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CONTENTS

VOLUME 25 • ISSUE 1 2013

PUBLISHER

James R. Baker ASSOCIATE EDITOR

Katie Sauro SALES MANAGER

Katie Higgins SALES

Eric Iles PRODUCTION MANAGER

John Rusnak DESIGNERS

Dawn Carlson Christina Poisal Beth Harrison WEBMASTER

Eric Pederson OFFICE MANAGER

Audra Higgins INFORMATION SERVICES MANAGER

Lois Sanborn CORRECTION:

FEATURES

In the article titled “Killer Instinct” (pgs 44-45, Media Inc. Issue 4), Kammie Mcarthur’s name was mis spelled (she was incorrectly listed as Tammy McArthur). We regret the error.

10 BREAKING THROUGH THE GLASS CEILING 20 2013 SEATTLE ADDY AWARDS

36 WHY REINVENT YOURSELF?

50 OREGON LANDS TNT PILOT

Media Index Publishing Group P.O. Box 24365, Seattle, WA 98124-0365 1201 First Ave. S., Suite 309, Seattle, WA 98134 (206) 382-9220 • (800) 332-1736 Fax (206) 382-9437 Email: media@media-inc.com www.media-inc.com Display Advertising. Call Media Index Publishing Group for a current rate card. Discounts for frequency advertising. Advertising confirmation deadline is the 30th of the month prior to issue publication. Advertising mechanicals are due the 5th of the month of issue. All submitted materials become the property of Media Index Publish-

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ing Inc. and will not be returned. Subscriptions. Annual subscriptions to Media Inc. (4 issues) are $25 (+$2.20 if sent to WA address); two-year subscription is $37.50 (+$3.30 if sent to WA address). Send check or money order to


CONTENTS 8

WHO’S NEWS

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WHY CONTENT MARKETING IS LIKE COMEDY: HARD TO PULL OFF CASE STUDY: BEHIND THE SCENES OF A MAJOR MARKETING CAMPAIGN

22 DIGITAL MARKETING CONFERENCE SELLS OUT, GROWING BY 14 PERCENT

TO YES FASTER: TWO TOOLS 44 GETTING FOR ACCELERATING YOUR CLOSE 46 DESIGN SNAPSHOT 52 FILM HAS A LEADING ROLE FILM COLLECTIVE REVEALS 54 253 TACOMA’S VIBRANT PRODUCTION COMMUNITY INCENTIVE 56 WASHINGTON FILM MIDDLETON HOLDS ADVANCE SCREENING

64 THE DANCE CODE MEDIA PRESENTS: 66 KEY NW TECHNOLOGY EXPO 2013 THIS: 68 PICTURE BEYOND CUSTOMER SERVICE

26 HOSTS “BREAKING 23 PAF MEDIA BARRIERS”

24 ADVERTISING SNAPSHOT 34 ON THE RECORD 40 YOUR BRAND OF COMMUNICATIONS 42 FIVE TEAM MORALE BUSTERS 6

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MEDIA INC. INDUSTRY LISTS 26

AD AGENCIES

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INTERACTIVE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT COMPANIES

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PRODUCTION AND POST EQUIPMENT RENTAL

74

SUPPORT EQUIPMENT RENTAL

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MEDIA DUPLICATORS AND REPLICATORS


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WHO’S NEWS Check out the latest hires and promotions throughout the Northwest’s media companies. If you would like to submit an announcement and photo for Who’s News, e-mail them to the editor at editor@media-inc.com, or mail to P.O. Box 24365, Seattle, WA 98124. Photos should be 3” x 5” at 300 dpi, tiff or jpeg, labeled as the person’s name. ADVERTISING/MARKETING AND PUBLIC RELATIONS

GreenRubino/Seattle Thomas Bobson hired as Account Coordinator

GreenRubino/Seattle Kiri Garruto hired as Media Planner and Buyer

GreenRubino/Seattle Joe LePla joined as Principal Strategist

GreenRubino/Seattle Briana Marrah joined as Strategy Director

GreenRubino/Seattle Lynn Parker joined as Principal Strategist

GreenRubino/Seattle Peggy Rodman hired as Studio Manager

Hanna & Associates/ Coeur d’Alene Danie Castilla hired as Production Artist

CREATIVE

Hodgson/Meyers/ Kirkland, WA Mary Kate Baker added as Account Manager

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Hodgson/Meyers/ Kirkland, WA Patricia Marr added as Marketing Coordinator

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Publicis Seattle/Seattle Jay Picard hired as Head of Planning

Digital Kitchen/Seattle Bill Fritsch named as CEO

Hemlock Printers/Burnaby, BC Richard Kouwenhoven appointed as President/ General Manager

Phinney Bischoff/Seattle Patti Frey Benjamin joined as Director, Brand Strategy


the Glass Ceiling WITH ALL THE PROGRESS THAT HAS BEEN MADE OVER THE LAST FEW DECADES, WHY DO WOMEN MAKE UP ONLY 3% OF AGENCIES’ CREATIVE LEADERS? By Hillary Miller Guest Columnist

ood ideas don’t have genitals.” That’s a direct quote from a British creative director. It comes from a report generated in 1990 to understand why so few women stay in creative departments. Twenty-three years later, that question is still being asked. Just this past September, the first “The 3% Conference” was announced. The conference is named after the statistic that apparently in the U.S. women make up only three percent of creative departments, at the creative director level or above. So while the ideas themselves don’t have a gender, whether the gender of their creators matters is still a topic for debate.

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In February I was asked to moderate a panel on this now decades-old topic. Seattle’s AAF chapter hosted “Women in Creativity” with a panel of four successful women who’d made it past the proverbial glass ceiling of creative director. Each of them had a different path into the creative department, and different perspectives on what it took to get to the CD level and above. It was a very lively discussion, needless to say. I won’t recap the entire discussion, but three questions emerged:

Is this a women’s problem? Candidly, the panelists felt that one of the challenges women face is that their peak-childrearing years typically are the exact same years they should be moving up to the CD level. Women feel they have to make a conscious choice whether to put family or career first, and that there is little tolerance in creative departments to try to balance both. Women who’ve already made it to a more senior level in creative can ‘get away’ with more personal hours and flexibility. But women just trying to prove themselves in creative felt that too often proof had to be demonstrated in staying later or working more weekends than anyone else. One woman was told by her boss that she hadn’t ‘earned the bragging rights’ of long hours yet. This idea of long hours isn’t unique to advertising. Plenty of women make it through medical residency, but the difference there is those are scheduled long hours. Allnight work sessions at an agency are much less predictable, therefore harder 12

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for a working mom to schedule around. Several of the panelists admitted that at a certain point in their careers, they consciously worked to avoid mentioning where they were going when they left work, so it wouldn’t look like they put their families before their careers.

Is this a men’s problem? Since I knew the panel would be 100-percent women, prior to the event I asked a dozen of my male CD friends to give me their anonymous opinions on why there weren’t more women in creative departments. To their credit, they were candid. Several said they personally would like to hire more women, but they typically received five times as many books from men as they did women. And of those women’s books, many just weren’t that good. While graduates from most art schools are balanced equally between men and women, few women even bother to apply to ad agencies. Is there a self-filtering process going on? The other key theme male CDs acknowledged was the inherent ‘frat boy’ culture that has been perpetuated since the Mad

Men era. Every other department in an agency seems to have broken out of the ‘Don Draper’ mold. Most agencies now have an abundance of women, if not a majority, in account management, planning, production, and of course media. But creative has remained the ‘guys’ hangout.’ It used to be ping-pong and pool tables, now it’s couches and video games. The men who run these departments admitted the culture wasn’t especially gender-neutral. Crude jokes are easier to make when the only people in the room are other guys. And mentoring a 25-year-old guy isn’t looked upon as suspiciously as a 25-year-old woman.

Do clients care? Several of the women CDs noted that at some point in their careers, they’d been told their work would have to be presented by a male CD because ‘that’s what the client expected.’ Needless to say, none of them work at those agencies today. But the question can be raised, why aren’t more clients asking where the women are? None of the women on the panel felt that only women could work on products aimed at women. But if women in America really do control over 80 percent of the buying decisions, should the ads they’re viewing be created 97 percent of the time by men? Having more women in decisionmaking roles in creative should lead to a broader range of good ideas. This week I had a déjà vu sensation. I attended a workshop at a major technology company to discuss the future of retail. When I first entered the room I was surprised to see out of 25 attendees, only 2 of us were women. Granted, it was a technology company—a field renowned for its lack of women. But they had invited 18 companies that specialize in retail marketing. So even in a category like retail, renowned for the jokes about how women are the ones who love to shop, apparently men still run the businesses.

Where do we go from here?

2012 Puyallup Fair Campaign

More than 1.1 million customers. In two weeks.

strategy. creative. results.

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So where do we go from here? We won’t see meaningful change until we first agree if this is a problem. Unless women and men, agency management and clients, all see it as an issue, there won’t be any agreement on how to solve it. The conversation needs to start with a question—would the work be better if we had more than one type of perspective working on it? Hillary Miller is VP, Global Strategic Services Director, at Wunderman. Hillary’s role at Wunderman is to lead all aspects of ‘business concepting’ for their clients, whether it’s through business analytics, consumer insight or innovative channel strategy. Over the past 20 years, from Pizza Hut to Microsoft, Hillary has helped launch new brands and course-correct existing ones. The challenge is the same—creating a dialog, not a monolog, between brand and consumer.


Why Content Marketing is Like Comedy: Hard to Pull Off By Gary Rubin, APR Guest Columnist

ow’s this for an eyepopping statistic: 86 percent of B2C marketers in North America are using content marketing, employing 12 individual tactics on average, according to new research from Marketing Profs and the C o n t e n t M a r k e t i n g I n s t i t u t e . A p p a rently, we’re all doing it. Are we doing it well?

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CMD team members have been reading and talking a lot about content marketing and brand journalism lately, and attending workshops from industry thought leaders like the Content Marketing Institute. As in the early days of social media marketing years ago, there are emerging methodologies for content marketing best practices. Here are several key insights and trends that stood out as part of a recent workshop discussion: • Content marketing is not simply production of content. We agree with the POV that this will become a commodity quite quickly. The best practices in content marketing are rooted in solid, strategic planning preceding implementation and measurement, so be wary of a “just do it” approach. • Brand journalism is on the rise and will soon become part of the marketing discussion at large. We talk with more and more clients who accept the concept that they must “be the media” and tell their own stories. That’s good news for all the out-of-work journalists who are being snapped up by corporations. Be on the lookout for emerging standards of practice for reporters in this new context. This is especially heartening for our earned media team, since we have years under our belts of providing brands with a “news bureau” approach. This has included live video streams, producing news-style roundtable discussions with thought leaders, and live blogging from events, both face-to-face and virtual. • Find a way to tell stories over a period of at least six months. Narratives need time to penetrate. The old marketing adage is correct: Just when the marketer is tired of the story, the target audience is beginning to pay attention. The Game Has Changed There’s little doubt that content marketing is a dramatic shift in messaging and focus for brands. “Push content” with brand messages (we, us, our) is long gone. In its place are “pull messages” (content that inspires, educates, motivates consumers in ways that benefit them) that are meant to engage the audience and foster a dialogue. For veteran marketers, this shift 16

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requires a change in attitude, and a better understanding that if you are fishing for engagement and customers, the bait must be what the fish likes, not what you want to put out there. As an example, we recently had a client ask us for a definition of content marketing. We thought about it, did some research on our past activities, and at the end of the day came back with this answer: produce content that makes your customers smarter. This focus on educational ideas and content is the new bait that is driving results. It took awhile for this concept to sink in with our client, but after really exploring what content they could offer that would educate customers, rather than “push” ideas that the company wanted to address, the light bulb clicked on. Now we are exploring a standalone content portal on the industry’s largest Web site with a robust educational editorial calendar.

If you are fishing for engagement and customers, the bait must be what the fish likes, not what you want to put out there. As early adopters of this content marketing philosophy, we are now starting to see the real results of interacting with customers and becoming the “media.” We are proud to say we saw this trend coming and took action about three years ago with a healthcare client. Our recommended content strategy at the time (talking about industry trends, inviting guest posts, showing videos of experts in the field, hosting informational webinars) was to focus on industry hot buttons, and basically everything except the client’s products. The ultimate goal of this approach was to fill the funnel with potential customers through engagement and lead them down the path to purchase through a content breadcrumb trail. It’s worked. This client understood what we proposed, and welcomed the position of being a thought leader who facilitated conversations with potential customers. This approach has been so effective that the client won a BtoB Magazine award this year for Best Corporate Blog. Here’s the bottom line on content marketing: It sounds easy (produce content) and yet it is in some ways trickier than past marketing strategies. Think of it like you would comedy: Anyone can attempt to be funny, but it’s difficult to actually make people laugh. Gary Rubin, APR, is a Senior Account Supervisor in the Earned Media Department at CMD, a West Coast marketing agency based in Portland. www.cmdagency.com.


