

11/7/13

1:34 PM

Page 17

No More Passing the Buck EXPAND YOUR OFFERINGS BY PARTNERING WITH AN OUTSIDE COMPANY By Mike McNamara Guest Columnist Edited by Mia Mar

e all have our areas of expertise, but at times it makes sense to expand our horizons. Especially with regards to our service offerings. Many times I’m asked for services I don’t provide in-house. It’s easy to pass the buck and send potential clients elsewhere, but then you are literally passing the buck—right into someone else’s pocket. Subbing out work takes more time and effort, but it comes with rewards— there is profit to be had! Going out-of-house to meet your customer’s needs can be the difference between getting a job and losing a job. Many times it’s just a small component to a project that complements the whole offering, and then it’s definitely worth the effort! There are a number of reasons to consider partnering with an outside company to expand your offerings. But I would say making money is at the top of the list, without a doubt. When you are asked to create a lobby sign, banner, or other large-format visual, there are a few things to keep in mind when deciding to sub out to a sign vendor. Firstly, it’s very important

W

to work with a reputable company. You will only be as good as your “partner” in your client’s eyes. Finding the right partner is crucial to your reputation and ability to please your client.

SUBBING OUT WORK TAKES MORE TIME AND EFFORT, BUT IT COMES WITH REWARDS—THERE IS PROFIT TO BE HAD! There are a few Internet-based sign companies offering online pricing, and certainly many sign companies have price lists and catalogs, but be sure to read the fine print. Colormatching, adhesives, set-up, shipping, and other finishing Continued on page 18

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

17


MI 3-13 McNamara:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:46 AM

Page 18

Continued from page 17 details are considered “extras,” adding to the price. A custom sign shop is a more fail-safe way to go. Although we don’t have wholesale price lists (there are too many variables), we are more flexible and can create customized one-of-a-kind pieces, often at a better price. Visiting a showroom is a great way to see all available options. Can’t do that with an online vendor. You can help your sign company succeed if you are prepared when requesting a quote. Sketches will help start the conversation. A simple drawing with accurate dimensions, color call-outs, and quantities will go a long way to preventing any confusion and will expedite the process. The delivery method of your request also makes a difference. Sending a fax is still better than placing a phone call, but an e-mail with a jpg or pdf sketch is ideal. Be sure to follow up with the sign vendor to make sure the request was received. It helps to know what materials your client is interested in. Sign companies utilize a wide range of materials such as plastics, metal, foam vinyl, and wood—even reclaimed boards from old barns are potential substrates. There are also different grades of materials. All of these affect quality and price. It’s good to know what purpose the sign will serve and how it will be used. The cost and construction of a sign will differ depending on how and where it will be used. A monument sign that identifies a property will require a much different approach than a large banner that promotes a special event. Both are very important, but they serve entirely different purposes, take different amounts of effort, and involve different types of materials.

It is important to make sure the estimate you receive is what the client expects. Proofs should note colors, materials, quantities, sizes and finishes detailed for your client’s approval. Proposals should clearly contain all pricing, expected start dates, due dates, delivery terms, art submission requirements, and payment terms. Read your proofs and proposals and make sure your client reads theirs. Don’t accept vague “looks great” approvals when subbing out work! Presenting the quote to your client is the next challenge. You’ll need to mark-up the price, but how much depends on how comfortable you are with your client’s budget and how much information you have from your sign vendor. If you don’t have a handle on your client’s budget, you may present something they can’t afford (that’s a lot of work for a “no” answer from your client) or you may lose an opportunity to produce a high-end piece that will potentially bring you more customers. If you don’t have all the necessary information from your sign vendor, you could incur unforeseen costs. You don’t want to have to call your client back and explain the cost has changed because you forgot to add shipping. Once you have a handle on all the little details of subbing out work, you will be more successful at delivering a quality product, in turn making your customer happy! More importantly, you’ll meet your number one objective—you’ll have more money in your pocket! No more passing the buck! Mike McNamara is founder, owner and operator of McNamara Signs in Seattle. Mia Mar is a graphic designer and writer at McNamara Signs.

PRINT MANAGEMENT

Enthusiast Media Group: Print and Branding Management and why it is critical to your successful business growth Bring your brand to life! This is our tagline and also our belief in creating solutions in print and promotion management. I founded Enthusiast Media Group in 2006, focused on providing complete solutions for magazines and catalogs across the country. We have over 20 years’ experience in Web, sheetfed and mailing production. We added digital printing (large and small format) plus promotional item management in 2009 to support our client growth and capitalize on technology advancements for them. Printing is an art that does not work on the notion that the more you pay, the better the quality or service. Quite the opposite is true. The reality of today is: “The less you pay, the more improved the quality and service.” This is due to technology advancements in the printing industry over the past seven years. Does this mean if you get the lowest quote, you should not question it? Absolutely not. What it does mean is that to be consistently successful, you need a good print management group that has a network of plants and knows immediately where your print media projects belong. Our statistics show that we save our clients 25%, on average, in the first year of 18

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

working together, based on equipment fit, paper options, postage, and volume economies. We work with over 20 publications and 60 catalogers and we are an extension to their

company in print management and buying. Our clients are industry leaders in their niche and are supported through the education, print management, and the guidance of our team. Our printing services include full web, sheetfed, packaging, digital and large format signage. Our mailing and comail expertise will ensure that you are paying the lowest postage possible and we will show you through analysis. Our aggressive newsstand approach, both traditional and in the APP

stores, provides exceptional distribution growth. And finally, our digital page turning and iPad app built directly from your print media platform is the hottest addition to catalog and magazine production. We make it simple for you to save money, create value, and be profitable. We understand your hard earned reputation deserves just the right printed message, quality, and professional management to ensure your success. If you are working directly with a plant and you have multiple print and promotional item projects in progress, give us a call. We will find the right fit, the right price, and the right print solution. Enthusiast Media Group is dedicated to our clients’ success. Become one of our clients! You will benefit from the results and we will enjoy working with you. We don’t talk about stretching your print marketing dollars—we talk about getting the most exposure and opportunity within your current budget and saving you money. This is what we do exceptionally well. Please see our Web sites at www.enthusiastmediagroup.com and www.emgpromo.com for over 800,000 promotional item ideas.


MI 3-13 McNamara:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:46 AM

Page 19


11/6/13

BRIEFS

9:48 AM

Page 20

(

MI 3-13 creative briefs:Layout 1

Western Neon Restores the “R” The iconic giant letter “R” that once stood atop the old Rainier Brewery in Seattle has been restored to its rightful place in the city skyline. Fabricated by Western Neon, the replica was installed on October 24 with great fanfare. The original R, now on display at Seattle’s Museum of History and Industry (MOHAI), sat perched on the brewery for nearly 50 years, lighting the Seattle sky and serving as a warm welcome to those entering the city via I-5 North. Its restoration marks a return after a 13-year absence. “This is something we’ve been The new Rainier R. (PR News Photo/Rainer Beer) working on for nearly a year, and we couldn’t have done it without the help of our partners at Columbia Distributing, MOHAI and Western Neon, as well as the building owners at Ariel Development,” said Dan McHugh, chief marketing officer for Pabst Brewing Co., owners of Rainier. As a prelude to the October 24 party, Western Neon and Rainier collaborated in touring the new R around Seattle on a neighborhood “R Crawl” the evening of Tuesday, October 22. The R was loaded on a flatbed trailer and towed from Ballard to Georgetown, via Fremont, the University District, Capitol Hill, Belltown and Pioneer Square. The restoration project was paid for through a partnership between Rainier and Columbia Distributing.

Hemlock Partners with Tagga for Interactive Print Hemlock Printers recently announced its partnership with Tagga, a leading cross-channel marketing company based in Vancouver, BC, to bring interactive print opportunities to its many customers. Building on Tagga’s expertise with national and international consumer-facing brands, Hemlock can now offer interactive digitized content that is accessible from mobile, tablet and desktop devices for uniquely designed promotional campaigns that readily tell consumers more about products and services. Tagga’s software platform, engineered services, comprehensive reporting and market savvy all contribute to ensuring online and offline media work effectively. Further, the new service enables clients to build community through advanced social media integration, and determines where and when the consumer was in the moment of consideration, elements that are critical to optimizing effectiveness and results. “We work with a wide array of leading brands for their print and distribution requirements, and this partnership now allows us to provide an exciting new dimension to their marketing plans,” said Hemlock’s president and general manager Richard Kouwenhoven. “Using a small footprint for QR or SMS codes on their packaging, hang-tags or catalogues, a bold and simple interactive connection can be made with compelling promotional or informational offers.” Hemlock Printers is one of the largest commercial printers in the Pacific Northwest, with a production facility in Burnaby, BC, and offices in Seattle, Victoria, and San Francisco. Visit www.hemlock.com for more.

STAFFING AGENCY

ABOUT THE CREATIVE GROUP® The Creative Group (TCG) specializes in placing interactive, design, marketing, advertising and public relations professionals on a project and full-time basis with a variety of companies. As a division of Robert Half, the world’s first and largest specialized staffing firm, we are backed by a history of excellence. Businesses throughout North America turn to TCG to fill their creative staffing needs. We represent a broad range of professionals, including user experience designers, marketing strategists and communications specialists. By working with us, businesses know they will be provided with highly skilled professionals who have been assessed using TalentMatch®, our proprietary evaluation process which includes a per20

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

sonal interview and skills testing. Our staffing and recruiting teams are composed of creative and marketing professionals, many of whom are industry awardwinners. They make it their business to identify fellow professionals whose skills match our clients’ needs. Their industry backgrounds give them an in-depth understanding of an organization’s requirements, enabling them to quickly supply individuals well-suited for each project. In addition, our business relationships with prestigious industry organizations, including AIGA, the American Advertising Federation,

Graphic Design USA, HOW and Rhode Island School of Design, reinforce our commitment to the profession and help us reach the most highly skilled creative professionals in the market. Our experience placing thousands of highly skilled individuals with businesses each year has made us a respected authority on employment issues. Through our industry-leading research on career and management trends, and complimentary advice booklets, including our annual Salary Guide, we ensure that our clients receive a level of service and attention second to none. For more information about TCG, please call our Seattle branch at 206.749.9046 or visit creativegroup.com.


MI 3-13 creative briefs:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:48 AM

Page 21

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

21


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:49 AM

Page 22

NW

John Madden, president Ad Services; Seattle, WA 206-623-6963; fax 206-682-1945 csr@adservices.com www.adservices.com Ed Millman Adpro Litho Inc.; Mukilteo, WA 425-743-3200; fax 425-348-4274 csmith@adprolitho.com www.adprolitho.com Gary Smith, president; Chris Smith, VP AllpakTrojan; Renton & Cheney, WA 425-227-0400; fax 425-227-0197 sales@allpaktrojan.com www.allpaktrojan.com Wayne Millage, president; Bruce Hutcheon, SVP sales & marketing; John Castaldi, commercial print manager Alphagraphics; Seattle, Lynnwood, Renton, & Bellevue, WA 206-448-9100; fax 206-448-1760 cstempler@alphagraphics.com www.alphagraphicsseattle.com Charles Stempler, CEO/president Amica Inc.; Kent, WA 253-872-9600; fax 253-872-7414 amica@ix.netcom.com www.amicainc.com DND Aurora Prints; Seattle, WA 206-274-8475; fax 206-274-8483 print@auroraprints.com www.auroraprints.com Abyaz Mahmud, president Bridgetown Printing; Portland, OR 503-863-5300; fax 503-863-5301 info@bridgetown.com www.bridgetown.com; www.cgx.com Margo L. Yohner, president Capitol City Press Inc; Tumwater, WA 888-943-3556; fax 360-943-2140 michael@capitolcitypress.com www.capitolcitypress.com Michael Eisenmann, president CCS Digital, Inc.; Bellevue, WA 425-653-9606; fax 425-653-9322 sales@ccsprinting.net www.ccsprinting.net Greg Hawes, CEO Kevin Sullivan, president CDS; Medford and Sunriver, OR & Puyallup, WA 800-388-7575; fax 541-773-1832 cdssales@cdspubs.com www.cdspubs.com Steve Brown, president Cendix; Lake Oswego, OR 888-898-0066; fax 503-210-6479 sales@cendix.com www.cendix.com Wilson Zehr, GM Century Publishing Company; Post Falls, ID 208-765-6300; fax 208-765-6583 rogersc@centurypublishing.com www.centurypublishing.com David Risdon, CEO; Craig Rogers, president/COO Champion Envelope; Portland, OR 503-796-0500; fax 503-796-0504 rod@championenvelope.com www.championenvelope.com Steve Kauffman, GM

22

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

IN N V WE G ARIA TIN BL BED G T AT FL O-PR A EX I OG NT

OO

Top Local Executives AAA Printing; Bellevue, WA 425-454-0156; fax 425-454-5786 info@aaa-printing.com www.aaa-printing.com

BIN RA DE PH RY Y / MA BIND ER ILI YE NG QU /L D IPM SE IREC IST RV T M EN A I M FU CES AIL/M NAG T E LF AR ME IL KE TIN NT WE LME G B/ MO NT BIL LA RG ES EF ER O VIC RM DE SIG AT ES N

SERVICES PROVIDED R/ SH VE EE HIC TF LE ED WE WR OF FS BO AP ET S F P F DIG SE R I PR IT NT INT AL T PR I N G I /

Company; City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

PRODUCTS CA TA L BR OGU OC ES H AN UR NU ES A MA L R GA EPO R Z BO INE TS S OK S PA CK A DI GIN RE G CT MA ST AT I ION LING ER PIE PO Y/ ST LE CES ER T S/ TE B LA BE ANNE RHE AD RS LS /D EN /ST ISP VE IC L AY KE LO S RS P OU TD ES

PRINT/VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:50 AM

Page 23

Many printing companies use the term marketing service provider to describe their relationships with agencies and design firms.

