Michigan Milk Messenger: August 2016

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Michigan 2015 Milk

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F M I C H I G A N M I L K P R O D U C E R S A S S O C I AT I O N

VOL. 99 | ISSUE 2 | AUGUST 2016

EFFICIENTLY

POWERING the DAIRY

mimilk.com



AUGUST 2016 FEATURES

On the Cover MMPA Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik works with member Chris Fry to complete an energy

POWERING THE DAIRY 14 | EFFICIENTLY

18 | 100 YEARS IN THREE WORDS

audit. In this issue, learn about the resources of the MMPA member services department, helping members on the farm every day.

The MMPA energy audit program helps members with cost-saving energy efficiency solutions.

MMPA leaders each outline three characteristics that describe MMPA, reflecting the heart and soul of the cooperative that has seen the ups and downs of a volatile industry though one hundred years.

20 | LEARNING AND ENGAGING

An MMPA farm and MSU Extension educator offer insights on how to improve employee management with training and communication.

Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA), established in 1916, is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving approximately 2,000 dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

AUGUST 2016 | MESSENGER

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Change Change is is coming. coming. Will you be ready? Will you be ready? Beginning January 1, 2017, Beginning January 1, 2017, aaVeterinary Feed Directive order must be Veterinary Feed Directive order must be presented to purchase feeds containing: presented to purchase feeds containing: Established drug name Established drug(CTC) name Chlortetracycline Chlortetracycline (CTC) Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine/Penicillin Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine/Penicillin Hygromycin B Hygromycin B Lincomycin Lincomycin Oxytetracycline (OTC) Oxytetracycline (OTC) Oxytetracycline/Neomycin Oxytetracycline/Neomycin Penicillin Penicillin Sulfadimethoxine/Ormetoprim Sulfadimethoxine/Ormetoprim Tylosin Tylosin Tylosin/Sulfamethazine Tylosin/Sulfamethazine Virginiamycin Virginiamycin

Examples of proprietary drug name(s) Examples ofCLTC, proprietary drug name(s) Aureomycin, CTC, Chloratet, Chlorachel, ChlorMax, Aureomycin, CLTC, CTC, Chloratet, Chlorachel,Pfi ChlorMax, Chlortetracycline, Deracin, Inchlor, Pennchlor, chlor Chlortetracycline, Deracin, Inchlor, Pennchlor, Pfi chlor Aureo S, Aureomix S, Pennchlor S Aureo S, Aureomix S, Pennchlor Aureomix 500, Chlorachel/Pfi clorSSP, Pennchlor SP, ChlorMax SP Aureomix 500, Chlorachel/Pficlor SP, Pennchlor SP, ChlorMax SP Hygromix Hygromix Lincomix Lincomix TM, OXTC, Oxytetracycline, Pennox, Terramycin TM, OXTC, Oxytetracycline, Pennox, Terramycin Neo-Oxy, Neo-Terramycin Neo-Oxy,Penicillin Neo-Terramycin Penicillin, G Procaine Penicillin, Penicillin G Procaine Rofenaid, Romet Rofenaid, Romet Tylan, Tylosin, Tylovet Tylan,Sulfa Tylosin, Tylovet Tylan G, Tylan Plus Sulfa G, Tylosin Plus Sulfamethazine Tylan Sulfa G, Tylan Plus Sulfa G, Tylosin Plus Sulfamethazine Stafac, Virginiamycin, V-Max Stafac, Virginiamycin, V-Max

Tilmicosin (Pulmotil,Tilmovet), Avilamycin (Kavault), Florfenicol (Aquaflor, Nuflor) currently require a VFD order. Tilmicosin (Pulmotil,Tilmovet), Avilamycin (Kavault), Florfenicol (Aquaflor, Nuflor) currently require a VFD order.

www.michigan.gov/vfd www.michigan.gov/vfd


CONTENTS 6

MMPA MATTERS

Understanding, trust and patience

8

QUALITY WATCH

Maintenance Before Failure

10

NEWS & VIEWS

12

LEGISLATIVE WATCH

13

FOUR INSIGHTS TO UNDERSTAND HOW GRADE A SURVEYS IMPACT MILK MARKETING

“We will need to work together to address the challenges of the industry. We’re all in this together.” – SCOTT LAMB (PAGE 17)

DEPARTMENTS 25 MERCHANDISE 26

QUALITY PREMIUMS

17

SPOTLIGHT ON THE BOARD

Meet District 8 Director Scott Lamb

27 POLICIES

23

DAIRY DAY AT THE CAPITOL

28 FREELINERS

24

YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

29 CLASSIFIEDS

Working in Schools to Build Lifelong Dairy Consumers

30

MARKET REPORT

31 STAFF

MMPA CORE VALUES: » QUALITY » INTEGRITY » PROGRESS » LEADERSHIP » COMMUNITY Managing Editor................................................ Sheila Burkhardt Editor...............................................................................Allison Stuby Advertising Manager......................................Nancy Muszynski Circulation..................................................................................... 2,843 An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Michigan Milk Messenger (USPS 345-320) is the official publication of Michigan Milk Producers Association, published monthly since June 1919. Subscriptions: MMPA members, 50¢ per year; non-members, $5 per year.

41310 Bridge Street P.O. Box 8002 Novi, MI 48376-8002

p: 248-474-6672 f: 248-474-0924 w: www.mimilk.com

Periodical postage paid at Novi, MI and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Michigan Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. (ISSN 0026-2315)

August 2016 | MESSENGER

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MMPA MATTERS

Understanding, trust and patience BY KEN NOBIS, PRESIDENT

In June and July MMPA did something unusual. Five meetings were held in locations scattered strategically throughout the state to update our membership on the latest dairy issues and how MMPA is affected by them. The speed of change we are experiencing in the industry called for an update before the Local Annual Meeting season. The meetings were well attended, and we shared insights with our members in an atmosphere that was conducive to interactive conversation. Each session lasted two and a half to three hours. We weren’t sure going into this new venture just how long discussions might last, and we were pleased to experience meetings that lasted longer than we had anticipated. The open-ended time line encouraged discussion, and that was very welcome. The objective was to share a deeper understanding of current conditions. Unlike Local Annual Meetings where a business meeting, elections, and other operational functions must also be addressed, the focus during these sessions was entirely on global milk production, MMPA policies, marketing, manufacturing, and building for the future. Having the extra time available allowed for detailed explanations when members asked questions.

“Understand the underlying challenges the dairy world faces. Trust that MMPA’s board and management are continually tweaking systems at the plant and sales level for optimum results. Have patience. The problems cannot be resolved overnight, because so many factors are beyond the control of a dairy co-op.”

One question I wasn’t expecting but was super appropriate came at the end of the first meeting in Sandusky when a member asked, “You’ve told us what is being done at the cooperative level of our business, but what can we as individual members do to help?” I have come up with a list of ways that members can help. First, my list includes the obvious things like producing high quality milk. This really, really helps add value to our milk, which in turn helps our management team find more options for marketing the milk. A member recently asked me how MMPA enforces its high quality standards, and the answer is that we work with members who are struggling to meet customer quality standards but we can’t tolerate quality issues that are not resolved in a reasonable amount of time. Another thing that always appears on the list of what members can do is to be active in the co-op. For example, the feedback we received from those who attended the informational meetings indicates that the meetings were useful. Staying informed about your industry helps you and your co-op. Members can help by recognizing and accepting the challenges we face in a market that, today, has more than enough product with more being added daily. While we did expect production to continue increasing in our market area, we hadn’t expected the increases to come as rapidly as they have, despite the fact that it is a great place to milk cows with fertile soils, moderate weather and ample water supplies. An added factor is that we are within a day’s drive to deliver the finished product to over 50 percent of the U.S. population. Members can help by staying informed about what faces our industry. Understanding, trust and patience are essential. Understand the underlying challenges the dairy world faces. We are in a global marketplace where milk production and consumption patterns worldwide impact our U.S. prices like never before. The recent price declines we have experienced in the U.S. have more to do with what goes on outside the U.S. than within, and we have little to no control over those events. Trust that MMPA’s board and management are continually tweaking systems at the plant and sales level for optimum results. Have patience. The problems cannot be resolved overnight, because so many factors are beyond the control of a dairy co-op. We will continue to interact with our members in person and via other methods as we strive to foster a clear understanding of the challenges we face and the steps we are taking to “market our members’ milk to the greatest advantage possible.”

