Michigan Milk Messenger: November 2016

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Michigan 2015 Milk

T H E O F F I C I A L P U B L I C AT I O N O F M I C H I G A N M I L K P R O D U C E R S A S S O C I AT I O N

VOL. 99 | ISSUE 5 | NOVEMBER 2016

BRING in the

CHEESE!

MMPA ENTERS CHEESE MAKING BUSINESS WITH PURCHASE OF INDIANA’S DEUTSCH KÄSE HAUS

mimilk.com


F O S N O T

O T S N O REAS

R M B R U O NT

PLA

Dan Rice Dairy Producer

Randy Thimm Pioneer Sales Professional

INTEGRATED FEED SOLUTIONS

Pioneer.com/BMR

PIONEER® brand products are provided subject to the terms and conditions of purchase which are part of the labeling and purchase documents. ® TM SM , , Trademarks and service marks of DuPont, Pioneer or their respective owners. © 2016 PHII. DUPPFO16017_VA R1_110116_MMM

SUPERIOR TONNAGE AND STARCH

HIGHER FIBER DIGESTIBILITY


NOVEMBER 2016 FEATURES

On the Cover

14 | DAIRYING WITH FLEXIBILITY

Tolan. The Ossineke, Michigan couple navigate the needs of the dairy business through planning and adaptability.

Colby, Amish creamery and garden vegetable are three of the award-winning types of cheeses

The 2016 OYDC Runners-Up are Dave and Gretchen

18 | BRING IN THE CHEESE!

Joining MMPA’s product portfolio is cheese through the purchase of the Deutsch Käse Haus. The cheese

made at the Deutsch Käse Haus.

plant is located in the heart of Amish Country in

Read more about the plant and

northern Indiana.

cheese making process on page 18. ROAD LESS TRAVELED 24 | THE FORGED BY GREAT LEADERS

Through one century as a cooperative serving dairy farmers, MMPA has been directed by progressive leaders in the general manager’s office.

Michigan Milk Producers Association (MMPA), established in 1916, is a member owned and operated dairy cooperative serving approximately 2,000 dairy farmers in Michigan, Indiana, Wisconsin and Ohio.

NOVEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

3


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CONTENTS 6

MMPA MATTERS A “Better, But Tenuous” Global Dairy Outlook

8

QUALITY WATCH

Bulk Tank Calibration

10 13 16

NEWS & VIEWS

MMPA Farms Participate in Indiana Bicentennial Celebration and Dairy Trail

26

LEGISLATIVE WATCH CARRYING THE TORCH THROUGH THE BICENTENNIAL WITH DAIRY

MICHIGAN DAIRY AMBASSADOR PROGRAM GEARING UP FOR 2017

“Odds are that the first settlers in Indiana had cows. And if not the first, definitely the second!” — INDIANA DIRECTOR OF AGRICULTURE, TED MCKINNEY (PAGE 16)

DEPARTMENTS 29 MERCHANDISE 30

QUALITY PREMIUMS

31 POLICIES 32 FREELINERS

27 28

WORLD DAIRY EXPO 2016 YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

34

Opening the Farm Gate to Influencers

35 STAFF

33 CLASSIFIEDS MARKET REPORT

MMPA CORE VALUES: » QUALITY » INTEGRITY » PROGRESS » LEADERSHIP » COMMUNITY Managing Editor................................................ Sheila Burkhardt Editor...............................................................................Allison Stuby Advertising Manager......................................Nancy Muszynski Circulation.......................................................................................2,814 An Equal Opportunity Employer – F/M/V/D Michigan Milk Messenger (USPS 345-320) is the official publication of Michigan Milk Producers Association, published monthly since June 1919. Subscriptions: MMPA members, 50¢ per year; non-members, $5 per year.

41310 Bridge Street P.O. Box 8002 Novi, MI 48376-8002

p: 248-474-6672 f: 248-474-0924 w: www.mimilk.com

Periodical postage paid at Novi, MI and at additional offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Michigan Milk Messenger, PO Box 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002. (ISSN 0026-2315)

NOVEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

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MMPA MATTERS

A “Better, But Tenuous” Global Dairy Outlook BY KEN NOBIS, PRESIDENT

The U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) fall board meeting was held in mid-October. As a board member, I found this meeting to be significant not only because of the information shared, but also because it was the last board meeting with Tom Suber at the helm. Tom became the first President of USDEC when it was formed in 1995, a time when our dairy exports rarely – if ever – exceeded 3.5 percent of U.S. milk production. U.S. dairy leaders recognized, though, that global dairy trade was positioned for growth and that our dairy industry could be a part of this opportunity. USDEC was developed as a method of making this effort a priority. With Tom’s leadership, USDEC has reached a membership of over 120 and still growing. Members include dairy cooperatives, processors and other business entities. Dairy exports have grown from that 3.5 percent level to as high as 16 percent. The USDEC team is highly motivated to help the U.S. dairy industry export even greater quantities of the milk we produce. Tom’s leadership has been a critical factor in the strides our industry has made, and he leaves us in a strong position for future growth.

“Dairy prices outside the U.S. have now begun to increase and are headed towards alignment with U.S. prices. Also, U.S. dairy exports are beginning to grow once again in spite of the U.S. dollar’s strength, indicating that supply and demand are showing signs of heading toward a balanced position.”

The agendas at these semi-annual USDEC board meetings focus on the past, present and future. The list of presenters is always impressive, and the subjects are always pertinent to our industry. I would like to touch on a few from this meeting. The dairy economic outlook provided by Tom Bailey, Senior Dairy Analyst at Rabobank, a global leader in food and agricultural financing, is a good place to start. We have witnessed a slight decline in U.S. exports in the last year with the challenge of much lower pricing of dairy products coming out of the European Union and New Zealand. Dairy prices outside the U.S. have now begun to increase and are headed towards alignment with U.S. prices. Also, U.S. dairy exports are beginning to grow once again in spite of the U.S. dollar’s strength, indicating that supply and demand are showing signs of heading toward a balanced position. As part of Rabobank’s outlook, they noted that six of the seven major dairy production areas of the globe are witnessing a decline in milk production, with the U.S. being the exception. U.S. production is predicted to grow by about 1.5 percent in the coming year, due to cheaper feed here. The U.S. dollar is expected to remain strong, which presents an added challenge for exports from our country and is a factor that places limits on price enhancement. Global inventories of dairy products and a “wobbly” global economy also limit a strengthening price scenario for our product. The bottom line message for dairy was, “better, but tenuous.” Other presenters included Michael Morrell, former Deputy Director of the C.I.A., whose comments about national security were not conducive to a good night’s sleep. David Mahon, managing director and chief investment officer of Mahon China Investment Management Ltd., has lived in China since 1984. His firsthand knowledge of the inner workings of China was extremely valuable. U.S. Trade Ambassador Michael Froman is still positive about the passage of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, and I hope he’s right. Mathew Dowd, ABC news commentator and campaign strategist is an independent who has worked with candidates on both sides of the political aisle. His message focused on “how to move forward in an era of profound confusion and disconnection.” These and other presentations provided me with valuable information too vast to include in a single column. If you would like to discuss these topics or others, please do not hesitate to contact me at any time.

6

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016



QUALITY WATCH

Calibration of Bulk Milk Tanks BY JOHN LEHMAN, BULK TANK CALIBRATOR

As a recent addition to the MMPA member services department, I bring experience as a milk hauler and former member dairy farmer to the team. I hope to serve members in an area often overlooked: bulk milk tank weight measurements. What conditions would require a bulk tank calibration? If a new bulk tank is installed, if a tank has been moved or if a routine check of calibration is needed, your bulk tank needs to be calibrated. Any time a new or used tank is installed at a new location it needs to be checked to confirm the measuring device (whether a graduated internal rod or external sight tube) is accurately representing the volume of milk in the tank. This measurement is then compared to a chart unique to each tank which the hauler uses to convert the measurement to weight, which is how producers are paid for milk volume.

“If a new bulk tank is installed, if a tank has been moved, or if a routine check of calibration is needed, your bulk tank needs to be calibrated.�

Another reason for tank calibration is if a tank has been moved within a location such as for milkhouse renovation or to make room for multiple tanks. Also, if a tank has been involuntarily moved by a wayward animal, vehicle or implement, a calibration check is necessary to ensure the weight being recorded is still accurate. Perhaps the most common reason for calibration is the routine tank verification which is a spot check of tank measuring accuracy done at regular intervals of time to compensate for settling or erosion of milkhouse floors and/or tank leg footings. Some processers are also requesting that tanks are checked regularly to verify the weights recorded on the hauler’s manifest correspond (within specified tolerance) to the weights received at the plants. The calibration procedure involves pumping predetermined volumes of water through a verified meter into the empty tank and comparing the weights computed from the measuring device and chart to the meter weights at various levels to determine tank measuring accuracy. If the tank reading does not match the meter reading, it is most desirable to adjust tank legs to make the tank read to the existing chart. However, in case of extreme differences, limited tank movement or missing chart, a new chart can be generated by a complete bottom to top calibration involving taking metered readings at specified intervals throughout the tank profile. These measuring points are then entered into a computer program which fills in the increments between each point and prints the individual tank chart for use by the hauler to convert tank measurement to weight. Another important consideration when calibrating tanks is the proper washing and sanitizing of the tank following the calibration procedure prior to the next use of the tank to cool and store milk. While it can be a challenge to schedule a time for a tank calibration, with cooperation of producer, hauler and calibrator, it can usually be accomplished in a timely manner with the end result being an accurate measurement of milk each shipment. Please remember that when a calibration is due, it is not just an interruption of the routine activities, it is to be sure each producer is properly credited for the volume of milk shipped from each individual tank.