We prefer “best friend.� Stevens Integrated Solutions 4101 SE 26th Avenue, Portland Oregon 503.233.5746 | www.stevensIS.com

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

23


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:50 AM

Page 24

NW

David Carns, GM Brad Barnard, director sales & marketing Consolidated Press; Seattle, WA 206-447-9659; fax 206-447-9477 gstone@consolidatedpress.com www.consolidatedpress.com Gary R. Stone, CEO; Robert T. Brown, CFO; Scott Serna, VP CORE Communications; Corvallis, OR 541-757-2016; fax 541-757-2480 lou.butera@corecomm.us www.corecomm.us Lou Butera DCG West; Seattle, WA 206-784-6892; fax 206-782-3623 info@dcgwest.com; www.dcgwest.com Terry Storms, CEO, McCallum Print Group Brad Clarke, president, McCallum Print Group Tammy Peniston, president, Mailhandlers Digital Print Services, QC Graphics; Kent, WA 425-251-4925; fax 425-251-0605 dtassielli@go4color.com Domenic Tassielli, president

Eagle Web Press Co.; Salem, OR 800-800-7980; fax 503-393-4917 sgustafson@eaglewebpress.com www.eaglewebpress.com Michael Gehring, GM; Mike Connor, plant manager; Sharon Gustafson, sales manager Emerald City Graphics - A Consolidated Graphics Company; Kent, WA 253-520-2600; fax 253-520-2607 www.emeraldcg.com Mark Steiner, president Enthusiast Media Group, LLC; Portland, OR 253-617-0395; fax 503-253-2234 wmartin@enthusiastmediagroup.com www.enthusiastmediagroup.com Wendie Martin, president Lisa White Global Fulfillment, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-405-3350; fax 206-405-3356 info@gloful.com www.gloful.com Julie Hiatt, GM/CEO; Robyn Bayless, sales manager; Randy Gray, accounting manager Global Printing Sourcing & Development (Global PSD); Carnation, WA 206-390-9617/425-354-3690 bob@globalpsd.com www.globalpsd.com Bob Larkin, international sales manager Graphic Arts Center (GAC) - A Cenveo Company; Portland, OR 800-347-4655/503-224-7777; fax 503-248-7210 dan.graaff@cenveo.com www.gacnw.com; www.cenveo.com James Miller, director of operations HB Design; Portland, OR 503-944-1000; fax 503-944-1030 gail@hbdesign.com www.hbdesign.com Noma Hanlon; Gail Snow; Leslie Worth Hemlock Printers USA, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-241-8311; fax 206-241-2177 kwilliams@hemlock.com www.hemlock.com Frits Kouwenhoven, VP Hemlock USA sales

24

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

N

IN N V WE G ARIA TIN BL BED G T AT FL O-PR A EX I OG NT

DO O

Top Local Executives ColorGraphics - A Cenveo Company; Seattle, WA 206-682-7171; fax 206-329-2017 seattleprint@colorgraphics.com www.colorgraphics.com

BIN RA DE PH RY Y /B IND MA E ILI RY NG EQ /L D UIP SE IREC IST ME RV T M N AN ICE MA FU S IL/M AG T LF AR EM IL E KE TIN NT WE LME G B/ N T MO BIL LA RG ES EF ER OR VIC DE MA SIG ES T

SERVICES PROVIDED R/ SH VE EE HIC TF LE ED WE WR OF FS BO AP E T S F PR F D INT PR IGIT SET INT AL I P N R G I /

Company; City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

PRODUCTS CA TA L BR OGU OC ES H AN UR NU ES A MA L R GA EPO R Z BO INE TS S OK S PA CK A DI GIN RE G CT MA ST AT I ION LING ER PIE PO Y/ ST LE CES ER TT S/ B LA E BE ANNE RHE AD RS LS /D EN /ST ISP VE IC LA K LO YS PE ERS OU S T

PRINT/VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:51 AM

Page 25

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

25


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

9:52 AM

Page 26

NW

IN N V WE G ARIA TIN BL BED G T AT FL O-PR A EX I OG NT

OO

Top Local Executives

BIN RA DE PH RY Y / MA BIND ER ILI YE NG QU /L D IPM SE IREC IST RV T MA EN ICE MA FU S IL/M NAG T E LF AR ME IL KE TIN NT WE LME G B/ MO NT BIL LA RG ES EF ER O VIC RM DE SIG AT ES N

SERVICES PROVIDED R/ SH VE EE HIC TF LE ED WE WR OF FS BO AP E TP S F F DIG SE R INT PR IT INT AL T PR I N G I /

Company; City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

PRODUCTS CA TA L BR OGU OC ES H AN UR NU ES A MA L R GA EPO BO ZINE RTS OK S S PA CK A DI GIN RE G CT MA ST AT I ION LING ER PIE PO Y/ ST LE CES ER T S/ TE B LA BE ANNE RHE AD RS LS /D EN /ST ISP VE IC KE LAYS LO RS P OU TD ES

PRINT/VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS

Hulett Printing, Inc.; Spokane, WA 509-326-1611/877-644-1611; fax 509-326-2240 brad@hulettprinting.com www.hulettprinting.com Brad Hulett, president

Image Media; Portland, OR 503-214-4500; fax 503-221-9737 geoff@imagemediagx.com www.imagemediagx.com Charley Cobb, CEO Geoff Gillam, GM Journal Graphics Inc.; Portland, OR 503-790-9100; fax 503-790-9043 www.journalgraphics.com Phillip Bridge, president

K/P Corporation; Renton, WA 800-328-3284; fax 425-204-6305 www.kpcorp.com Joe Hollandsworth, VP sales

Labels Plus, Inc.; Everett, WA 206-523-0477; fax 206-523-1973 sales@labelsplus.com www.labelsplus.com Eric Phillips, owner Tracy Overcash, operation manager

Produce, protect, and deliver your brand.

Offset Printing

Digital Printing

Fulfillment

Envelope Manufacturing

DCGWest.com 206.784.6892

26

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

Specialty Bindery

Direct Mail


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:13 AM

Page 27

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

27


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:28 AM

Page 28

NW

Grant Cundy, owner/president Lithtex Inc.; Hillsboro, OR 503-726-4102; fax 503-726-4090 les@lithtex.com www.lithtex.com Les Davis, president/CEO Mastercraft of Seattle; Seattle, WA 206-768-1297; fax 206-768-1301 info@mastercraftofseattle.com www.mastercraftofseattle.com DND McCallum Print Group; Seattle, WA 206-784-6892; fax 206-782-3623 info@mccallumprintgroup.com www.mccallumprintgroup.com Terry Storms, CEO Brad Clarke, president McIntyre Direct; Portland, OR 503-286-1400; fax 503-286-1300 dan@mcintyredirect.com www.mcintyredirect.com Susan McIntyre, founder/chief strategist McNamara Signs; Seattle, WA 206-284-0809; fax 206-284-0796 mike@mcnamarasigns.com www.mcnamarasigns.com Mike McNamara Metropolitan Fine Printers Inc.; Vancouver, BC 604-254-4201; fax 604-254-5175 nikos@metprinters.com www.metprinters.com Nikos Kallas, president MyBinding.com; Hillsboro, OR & Kent, WA 800-944-4573; fax 503-640-6152 sales@mybinding.com www.mybinding.com Cory Ware, owner Jeff McRitchie, VP of marketing Newman-Burrows, Northwest Publishing Center; Tukwila, WA 206-324-5644; fax 206-324-8939 sales@nwpublishingcenter.com; www.nwpublishingcenter.com Mike Daigle, CEO; Doug Andreassen, sales manager; Steve Bergendoff, development director Olympus Press; Seattle, WA 206-242-2700; fax 206-242-8230 info@olypress.com www.olypress.com Glenn Blue, owner Frank Vertrees, owner Oregon Web Press; Albany, OR 541-926-3000; fax 541-926-1515 s.crowe@oregonwebpress.com www.oregonwebpress.com Steve Crowe, president Pacific Publishing Company; Seattle, WA 206-461-1322; fax 206-461-1347 ppcprint@nwlink.com www.pacificpublishingcompany.com Robert Munford, VP marketing & operations Terry Fain, sales manager Premier Graphics; Bellingham, WA 360-733-1212; fax 360-676-5805 www.premiergraphics.biz Bob Lynch, president Premier Press; Portland, OR 503-223-4984; fax 503-223-4601 info@premierpress.com www.premierpress.com Jodi Krohn, CEO

28

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

N

IN N V WE G ARIA TIN BL BED G T AT FL O-PR A EX I OG NT

OO

Top Local Executives Leatherback Printing; Kirkland, WA 425-822-1202; fax 425-828-3935 support@leatherback.net www.leatherback.net

BIN RA DE PH RY Y /B IND MA E ILI RY NG EQ /L D UIP SE IREC IST ME RV T M N AN ICE MA FU S IL/M AG T LF AR EM IL E KE TIN NT WE LME G B/ N T MO BIL LA RG ES EF ER OR VIC DE MA SIG ES T

SERVICES PROVIDED R/ SH VE EE HIC TF LE ED WE WR OF FS BO AP E T S F PR F D INT PR IGIT SET INT AL I P N R G I /

Company; City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

PRODUCTS CA TA L BR OGU OC ES H AN UR NU ES A MA L R GA EPO R Z BO INE TS S OK S PA CK A DI GIN RE G CT MA ST AT I ION LING ER PIE PO Y/ ST LE CES ER TT S/ B LA E BE ANNE RHE A RS LS / DIS D EN /ST PL VE IC AY KE LO S RS P OU TD ES

PRINT/VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS


Project8:Layout 1

11/7/13

3:13 PM

Page 29


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:30 AM

Page 30

NW

DND Print NW; Tacoma, WA 253-284-2300; fax 253-581-6840 sales@printnw.net www.printnw.net Jeff Stallings, partner/manager Printing Control; Tukwila, WA 206-575-4114; fax 206-575-3098 toniao@printingcontrol.com www.printingcontrol.com Tonia Olson, president Printing Today; Portland, OR 503-641-0200; fax 503-445-4437 www.printingtoday.com Frank Stammers, CEO PrintStreams; Mount Vernon, WA 360-424-5945; fax 360-424-8778 bobsinger@hotmail.com www.printstreams.net Bob Singer, president PrintWest, Inc.; Woodinville & Seattle, WA 425-402-8600 info@printwest.net; www.printwest.net Phil Parrish, president/CEO; Charlie Wozow, EVP; Jim Slayton, VP, sales

30

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

IN N V WE G ARIA TIN BL BED G T AT FL O-PR A EX I OG NT

OO

Top Local Executives Print Fusion; Seattle, WA 206-365-1244; fax 206-365-9935 info@print-fusion.com www.print-fusion.com

BIN RA DE PH RY Y / MA BIND ER ILI YE NG QU /L D IPM SE IREC IST RV T M EN A I M FU CES AIL/M NAG T E LF AR ME IL KE TIN NT WE LME G B/ MO NT BIL LA RG ES EF ER O VIC RM DE SIG AT ES N

SERVICES PROVIDED R/ SH VE EE HIC TF LE ED WE WR OF FS BO AP ET S F P F DIG SE R I PR IT NT INT AL T PR I N G I /

Company; City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

PRODUCTS CA TA L BR OGU OC ES H AN UR NU ES A MA L R GA EPO R Z BO INE TS S OK S PA CK A DI GIN RE G CT MA ST AT I ION LING ER PIE PO Y/ ST LE CES ER T S/ TE B LA BE ANNE RHE AD RS LS /D EN /ST ISP VE IC L AY KE LO S RS P OU TD ES