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QUALITY WATCH

Maintenance Before Failure– Spend Pennies to Save Dollars BY STEVE LEHMAN, TECHNICAL AREA SUPERVISOR/MASTITIS MANGAGEMENT SPECIALIST

Milking equipment maintenance is often forgotten until a failure results in the loss of quality premiums, unscheduled equipment down times, or in severe cases, a rejected load due to cleaning failures. Lack of a scheduled maintenance program can result in expensive costs.

Milk the cows the same way every day

“Lack of a scheduled maintenance program can be some of the most expensive money ‘saved’ on dairy farms today.”

Recommended maintenance tasks cover all of the components of the milking system. Filters for vacuum pumps and pulsators and vacuum regulators should be cleaned on a monthly basis. Milk and vacuum pump seals can leak air and/or milk. Pulsators and detachers should be cleaned and rebuilt to ensure consistent function. Pulsator hoses and short air tubes develop leaks that can lead to abnormalities in pulsator function. Replacing all short air tubes quarterly can minimize pulsation problems without being an excessive financial and time burden. Replace inflations according to manufacturer’s recommendations, but note if cows milk better after an inflation change, because this means they should have been changed earlier.

Tune up the CIP system Cleaned In Place (CIP) systems are especially prone to failure over time. Air leaks at milk and wash inlets, deteriorated gaskets, diaphragms, hoses, jetter cups, and duckbills, and worn peristaltic pump tubes are some of the items that can lead to cleaning system failure. These parts should be replaced at least annually to prevent failure. Air injector filters should be cleaned monthly. Watch wash vat drains and drain valves for leakage that will affect the concentration of cleaning solutions. Plugged screens in water fill valves can affect water temperatures and fill times. Drop pipes and bottom fill adapters that do not wash in the CIP circuit must be hand cleaned. Many of the same problems found in milking system CIP systems also plague bulk tank washing systems. Additional problems found with bulk tanks are plugged spray balls, dishes, and nozzles, airlocking of the wash pump due to sagging suction hoses, and dirty vents and fill openings.

Don’t forget the cooling Maintaining properly-functioning cooling systems are essential to providing the high-quality milk MMPA processors want. Unobstructed airflow both in and out of the compressor condenser is necessary. Both intake and exhaust openings should each be 1-1/3 times the area of the condensers. Condensers, fans, and air intake screens must be cleaned on a regular basis. This, in conjunction with a yearly evaluation by a refrigeration system professional to check refrigerant levels, pressures, and current draws can prevent breakdowns that compromise milk quality and cause delays in milk harvest. While pre-coolers have few moving parts, they are not without the need for maintenance. Since most water that is used to pre-cool milk is not treated, mineral scale can build up on the water side of cooling plates and tubing. It is not uncommon to see water lines both in and out of pre-coolers reduced to one quarter of their original size. The water side of pre-coolers should be cleaned at least annually; the temperature of milk exiting a pre-cooler can decrease 10 – 15 degrees following cleaning. A scheduled maintenance program can be set up through your milking equipment dealer. For those who prefer to do the work themselves, your member representative can provide you with templates for scheduled maintenance intervals, and many maintenance parts can be obtained through the MMPA Member Merchandise Program. Attention to detail has helped MMPA members earn the reputation for producing premier quality milk, and will serve to open doors for market access in the future. 8

MESSENGER | AUGUST 2016


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NEWS & VIEWS

NEWS & VIEWS

Class III and IV Milk Prices Up

The USDA announced that the June Class III milk price is $13.22 per hundredweight, up 46 cents from May’s price, but $3.50 below June 2015. The June Class IV price was 68 cents higher than last month’s price, at $13.77, but was 13 cents less than June of last year. Dairy Market Report – Looking Ahead

The NMPF and DMI Market Report noted cash and futures market prices improved along with market sentiment in June, after several months of increasingly dour outlooks. USDA raised its 2016 mid-point forecast for the average all-milk price to $15.15 per hundredweight, 30 cents higher than a month earlier. By midJune, the CME dairy futures had become even more optimistic, indicating a 2016 average all-milk price of approximately $16.30 per hundredweight. The improved outlook is likely due to indications that milk production growth will stay moderate, along with forecasts that domestic demand will remain strong and world market prices should improve.

Dairy Margin Protection Program Sign Up Open

T

he Margin Protection Program (MPP) provides financial assistance to participating dairy producers when the margin – the difference between the price of milk and feed costs – falls below a coverage level selected by the producer. Its focus is to protect farm equity by guarding against destructively low margins, not to guarantee a profit to individual producers. The National Milk Producers Federation has updated its Margin Protection Program website – futurefordairy.com – with new materials to assist dairy producers considering enrollment in the third year of the federal dairy safety net program. The enrollment period officially opened July 1 and ends September 30, 2016, for coverage in calendar year 2017. Farmers already participating in the program can change their coverage level during this threemonth enrollment window. The program supports producer margins, not milk prices, and is designed to address both catastrophic conditions as well as prolonged periods of low margins. Under this program, the margin will be calculated monthly by USDA. Simply defined, it is the all-milk price minus the average feed cost. Average feed cost is determined using a national feed ration that has been developed to more realistically reflect those costs associated with feeding all dairy animals on a farm on a hundredweight basis. Dairy farmers can insure their farms on a sliding scale between $4 and $8 per hundredweight, deciding both how much of their production history to cover, and the level of margin to protect. The progra, created in the 2014 Farm Bill, offers more extensive coverage for low-margin conditions than previous programs.

2016 OYDC Picnic The annual Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator (OYDC) reunion picnic was hosted by 2011 OYDC Jeremy and Jody Sharrard in Peck, Michigan. Each year, the past OYDCs gather together fo a picnic and the chance to visit with friends.

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Upcoming Events August 2 Ovid Open House, Ovid

August 18-19 Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator Conference, Novi

September 28 Advisory Committee Meeting, Novi

Producers Scoring 95 percent or more on Grade A Surveys and Federal Check Ratings Gerald / Brent Cottle Folkersma Farm LLC Roger Weiss James Kreger Larry Niec Farms LLC* Weil Dairy Farm Robert Dale Gleason* *100 PICTURED AT 2016 OYDC PICNIC FRONT ROW: LISA LARSEN, SUMMER WERTH, DIANE HORNING, LOUISA WESTENDORP, DOREEN SLAVIK, ANDREA GASPER, JODY SHARRARD, LIZ NOBIS, TERESA CROOK, GLORIA CRANDALL AND PAM BONTEKOE BACK ROW: BRUCE AND JENNIFER LEWIS, BURKE LARSEN, JEREMY WERTH, DIANNE COOK, TOM COOK, EARL HORNING, DOUG WESTENDORP, LISA DIGLIO, MARY NICHOL, JOE DIGLIO, AL NICHOL, AARON GASPER, JEREMY SHARRARD, GEERT VAN DEN GOOR, KEN NOBIS, GERTIE VAN DEN GOOR, ERIC FRAHM, JORDAN NOLL, LARRY CRANDALL, MIKE NOLL AND PETE BONTEKOE

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AUGUST 2016 | MESSENGER

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LEGISLATIVE WATCH

Congress Passes Biotech Labeling Bill to Develop Uniform Labeling System The National Milk Producers Federation thanked U.S. Senate and House members for approving legislation in early July that would create a federal, uniform labeling system for foods produced using biotechnology. The legislation awaits a signature from President Obama to become law. The legislation, negotiated by Sens. Pat Roberts (R-KS) and Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) of the Senate Agriculture Committee, preempts Vermont’s state GMO labeling law that took effect July 1, and instead establish national guidelines for how companies disclose the presence of ingredients and foods made with biotechnology. “NMPF greatly appreciates the efforts of members of both the House and Senate on this issue, which unfortunately has been one of the most challenging – and important – food policy issues of the 21st century. We strongly urge President Obama to sign this legislation into law. Once this process is complete, we can begin moving beyond specious arguments over labels, terminology and absence claims, and work to address real food safety and nutrition issues, and further the sustainability of our food system,” Jim Mulhern, NMPF president and CEO stated after the House vote on July 14.

The legislation: • Prevents a multi-state patchwork of bioengineered food labeling laws which would create confusion for consumers and uncertainty for food companies and farmers. • Directs USDA to create a nationwide mandatory bioengineered food disclosure standard within 2 years. • Provides food companies with three options for bioengineering disclosure: on-package words, on-package symbol, or on-package electronic label. • Words next to electronic label must say “Scan here for more food information.” • Animal products (like milk, meat, eggs, and poultry) from animals who eat bioengineered feed do not require a label, in line with the EU and other trading partners. • Processed food products where meat, poultry, or eggs are the predominant ingredient do not require a label. • Ensures that a disclosure required under this bill will not disparage biotechnology, but provides clear, science-based information to consumers about their food. • Includes a statutory definition of bioengineering that provides certainty for farmers about what types of biotechnology products will have to be labeled. Food ingredients made using biotechnology have been proven safe by more than 2,000 studies from leading scientific bodies worldwide. The U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency have all reaffirmed their long-standing recognition of the safety of the technology.