#ADVERTISINGSHOULD


Case Study: Behind the Scenes of a Major Marketing Campaign olling. Not something that excites the average commuter, but necessary for relieving traffic congestion, accommodating regional growth and providing for a safe, reliable trip. Tasked with selling 90,000 toll transponders before the launch of the newly tolled SR 520 bridge, which connects communities on the eastside of Lake Washington to Seattle, Denise Walz and her team at PRR recognized the need for innovative methods to make behavior change easy on the consumer. More than 190,000 people travel across the SR 520 Corridor daily, connecting the eastside cities with Seattle across Lake Washington. Introducing tolling on this existing bridge was needed to reduce traffic congestion and generate revenue to help build a larger, safer and more reliable bridge. But let’s be real: nobody wants to pay to cross a bridge they’ve been using for free for decades. Nevertheless, tolling was poised to become the new normal. So, the challenge shifted to how to make it as painless on the bridge user as possible, while also making it affordable to the state to build and maintain. Enter from stage left: All-electronic tolling, or tolling with absolutely no toll booths. With all-electronic tolling, each vehicle is tolled through either the use of a pass (fully automated) or through the use of license plate imaging (sometimes automated, sometimes reviewed multiple times by human eyes to ensure accuracy— but always requiring a second step of communicating with the Department of Licensing to obtain addresses associated with those vehicles). Because the passes would prove the most affordable option for the state, pass holders would receive a lower rate to cross the bridge. Enter from stage right: The marketing goal—sell 90,000 toll passes before the launch of the newly tolled bridge. To tackle this goal, the Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT) enlisted PRR, a small communications firm in the heart of downtown Seattle. Traditionally, WSDOT sold passes at its Customer Service Centers. In the Seattle area, there was one on each side of the lake. Each facility had room for about four customer service representatives at the counter. Walz and the team at WSDOT immediately saw the challenges with using this method for SR 520 tolling. “Do the math—you’ve got over 150,000 cars crossing the bridge back and forth every day,” said Walz. “Most people are procrastinators at heart. They are going to wait until the very last few days to purchase their pass. And, if they only have two addresses from which to pick up a pass, there will be lines around the block at each of those locations. If you estimate that the eight representatives will need 15 minutes per account set up, you can only get through a fraction of a percent of the total sales you need to achieve in a single 12-hour day. We knew these two locations couldn’t possibly accommodate everyone,

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especially the last-minute purchasers.” From the beginning, Walz had the idea of retail partnerships. The average person makes 2.5 trips to the grocery store each week—why not reach the target audience where they already shop? With careful review of a map showing which neighborhoods used the bridge most, and which of those areas were underserved, PRR and WSDOT targeted Safeway as their pilot partner for selling Good To Go! Passes. PRR developed the proposed pilot Courtesy WSDOT program and pitched it to Safeway, who agreed to be the exclusive partner. During the pilot program, Safeway sold passes at 84 locations and provided added value through in-store displays, gas pump toppers, retail coupons and advertising exposure worth more than $1.5 million. “Safeway was an amazing partner,” said WSDOT Toll Communications lead Patty Michaud. “And, because of our success with them, we then expanded the program to engage other retailers like QFC, Fred Meyer, Costco and Walgreens.” By the time tolling began in late December 2011, 170,000 passes had been sold, exceeding the goal of selling 90,000 passes by more than 47 percent. Today, Washingtonians have a stable, statewide toll system that successfully processes more than three million transactions a month, and SR 520 commuters enjoy a shorter, more reliable trip. “The drumbeat of tolling as a transportation funding solution is beating steadily across the country, and the model we established with the strategic partnerships program is already serving our other clients well,” stated Walz, in reference to new work the agency is doing in Norfolk, Virginia, with the Elizabeth River Crossings Tunnels project. “Sometimes a little simple math can lead to a lot of problem solving.” As the Principal in charge of the Marketing and Public Relations groups, Denise Walz leads a team of relentless communicators. She is the driving and creative force behind marketing and PR campaigns that have changed the way people think, buy and live. Denise is the “yenta” of all that is business— match-making public and private business and organizations in a way that provides value and visibility for all who participate. PRR is headquartered in Seattle, with offices in Washington D.C., Norfolk, VA, and Austin, TX. PRR offers a ‘one stop’ approach to communications solutions drawing from multiple departments: Marketing, Public Relations, Facilitation and Public Involvement, Research and Graphic Design. Visit www.prrbiz.com.


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BRIEFS Parker LePla Joins GreenRubino

Seattle-based GreenRubino has brought over the brand strategists from Parker LePla to create an industry-leading strategy practice within the agency. Effective January 1, 2013, the combined practice provides Parker LePla’s clients with access to comprehensive, integrated marketing services, including advertising, digital and public relations, while providing GreenRubino with increased brand strategy, digital strategy and healthcare expertise that Parker LePla cultivated in its 19 years in business. “We’ve worked with Parker LePla for years and have always admired their thought leadership around branding and their understanding of how to transform a brand into a business and marketing strategy,” said John Rubino, CEO of GreenRubino. “Now, combined with GreenRubino’s brand expertise, all of our clients will benefit from a stronger practice delivered by one of the most comprehensive brand and marketing agencies on the West Coast.” The entire staff from Parker LePla will be joining GreenRubino, including principals Joe LePla, Briana Marrah and Lynn Parker. Marrah will become GreenRubino’s strategy director, while LePla and Parker will be principal strategists. For more information, visit www.greenrubino.com.

Anvil Media Releases New Marketing Resources In response to building pressure on executive-level marketers, Anvil Media Inc., a Portland-based digital marketing agency specializing in search engine and social media marketing services, released a new series of resources—marketing cheat sheets. The cheat sheets are designed to quickly provide top-level marketers with essential decision-making information. The latest resource, a Marketing Automation Cheat Sheet, was co-authored by marketing automation expert and worldwide consultant Robert J. Moreau, CEO of Zyphias Group. The Marketing Automation Cheat Sheet includes key research findings from highly respected resources, as well as quotes and insights from industry leaders Kent Lewis, president of Anvil Media, and Robert J. Moreau. “Marketing automation has become a necessity for enterprises,” said Moreau. “This cheat sheet provides a breakdown of marketing automation and the significant impact its adoption can have on a company’s sales and marketing processes.” While White Papers are the industry standard and Anvil has produced several over the past few years, research showed that executive-level marketers and CMOs need a shorter, more highlevel resource to aid them in decision making. “We acknowledged that CMOs’ time is extremely valuable and they often don’t have time to read White Papers that can easily be 10-12 pages in length,” said Lewis. “With the cheat sheets we wanted to give them easily-digestible and actionable overviews that provide the key information necessary to make informed and smart marketing decisions.” Previously released cheat sheets cover the topics of online advertising, video marketing and conversion optimization. For more information, visit www.anvilmediainc.com.

PRR Celebrates Award-Winning Month PRR, a Seattle-based integrated communications agency, won eight industry awards over the course of February 2013. The agency entered six items in the AVA Digital Awards, which look for quality, creativity and resourcefulness in digital communications, and every item that PRR entered was recognized. The agency earned two Platinum awards (1st place), two Gold awards (2nd place), and two honorable mentions. Turning to the local awards scene, PRR won two awards at the Puget Sound Chapter of the Public Relations Society of America’s Totem Awards banquet in February, including an Award of Excellence and a Totem Award. “This cadre of award wins really substantiates our approach, what we at PRR call Human Powered Change,” said managing director Mike Rosen. “This means that we don’t just count press clips or Web hits; we affect real and measurable behavioral change on behalf of our clients who serve the greater good—in the realms of health and wellness, the environment and transportation. We are proud to be a part of these efforts, which give local families the tools to make smart, healthy choices for their lives.” For more information, visit www.prrbiz.com.

DNA Launches Group Health Ad Campaign Sixty-five years ago, Group Health was founded by a small group of community leaders with the unusual ideas that healthcare should prevent illness and promote better health, and that people shouldn’t worry about affording treatment when they get sick. Today, Group Health and the healthcare industry face similar challenges. With unsustainable cost increases and an unpredictable future, patients and purchasers are struggling to find quality care at an affordable price. DNA, an independent full-service agency in Seattle, addresses this very issue with the launch of its first campaign for Group Health Cooperative. Taglined “One Goal. Group Health.”, the campaign highlights Group Health’s ongoing commitment to putting patients first. Television, print, radio and digital elements focus on the unique value proposition of care and coverage working together to achieve healthier outcomes for patients—and in turn making quality care more affordable to everyone. “This campaign goes back to Group Health’s roots and shows how it has become a healthcare leader by staying true to its founders’ mission. Everything they do is aligned around one goal— better health for everyone,” said Dan Gross, executive creative director, DNA. For more information, visit www.dnaseattle.com.

HMH Wins ADDY Awards Portland-based agency HMH earned six awards at the annual Oregon ADDY Awards Show on March 16 in Bend, Oregon. HMH took home one gold, four silvers, and one merit award. ADDYs received: • Gold in the television category for Idaho Power’s “Powering Lives” campaign. • Silver for Idaho Power’s “Boise Bicycle Project”; PeaceHealth television ads “Skatepark” and “Every Body”; and PeaceHealth’s “Every Body” integrated campaign. • A merit award for the SUBWAY television ad “Team Colors.” HMH also received a Best of Category award from the Advertising Federation of Central Oregon for the “Powering Lives” television campaign for Idaho Power. “We’re delighted that our work has been recognized by our peers,” said HMH president Ed Herinckx. “This recognition is just one more reason why we love what we do.” For more information, visit www.hmhagency.com.

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2013 Seattle

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he ADDY Awards is the advertising industry’s largest and most representative competition, attracting over 50,000 entries every year in local ADDY competitions around the country. The mission of the ADDY competition is to recognize and reward creative excellence in the art of advertising.

Best of Show – Digital/Interactive Entrant: Cole & Weber United Advertiser: Washington’s Lottery Title: Group Play Facebook App

Best of Show – Non-Traditional Entrant: Copacino+Fujikado Advertiser: Seattle Aquarium Title: Edwin the Otter e-Book

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Conducted annually by the American Advertising Federation (AAF), the local ADDY Awards is the first of a three-tier, national competition. Concurrently, across the country, local entrants vie for recognition as the very best in their markets. As the second tier, local winners compete against other winners in one of 15 district competitions. AAF Seattle is part of District XI, comprised of Washington, Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Alaska. District winners are then forwarded to the third tier, the national ADDY Awards competition, where winners will be recognized at the AAF National Conference in June, held this year in Phoenix, Arizona. This year’s Seattle ADDY Awards competition was held on Thursday, March 21, at Bell Harbor International Conference Center. The 2013 event hosted nearly 200 more attendees than the 2012 edition, and entries into the competition saw a 20-percent increase over last year. A judging panel weighed in to determine which entries would receive the coveted ADDY Award in a number of categories, as


ADDY Awards well as three Best of Show awards and a Judges’ Choice award. The judges were: Eric Flynn, senior copywriter at Gyro; Dave Mason, co-founder/designer at Symbolic; Lori Nygaard Cabrera, associate creative director/copywriter; Elaine Pratt, principal/creative director at Pratt Design; and Simeon Roane, creative director/copywriter. For more information, a full list of winners, and photos from the event, visit www.aafseattle.com and www.facebook.com/ AdClubSeattle.

Best of Show – Integrated Campaign Entrant: Wexley School for Girls Advertiser: Rainier Title: Restore the R

Judge’s Choice Entrant: Digital Kitchen Advertiser: Digital Kitchen Title: Stanley Piano

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Digital Marketing Conference Sells Out, Growing By 14 Percent n Friday, February 22, approximately 440 professionals attended the seventh annual SearchFest at the Governor Hotel in Portland. With the digital marketing conference steadily breaking attendance records every year, event organizers (SEMpdx) thoughtfully planned ahead to meet the needs of its growing audience. A new bonus track expanded the event, while an adjusted seating chart allowed for 40 additional guests and a new after-party offered more social(From left) Alan George, SearchFest Chair and SEMpdx Board Member, and Mark Knowles, SEMpdx Adizing and networking opportunities. visory Board Member, celebrate a successful event. (Photo by Nathan Isaacs, Seven G Media) “SearchFest’s continuous growth shows us that Portland is a hotbed among decision makers within an industry that is increasingly in demand,” said Alan George, SearchFest director and SEMpdx board member. “We were ‘trending’ on Twitter before the opening keynote and throughout the day.” In fact the conference (hashtag (Left to right) Mike Rosenberg, SEMpdx Board President; Kathy Covey, Cat #searchfest) was tweeted over Adoption Team (CAT) PR Manager/CATnip Race Director; and Aisha Beck, CAT Volunteer, address the SearchFest crowd to help get “Candy Cane” 3,000 times during the event. Atten(pictured) and five other cats adopted using social media. (Photo by Alan George, SEMpdx) dees and those that could not make it also showed their affinity for SearchFest and its presenters, elevating two presentations given at the conference to “Top Presentations of the Day” on the social media site SlideShare. SearchFest is currently the only search and social media conference organized by a nonprofit business organization (SEMpdx) in the (Photo by Nathan Isaacs, Seven G Media) Northwest—allowing tickets to be one-third of the cost of other conferences featuring the same caliber of speakers. Lower ticket prices paired with national experts has led to tremendous growth of the event. Opening keynote Marty Weintraub, founder and evangelist at aimClear, kicked off a remarkable day featuring four tracks and 32 presenters from across the country. Weintraub spoke of the radical shift in marketing that is occurring and SearchFest organizers, speakers, sponsors and attendees unwind at the event’s after-party, sponprovided insight into how to stay relevant and sored by AdRoll and Splash Worldwide. (Photo by Alan George, SEMpdx) manage all the channels and tools. Bing’s Duane Forrester provided the closing keynote where he spoke about the future of search and the marketing industry. Session presenters included Jeff Preston of Disney Interactive, REI’s Jonathan Coleman, Ian Lurie of Portent, and SEOmoz’s Rand Fishkin. A wide variety of online marketing topics were covered throughout the day, including: advanced analytics, social media strategies and analytics, advanced technical SEO, content marketing strategy, SEO for e-commerce, user experience optimization, link building, Facebook advertising, advanced pay-per-click techniques, and local/mobile

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(Photo by Alan George, SEMpdx)

Opening keynote Marty Weintraub, founder and evangelist at aimClear, praises Portland and wakes the crowd up at SearchFest. (Photo by Kenneth Benjamin Reed)

strategies and tactics. Attendees also enjoyed several social and networking opportunities surrounding SearchFest. A reception, sponsored by G5, with the SEMpdx Board, Advisory Board and SearchFest presenters was held the evening prior to the conference exclusively for SEMpdx members. Following the day of education was a SEOmoz-sponsored happy hour on-site and an after-party at nearby Couture Ultra Lounge, which was sponsored by AdRoll and Splash Worldwide. SEMpdx, the Search Engine Marketing Professionals of Portland, is a nonprofit group dedicated to nurturing the development of the search engine marketing (SEM) and social media marketing (SMM) industries in the greater Northwest. Created as a resource for both local industry professionals and area businesses, SEMpdx strives to build national credibility for Portland as a hub for the SEM/SMM industry, as well as improve the quality of work and life for its professionals. Visit www.sempdx.org for more information.