PRINT/VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/7/13

1:54 PM

Page 31

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

31


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:33 AM

Page 32

NW

Tom Creamer, president Brad Settlemyer, GM Puget Bindery/UltraKote; Kent, WA 253-872-5707; fax 253-872-5221 bob@pugetbindery.com www.pugetbindery.com Bob Bayless, VP Puget Sound Envelope; Redmond, WA 425-869-2420; fax 425-602-8739 rod@psenvelope.com www.psenvelope.com Rod Reineke, president QSL Print Communications; Springfield, OR 541-687-1184; fax 541-743-0708 melissakoke@qslprinting.com www.qslprinting.com Doug Koke, owner Pete Gribskov, special projects Rhino Print Solutions; Blaine, WA 888-333-7917 reception@rhinoprintsolutions.com www.rhinoprintsolutions.com David Allan, president/CEO Scanner Graphics; Seattle, WA 206-624-4469; fax 206-587-2706 john@scannerinc.com www.scannerinc.com Phil Parrish, president/CEO; Charlie Wozow, EVP; John Ersfeld, senior sales representative SeaPrint; Kent & Woodinville, WA 206-443-2000; fax 425-481-1451 info@seaprint.com www.seaprint.com Phil Parrish, president/CEO; Charlie Wozow, EVP; Jim Slayton, VP, sales Signature Graphics, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-256-5956; fax 503-256-5949 info@signature-graphics.com www.signature-graphics.com Brian Dutton, president/CEO Dan Dutton, EVP Sir Speedy Printing and Marketing Services; Seattle & Tacoma, WA 206-768-9686; fax 206-768-9689 jimb@sirspeedy0905.com www.sirspeedy0922.com Jim Brebner, president Sound Binding Solutions; Kent, WA 425-656-8586; fax 425-656-8080 sbsbind@hotmail.com Don Boland, owner

Star Printing; Seattle, WA 206-282-8400; fax 206-283-1213 scott@starprinting.net www.starprinting.net Scott Reid, president Stevens Integrated Solutions; Portland, OR 503-233-5746; fax 503-233-8211 rich@stevensis.com www.stevensis.com Rich Stevens, president Taylor Made Labels; Lake Oswego, OR 503-699-5000; fax 503-699-0408 dtaylor@taylormadelabels.com www.taylormadelabels.com Paul Taylor, CEO/president Dan Taylor, EVP

32

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

IN N V WE G ARIA TIN BL BED G T AT FL O-PR A EX I OG NT

OO

Top Local Executives Prographics Services Inc.; Wilsonville, OR 503-968-1999; fax 503-968-8862 mail@prographicsservices.com www.prographicsservices.com

BIN RA DE PH RY Y / MA BIND ER ILI YE NG QU /L D IPM SE IREC IST RV T M EN A I M FU CES AIL/M NAG T E LF AR ME IL KE TIN NT WE LME G B/ MO NT BIL LA RG ES EF ER O VIC RM DE SIG AT ES N

SERVICES PROVIDED R/ SH VE EE HIC TF LE ED WE WR OF FS BO AP ET S F P F DIG SE R I PR IT NT INT AL T PR I N G I /

Company; City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

PRODUCTS CA TA L BR OGU OC ES H AN UR NU ES A MA L R GA EPO R Z BO INE TS S OK S PA CK A DI GIN RE G CT MA ST AT I ION LING ER PIE PO Y/ ST LE CES ER T S/ TE B LA BE ANNE RHE AD RS LS /D EN /ST ISP VE IC L AY KE LO S RS P OU TD ES

PRINT/VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:34 AM

Page 33

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

33


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:36 AM

Page 34

NW

Michael Crumpacker, president Voda Brands; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO Windward Communications Group; Seattle, WA 206-382-1117; fax 206-623-5431 info@windwardpress.com www.windwardpress.com David K. Livingston, president Wright Business Graphics; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 800-547-8397; fax 503-491-4320 gklepec@wrightbg.com www.wrightbg.com Jim Wright, CEO Dan Adkison, president/COO Zairmail; Lake Oswego, OR 888-898-0066; fax 503-210-6479 sales@zairmail.com www.zairmail.com Wilson Zehr, GM

34

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

V

IN N WE G ARIA TIN BL BED G TO AT -P FL A EX RIN T OG

DO O

Top Local Executives TCC Printing & Imaging; Seattle, WA 206-622-4050; fax 206-622-4407 michael@tccprinting.com www.tccprinting.com

BIN RA DE PH RY Y /B IND MA ER ILI YE NG QU /L D IPM SE IREC IST RV T M EN AN ICE MA I FU S L/M AG T LF AR EM IL E KE TIN NT WE LME G B/ N T MO BIL LA RG E S EF ER OR VIC DE MA SIG ES T N

SERVICES PROVIDED R/ SH VE EE HIC TF LE ED WE WR OF FS BO AP E T S F PR F D INT PR IGIT SET INT AL I P NG R I /

Company; City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

PRODUCTS CA TA L BR OGU OC ES H AN UR NU ES A MA L R GA EPO R Z BO INE TS S OK S PA CK A DI GIN RE G CT MA ST AT I ION LING ER PIE PO Y/ ST LE CES ER TT S/ B LA E BE ANNE RHE AD RS LS /D EN /ST ISP VE I LO CKE LAYS RS PE OU S T

PRINT/VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS


MI 3-13 PRINT:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:35 AM

Page 35

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

35


MI 3-13 Washington Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

3:10 PM

Page 36

It’s Time to Commercialize Seattle ashington Filmworks (WF), in partnership with the Seattle Office of Film + Music, is pleased to have launched Commercialize Seattle, a new business development campaign designed to drive commercial film production and advertising business. This past August more than 350 people gathered at the monthly Film + Music + Interactive Happy Hour in Seattle to learn more about the new initiative and see elements of the marketing campaign; that’s a record attendance for the monthly event! Seattle Mayor Mike McGinn kicked off the presentation to a packed house of industry veterans, representing agencies, production companies, cast, and crew. Senator Jeanne Kohl-Welles, prime sponsor of the Motion Picture Competitiveness Program, was also there to support the launch of the initiative. If you missed the event we invite you to check out the Commercialize Seattle Web site (www.CommercializeSeattle.com), a landing page for all things commercial in our region. Would you like to be a part of Commercialize Seattle? Register today. Interested production companies in Washington can register at www.surveymonkey.com/s/DC2T6FZ.

Mayor Mike McGwin kicks off the Commercialize Seattle presentation.

W

Why register? As a registered production company, WF will include your contact information in our Commercial Production Resource Guide, which is circulated to advertising agencies,

1.

36

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

directors and producers interested in working in Washington State. Another benefit of registering is that your business is now eligible to participate in the production incentive program as part of our recently launched Commercial Business Development Plan (CBDP). The CBDP is an innovative new approach to how WF allocates funding assistance for commercial productions. The program offers lucrative finan-

2.


MI 3-13 Washington Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:43 AM

Page 37

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

37


MI 3-13 Washington Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:44 AM

Page 38

Providing operators and equipment

cial incentives to advertising agencies that choose to use Washington-based production companies that are registered with WF. WF is currently holding in reserve 15 percent of its annual allocation to support this new initiative. Under the new program, advertising agencies may apply for funding assistance. If an advertising agency chooses to work with an in-state production company, WF will offer a 25-percent return on their in-state spending (as compared to a 15-percent return if they choose to use a production company from out of state). An additional 5 percent of the in-state spend will be

38

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

425-891-8575 Duffel@akteleprompt.com www.akteleprompt.com


MI 3-13 Washington Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:45 AM

Page 39

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

39


MI 3-13 Washington Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:46 AM

Page 40

given to your business to help cover the administrative costs of the application and completion package process, which is a requirement of the program. The CBDP Fact Sheet gives an overview of the program. For a full list of the requirements of how to qualify, please review the CBDP Guidelines and Criteria, which are available at www.washingtonfilmworks.org. Once your business is registered, you may also submit your recent production work for possible inclusion in the “Latest Work� section at www.CommercializeSeattle.com. As we promote Seattle and the region as a destination for commercial production, we will point potential clients to www.CommercializeSeattle.com to show off the capabilities of our creative community. This section of the Web site will be updated constantly to show the best of what we have to offer. For

3.

40

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013


MI 3-13 Washington Film:Layout 1

11/7/13

1:40 PM

Page 41


MI 3-13 Washington Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:49 AM

Page 42

more information about how to submit, please send an email to Info@CommercializeSeattle.com. If you have specific questions about the Commercial Business Development Plan, please contact WF Executive Director Amy Lillard at 206-264-0667 or e-mail Amy@WashingtonFilmworks.org. Our collective goal with Commercialize Seattle is to bring more commercial work to Seattle and the region. The Commercialize Seattle Web site and the CBDP are powerful tools that will help give our Washington-based production companies an opportunity to pitch ad agencies for business that is not currently being done in-state. We’re ready, are you? We look forward to partnering with you on Commercializing Seattle!

42

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013


MI 3-13 Washington Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:50 AM

Page 43

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

43


MI 3-13 Oregon Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:52 AM

Page 44

Oregon Film Legislative Update NEW iOPIF APPLICATION INCLUDES POST-PRODUCTION AND VIDEO GAMES By Vince Porter, Executive Director, Oregon Governor’s Office of Film and Television

n October 7, HB 3367 became law. This is significant in several ways for Oregon’s film, television and digital media industry. The most obvious change is the increase in the annual amount of Oregon Production Investment Fund (OPIF) tax credits to $10 million a year. What may prove to be just as important of a development, though, are the changes happening within the “local filmmaker” program, which is commonly referred to as the Indigenous Oregon Production Investment Fund (iOPIF). iOPIF has now been modified to include local “media production services.” Media production services, as defined in the bill, will include post-production services and interactive video game development. In layman’s terms, projects where only post-production work is done in Oregon may apply for iOPIF. Video game projects are also eligible to apply. If you would like to apply, go to the Oregon Film Web site (www.oregonfilm.org) and find the iOPIF application. Another change to iOPIF is the budget range. $75,000 is still

O

44

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

the low-end budget threshold, but now the high-end threshold is “up to $1 million.” There have been several questions already about these new changes and I thought it would be prudent to answer a few of these questions here: If my project is over $1 million and there are no more OPIF funds available, may I still apply for iOPIF? Yes, but only the first $1 million of your expenses can qualify for the rebate. My video game company (or post-production company) will be producing four projects over a calendar year. Can I fill out one application as a company? No. Each individual project must apply as a separate project. We cannot accept speculative applications based on anticipated work. May I apply as I am bidding for a project? Yes. We will tentatively hold the anticipated rebate amount


MI 3-13 Oregon Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:52 AM

Page 45


MI 3-13 Oregon Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:53 AM

Page 46

while you are bidding for work, but only for a fixed amount of time. Should you win the bid, we will then formally reserve the funds for your project. My company does post-production for commercials. May I apply for a rebate on one of those projects? No. iOPIF is only for projects with some form of a narrative. Commercial production, news, and sports programming are not allowed in the program according to the statute. Can my company outsource work out of the state and still apply for the program? You may, but any expense that occurs physically outside the state (i.e. outsourcing work) will not count towards the rebate. By law, you are also required to have 80 percent of your cast and crew be residents of Oregon to qualify for the rebate, so excessive outsourcing may exclude you from the program. Any inaccurate reporting about the location of the work will cause that project to be excluded from any rebate and may prevent the production company from being able to apply for a rebate on any future projects. All rules that apply to iOPIF film and television projects also apply to post-production and video game projects. You will need an Oregon producer or production company. You will need to have all your employees on payroll. And you must have an Oregon CPA verify that the payroll was done in accordance with state law. Please don’t hesitate to call the film office at 503-229-5832 if you have questions. We’re looking forward to the first iOPIF post-production and video game project!