2016 MMPA Advisory Committee

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District 1

District 5

Bruce Lewis, Jonesville........................................ 517-869-2877 Jeff Horning, Manchester..................................... 734-428-8610 Art Riske, Hanover............................................... 517-524-6015 Clark Emmons, Fayette, OH................................ 419-466-4471 Jeff Alexander, Hanover....................................... 517-740-9981

Mike Rasmussen, Edmore................................... 989-304-0233 Lyle Vanderwal, Lake City.................................... 231-328-4926 Tom Jeppesen, Stanton........................................ 989-506-5287 Bruce Benthem, McBain....................................... 231-825-8182 Amy Martin, Leroy................................................ 231-388-0496

District 2

District 6

Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN............................. 574-825-2454 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek................................. 269-660-2229 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN.......................... 574-825-5198 Don Bever, Delton................................................ 269-671-5050 Heather Wing, Bellevue........................................ 269-660-0498

David Reed, Owosso............................................ 989-723-2023 Jamie Meyer, Ionia............................................... 989-640-3372 Kris Wardin, St. Johns.......................................... 989-640-9420 Aaron Gasper, Lowell........................................... 616-897-2747 Steve Thelen, Fowler............................................ 989-682-9064

District 3

District 7

Tim Butler, Sand Lake.......................................... 269-330-5538 Bill Gruppen, Zeeland........................................... 616-875-8162 Burke Larsen, Scottville........................................ 231-425-8988 Bill Stakenas, Freesoil.......................................... 231-425-6913 Gary Nelsen, Grant.............................................. 231-834-7610

John Bennett, Prescott......................................... 989-345-4264 Mark Iciek, Gladwin.............................................. 989-426-5655 Eric Bergdolt, Vassar............................................ 989-652-6500 Steve Foley, Millington.......................................... 989-871-4028 Rodney Fowler, Chesaning.................................. 989-302-2299

District 4

District 8

Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth.................................... 231-588-6084 Jeremy Werth, Herron.......................................... 989-464-4022 Dave Folkersma, Rudyard.................................... 906-630-1957 Russ Tolan, Ossineke........................................... 989-471-2993 Ron Lucas, Posen................................................ 989-379-4694

Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing.................................. 989-977-3718 Bill Blumerich, Berlin............................................ 810-706-2955 Michael Bender, Croswell..................................... 810-404-2140 Patrick Bolday, Emmett........................................ 810-395-7139 Michael Noll, Croswell.......................................... 810-404-4071

MESSENGER | AUGUST 2016


Four Insights to Understanding How Grade A Surveys Impact Milk Marketing

T

he dairy industry and dairy products in the U.S. are regulated by the Grade A milk program. To be compliant with the requirements, dairy farms and dairy processing plants are inspected and receive a score based on how the facility fares during inspection. The results of these inspections, or surveys, can impact how your milk is marketed. MMPA offers a Grade A Survey incentive program and producers scoring 95 percent or higher on surveys will receive a premium.

How do Grade A surveys impact milk marketing? Here are four insights on the program:

1. The Pasteurized Milk Ordinance (PMO) is adopted as the Grade A milk law.

3. For the purpose of surveying, farms are grouped into Bulk Tank Units (BTUs).

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) develops the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance (PMO) to be adopted as the Grade A milk law. Dairy farms and dairy plants must meet the requirements of the PMO to produce Grade A products.

Farms are broken up into groups called Bulk Tank Units (BTUs) by individual cooperatives. If a BTU consists of 25 farms or less, all of the farms are surveyed. In BTUs with greater than 25 farms, additional farms are surveyed to provide a valid statistical sampling. Therefore, in BTUs with greater than 25 farms, not every farm will be surveyed, but the listing of all the farms in that BTU will be impacted by the weighted average score of the farms surveyed.

According to the 2007 PMO, “The Grade ‘A’ PMO is incorporated by reference in Federal specifications for procurement of milk and milk products; is used as the sanitary regulation for milk and milk products served on interstate carriers; and is recognized by the Public Health Agencies, the milk industry, and many others as the national standard for milk sanitation.” All milk must be Grade A to be sold out of state or to Grade A dairy processors. FDA maintains a listing of farms and processors qualified as Grade A on the National Council of Interstate Milk Shippers (NCIMS) listing.

2. Grade A surveys are conducted by the state regulatory agency every 18-24 months. In fulfillment of the PMO, a state agency conducts surveys on dairy farms to maintain Grade A status. A survey is a farm inspection that records observations to be scored and tallied. The surveys are conducted every 18-24 months to keep a milk supply on the NCIMS listing Prior to the NCIMS listing, inspectors from other cities or states would have to conduct inspections on dairy farms to ensure compliance with their local regulations. The NCIMS rating system, based on the PMO, limits the amount of regulatory inspections to those done by the state regulatory agency.

4. BTUs must score an average of 90 percent on Grade A check surveys to remain listed. Each farm surveyed earns a score after inspection. A weighted average (based on daily pounds of milk) of 90 percent or greater is required for a Grade A survey to pass. A failure means that the milk from that BTU is delisted, and may not be used for Grade A purposes. Delisting of a milk supply impacts milk marketing, transportation and production. Milk from the delisted BTU must be diverted to a non-Grade A facility or processed at a Grade A facility at the end of the normal production day until the resurvey is conducted and tabulated. Since this milk must be used for non-Grade A purposes, the value of the milk and its manufactured products is reduced. When a BTU is delisted, MMPA member representatives conduct inspections on all of the farms belonging to that BTU. To get a satisfactory resurvey conducted as soon as possible, these inspections may take place during atypical times. Many farms are put on reinspection. Once the BTU is reinspected with a satisfactory score of 90 percent or higher, the BTU is relisted and the raw milk from those farms can be sold as Grade A.

AUGUST 2016 | MESSENGER

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MESSENGER | AUGUST 2016


MMPA ENERGY AUDITS

EFFICIENTLY

PROVIDE COST-SAVINGS

POWERING

AND ENERGY EFFICIENCY FOR MEMBERS

the DAIRY

Sitting on a five-gallon bucket, Ed Zuchnik chatted with MMPA Member Chris Fry, rattling off a mix of questions: “Who is your utility provider? What is your feed cost per cow? How many times a day are you milking?” On this sunny morning, Zuchnik found himself five miles west of Lake Huron in Michigan’s thumb, performing a Type 2 farm energy audit on Sunrise Dairy. Zuchnik is the member representative supervisor for the South Area of MMPA. He is also one of MMPA’s certified energy auditors. After addressing some basic questions about the farm and how it operates, Zuchnik headed out for a short tour of the dairy to note farm specifics such as lighting fixtures, compressor type and freestall dimensions. Surrounded by whirring wind turbines on the rural landscape, he focused in on the details of the farm to best evaluate the farm’s energy needs.

BY ALLISON STUBY

And the process doesn’t stop there. Energy audits occur in three steps: analysis of current energy use, a review of current versus proposed energy use and a report of recommendations. But, why undergo an energy audit? Energy audits provide a comprehensive look at energy usage on a particular dairy and outline recommendations for efficiency improvements. A report by the Michigan Farm Energy Program at Michigan State University found the average dairy farm saved $8,325 annually after undergoing an energy audit. “In addition to increased energy efficiency, the benefits of the audit are a potential increase production and the ability to improve working conditions on the farm,” says Zuchnik. Zuchnik spends approximately 4060 hours preparing an energy audit report. He reviews past energy bills and production reports, contacts the member’s equipment dealer for quotes, and complies recommendations. This includes information on equipment upgrades and estimated pay-back periods to help farmers

best understand where the potential savings—and costs—can be found. “I offer my recommendations, and from there, the farm can do what’s best for them,” he explains. Data from energy audits performed in Michigan by MMPA are shared with Aluel Go at the Michigan Farm Energy Program to assist with their research. An article, written by Go and Ben Van Zweden developed an energy profile of Michigan dairy farms as compared to Minnesota, Wisconsin and New York. At 761 kWh, Michigan was found to have a higher energy consumption per milk cow, by a factor of two to three times less energy efficient. “Existing policies exempting agricultural operations in Michigan from both electrical and construction codes have prevented energy efficiency aspects embedded in these codes from being implemented on Michigan agricultural operations,” the report found. “Therefore, it is necessary to significantly improve energy efficiency in Michigan Dairy farms to at least remain competitive and even attain a competitive edge in the dairy industry.” (Continued on page 16)

« MMPA ENERGY AUDITOR ED ZUCHNIK (LEFT) DISCUSSES LIGHTING

IN SUNRISE DAIRY’S PARLOR WITH CHRIS FRY (RIGHT).