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MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016


Change is coming. Will you be ready? ready? BeginningJanuary January1,1,2017, 2017, Beginning Veterinary Feed FeedDirective Directiveorder ordermust mustbe be a Veterinary presented to to purchase purchasefeeds feedscontaining: containing: presented Established Established drug drugname name Chlortetracycline Chlortetracycline(CTC) (CTC) Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine/Penicillin Chlortetracycline/Sulfamethazine/Penicillin Hygromycin Hygromycin BB Lincomycin Lincomycin Oxytetracycline Oxytetracycline (OTC) (OTC) Oxytetracycline/Neomycin Oxytetracycline/Neomycin Penicillin Penicillin Sulfadimethoxine/Ormetoprim Sulfadimethoxine/Ormetoprim Tylosin Tylosin Tylosin/Sulfamethazine Tylosin/Sulfamethazine Virginiamycin Virginiamycin

Examples Examplesofofproprietary proprietarydrug drugname(s) name(s) Aureomycin, Chlorachel, ChlorMax, Aureomycin,CLTC, CLTC,CTC, CTC,Chloratet, Chloratet, Chlorachel, ChlorMax, Chlortetracycline, Pennchlor, PfiPfi chlor Chlortetracycline,Deracin, Deracin,Inchlor, Inchlor, Pennchlor, chlor Aureo SS AureoS,S,Aureomix AureomixS,S,Pennchlor Pennchlor Aureomix clor SP,SP, Pennchlor SP,SP, ChlorMax SPSP Aureomix500, 500,Chlorachel/Pfi Chlorachel/Pfi clor Pennchlor ChlorMax Hygromix Hygromix Lincomix Lincomix TM, Terramycin TM,OXTC, OXTC,Oxytetracycline, Oxytetracycline,Pennox, Pennox, Terramycin Neo-Oxy, Neo-Oxy,Neo-Terramycin Neo-Terramycin Penicillin, Penicillin Penicillin, PenicillinGGProcaine Procaine Rofenaid, Romet Rofenaid, Romet Tylan, Tylan,Tylosin, Tylosin,Tylovet Tylovet Tylan Sulfa G, Tylan Tylosin Plus Sulfamethazine Tylan Sulfa G, TylanPlus PlusSulfa SulfaG,G, Tylosin Plus Sulfamethazine Stafac, Stafac,Virginiamycin, Virginiamycin,V-Max V-Max

Tilmicosin or,or,Nufl or) currently require a VFD order. Tilmicosin (Pulmotil,Tilmovet), (Pulmotil,Tilmovet),Avilamycin Avilamycin(Kavault), (Kavault),Florfenicol Florfenicol(Aquafl (Aquafl Nufl or) currently require a VFD order.

www.michigan.gov/vfd www.michigan.gov/vfd www.michigan.gov/vfd


NEWS & VIEWS

NEWS & VIEWS

Class Pricing Dips Slightly The USDA announced last week that the September Class III price was $16.39 per hundredweight, a drop of $0.52 from August. The Class IV Price was $14.25 per hundredweight, down $0.40.

Producers Scoring 95 Percent or More on Grade A Surveys and Federal Check Ratings Many Blessings Dairy Inc * Englebrecht Farms LLC* Lundberg Bros Inc.* Powers Dairy Farm LLC Larsen Farms Stakenas Farms Inc.* Richard Papes Dewey Farm LLC Arlyn Walt J-Max LLC Slater Farms Baseline LLC E-D Farms Ron Diehl Brad / Nicole Wren* Mark Ramer Keith / Emily Martin* Ray Zeitz Clarence Stachnik Jr Edward / Darlene Gingerich * Robert / Anna Miller * Schooley Farm LLC Thomas / Francis Themm Cedar Lane Dairy Farms Joseph Miller Philip Wagler Stroven Dairy Farm Carson Acres LLC* Norris Dairy Farm Inc.* Doug / Shelly Ekkel * Roger Studer Robert Wackernagel Sueann Higgins James Wolter *100 percent

Upcoming Events November 21 Leaders’ Conference, East Lansing

December Local meetings begin

December 14 Advisory Committee Meeting, Novi 10

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016

USDA Announces Plans to Purchase Surplus Cheese, Releases New Report Showing Trans-Pacific Partnership Would Create Growth for Dairy Industry

F

ollowing a roundtable discussion with dairy producers near La Crosse, Wisconsin, Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack announced the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is offering to purchase $20 million of cheddar cheese to reduce a private cheese surplus that has reached record levels, while assisting food banks and other food assistance recipients. While USDA projects dairy prices to increase throughout the rest of the year, many factors including low world market prices, increased milk supplies and inventories, and slower demand have contributed to a sluggish marketplace for dairy producers and caused dairy revenues to drop 35 percent over the past two years. Section 32 of the Agriculture Act of 1935 authorizes USDA to purchase surplus food to benefit food banks and families in need through its nutrition assistance programs. “America’s farming families are being called on to demonstrate their world-famous resourcefulness and resilience in the face of this current market downturn, and USDA is making use of every tool that we have to help them,” said Vilsack. “While our analysis predicts the market will improve for these hardworking men and women, reducing the surplus can give them extra reassurance while also filling demand at food banks and other organizations that help our nation’s families in need.”

A solicitation will be issued shortly, and cheese deliveries to food banks and other food assistance recipients are expected to occur beginning in March 2017. Also at the roundtable, Vilsack shared details of a new report by the USDA’s Office of the Chief Economist, which shows continued growth of the U.S. dairy sector is largely contingent on trade and that the Trans-Pacific Partnership could create an additional $150 to $300 million in annual U.S. dairy exports. Free trade agreements have contributed to the growth in U.S. dairy exports and helped to address tariff and nontariff barriers that disadvantage U.S. products in overseas markets. U.S. dairy exports to free trade agreement partners grew from $690 million in the year prior to each agreement’s entry into force to $2.8 billion in 2015, driven by lower trade barriers and increased U.S. competitiveness.


Nominating Committee Accepting Applications for Board of Directors Five positions on the MMPA Board of Directors—two at-large and three district—are up for election in 2017. The two at-large terms will be voted on at the 101st Annual State Delegate Meeting and are currently held by Rod Daniels and Jim Reid. In addition, the terms of District Directors Tim Hood of District 2, Tony Jandernoa of District 6 and Dave Pyle of District 3 are up for election at District Delegate meetings in February. » Applications for the Director-at-Large positions are due Dec. 1. » Applications for the District Director positions are due on Jan. 12.

In order to be nominated for a position on the board of directors, each candidate must submit an application. The State Nominating Committee will meet to evaluate applications and may interview candidates for the at-large positions. The District Nominating Committee will review applications for those interested in the District Board positions. Email Muszynski@mimilk.com or call 248-474-6672 for more information.

MMPA Recognized at MSAE Diamond Awards At the 15th Annual Michigan Society of Association Executives (MSAE) Diamond Awards, MMPA won a diamond award for the Michigan Milk Messenger and a gold award for social media. The co-op also earned an honorable mention in the meetings and expositions category for the display at the MMPA 100th Annual State Delegate Meeting. The Diamond Awards recognize the best of the best in the association industry. According to MSAE, the Diamond Awards celebrate and applaud best practices worthy of emulation for associations in 13 program categories. MSAE, based in East Lansing, is a professional organization of more than 1,600 members that works to advance knowledge in the association industry.

2016 MMPA Advisory Committee District 1

District 5

Bruce Lewis, Jonesville........................................ 517-869-2877 Jeff Horning, Manchester..................................... 734-428-8610 Art Riske, Hanover............................................... 517-524-6015 Clark Emmons, Fayette, OH................................ 419-466-4471 Jeff Alexander, Hanover....................................... 517-740-9981

Mike Rasmussen, Edmore................................... 989-304-0233 Lyle Vanderwal, Lake City.................................... 231-328-4926 Tom Jeppesen, Stanton........................................ 989-506-5287 Bruce Benthem, McBain....................................... 231-825-8182 Amy Martin, Leroy................................................ 231-388-0496

District 2

District 6

Michael Oesch, Middlebury, IN............................. 574-825-2454 Mark Crandall, Battle Creek................................. 269-660-2229 Richard Thomas, Middlebury, IN.......................... 574-825-5198 Don Bever, Delton................................................ 269-671-5050 Heather Wing, Bellevue........................................ 269-660-0498

David Reed, Owosso............................................ 989-723-2023 Jamie Meyer, Ionia............................................... 989-640-3372 Kris Wardin, St. Johns.......................................... 989-640-9420 Aaron Gasper, Lowell........................................... 616-897-2747 Steve Thelen, Fowler............................................ 989-682-9064

District 3

District 7

Tim Butler, Sand Lake.......................................... 269-330-5538 Bill Gruppen, Zeeland........................................... 616-875-8162 Burke Larsen, Scottville........................................ 231-425-8988 Bill Stakenas, Freesoil.......................................... 231-425-6913 Gary Nelsen, Grant.............................................. 231-834-7610

John Bennett, Prescott......................................... 989-345-4264 Mark Iciek, Gladwin.............................................. 989-426-5655 Eric Bergdolt, Vassar............................................ 989-652-6500 Philip Gross, Weidman......................................... 989-289-0670 Rodney Fowler, Chesaning.................................. 989-302-2299

District 4

District 8

Marvin Rubingh, Ellsworth.................................... 231-588-6084 Jeremy Werth, Herron.......................................... 989-464-4022 Dave Folkersma, Rudyard.................................... 906-630-1957 Russ Tolan, Ossineke........................................... 989-471-2993 Ron Lucas, Posen................................................ 989-379-4694

Darwin Sneller, Sebewaing.................................. 989-977-3718 Bill Blumerich, Berlin............................................ 810-706-2955 Michael Bender, Croswell..................................... 810-404-2140 Patrick Bolday, Emmett........................................ 810-395-7139 Michael Noll, Croswell.......................................... 810-404-4071

NOVEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

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LEGISLATIVE WATCH

MMPAC Endorses Candidates for General Election

T

he Michigan Milk Political Action Committee (MMPAC) has announced the following endorsements for the Nov. 8 general election. The bipartisan, statewide organization selected candidates based on input from members, questionnaires completed by candidates and evaluation of the candidates’ general knowledge and support of the dairy agriculture issues. MMPAC is the political action arm of MMPA, the largest Michiganbased dairy cooperative. Individual MMPA members fund the political action committee and make recommendations from their local areas to the MMPAC board of directors. A resolution passed by MMPA delegates at the 100th Annual State Delegate Meeting in March recommended each member contribute one dollar per cow to the state or federal MMPAC.