Grip & Lighting Gear Production Supplies Dollies & Jib Arms Expendables Service 46

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

REESE WITHERSPOON FILM SHOOTS IN OREGON A few months back it was announced that Portland-based author Cheryl Strayed’s successful memoir Wild was being made into a feature film, with Fox Searchlight producing and distributing the film. Reese Witherspoon’s company, Pacific Standard, originally optioned the theatrical rights. Acclaimed director Jean-Marc Vallée, who recently directed Dallas Buyers Club, is directing. The film, shot in October, covers more parts of Oregon than any other project in recent memory. It makes sense that the film was shot throughout the state since the film covers Strayed’s trek on the Pacific Crest Trail. In 1995, Strayed began her journey in Mojave, California, and finished at the Bridge of the Gods in the Columbia Gorge. Along the way she spent a bit of time in Ashland, stopped by Crater Lake, Three Sisters National Forest, Timberline Lodge, and ended up in Cascade Locks by the Bridge of the Gods. It will be great to see some of these iconic Oregon locations on the big screen and we can’t wait to see what other parts of the state the production uses for the other scenes on the trail. Wild is the first new project to come to Oregon since Governor Kitzhaber called for an expansion of the Oregon Production Investment Fund (OPIF), and since the legislature passed HB 3367 to expand OPIF to $10 million. It’s fitting that this first new project will feature our greatest asset—Oregon’s beautiful and diverse landscapes. —VP

3357 SE 22nd Ave Portland, OR 97202 503-542-3990 gearheadgrip.com


MI 3-13 Oregon Film:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:53 AM

Page 47


MI 3-13 Hall of Giants:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:55 AM

Page 48

The Hall of Giants: The Story of Fremont and its Troll

T

he Hall of Giants is nearly complete after three years in the making. Named after the dramatic view corridor under the Aurora Bridge in Fremont, The Hall of Giants is a documentary about the creation and endurance of The Fremont Troll—a sculpture that sits under the bridge’s north end and ranks second only to the Space Needle as a beloved Seattle icon. Through frank interviews, archival footage and rare photographs, the film explores the lives and times of those who produced the Troll, chronicling how public art can help define and revitalize urban spaces. It’s also a celebration of Seattle’s scrappy underdog roots, given that this popular tourist attraction was once a dump site that turned into a volunteer-driven and grant-funded art project that cost “less money than the city would spend on a new police car,” as Troll lead artist Steve Badanes states in the film. At its core, the film can be seen as a cautionary tale about the specter of gentrification, where artists and citizenry are pushed out of areas by development, and how neighborhoods and entire cities can grow estranged from the cultural and artistic roots that once established them. It’s an old tale, but it’s one that can surely resonate in these modern times. The Hall of Giants is something of an underdog in its own right; it’s the first feature film that director Michael Falcone has ever produced, but it was well received and attended at a test screen-

48

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

The film’s premiere at SIFF Uptown.

ing last year at Hales’ Palladium. “People just kept coming through the door,” said Falcone. “Before we knew it, we were looking at a near-capacity crowd in the same space that hosts large-scale events like The Moisture Festival. I was completely unprepared for that.” When the film premiered its final cut

Director Michael Falcone


MI 3-13 Hall of Giants:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:55 AM

Page 49

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

49


MI 3-13 Hall of Giants:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:56 AM

Page 50

at SIFF Cinema’s Uptown Theater this September, the house was nearly full again. The Troll brings good fortune to those who are touched by it, it seems. The film’s production started in 2010 with a modest grant from the Fremont Arts Council. Falcone teamed up with director of photography Hank Graham with the intent of making a short film to document the challenges involved with the making of the Troll. As interviews with the Troll’s creators progressed, much broader themes began to take shape, and the film’s arc widened. “Once I saw that Giants was less about a statue and more about larger issues like gentrification and art’s role in keeping that in check, I thought, hey, I think I might have a feature here,” said Falcone. From there, he sought out the photo- Constructing the Fremont Troll. graphs and footage necessary to support a larger film narrative and eventually struck pay-dirt when he discovered The Seattle Municipal Archives media collection. “It’s an amazing resource,” said Falcone of the collection. “I’m indebted to them for providing so much good material.” In 2012, Falcone won a Seattle CityArtist Grant and used the funds to hire editor James Culbertson to polish the rough film he’d cobbled together on an old underpowered MacBook. Test screenings at Hales and the University of Washington proved promising, and attendees volunteered their services to help with post-

50

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

production work after viewing the rough cut of the film. Now, The Hall of Giants is complete, with a run time of 90 minutes—a feature film made for $3,000 and no out-of-pocket expenses from the filmmakers. “It’s not lost on me that the creation of the Troll sculpture has proven a fitting model for the creation of this film,” said Falcone. “The Hall of Giants is a grant-funded and volunteerdriven project that had humble beginnings, but through the faith and sweat equity of a supportive community, bigger things have come to life. It’s been an amazing experience.”


MI 3-13 Hall of Giants:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:56 AM

Page 51

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

51


MI 3-13 kairos:Layout 1

11/6/13

10:58 AM

Page 52

The Inland Alternative for Independent Film in Washington

W

est of Redemption, a Washington Filmworks incentive film produced by Seattle’s Kairos Productions, wrapped principal photography this September. In contrast to many feature films produced in Washington, the movie was filmed east of the mountains, out of Spokane. It stars Billy Zane (Titanic), Kevin Alejandro (Southland), and Mariana Klaveno (True Blood). While many productions choose Washington State for its views and rich natural landscapes, inland Washington offers many similar resources. By working with Spokane-based North By Northwest, West of Redemption was able to leverage high quality production value within a short pre-production schedule in order to meet the needs of its script and budget. “Eastern Washington was my first choice for a movie that was mostly set on a dry farm,” said director Cornelia Moore. “It provided the wide-open landscapes that we needed for the story,

The crew sets up for a shot. (Credit: Cornelia Duryée Moore)

Mary Russell, Cornelia Duryée Moore and Marc Dahlstrom. (Credit: Sarah MacAaron)

Above: Kairos camera. Right: TJ Williams (Credit: Sarah MacAaron)

52

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

and I couldn’t have asked for a more hard-working crew.” This isn’t the first time Moore has worked in the area. Her second feature film, Camilla Dickinson, was also shot in Spokane, in association with North By Northwest. “There’s a lot of versatility and diversity of scenery on the Eastside,” she added. “It’s amazing that we were able to find locations ranging from 1940s New York to war-torn Lebanon.” Set in the early 1990s, West of Redemption is a story about the battle between two men who love the same woman. The film was directed by Cornelia Duryée Moore, written by Meagan Daine, and produced by Larry Estes and Tony Becerra for Kairos Productions. Rich Cowan served as executive producer.


Project8:Layout 1

11/7/13

3:15 PM

Page 53

Aerial Camera Platform

Cineflex HD • Tyler • SpaceCam

Story Aircraft

Largest Helicopter and Vintage • Airplane Operator in Washington

SAG Pilots • Location Scouting

NORTHWEST HELICOPTERS Olympia, WA

360.754.7200

www.nwhelicopters.com


MI 3-13 Film Fests:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:01 AM

Page 54

Coming Attractions:

Fall Film Festivals he Northwest boasts dozens of film festivals and screenings throughout the year, and fall is no exception. Check out these November events coming to a theater near you.

T

Celluloid Bainbridge Film Festival Bainbridge Island, WA November 1-3 www.bainbridgeartshumanities.org/our-programs/celluloid Following the simple guideline that films must have been filmed on Bainbridge or feature a past or present Bainbridge Islander in the cast, crew or production, the goals of the festival are to bring the Bainbridge community together to learn about and celebrate local filmmakers. The weekend festival will be held at both the Historic Lynwood Theatre and Bainbridge Cinemas at the Pavilion, showcasing over 20 submitted films chosen for the festival.

Spokane’s GLBT Film Festival Spokane, WA November 1-3 www.spokanefilmfest.org Spokane’s GLBT Film Festival is a non-profit organization dedicated to presenting a realistic and positive depiction of the gay/lesbian community and its concerns. The festival is dedicated to screening contemporary independent films that are of interest to the GLBT community and that are not likely seen anywhere else in the community. Eugene International Film Festival Eugene, OR November 7-10 www.eugenefilmfest.org In addition to the myriad excellent film screenings at EIFF, the event also features a number of networking opportunities for filmmakers (such as the complimentary filmmaker buffet mixer, the intimate nightly cocktail-and-snack lounge, and the exciting awards ceremony), as well as several production workshops like the EIFF Screenwriters’ Retreat™. 54

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival Portland, OR November 8-17 www.nwfilm.org/festivals/nwfest The Northwest’s premier showcase of new work by regional filmmakers, the Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival—for 38 years called the Northwest Film & Video Festival—brings artists and audiences together for a singular community celebration. Each year the Festival draws more than 400 entries from filmmakers in Alaska, British Columbia, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington, presenting to the public carefully selected programs of outstanding work and awarding critical recognition to top juror- and audience-recognized films. Olympia Film Festival Olympia, WA November 8-17 www.olympiafilmsociety.org/festivals/olympia-film-festival 2013 marks the 30th anniversary of the Olympia Film Festival. Since 1983, Olympia Film Society has hosted the annual Olympia Film Festival, a 10-day around-the-clock extravaganza of films, filmmakers and film-related guests, special performances, discussion panels, and educational workshops. Screenings are held at the Capitol Theater, a 750-seat venue built in 1924.

Seattle Shorts Film Festival Seattle, WA November 9 www.seattleshorts.org Seattle Shorts held its first annual film festival in November 2011 to sold out audiences. The goal was and is to bring Seattle film lovers the very best short films from around the globe. The event, held at SIFF Film Center at the Seattle Center, focuses on the artistry of independent filmmaking through inspiring and extraordinary films. Fresh Film NW Portland, OR November 16 www.nwfilm.org/festivals/ youngfestival The Northwest Film Center’s annual Fresh Film NW (formerly the Young People’s Film Festival) celebrates the next generation of regional filmmakers by showcasing their work and circulating it around the region and beyond. It is one of the oldest and largest youth film festivals in the nation. The screening is presented as part of the Northwest Filmmakers’ Festival.


MI 3-13 Film Fests:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:01 AM

Page 55

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

55


MI 3-13 clatter:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:02 AM

Page 56

Face-to-Face is Still the Best for Creative By Peter Barnes Guest Columnist

e have become a nation of multitaskers, type As and stressed out deadline-makers, and that has forced many of us to forego the luxury of the visit to the studio for the final face-to-face client session. Used to be that the final edit and mix session was a sort of “get out of the office for half-a-day” boondoggle for producers, writers and CDs, as the client and the creatives battled it out for those last-minute changes and big ideas at the eleventh hour. I submit that the process of creating such a last-minute rush— waiting until there’s no time left for in-person collaboration—can sometimes destroy the opportunity for real communication; the kind with all the decision-makers in the same room. It also creates a situation for some really cool drama and ego bashing, as dumb ideas get blasted in public and the good ones rise to the surface, requiring careful and diplomatic discussions. Maybe it’s just me being maudlin, but I sure miss the days of that last day of post-production where the VP of marketing shows up and the agency creatives all tense up at the possibility of some real power-trippy fireworks as everyone sees and hears the final product and weighs in with their

W

opinions. I have been doing a fair amount of custom music lately and have had the pleasure of working on some very intense and cool agency projects. Fortunately, we have had the pleasure of working with reasonable clients and very professional agency folks who have mastered the art of “last day” negotiations in the control room. Having everyone there, in my opinion, is a very valuable way to work. Not to say that we didn’t get some surprises on that last day… but I’m under NDA. While the “just e-mail me a QuickTime or an MP3” approach works pretty well some of the time, I believe that there is much higher quality communication when all of the players are in the same room. Not to say that a naive client won’t ruin your hard work with a questionable last-minute idea (we’ve all seen that before)… the opportunity for true collaboration and clear understanding, and the ability to try some things very quickly and get that instant feedback, provides a magical potion of fresh ideas that can often make a project far better than the alternative of providing ideas via e-mail. Next time, take the time to sit in a room with everyone responsible and watch the sparks fly! Peter Barnes is principal at Clatter&Din in Seattle. Visit www.clatterdin.com for more information.

Commercial recording in a more relaxing atmosphere* (*recently added both incense AND peppermints!)

56

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013


MI 3-13 clatter:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:02 AM

Page 57


MI 3-13 Red Jet:Layout 1

11/6/13

3:12 PM

Page 58

Game-Changing Gear: The MoVI M10 By Jeff Erwin and Sue Feil-Erwin Guest Columnists

s most of you know, I am seldom at a loss for words. However, when Katie Higgins from Media, Inc. asked me to be a guest contributor, I drew a complete blank. What am I going to do? What will I write about? Have I gone completely insane for having agreed to participate? But then—husband of mine and owner of red jet films—Jeff Erwin came to the rescue. He bought a new toy (aka tool) that he is pretty darned excited about. It’s the MoVI M10 and he just attended a training session provided by the good folks at Freefly Systems, designers of the MoVI. “The MoVI system will automatically adjust the camera angle to maintain a consistent frame. This is useful in situations where the camera will be moving so fast that no human operator could possibly keep up. The MoVI can accurately adjust the frame hundreds of times per second to keep the subject in frame as the camera translates.

A

It is a toy— I mean a tool— that will make us think more creatively and keep us excited about each new day in the biz. “It is a handheld 3-axis digital stabilized camera gimbal which redefines the possibilities for camera movement. The heart of the gimbal is Freefly’s proprietary high performance IMU and brushless direct drive system. The gimbal is 100% custom

What is it that you are looking for?

We can help... Experienced and easy to work with, we can provide you with any animal for your next project.

Animal Talent NW animaltalentnw@earthlink.net Debbie Betson 360-794-6919 ph 425-350-2869 cell 58

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

designed in-house by our engineering team. No compromises were made to accommodate off-the-shelf brushless motors, motor drives or IMUs. Creating the gimbal from scratch allowed Freefly to precisely execute our vision for the next generation of stabilized camera gimbals. In creating this camera gimbal, we aim to empower a new era of stabilized cinematography. Freefly MoVI – The New Moving Picture.” — Freefly Systems Okay—there you have the technical and selling-point jargon from Freefly. What does it mean to red jet films? In Jeff’s own words… It will both keep us young and make us old at the same time. If one has spent the last 30 years making a movie every day, it becomes more and more challenging to keep it fresh. Let’s face it—in this business, people are copycats. Someone lacking any talent with a camera waves it around too much and the MTV style is born. For years we have to suffer that over-used gimmick to the point where a great story is unwatchable because of excessive camera jerking. For me, it was Friday Night Lights. I loved the story and the actors, but found the show difficult to watch because it made me want to barf in my own living room. Now on the other hand, I think we all love really clever shots that leave us wondering, “how did they do that?” There is already a series of great footage out there created with the MoVI and we just could not resist wanting to be a part of that action. It is a toy—I mean a tool—that will make us think more creatively and keep us excited about each new day in the biz. And like all tools for this industry, the base price is only about half of what you really need to spend to make it work. That part can make you a little older. Regardless, we will master the device and I can’t wait to start using it on projects. That keeps us young. Jeff Erwin and Sue Feil-Erwin are owners of red jet films. Visit www.redjetfilms.com for more.