PAF Hosts “Breaking Media Barriers” n March 13, Portland Advertising Federation (PAF) held its first media panel of a full series of events designed specifically to connect and inspire Portland media professionals. The all-star panel featured some of the best media talent in town, including Sarah Prince (Grady Britton), Katie Cox (MBT Marketing), Jackie Hensel (Turtledove Clemens), Stephanie Ehui (Weiden + Kennedy), and Danielle Perez (R/West), and was moderated by Molly Spaniel (Mutt Industries). Approximately 100 media professionals attended, representing both agency planners and buyers, as well as media sales. The discussion aimed to unveil issues between media buyers and sales reps to ultimately improve working relationships. By shedding light on what planners and buyers face in their daily roles compared to what sales professionals face on their end, PAF’s media panel started a great discussion to improve processes, align on expectations and move toward mutually beneficial success. As Mark Handwerger, local sales manager of KPTV and KPDX, put it, “Forums like the one the PAF held in March are a wonderful opportunity to get our great Portland media community together in one group and connect. The added value is the content and hard work that the panelists put in and are willing to give honest feedback and ideas to everyone in attendance.” PAF’s next media-focused event will be held in May. The topic is still undetermined.

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The panel featured some of Portland’s top media talent.

Attendees discuss the issues between media buyers and sales reps.

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Advertising SNAPSHOT

Media Inc. spotlights a cross-section of the region’s advertising agencies

Hunt Marketing Group www.hmgseattle.com At Hunt Marketing Group, our focus is simple. We help our clients maintain vibrant, healthy businesses by attracting new customers and nurturing the relationships they already have. Our team brings a wealth of battle-tested strategies and tactics in lead generation, customer acquisition, cross-sell campaigns, loyalty marketing, customer win-back and more. As seasoned direct marketing professionals, every action we take is grounded in solid strategic thinking and informed by a process that values accountability, measurability and effectiveness above all else. Originally founded in 1992, Hunt Marketing Group was re-launched in 2007 by Brian Hunt and has quickly grown from four to 20 full-time employees. Working with an outstanding group of clients from a broad range of industries including technology, luxury travel, insurance and higher education, we’ve experienced steady growth every year, even earning recognition as one of Washington’s FastestGrowing Private Companies in 2012.

GCDirect www.gcdirect.com GCDirect has been helping our clients breathe easier for over 15 years. We help the harried and over-burdened by bringing marketing back to its basics. We collaborate with our clients to understand the objectives and nature of their marketing challenges, and then deliver on-target strategies that can be implemented—almost as soon as yesterday! We are a boutique agency that is steeped in the measurement-bias of direct marketing, but we use that mindset across all marketing channels to create campaigns that work—measurably so. We are media-neutral, which means that we pick the right solution for the problem. Specialized agencies see everything in terms of their specialty—when they have a hammer, every problem is a nail. If you are looking to add a marketing partner to help guide you through the minefields of marketing and make you look like a hero, call GCDirect!

Jones Advertising www.jonesadvertising.com Jones Advertising is a results-driven creative agency that produces integrated campaigns in all media. Jones has won major creative awards for television, radio, print and online advertising. Jones Advertising is also one of the largest producers of television, online video and radio advertising in the region, with in-house video production and post-production capabilities. Agency owner Mark Jones believes his agency is right for clients that want big agency creative without the big agency. In fact, many Jones clients have come from much larger agencies, and have been very happy with their results. Established in 2001, Jones Advertising clients include Ben Bridge Jewelers, Mattress Discounters, MultiCare, Microsoft, Sleep Country USA, Sleep Train, Rover.com, Washington Traffic Safety Commission and The Washington State Fair. 24

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Dan Wieden, chairman Dave Luhr, president

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Wieden+Kennedy, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-937-7000; fax 503-937-8000 sarah.woodward@wk.com www.wk.com

Bill Fritsch, CEO Mark Bashore, head of creative

$208m

2

Digital Kitchen; Seattle, WA 206-267-0400 info@thisisdk.com www.thisisdk.com Draftfcb; Seattle, WA 206-223-6464; fax 206-223-2765 nick.paul@draftfcb.com www.draftfcb.com

Nick Paul, EVP, chief growth officer

WND

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Wong, Doody, Crandall, Wiener; Seattle, WA Tracy Wong 206-624-5325; fax 206-624-2369 andrew.willingham@wdcw.com www.wdcw.com

$142m

CMD; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-223-6794; fax 503-223-2430 info@cmdagency.com www.cmdagency.com

Phil Reilly, president Mike Cobb, VP sales Dan Hergert, VP/COO

Hacker Group; Seattle, WA 206-805-1500; fax 206-805-1599 cdillon@hackergroup.com www.hackergroup.com

Spyro Kourtis, president/ CEO

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remerinc; Seattle, WA 206-624-1010; fax 206-467-2890 info@remerinc.com www.remerinc.com

Dave Remer, CEO/CD Andrea Jones, SVP strategy & client services

$93.3m

Wunderman; Seattle, WA 206-505-7500; fax 206-505-7672 www.wunderman.com

Julie Rezek, managing director

WND

Magner Sanborn; Spokane & Seattle, WA 509-688-2200; fax 509-688-2299 info@magnersanborn.com www.magnersanborn.com

Dennis Magner, president Jeff Sanborn, VP/CD Brandt Heinemann, VP/director of planning

$43m

Edward Herinckx Sally Auguston Bob Rickert

$41.48m

10

HMH, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-295-1922; fax 503-295-1938 edh@hmhagency.com www.hmhagency.com

Dan Voetmann, founder/CEO Chris Settle, EVP Jerry May, EVP

$41m

11

Destination Marketing; Mountlake Terrace, WA 425-774-8343; fax 425-774-8499 dan.voetmann@destmark.com www.destmark.com

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Copacino+Fujikado, LLC; Seattle, WA 206-467-6610; fax 206-467-6604 copacino@copacino.com www.copacino.com

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R/West; Portland, OR 503-223-5443 sarahs@r-west.com www.r-west.com

Jim Copacino, co-founder/ $32m ECD; Betti Fujikado, co-founder/client services; Brandy O’Briant, managing director $30.9m Sarah Simmons, president Elizabeth McKenzie, ECD Heather Villanueva, VP

5 6 7 8 9

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Williams Helde Marketing Communications; Seattle, WA 206-285-1940 slf@williams-helde.com www.williams-helde.com Wexley School for Girls; Seattle, WA 206-438-8900; fax 206-438-8992 headmaster@wexley.com www.wexley.com

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$129m

Marc Williams, president Jason McCourt, CD

$29.7m

Cal McAllister, co-founder/CEO Ian Cohen, co-founder/CCO

$28m

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NW AD AGENCIES


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Mark Ray, principal/ECD Rebecca Armstrong, principal/managing director

$21.5m

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North, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-222-4117; fax 503-222-4118 hello@north.com www.north.com

Barbara Bradshaw, president

$20.8m

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Bradshaw Advertising; Portland, OR 503-221-5000; fax 503-241-9000 info@bradshawads.com www.bradshawads.com

Kimberly Brandner, director of marketing & client services

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Brandner Communications, Inc.; Federal Way, WA 253-661-7333; fax 253-661-7336 info@brandner.com www.brandner.com

Paige Campbell, president/partner Andy Askren, ECD/partner

$17.25m

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Grady Britton; Portland, OR 503-228-4118; fax 503-273-8817 info@gradybritton.com www.gradybritton.com

Gary Meyers, president Tim Hodgson, CD

$16.7m

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Hodgson/Meyers Communications; Kirkland, WA 425-827-2506; fax 425-822-0155 getnoticed@hodgsonmeyers.com www.hodgsonmeyers.com Jones Advertising, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-691-3124; fax 206-691-3495 mark@jonesadvertising.com www.jonesadvertising.com

Mark Jones, president David Edgerton, ACD

$16.7m

TIE

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Celebrating

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NW AD AGENCIES

23 Years @ErniePino_

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Gard Communications; Portland, OR 503-221-0100; fax 503-226-4854 vgrudier_edwards@gardcommunications.com www.gardcommunications.com

Brian Gard, president Liz Fuller, dir. of client services Valarie Edwards, VP/GM

$14m

Jeanie Coates, founder/CEO Steve Kokes, president

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Coates Kokes; Portland, OR 503-241-1124; fax 503-241-1326 info@coateskokes.com www.coateskokes.com

D. Alex Howard, managing partner Karen Skeens, CD

$12.6m

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Ad Ventures; Seattle, WA 206-282-1719 ventures@adventuresdesign.com www.adventuresdesign.com

Dayne Hanna, CEO Jeff Hanna, VP media John Baechler, VP ECD

$12m

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Hanna & Associates Inc.; Coeur d’Alene, ID 208-667-2428; fax 208-765-8044 dayneh@hanna-advertising.com www.hanna-advertising.com

Mike Smith, partner Ken Chitwood, partner

$11.9m

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Sasquatch Agency; Portland, OR 503-222-2346; fax 503-222-2492 mikes@sasquatchagency.com www.sasquatchagency.com

Andrew Rogers Geo Purdie

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Purdie Rogers; Seattle, WA 206-628-7700; fax 206-628-2818 info@purdierogers.com www.purdierogers.com Turtledove Clemens, Inc.; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-226-3581; fax 503-273-4277 jay@turtledove.com www.turtledove.com DVA Advertising & Public Relations; Bend, OR 541-389-2411; fax 541-389-1208 justin@dvaadv.com www.dvaadv.com

Jay Clemens, CEO Stuart Samuelson, EVP Barbara Bratsberg, president (Seattle)

$9.2m

David Day, president/CEO Justin Yax, dir. PR Mary Ramos, dir. client services

$8.75m

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AHA!; Vancouver, WA 360-750-1680; fax 360-750-1597 hello@aha-writers.com www.aha-writers.com

Betsy Henning, CEO/founder

$6.88m

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Hammerquist Studios; Redmond, WA 425-285-3363 fred@hammerquist.net www.hammerquist.net

Fred Hammerquist, president Keith Karlick, director of interactive

$6.44m

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The New Group; Portland, OR 503-248-4505 doug.new@thenewgroup.com www.thenewgroup.com

Doug New, CEO Steve Marshall, president Susan Hawkins, COO

$6.4m

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Stanton & Everybody, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-224-4242; fax 206-224-4264 www.stantonandeverybody.com

Rick Stanton, president/ CD

$5.3m

Athena Maris, principal/ CD

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The Maris Agency; Portland, OR 503-236-3486; fax 503-236-3521 admin@marisagency.com www.marisagency.com Fusionhappens, LLC; Seattle, WA 206-264-7707 fusionhappens@fusionhappens.com www.fusionhappens.com

Al Doyle, senior partner/CD; Deanna Sihon, partner/ president/dir. of research & client services; Kate Quinn, director of logistics

WND

Adlib Advertising Agency; Eugene, OR 541-342-5068; fax 541-342-5218 info@adlib.com www.adlib.com

Donna Smith, president

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Brett Stevenson, president

$4.2m

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Stevenson Advertising; Lynnwood, WA 425-787-9686; fax 425-787-9702 brett@stevensonadvertising.com www.stevensonadvertising.com

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Hunt Marketing Group; Seattle, WA 206-447-5665; fax 206-447-5789 brian@hmgseattle.com www.hmgseattle.com

Rebecca Lyman, principal Tim Garrigan, principal Joe Huber, media director Brian Hunt

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The Garrigan Lyman Group, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-223-5548; fax 206-223-0818 joe.huber@glg.com www.glg.com

Coralee Taylor, VP

$3m

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The Silver Agency; Centralia, WA 360-736-8065; fax 360-330-7960 cori@silveragency.com www.silveragency.com

Kevin Maude, CEO Norma Straw, agency director Byron Tucker, ECD

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B47; Seattle, WA 206-577-1153 info@b47agency.com www.b47agency.com Palazzo Creative; Seattle, WA 206-328-5555; fax 206-826-6212 richard@palazzocreative.com www.palazzocreative.com

Richard Roberts, president/CD Pennie Pickering

$2.15m

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$3.8m

Relax. e Produce, protect, and deliver your brand.

Offset Printing

Digital Printing

Fulfillment

Envelope Manufacturing

Targeted marketing is our specialty.