U.S. House of Representatives

67 Tom Cochran (D-Mason)

DISTRICT

68 Andy Schor (D-Lansing)

4

John Moolenaar (R-Midland)

69 Sam Singh (D-East Lansing)

5

Daniel Kildee (D-Flint)

70 James Lower (R-Cedar Lake)

Fred Upton (R-Saint Joseph)

7 1 Tom Barrett (R-Charlotte)

Tim Walberg (R-Jackson)

74 Rob VerHeulen (R-Walker)

Mike Bishop (R-Brighton)

78 Dave Pagel (R-Berrien Springs)

6

7

8

10 Paul Mitchell (R-Washington)

79 Kim LaSata R-Saint Joseph)

1 1 Dave Trott (R-Troy)

80 Mary Whiteford (R-Allegan)

12 Debbie Dingell (D-Dearborn)

8 1 Dan Lauwers (R-Brockway Twp) 82 Gary Howell (R-North Branch)

State House of Representatives

83 Shane Hernandez (R-Port Huron)

DISTRICT

84 Edward Canfield (R-Sebewaing)

9

Sylvia Santana (D-Detroit)

85 Ben Frederick (R-Owosso)

16 Robert Kosowski (D-Westland)

86 Thomas Albert (R-Lowell)

17 Bill LaVoy (D-Monroe)

87 Julie Calley (R-Portland)

19 Laura Cox (R-Livonia)

88 Roger Victory (R-Hudsonville)

22 John Chirkun (D-Roseville)

89 Jim Lilly (R-Macatawa)

35 Jeremy Moss (D-Southfield)

90 Daniela Garcia (R-Holland)

36 Peter Lucido (R-Shelby Twp)

9 1 Holly Hughes (R-Montague)

37 Christine Greig (D-Northville)

92 Terry Sabo (D-Muskegon)

38 Kathy Crawford (R- Novi)

93 Tom Leonard (R-Dewitt)

39 Klint Kesto (R-Walled Lake)

94 Tim Kelly (R-Saginaw)

40 Michael McCready (R-Birmingham)

96 Brian Elder (D-Bay City)

45 Michael Webber (R-Rochester Hills)

97 Jason Wentworth (R-Clare)

47 Henry Vaupel (R-Fowlerville)

98 Gary Glenn (R-Midland)

49 Phil Phelps (D-Flushing)

99 Roger Hauck (R-Mount Pleasant)

“Michigan’s dairy industry,

100 Scott VanSingel (R-Grant)

and agriculture in general, is a

52 Donna Lasinski (D-Ann Arbor)

101 Curt VanderWall (R-Ludington)

56 Jason Sheppard (R-Lambertville)

102 Michele Hoitenga (R-Manton)

vital component to our state’s

5 1 Joseph Graves (R-Linden)

57 Bronna Kahle (R-Adrian)

103 Daire Rendon R-Lake City)

economy,” says Ken Nobis, a

58 Eric Leutheuser (R-Hillsdale)

104 Larry Inman (R-Williamsburg)

dairy farmer from St. Johns,

59 Aaron Miller (R-Sturgis)

105 Triston Cole (R-Mancelona)

Mich. and MMPAC Chairman.

60 Jon Hoadley ( D-Kalamazoo)

107 Lee Chatfield (R-Levering)

“We need people in state

110 Scott Dianda (D-Calumet)

and federal government who

6 1 Brandt Iden (R-Kalamazoo)

62 John Bizon (R-Battle Creek) 63 David Maturen (R-Vickburg)

MSU Board of Trustees

64 Julie Alexander (R-Hanover)

Dianne Byrum (D)

and work with us as our

65 Brett Roberts (R-Charlotte)

William Deary (R)

industry continues to grow.”

66 Beth Griffin (R-Paw Paw)

recognize our contributions

NOVEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

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OYDC IN FOCUS

Dairying with Flexibility DAVE & GRETCHEN TOLAN MMPA 2016 OYDC RUNNERS-UP BY ALLISON STUBY

Dairying in Alpena County, Michigan, is no small feat. With depressed milk prices, the threat of Bovine Tuberculosis and often low-yield cropland, flexibility is essential. “In this business, the best laid plans are sometimes only a guideline,” says Dave Tolan, MMPA member in Ossineke, Michigan. Dave and his wife, Gretchen, were recently named the 2016 MMPA Outstanding Young Dairy Cooperator (OYDC) Runners-Up. Dave’s adaptability has helped the couple—who farm with Dave’s parents, sister and brother-inlaw—navigate the challenges of the dairy business on Risky Endeavor Dairy.

“My whole day could fall right apart in the morning, but it’s not a problem,” Dave admitted. “I try to be relaxed and don’t stress when things don’t go as planned.” When the Tolans decided to expand over a decade ago, the original plan was to expand slowly once the new building, freestall barn and double 12 parallel milking parlor was constructed. But when the occasion arose to purchase cows from a neighbor moving north, the Tolans seized the opportunity and purchased the cows, doubling their own herd. “We went from planning to slowly building into the expansion to being overcrowded before the barns were built,” Dave recalled. “But we adjusted and decided to temporarily pasture when we didn’t have the barn space to house all of the new cows.”

Today, the Tolans milk around 280 cows in the new parlor. The newer freestall barn and milking parlor rest just down the hill from some of the older buildings and silos on the property. There, the Tolans house the farm’s young stock. They raise their own heifers and breeding bulls, maintaining a closed herd. Risky Endeavor Dairy is within the Bovine Tuberculosis zone, which spans Michigan’s Montgomery, Alpena, Oscoda and Alcona counties. Worse yet, the farm is approximately ten miles from the recent outbreak’s hot spot. To tackle this challenge, the farm is tested annually for Bovine Tuberculosis. Dave and Gretchen also are currently looking into a new computer system to better track their cattle to fight the threat of Bovine Tuberculosis. The farm employs five people, but is still very much a family operation. Dave says a hand-on approach from the family makes a difference on the farm, especially when facing challenges.

14

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016


“Having someone in the family here all the time helps everything in our operation flow efficiently,” Dave explained. Dave has farmed with his family for over 20 years. Yet the farm is currently working on its succession plan as Dave and his sister hope to take more ownership in the operation through a LLC structure. With resources from MSU Extension, Farm Bureau, a local law firm and their full-time accountant, the family is poised to make the best decisions for the farm and next generation. Gretchen, who’s first experience with dairy was on Risky Endeavor Dairy, says though moving out to the farm was an adjustment, she’s happy to be involved in dairying. Gretchen is a teacher and plans to become more involved day-today when she retires in several years. “Dave is my favorite thing about being on the farm; I love being supportive of him. It’s rewarding to be involved in dairy farming and working with family. Though it did take me a while to understand ‘Tolan time.’ Whatever time Dave says, it will be at least double that,” Gretchen laughed. Despite Dave’s relaxed attitude, Gretchen says she is the planner. The balance between the two keeps the family and the farm going as they face the everyday challenges of dairy. Selection for each year’s OYDC starts during the winter local meeting season. If you are interested in participating in the 2017 OYDC program, please contact your local officer or call Jessica Welch at 248-474-6672, ext. 303 or email jwelch@mimilk.com.

Dave and Gretchen Tolan of Risky Endeavor Dairy Hillman Local, District 4 Children: Colyn (12), Liliana (9), Gabriella (7) and Vanessa (5) Herd size: 280 milking cows, 320 total dairy cattle Acres farmed: 1,000 of hay and corn Education: Dave graduated from the University of Wisconsin with a degree in dairy herd management. Gretchen has an associate’s degree from Alpena Community College, a bachelor’s degree from Central Michigan University and a master’s degree from Marygrove College. Agriculture, Dairy and Community Involvement: Dave is president of Alpena County Farm Bureau, serving on the board for the last 13 years. He is also a member of the Knights of Columbus. He was a finalist in the Michigan Farm Bureau Young Farmer of the Year competition and won the Michigan Farm Bureau Outstanding Young Agriculture Leader award. Gretchen teaches first grade at Ossineke Public Schools where she is on the curriculum review team and a society of teachers, Delta

OPPOSITE PAGE, LEFT: DAVE TOLAN SUPERVISES THE FARM’S CROPPING OPERATIONS, HERE HE BAGS FEED INTO AG BAGS.

OPPOSITE PAGE, TOP RIGHT: RISKY ENDEAVOR DAIRY’S NEWER BARN AND PARLOR ARE LOCATED DOWN THE HILL FROM THE ORIGINAL FARM WHERE THE YOUNG STOCK ARE NOW HOUSED.

Kappa Gamma. She leads a Brownie troupe for Girl Scouts and mentors in Big Brothers Big Sisters. The farm hosted Breakfast on the Farm in 2010 and Fun on the Farm in 2010. The farm also hosts approximately a dozen farm tours every year and visits a couple schools every year for a farm day.

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Carrying the Torch through the Bicentennial with Dairy MMPA FARMS PARTICIPATE IN INDIANA BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION AND DAIRY TRAIL BY KRISTA SCHROCK

Two hundred years ago, the state of Indiana was established. Then, as it is today, the dairy industry was a vital component to the state. To celebrate this bicentennial, the state organized a torch relay to zig-zag across the 36,418 square miles of Indiana, unify communities and create “One Indiana.”