MI 3-13 Red Jet:Layout 1

11/7/13

1:56 PM

Page 59


11/6/13

BRIEFS

11:10 AM

Page 60

(

MI 3-13 film briefs:Layout 1

Band in Seattle Set to Debut in December Brought to you by Seattle’s Victory Studios, Band in Seattle is a new television series that showcases local music. In each episode, two up-and-coming Pacific Northwest bands will be featured, telling the stories behind their lives and songs, and performing live. The process of creating music and performances in the Pacific Northwest has created great music from Jimi Hendrix all the way to Nirvana and Pearl Jam. This extraordinary environment continues to nurture new “sounds” and kinds of music. Seattle bands are appearing on national television like Saturday Night Live, Letterman, etc. Band in Seattle will, in each episode, explore what is behind this extraordinary process and the fun and entertaining results. Instead of waiting for them to rise to fame before we get to know them, Band in Seattle will let you get to know these future “stars” now and see inside the next phenomenon in rock or whatever the new music will be called. The show will begin airing weekly on Saturday, December 7, at 11pm on CW11. For more information, visit www.bandinseattle.com, and for more on Victory Studios, visit www.victorystudios.com. The Actors Group Acquires EBF Talent Northwest talent agency The Actors Group recently acquired EBF Talent and Management, a full-service, Seattle-based talent agency. With this deal, The Actors Group will bring some of the region’s busiest working actors to their existing roster of talent. EBF founder Erin Fetridge will head The Actors Group’s theatrical, commercial and corporate camera divisions, while Jamie Lopez, a 20year industry veteran, will continue to oversee the company’s voiceover, hosting, auction and celebrity talent business. “Erin has been incredibly successful at building strong relationships with talent and talent buyers in the Northwest and nationally, and has built one of the most respected agencies in the region for on-camera

60

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

talent,” said Lopez. “There are a growing number of great filmmakers in the Northwest and this is a tremendous opportunity to provide them with premium talent. Bringing Erin and the EBF Talent roster to The Actors Group gives us a dominant voice in the marketplace.” “The Actors Group has a strong reputation in our industry and I am very proud to join the agency,” said Fetridge. “I’m also very excited for our roster of talent, as this will offer exposure to so many new opportunities—both commercially and artistically. I consider myself an active member of the arts community in Seattle. I have my finger on the pulse of the artists and on the opportunities available to artists. Jamie and I coming together in this way is such a win for our roster of folks.” For more information, visit www.theactorsgroup.com. Northwest Film Forum Announces New Program Director Northwest Film Forum, Seattle’s nonprofit center for film arts, has announced that Courtney Sheehan has accepted the program director position. In her role, Sheehan will program Northwest Film Forum’s year-round cinema exhibition programs, which include annual series, festivals, quarterly programming, retrospectives, filmmaker visits and new live work (Live at the Film Forum, live scores). She will also oversee the Film Forum’s unique film distribution program, which distributes two independent films each year to up to 20 U.S. cities. Sheehan comes to Northwest Film Forum after programming for venues and festivals in the U.S., Spain, the Netherlands and India. Sheehan interned at the Film Forum in 2009, during Children’s Film Festival Seattle, and was subsequently awarded a prestigious Watson Fellowship for international research. She spent 2011-12 investigating the organizational structures, community roles, and programming strategies of 20 film festivals across 8 countries. Of her new position, Sheehan said, “Working with Liz Shepherd, Adam Sekuler, and the rest of Northwest Film Forum’s exceptional staff during


MI 3-13 film briefs:Layout 1

11/7/13

2:02 PM

Page 61


MI 3-13 film briefs:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:12 AM

Page 62

BRIEFS Cont.

k

productions Never Had A Bad Day 50 States & International Experience Complete production services 

Location Manager



Detailed Nationwide Locations



Budgets & Schedules



MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

r

W Y G A N T



62

a



Creature Launches “Commercialize-izer” App A great idea can come from anywhere. And thanks to the Commercialize-izer, ad agency creatives now know exactly where to look. The Commericialize-izer is a mobile and desktop app that writes TV spots for ad people to pass off as their very own. As part of the Commercialize Seattle campaign, an initiative to bring commercial production to the city of Seattle and state of Washington, the Commercialize-izer takes all the headache out of being a creative. It’s easy. All you do is: 1. Select an Ad Cliché, 2. Select a Seattle Area Landmark, 3. and Hit the Commercialize Button. What comes out? An incredible script that will be the envy of any creative presentation. So take that long lunch. Cut out at three. Quit begging for the muse to help you figure out how to sell stuff. Go home and see your family at a reasonable hour, if you’re lucky enough to still have one. And when you do sell that amazing spot, come shoot it in Seattle. Commercialize Seattle is a project created by Creature for the Seattle Office of Film + Music and Washington Filmworks. For the desktop or mobile version of the Commercialize-izer, go to www.commercializeseattle.com.

m



Children’s Film Festival Seattle, I discovered an organization that truly embodies what it means to be a center for cinema. As a programmer, I am driven by a ceaseless curiosity about the question of why movies matter. It is thrilling to join an organization whose programs answer this broad question in so many ways, on a daily basis, from the children’s summer camps that promote audiovisual literacy to the grants that make new films possible.” Sheehan steps into her new role on November 4. For more information, visit www.nwfilmforum.org.

Large Crew & Resource Database

Past productions include: Anheuser Busch, AT&T, Blue Cross, Boeing, General Motors, Jaguar, John Deere, Microsoft, Nike

S e a t t l e , WA s h i n g t o n markwygant.com • Tel 206.679.3072 Email wygant1@mac.com A Monkeys With Footballs Production


MI 3-13 film briefs:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:13 AM

Page 63

T S O P ON &

I T C U PROD F

AUDIOd

Soun r r o u n d n in g u S 1 . 5 e Sw eet gn and i ffe c ts s e E D d n Sou S ound d n tc h a c ita l P a M usi c t D ig e er n n O o ic e v e -C R / Vo S o u rc D d A on n i a t c odu IS D N n & Pr o i t a l s n ge Tra angua L n g i e or

V I D E O o d u c tio n

r Video P E d itin g s on o r r e c ti l E ffe c t Color C ion and Visua m at Titling 3D A ni cs and i h p a r G o r in g M o tio n a y A u th R u l B d ic a tio n D V D an D D upl V D d n d S ta g e CD a n S oun e e r c S G re e n ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

63


MI 3-13 Post Pro List:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:14 AM

Page 64

NW

ADi; Portland, OR 503-227-5914; fax 503-227-3269 kate@animationdynamics.com www.animationdynamics.com

Kate Ertmann, president

Allied Video Productions; Salem, OR 503-363-7301; fax 503-363-6477 scott@alliedvideo.com www.alliedvideo.com

Scott Hossner, CEO

Arkitek Studios; Seattle, WA 206-286-0337; fax 206-282-4103 beth@arkitek.com www.arkitek.com

Beth Anderson, CEO Doug Huff, CD

Bad Animals; Seattle, WA 206-443-1500; fax 206-441-2910 wendi@badanimals.com www.badanimals.com

Dave Howe Mike McAuliffe Tom McGurk

Beyond Home Productions; Seattle, WA 206-501-3054 info@beyondhome.com www.beyondhome.com

Kevin Maude, CEO Paul Killebrew, lead producer Ben Medina, CD

BingoLewis, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-223-2224 info@bingolewis.com www.bingolewis.com

Nancy Anderson

Blue Plate Digital; Seattle, WA 206-388-0174; fax 206-299-3376 brian@blueplatedigital.com www.blueplatedigital.com

Brian Pelzel, owner

Bullseye Disc; Portland, OR 503-233-2313; fax 503-233-4845 curtis@bullseyedisc.com www.bullseyedisc.com

Curtis Kidwell, president

Cinemagic Studios; Portland, OR 503-233-2141; fax 503-233-0076 joe@cinemagicstudios.com www.cinemagicstudios.com

Joe Walsh, president/ EP

Clatter&Din, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-464-0520; fax 206-464-0702 tickle@clatterdin.com www.clatterdin.com

Peter Barnes/Vince Werner, principals Leigh Eckert, EP

Cross Films; Seattle, WA 206-297-3456 michael@crossfilms.com www.crossfilms.com

Michael Cross, director/ editor

Digital Foundry; Portland, OR 503-235-3456 edit@pixthis.com www.pixthis.com

John Meyers, chief

Digital One; Portland, OR 503-228-3441; fax 503-224-7413 cameron@digone.com www.digone.com

Eric Stolberg, president Cameron Shaw, EP

Digital Wave Productions, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-227-9283; fax 503-715-0500 wayne@digitalwave.tv www.digitalwave.tv

Wayne Paige, president

Dubs, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-624-3827; fax 206-624-3854 contact@dubsinc.com www.dubsinc.com

Charles Core, co-owner Troy Murison, co-owner

The Edge Creative; Seattle, WA 206-957-5447 cindykru@theedgecreative.com www.theedgecreative.com

Peter Howland, CEO Cindy Krueger, COO

EMA Video Productions, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-241-8663 sales@emavideo.com www.emavideo.com

Ed Mellnik, president

Film to DVD (division of Tobin Cinema Systems); Spokane Valley, WA 509-922-7841; fax 509-315-9895 filmtodvd@comcast.net www.tobincinemasystems.com

Clive Tobin, president

Final Take Productions; Bothell, WA 206-799-6735 john@finaltakeproductions.com www.finaltakeproductions.com

John Holmes, president Kathleen Holmes, coowner Dan Holmes, VP

64

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

SERVICES PROVIDED

TH ER

M VIS OTI UA ON L E GR FF AP EC HI AN TS CS IM /F / AT LA IO SH N CA PT IO NI NG CO LO R CO RR EC DI GI TIO TA N LW O RK LA FL B SE OW RV IC ES AU TH OR IN G EN CO DI NG AD R/ FO LE Y MI XI NG /M AS TE HD RI PO NG ST O

ITI NG ED

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

POST-PRODUCTION SERVICES


MI 3-13 Post Pro List:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:15 AM

Page 65

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

65


MI 3-13 Post Pro List:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:15 AM

Page 66

NW

Ford Video Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-525-0449 ford@fordvideo.com www.fordvideo.com

Susan Warden Patricia Ford

Glass Jaw/Michael Gross Productions; Seattle, WA 206-818-5267 mikalgross@glass-jaw.com

Michael Gross, principal

GoodSide Studio; Seattle, WA 206-322-1576 studio@goodsidestudio.com www.goodsidestudio.com

Matt Krzycki, CD

Happy Trails Animation, LLC; Portland, OR 503-590-7377; fax 503-590-7111 hta@happytrailsanimation.com www.happytrailsanimation.com

Andy Collen Amy Collen

HEARby; Seattle, WA 206-948-0169 info@HEARbysound.com www.HEARbysound.com

John Buroker, owner

ILF Media; Spokane, WA 509-755-4536; fax 509-755-4343 allison@ilfmedia.com www.ilfmedia.com

Dave Holcomb, partner/ senior editor; Jim Swoboda, partner/director; Daro Walker, partner/ computer programmer

John Davidson Color; Seattle, WA 206-782-5114 john@jdavidsoncolor.com www.johndavidsoncolor.com

John Davidson, owner/operator

KIRK TV, Incorporated; Seattle, WA 206-789-0401 kirk@kirktv.com www.kirktv.com

Kirk Schroeder, president

KTVA Productions; Portland, OR 503-659-4417 mail@ktvavideo.com www.ktvavideo.com

Rick Phillips, owner

Lightpress, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-462-4717 info@lightpress.tv www.lightpress.tv

Jeff Tillotson, president Eric Rosen, VP Shane Dillon

LNS Captioning; Portland, OR 800-366-6201; fax 503-299-6839 madeline@lnscaptioning.com www.lnscaptioning.com

Carol Studenmund, president/owner Madeline Lynde

Martin Arts; Sammamish, WA 425-269-2729 smartin@martinarts.com www.martinarts.com

Scott Martin, president

McComb Sound; Seattle, WA 206-774-7915 info@mccombsound.com www.mccombsound.com

Matt McComb, owner/engineer Maggie Garcia, producer

Mission Control Inc.; Portland, OR 503-235-1122; fax 503-235-1133 terry@missioncontrolinc.com www.missioncontrolinc.com

Mike Quinn, president

Mortimore Productions; Spokane, WA 509-327-8384 info@mortimore.com www.mortimore.com

Dan Mortimore, president/ DP/producer; Angela Downey, VP marketing & sales/producer; Ray Gross, senior editor/audio engineer