Specialty Bindery

Direct Mail

DCGWest.com 206.784.6892

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www.gcdirect.com www.gcdirect.com 206.262.1999 2 06.262.1999 x 205 205


Sean K. Fay, CEO Chris Johns, VP marketing

$1.8m

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Envision Response Inc.; Seattle, WA 800-809-8397; fax 206-299-3562 sean@envisiontv.com www.envisiontv.com

Philip Shaw, president

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Golden Lasso; Seattle, WA 206-838-3170 philips@goldenlasso.com www.goldenlasso.com

Dave DeMots, president Tim Holmes, VP Tim Cobb, managing director

$1.7m

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DHX Advertising, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-872-9616; fax 503-872-9618 dave@dhxadv.com www.dhxadv.com

Ed Steenman, owner

$1.2m

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Steenman Associates; Sammamish, WA 425-427-9692; fax 425-427-9693 steenmanassoc@gmail.com www.steenmanassociates.com

Michael Pursel, owner Michelle Nitta, media buyer

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Mike Pursel Advertising; Spokane, WA 509-464-0259 mikepursel@mikepursel.com www.mikepursel.com

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Rusty George Creative; Tacoma, WA 253-284-2140; fax 253-284-2142 rusty@rustygeorge.com www.rustygeorge.com

Rusty George, principal Kitura George, operations manager

$1m

Bonnie Chelini Candy Young

$980k

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Synchro Creative; Bellevue, WA 425-885-5661; fax 425-957-7202 bonnie@synchrocreative.com www.synchrocreative.com

Doug Cox, president

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posterGIANT; Seattle, WA 206-850-0818 info@postergiant.net www.postergiant.net

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ioCreative, LLC; Ferndale, WA 360-384-4640; fax 360-384-4650 tim@iocreative.com www.iocreative.com

Tim Cathersal, partner

$550k

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Carole Berke Media Services, LLC; Portland, OR 503-293-0599; fax 503-293-9008 caroleberke@comcast.net

Carole Berke, strategic media planner/buyer

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Blu Room Advertising, LLC; Steilacoom, WA 253-241-8912 charles@bluroomadvertising.com www.bluroomadvertising.com

Charles Davis, owner Russell Silva, cinematographer/editor

WND

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Burrus Communications, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-595-4321; fax 206-633-0832 kevin@burruscomm.com www.burruscomm.com

Kevin Burrus, president Sherry Taft, media dir. Justin Esparza, art direction

N/A (opened January 2013)

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WE CH ERI H IN WH A DIFF ES , S U ERIE ST WIT CONTIN S E W T E, RVIE D GREA H ISSU E T N N C I A A C.’S LATEST PANY E N I M E IA . MED USS TH EST CO JIKADO W U C DIS NORTH INO+F C ENT COPA H WIT “

e’ve been voted the hardest agency name to spell for 15 years running, which is exactly how long we’ve been in business,” jokes Copacino+Fujikado creative director Mike Hayward. The Seattle-based agency boasts a long and illustrious client list that includes REI, Seattle Children’s Hospital, Seattle Mariners, Safeco, Visit Seattle, and Premera Blue Cross. “I think we’re a strong hybrid agency,” says Hayward. “We have our roots in advertising, which I think pushes us to focus on the central idea first, but we’ve also developed a killer engagement strategy and digital team. I really love how the agency has evolved over the years.” Here is Hayward, on the record:

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WHAT DO YOU LIKE BEST ABOUT YOUR JOB? Having clients I truly care about and the variety of the work. I can go from working on a brand campaign for a museum to a mobile experience for a winery. And the people here are the best (we have the data to prove it). It’s a group of really talented, funny, smart people with no big egos. COPACINO+FUJIKADO JUST RELEASED THE LATEST SET OF SEATTLE MARINERS COMMERCIALS. WHAT HAS THAT PARTNERSHIP MEANT TO YOU OVER THE LAST FEW YEARS? The agency got its start thanks to Kevin Martinez, vice president of marketing, and the Seattle Mariners. Kevin is still our client today. It’s great to have that kind of shared history and level of trust. When people ask what C+F does, the Mariners are usually the first client we mention. Which is followed by them saying, “I love that Edgar light bat commercial!” Which was actually an ad for Eagle Hardware 34

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that we didn’t do. WHO OR WHAT INSPIRES YOU, EITHER PERSONALLY OR PROFESSIONALLY? Jim Copacino and Betti Fujikado, who are avid readers of this column. I actually get inspired fairly easily. I find myself geeking out over new social and digital tools all the time. I’ll run over to our creative technologist Nat Duffy (or he’ll come to me) and say, “What can we do with this new thing?” The pace of innovation is incredibly exciting to me. Right now we’re playing around with “hashbots,” our term for robots that perform a physical action in response to tweeted hashtags or keywords. So far we’ve built a mechanical bobblehead, a piñata-pecking bird and a light-up Space Needle that plays Salt N Pepa’s “Push It.” HOW IMPORTANT IS IT FOR YOUR COMPANY TO CONNECT AND ENGAGE WITH YOUR SURROUNDING COMMUNITY? I’m not sure there’s another agency that’s quite as rooted in the community as C+F (so much for the “no big egos” thing). We’re very active with local community groups and state universities, and our client roster reads like a guide to the Pacific Northwest. It’s a point of pride for us. And just next month, we’re hosting our first Digital Summit here. We’re bringing together social media

managers from 20 different Seattle businesses and attractions to see how we can all work together in a mutually beneficial way. COPACINO+FUJIKADO HAS EARNED MANY PRESTIGIOUS AWARDS OVER THE YEARS. WHAT ARE SOME OF YOUR MOST GRATIFYING PROFESSIONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS? We’ve won Best of Show at the ADDYs two years in a row for ideas that weren’t traditional ads, which I think says a lot about the agency overall. Awards are certainly a measure of success, but I really like how we can now see the impact of what we do through social media and real-world metrics. So it means more to me to see kids dressed up like Larry Bernandez at Mariners games, or watch the #2DaysInSeattle hashtag take off or see our children’s ibook for the Aquarium hit 100,000 downloads on iTunes. Not that we don’t still like our shiny statues. IF YOU COULD BE ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD RIGHT NOW, WHERE WOULD YOU BE? Why was “the Auburn Supermall” the first thing that popped into my head? I know I’m supposed to say a tropical paradise or cultural mecca, but I would be in the stands at Pasadena watching WSU win the Rose Bowl. Which leads to the next question… IF A GENIE GRANTED YOU 3 WISHES, WHAT WOULD YOU WISH FOR? For WSU to win the Rose Bowl. And I assume we’re excluding the usual “world peace” and “infinite wishes” answers, right? Then my other two would be a World Series for the Mariners and for our good friend Steve Cunetta to finally kick this cancer thing. We miss you at the office, buddy.


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Why Reinvent Yourself? REBRANDING & REBUILDING FOR RELEVANCE cial printers, but also for those engaged in digital print production, web press and publication printing, pack’ve been fortunate to have worked around, in, aging, flexography, grand or on behalf of the industry “formerly (and format, specialty products, kinda still) known as print” over the past mailing, fulfillment, (gulp) 25-ish years. I’ve worn many hats, including design, and integrated those as an ad agency buyer, marketing and platforms that utilize creative director, production manager, salesperthe power of visual son, general manager, and as the executive director of the regional communications to industry association, PPI, for the last seven years. Boards, spray get a message across. mount, blue lines, Rubilith… (Can you hear the crickets?) Selling products, So much has changed, and we’re all being encouraged to consider branding, raising what we want to be in this new world. The association I run isn’t funds and driving immune to this, nor should it be. We preach to our constituents that demand are what they either find a unique niche or consider adding new services, skills small businesses and and resources for market positioning. As we’ve continued to fight corporations seek. the history of what an association used to be and how the market Our industry does utilized this community, so too has the “printer” of today had to reconand still can fulfill sider its relationships and competitive place in our digital world. these deliverables— Notes from the 1930s: The challenges printers faced 80 years ago better than ever are similar to the ones printers face today. PPI Takes the Leap before. Combining technologies and mediums adds value. We The marketing maven in me knew it was time the organization get that. But PPI Association needed to be sure to have a brand jump with both feet forward and not look back. I took the battle that communicates “we get it” and that conveys our support for cry to our board of directors last year: “If we’re to lead our the companies served. members and the regional industry into a new battlefield to It’s not enough to just belong to a “group” anymore. We can compete for dollars, positive results and future opportunities, join all kinds of virtual groups online, but our time is precious, shouldn’t we face the facts, lead the charge and do the same?” as is our money. Our relationships need to yield a return— We engaged in some strategic thinking as a group to see what measurable results so that it makes sense to commit resources we should look like in the future. Who should we represent, how of any sort. PPI do we sustain ourselves, Our core industry is changing so it only made sense that we go along for the ride. continually needs to and how do we best get get that, and hopethere? This is building on fully through a a long legacy and legitibranding renewal, macy we have built up as we can tell that an organization since— story, too. dang—the 1920s! Can’t Circling back to discount what we’ve what the marketing done. mix has evolved Side note: I pulled out into, it’s key we some old notes from way embrace that back, and the challenges buyers aren’t only that businesses faced looking for printers, then haven’t changed that but seeking for much! Competition, pricvisual solutions to ing, economic downturn accomplish busi(The Great Depression), ness goals. PPI’s labor issues—all still a mission is to factor, even if they look Source: Business Development and Professional Services That Work! InfoTrends 2010 support the indusdifferent today. try that brings these solutions to market. Fluid, integrated, alive, It’s not that we haven’t been moving this direction, but as an regionally-based yet with vision towards new opportunities and organization, we can still be perceived as not having a broad the future. We have to offer them something to get them there. reach. I get that, but it’s the old story, and not who we are now. The journey brought us to this—an updated look and name The market needed to understand that better. that keeps the representation of the six states we serve, but At PPI, we have relevance today, not only to offset commerBy Jules Van Sant Executive Director, PPI – The NW Visual Communications Industries Association

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Our customers are dealing with a buying audience that expects more options from their vendors.

How many different types of media does your company use for a typical direct marketing campaign?

Source: The Cross-Media Direct Marketing Opportunity, InfoTrends 2010

Many printing companies use the term marketing service provider to describe their relationships with agencies and design firms.

We prefer “best friend.” Stevens Integrated Solutions 4101 SE 26th Avenue, Portland Oregon 503.233.5746 | www.stevensIS.com

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encompasses the broader world we live in these days. The logo feels as if it’s in motion, rolling along, keeping what matters, adding what’s needed, and spinning into the future. Fresh and fluid. PPI is now The NW Visual Communications Industries Association – Connecting Your Business with the Industry’s Best. Now that feels like a great place to launch from! So where are you in the process? Are you reinventing? Seth Godin was featured in a Success.com blog post in 2012 titled “Ways to Reinvent Yourself.” Here’s his short list of the seven levels available for anyone (like you) in search of reinvention: 1. Connect – Don’t isolate. 2. Be Generous – Individuals supporting each other create mutual successes. 3. Make Art – Create something new, something that changes everything. 4. Acknowledge the Lizard – Avoid resistance to do something new. 5. Ship – Become the one that goes the extra mile, indispensible, takes risks. 6. Fail – The reinvention the marketplace is demanding is one that includes the ability to fail, often, and with grace. 7. Learn – Every single day.


Your Brand of Communications By Ryan T. Sauers Guest Columnist

e communicate a message in everything we do. Also, the word brand is one frequently used. In addition, we discuss brands we prefer and those that we do not. Why? It is simple. All of these brands stand out in our mind for some reason. Successful organizations recognize this fact and work hard to develop their brand—through effective communications. This process includes establishing valuable brand equity as well as a recognizable brand name in the eye of the beholder. So, what does this mean to you? I am glad you asked… Think about our instant recognition of Nike’s “Just Do It” or Apple’s “there’s an app for that” campaign. These messages are effective in connecting a customer with the brand. Connection is one of the 5 C’s of Effective Communication. The goal is to make such a brand experience personal in nature. For example, are you a McDonald’s or Burger King person? Coke or Pepsi person? You get the idea. You see, successful communication of your brand is both the now and the future of marketing. It is not about us. It is not about what we offer. It never was. However, it is about them. It always has been and always will be. All of this is covered in greater detail in my book Everyone Is in Sales (www.everyoneinsales.com) on Amazon. This means that the way in which a communications, marketing or media company communicates its message is of the utmost importance. Always remember that building a strong, recognizable, reliable and consistent brand takes time, effort and commitment. Simply said, it requires a deliberate, purposeful and intentional strategy. This hard work pays off by creating something referred to as brand loyalty. Brand loyalty is one of the most valuable assets any organization can have. Quite frankly, it is the “why” that answers the reason that customers will pay more for our goods and services. A brand can be referred to as the sum total of key ideas, emotions and perceptions that are communicated to your audience and associated with your organization’s work. A brand can then be called the “shorthand” for the identifying characteristics retained and recalled when your stakeholders reflect upon their experiences with your organization. To help simplify this subject, I have developed an acronym that is useful in helping us better understand and examine the subject of a brand. A BRAND can be considered the Barometer reading of one’s Reputation, Attributes, Name, and Distinctiveness. This means it is the “barometer,” or measurement, of your “reputation,” which is all your organization stands for; your “attributes,” which are the characteristics others use when describing you; your “name,” which suggests something (good, bad or indifferent when a person hears it); and your “distinctiveness,” which means why you? What makes you different/unique?