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MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016

The relay stopped in all 92 Indiana counties, covering 3,200 miles in five weeks, highlighting various aspects of Indiana’s culture and heritage— including dairy—along the way. “Odds are that the first settlers in Indiana had cows and if not the first, definitely the second!” commented Indiana Director of Agriculture, Ted McKinney during a torch lighting ceremony at Mybrook Farms. “It is only fitting dairy would be part of this celebration of Indiana’s history.”

The torch began its journey in Corydon, Indiana on Sept. 9 where the first State Capitol was located and ended on the State Grounds in Indianapolis on Oct. 15. Representing Elkhart County and the dairy industry, one of the stops on the torch relay was MyBrook Farms, an MMPA member farm. The ceremony on Oct. 4 included a torch lighting, breakfast, farm tour and milk toast. “We planned for about 200 people not knowing what to expect from this whole thing, but had even more people attend.


It was standing room only for the ceremony and milk toast,” said Mike Oesch of Mybrook Farms. “It was great to see the support of the community for such a unique celebration.” To precede the torch relay, Northern Indiana dairy farmers and industry leaders created the Northern Indiana Dairy Trail, another bicentennial event. Eleven farms hosted open houses with farm tours, education booths and free dairy products for their communities as part of the Dairy Trail. These open houses were held over a span of two Saturdays in June to promote June Dairy Month. Knollbrook Dairy in Goshen, Indiana, and Perkins Twin Creek Dairy in Stroh, Indiana, represented MMPA on the trail. Together, the two farms helped reach approximately 3,000 people by communicating how modern dairy farming focuses on animal care, environmental stewardship and quality milk and products. Host farms participated in creating educational videos promoted via three social media platforms. Topics highlighted in the clips were cow care, modern technology, “love of farming” and “Why should I visit the Northern Indiana Dairy Trail?” In all, the videos reached 30,700 views on Facebook.

“[Consumers] need a little more education and a little more opportunity to identify how cows are being taken care of, how they are actually getting milked and how much care and concern goes into the welfare of the animals,” Cynthia Adams of Knollbrook Dairy said in one of the promotional videos. The Northern Indiana Dairy Trail also promoted the Great American Milk Drive. The purpose for the Great American Milk Drive is to raise awareness about the need for milk in food banks across Indiana. “If people ate as good as cows eat, it would be a healthier world,” said Kirk Perkins of Perkins Twin Creek Dairy. Feedback from the Northern Indiana Dairy Trail yielded positive comments from participants on their trust in Indiana dairy farmers for animal care and the environment. The event committee will pursue continuing the trail next summer. For more information, visit DairyTrail. com. Indiana farms interested in hosting a tour next summer should contact Jackie Barber, Producer Relations Coordinator at American Dairy Association of Indiana at barber@winnersdrinkmilk.com.

ABOVE, TOP: A ‘MILK MAN’ CARRIES OLD-FASHIONED MILK BOTTLES FOR THE MILK TOAST AT THE TORCH LIGHTING CEREMONY AT MYBROOK FARM. ABOVE, BOTTOM: THE INDIANA DAIRY TRAIL EVENT AT PERKINS TWIN CREEK DAIRY INCLUDED TOURS OF THE FARM OPEN TO THE PUBLIC. LEFT: MICHAEL OESCH (IN BLUE) LIT THE TORCH AT A CEREMONY AT HIS FARM ON OCT. 3, KICKING OFF THE TORCH RELAY IN ELKHART COUNTY, INDIANA.

“Odds are that the first settlers in Indiana had cows and if not the first, definitely the second!” — Ted McKinney, Indiana Director of Agriculture

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17


BRING in the

CHEESE! MMPA ENTERS CHEESE MAKING BUSINESS WITH PURCHASE OF INDIANA’S DEUTSCH KÄSE HAUS BY ALLISON STUBY

As horse-drawn buggies clip-clop down the county road, locals and tourists alike visit the Deutsch Käse Haus, exiting the red barn storefront with Colby- cheese-colored shopping bags in hand. Amidst the quaint Amish countryside in northern Indiana, this staple in the community has been brought under new ownership.

I

n early October, MMPA announced the purchase of the Deutsch Käse Haus, a small cheese plant and storefront in Middlebury, Indiana. The Deutsch Käse Haus—translated from German as German Cheese House—processes approximately 400,000 pounds of milk per day into cylinder-shaped “longhorn” or “deli horn” cheeses. MMPA officially assumed ownership of the plant on Nov. 1, becoming the cooperative’s first foray into producing a retail cheese product. The acquisition diversifies MMPA’s mix of manufactured dairy products which includes awardwinning butter, powder and other fluid milk products produced in Ovid or Constantine, Michigan.

“We are eager to continue to grow our footprint in the Great Lakes region and utilize the expertise at Deutsch Käse Haus to gain greater diversity of our product portfolio,” MMPA General Manager Joe Diglio explained. “MMPA members have a proven track record of producing high quality milk and to be able to align with an award winning cheese plant located in close proximity to our Constantine plant provides great synergies in our milk marketing strategy.” MMPA purchased the plant from the Guggisberg Cheese Company of Millersburg, Ohio. Yet the history of the Deutsch Käse Haus began in the late 1970s when a local Amish man, Ralph Bontrager, built the plant to

OPPOSITE: GATHERING OUTSIDE THE DEUTSCH KÄSE HAUS IS, FROM LEFT: GUGGISBERG CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER SHAWN SHERTZER, GUGGISBERG CHEESE COMPANY OWNER RICHARD GUGGISBERG, MMPA PRESIDENT KEN NOBIS, MMPA DISTRICT 2 DIRECTOR TIM HOOD, MMPA GENERAL MANAGER JOE DIGLIO AND MMPA CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER JOSEP BARENYS

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MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016


provide Amish dairy farmers a place to market their can milk. The first day of production back then welcomed one can milk truck delivering 15,000 pounds of milk. According to Plant Manager Elsie Raber, they were still receiving milk in cans until this past spring from approximately 20 small Amish farms. She says the can market has dwindled over the last several years and the Amish church leaders have allowed more Amish farmers to have cooled bulk milk tanks and operate as a Grade A farm. The Deutsch Käse Haus was one of the Guggisberg Cheese Company’s three cheese plants. The other two facilities are in Ohio and specialize in the production of Swiss cheese with the company’s signature “Baby Swiss.” The company decided to sell the Indiana plant to refocus their efforts on Swiss

PLANT MANAGER ELSIE RABER (RIGHT) PLAYS A PIVOTAL ROLE IN THE SUCCESS OF THE DEUTSCH KÄSE HAUS AND ITS STOREFRONT, MANAGED BY NORA YUTZY (LEFT), WHERE THE PLANT’S CHEESE IS SOLD DIRECTLY TO CONSUMERS.

(Continued on page 20)

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19


CHEESE - Continued from page 19

but intends to maintain a relationship with MMPA and the Deutsch Käse Haus moving forward.

GUGGISBERG CHEESE COMPANY OWNER, RICHARD GUGGISBERG, AND MMPA GENERAL MANAGER JOE DIGLIO.

MAKING CHEESE at the

Deutsch Käse Haus

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MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016

“The Deutsch Käse Haus has established a valued and trusted legacy in Indiana. I am confident MMPA’s progressive leadership will carry on this legacy as we move forward, bringing mutual benefit to both Guggisberg Cheese Company and MMPA,” Richard Guggisberg, owner of Guggisberg Cheese Company, said. “MMPA has a strong membership base in northern Indiana which will allow Deutsch Käse Haus to continue providing high quality products under new ownership.” In Indiana, MMPA has just under 200 member farms, many of whom are Amish. The plant began receiving milk exclusively from MMPA farms in early September. Every year, many of these farms earn MMPA awards for producing milk with outstanding quality.

1

Once pasteurized, milk received at the plant is transferred to cheese vats to be cooked. Cheese makers add coloring, starter cultures and rennet. Rennet, an enzyme, causes the milk to ‘set up’ and the curd begins to separate from the whey.

Cheese at the Deutsch Käse Haus is award-winning and internationally recognized at the World Dairy Expo, U.S. Cheese Makers Competition and World Cheese Makers Competition. The plant mainly produces Colby cheese, a softer, milder flavored cheddar cheese, in addition to Colby-jack, Montereyjack, cheddar, pepper-jack cheese and other flavors. One new popular product is Sriracha flavored cheese. These flavors of cheese are sold to dairy companies or as retail products directly to consumers. A facilitator of customer sales is the on site retail shop which welcomes approximately 70,000 customers annually. Under Guggisberg management, Raber recently remodeled the store and in 2012, they added a walk-up window to sell grilled cheese sandwiches and frozen yogurt. Inside of the store front, there is a window for customers to view the cheese making process.

2

When the cooking process is complete, the curd and the remaining whey are transferred to the draining tables, where they are cooled.


“We gave the store a totally new look, which has helped a lot in promoting the product and attracting new customers,” Raber explained. “Many families visit the store and kids love to watch the cheese making. People have a lot of questions about cheese making and how it all works.” As MMPA completes the acquisition, the co-op intends to continue manufacturing the current types of cheeses made at the plant. MMPA will also retain the 55 employees currently on staff. However, the investment positions MMPA to explore expansion opportunities at the Middlebury plant location in the future. “This plant has a lot of potential and I am very excited to be a part of taking this place to next level with MMPA,” Raber says. “It is really cool to work with people enthusiastic about what we’re able to do. That certainly helps the transition.”

.

3

The remainder of the whey is drained and the cheese makers add ingredients, such as salt, seasonings, peppers and vegetables, to the curd.

4

The curd is then transferred to the form towers, where it is pressed into a rounded cheese horn shape and bagged in 6-pound deli horns or 15-pound long horns.

5

Once the cheeses are bagged and sealed, they are packed in cases and sent to our cooling room to age. The cheeses produced at this plant are generally aged 2-3 weeks.