MoshMedia; Portland, OR 503-688-1977; fax 503-287-5886 stevewood@moshmedia.com www.moshmedia.com

Steve Wood

Pacific Multimedia; Everett, WA 425-347-4110; fax 425-710-9932 jim@pacmultimedia.com www.pacmultimedia.com

James Campbell

Pilot Rock Productions; Medford, OR 888-262-4937; fax 541-779-5564 info@pilotrockproductions.com www.pilotrockproductions.com

Roger Harris, GM Pete Bedell, senior editor Brian Horton, production coordinator

66

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

SERVICES PROVIDED

TH ER

M VIS OTI UA ON L E GR FF AP EC HI AN TS CS IM /F / AT LA IO SH N CA PT IO NI NG CO LO R CO RR EC DI GI TIO TA N LW OR LA KF B LO SE W RV IC E AU S TH OR IN G EN CO DI NG AD R/ FO LE Y MI XI NG /M AS TE HD RI PO NG ST O

ITI NG ED

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

POST-PRODUCTION SERVICES


MI 3-13 Post Pro List:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:16 AM

Page 67

NW

Producciones Pino; Lynnwood, WA 425-774-7772; fax 425-775-1980 ernesto@producciones.com producpino@aol.com www.producciones.com

Ernesto G. Pino

Production Partners; Seattle, WA 206-441-3773; fax 206-443-5402 john@productionpartners.cc www.productionpartners.cc

John Douthwaite

ProMotion Arts; Seattle, WA 206-938-0348; fax 206-493-2987 info@promotionarts.com www.promotionarts.com

Steve Crandall, managing director Drew Witt, managing producer

Pure Audio; Seattle, WA 206-728-6300; fax 206-728-1433 inbox@pureaudio.com www.pureaudio.com

Paul Goldberg, president Kathy Levin, studio manager

Recording Associates; Portland, OR 503-777-4621; fax 503-777-4622 recassoc@teleport.com www.recordingassociatesportland.com

Jay Webster, partner Chris Webster, partner Bob Stoutenburg, partner

red jet films; Seattle, WA 206-282-4534; fax 206-812-0768 sue@redjetfilms.com www.redjetfilms.com

Jeff Erwin, owner

Rex Post; Portland, OR 503-238-4525; fax 503-236-8347 info@rexpost.com www.rexpost.com

Russ Gorsline

SERVICES PROVIDED

TH ER

M VIS OTI UA ON L E GR FF AP EC HI AN TS CS IM /F / AT LA IO SH N CA PT IO NI NG CO LO R CO RR EC DI GI TIO TA N LW OR LA KF B LO SE W RV IC ES AU TH OR IN G EN CO DI NG AD R/ FO LE Y MI XI NG /M AS TE HD RI PO NG ST O

ITI NG ED

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

POST-PRODUCTION SERVICES

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

67


MI 3-13 Post Pro List:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:16 AM

Page 68

NW

Roam Editorial; Seattle, WA 206-293-2598 dan@roameditorial.com www.roameditorial.com

Dan Larson, owner/ editor

Rocket Pictures; Seattle, WA 206-623-7678 les@rocket-pictures.com www.rocket-pictures.com

Les Fitzpatrick

Sadis Filmworks; Seattle, WA 206-728-1610 stephen@sadisfilmworks.com www.sadisfilmworks.com

Stephen Sadis

Sparkworks Media; Seattle, WA 206-284-5500; fax 206-284-6611 info@sparkworksmedia.com www.sparkworksmedia.com

Michel Hansmire, president Travis Metcalf, co-owner

SprocketHeads, LLC; Anchorage, AK 907-248-4829; fax 907-248-0239 post@sprocketheads.com www.sprocketheads.com

Loren Church, post production manager

StudioBard LLC; Portland, OR 503-273-2273; fax 503-225-1852 audiospa@studiobard.com www.studiobard.com www.hotspotmusiccompany.com

Michael Bard, head funkologist

Tim Underwood Productions/ TheWebVoice.com; Bend, OR Tim Underwood, owner 877-284-7876; fax 541-317-0496 studio@tuproductions.com www.thewebvoice.com

68

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

SERVICES PROVIDED

TH ER

M VIS OTI UA ON L E GR FF AP EC HI AN TS CS IM /F / AT LA IO SH N CA PT IO NI NG CO LO R CO RR EC DI GI TIO TA N LW O R LA KF B LO SE W RV IC ES AU TH OR IN G EN CO DI NG AD R/ FO LE Y MI XI NG /M AS TE HD RI PO NG ST O

ITI NG ED

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

POST-PRODUCTION SERVICES


MI 3-13 Post Pro List:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:17 AM

Page 69

NW

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke, CEO Saul Mitchell, VP media services

Visual Thinking Northwest; Bend, OR 541-317-0619; fax 541-317-0371 kr@visual-thinking.com www.visual-thinking.com

Kevin Raichl

VMG/Studio520; Bellevue, WA 425-457-7100; fax 425-457-7104 info@visualmediagroup.net www.vmgstudio520.com

Kelly Sparks, CEO/queen bee

Voda Brands; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO

Wallace Creative Inc.; Portland, OR 503-224-9660 donw@wallyhood.com www.wallyhood.com

Donald Wallace, CD

Wattsmedia, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-456-6553 david@wattsmedia.us www.wattsmedia.us

David Mangone, partner/EP/director Andrew Watts, partner

White Rain Films; Seattle, WA 206-682-5417; fax 206-682-3038 bill@whiterainfilms.com www.whiterainfilms.com

Brad Bolling, director Bill Phillips, producer

SERVICES PROVIDED

TH ER

M VIS OTI UA ON L E GR FF AP EC HI AN TS CS IM /F / AT LA IO SH N CA PT IO NI NG CO LO R CO RR EC DI GI TIO TA N LW O R LA KF B LO SE W RV IC ES AU TH OR IN G EN CO DI NG AD R/ FO LE Y MI XI NG /M AS TE HD RI PO NG ST O

ED

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

ITI NG

POST-PRODUCTION SERVICES

McDONALD INSURANCE GROUP, INC. SPECIALIZED INDUSTRIES Special Effects Wa r d r o b e

Sets

Tr a n s p o r t a t i o n

Lighting and Grip Rentals

Po s t P r o d u c t i o n

Props

Co m m e r c i a l s

Stages

Music Videos

V i d e o D u p l i c a t i o n B r o a d c a s t i n g A u d i o, S o u n d, V i d e o Fe a t u r e F i l m s S h o r t Te r m P r o d u c t i o n s D o c u m e n t a r y I n f o m e r c i a l V i d e o g r a p h y OFFERING COVERAGE FOR ALL YOUR INSURANCE NEEDS.

Call John R. Gunn ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE TOLL FREE: 1.888.827.7400 DIRECT: 425.897.5956 D I R E C T FA X : 4 2 5 . 8 9 7 . 5 9 5 7 johng@mcdonaldins.com 6 2 0

K i r k l a n d

W a y ,

S u i t e

1 0 0

K i r k l a n d ,

W A

9 8 0 3 3

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

69


MI 3-13 CMD:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:18 AM

Page 70

Breakthrough: Five Tips for Brand Messaging That Resonates in Today’s Marketplace conversation leads you. This is where the role of an agency can be particularly helpful, because it provides trusted counsel, honest opinions and validation to help back you up with your peers.

By Caryn Herder Guest Columnist

hat is your brand message to the marketplace? You can probably describe your product or service, but what about your connection with the customer? A lot of brands fall short when it comes to developing a brand message that describes their reason for being. In my experience, I’ve learned that the best messages are those that most closely align with your audience’s needs and desires. You have to know what your relevancy is in the marketplace—and understand what messaging your audience is willing to accept from you. The key is to place the value on your audience—not the brand, product or service. This is an easy mistake I see many marketers make all too often when starting the process of developing key messages. Here are some of the top considerations I use with my teams when developing brand messages for today’s ever-changing marketing landscape.

W

1

Be open to hearing others’ opinions. Throughout this process, you have to be willing to let go of paradigms. Start fresh. View your brand through the lens of your audience. How do you do that? It’s certainly easier said than done. Listen to your customers and partners, but don’t ignore your internal stakeholders. Ask questions and be willing to go where their

2

Understand your marketplace position. Before you can define your brand, you have to understand the market. What are your obstacles? What are your points of distinction? A colleague once told me, if you don’t have a hammer, then you’ve got to have a sharp nail. Meaning, if your product or service doesn’t have any clear distinction in the marketplace, then your creative and messaging has to be spot-on to resonate with the audience.

3

Be patient. From start to finish, a messaging development project can take anywhere from two to six months, depending on the complexity and audience. Try to think of this undertaking as pre-production. Once your messaging is aligned, your entire creative process will go much smoother.

4

Anticipate how messaging could impact business strategy. Message development research findings often force internal discussions at a higher level about product and overall business strategy. If you’re successful in bringing knowledge, it’s going to empower your teams to do more dimensional work. Think about the impact and value that comes from having your sales and marketing teams aligned in a message that speaks directly to what your audience wants to hear from you.

5

Remember to refresh. When you’re developing your message, consider your audience not only in the immediate period, but also try to forecast for the short term and long term. We like to think that if you develop messaging that truly sticks with your audience, it can last for up to 18 months, depending on the industry. Once you have your starting place, it’s also much easier to update your messaging as products change and markets evolve.

Relax. Relax e Targeted marketing is our specialty.

Message development is certainly hard work. There’s no cookiecutter approach that can be applied to every industry, product and service. Each project has its own unique consideration set. But that’s also what makes the effort and the results so rewarding. My last piece of advice for marketers who are considering a message development project is to make sure you have senior-level executives conducting your research. Just like I don’t believe in cookie-cutter approaches, I also don’t believe valuable research can be found from a scripted conversation. You need to know which questions to ask and where to guide the conversation to build trust and rapport with the audience you’re seeking to learn from. After all, that’s the key to developing relationships with your audience through your marketing messages, too. www.gcdirect.com www.gcdirect.com 206.262.1999 2 06.262.1999 x 205 205 70

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

Caryn Herder is the director of strategic planning at CMD, a West Coast marketing agency based in Portland. www.cmdagency.com.


MI 3-13 CMD:Layout 1

11/7/13

2:04 PM

Page 71


MI 3-13 creative group:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:21 AM

Page 72

The Structure of Social Media WHICH DEPARTMENT SHOULD OVERSEE SOCIAL MEDIA ACTIVITIES? By Terah Brossart Guest Columnist

ore companies are investing budget and resources into social media, making it a hot spot in the job market right now. At the same time, many employers are trying to determine which department should manage their company’s social media presence—public relations, marketing, both, or neither? According to a new survey by The Creative Group, it’s a tough question. When advertising and marketing executives were asked which department is best suited to oversee an organization’s social media efforts, the response was divided: 39 percent of respondents said public relations/communications and 35 percent said marketing. Only 15 percent said customer service. Corporate social media encompasses many things—posting updates and engaging with followers, responding to customer questions and complaints, and monitoring and measuring the success of campaigns. Each of these tasks requires different skill sets and is likely best handled by different departments within an organization. For example, a customer support team may be best equipped to respond to complaints on social media since they have experience addressing similar queries by phone or e-mail. Marketing may handle activities like paid advertising, contests and other social media promotions since they have experience reaching a company’s target audience. PR may be best suited for disseminating information on social media channels, much as they would with press releases, bylined articles, and media or blogger outreach to communicate a company’s key messages. For this reason, no one person or department should “own” social media; it’s more strategic to create cross-departmental work groups that can tackle social media piece by piece.

M

Here are a few tips to help companies delegate social media activities:

Make it a group effort. There are many aspects to corporate social media—including posting updates and engaging with followers, responding to customer queries and complaints, and analyzing activity—and it’s a lot for one person, much less one department, to handle. Create cross-departmental work groups to manage social media activi72

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

ties, leveraging the strengths of different teams. Also be sure to establish clear success metrics and accountability for reaching them.

Scout for internal talent. Identify current employees who have expressed an active interest in social media and can help drive the effort— whether from a strategy, execution or maintenance standpoint.

Communicate best practices to all employees. Even if you plan to rely solely on a select group of people to represent your brand via social media, all staff members should be provided with company guidelines regarding posting content, managing feedback and handling negative commentary. Employees equipped with these best practices may become your company’s strongest brand ambassadors, even if they’re tweeting and posting from a personal versus corporate account.

Bring in reinforcements. Social media moves at lightning speed and your current staff may not have the time or expertise to keep up with the constant activity. Bringing in highly skilled freelancers who have experience developing, launching and managing social media campaigns can help alleviate the workload and provide outside expertise your team may lack. There are many aspects of social media and it’s a lot for one person, much less one department, to handle. Creating crossdepartmental work groups maximizes the strengths of all teams involved. Bringing in freelancers with social media skills can also be an effective way for companies to support social media activities and gain access to skills they lack internally. Lastly, companies may want to consider working with a specialized staffing firm to identify top social media talent quickly. Terah Brossart is a division director of The Creative Group, a specialized staffing firm placing interactive, design, advertising and marketing professionals on a project and full-time basis. The company has offices in major markets across the United States and in Canada, and offers online job search services at www.creativegroup.com. Contact the Seattle branch at 206-749-9046.