AUGUST 2016 | MESSENGER

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(Continued from page 15) energy conservation measures include: lighting, variable frequency drives (VFDs) on electric motors, manure handling, compressor upgrades, water heater upgrades and weatherproofing. Lighting and VFDs offer the highest potential percent savings at 35 and 32 percent, respectively.

Looking for energy savings? Common energy conservation measures include: • Lighting • Variable Frequency Drives (VFDs) on Electric Motors • Manure Handling • Compressor Upgrades • Water Heater Upgrades • Weatherproofing

On Sunrise Dairy, Fry hoped having an energy audit performed would provide insight on efficiency improvements for his operation. “I’m looking for savings on a VFD vacuum pump motor and even considering long day lighting on my farm,” he admitted. VFDs on vacuum pump motors and milk pump motors are good energy conservation measures that eliminate the need to operate the pumps for an entire milking session at a fixed, fullcapacity speed. With a VFD vacuum pump motor, speed varies based on the demand. Another benefit in reduced heat loss results from milk flowing through the pre-cooler at a slower and more continuous rate.

Farms can also consider replacing incandescent lighting with florescent or LED blubs. The concept of longday lighting involves LED lighting for milking cows for 16 hours per day to increase milk production and improve cow comfort. However, efficiency improvements involve an up-front investment for long-term savings. Though energy audits provide information on payback periods on recommended equipment, additional costs can be harder to manage in this fluctuating dairy market. Fortunately, private, state and federal organizations offer funding to assist with costs of energy efficiency upgrades. Many energy companies even offer rebates for farms who have undergone a Type 2 farm energy audit. Yet it all starts with a few questions. From there, MMPA energy auditors can help producers learn how to efficiently power their dairies.

The article emphasizes the importance of viewing energy consumed by per pound of milk, though data on that ratio is not available in all of the other states. Strategies some dairies use to increase productivity, such as longday lighting, robotic milkers and cooling systems, also increase energy consumption per cow. Yet, as the article describes, these tactics result in higher milk production and reduced labor needs, offsetting the energy cost. Michigan dairies studied had an average total energy used per pound of milk at 0.105 (kWh/lb). The main purpose of the Michigan Farm Energy Program is to identify the current energy uses of dairy farms in Michigan and recommend energy efficiency improvements. Common

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MESSENGER | AUGUST 2016

ZUCHNIK NOTES BULK TANK CAPACITY AND DIMENSIONS OF THE MILK HOUSE TO INFORM ENERGY AUDIT RECOMMENDATIONS.


SPOTLIGHT ON THE BOARD

» Meet MMPA District 8 Director Scott Lamb « What do you like most about MMPA? MMPA allows members to bring questions to leadership and have face-to-face conversations. We are able to have direct contact with the cooperative’s leadership.

Why did you want to join the board of directors? I have experience as a leader in my local and on the advisory committee. I wanted to be able to be involved in the whole process and help lead the direction of the cooperative by serving on the board.

DISTRICT 8 DIRECTOR SCOTT LAMB

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ow settling into his new leadership role at MMPA, District 8 Director Scott Lamb takes a moment to share a little about himself with fellow dairy farmer member-owners. Lamb previously served as president of the MMPA Mid-Thumb Local, District Secretary, and on the MMPA advisory and resolutions committees. He was also active as a member of St. Clair County Farm Bureau board of directors and St. Clair County Soil Conservation board of directors. Lamb and his wife, Kristie, represented MMPA as Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator runners-up in 2008. The couple has four children: Wyatt, Madyson, Lane and Savannah. A fourth-generation farmer, Lamb owns Lamb Dairy Farm in Jeddo in a partnership with his parents Max and Phyllis. The Lambs milk 300 cows and farm 950 acres.

What do you enjoy most about being a dairy farmer? As a dairy farmer, no two days are the same. I have the opportunity to work with my family and work with animals every day.

What makes your farm unique? I am the fourth generation and so on our farm, it’s my dad, me and my children all working together. My children will be the fifth generation if they, too, decide to farm.

What is the biggest challenge facing dairy farmers? I can think of many challenges in our industry: pricing, input costs, workforce and environmental issues. Yet, I think a major concern is consumer demand and the pressures they place on our farms.

How do you want to best serve MMPA members? I will listen to farmers’ concerns and bring them to my fellow members of the board. I will try to have good answers to their questions. As part of a 100year old cooperative that has been very successful, I am glad to be part of the process.

How do you see the next century of MMPA unfolding? In the next century, I see cooperatives working together more and unifying to accomplish certain goals. We will need to work together to address the challenges of the industry. We’re all in this together. ————— Lamb began serving his term on the MMPA board of directors in March, along with fellow new board members, Doug Chapin and Gertie van den Goor. They join 10 other dairy farmers on the MMPA board of directors, helping guide the direction of the cooperative and setting strategic goals. AUGUST 2016 | MESSENGER

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POWER of the Past. » VISION for the Future.

100 Years IN THREE WORDS BY MELISSA HART

Several leaders, past and present, were asked to offer three characteristics that describe MMPA and here’s what they said: “Integrity, stability and honesty.” – DEANNA STAMP, RETIRED BOARD DIRECTOR

“Trust, transparency and dedication.” – KEN NOBIS, BOARD PRESIDENT

ABOVE: WALT WOSJE AND ELWOOD KIRKPATRICK LEAD THE WAY TO CHEESEMAKING WITH A PARTNERSHIP WITH LEPRINO FOODS. TOP: MCDONALD DAIRY SERVED AS AN OBSTACLE THAT WAS OVERCOME BY A FAITHFUL MEMBERSHIP AND AGGRESSIVE LEADERSHIP.

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MESSENGER | AUGUST 2016

“Progressive, financially sound and member oriented.” – VELMAR GREEN, RETIRED BOARD TREASURER

“Family, honesty and integrity.” – GARY TRIMNER, RETIRED DIRECTOR OF MEMBER SERVICES


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hese powerful words fit the description of the heart and soul of the cooperative that has seen the ups and downs of a volatile industry though one hundred years. Milk prices through the years would make the most thrilling roller coaster look like child’s play and yet Michigan dairy producers have faced unpredictability with sheer determination.

better milk prices. He commented, “The prices were extremely low and the farmers thought that striking would produce a better price. Fortunately, we had probably the greatest leader in Glenn Lake at that time and as president he was very articulate with the members and convinced them that Michigan Milk was fair to everyone.”

Fluid milk consumption began to drop in the early 70s and that proved to trickle down to MMPA with consequences that In 1916, it was no secret the dairy farmers would last a decade. Twin Pines Dairy and of Michigan were in great need of milk United Dairy merged to make Unitedpricing reform. Deciding to take matters Twin Pines Dairy in the early 70s and were into their own hands, they forged a purchasing several million dollars’ worth of milk cooperative that would make the milk from MMPA. When they couldn’t pay production of milk in Michigan a more satisfactory occupation. That fateful Tuesday the bill, MMPA took action. John Dilland, the newly hired controller, commented in May of 1916, the forward thinking, about the havoc that existed as he moved determined group of dairymen made it their business to bargain for their own milk into his new position, “The management commitment made at that time was to price and MMPA was born. continue the pay back the capital retain Past president Jack Barnes wrote, “At that investment by members on the same tenmeeting, (in 1916) the dairy farmers chose year cycle but without a fixed obligation. from their members, a board of directors Members, of course, had to approve this and ever since that first meeting, the change in capital structure at an annual Association has been owned and operated meeting, which they did even after being by its farmer-members. MMPA has been told that some of their certificates of successful because it is owned by dairy indebtedness would be applied against their farmers, services dairy farmers and is share of the allocated loss related to Unitedcontrolled by the dairy farmers it serves.” Twins Pines Dairy.” Dilland continued, With a bargaining association in place, dairy “While no one liked making these changes, MMPA members stepped up and did what producers were set for better days ahead was necessary to save their cooperative. as they moved from being price takers to I have never forgotten that commitment price makers. Leadership was a key role in and the loyalty members showed to their this monumental task and as they moved cooperative.” through the years, the member leadership would provide the one constant needed to McDonald Cooperative Dairy Company face the unforeseen struggles of the Great was another casualty of tanking fluid Depression and beyond. The dairy industry milk sales. MMPA took on the McDonald would survive the depressed decade of the Cooperative’s 800 member’s milk and 30s and move into the war torn years of the struggles ensued. When Walt Wosje took 40s, 50s and 60s. over as General Manager he noted that Former board member and treasurer, Velmar Green was initiated into the cooperative in the late 50s and early 60s when farmers were desperately seeking

while the membership was well organized, the business organization needed some attention and McDonald Dairy was at the top of the list.