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Giveof the gift

Cheese

Gift Boxes Now Available The Michigan State University Dairy Store is proud to be supporting the

MSU Dairy Club by teaming up for this year’s Holiday Cheese Sale! The MSU Dairy Club is a professional & social organization with priorities of education, leadership, & communication. By supporting the MSU Dairy Club, we are supporting the future of the Dairy Industry! Join us this holiday season by purchasing a cheese gift box (or 2!) for family, friends, co-workers or for yourself! All boxes are beautifully packaged and ready to gift.

A. Dairy Store Deluxe

B. MSU Party Pack

C. Mitten Cutting Board

Contents of “MSU Party Pack” PLUS Dairy Store logo engraved cutting board. $84.95

16 oz.: Cheddar, Jalapeno, Colby Jack & Smoked Cheddar, 8 oz. Gouda & Summer Sausage $59.95

Wooden board engraved with Dairy Store logo and “Michigan State University” $39.95

D. Sparty’s Snack Pack 16 oz. Jalapeno Pepper 16 oz. Smoked Cheddar 8 oz. Summer Sausage $29.95 22

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016

E. Sparty’s Cheddar Chunk 2.5 lb Cheddar cheese block dipped in Spartan Green wax! $19.95

F. Dagano Chunk

G. Dairy Club Special

2.5 lb of MSU developed

Two 8 oz. blocks of Cheddar and Colby Jack & 8 oz. Summer sausage. $14.00

Dagano cheese. Sweet & nutty; goes with anything! $19.95


H. Spartan Student Cheddar 16 oz. Cheddar, perfect for a snack! $7.50

I. Spartan Spectacular

J. Spartan Sampler

Four 16 oz. blocks. *Selectable cheeses but only available online* $32.00

Four 8 oz. blocks. *Selectable cheeses but only available online* $17.00

To Place Orders: Orders received from November 1 to December 9 will support the MSU Dairy Club. When option appears for online sales, be sure to select ‘Dairy Club’. 

The MSU Dairy Club will have over-the-counter sales out of the MSU Dairy Store Booth in the Dairy Store Lobby on Nov. 1418, 21-25, 28-30, and Dec. 1-2 and 5-9 from 9:00 am to 7:00 pm. Park as you would for the Dairy Store and proceed to the south end of the building.

Fill out an order form and drop off at the Dairy Store Booth or mail to MSU Dairy Club, 474 S. Shaw Lane, Room 1272, Anthony Hall East Lansing, MI 48824

Online - Go to dairystore.msu.edu, then click on “Online Cheese and Gifts”

Pick up of advance orders - Dairy Club Booth in Anthony Hall on December 7 and 8 from 9:00 am to 7:00 pm.

Shipped - If shipping is selected when ordering, your gift will be shipped the next day if Monday through Wednesday. If the order is received on Thursday or Friday shipping will be the following Monday.

Order Form Your Contact Information

Shipping Information:

Name:______________________________________

Items A & B out-of-state:

$24.95 per item

Address:____________________________________

Items C thru J out-of-state:

$18.95 per item

All Items in-state:

$10.95 per item

___________________________________________ City:_________________State:_____ __Zip:_______ Price Shipping

Item 1 Description

For multiple items going to the same address, contact the MSU Dairy Store for updated shipping prices. 571-355-8466 or msudairystore@anr.msu.edu. Make checks payable to MSU Dairy Store Total

Price

Item 2 Description

Shipping

Mailing Address: (____ Same as Contact Info)

Mailing Address: (____ Same as Contact Info)

Name:

Name:

Address:

Address:

City:

State:

Zip:

City:

Phone:

Phone:

E-mail:

E-mail:

Mail order form to MSU Dairy Club, 474 S. Shaw Lane, Room 1272, Anthony Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824

State:

Total

Zip:

Total Price Plus Shipping for all Items

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POWER of the Past. » VISION for the Future.

HOWARD SIMMONS WAS THE SECRETARY MANAGER WHEN MMPA CELEBRATED ITS 40TH ANNIVERSARY AND CONTINUED TO LEAD THE COOPERATIVE THROUGH THE NEXT 13 YEARS.

THE ROAD LESS TRAVELED WAS FORGED BY

GREAT LEADERS BY MELISSA HART

Maintaining a business for 100 years requires remarkable leadership and belief in the company. MMPA managed to have both, stacking decades on top of decades of business through leadership that pioneered the dairy industry from one century to another.

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MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016

MMPA

began leading the dairy industry by simply existing. Forming the cooperative was the first step in their greatness but so many steps followed like being the first to structure the milk price on the basis for how it was used. MMPA was the first in the United States to successfully establish a superpool program. The Great Lakes Milk Marketing Federation was established and included five milk marketing cooperatives covering Ohio, Pennsylvania, Indiana and Michigan. General Manager Jack Barnes said the milk marketing world was shocked as MMPA led the way in area pricing across several markets.


While MMPA chose the road less traveled to forge their success, they did it with leaders of longevity and who served a purpose in each of their tenures. John Near was the first state wide Secretary-General Manager who served from 1921-1927. He was at the helm at a great time of growth, managing at the new Detroit office in the Owen Building in downtown Detroit. Because the Detroit area was a huge market for MMPA another leader was tapped to manage just the Detroit market, Bernie Beach.

major portion of the milk supply and be a part of the merger of fourteen different cooperatives into MMPA. He also led the cooperative through a complete organizational overhaul enabling MMPA to survive and lead the industry through the next three decades. Walt Wosje took over in 1985 and

the strength of leadership continued. Stuck in the muck and mire of a failed McDonald Cooperative Dairy Company, Wosje was able to negotiate the sale of the McDonald Division, the first of many accomplishments realized through the leadership of Wosje.

Beach was a man of many talents as he succeeded Near in 1927. Not only did he take the cooperative through the devastating years of the Great Depression when milk prices took a deep dive, but he was also the editor of the Michigan Milk Messenger. Beach moved to managing the Michigan Producers Dairy Company and that opened the door to a new General Manager in Howard Simmons to take the lead in 1940.

The Remus cheese plant produced great volumes of cheese but had little to no market for the product. Wosje put an end to that when he and then President Elwood Kirkpatrick signed a deal with Leprino foods to produce mozzarella cheese for four top pizza chains. The result was an instantaneous turnaround of the financial failings of the Remus plant, a long term outlet for member milk and profit sharing from sales of mozzarella made there.

On the cusp of World War II, Simmons took the transportation improvements of Bernie Beach and strengthened them. In the 1930s and early 1940s, a system of transport units was developed and as MMPA became the dominant transporter of milk, the freight rates, all of which were paid by the farmer, were reduced dramatically. As the U.S. came out of WWII, MMPA had a system of receiving plants, a transportation fleet and the Imlay City processing plant. This operating system put considerable muscle in MMPA’s marketing program.

When Wosje retired in 2003 the cooperative was a very attractive market for expanding dairy producers and created a new problem for the new general manager, John Dilland: a need for greater capacity to handle an increasing volume of milk.

Jack Barnes came on the scene as the

General Manager in 1959 and held that position until 1985. Barnes leadership allowed MMPA to hold control over a

adversity and lead the cooperative through the first decade of the new century, retiring in 2010. Following Dilland’s retirement, Clay Glarneau served as general manager before resigning in 2014. Another leader with great financial experience moved from MMPA’s director of finance to general manager and is serving in that position today: Joe Diglio. Diglio had the great fortune to celebrate the 100th anniversary as MMPA’s GM and has the same passion as his predecessors possessed for successful cooperative and profitable dairymen as they move down the road less traveled into the next 100 years. RIGHT: JACK BARNES SERVED FROM 1959 TO 1985 AS THE GENERAL MANGER TAKING THE COOPERATIVE THROUGH THREE DECADES. BELOW: MMPA GM WALT WOSJE AND GOVERNOR BLANCHARD CELEBRATE THE GROUND BREAKING OF THE LEPRINO CHEESE PLANT.

Dilland was no stranger to the challenges of running a cooperative. Dilland began in 1975 at MMPA as a controller and director of finance before being asked to serve as General Manager in 2003. He experienced the United Twin Pines trouble with their delinquent account when they couldn’t pay their milk bill and the McDonald Dairy debacle. When he took over the general manager position he was well seasoned in

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Michigan Dairy Ambassador Program Gearing Up for 2017 » APPLICATIONS DUE JAN. 6 «

M

ichigan high school and college students interested in pursuing a career in the dairy industry have until Jan. 6 to apply for the 2017 Michigan Dairy Ambassador Scholarship and Leadership Program. The program offers dairy communications training to interested applicants.

dairy ambassador representative. Representatives will be the primary faces and voices of Michigan’s dairy industry at a variety of educational, industrial and promotional events held across the state during the year.

All applicants meeting baseline criteria will be invited to attend a day-long training on Feb. 3, the second day of the Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference (GLRDC). Attendees will be considered 2017 Michigan Dairy Ambassadors and will be equipped with the messaging and practice to effectively communicate with consumers in-person and online.

As in the past, two scholarships will be awarded to the representatives, one to a junior winner and another to a senior winner. The senior division is reserved for college students up to age 22, with the winner receiving a $1,500 scholarship. The junior division is limited to high school students in grades nine to 12, and the winner receives $1,000 that can be applied toward higher education or the purchase of a dairy animal within the upcoming year.