MI 3-13 creative group:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:21 AM

Page 73

    

           

        

      

  

  

         

    



 

             

 !                  #                "   #       $      # !   

   %   # #

     &     &      

+*)('! #    #


MI 3-13 poster giant:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:23 AM

Page 74

Wild Posting – The Savvy Marketer’s Wild Card By Doug Cox Guest Columnist

hese days, many organizations are shifting a large percentage of their marketing budgets toward digital marketing and away from traditional forms. Businesses of all sizes, including Fortune 500 companies, are ensuring they’re not left behind in the world of online marketing. According to Search Engine Watch, as of August 2013, 70 percent of these companies are using Facebook and 77 percent are using Twitter in their marketing. Online marketing certainly has its place, but what does this marketing revolution mean for business owners? If your organization is exclusively relying on online marketing, you could be missing a large number of opportunities to get your brand or message noticed. Most consumers spend time online, but not all day, every day. For example, on August 13, 2013, over 55,000 New York City pedestrians passed the corner of 5th and 46th, which is more than the population of Coney Island. What will catch the eye of pedestrians in New York City, Seattle, Los Angeles, Chicago and on corners in every city across America? Enter Wild Posting, a powerful marketing medium that grabs the attention of pedestrians, drivers and passengers with placement of posters in unique targeted areas around a city or venue. This traditional marketing tactic is far from dead; it’s thriving and should be considered by any marketing agency or organization. As brands like New Balance, Tiger Beer, Beats by Dre and even his Holiness the Dalai Lama work to get their message out to the masses

T

Celebrating

of where people pass daily, wild posting is being embraced with visible success that is getting them noticed nationwide. Consider the value of traditional marketing in what is becoming a digital marketing world. Getting back to the basics may just be the right move to reach your target audience. Wild posting is a guerrilla marketing tactic with one simple goal—to effectively reach your audience when and where they least expect it. Doug Cox is the president and founder of posterGIANT, a national guerrilla marketing company based in Seattle with over a decade’s worth of experience reaching audiences efficiently and effectively. www.postergiant.net.

24 Years @ErniePino_

74

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013


MI 3-13 quincy:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:28 AM

Page 75

The Heart of the Matter By Fred Canada Guest Columnist

eciding to buy or sell a business is an emotional act. You can dispassionately step back and view spreadsheets and numbers, but in the end, making that critical decision is more heart-based than head-based. But in spite of the fact that the decision is emotional, it’s best if the process is still business-like. When we’re approached by someone who wants us to sell their business, we send them a list that includes all of the items that we’ll need in order to appraise and sell their company (such as tax returns, company history, profit and loss statements, etc.), but we also send an emotional checklist that can be just as important for sellers to consider before making their move: • Are you ready to face the reality of not owning your own business? If you need to work for someone else after you’ve sold, it could be difficult after years of being your own boss. • Staying on for a short transition time will most likely be required with new owners who are unfamiliar with your business. They’ll need to be trained. But a deal that includes staying on indefinitely as an employee might be difficult for you. • What is your business really worth? Because your heart is wrapped up in it, you may believe that your company is worth

D

more than it really is. It’s a good idea to have your business appraised so that you know where you stand. We recommend an evaluation at least every five years. • What about employees? That’s the biggest concern that we hear from business owners: What will happen to them, especially those who are long-term and loyal? In some instances, new ownership may choose not to keep them, but sometimes key employee retention can be included in the selling agreement. • It’s always best to have someone represent you, regardless of which transition you’re attempting, even if it’s a sale to a family member. Actually... especially if it’s a sale to a family member. We’ve been witness to some pretty intense sibling and parent/offspring meetings that had us shaking our heads and wondering what their Thanksgivings look like. An impartial third party is always a good idea. • Transactions proceed most smoothly when egos are checked at the door. There’s a lot of healthy self-esteem involved in being a business owner, but when it comes time to seek a buyer—in spite of the fact that the decision to sell is an emotional one— it’s best to rein in your ego. Fred Canada is co-founder of The Quincy Group, celebrating 10 years of small business consulting and brokering. You can find out more at www.thequincygroup.net, e-mail him at thequincygroup@aol.com, or call him directly at 206-459-1820.

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

75


MI 3-13 AFF:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:29 AM

Page 76

American Advertising Awards: ANNUAL COMPETITION GETS A NEW NAME s retailers gear up for the holiday season, Puget Sound advertisers, agencies, suppliers and AAF Seattle are preparing for their industry’s biggest “holiday”—its largest advertising competition. This year, that competition sports a new name. The ADDY® Awards, in which more than 40,000 entries compete annually at three different levels, is now the American Advertising Awards, and the call for entries for the Seattle area competition will be going out November 14. The new identity is more than just a name change, according to James Edmund Datri, American Advertising Federation president and CEO. “The ADDY Awards began as a local program,” says Datri, “and one of its great strengths has always been that it offers a creative competition at the level of the local advertising market. It’s the only major awards program that offers recognition for the best work in hundreds of small, medium and large-sized markets. “But as the competition has grown, the marketplace has become a more global one. And the ‘local’ feel of the competition has overshadowed the fact that this is the largest—and we

A

believe the toughest—competition of its kind. “This is a celebration of the best of the best in American advertising, at every level, and the competition’s leadership felt it was important that the brand better reflect that.” At the same time, Datri says, it’s important that local clubs be able to maintain the traditional value of the ADDYs, which became a nationwide competition in 1968. “Clubs across the country will still refer to the award itself as the ADDY award,” he says. Work is entered in the American Advertising Awards through one of the AAF’s network of more than 170 local advertising clubs, such as AAF Seattle. At the local level, work is judged in more than 70 categories, along with the best creative in that market. Last year’s Seattle ADDY competition drew more than 400 entries from over 70 individuals and organizations. Almost 100 Seattle winners were forwarded to the next level of judging against other winners from AAF District XI in one of 15 district competitions. Renee Peterson, AAF Seattle president, says, “In many markets, including Seattle, the awards gala is the local club’s biggest night of the year.” In the third judging stage, District winners then advance to the national competition, whose winners are announced each June at AAF’s ADMERICA! national conference. Last year, five Seattle entrants brought home National ADDY honors. They were Cole & Weber United, Creature, GreenRubino, Keith Rivers Films (now Workhouse Creative), Rally and Wong, Doody, Crandall & Wiener. The three-level competition is unique to the American Advertising Awards, as is its inclusion of students. “Our student competition really mirrors the professional competition,” says Datri. “Other major competitions have a stripped-down version, or limit the students to a predetermined case. The American Advertising Awards offers students much more opportunity.” Last year the competition saw nearly 6,000 student entries nationally. AAF Seattle’s call for entries will go out November 14. Entry deadline is January 10 with judging scheduled for February 8 and 9. The AAF Seattle awards gala will be held in mid-March. The competition is open to both members and non-members of AAF Seattle. For entry details, visit www.aafseattle.com/addy beginning November 14. The American Advertising Federation is the nation’s oldest national advertising trade association, and the only association representing all facets of the advertising industry: advertisers, agencies, media and suppliers. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., AAF acts as the “Unifying Voice for Advertising.” Its membership includes corporate members comprising some of the nation’s leading advertisers, advertising agencies, and media companies.

76

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013


MI 3-13 AFF:Layout 1

11/7/13

2:05 PM

Page 77


MI 3-13 Rosey Awards:Layout 1

11/6/13

3:13 PM

Page 78

Rosey Awards Coming Soon hursday, December 5, marks the annual Rosey Awards, a ceremony celebrating the best advertising and creative work produced in Portland and Southwest Washington in the last year. Submitted entries had to have been published, posted, or aired for the first time between June 1, 2012, and May 31, 2013. Presented by Portland Ad Federation and Grady Britton, the Roseys have been awarded every year since 1957 to honor creativity and original thinking. Three levels of awards (the coveted Rosey Award, the Award of Excellence, and the Award of Merit) are given out in a variety of categories, ranging from print to Web to TV to mobile and beyond. The judges will collaboratively pick one Best of Show winner from all the entries.

T

Find out the winners at this year’s Rosey Awards ceremony. Here are the details:

Date: Thursday, December 5, 2013 Time: 7 – 10pm Location: Yale Union (800 SE 10th Avenue, Portland) For more information, visit www.roseyawards.com or www.portlandadfed.com.

(

BRIEFS

Hanna Earns National Marketing Award Hanna & Associates, a Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, marketing communications firm, recently earned a national award in communications excellence from the American Gaming Association (AGA) at its 13th annual Gaming Voice competition held at the Sands Expo and Convention Center in Las Vegas. Hanna won “Best Television” for its work with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians and Northern Quest Resort & Casino’s (Spokane, Washington) Q-Cash program. “We’re proud to have received such a high honor, especially given the incredible level of competition at this event,” said Hanna & Associates CEO and president, Dayne G. Hanna. “We attribute the win to our clients, however—the Kalispel Tribe and Northern Quest Resort & Casino—for allowing us to co-develop bold marketing strategies with their marketing team and push the creative envelope a bit in the creative execution of their advertising.” This year wasn’t the first time Hanna garnered top honors at the AGA event. Last year the company won for “Best Website” design and was voted a finalist for “Best Digital Direct Mail” and for “Best Print Advertisement” in two of eight other AGA award categories all for work done for Northern Quest. For more information, visit www.hanna-advertising.com. PRR and DDOT Win TransComm Skills Contest Seattle firm PRR, along with its client District Department of Transportation, recently won the TransComm Skills Contest for Website

78

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

with a Consultant for its work on the DC Streetcar site. PRR led the redesign and redevelopment of DCStreetcar.com, creating an intuitive interface that educates residents and riders on construction progress, while enabling them to manage their DC Streetcar use once service begins in fall 2013. The award was given at TransComm on September 26, during the annual meeting for the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials’ (AASHTO) Subcommittee on Transportation Communications. The Skills Contest is conducted annually by the subcommittee to recognize the outstanding work of its public relations practitioners and promote an exchange of ideas. The contest is considered the premier competition in the transportation industry. “This is a huge industry honor and we’re excited to be recognized for our efforts,” says Monica Hernandez, communications specialist with DDOT. “We’re very proud of our Web site and its continuing development. We’d like to recognize the hard work of our local PRR team of Keri Shoemaker and Cherie Gibson, along with the Seattle-based PRR Web/graphics team Joe Martin and Alex Sobie.” Mike Rosen, managing principal at PRR, adds, “We are in the business of advancing our client’s vision. Period. However, we also like to be recognized by those in the industry, and this AASHTO recognition means a lot to us. This is a well-deserved recognition for our outstanding team, and exemplary of what we at PRR strive to achieve for our clients.” For more information, visit www.prrbiz.com.


MI 3-13 PRSA:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:32 AM

Page 79

PRSA Spotlight Awards RESER’S AND RADIANCE COMMUNICATIONS QUE-UP FOR BEST IN SHOW he Portland Metro Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America (PRSA) held its annual Spotlight Awards competition on Thursday, October 17, at Portland’s West End Ballroom. Sunshine Morrison and Linda Collier were the toast of the evening, taking home Best in Show honors for their work on Reser’s ‘QueUp the Sales’ promotion. By the end of the evening, 48 awards were distributed to the region’s top communicators, including a special presentation honoring the 20th anniversary of the Ron Schmidt Community Involvement Award, given to Carole Morse, PGE Foundation president. “Carole epitomizes the spirit of Ron Schmidt with her tireless dedication to the community,” said Amber Lindsey, president of the PRSA Portland Metro Chapter. “All of the communicators honored tonight are shining examples of how exemplary research, planning, execution and evaluation lead to successful campaigns and programs.” In addition to the Ron Schmidt Community Involvement Award, this was an evening to recognize two of the region’s best communicators with the annual Awards of Distinction: • The William W. Marsh Lifetime Achievement Award was presented to Darcie Meihoff, APR, vice president at CMD, Portland’s second-largest marketing firm. • The New Professional Award of Excellence was presented to Taylor Long, U.S. public relations specialist at LaCie. This year’s awards were determined via a juried process and independently judged by the Raleigh, North Carolina, PRSA chapter. The complete list of Spotlight winners is below. To view the list of Merit Award winners, visit www.prsa-portland.org.