MMPA PRESIDENT KEN NOBIS LOOKS TO PASS ON TRANSPARENCY IN LEADERSHIP.

As the new General Manager, Wosje wanted to gain the trust of the membership and began riding along with milk haulers to get to know the producers who entrusted him to manage their milk co-op. Green commented, “There was no one like Walt, he could talk to the farmers in their language.” Wosje moved MMPA out of the milk bottling business and into the cheese making business by selling McDonald Dairy to Country Fresh and entering into a partnership with Leprino Foods. This provided an additional outlet for the large volume of milk that needed to be manufactured. And it provided much needed flexibility in utilization of milk production and helped balance the fluid market requirements. Gary Trimner commented about the leadership styles of Wosje as General Manager and Elwood Kirkpatrick as President, “They were different people with different personalities but very strong leaders and led MMPA very well into the 90s” From the 90s until present day, milk prices continue to be volatile and members continue to be progressive allowing for plant expansions, new technology and adjustments to consumer demands. Trust, transparency and dedication are three words Nobis used to describe MMPA. He concluded, “As the leadership has been transparent for the past one hundred years, I feel a tremendous responsibility to pass that transparent leadership forward to hopefully another hundred years.”

AUGUST 2016 | MESSENGER

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Learning & Engaging IMPROVE EMPLOYEE MANAGEMENT WITH TRAINING AND COMMUNICATION BY ALLISON STUBY

They milk your cows. They monitor your herd’s health. They lend a helping hand where you need it most. They are your employees. They are your partners in providing excellent animal care. While some farms fare with only family workers, many farms rely on outside labor to manage their business. That’s the nature of the 365-day-ayear dairy business.

TOP: MIKE VANPOLEN OBSERVES THE FARM’S HERD. ANIMAL HEALTH IS A KEY COMPONENT OF THE FARM’S WRITTEN CORE PURPOSE, OUTLINED IN THE EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK. OPPOSITE PAGE: FROM LEFT: KEN VANPOLEN, BETH KNOSSEN AND LAURIE VANPOLEN REVIEW THE FARM’S WRITTEN EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK.

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MESSENGER | AUGUST 2016

But how are you managing and training your employees? As the dairy industry grows and changes, it’s increasingly important to ensure employees are welltrained and understand the business they work in. And according to Stan Moore, MSU Extension educator, the key is through building a culture of learning and engaging on the farm. “Have an interest in the growth of that individual as a person and as an employee,” advises Moore. Moore has worked for MSU Extension for 25 years, spending the past five to six years focusing on agriculture human resources across the state. He, along with fellow MSU Extension Educator Phil Durst, conducted a study on employee satisfaction and engagement on dairy farms. Their findings suggest employers need to adopt three key attitudes to best manage their employees. “First, recognize that employees do want to learn more about what they’re doing and contribute to the business,” Moore explained. “Second, they have valuable minds and perspectives. And

finally, employees want to be an asset and want to see your farm succeed.” In practice, some farms implement tactics to better communicate with their employees and promote good work ethic. In Marion, Michigan, VanPolen Farms milks 275 cows and has developed through trial and error the best employee management practices for them. While still very much a family farm, they have four additional employees on staff to help with milking and feeding calves. When VanPolen Farms hires a new employee, they distribute a packet of information including a farm overview, employee handbook and a document describing the core purpose and values of the farm. Laurie VanPolen, who supervises the farm’s milkers, takes the time with each new hire to explain the company’s expectations and employee benefits. Moore affirms the usage of an employee handbook and even developed a template for producers to adapt to


needs of their farm. “I like to see them as a good communication piece. Handbooks help employees understand what policies are on the farm. However, you can’t rely on handbooks completely to communicate,” he advised. Still, Moore offered warnings on including employee discipline information in the handbook to protect the “At-Will” employment status. Farms who add an employee handbook should have their attorney review before implementing. He also recognized the need to have the handbook translated to another language if some employees are not native English speakers. Once employees move into their day-to-day role, good training and explaining the “why” behind procedures helps the process. Moore stressed the need to show employees why protocols are established, good training should address the purpose to each action.

He also noted training should be progressive and help more experienced employees continually improve. The VanPolens have noticed this need on their farm as employees become more comfortable with their job function. “We’ve seen milkers trying to rush the process. But you need to help them understand there is a timing, a method and a purpose for each step,” VanPolen affirmed. “Good employee training allows more consistency in practice to align with good animal care. Your employees are more likely to care if they understand why certain protocols are used and what you want,” Deb Gingrich, MMPA animal care coordinator and member representative, added. Further engaging with employees involves valuing their contributions and recognizing when they go above (Continued on page 22)

National Dairy FARM Program Version 3.0: Employee Training Requirements When the time comes to re-enroll in the FARM program, producers must adhere to additional requirements added in Version 3.0. Such additions include a greater emphasis on employee training, having a documented VeterinarianClient Patient Relationship and updated protocols. The employee training requirement involves documentation of any employee training conducted on or off the farm. The requirement only applies for non-family employees. The FARM Program has developed signature forms to document employee training, but producers can develop their own forms and documents.

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(Continued from page 21) and beyond. Some farms implement incentive programs for their employees when they reach certain goals. VanPolen Farms takes note of their employees’ performance every day and passes out gift cards and other rewards for employees when they put in extra effort. The incentives help employees feel appreciated for their work according to VanPolen. She makes sure to explain to the employee why he or she is given the reward to encourage continued hard work. Moore encourages farms to implement incentive programs by honing in on the goals that move the farm forward. He recommends building an incentives around multiple goals, emphasizing key performance. For example, if a farm has a somatic cell count incentive program, an employee could cut corners to lower their counts with tactics like withholding a high SCC cow’s milk from the tank or culling cows. According to Moore, this creates unintended consequences that ignore the root of the problem. By adding one or two more goals to the program, he finds you may be able to offset the unintended consequences and provide better animal care. Yet above all, VanPolen found the best way to manage her employees is through proper communication. “Communication is key. Be aware of what your employees are doing,” VanPolen expressed. “We have an open line of communication. We make sure they know they can come to us for anything.” And in caring for animals, it’s best everyone is on board with the right ideas and practices to align with the farm’s herd health needs. Employees are caring for the farm’s cows every day, and according to Moore’s research, they want the farm to succeed.

Resources for Employee Training MMPA ANIMAL CARE COORDINATORS • LINDSAY GREEN AT 989-488-8159 • DEB GINGRICH AT 248-520-3580 MMPA MILKER TRAINING AND CALF CARE SCHOOL • MARIANNE GASIEWSKI AT 248-474-6672, EXT. 215 FARM PROGRAM RESOURCE DOCUMENTS • NATIONALDAIRYFARM.COM MERCK DAIRY CARE 365 TRAINING MODULES: • TRAINING.DAIRYCARE365.COM MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY EXTENSION EMPLOYEE HANDBOOK TEMPLATE AND OTHER RESOURCES: • MSUE.ANR.MSU.EDU/TOPIC/DAIRY/BUSINESS_ MANAGEMENT/LABOR_MANAGEMENT

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MESSENGER | AUGUST 2016

Control Butyric Acid and Maximize Every Bite!

SilagePro® with CATALYST

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• 4-day fermentation • 5% more silage at feed-out • Increased rate of fiber digestion tion • Higher starch retention More milk per ton of silage fed

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Over one million tons treated last year alone!