A panel of industry judges will evaluate each ambassador based on his/her application, introduction and participation throughout the training to select one junior and one senior

Applicants are not required to have a dairy farm background, but they must plan to pursue a career related to the dairy industry. The scholarship program is funded through a benefit auction held

KRISTEN BURKHARDT AND CHARLENE MCALVEY, 2016 DAIRY AMBASSADOR REPRESENTATIVES.

at the annual Great Lakes Regional Dairy Conference (GLRDC). Currently, Charlene McAlvey of Owosso is serving as the 2016 senior Michigan dairy ambassador representative. Kristen Burkhardt of Fowlerville is the junior Michigan dairy ambassador representative. Students interested in applying for the 2017 Michigan Dairy Ambassador Scholarship and Leadership Program can download an application from www.glrdc.msu.edu or contact Megghan Honke Seidel at 517-884-7081, ext. 229. Applications must be submitted electronically to honkemeg@anr.msu.edu and will be accepted until Jan. 6. Any questions about the Michigan Dairy Ambassador Program please contact Jessica Welch at 248-474-6672, ext. 303 or jwelch@ mimilk.com. This year’s event will take place in Frankenmuth, MI, Feb. 2-4, 2017. For the conference schedule and registration information, visit www.glrdc.msu.edu or contact Megghan Honke Seidel.

DAIRY AMBASSADORS AT THE 2016 TRAINING PARTICIPATED IN DE-STRESSING ACTIVITIES DURING A SESSION DESIGNED TO EXPLORE CAREER GROWTH OPPORTUNITIES.

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MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016


CELEBRATE 50!

World Dairy Expo 2016 BY MELISSA HART Touting over 74,000 guests, 2,400 head of dairy cattle parading across the colored shavings and 881 commercial exhibitors from 30 countries and 45 U.S. states, it’s safe to say World Dairy Expo was the center of the dairy world on Oct. 4-8.

Madison, Wisconsin, came alive with dairy enthusiasts as they descended on the Dane County Fairgrounds to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the ‘greatest show on earth.’ With cattle in every corner and dairy equipment donning the exhibit halls and overflow tents, attendees enjoyed the opportunity to learn, network and just watch the show unfold. One of the highlights of the week is the World Dairy Expo Judging contest where over 200 youth from 4-H to the Collegiate levels participated in evaluating 10 classes of cattle. Michigan was well represented, as Dr. Joe Domecq and Sarah Black harnessed and honed the judging skills of the youth throughout the summer and enjoyed some solid results. At the 4-H level, the Michigan team consisting of Allison Schafer, Cameron Cook, Madeline Meyer and Lauren Heberling placed fourth overall and also owned the high individual winner in Cameron Cook.

OVER 200 YOUTH GATHERED ON THE GOLD SHAVINGS AT WORLD DAIRY EXPO TO EVALUATE THE CATTLE FOR THE JUDGING CONTEST. PHOTO CREDIT: WORLD DAIRY EXPO.

“When I heard my name as the top individual I was overwhelmed with joy and excitement,” exclaimed Cook, the daughter of Tom and Dianne Cook of Pewamo. She went on, “The eight years of hard work that I have put in finally paid off and it felt awesome! But I couldn’t have done it without the support of my coaches, family, and friends.” With eight years of experience under her belt, the MSU freshman enrolled in the two-year dairy management program has enjoyed the fruits of her labor. “Judging will help me in my career one day as it has taught me how to be a better public speaker and be more confident. It has helped me become a

better decision maker and be able to back up my opinion,” Cook added. “But most importantly, judging has helped me network and build connections in the dairy industry which will help me tremendously in the future.” The highlights didn’t end there, the MSU Ag Tech team consisting of Rachel Ekkel, Shelby Berens, Erin Fritz and Evelyn Okkema placed third overall, third in reasons with Rachel Ekkel winning the entire contest and Shelby Berens placing 7th overall. Ekkel placed first in reasons and Evelyn Okkema was 9th. MMPA sponsored five youth to attend the National 4-H Dairy Conference and World Dairy Expo with selection from the MMPA 4-H Milk Marketing Tour held last June. The five students were Jacob Armstrong of Branch County, Chelsea Barnes of Ottawa County, Miriah Dershem of Clinton County, Jonah Haskins of Lapeer County and Jessica Nash of Clinton County. The 2017 World Dairy Expo will be held Oct. 3-7 where they will “Discover New Dairy Worlds.” LAUREN HEBERLING, CAMERON COOK, MADELINE MEYER AND ALLISON SCHAFER CELEBRATE LIKE CHAMPIONS AFTER THE WORLD DAIRY EXPO DAIRY JUDGING CONTEST WHERE THEY PLACED FOURTH. PHOTO CREDIT SARAH BLACK.

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YOUR DAIRY PROMOTION AT WORK

Opening the Farm Gate to Influencers

O

ver the past year, the United Dairy Industry of Michigan (UDIM) has hosted over 260 influencers on tours of Michigan dairy farms to show the commitment your families and farm teams have for caring for cows and providing safe, wholesome dairy products. The tour participants range from elementary and college students to food service directors, who make decisions on what children eat in schools, to the families of physicians. During the bus ride to the farm, UDIM staff provide an overview of the dairy industry and share how we work for Michigan’s nearly 1,800 dairy farm families. Telling tour participants what they will see on the farm answers initial questions they have about the dairy industry. For example, we explain that cows are in barns because farmers can control the environment to protect them from Michigan’s weather swings and provide a roof to keep the sun off their back. Once on the farm, we show how the fans run during the summer and the curtains keep the wind off them during the winter. Each participant completes a pre-tour survey asking about their knowledge of and feelings toward the dairy industry. They are asked if they’ve ever visited a dairy farm and if they have questions for the farmer. On the return trip, participants complete a post-tour survey to show the effectiveness of the tour. They are asked the same questions about their perceptions of the industry and how farmers care for their animals. They are also asked what they will share with their family and friends about the tour. We answer any final questions so they leave with a good overview and new knowledge of the industry. A few comments we’ve received about the tours:

“We take for granted how the milk products are in the store we shop and what goes into getting them there.” “Every school should be required to do this in their high school years.” “Farming is a wonderful thing! Without farmers, where would we be?”

Tours have been arranged for the following audiences: • Over 50 school foodservice directors before the School Nutrition Association of Michigan conference last fall • Last November, over 45 first-year MSU veterinarian students • Also last November, 12 Registered Dietitians, who are media spokespeople for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, and students from the Michigan State University Dietetics program • Eight members of the St. Charles Elementary Fuel Up to Play 60 student leadership team and their Program Advisors in April • In May, 15 Food Service Directors from Macomb County • Nearly 25 school food service employees who stayed after the Michigan Department of Education School Nutrition Conference in June • More than 20 family members of those attending the MI Academy of Family Physicians Conference in July • Twelve Building Healthy Communities grant coordinators in August • Over 40 staff members of the Michigan Department of Education Child Nutrition Program Division in early September • In September, over 40 Eastern Michigan University dietetic students and their professors

If you’re interested in hosting farm tours for thought leaders, please contact Jolene Griffin at jolene@milkmeansmore.org. If your farm is new to tours and you want tips on where to start, contact Jolene for tips and checklists.

JENNIFER LEWIS AND HER NUTRITIONIST TALK WITH EASTERN MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY DIETETIC STUDENTS ABOUT THE WELL-BALANCED DIET PROVIDED TO DAIRY COWS.

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MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016


MERCHANDISE

Changes to Direct Delivery Minimum and Calf Blankets By Duane Farmer, Merchandise Supervisor Direct Delivery

These are service personnel only.

In an effort to better serve our members, MMPA is reducing the minimum order requirements for on farm deliveries. In the past, the merchandise program has required that each direct delivery order meet a $750 minimum value. That minimum is now reduced to $500 per delivery. If a member finds that they cannot meet the $500 minimum, but the order exceeds $300, a delivery is still possible, but subject to a $20 stop charge. We hope that changing these requirements will allow more of our members to utilize the merchandise program to their advantage.

Calf Blankets Cold weather is fast approaching and if the Farmer’s Almanac is correct, we are in for a long, snowy winter. With that in mind, keeping those valuable baby calves warm, comfortable and warm becomes very important to the future of your farm. Calf blankets by Udder Tech will make this job much easier. These blankets are made of water resistant nylon and feature a single or double layer of Thinsulate insulation. The single layer has a CLO (clothing insulating value) of 1.9 while the double blankets feature a 3.8 CLO value. These unique blankets are designed to stay on the calf, are easy to put on and take off and can be machine washed and dried. They feature quick release buckles, no Velcro to get matted, an extra strap length for growth and a belly strap to keep the blanket snug when lying down. The regular size calf blanket is available in blue and either single or double insulation. The small size for Jersey or twin calves comes only in pink and is double insulated. STOCK #

Chemical, Sanitizer and Teat Dip Contact Information

DESCRIPTION

MEMBER PRICE

Order your Member Merchandise supplies through your hauler.

ECOLAB 24 -Hour Medical Emergency Hotline: 1-800-328-0026 For Service, call the Ecolab Service Message Center 1-800-392-3392 or one of the following service representatives: Ben Johnson 4461 Cambridge Dr. Port Huron, MI 48060 810-824-0636 Pat Mitchell

5636

Calf Blanket-Reg. Single insulated

$ 33.84

7273 N. Rollin Hwy.

5680

Calf Blanket-Reg. Double insulated

$ 37.25

Addison, MI 49220

5635

Calf Blanket-Sm-Pink-Double insulated

$ 35.56

517-403-0928

If you have any questions on the new minimum delivery requirements, calf blankets or any other merchandise matter please call us at the warehouse.

Jason Wolfe 1890 Canter Dr. Riner, VA 24149

Three Ways to Order your MMPA Merchandise

540-553-5755

1. Place order through your milk hauler 2. Call in your order:

Duane Farmer, Supervisor......................................................989-317-8370

Toll Free..................................................................................... 877-367-6455

Orders (Novi)..................................................... 800-572-5824 then dial 2

3. Fax in your order:

MMPA Merchandise fax........................................................... 989-317-8372

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PREMIUMS MERCHANDISE

MMPA Quality Premium Program

MMPA Member Testing Fees

Somatic Cell Count premiums and deductions (in addition to Federal Order SCC Adjustments computed in the producer pay price) will be paid at the following levels:

Payment for testing will be made through an automatic milk check deduction. All costs are listed per individual sample.