T

Spotlight Award • Sunshine Morrison and Linda Collier – Radiance Communications and Reser’s Fine Foods, Best in Show • Carissa Sauer, APR, Oregon Dairy Products Commission - Annual Report Category • Rachel DeRosia and Kregg Arntson, PGE - Community Relations • Rosenberg Marketing and Clackamas FCU - Community Relations • AM:PM PR and 1D World Store - Event or Observance • Maegan Vidal, Legacy Health - Event or Observance • Kelliann Amico, APR, Maitripa College and Amico PR - Event or Observance • Maxwell PR and Argyle Winery - Event or Observance

• Steve Cox, PGE - Internal Communications • Maxwell PR and Kettle Brand - Marketing Consumer Product or Service and Media Kit • Maxwell PR and Pacific Foods - Media/Blogger Relations • Oregon Bankers Assoc. and Quinn Thomas PA - Public Affairs • Julie Piper Finley, ABC, Meals on Wheels People - Reputation/Brand Mgmt • Mary Ann Albright and Mindy Crouchley, St. Mary’s Academy Research/Evaluation • Maxwell PR and Pacific Foods - Social Media/Digital Communications • Vanessa Holmgren, Lewis & Clark - Video Program • Edelman and Edison Electric Institute - Website • Mark Mohammadpour, Weber Shandwick and U.S. Army Website The Portland Metro Chapter is one of 111 PRSA chapters located across the country. It serves about 200 members from Oregon and Southwest Washington, with the mission of offering public relations professionals a forum for idea sharing, professional development and networking. For more information, visit www.prsa-portland.org. ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

79


MI 3-13 PR firms:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:33 AM

Page 80

NW PR FIRMS APCO Worldwide; Seattle, WA 206-224-4340; fax 206-224-4344 mplaitis@apcoworldwide.com www.apcoworldwide.com

Maggie Brown, SVP/ managing director

Brenner Associates; Portland, OR 503-736-0610; fax 503-238-7304 brad@brennerassociates.com www.brennerassociates.com CFM Strategic Communications, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-294-9120; fax 503-294-9152 garyc@cfmpdx.com www.cfm-online.com

Brad Brenner

CMD; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-223-6794; fax 503-223-2430 info@cmdagency.com www.cmdagency.com Colehour + Cohen; Seattle, WA & Portland, OR 206-262-0363; fax 206-262-0366 info@colehourcohen.com www.colehourcohen.com

Phil Reilly, president Mike Cobb, VP accounts Darcie Meihoff, VP earned media

DeLaunay Communications; Seattle, WA 206-682-3699; fax 206-682-3899 pete@delaunay.com www.delaunay.com

Pete DeLaunay

Desautel Hege Communications; Spokane, WA 509-444-2350; fax 509-444-2354 andreim@desautelhege.com www.desautelhege.com

Michelle Hege, president/CEO

Duo Public Relations; Seattle, WA 206-706-0508; fax 206-706-0668 rebecca@duopr.com www.duopr.com

Rebecca Mosley & Amanda Foley, founding partners

Edelman; Seattle, WA 206-233-1606; fax 206-467-7978 seattle@edelman.com www.edelman.com

Will Ludlam, GM

Frause; Seattle, WA & Portland, OR 206-352-6402; fax 206-284-9409 bfrause@frause.com www.frause.com

Bob Frause, chairman/CEO Erika Schmidt, president/ COO

Gard Communications; Portland, OR 503-221-0100; fax 503-226-4854 bgard@gardcommunications.com www.gardcommunications.com

Brian Gard, president Liz Fuller, director of client services Valarie Edwards, VP/GM

Gogerty Marriott, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-292-3000; fax 206-292-2063 info@gogertymarriott.com www.gogertymarriott.com

Robert Gogerty, partner David Marriott, partner

Grady Britton; Portland, OR 503-228-4118; fax 503-273-8817 info@gradybritton.com www.gradybritton.com

Paige Campbell, president/ partner; Andy Askren, ECD/partner; Becky Engel, PR director/account director

Gruman & Nicoll PR; Bellevue, WA 425-451-4387; fax 425-451-4790 getresults@gruman-nicoll.com www.gruman-nicoll.com

Lissa Gruman, partner Margaret Nicoll, partner

Harvest PR & Marketing, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-274-0086; fax 503-961-7055 info@harvest-pr.com www.harvest-pr.com

Amy Wood, managing director

Hill + Knowlton Strategies; Seattle, WA 206-441-7340 www.hkstrategies.com

Jennifer West, SVP Christian Brown, SVP

HMH; Portland, OR 503-295-1922; fax 503-295-1938 lisah@hmhagency.com www.hmhagency.com

Lisa Heathman, PR director

LaBrue Communications; Issaquah, WA 425-427-8481; fax 425-427-8198 tlabrue@comcast.net www.labruecom.com

Terry J. LaBrue, principal

Lane PR; Portland, OR 503-221-0480; fax 503-221-9765 wendy@lanepr.com www.lanepr.com

Wendy Lane Stevens, president; Angie Galimanis, VP; Kristen Siefkin, VP; Amber Roberts, VP, New York

80

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

Gary L. Conkling, president

Julie Colehour, partner Bryan Cohen, partner

IN O IN UT G RE AC RE H/ OP SE INI AR ON CH RE / SE OT AR HE CH R

M A EN RK T O ET UT IN RE G AC ME H/ TR DI A A

CO MM S UN ITY RE G LA PO OVE TIO LIT RN NS ICA ME N L T PR RE PR LA TIO OM NS OT / IO NA LM SO AR IN CIA TE L KE RA M TIN CT ED G I I A V CR EM / MA ISI AR NA S C KE GE OM TIN ME M G U NT NI ST CA CO RAT TIO MM EG N/ UN IC ICA TIO PU NS BL IC AF FA IR EV S

RE LA TIO N IA ME D

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

SERVICES PROVIDED


MI 3-13 PR firms:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:34 AM

Page 81

NW PR FIRMS The Martin Firm; University Place, WA 253-565-2040 kfmartin@martinfirm.com www.martinfirm.com

Kathy Martin

Maxwell PR; Portland, OR 503-231-3086; fax 503-231-3089 vicky@maxwellpr.com www.maxwellpr.com

Jennifer Maxwell-Muir, founder/principal; Vicky Hastings, managing director; Jen Scott, VP

Metropolitan Group; Portland, OR 503-223-3299; fax 503-223-3474 marketing@metgroup.com www.metgroup.com

Eric Friedenwald-Fishman, CD/president Laura K. Lee Dellinger, senior EVP/principal

MWW Group; Seattle, WA 206-689-8505; fax 206-462-1772 khoffbuhr@mww.com www.mww.com

David Herrick

Nereus; Beaverton, OR 503-619-0656; fax 503-644-6708 info@nereus-worldwide.com www.nereus-worldwide.com

Sara Belkowitz, director

Porter Novelli; Seattle, WA 206-727-2880; fax 206-727-3439 www.porternovelli.com

Angie Schneider, managing director

PRR, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-623-0735; fax 206-623-0781 kwheeler@prrbiz.com www.prrbiz.com

Rita Brogan, CEO Michael Richards, COO Mike Rosen, managing principal

Publicis Consultants USA; Seattle, WA 206-270-4664; fax 206-272-2497 steve.bryant@publicis-pr.com www.publicis-pr.com

Steve Bryant, president; Audrey Lincoff, SVP, corporate communications; Mike Durand, SVP, consumer marketing

Pyramid Communications; Seattle, WA 206-792-0442; fax 206-374-7798 Portland, OR office: 503-241-2341; fax 503-238-5788 sstephan@pyramidcommunications.com www.pyramidcommunications.com

John Hoyt, founder; Anne Tillery, managing partner; Sarah Stephan, managing director/SVP

Quinn/Brein Public Relations; Bainbridge Island, WA 206-842-8922; fax 206-842-8909 ginger@quinnbrein.com www.quinnbrein.com

Jeff Brein, president

Raffetto Herman Strategic Communications; Seattle, WA 206-264-2400 info@rhstrategic.com www.rhstrategic.com

John Raffetto, CEO

Revolution PR; Seattle, WA & Portland, OR 206-354-8049; fax 206-400-1575 connect@revolutionpr.com www.revolutionpr.com

Jennifer Karkar Ritchie, principal Rebecca Haas, principal

Richmond Public Relations; Seattle, WA 206-682-6979; fax 206-682-7062 general@richmondpr.com www.richmondpr.com

Lorne Richmond, president Jason Hamilton, SVP

Synchro Creative Communications; Bellevue, WA 425-885-5661; fax 425-957-7202 bonnie@synchrocreative.com www.synchrocreative.com

Bonnie Chelini, principal Candy Young, principal

Tactical Marketing Group; Tacoma, WA 253-678-2617 kevin.hayes@tacticalmark.com www.tacticalbg.com/tacticalmark

Kevin Hayes, principal Doug Hudak, principal

Team Soapbox; Seattle, WA 206-528-2550; fax 206-625-0109 christine@teamsoapbox.com www.teamsoapbox.com

Christine Stepherson, founder/owner Janda Black Keenan, founder/owner

Vox Public Relations Public Affairs; Eugene, OR 541-434-7021; fax 541-302-6622 pwalsh@voxprpa.com www.voxprpa.com

Pat Walsh, CEO Patricia Pearson, president Sadie Dressekie, VP

Waggener Edstrom Worldwide; Bellevue, WA & Lake Oswego, OR 425-638-7000; fax 425-638-7001 commscore@waggeneredstrom.com www.waggeneredstrom.com

Melissa Waggener Zorkin,CEO/ president/founder; Pam Edstrom, president, Microsoft account/ founder; Jennifer Houston, president, Studio D

Weber Shandwick; Seattle, WA 206-576-5500; fax 206-576-5599 www.webershandwick.com www.webershandwickseattle.com

Tim Fry, EVP/GM

NI OU NG TR EA CH RE / OP SE INI AR ON CH RE / OT SE HE AR R CH

M A EN RK T O ET UT IN RE G AC ME TR DI H/ AI A

CO MM S UN ITY RE G LA PO OVE TIO LIT RN NS ICA ME N L T PR RE LA PR TIO OM NS OT / IO NA LM SO AR IN CIA KE TE L RA M TIN CT ED G I I A V CR EM / MA ISI AR NA S C KE GE OM TIN ME M G U NT NI ST CA CO RAT TIO MM EG N/ UN IC ICA TIO PU NS BL IC AF FA IR EV S

RE LA TIO N IA ME D

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

SERVICES PROVIDED

ISSUE THREE 2013 MEDIA INC.

81


MI 3-13 On the Record:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:36 AM

Page 82

D T AN S E T N I T LA THE UE, CON S S ISS SCU E DI Y EACH W HICHCOMPAN W N S, I EST ERIE ORTHW S W N RVIE ERENT . E T IN S FF C.’S TH A DI A SIGN N I I A R I MED TEST W CNAMA A E GR WITH M S UE

he Seattle-based shop, owned and operated by Michael and Heather McNamara, has been creating custom indoor and outdoor signs—from banners to vehicle wraps to architectural signs and beyond—for nearly two decades.

T

Here is Michael McNamara, on the record: TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF AND HOW YOU GOT INTO THIS BUSINESS. My then-girlfriend, Heather, was working part time at a local sign shop while at the UW. After graduating from the UW in ’92, I joined up with the company and helped them expand into Olympia. She was gaining experience with sales and office work, and I was learning production. In 1993 we were married, and a few years later decided we were ready to take some risks on our own. In 1995 we started McNamara Banner & Sign. As young 23-year-olds we figured we might as well start a family, too; our son was born that same year. Looking at pictures of us in our first shop with a baby carrier over 18 years ago really puts time in perspective. We also have a 13-yearold daughter. We started in a tiny shop on Elliott by the Magnolia bridge—but growth was steady and we were able to add the equipment, people and skills to meet the growing needs of our clients. In 2007 we were able to purchase our own buildings on Lake City Way, and have settled in nicely. Over the years we have seen the size of our business and the number of employees vary, but even the downturn left us with some good lessons that have made us stronger and ready to meet the challenges and opportunities ahead of us. WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT YOUR JOB? We have created a family business. The job gives my wife and I the flexibility to be parents first. We have been blessed to have the freedom to make our own schedule—this hasn’t meant less hours, but we can decide when and where we work. Over the years our kids have had an opportunity to work on projects and learn more about business firsthand. I don’t know if our kids will want to take this over, but it will be available for them. TELL US ABOUT A RECENT MEMORABLE PROJECT. Over the last year my college fraternity has been dedicating rooms 82

MEDIA INC. ISSUE THREE 2013

in the house to alumni that have made contributions over the years. Part of honoring their commitment has been to place plaques, graphics, and signs throughout the chapter house (pictured here). I have been given free rein to create a variety of pieces that recognize their contributions. I have had a great time utilizing specialty materials and trying new fabrication processes. It is always nice to produce highend pieces made to stand the test of time. WHO OR WHAT INSPIRES YOU, EITHER PERSONALLY OR PROFESSIONALLY? I still look at other signs and draw inspiration from my competition. There are some great sign companies in our area, and good craftsmanship is something I notice. IF A GENIE GRANTED YOU THREE WISHES, WHAT WOULD YOU WISH FOR? Happy wife, happy son, happy daughter! LAST QUESTION: ARE THE SEAHAWKS GOING TO WIN IT ALL THIS YEAR? I hope so; the energy in Seattle really picks up when playoffs come around. It would be fun to stretch it out as long as possible—just as long as the Huskies win!


MI 3-13 On the Record:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:36 AM

Page 83


MI 3-13 On the Record:Layout 1

11/6/13

11:37 AM

Page 84


Mi 3 13