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So the question is not if we have a brand or not, because we do. All organizations have a brand. Instead, the question is: What do you do with our brand? In short, our brand is not defined by what we say it is, but is characterized by what others say it is. So here are five things the promotional products and print industry should consider in regards to the concept of “branding.” 1. Please refrain from saying that “traditional media (insert type) is still relevant.” Of course it is. The market has simply changed—as has the entire world. I argue that such traditional media are more useful than ever as they integrate with the new—and trust me, I spend a lot of time in the social and emerging media world. 2. Please don’t get caught up with feeling you must refer to yourself as a “marketing or communications solutions” company. This should be what you do, not what you are. 3. Please don’t become overwhelmed with social and emerging media. Always remember, it is all about the psychology, not the technology. These are simply new ways to communicate— and if used correctly are an asset, not a threat. They are a tool, not the tool, in your marketing mix. 4. Determine what it is you are best at, embrace it and then build and promote your brand around it. Shout it from the mountaintop, print it, e-mail it, Tweet it, etc. But, always be authentic in all of your communications. 5. Remember, your brand is that “extra value” you provide and the reason a customer stays with you over similar competition/offerings in the market. When pondering your brand, you must first determine what it is all about. So obtain feedback from those around you as a first step. Be sure to obtain this 360-degree feedback from those close to you, as well as those who are more removed from you. Once you know what your brand is, you can determine the ways you want to purposefully grow, change, re-frame, promote, and/or strengthen your current brand position. So, how do you define your brand? Does it matter? You bet! Remember—we all have a brand and there is no better time than now to address it. P.S. The best response to what your brand is (e-mail me at ryan@ryansauers.com) wins a free inscribed book. Good luck! Ryan T. Sauers is president/owner of Sauers Consulting Strategies, whose focus is growing the sales of printed and related communications businesses. The organization consults with a variety of marketing and communications companies across the U.S. Sauers is working on his Doctoral degree in Organizational Leadership. He is both a Certified Myers Briggs (MBTI) and DiSC practitioner, as well as a Certified Marketing Executive. This article is based on a chapter from Sauers’ best-selling book Everyone Is in Sales, which can be ordered through Amazon. More at: www.ryansauers.com or ryan@ryansauers.com.


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Five Team Morale Busters By Maria Scheleen Guest Columnist

anaging a creative team has never been easy, and given today’s business climate, the job can be even more challenging. Many advertising agencies are feeling increased pressure to do more with less. How do you keep your employees inspired as workloads rise and resources remain limited? Your attitude and interactions with employees can have a major impact on morale. Following are five common pitfalls supervisors make, along with tips for avoiding them:

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Assuming they’re lucky to have a job. While many people today may feel fortunate to have a stable position, keep in mind that your most talented employees always have options. And as the job market picks up, they may begin to explore opportunities outside of your organization. Instead of adopting a

“you’re lucky” posture, make sure you thank employees for a job well done and show your appreciation with low- or no-cost incentives when possible (like tickets to an art exhibit or the option to leave work early one day). Not asking for input. If your agency is facing new business challenges, consider putting your group’s talents to work solving those problems. After all, you hired your team because of their strong skills and good judgment. By informing them of the issue—the need to win a few new clients right away to offset the departure of a major account, for example—you make them stakeholders and give them the opportunity to influence the company’s success. Ignoring rumors. Nearly two-thirds of advertising and marketing executives surveyed by The Creative Group said it’s common for employees to engage in office gossip. There’s always plenty of grist to fuel the rumor mill, but if you begin to cancel meetings, shut your door or speak in hushed tones, your staff will suspect something is up. And you can count on the fact that if you don’t tell them what’s going on, someone else will. Control the message by giving it yourself, and keep in mind that managers need to be honest whether delivering good news or bad: Don’t promise things you can’t deliver or, alternatively, make a situation appear better than it actually is. Creating a “no” zone. It’s easy to stick to tried-and-true formulas in uncertain times because they’re safe. But you need to take calculated risks and break new ground, or you risk losing your competitive edge. Encourage staff to approach you with innovative concepts; if you can’t implement them, explain why, and let the team know you value their input. Remember that if employee suggestions are dismissed without any real discussion, staff will stop presenting them. Letting a lack of recognition trickle down. Many senior managers and executives would be the first to admit that they could offer a bit more positive reinforcement. But recognition often becomes endangered during busy times because employees are so focused on their work. If you’re feeling under-appreciated, don’t make your team feel the same way. Showing your gratitude will motivate team members; as long as praise is specific, genuine and timely, there’s no such thing as too much. Almost everyone has encountered one of the stumbling blocks mentioned above. By taking measures to avoid them, you can make your workplace more appealing and productive in any business environment. Maria Scheleen is branch manager of The Creative Group, a specialized staffing firm placing interactive, design, advertising and marketing professionals on a project and full-time basis. The company has offices in major markets across the United States and in Canada, and offers online job search services at www.creativegroup.com. Contact the Seattle branch at 206-7499046.

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Getting to Yes Faster: TWO TOOLS FOR ACCELERATING YOUR CLOSE By Lisa Magnuson Guest Columnist

veryone loves hearing yes and closing a deal. However, some sales can languish while prospects waffle between agreeing to your offer or declining it. This lag time can be frustrating and time consuming for you and your prospect. If you want to help your prospects reach a decision more quickly, try including a cost justification discussion in your sales process. When you can demonstrate a solid return on investment (ROI), you will help your prospect see the positive financial impact of their investment. When your prospects have solid ROI information, they have the justification they need to say yes to your offer and, if required, sell it to their boss. In this article, I’ll teach you about this concept and share two powerful acceleration tools you can use with your prospects during your sales process.

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Tool #1: Simple Cost Justification With the simple cost justification method, you find the fastest and easiest way for your prospect to recoup his investment in your product or service. This process is very logical and depends on factual information. When your prospect can see the ROI he will enjoy after investing with you listed in dollars and cents, he can quickly evaluate your offer and make a decision. You can demonstrate a return on investment by stressing how much money your prospect will save when using your product or service, or how much additional business he will generate. The simple cost justification method is best used for fairly straightforward sales, such as training courses, technology or consulting. Based on your research and the information you’ve gathered during your sales process, select either cost savings or additional revenue for your cost justification discussion. To use this method, you’ll need to ascertain a few facts from your prospect. First, if you are focusing on savings, determine what he is currently spending in time or resources to achieve the outcome that your product or service will impact. If you are focusing on additional revenues, find out the average value of each new customer or client. Once you have this information, demonstrate how investing in your product or service will quickly pay for itself by the cost savings or increase in revenues. Sample conversation for increased revenues: “Bill, you mentioned that each new client brings you an additional $3,000 in revenues. If you invest in my product for $1,000, you’ll only need to bring in one additional sale and more than cover the investment.” Sample conversation for cost savings: “Sue, you mentioned that you have 10 customer service reps and pay each one about $45,000 a year. If you invest in my services, I’ll be able to help you cut your customer service needs by 20% and eliminate a position. Your $10,000 investment would save you $45,000 each year.” This is the critical piece of information that your client needs 44

MEDIA INC. ISSUE ONE 2013

to know—that the investment in your product or service is going to quickly and easily be covered by savings or increased revenues, and then add to their profit margin. Tool #2: A Thorough ROI Analysis When you are selling a very costly product or service, your prospect will respond best to a thorough ROI analysis of all the benefits your offering will bring to the organization, along with a comparison of the investment required. For example, a manufacturer is unlikely to purchase a multimillion-dollar piece of equipment without a thorough ROI analysis. If you have a highly analytical prospect, he may not be satisfied with a simple cost justification and feel much more comfortable with a full ROI analysis. Or, you may be offering a product or service that provides many small benefits that add up to a value much greater than the investment. In all these cases, a thorough ROI analysis will help your prospect see the complete value of your offering. Preparing a thorough ROI analysis requires time and teamwork with your prospect. You’ll work together to estimate the impact

YOUR AIM IS TO NOT FALL PREY TO ANALYSIS PARALYSIS AND LET YOUR PROSPECT GET LOST IN TOO MANY DETAILS. of your product or service on increasing revenues and decreasing costs so that you can calculate the positive financial impact of the investment. You’ll also want to include any non-financial factors, such as reducing environmental impact, increasing customer loyalty, or improving staff morale. Be sure that you have carefully considered all the potential ways your product or service can serve your client. Financial Impacts to Include The list below includes some common areas that are used to justify the financial benefit of products and services. Be sure to tailor this list to include the benefits of your product or service in addition to these standard questions. • Does your product or service reduce the need for outside services? Estimate the cost savings of outside services that can be eliminated. • Does your product or service reduce material costs? Estimate the cost savings of materials that will no longer be required. • Does your product or service have an impact on employee job satisfaction? Estimate the financial impacts of increased productivity, decreased employee turnover, increased customer retention, and increased sales. • Will your product or service allow your customer to charge more for their product or service? Estimate the percentage of the price increase and calculate the amount of net profit generated. • Will your product or service increase revenues? Estimate the


percentage of revenue impact and calculate the amount of increase. • Will your product or service increase productivity? Estimate the amount of time saved and multiply by the cost of the time to calculate the savings. In Summary The keys to both simple cost justification conversations and thorough ROI analysis discussions are to keep them simple and focused. Your aim is to not fall prey to analysis paralysis and let your prospect get lost in too many details. You can monetize most impact areas, both financial and nonfinancial. It is acceptable to use estimates if you are unable to get exact figures. However, ask your prospect to give you the

estimates so that he will trust the end results of the calculations. Remember that your goal is to help your potential customer quantify the value of your offering. Once you can help your prospect to see the real value of the investment and positive financial impact, he will have the facts needed to make a decision rapidly. Lisa Magnuson, sales strategist and founder of Top Line Sales, LLC, helps high potential sales people and business owners land larger deals, connect to new customers, and expand business. Lisa is passionate about her mission to help her clients win more business. For essential ideas on winning more business, look for the first eBook in Top Line’s series due out shortly, 3 Secrets to Increase Sales with Existing Customers. Visit www.toplinesales.com.

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SNAPSHOT

HB Design www.hbdesign.com HB Design is a strategic visual communications company that unites design with technology to help companies achieve their business goals. We help clients drive sales, effectively communicate with their employees, educate their audiences, strategize their visual branding and bring it to life. HB Design is known for its innovative design solutions, successful business relationships, and “best practices” processes in successfully managing projects.

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Print Is On A Roll PDX 2013 PPI hosted “Print Is On A Roll” on March 13 at Grand Central Bowl in Portland. Billed as a bowling tournament/constructive cocktails event, around 100 people from the print and communications industries showed off their “pin skills” while also enjoying cocktails, food, games and networking opportunities. Twelve teams of six vied for the top spot, with the team from B&B PrintSource in Tigard, Oregon, winning the coveted trophy. A Seattle bowling night is next on the docket. PPI is partnering with Art with Heart on their fifth annual bowling event and fundraiser. Funds raised will benefit the work this Seattlebased charity engages in. This year in particular the staff will be part of the ongoing healing process at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut, where they were devastated by the loss of students and teachers late last year. The event will be held May 8 at Acme Bowl in Tukwila. For more information, visit www.ppiassociation.org.

WE’LL L MAKE E YOU YO SO SO HAPPY HAP PPY Y, W ’LL WE LW WISH ISH WE W WERE Y OU. O YOU MARKETING M A RKETING :: B BRANDING BRAND ING :: DESIGN

LIFESTYLE L I FES T Y L E A AND ND CULTURE C U LT U R E

Quesinberry Q uesinberry a and nd Ass Associates, ociates, IInc. nc. [p p]] 2 206 06 3 323 23 11 1173 73 [ w ] qu quesinberry.com esinberry.com S Seattle eattle :: San San Francisco Francisco

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1

Wunderman; Seattle, WA 206-505-7500; fax 206-505-7672 www.wunderman.com

Julie Rezek, managing director

WND

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POP; Seattle, WA 206-728-7997; fax 206-728-1144 info@popagency.com www.popagency.com

Bill Predmore, founder/CEO

$34.7m

Phil Reilly, president Mike Cobb, VP sales Dan Hergert, VP/COO

$27m

3

CMD; Portland, OR & Seattle, WA 503-223-6794; fax 503-223-2430 info@cmdagency.com www.cmdagency.com

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VODA Digital (part of VODA Brands); Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodadigital.com www.vodabrands.com

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO

WND

Doug New, CEO Steve Marshall, president Susan Hawkins, COO

$6.4m

5

The New Group; Portland, OR 503-248-4505 doug.new@thenewgroup.com www.thenewgroup.com

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Seven2; Spokane, WA 509-624-1222 info@seven2.com www.seven2.com

Tyler Lafferty & Nick Murto, principals

WND

SERVICES PROVIDED

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Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

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14Four; Spokane, WA 509-448-4070 jeff@14four.com www.14four.com

Jeff Oswalt, president Tyler Lafferty & Nick Murto, principals

WND

8

HB Design; Portland, OR 503-944-1000; fax 503-944-1030 gail@hbdesign.com www.hbdesign.com

Noma Hanlon, president

WND

Patrick Ezell, CEO

$2.6m

9

Copious; Portland, OR 503-255-1822 hello@copiousinc.com www.copio.us

10

Quango Interactive Inc.; Portland, OR 503-968-0825; fax 503-968-1565 info@quangoinc.com www.quangoinc.com

Sean Henderson, president/CEO

$2.5m

Kevin Maude, CEO Norma Straw, agency director Byron Tucker, ECD

WND

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B47; Seattle, WA 206-577-1153 info@b47agency.com www.b47agency.com Hornall Anderson; Seattle, WA 206-467-5800; fax 206-467-6411 www.hornallanderson.com

Jack Anderson, CEO/co-founder John Anicker, president Lisa Cerveny, president

WND

Frank Chenn, president/CEO

WND

13

ChannelReady, Inc.; Bellevue, WA 425-644-8700; fax 425-644-2099 frankc@channelready.com www.channelready.com

Richard Roberts, president/CD

$2.1m

14

Palazzo Creative; Seattle, WA 206-328-5555; fax 206-826-6212 richard@palazzocreative.com www.palazzocreative.com

Leslie Phinney, CEO Karl Bischoff, CFO Holly Keenan, president

$2.05m

15

Phinney Bischoff; Seattle, WA 206-322-3484; fax 206-322-3590 hollyk@pbdh.com www.phinneybischoff.com

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Ad Ventures; Seattle, WA 206-282-1719 ventures@adventuresdesign.com www.adventuresdesign.com