American Farm rm P Products rod ducts ucts Arlin Koglin • 989-553-3370


Dairy Awareness Day at the Capitol BY MELISSA HART

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ll the dairy treats were consumed by the hundreds of people who flocked to get their Three-A-Day bone building snacks during Michigan’s Dairy Awareness Day at the Capitol in June. Celebrating June Dairy Month and Michigan’s dairy industry, MMPA, along with several dairy processors and cooperatives came together under one big tent to give away free dairy treats including cookies, ice cream, cheese, sour cream dips, yogurt and all flavors of ice cold milk. The 14th annual Dairy Awareness Day also included a welcome from Representative Tom Leonard (R-DeWitt) and Senator Curtis Hertel (D-East Lansing) along with a few words from the newest spokesperson for Michigan’s dairy industry, Leah O’Connor. O’Connor, a National Champion runner from Croswell, Michigan graduated from Michigan State

University in 2015 and recently tried out for the Summer Olympics in Rio. While at MSU she was a 12 time Big Ten Champion and a two time NCAA Division I Champion. “I run about 7580 miles a week, I lift weights twice a week and meet with a personal trainer every Monday.” O’Connor has dairy in her family roots and grew up drinking milk at every meal. As a student athlete at MSU she continued to use dairy as a building block to her athletic success. “I eat a lot of yogurt and cheese, actually cheese is my vice.” She continued, “A lot of athletes go to chocolate milk as their post workout recovery drink because it has the perfect balance of carbs, protein and sugar.” O’Connor has been injury free since she began her running career and attributes that not only to great coaching and a running regime that allowed her to slowly get stronger but also to her parents who provided

solid meals growing up. “I came from a family of six kids and we ate what was on the table and that was usually steak, potatoes, sometimes pasta and milk.” O’Connor said in college she put her body through the wringer but she was able to stay injury free and she attributes that to her parents’ guidance on a healthy diet including an ample supply of dairy products, “I thank my parents a lot for setting me up for success in that area.” Enjoying free ice cream, Jeff Haarer has made this an annual stop in June. “Every year I come out and enjoy what the dairy industry provides for all of us who work in downtown Lansing.” He said, “I love supporting Michigan’s dairy farmers.” The Michigan Dairy Foods Association (MDFA), a trade and membership service organization representing the nearly 90 dairy processing plants located across the state has sponsored and organized the annual event for more than 20 years.

LEFT: PRESIDENT KEN NOBIS VISITS WITH CONSUMERS AT DAIRY AWARENESS DAY. MMPA FLUID SALES ACCOUNT MANAGER NICK PIERSCINSKI MANNED THE MMPA BOOTH, PASSING OUT BUTTER COOKIES. TOP: MICHIGAN DAIRY AMBASSADORS WERE ON HAND TO PROMOTE AND EDUCATE CONSUMERS ABOUT THE DAIRY INDUSTRY WITH LEAH O’CONNOR. FROM LEFT: CHARLIE MCALVEY, KRISTEN BURKHARDT, LEAH O’CONNOR AND SUZANNA HULL.

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YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

Working in Schools to Build Lifelong Dairy Consumers

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tudents may be out of school for the summer, but the United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM) continues to connect with schools on dairy farmers’ behalf. There have been many changes in school meals since the Healthy Hungry Free Kids Act began in 2010, but milk is still required to be offered at breakfast and lunch. Increasing school breakfast and lunch participation remains top priority for the UDIM School Team. The checkoff has promoted dairy in school meals through the following programs: During the 2015-2016 school year, promotion dollars supported Breakfast in the Classroom grants for three schools in Michigan. Getting breakfast service out of the cafeteria and into more convenient locations is a great way to increase participation. Tim Forton, food service director at St. Johns Public Schools said, “The biggest success is that now we have documented success to propose Breakfast in the Classroom in other schools in the district. Not only do more students eat breakfast, but free and reduced students make up nearly 70 percent of the new participation.” Forty-six schools were provided blenders to add smoothies to their breakfast menus. This was a great success in many of the schools. Hartland Consolidated Schools saw an 8 percent increase in their breakfast participation at the high school by serving smoothies. Almost 54,000 pounds of yogurt was purchased by these schools to make smoothies. UDIM hosted three farm tours for school food service professionals this past school year. In November, over 30 people toured a processing plant and a nearby dairy farm. In May, 15 school food service directors from Macomb

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County toured the Reid family dairy farm. The third tour took 30 people to Vanderploeg Dairy in June. Participants were very interested in seeing first hand where their school milk comes from. Will Farkas from Genesee ISD said “Thank you so much for the tour, I would again like to express how much I enjoyed the tour and how friendly and knowledgeable all the staff were. I’ve been telling as many people as will listen about the experience. Thank you again, it was worth the half day!” During National School Breakfast Week in March, we supported the food service efforts by providing a sticker that read, “You can’t be a champion without breakfast.” Food service directors responded well to these and asked to use the stickers in their in-school promotions. Looking ahead to the upcoming school year, more collaboration with schools is planned. Schools will receive a number of promotional materials to kick off the school year, including two posters

to hang in their cafeterias. One poster features two Michigan high school engineering teams and promotes the importance of eating breakfast to be ready to learn. The second poster features one of six Michigan dairy farm families. The schools will receive the poster of the farm family located nearest to their school district in an effort to promote that milk in Michigan is local. Schools will also receive materials to promote smoothies in their schools, including popular recipes from schools that received the smoothie grant last year and a shopping list of smoothie ingredients. The back-to-school kit also includes information about promoting chocolate milk and information on the fall promotion for National School Lunch Week in October. If you have any questions about schools or see an opportunity in your local district, please email Emily at emily@ milkmeansmore.org

BELOW: SCHOOL FOOD SERVICE DIRECTORS SAW FIRSTHAND HOW DAIRY FARMERS CARE FOR THEIR ANIMALS AND PROVIDE SAFE, WHOLESOME DAIRY PRODUCTS THEY CAN SERVE THEIR STUDENTS.


MERCHANDISE

Milk Hose and Vacuum Tubing The Merchandise Department can fulfill most milking or vacuum hose needs. The warehouse stocks various kinds of Transflow tygon and black rubber hoses. “Cut to order” lengths can be special ordered in a variety of materials.

Tygon-Milk and Vacuum Tubing Saint-Gobain makes the Transflow M34R milk tubing. It is clear with a blue stripe and comes in numerous inside diameter sizes. Transflow vacuum tubing is available in black with a white stripe or clear with a black stripe. It can be purchased as single or twin inside diameter (ID) sizes. TYGON IN STOCK ID size Stock # 5/8” 5185 9/16” 5187

ID size Stock # 1/2" 5186 3/4" 4138

Special order sizes include: 7/16” through 4”

TRANSFLOW VACUUM TUBING IN STOCK: ID sizes include: Stock # Twin 9/32” clear 4129 9/32” black 4188

Both are stocked and sold in a 100’ roll only. Our vendor will custom cut tubing if requested for an additional charge. Other sizes are also available through special order. SILICONE TUBING:

The warehouse stocks 5/8” silicone tubing in the 100’ roll. Other sizes and special cuts are available through special order. ID size 5/8”

Stock # 4114

BLACK RUBBER IN STOCK: ID size Stock # 5/8” x 50' 5423 5/8” x 54' 1182 7/16” x 7.5' 5180 Stanchion Hose

Chemical, Sanitizer and Teat Dip Contact Information These are service personnel only. Order your Member Merchandise supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24 -Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026 For Service, call the Ecolab Service Message Center 1-800-392-3392 or one of the following service representatives: Ben Johnson 4461 Cambridge Dr. Port Huron, MI 48060 810-824-0636

ULTRA CLEAN BLACK RUBBER:

Ultra Clean tubing from Milk Rite has a rubber exterior with a white flexible liner. It is available in a 65’ roll only and cannot be custom cut. ID size Stock # 5/8" 5183 3/4" 5184

Many other sizes are also available through our vendors and can be custom cut. Prices do vary so be sure to call the merchandise warehouse for pricing. Measure the inside diameter of the hose to best determine the size you need. It is helpful to cut the end off of the hose so you are not measuring hose that has been stretched. This will give a more accurate measurement and avoid ordering the wrong size hose.

Pat Mitchell 7273 N. Rollin Hwy. Addison, MI 49220 517-403-0928

If you wish to order milk hose or vacuum tubing, please contact the merchandise warehouse.

Three Ways to Order your MMPA Merchandise 1. Place order through your milk hauler 2. Call in your order:

Duane Farmer, Supervisor......................................................989-317-8370

Toll Free..................................................................................... 877-367-6455

Orders (Novi)..................................................... 800-572-5824 then dial 2

3. Fax in your order:

MMPA Merchandise fax........................................................... 989-317-8372

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PREMIUMS MERCHANDISE

MMPA Quality Premium Program

MMPA Member Testing Fees

Somatic Cell Count premiums and deductions (in addition to Federal Order SCC Adjustments computed in the producer pay price) will be paid at the following levels:

Payment for testing will be made through an automatic milk check deduction. All costs are listed per individual sample.

50,000 or below............ +55¢/cwt.

201,000-225,000........... +20¢/cwt.

51,000-75,000................+50¢/cwt.

226,000-250,000............+15¢/cwt.

76,000-100,000.............+45¢/cwt.