50,000 or below............ +55¢/cwt.

201,000-225,000........... +20¢/cwt.

51,000-75,000................+50¢/cwt.

226,000-250,000............+15¢/cwt.

76,000-100,000.............+45¢/cwt.

251,000-300,000...........+00¢/cwt.

101,000-125,000.............+40¢/cwt.

301,000-400,000..........- 30¢/cwt.

126,000-150,000........... +35¢/cwt.

401,000-500,000........ -$1.00/cwt.

151,000-175,000.............+30¢/cwt.

501,000-600,000.........-$1.50/cwt.

176,000-200,000.......... +25¢/cwt.

601,000 and greater.. -$2.00/cwt.

A payment of 5¢/cwt. will be added for each of the following, the count is equal to or below: • 10,000 Raw Bacteria Count • 20,000 Pre-Incubated (PI) Count There will be a deduction of 10¢/cwt. for: • Greater than 100,000 Raw Bacteria Count A high raw count deduction will be waived if the producer has received the quality premium the previous three months for raw bacteria count. To qualify for Raw and PI Bacteria Count premiums there must not be any of the following during the month: • Positive drug residue • Abnormal freeze points • High load count shipment or rejected load shipment • #3 or #4 sediment • Raw Bacteria count over 100,000 The count levels for raw and PI will be determined on one test run per month. To qualify for MMPA SCC premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month To qualify for MMPA volume premiums there must be: • No abnormal freeze points during the month • An average somatic cell count of 350,000 or less

if

Cow Tests: $1 Cow samples may be tested for: Culture for Streptococcus agalactiae, Strep non ag, Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase negative staph, gram negative and/or SCC. Additional testing can be coordinated through your MMPA member representative to include: Raw bacteria count and components. All herd tests must be scheduled with the laboratory through your representative.

MMPA member

Additional Tests Available: All costs are listed per individual sample.

• Mycoplasma Cultures...........................................................................$13 • Bacteriology Cultures...........................................................................$15 – Includes identification of bacteria and drug susceptibility.

• Bovine Viral Diarrhea - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA........................................................................................................$6 • Johne’s Milk Test - PCR.........................................................................................................$40 - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Bovine Leukosis Test - ELISA – cows.........................................................................................$6 - ELISA – tank......................................................................................... $10 • Milk Pregnancy ELISA.................................................................... $4.50 Lab test results by mail: $2/month All tests must be scheduled through your MMPA member representative or the laboratory for proper sample submission protocol.

ANTEL-BIO TESTING Loc/Hlr/Producer # ______________________ Sample Date Member name_______________________________________________________________________________ Sample ID__________________________________________________________________________________ BLV ELISA_Johne’s ELISA____________ Johne’s PCR Pregnancy______________

Refer to above for current pricing. The cost of testing is the responsibility of the producer. This card MUST be filled out completely when sending in samples to be tested by Antel-Bio to avoid potential service charges.

30

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016


POLICIES MERCHANDISE

MMPA Policy on Drug Residue in Milk MILK ON FARM – DRUG RESIDUE SUSPECTED

MILK SHIPPED — POSITIVE DRUGS CONFIRMED

If a member suspects milk in the farm bulk tank contains drug residue:

If a member ships milk from the farm and testing by approved laboratory methods show that the milk contained drug residue, the member will be assessed the penalties imposed by the state regulatory agency and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums.

1. Call a MMPA member representative to have the milk in the tank tested. A “hold” must be placed on the tank contents until the test results are known.

OR 2. The member can test the milk on the farm. If dumped, the member must be sure to take the stick reading, record the number of pounds of milk and report the information to their member representative. • If the tank tests negative (no drugs present), the milk may be released and shipped. • If the tank tests positive (drugs present), the member representative will authorize the member to dump the tank of milk. The member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* • If for any reason MMPA personnel must pick up samples at the farm for testing three or more times within 12 consecutive months, the member involved will be charged $25 per trip.

If a loss is incurred by MMPA due to the disposal and/or non-marketability of a load of milk or milk products containing drug residue, then the member responsible will be provided an invoice for the entire value of the loss plus transportation and disposal costs as required by the Pasteurized Milk Ordinance. This invoice may be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. Milk from that member’s farm tank must be tested and found clear of drugs before the next tank of milk can be picked up. A hauler whose entire load sample shows the presence of drugs will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all show negative.

ALL POSITIVE DRUG RESIDUE SHIPMENTS MUST BE REPORTED TO THE ENFORCEMENT AGENCY.

MMPA Milk Quality Policy QUALITY QUESTIONABLE When a member suspects that the milk in the farm bulk tank is of poor quality they should call a MMPA member representative who will authorize milk in the tank to be dumped. If the member dumps the milk on their own, they must be sure to take the stick reading and record the number of pounds of milk, and report the information to the member representative. If the milk is dumped, the member will be paid 75% of the value of the tank of milk involved.* In order to receive payment for an added water voluntary dump, the member must install a Swingline Safety Switch. The Swingline Safety Switch can be ordered from the Mt. Pleasant warehouse. The MMPA member representative will verify the switch has been installed. Reimbursement for the Swingline Safety Switch and the voluntary dump will then be made to the member. The member assumes all liability for losses incurred as a result of shipping poor quality or contaminated milk.

MILK SHIPPED – HIGH BACTERIA COUNT

If… 1. a load of milk is received (unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. a sample from the load has a bacteria count of 300,000 or more and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members having a bacteria count of 300,000 or more, then the member or members involved will be charged the value of one-half of one day’s production** and will be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums. * The member will only be paid for two (2) voluntary dumps in a rolling 12 month period. ** For members using more than one bulk tank, the assessment will be based on the value of milk in the tank or tanks in violation of the MMPA quality policy.

REJECTED LOAD SHIPMENT

If… 1. a load of milk is rejected (not unloaded) at a dairy processing plant and, 2. the milk cannot be sold through normal Grade A channels for reasons of quality which results in the load being sold or disposed of at a loss to MMPA, and, 3. testing of the individual member samples on that load identifies the member or members that caused the contamination or rejection of the load, then, the member or members responsible will be charged the full value of the loss to MMPA plus transportation and disposal costs, and be disqualified for raw and PI bacteria count premiums except for loads rejected for temperature. 4. MMPA will provide an invoice to the member for the amount of the loss, to be submitted to the member’s insurance carrier. MMPA must receive settlement on the invoice within 90 days of issuance. If settlement is not made within 90 days, the full amount of the invoice will be deducted from the next milk check unless other settlement arrangements are made. If a member has three or more occurrences within 12 consecutive months, that member must appear before the MMPA board of directors to review steps taken on the farm to correct the quality problem which will enable MMPA to continue to market the milk for this member.

HAULER A hauler whose entire load sample exceeds 300,000 cells per mL bacteria count will be charged the amount of an average shipment on that load if the individual member samples all are less than 100,000. A hauler will be responsible for all costs incurred by MMPA for loads rejected for temperature. Charges and assessments made under this program will be withheld from milk checks of members or haulers involved.

NOVEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

31


FREELINERS Bulls To place a freeliner, fax your ad to 248-426-3412 or email your ad to: Muszynski@mimilk.com

Freeliner Policy The Freeliners column is open to current MMPA members who wish to advertise— at no charge—goods or services relating directly to their dairy farm operations. • An item submitted will be published for no more than two consecutive months (one month, unless otherwise requested). After that, it will be withdrawn. • It will be published again for no more than two consecutive months only if the member resubmits the item by writing or calling the Novi office. • Reference to a name of a firm or other commercial enterprise with which a member is involved will be deleted, with permission of the member. • If the member does not wish such deletion, he/she may choose to have the item published as a Classified Ad at the regular per-line Classified Ad rate. • Freeliners must be received by the 10th of the month preceding the desired month of publication.

Registered Holstein Bulls: We now have a nice selection of service age bulls, sired by top AI sires. Green Meadow Farms, Elsie, MI. 989-862-4291 or visit www.greenmeadowfarms.com. Service age Holstein bulls. Call Steve Alexander, 810-622-8548 evenings or 810-404-8548. Registered Holstein breeding bulls, all AI sired from top bulls, b&w, red, red carrier and some polled, high production, low SCC herd. Bulls are priced to sell. Ver Hage Holsteins, 269-673-4886 or 269-217-6076, ask for Tim. www.verhageholsteins.com. AI certified crossbred bulls. 810-724-8825.

Cows & Heifers Breeding age to springers. Call 616-318-1833. Milk Cows. Herd currently averaging 92 lbs. and 125 SCC. Up to 100 head to sell! 734-776-0285.

50 Milk Cows. Averaging 90 lbs. and 170 SCC. Call Allen Yoder, 269-467-9932.

Dairy Equipment Double 15 Delaval parallel parlor with cow ID and milk meters. Call 269-838-1637. Surge 1,000 gal bulk tank, 2 compressors, new washer motor, new agitator with motor, 2 water jackets, $2,500. 810-387-2856. 10-station calf milk bar, $40 each. 810-387-2856. Mueller 500 gal bulk tank with 3 HP compressor, good condition, just taken out, replaced with bigger tank, $2,500. 231-250-7341. Mueller 1250 gal. bulk tank. High perform 2 washer. 734-231-0633.

Equipment JD 459 Round Baler Silage Special, mega P.U., like new, excellent condition. 260-7687803 ext. 3. Penta 6710 twin screw mixer. 810-516-6867. 27 ft. Big Jim silo unloader for parts, angled Kelly feed conveyor, 26 ft. Buffalo (same as Kelly) conveyor, Gehl 960 and 970 for parts, all offers considered (do not want them to waste away if someone can use them), John Deere 250 series 2 skid steer, 3950 hours $9,999. Allis Chalmers 185, 1 for parts, 1 to rebuild, best offer. 810-348-5500 Flint area.