D. Alex Howard, president Karen Skeens, CD

$1.9m

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VMG/Studio 520; Bellevue, WA 425-457-7100; fax 425-457-7104 kelly@vmgstudio520.com www.vmgstudio520.com

Kelly Sparks, CEO Mark Sparks, president

WND

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Plexipixel, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-781-1405; fax 206-352-1311 info@plexipixel.com www.plexipixel.com

Matt Tamaru, co-founder/ executive director Vicky Tamaru, co-founder/ executive producer

$1.2m

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Sandcastle Web Design & Development; Seattle, WA 206-325-5383; fax 206-568-3291 david@sandcastle-web.com www.sandcastle-web.com

David Newsom, principal Ashlee Bowell, principal

WND

Stewart McCullough, CEO

$750k

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Montana Banana; Seattle, WA 206-322-2435 info@montanab.com www.montanab.com

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Ply Interactive; Seattle, WA 206-328-1130 x112 info@plyinteractive.com www.plyinteractive.com

Patrick Stroud, president

$700k

12

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SERVICES PROVIDED

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InfoAdvantage Marketing; Bellevue, WA 425-869-2157 web@infoadvantage.com www.infoadvantage.com

Eva Chiu, founder/president

WND

23

Synchro Creative; Bellevue, WA 425-885-5661; fax 425-957-7202 bonnie@synchrocreative.com www.synchrocreative.com

Bonnie Chelini Candy Young

$280k

Malania Calugas, president

WND

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Realite Networks, LLC; Seattle, WA 206-621-8283 info@realitenetworks.com www.realitenetworks.com

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Adams Creative & Production Services; Des Moines, WA 206-824-6970; fax 206-824-7036 adamscreative@isomedia.com www.adamscreative.net

Dan Adams, president/CD

WND

Northwest Web Construction Company; Vancouver, WA 360-260-0347 sales@nwwcc.com www.nwwcc.com

Kelly Burbank, owner

$80k

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Design Central; North Bend, WA 425-747-4115 mct@designcentral.com www.designcentral.com

Michelle Twohig, CD

WND

SERVICES PROVIDED

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W DE EB SI DE GN V EL OP WE ME MA B NT IN HO / TE ST NA IN G NC / M E FL OTI AS ON H G AN RA IM PH US AT IC ER IO S/ N EX PE RI EN WE CE B AP PL IC AT MO IO NS BI LE AP PL D IC AT INT IGITA IO ER L/ NS AC TIV E SE MA O/ RK SE ET M ING SY IN ST TE EM GR AT IO OT N HE

RE VE NU E

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

RANK

NW INTERACTIVE DESIGN & DEVELOPMENT COMPANIES

STATE OF THE ART

WEBSITES FOR YOUR COMPUTING MACHINE

email us at: tickle@clatterdin.com or call us at: 206.464.0520

ISSUE ONE 2013 MEDIA INC.

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Oregon Lands TNT Pilot ot on the heels of Leverage’s series wrap, Oregon has landed yet another TNT project from director/producer Dean Devlin and his team at Electric Entertainment.

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Set to begin filming in April, the as-yet-untitled pilot features Oscar-winning, Emmy-nominated actress Geena Davis (The Accidental Tourist, Commander in Chief) as an unconventional bail bondswoman and bounty hunter whose eccentric personality and unusual tactics give her an advantage in a tough and unpredictable business. The show is inspired by the real-

“WE’RE THRILLED TO CONTINUE OUR RELATIONSHIP WITH TNT AND ELECTRIC ENTERTAINMENT.� - Vince Porter life story of Mackenzie Green. Other castmembers include Scott Bakula (TNT series Men of

a Certain Age, Quantum Leap), as a detective who is also the ex-husband of Davis’ character, and Marsha Mason (The Goodbye Girl), as the strong and independent mother of Davis’ character. The pilot script for TNT’s bounty hunter drama was written by Oregon native Scott Prendergast and Amy Berg, with Dean Devlin set to direct. Prendergast, Berg and Devlin serve as executive producers on the proj- Geena Davis. (Credit: Getty Images via ect, along with John Altschuler, Dave The Hollywood Reporter) Krinsky, Tom Lassally and Michael Rotenberg. Davis serves as co-executive producer, while Devlin and Berg are the showrunners. The project comes to TNT from Electric Entertainment, Ternion Productions and 3 Arts. “We’re thrilled to continue our relationship with TNT and Electric Entertainment,� said Vince Porter, executive director, Oregon Governor’s Office of Film and Television. “As the legislature is contemplating a possible expansion of our incentives, it’s nice to have a new project waiting in the wings.� For more information on Oregon’s production industry, visit www.oregonfilm.org.

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TWITTER at twitter.com/MediaIncMag

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Film Has a Leading Role develop a thorough project plan that relays how their story will unfold across multiple delivery platforms and, more importantly, how the story is enhanced by being seen in different ashington State has long been a home for venues and environments. The following briefly outlines the eligibility criteria for the innovation and entrepreneurial business Innovation Cycle: models. As Hollywood begins to explore • Motion picture content may be narrative, documentary, alternative distribution paradigms, Washington animation, experimental, serial, episodic, or other type. State is perfectly positioned to lead the digital Content may be feature-length or short. revolution. • Projects must spend $25,000-$499,999 on qualified in-state expenditures upon award of Filmworks Innovation Lab funding To help facilitate the creative process, Washington Filmworks assistance. has launched the Innovation Cycle of the Filmworks Innovation • At least 85 percent of the workforce for the physical Lab, a pilot funding assistance program designed to explore the production of motion picture intersection of technology and storycontent must be Washington telling. By leveraging the diverse WASHINGTON FILMWORKS IS landscape of in-state technology HELPING FILM TAKE A LEADING ROLE residents. • Projects must use a resources and motion picture producIN DEVELOPING A NEW CREATIVE majority of Washington resition infrastructure, Washington ECONOMY FOR WASHINGTON STATE. dents in Key Creative Filmworks is helping film take a leadpositions. ing role in developing a new creative economy for Washington • Qualified projects must spend at least 95 percent of the motion State. picture content production budget in Washington State. In order to better promote this kind of entrepreneurial spirit, Washington Filmworks created this program in part to explore the Washington Filmworks Board of Directors can allocate up new ways that filmmakers and motion picture workers can to $350,000 in funding assistance, across two cycles per year. contribute to the local creative economy and generate more opporThe inaugural Film Cycle of the Lab was created to nurture tunities to keep film industry professionals working. traditional forms of filmed entertainment, and recently commit“Washington State is uniquely positioned to capitalize on this ted $175,000 in funding assistance to five diverse projects from digital revolution, and create revenue streams that integrate our emerging Washington resident filmmakers. These projects go in-state technology resources,” says Amy Lillard, Washington Filminto production throughout 2013. The Innovation Cycle is works executive director. “Washington Filmworks is passionate underway now. It was created to support filmmakers using new about developing programs that empower our local storytellers forms of production that are specifically designed to incorpoto lead the innovation revolution. Using our creative capital and rate and distribute motion picture content in inventive ways. technology expertise, we can create a new economic development The Board may allocate up to $175,00 for this cycle. model for the world to follow.” Distribution outlets are expanding. With new access points come new audiences and enhanced opportunities to share intellectual property, as well as to build potential revenue streams. Want to learn more about the Filmworks Innovation Lab? Visit The Innovation Cycle challenges creative entrepreneurs to www.washingtonfilmworks.org (and click on the Innovation Lab produce motion picture content that traverses multiple delivery tab) or call 206-264-0667. Funding assistance recipients for this platforms. The process is juried and requires that applicants cycle of the program will be announced in May.

By Jessie Wilson Programs and Communications Coordinator, Washington Filmworks

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253 Film Collective Reveals Tacoma’s Vibrant Production Community By Rick Walters 253 Film Collective Photos Courtesy Steve Dunkelberger

group of passionate filmmakers have come together to form the 253 Film Collective. This group is dedicated to fostering a vibrant and sustainable film and media community in Tacoma, Washington, by encouraging, mentoring, and promoting local filmmakers and businesses. The 253 Film Collective is committed to sustaining and growing opportunities for more motion picture production in the city.

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Amy Lillard, Washington Filmworks executive director, and Krys Karns, WF production services coordinator, visited the collective last month. They gave a presentation on the business of film in Washington State and discussed the ongoing importance of maintaining relationships with elected officials. The ladies had a great time learning more about the collective and meeting with area filmmakers. In addition to the efforts of the 253 Film Collective, the City of Tacoma is also taking steps to foster more production in the area. They’ve recently implemented standard procedures for permitting and production inquiries. Contact Kala Dralle, special projects manager with the City of Tacoma, for further information at 253-573-2523 or kdralle@cityoftacoma.org. Tacoma was also WF’s January Location of the Month. Interested in participating? Visit www.253film.com to find out how to become a member, and join the group on Facebook.

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Washington Incentive Film Middleton Holds Advance Screening iddleton, a feature film shot last summer at Washington State University, Gonzaga, and various other Eastern Washington locations, held an advance screening on March 22 on the WSU campus. Following the film’s screening, director Adam Rodgers and producer Glenn German took part in a Q&A session with students. The filmmakers scouted several college campuses throughout six states before selecting WSU and Gonzaga as their filming locations. Their reasoning was due in part to both campuses’ charming settings, as well as Washington State’s film incentive. Middleton stars Andy Garcia and Vera Farmiga as parents who take their students to the fictional Middleton College for a campus tour, where the two meet and fall in love. The film also stars Taissa Farmiga, Tom Skerritt and Nicholas Braun. Throughout production, the film was titled Admissions, but the filmmakers changed the name to Middleton after discovering that a different Admissions (starring Tina Fey and Paul Rudd) was being released this year. The majority of Middleton was shot on the WSU campus, including the interiors and exteriors of Thompson Hall, Honors Hall, and the Edward R. Murrow building. Gonzaga University was also utilized for

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some interior scenes, as well as a climactic bell tower scene. Hundreds of students on both campuses were recruited to appear in the film as extras, and the production utilized local crew and vendors as well. Middleton is set to be released sometime this year. iddleton is just one of several productions that utilized the Washington State film incentive program in 2012. Here is a list of all the other feature films and commercials filmed last year thanks to the incentive: A Bit of Bad Luck (feature film) American Family Insurance – Aero Films (commercial) Bank of America – Anonymous Content (commercial) Bravo Promos – 99 Tigers (commercial) Deep Burial (feature film) Different Drummers (feature film) Ford Summer Sales Event – Nonfiction Unlimited (commercial) Glad – Motion Theory (commercial) Green Mountain Coffee – Crossroads Films, Inc. (commercial) One Square Mile (feature film) Touchy Feely (feature film) Win8Shop – Loaded Pictures (commercial) Xbox E3 – World Famous (commercial) You Can’t Win (feature film)

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four is scheduled to begin airing in January 2014. Magnolia Pictures Acquires Distribution Rights to Touchy Feely Magnolia Pictures picked up the world distribution rights to Lynn Shelton’s new film Touchy Feely, which premiered at this year’s Sundance Film Festival. Touchy Feely, shot in Seattle and starring Rosemarie DeWitt, Josh Pais, Ellen Page, Scoot McNairy, Allison Janney, Ron Livingston and newcomer Tomo Nakayama, is the second film of Shelton’s that Magnolia picked up; Humpday in 2009 became a hit comedy. As her follow up film to the award-winning Your Sister’s Sister, Shelton is delighted to be back with Magnolia Pictures, saying, “My experience with Magnolia on the release of Humpday was magical, so I couldn’t be more thrilled that we have found the perfect distribution partners for Touchy Feely. We look forward to collaborating with Eamonn [Bowles, president of Magnolia] and their entire team to share the film with audiences everywhere.” Portlandia Wins WGA Award At this year’s Writers Guild Awards, IFC’s Portlandia won the award for Best Comedy/Variety Series, beating out other nominees such as Saturday Night Live, Conan, The Daily Show, The Colbert Report, Jimmy Kimmel, and Real Time with Bill Maher, among others. Portlandia aired its third season finale on March 1, and season

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Eden Hits Theaters in New York, L.A., Seattle Following an award-winning festival run, Washington incentive film Eden opened in theaters in New York in March, and is set to hit theaters in


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Los Angeles and Seattle this spring. Directed by Seattle’s Megan Griffiths, Eden is based on a true story and puts a spotlight on the world of sex trafficking. The film shot in diverse landscapes around the state, including Seattle, Moses Lake and Ellensburg. The desert of Eastern Washington doubled for the Southwest; landscapes surprised critics and audiences alike, who were astonished to learn that the film was actually shot in the Pacific Northwest. Eden, distributed by Phase 4 Films, will release on VOD on April 20 and on DVD on June 11.

iOPIF Film Selected for Fantaspoa Portland-shot film House of Last Things has been named an official selection for Fantaspoa, a Brazilian festival that showcases films in the fantastic genre. Filmed in 2010, House of Last Things was one of the first independent features to benefit from the Indigenous Oregon Production Investment Fund (iOPIF), an incentive program that aims to build the state’s homegrown film industry. The iOPIF program provides rebates of 20 percent of goods and services and 10 percent of Oregon labor for films produced by Oregon filmmakers who spend a minimum of $75,000 but not more than $750,000 on their project. House of Last Things is a mind-bending thriller set in Portland about an unspoken tragedy and its effects on a house, its temporary caretakers and the owners, a classical music critic and his wife on a recuperative trip to Italy. Visit www.houseoflastthings.com for more.

production. The short film is a coming-of-age story set in rural Eastern Washington that spans almost two decades. A quiet 13-yearold and his rough and silent stepfather track down a wounded deer. The lessons learned in those dark woods aren’t fully realized until 17 years later, when the teenager, now a grown man, pays a visit to his stepfather. In March the short film shot for five days, bringing production into more remote areas of Washington, including Moses Lake, Soap Lake, Mazama, Winthrop and Cle Elum. To learn more about their progress check out the film’s Facebook Page.