251,000-300,000...........+00¢/cwt.

101,000-125,000.............+40¢/cwt.

301,000-400,000..........- 30¢/cwt.

126,000-150,000........... +35¢/cwt.

401,000-500,000........ -$1.00/cwt.

151,000-175,000.............+30¢/cwt.

501,000-600,000.........-$1.50/cwt.

176,000-200,000.......... +25¢/cwt.

601,000 and greater.. -$2.00/cwt.

Cow Tests: $1 Cow samples may be tested for: Culture for Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep non ag, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staph, gram negative and/or SCC. Additional testing can be coordinated through your MMPA member representative to include:

A payment of 5¢/cwt. will be added for each of the following, if the count is equal to or below: • 10,000 Raw Bacteria Count • 20,000 Pre-Incubated (PI) Count

Raw bacteria count and components.

There will be a deduction of 10¢/cwt. for: • Greater than 100,000 Raw Bacteria Count A high raw count deduction will be waived if the producer has received the quality premium the previous three months for raw bacteria count.

All costs are listed per individual sample.

To qualify for Raw and PI Bacteria Count premiums there must not be any of the following during the month: • Positive drug residue • Abnormal freeze points • High load count shipment or rejected load shipment • #3 or #4 sediment • Raw Bacteria count over 100,000 The count levels for raw and PI will be determined on one test run per month. To qualify for MMPA SCC premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month To qualify for MMPA volume premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month • An average somatic cell count of 350,000 or less

All herd tests must be scheduled with the laboratory through your MMPA member representative.

Additional Tests Available: • Mycoplasma Cultures...........................................................................$13 • Bacteriology Cultures...........................................................................$15 – Includes identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility.

• Bovine Viral Diarrhea - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA........................................................................................................$6 • Johne’s Milk Test - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Bovine Leukosis Test - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Milk Pregnancy ELISA.................................................................... $4.50 Lab test results by mail: $2/month All tests must be scheduled through your MMPA member representative or the laboratory for proper sample submission protocol.

ANTEL-BIO TESTING Loc/Hlr/Producer # _________________________________ Sample Date______________________________ Member name_______________________________________________________________________________ Sample ID__________________________________________________________________________________ BLV ELISA__________ Johne’s ELISA____________ Johne’s PCR____________ Pregnancy_____________

Refer to above for current pricing. The cost of testing is the responsibility of the producer. This card MUST be filled out completely when sending in samples to be tested by Antel-Bio to avoid potential service charges.

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POLICIES MERCHANDISE

MMPA Policy on Drug Residue in Milk MILK ON FARM – DRUG RESIDUE SUSPECTED

MILK SHIPPED — POSITIVE DRUGS CONFIRMED

If a member suspects milk in the farm bulk tank contains drug residue:

If a member ships milk from the farm and testing by approved laboratory methods show that the milk contained drug residue, the member will be assessed the penalties imposed by the state regulatory agency and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums.

1. Call a MMPA member representative to have the milk in the tank tested. A “hold” must be placed on the tank contents until the test results are known.

OR 2. The member can test the milk on the farm. If dumped, the member must be sure to take the stick reading, record the number of pounds of milk and report the information to their member representative. • If the tank tests negative (no drugs present), the milk JUNE be released and shipped. • If the tank tests positive (drugs present), the member representative will authorize the member to dump the tank of milk. The member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* • If for any reason MMPA personnel must pick up samples at the farm for testing three or more times within 12 consecutive months, the member involved will be charged $25 per trip.

If a loss is incurred by MMPA due to the disposal and/or non-marketability of a load of milk or milk products containing drug residue, then the member responsible will be provided an invoice for the entire value of the loss plus transportation and disposal costs as required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. This invoice JUNE be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. Milk from that member’s farm tank must be tested and found clear of drugs before the next tank of milk can be picked up. A hauler whose entire load sample shows the presence of drugs will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all show negative.

ALL POSITIVE DRUG RESIDUE SHIPMENTS MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

MMPA Milk Quality Policy QUALITY QUESTIONABLE When a member suspects that the milk in the farm bulk tank is of poor quality they should call a MMPA member representative who will authorize milk in the tank to be dumped. If the member dumps the milk on their own, they must be sure to take the stick reading and record the number of pounds of milk, and report the information to the member representative. If the milk is dumped, the member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* In order to receive payment for an added water voluntary dump, the member must install a Swingline Safety Switch. The Swingline Safety Switch can be ordered from the Mt. Pleasant warehouse. The MMPA member representative will verify the switch has been installed. Reimbursement for the Swingline Safety Switch and the voluntary dump will then be made to the member. The member assumes all liability for losses incurred as a result of shipping poor quality or contaminated milk.

MILK SHIPPED – HIGH BACTERIA COUNT

If… 1. a load of milk is received (unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. a sample from the load has a bacteria count of 300,000 or more and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members having a bacteria count of 300,000 or more, then the member or members involved will be charged the value of one-half of one day’s production** and will be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums. * The member will only be paid for two (2) voluntary dumps in a rolling 12 month period. ** For members using more than one bulk tank, the assessment will be based on the value of milk in the tank or tanks in violation of the MMPA quality policy.

REJECTED LOAD SHIPMENT

If… 1. a load of milk is rejected (not unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. the milk cannot be sold through normal Grade A channels for reasons of quality which results in the load being sold or disposed of at a loss to MMPA, and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members that caused the contamination or rejection of the load, then, the member or members responsible will be charged the full value of the loss to MMPA plus transportation and disposal costs, and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums except for loads rejected for temperature. 4. MMPA will provide an invoice to the member for the amount of the loss, to be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. If a member has three or more occurrences within 12 consecutive months, that member must appear before the MMPA board of directors to review steps taken on the farm to correct the quality problem which will enable MMPA to continue to market the milk for this member.

HAULER A hauler whose entire load sample exceeds 300,000 cells per mL bacteria count will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all are less than 100,000. A hauler will be responsible for all costs incurred by MMPA for loads rejected for temperature. Charges and assessments made under this program will be withheld from milk checks of members or haulers involved.

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FREELINERS To place your freeliner, please fax your ad to 248-426-3412 or email your ad to Muszynski@mimilk.com.

Bulls Registered Holstein Bulls: We now have a nice selection of service age bulls, sired by top AI sires. Green Meadow Farms, Elsie, MI. 989-862-4291 or visit www.greenmeadowfarms.com. Service age Holstein bulls. Call Steve Alexander, 810-622-8548 evenings or 810-404-8548. Registered Holstein breeding bulls, all AI sired from top bulls, b&w, red, red carrier and some polled, high production, low SCC herd. Bulls are priced to sell. Ver Hage Holsteins, 269-673-4886 or 269-217-6076, ask for Tim. www.verhageholsteins.com.

Equipment John Deere 3950 chopper, long tongue, middle alert, 2-row 30-in. corn head, 7-ft. hay head, $3,250 obo. 517-610-4594. Extra John Deere 7-ft. hay head, $1,000. 517-610-4594. Circle-C Model RT 8000 super conditioner, air adjust tension on rolls, 8-ft. pick-up, $4,850 obo. 517-610-4594.

H&S Hydraulic Drive Feed Wagon on H&S 14-ton trailer, $1,500. Also H&S 500 Forage Box for parts, bad floor, $500 obo. 989-848-5541 (no Sunday calls). Harvestore Roller Mill 3-phase 3hp $1,000 new rolls. Goliath 20' silo unloader 7.5hp 3-phase $4,000 Alliance 20' unloader w oiler 15hp 3-phase $10,000. 30'x16" Harvestore belt conveyor $500. Val-metal 170 cu ft. stationary chain mixer 3hp 3-phase $4,500. Case IH 600 forage blower excellent condition $5,000. 989-297-1850. New Holland 240 forage chopper with KP, hay head & 3-row corn head, field ready, excellent condition, always housed, $42,000 obo. 989-345-1501.

Freeliner Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise—at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be

Misc.

published for no more than

Corn Silage, Haylage, Snaplage and 4 x 5 net wrapped round bales for sale. Delivery available. 231-250-8592.

(one month, unless otherwise

Wanted Metatron 12 milk meters and concrete bunker silo in good condition. 269-275-5323.

two consecutive months requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. • It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office. • Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member. • If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line Classified Ad rate. • Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding the desired month of publication. Example: To be included in the September issue, the freeliner must be at the MMPA office by August 10.

28

MESSENGER | AUGUST 2016


CLASSIFIED ADS

Cost for classifieds is $20 per ad, up to six lines. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month before the month of desired publication. Send check or money order for $20 for up to 6 lines with your order. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Messenger. You may submit your ads by: MAIL:

Classified Ads | Michigan Milk Messenger

P.O. BOX 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002

EMAIL: Muszynski@mimilk.com FAX: 248-426-3412

OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can fix your scabbled floors. Diamond sawed grooves, no hammering or cracking of concrete. No hoof damage. Call Opperman Grooving Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381. DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING, INC: NO water needed. Wider, rougher grooves for better traction. We also

FOR SALE: 5000-4000-3000-25002000-1500 OH MUELLER LATE MODEL BULK TANK MILK TANKS, complete, will trade. 1-800-558-0112. WANTED TO BUY: USED BULK MILK TANKS, 200 gallons & larger, Sunset & Mueller, 1-800-558-0112. DRY HAY & STRAW (large & small bales) & BARLEY FOR FEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. 3 operators will travel Michigan and other states. No interest payment terms. Est. since 1987. Call 1-800-365-3361. CONCRETE GROOVING BY TRISTATE SCABBLING, home of the 2” wide groove. Best traction, lowest prices. (800) 554-2288. www. tristatescabbling.com A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR COWS UPRIGHT! Concrete grooving/ texturing provides high quality traction in new & old concrete, fast service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC.

FARMERS: INCREASE YIELDS 7 PROFIT by using the 1# crop production system. Distributors needed. 260-768-8137 ext. 1 BARN WHITE WASHING AND CLEANING WITH HIGH PRESSURE AIR: Serving all Michigan and Indiana. Miller Spray Service, Inc. 574-825-9776. BARN WHITE WASHING: SCHOLTEN SPRAYING SERVICES. 616-895-6307. Allendale

PTO and Automatic Start Generators

1971 KENWORTH TANDEM AXLE, V903 CUMMINS DIESEL ENGINE, 15 speed transmission, aluminum cab/ fiberglass hood. 1972 FREUHAUF 24 FT. ALUMINUM TRI-AXLE DUMP TRAILER. $10,000. 989-593-2488.

1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419 www.hamiltondist.com

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BULLS OVER 100 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR YOUR SELECTION! A special herd sire or a truck load of breeder bulls. Ready to go to work on your farm!

• Sired by the top sires from the U.S. and Canada • From our top production cows

GREEN MEADOW FARMS 6400 Hollister Road, Elsie, MI 48831 Phone: 989-862-4291

www.greenmeadowfarms.com

Concrete Grooving and Texturing Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202 Cell: 1-716-353-1137

AUGUST 2016 | MESSENGER

29


MARKET REPORT

Statistical Summary | FOR MILK MARKETED IN JUNE 2016 Market Statistics - Mideast Federal Order #33 (pounds)

% This Month Year Ago Change

National Trends* (million pounds)

2016

2015 % Change

Total Class 1 Sales

483,005,691

484,648,540

-0.34

Production

Total Class 2 Sales

253,884,323

349,567,402

-27.37

California

3,363

3,396

-1.0

Total Class 3 Sales

630,741,018

331,184,579

+90.45

Wisconsin

2,543

2,451

+3.8

Total Class 4 Sales

280,273,909

268,964,800

+4.20

Total Production

1,647,904,941

1,434,365,321

+14.89

New York

1,249

1,199

+4.2

Idaho

1,223

1,195

+2.3

Pennsylvania

914

909

+0.6

Michigan

918

871

+5.4

Texas

880

848

+3.8

Minnesota

813

796

+2.1

New Mexico

634

657

-3.5

Washington

553

553

+0.0

Ohio

466

460

+1.3

Indiana

337

330

+2.1

Class 1 Utilization

29.3%

33.8%

Mideast Federal Order #33 Total Producers........................................................................................................ 5,336 Avg. Daily Production per farm..................................................................... 10,294 Avg. Protein Test....................................................................................................3.02% Avg. Butterfat Test................................................................................................3.60% Avg. Oth Solids Test.............................................................................................6.05% Avg. SCC - MMPA.............................................................................................. 172,000

Component Pricing Information Mideast Federal Order #33

Total U.S.*

16,655 16,397

+1.6

Butterfat Price /lb.............................................................................................$2.4109

U.S. Y-T-D*

100,565 98,870

+1.7

Other Solids Price /lb.....................................................................................$0.0628

* For 23 States

Protein Price /lb................................................................................................. $1.4807

Class III Price @ 3.5%.......................................................................................... $13.22 Prod. Price Diff /cwt. - Mich Mkt.....................................................................$0.75 Uniform Price at 3.51........................................................................................... $13.97 SCC Adjustment /cwt /1000...................................................................$0.00072

AMS Survey Prices Product

Monthly Avg

Cheese /lb................................................................................................................. 1.6231 Butter /lb................................................................................................................. 2.3245 Nonfat Dry Milk /lb............................................................................................ 0.8428 Dry Whey /lb........................................................................................................0.2745

30

MESSENGER | August 2016


MMPA STAFF MERCHANDISE

MMPA Field Staff*

Novi Headquarters

Northwest Area Supervisor Ben Chapin, Blanchard......................................989-289-0731

Main Office Local line...................................................... 248-474-6672 Toll free......................................................... 800-572-5824

Energy Auditor Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI................................906-250-0337

General Manager Joe Diglio................................................................ ext. 200

Animal Care Coordinator Deb Gingrich, Leroy...........................................248-520-3580

Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys......................................................... ext. 240

Lyndsay Earl, Ludington.....................................231-519-2455

Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt..................................................... ext. 208

Sarah Michalek, Portland...................................248-305-0537 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard.................................. 248-756-2062

Northeast Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Fairgrove.............................248-513-7920 Animal Care Coordinator, Energy Auditor Lindsay Green, East Lansing...............................989-488-8159 Ben Butcher, Durand.........................................248-514-5273 Ashley Herriman, Alpena...................................269-245-6632 Bridget Moore, Snover......................................231-414-4539

South Area Supervisor & Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers....................................269-967-7351 Krista Beeker, Topeka, IN...................................269-986-6792 Dave Brady, Grass Lake..... 517-522-5965 or (c) 517-937-9061 Elyse Martin, Charlotte......................................810-701-6460 Joe Packard, Kalamazoo....................................248-520-3481 Emily Smith, Bronson.........................................269-535-0822

Quality Amandeep Dhillon.................................................. ext. 305

Officers

Manufactured Product Sales Jim Dodson............................................................. ext. 229

Mark Halbert, Vice President

Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula........................................................... ext. 219

Joe Diglio, GM / Secretary

Member Services Dean Letter................................................... 989-289-9251

Todd Hoppe, General Counsel

Milk Sales/Dispatch Carl Rasch............................................................... ext. 244

Directors-At-Large

Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt.................................................... ext. 210 Management Information Systems Gregory Schulkey.................................................... ext. 237 Andrew Caldwell.....................................................ext. 304 Communications Allison Stuby........................................................... ext. 296 Human Resources Cindy Tilden........................................................... ext. 220 Member Relations Jessica Welch.......................................................... ext. 303

Other Services Bulk Tank Calibration John Lehman, Elsie............................................248-444-6775 Mastitis Management Specialist Steve Lehman, Ithaca....... 989-875-3441 or (c) 989-330-1638 Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson, Coleman.....................................989-289-9686

Manufacturing Plants Constantine Dave Davis, Plant Manager............................ 269-435-2835 Ovid Colt Johnson, Plant Manager........................ 989-834-2221

MMPA Labs In Michigan....................................................800-572-5824 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)..................... 989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.).........800-391-7560

Main Line......................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free............................................................ 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)..................................800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax................................................................... 989-317-8372

Eric Frahm, Treasurer

Josep Barenys, Asst. Treasurer

Ken Nobis, St. Johns 989-224-6170 or 248-474-6672, ext. 201 Rodney Daniels, Whittemore 989-756-4935 Gertie van den Goor, Marlette 989-550-8453 Mark Halbert, Battle Creek 269-964-0511 James Reid, Jeddo 810-327-6830 District Directors 1. Hank Choate Cement City 517-529-9032 2. Tim Hood Paw Paw 269-657-5771 3. David Pyle Zeeland 616-772-1512

5. Doug Chapin Remus 231-972-0535

Toll Free 800-233-2405

Supervisor: Duane Farmer

Ken Nobis, President

4. Corby Werth Alpena 989-464-5436

Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.)

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant

Board of Directors

*If you are unable to reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area.

6. Tony Jandernoa Fowler 989-593-2224 7. Eric Frahm Frankenmuth 989-652-3552 8. Scott Lamb Jeddo 810-327-6135

August 2016 | MESSENGER

31



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