Original Music Audio Production portland s los angeles Award winning scores & sound design Recording Ɣediting Ɣ5.1 mixing Ɣvoice casting Ɣisdn

Box Walk Goes into Production In late 2012, Washington Filmworks committed funding assistance to five projects helmed by emerging Washington filmmakers through the inaugural Film Cycle of the Filmworks Innovation Lab. Tony Fulgham’s Box Walk is the first of those projects to go into

Custom online music library : ConsciousMindMusic.com

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Who’s Who in Northwest Production Actors First Agency Elicia Walker Owner and Agent www.actorsfirstagency.com 206-522-4368

Big Fish NW Talent Gordon Adams Seattle Area Director/Agent www.bigfishnw.com 877-424-4347 x2

With 20+ years experience in the field, Elicia Walker has opened Actors First Agency. She is dedicated to working with the clients to get them the best actor for the right role, be it voiceover, commercial, corporate, video or film. Clients must have a sense of humor!

In his 12th year at Big Fish NW Talent, Gordon Adams is the Seattle area Director/Agent. Gordon advocates for talent and loves it!

Bluescooter Productions Bill Murray wm@bluescooter.net 206-264-5454

The Actors Group Jamie Lopez Partner www.theactorsgroup.com 206-427-7449

Storyteller in multiple media— Director, producer, or production wildcard for corporate & industrial video and a dozen feature films. Writing, marketing, advertising, still photography.

Jamie Lopez owns Seattle’s leading talent agency, The Actors Group. His client roster includes famed chef Tom Douglas, “Boston Rob” Mariano, anchor Kaci Aitchison and Kevin Calabro, among others.

AK Teleprompt Christopher Duffel COO www.akteleprompt.com 425-891-8575 Just as effective teleprompting can help your production run smoothly, any problems can bring your shoot to a screeching halt. AK Teleprompt offers effective, reliable service so you can focus on a high quality production. Experienced operators and equipment redundancy guarantee your shoot won’t skip a beat.

Bad Animals Thomas McGurk Composer and Principal www.badanimals.com 206-443-1500 Tom is a molten volcano of creativity, waiting to be unleashed on unsuspecting creatives. 60

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Blue Plate Digital Brian Pelzel Producer/Owner www.blueplatedigital.com 206-388-0174 Brian has developed a reputation as one of Seattle’s most trusted and reliable producers, and this year celebrates Blue Plate’s 10th Anniversary. Our clients are the best!

Cathy Faulkner Voiceovers Cathy Faulkner Voice Talent/Owner www.cathyfaulkner.com 206-521-0363 Cathy has 20 years of voiceover experience. Client list includes AT&T/YP, Microsoft, Exxon, Mood, and American Express; specializing in IVR, e-learning and web-based media.


Glazer’s Camera Bill Seymour Rentals Manager www.glazerscamera.com 206-233-0211

Mark Wygant Productions Mark Wygant President www.markwygant.com 206-679-3072

Bill leads the team in Glazer’s rentals store, offering quality equipment for large or small projects—perfect for beginning filmmakers or traveling production crews.

Seattle based, experienced production services and locations throughout the US and abroad, including: Moscow, London, Tokyo, Mexico and the Caymans.

Hullabaloo Tracy Dethlefs Creative Director www.hullabaloo.tv 206-890-2902 Tracy puts the Hulla in the Baloo by helping clients tell their stories, regardless of the size of the screen or the budget.

In Both Ears World-Class Voices, Exceptional Representation www.inbothears.com Hearing voices? Yeah, us too! Contact In Both Ears when you’re searching for just the right voice on your next project. Representing world-class voices and ethnic voices across the nation.

KTVA Productions Rick Phillips Owner www.KTVAvideo.com 503-659-4417 KTVA Productions — Custom Video Services since 1987. Rick is a freelance cameraman (Sony PMW350 & EX3), producer, editor, voice-over talent, notary public and minister. Please call him, he loves his work and so will you!

Marshall Arts Motion Graphics Shawn and Lisa Marshall 3D Animation and Motion Graphics www.marshall-arts.net 503-288-6791 Marshall Arts Motion Graphics has been specializing in 3D product animation for over 10 years. If you want it to sing, give us a call.

Oppenheimer Cine Marty Oppenheimer Owner www.oppenheimercinerental.com 206-467-8666 Marty’s been part of the PNW production community since 1974, renting top quality camera gear since 1979 and manufacturing innovative accessories since 1992. Serving the region’s top productions and proudly providing quality gear, creative support and reliable service to all.

Maxline Custom Cases Loren McMahill Music Division 503-570-8803 Maxline manufactures and distributes protective shipping cases for the safe transport of any equipment of value. We offer a complete selection of shipping cases in both standard and individually customized models to meet any shipping requirement. ISSUE ONE 2013 MEDIA INC.

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McDonald Insurance John Gunn Account Manager 888-827-7400

Mike Boydstun Director of Photography www.mikeboydstun.tv 206-229-9372

One stop shopping for your production insurance needs. Next time you have a shoot, give us a shot!

25+ years of creating compelling images that inspire viewers to see, think and feel a story. See my specialty reels in Television, Commercial, Corporate, Comedy and Drama. Owner of cameras and a well equipped grip truck.

Pro Photo Supply Rob Layman The Pro Desk www.prophotosupply.com If you have a question about photography and the gear that goes with it? Rob’s the man to speak to. He will set you up and get you prepared for your next shoot.

red jet films Jeff Erwin Owner www.redjetfilms.com We are a creative team with the ability to make your vision fly. Whether it’s local or global, red jet films provides start-tofinish, high-definition video production with the talent and the tools to take your ideas and turn them into reality.

Reel Solutions Insurance Dave Peterson Executive Producer www.midlakesinsurance.com 206-352-8300

Seattle Teleprompter Maia McQuillan Owner www.seattleteleprompter.com 425-454-5659

Seattle-based Insurance Brokerage specializing in coverages for the Creative Community for over 30 years. They can insure any project from one-day shoots, to annual policies and everything in between.

Teleprompter equipment rental and operators for video and film production, live events, conferences, awards shows and concerts. Over 20 years of professional experience.

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Who’s Who in Northwest Production

StudioBard Michael Bard, CAS Head Funkologist/ Composer/Sound Designer www.studiobard.com 503-273-2273

Tom Price Storyboarding Tom Price Freelance Storyboard Artist www.storyboardcity.com 206-937-3151

Realize your creative vision through our personal, awardwinning craftsmanship. We specialize in music scoring, sound supervision, mixing and voice-casting for all electronic media projects.

TCM Models and Talent Terri Morgan Owner/Director www.tcmmodels.com 206-728-4826 TCM has been an industry presence in the Northwest market for 30 years. We are committed to developing the best talent for our clients.

The MacPac George Swords Director of Marketing www.macpac.com 503-256-5210 33 years of Apple experience helps me promote the extraordinary combination of technical expertise and down to earth people that create the MacPac experience.

Tom brings many years of experience to storyboarding for video game cinematics, TV spots, films, and corporate projects. Live-action and animation styles.

Utter Associates Erik Utter President www.erikutter.com 206-829-8170 Utter Associates is a video engineering and consulting firm specializing in digital television facility design, integration, and project management.

VER – Video Equipment Rentals Your Rental Resource www.verrents.com 866-837-9288 VER is a leader in the Broadcast and AV rental industry, located throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe with a local office in Seattle. Our full line of products includes high-definition, video projection, cameras, VTR’s, monitors, lighting, Flypacks, plasmas, LED display and more. ISSUE ONE 2013 MEDIA INC.

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The Dance By Maia McQuillan Guest Columnist

ark Walberg likes teleprompters. I recently had the pleasure to teleprompt for Mark, while he was the emcee on a live corporate event to an audience of 5,000 people. Mark Walberg is mostly known for being the host of the popular PBS television series Antiques Roadshow. When people meet Mark, they usually say, “Hey…my grandfather gave me this watch. What’s it worth?” And then they tell him they love him on The Bachelor. I guess people think Mark looks like host Chris Harrison. “Sorry, that’s not me,” he says. “I have no idea who’s getting a rose this week, and more importantly, I don’t know how much your watch is worth.” When I met Mark, I didn’t ask him the “what’s it worth” question. But I did ask him if he wanted to use the teleprompter. He said, “Of course! I like teleprompters!” Good answer, Mark! Mark spent a lot of time backstage with me and the crew, as he prepped for his time in the spotlight. He worked with me to adjust the script to accommodate his ad-libs and added his personal touch and humor to make the words “his own.” He was easy to work with and is an absolute pro at using a teleprompter. Mark told me why he really likes teleprompters. “What the audience never knows, but I rely on fully, is the partnership

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between the teleprompter operator and me,” he said. “This is a very important relationship, especially with someone like me who improvises a lot. An experienced operator is very important… it isn’t as easy as it looks. It’s imperative to meet and talk with the person operating the teleprompter. You don’t realize how close to death you Maia McQuillan with Mark Walberg. are without their support and expertise… they are my lifeline! There is an art to teleprompting… being there when I need it and out of the way when I don’t. Just know that for me to be fully effective on stage or on set… means being able to be ‘in the moment.’ I need to have the audience believe I’m 100-percent off-the-cuff, even though I’m partially scripted. The reliability I have on the teleprompter operator allows me the freedom to do my best work. It’s truly a dance.” Mark said it well, and I’m happy to dance with him on the next show. I’m glad he likes teleprompters! Maia McQuillan is the owner of Seattle Teleprompter and has over 19 years of international teleprompting experience. Maia has teleprompter gear and operators for film & video productions, concerts, conferences and live events. Contact Maia at teleprompting@gmail.com and visit www.seattleteleprompter.com.


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W Y G A N T productions Never Had A Bad Day 

50 States & International Experience



Complete production services 

Location Manager



Detailed Nationwide Locations



Budgets & Schedules



Large Crew & Resource Database



Past productions include: Anheuser Busch, AT&T, Blue Cross, Boeing, General Motors, Jaguar, John Deere, Microsoft, Nike

S e a t t l e , WA s h i n g t o n markwygant.com • Tel 206.679.3072 Email wygant1@mac.com A Monkeys With Footballs Production

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Key Code Media Presents: NW Technology Expo 2013 an’t make it out to Las Vegas for NAB 2013 this year? Key Code Media invites you to their second annual Post NAB Expo where their partners will be showcasing new products released at NAB in editorial, post production and live production.

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The event will be held on Thursday, May 9, at the historical Arctic Club in Seattle (Financial District). Exhibit hall hours run from noon to 6pm, including a buffet lunch from 12 to 1pm and a cocktail reception from 4 to 6pm. Here’s your chance to test drive new products, have your workflow questions answered by manufacture technology experts, as well as mix and mingle with your fellow industry peers. Best of all, admission is free! Get a hands-on demonstration from new products previously released at the NAB show in Las Vegas from participating exhibitors and sponsors. This year will also feature workflow presentations and a number of raffle prize giveaways. Vendors will be announced in the coming weeks.

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To register, visit www.keycodemedia.com, click on “Coming Events” on the right-hand side, then select “Seattle Post NAB Technology Expo 2013.”


Providing operators and equipment

425-891-8575 Duffel@akteleprompt.com www.akteleprompt.com

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Picture This: Beyond Customer Service icture This has provided professional services to the visual and audio industry for over 29 years. Our proven ability to provide excellent service as well as excellent products has been the key factors to our success. In order to provide excellent service it requires quality people. Our staff and key freelance team are some of the best in the business and they too understand and believe in excellent customer service.

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These are our people and they have their own message about the service we offer. Ben Olberg – Production Management Department Our industry lives and dies by the quality of customer service and the clarity of communication. We excel at both because we care about the success of our clients’ projects. As a production services company, we are only as successful as the clients that we serve. The Production Coordination Team strives to work through every detail of a project in advance, clearly defining client needs and expectations, then making sure that we exceed them. Will Walle – Equipment Department My vision for excellent customer service is not only to facilitate the needs of our clients in a knowledgeable and friendly way but also to predict a client’s needs that they may not yet be aware of. Whether it’s informing them of the latest cuttingedge technology or filling in the gaps of their rental needs that they may have overlooked, the equipment rental department excels at meeting and exceeding our clients’ expectations for production services.

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Tim Carroll – Stage, Grip and Electric Departments Listening to our clients’ and crew’s needs, caring for each of them individually, and their goals comes first and foremost. Considering every client a co-worker helps accomplish a very nice and polished product.

Josh Kottler – Live Events Department I believe that customer service is the most important part of any business. It is what sets us above anyone else. My role is to help our customers navigate the difficult and complicated world of planning technical events. I am always working towards the goal of creating the best possible results within any given budget. I work hard to develop relationships based on trust and respect and I feel that this is why my customers keep coming back year after year. People are often surprised by how much we are willing to do to make sure they have exactly what they need. John Meyers – Digital Foundry Post Production & Webcasting Customer service is being flexible enough to meet the client’s needs and deadlines and having the ingenuity to anticipate and solve problems before they happen. It’s also about delivering creativity to help every project be at its best. I want the clients to know they can trust Digital Foundry to handle their diverse projects and deliver stellar results. Sue Spry – Office Administration My job is the most fun as I get to interact with most everyone that we assist. From directing them to the person who can best assist them, to answering the many questions that our customers may have. I assist their navigation of insurance, billing and help keep them smiling through the hard stuff. Picture This Production Services Inc. can be reached at 503-2353456. For more information, visit www.pixthis.com.


NW

Absolute Digital Broadcast Rentals; Bellevue, WA 206-768-9828; fax 425-861-9743 info@absolutedigi.com www.absolutedigi.com

Rey Serna, owner

Cine Rent West; Portland, OR 503-228-2048; fax 503-228-1789 chris@cinerentwest.com www.cinerentwest.com

Chris Crever, owner

CineMonster, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-780-3907 dale@cinemonster.com www.cinemonster.com

Dale Fay, president

Fremont Media Studios; Seattle, WA 206-838-9080; fax 206-838-9088 info@fremontstudios.com www.fremontstudios.com

Scott Jonas, president

Gearhead Grip & Electric; Portland, OR 503-542-3990; fax 503-542-4455 gear@gearheadgrip.com www.gearheadgrip.com

Joel Stirnkorb, partner Greg Schmitt, partner Don Rohrbacker, GM

Glazer’s Camera; Seattle, WA 206-624-1100 rentals@glazerscamera.com www.glazerscamera.com

Ari Lackman & Rebecca Kaplan, co-owners, Bill Seymour, rentals mgr

Key Code Media; Seattle, WA 206-728-4000; fax 206-728-4001 seattle@keycodemedia.com www.keycodemedia.com/seattle

Andrew Takacs, NW territory manager

Koerner Camera Systems Inc.; Portland, OR 503-274-6533; fax 503-274-5446 michael@koernercamera.com Seattle, WA office: 206-285-7334; fax 206-285-7335 seattle@koernercamera.com/www.koernercamera.com

Michael Koerner, Portland Karen MacDonald, Seattle

Morgan Sound; Lynnwood, WA 425-771-7257; fax 425-670-1656 johnh@morgansound.com www.morgansound.com

Charlie Morgan, president

Northern Lights; Mountlake Terrace, WA 425-774-1905 doug@loud.net www.loud.net

Douglas Jones, president

Oppenheimer Cine Rental; Seattle, WA 206-467-8666; fax 206-467-9165 marty@oppcam.com www.oppenheimercinerental.com

Marty Oppenheimer, managing director

Pacific Grip & Lighting Portland, OR office: 503-233-4747 Seattle, WA office: 206-622-8540 www.pacificgrip.com

Doug Boss

Picture This Production Services; Portland, OR 503-235-3456 info@pixthis.com www.pixthis.com

Perry Loveridge, president Sari Loveridge, senior account executive Ben Olberg, production manager

PNTA; Seattle, WA 206-622-7850; fax 206-267-1769 rcarlson@pnta.com www.pnta.com

Richard Carlson, president

Pro Photo Supply; Portland, OR 503-241-1112; fax 503-241-1110 rental@prophotosupply.com www.prophotosupply.com

DND

Professional Video and Tape Inc.; Tigard, OR 503-598-9142; fax 503-598-9172 dmcandrews@provideoandtape.com www.provideoandtape.com

Doug McAndrews, rental manager

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PRODUCTION & POST EQUIPMENT RENTAL

red jet films; Seattle, WA 206-282-4534; fax 206-812-0768 sue@redjetfilms.com www.redjetfilms.com

Jeff Erwin

Seattle Grip & Lighting; Seattle, WA 206-285-0840; fax 206-285-9503 jknapp@seattlegrip.com www.seattlegrip.com

Mick Lane Jeremy Knapp

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Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

EQUIPMENT RENTED

VER - Video Equipment Rentals; Tukwila, WA Steve Daniels 866-837-9288/206-242-3860; fax 206-242-3859 Anthony Routh rentals@verrents.com www.verrents.com Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke Saul Mitchell Brent Sharp

Voda Brands; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO

Westside Camera Crane Co.; Lake Oswego, OR 310-345-2919 1denniskw@gmail.com

Dennis Wilson, president

SEATTLE TELEPROMPTER Teleprompter rental and operators for video & film productions, corporate events, conferences, award shows and concerts. Experts in the teleprompting business for over 19 years.

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OFFERING...

PRODUCTION EQUIPMENT & SERVICES FOR OVER TWO DECADES Cameras & Lenses • Video & Audio Equipment • Teleprompting & PowerPoint • Jibs, Dollies & Track • Grip & Lighting Live Events • Webcasting • Post Production • Sound Stage Rentals • Crewing Services

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NW

SUPPORT EQUIPMENT RENTAL

Absolute Digital Broadcast Rentals; Bellevue, WA 206-768-9828; fax 425-861-9743 info@absolutedigi.com www.absolutedigi.com

Rey Serna, owner

Cine Rent West; Portland, OR 503-228-2048; fax 503-228-1789 chris@cinerentwest.com www.cinerentwest.com

Chris Crever, owner

CineMonster, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-780-3907 dale@cinemonster.com www.cinemonster.com

Dale Fay, president

Event Communications; Portland, OR 800-283-COMM support@eventcomm.us www.eventcomm.us

Wayne Lund, president

FocalPoint Digital; Portland, OR 503-245-5300 steve@focalpointdigital.com www.focalpointdigital.com

Steve Smith, owner

Fremont Media Studios; Seattle, WA 206-838-9080; fax 206-838-9088 info@fremontstudios.com www.fremontstudios.com

Scott Jonas, president

Gearhead Grip & Electric; Portland, OR 503-542-3990; fax 503-542-4455 gear@gearheadgrip.com www.gearheadgrip.com

Joel Stirnkorb, partner Greg Schmitt, partner Don Rohrbacker, GM

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Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

EQUIPMENT RENTED

Grip & Lighting Gear Production Supplies Dollies & Jib Arms Expendables Service

3357 SE 22nd Ave Portland, OR 97202 503-542-3990 gearheadgrip.com

 ,  1 3  5 $-**FACEBOOK at facebook.com/MediaIncMag

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TWITTER at twitter.com/MediaIncMag


NW

Glazer’s Camera; Seattle, WA 206-624-1100 rentals@glazerscamera.com www.glazerscamera.com

Ari Lackman & Rebecca Kaplan, co-owners, Bill Seymour, rentals mgr

Kenmar Water Truck Service; Stanwood, WA 360-652-3725; fax 360-652-3725 kenmarwater@aol.com www.kenmarwatertrucks.com

Kenneth Fowler, owner

Koerner Camera Systems Inc.; Portland, OR 503-274-6533; fax 503-274-5446 michael@koernercamera.com Seattle, WA office: 206-285-7334; fax 206-285-7335 seattle@koernercamera.com/www.koernercamera.com

Michael Koerner, Portland Karen MacDonald, Seattle

Morgan Sound; Lynnwood, WA 425-771-7257; fax 425-670-1656 johnh@morgansound.com www.morgansound.com

Charlie Morgan, president

National Barricade; Seattle, WA 206-523-4045; fax 206-525-2042 jimh@barricade.com www.barricade.com

James Humphryes

Northern Lights; Mountlake Terrace, WA 425-774-1905 doug@loud.net www.loud.net

Douglas Jones, president

Northwest Helicopters; Olympia, WA 360-754-7200; fax 360-754-1761 duttecht@nwhelicopters.com www.nwhelicopters.com

Brian Reynolds, president Doug Uttecht, GM

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Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

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SUPPORT EQUIPMENT RENTAL

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SUPPORT EQUIPMENT RENTAL

Nuge Inc. (Go4Nuge); Seattle, WA 206-234-4075; fax 206-333-1137 dave@go4davenugent.com www.go4nuge.com

David P. Nugent, owner Bobbi Gerlick, co-owner

Oppenheimer Cine Rental; Seattle, WA 206-467-8666; fax 206-467-9165 marty@oppcam.com www.oppenheimercinerental.com

Marty Oppenheimer, managing director

Pacific Grip & Lighting Portland, OR office: 503-233-4747 Seattle, WA office: 206-622-8540 www.pacificgrip.com

Doug Boss

Picture This Production Services; Portland, OR 503-235-3456 info@pixthis.com www.pixthis.com

Perry Loveridge, president; Sari Loveridge, senior account executive; Ben Olberg, production manager

PNTA; Seattle, WA 206-622-7850; fax 206-267-1769 rcarlson@pnta.com www.pnta.com

Richard Carlson, president

Pro Photo Supply; Portland, OR 503-241-1112; fax 503-241-1110 rental@prophotosupply.com www.prophotosupply.com

DND

Professional Video and Tape Inc.; Tigard, OR 503-598-9142; fax 503-598-9172 dmcandrews@provideoandtape.com www.provideoandtape.com

Doug McAndrews, rental manager

Royal Restrooms of WA; Maple Valley, WA 206-816-5406; fax 425-432-5406 seattle@RoyalRestroomsWA.com www.RoyalRestroomsWA.com

Jayne Van Vleck, member Max Van Vleck, member

Seattle Grip & Lighting; Seattle, WA 206-285-0840; fax 206-285-9503 jknapp@seattlegrip.com www.seattlegrip.com

Mick Lane Jeremy Knapp

Seattle RV Center; Everett, WA 425-741-3860; fax 425-348-0978 jeffr@seattlervcenter.com www.seattlervcenter.com

Jeff Richford

Seattle Teleprompter; Medina, WA 425-454-5659 teleprompting@gmail.com www.seattleteleprompter.com

Maia McQuillan

VER - Video Equipment Rentals; Tukwila, WA Steve Daniels 866-837-9288/206-242-3860; fax 206-242-3859 Anthony Routh rentals@verrents.com www.verrents.com Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke Saul Mitchell Brent Sharp

Voda Brands; Seattle, WA 206-441-8158 info@vodastudios.com www.vodastudios.com

Josh Courtney, chairman/CCO

Water Buffalo Inc.; Bonney Lake, WA 253-863-8883; fax 253-447-3826 waterbuffaloinc@netzero.net www.waterbuffaloinc.com

Phyllis M. Brown

Westside Camera Crane Co.; Lake Oswego, OR 310-345-2919 1denniskw@gmail.com

Dennis Wilson, president

WorldWind Helicopters, Inc.; Renton, WA 425-271-8441; fax 425-271-8442 info@wwheli.com www.wwheli.com

Michael O’Leary

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PM S G EN TAG HE ENE T ES AT RA / ER TO S/ RS AC / EX PE ND AB LE S PO RT AB LE RE ST A/ RO VE OM QU S IP ME NT TE LE PR OM PT ER CO S MM UN IC AT IO BA N TR RR EQ AF IC UI FIC AD P /S ES AF EV ET EN Y T

UI ND

R TR V’S AI /TR LE U RS CK /M S/ WA OT OR TE HO R TR ME UC S KS HE LIC OP TE RS ST /M ST AG OU AG ES NT E E /SO S Q U

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

EQUIPMENT RENTED


Bullseye Disc; Portland, OR 503-233-2313; fax 503-233-4845 sales@bullseyedisc.com www.bullseyedisc.com

Curtis Kidwell, president

Cravedog, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-233-7284; fax 503-345-0864 info@cravedog.com www.cravedog.com

Todd Crosby Michael Fitzgerald

Diversified Systems Inc.; Redmond, WA 425-947-1500; fax 425-947-1501 mari@dsgi.com www.dsgi.com

Robert Sambrook, president

Dubs Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-624-3827; fax 206-624-3854 contact@dubsinc.com www.dubsinc.com

Charles Core, co-owner Troy Murison, co-owner

EMA Video Productions, Inc.; Portland, OR 503-241-8663; fax 503-224-6967 emellnik@emavideo.com www.emavideo.com

Ed Mellnik

Film to DVD (division of Tobin Cinema Systems); Spokane Valley, WA 509-922-7841; fax 509-315-9895 filmtodvd@comcast.net www.tobincinemasystems.com

Clive Tobin, president Susan Dow, customer service

KTVA Productions; Portland, OR 503-659-4417; fax 503-659-4438 mail@ktvavideo.com www.ktvavideo.com

Rick Phillips, owner

Lightpress, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-462-4717 info@lightpress.tv www.lightpress.tv

Jeff Tillotson, president Eric Rosen, VP

NW Media Inc.; Portland, OR 503-223-5010; fax 503-223-4737 jeannea@nwmedia.com www.nwmedia.com

Jeanne Alldredge

Pacific Multimedia; Everett, WA 425-347-4110/888-373-8273; fax 425-710-9932 jim@pacmultimedia.com www.pacmultimedia.com

James Campbell, owner

ProMotion Arts; Seattle, WA 206-938-0348; fax 206-493-2987 info@promotionarts.com www.promotionarts.com

Steve Crandall, managing director Drew Witt, managing producer

Realtime, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-523-8050; fax 206-524-0711 pip@realtimepip.com www.realtimepip.com

Pip McCaslin Rebecca Sikes

Rex Post; Portland, OR 503-238-4525; fax 503-236-8347 info@rexpost.com www.rexpost.com

Russ Gorsline, GM Tara Krick, business manager

Rocket Pictures, Inc.; Seattle, WA 206-623-7678 les@rocket-pictures.com www.rocket-pictures.com

Les Fitzpatrick

Seattle Motion Picture; Seattle, WA 206-632-3717 info@seattlemotionpicture.com www.seattlemotionpicture.com

Ron Tennison, project manager

Victory Studios; Seattle, WA 206-282-1776; fax 206-282-3535 info@victorystudios.com www.victorystudios.com

Conrad Denke Saul Mitchell Braxton Schmidt

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O SE THE RV R ICE S

US B

VI DE O

BL URA Y

FORMATS REPLICATED

DV D

CD

US B

BL URA Y VI DE O

DV D

FORMATS DUPLICATED

CD

Company City, State Phone; Fax E-mail Web site

T EX OP L EC OC UT A IVE L S

NW MEDIA DUPLICATORS/ REPLICATORS


Media Inc.  

Media industry news and information

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