Wanted Freestalls and self-locks for feed bunk. Jacob Weaver 260-499-4318 ext. 2 Calf-Tel Calf Hutches. Call 616-634-2958. 32

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016


CLASSIFIED ADS A SURE WAY TO KEEP YOUR

Cost for classifieds is $20 per ad, up to six lines. All ads must be received by the 10th of the month before the month of desired publication. Send check or money order for $20 for up to 6 lines with your order. MMPA neither sponsors nor endorses products or services advertised in the Messenger. You may submit your ads by:

grooving/texturing provides high quality traction in new & old concrete, fast service. Call for your below pricing 989-635-1494. BLUE RIBBON HOOF TRIMMING, LLC.

MAIL: Classified Ads | Michigan Milk Messenger

COWS UPRIGHT! Concrete

FOR SALE: 5000-4000-3000-

P.O. BOX 8002, Novi, MI 48376-8002

2500-2000-1500 OH MUELLER LATE MODEL BULK TANK MILK

EMAIL: Muszynski@mimilk.com

TANKS, complete, will trade. 1-800-558-0112.

FAX: 248-426-3412

WANTED TO BUY: USED BULK MILK TANKS, 200 gallons & larger, OPPERMAN GROOVING: We can

Concrete Grooving and Texturing Call: Jeff Brisky - Owner Toll Free: 1-800-294-1202 Cell: 1-716-353-1137

fix your scabbled floors. Diamond sawed grooves, no hammering or cracking of concrete. No hoof damage. Call Opperman Grooving Inc., Portland. 517-647-7381.

Sunset & Mueller, 1-800-558-0112. DRY HAY & STRAW (large & small bales) & BARLEY FOR FEED. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414. FARMERS: INCREASE YIELDS 7 PROFIT by using the 1# crop

DAVIDSON CEMENT GROOVING,

production system. Distributors

INC: NO water needed. Wider,

needed. 260-768-8137 ext. 1

rougher grooves for better traction. We also offer texturing for your previously grooved floors. 3

ALPHALFA HAYLAGE (excellent & fair grades) & CORN SILAGE. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

operators will travel Michigan and other states. No interest payment

MICHIGAN CERTIFIED WHEAT

terms. Est. since 1987.

SEED red & white, fall barley seed. 989-723-1886 or 989-277-1414.

Call 1-800-365-3361. CONCRETE GROOVING BY

HERD OF DAIRY COWS, parlor and freestall cows. 40 years of AI

TRI-STATE SCABBLING, home of

breeding. First, second and third

the 2” wide groove. Best traction,

lactation. $2,500. Doyle David

lowest prices. (800) 554-2288.

989-343-0756 or 989-254-0213.

www.tristatescabbling.com

Prescott, Michigan

REGISTERED HOLSTEIN BULLS OVER 100 SERVICE AGE BULLS FOR YOUR SELECTION!

PTO and Automatic Start Generators

A special herd sire or a truck load of breeder bulls. Ready to go to work on your farm!

• Sired by the top sires from the U.S. and Canada • From our top production cows

1-800-248-8070 M-40 South Hamilton, MI 49419

GREEN MEADOW FARMS

www.hamiltondist.com

www.greenmeadowfarms.com

6400 Hollister Road, Elsie, MI 48831 Phone: 989-862-4291

NOVEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

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MARKET REPORT

Statistical Summary | FOR MILK MARKETED IN SEPTEMBER 2016 Market Statistics - Mideast Federal Order #33 (pounds)

National Trends*

This Month

Year Ago

% Change

Total Class 1 Sales

560,578,781

521,387,256

+7.52

Production

Total Class 2 Sales

342,994,480

357,069,564

-3.94

Total Class 3 Sales

340,680,667

454,263,865

-25.00

Total Class 4 Sales

256,294,906

227,743,273

+12.54

1,500,548,834

1,560,463,958

-3.84

37.4%

33.4%

Total Production Class 1 Utilization

Mideast Federal Order #33 Total Producers........................................................................................................ 5,377 Avg. Daily Production per farm.......................................................................9,302 Avg. Protein Test....................................................................................................3.04%

(million pounds)

% 2016

2015

California

3,170

3,172

-0.1

Wisconsin

2,439

2,360

+3.3

New York

1,209

1,153

+4.9

Idaho

1,228

1,171

+4.9

Pennsylvania

867

856

+1.3

Michigan

874

826

+5.8

Texas

869

825

+5.3

Minnesota

770

752

+2.4

New Mexico

625

633

-1.3

Washington

543

536

+1.3

Ohio

442

442

+0.0

Indiana

332

326

+1.8

Change

Avg. Butterfat Test................................................................................................3.64% Avg. Oth Solids Test............................................................................................. 5.73% Avg. SCC - MMPA..............................................................................................186,000

Component Pricing Information Mideast Federal Order #33

Total U.S.*

15,975 15,609

+2.3

Butterfat Price /lb............................................................................................ $2.3082

U.S. Y-T-D*

150,083 147,417

+1.8

Other Solids Price /lb......................................................................................$0.1096

* For 23 States

Protein Price /lb.................................................................................................$2.5675

Class III Price @ 3.5%..........................................................................................$16.39 Prod. Price Diff /cwt. - Mich Mkt.................................................................($0.32) Uniform Price at 3.51...........................................................................................$16.07 SCC Adjustment /cwt /1000..................................................................$0.00088

AMS Survey Prices Product

Monthly Avg

Cheese /lb..................................................................................................................1.7514 Butter /lb................................................................................................................. 2.0775 Nonfat Dry Milk /lb.............................................................................................0.8847 Dry Whey /lb.......................................................................................................0.3055

34

MESSENGER | NOVEMBER 2016


MMPA STAFF MERCHANDISE

MMPA Field Staff*

Novi Headquarters

Northwest Area Supervisor Ben Chapin, Blanchard......................................989-289-0731

Main Office Local line...................................................... 248-474-6672 Toll free......................................................... 800-572-5824

Energy Auditor Frank Brazeau, Oconto, WI................................906-250-0337

General Manager Joe Diglio................................................................ ext. 200

Animal Care Coordinator Deb Gingrich, Leroy...........................................248-520-3580

Chief Financial Officer Josep Barenys......................................................... ext. 240

Lyndsay Earl, Ludington.....................................231-519-2455

Member and Government Relations Sheila Burkhardt..................................................... ext. 208

Sarah Michalek, Portland...................................248-305-0537 Dirk Okkema, Blanchard.................................. 248-756-2062

Board of Directors

Quality Amandeep Dhillon.................................................. ext. 305

Officers

Manufactured Product Sales Jim Dodson............................................................. ext. 229

Mark Halbert, Vice President

Laboratory Supervisor Patti Huttula........................................................... ext. 219

Joe Diglio, GM / Secretary

Member Services Dean Letter................................................... 989-289-9251

Todd Hoppe, General Counsel

Bridget Moore, Snover......................................231-414-4539

Milk Sales/Dispatch Carl Rasch............................................................... ext. 244

Directors-At-Large

South Area

Credit/Insurance Cheryl Schmandt.................................................... ext. 210

Northeast Area Supervisor & Mastitis Management Specialist Christy Dinsmoore, Fairgrove.............................248-513-7920 Animal Care Coordinator, Energy Auditor Lindsay Green, East Lansing...............................989-488-8159 Ben Butcher, Durand.........................................248-514-5273 Ashley Herriman, Alpena...................................269-245-6632

Supervisor & Energy Auditor Ed Zuchnik, Three Rivers....................................269-967-7351 Dave Brady, Grass Lake..... 517-522-5965 or (c) 517-937-9061 Elyse Martin, Charlotte......................................810-701-6460 Joe Packard, Manchester...................................248-520-3481 Krista Schrock, Orland, IN..................................269-986-6792 Emily Smith, Bronson.........................................269-535-0822 Brittni Tucker, Elsie.............................................248-880-3785

Other Services Technical Area Supervisor & Mastitis Mgt. Specialist Steve Lehman, Ithaca....... 989-875-3441 or (c) 989-330-1638 Bulk Tank Calibration John Lehman, Elsie............................................248-444-6775 Merchandise Coordinator, Energy Auditor Katie Pierson, Coleman.....................................989-289-9686 Andrea Meade, Livonia......................................248-880-4113

Management Information Systems Gregory Schulkey.................................................... ext. 237 Andrew Caldwell.....................................................ext. 304 Communications Allison Stuby........................................................... ext. 296 Member Relations Jessica Welch.......................................................... ext. 303 Human Resources Bill Zoli.................................................................... ext. 301

Manufacturing Plants Constantine Dave Davis, Plant Manager............................ 269-435-2835 Ovid Colt Johnson, Plant Manager........................ 989-834-2221

MMPA Labs In Michigan....................................................800-572-5824 Ovid (Daily, 6 a.m.-10 p.m.)..................... 989-834-2515 Constantine (Daily, 7 a.m.-10 p.m.).........800-391-7560

Main Line......................................................... 989-317-8370 Toll Free............................................................ 877-367-6455 Orders (Novi)..................................800-572-5824, then dial 2 Fax................................................................... 989-317-8372

Josep Barenys, Asst. Treasurer

Ken Nobis, St. Johns 989-224-6170 or 248-474-6672, ext. 201 Rodney Daniels, Whittemore 989-756-4935 Gertie van den Goor, Marlette 989-550-8453 Mark Halbert, Battle Creek 269-964-0511 James Reid, Jeddo 810-327-6830 District Directors 1. Hank Choate Cement City 517-529-9032 2. Tim Hood Paw Paw 269-657-5771 3. David Pyle Zeeland 616-772-1512

5. Doug Chapin Remus 231-972-0535

Toll Free 800-233-2405

Supervisor: Duane Farmer

Eric Frahm, Treasurer

4. Corby Werth Alpena 989-464-5436

Novi (Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-4:30 p.m.)

Merchandise - Mt. Pleasant

Ken Nobis, President

*If you are unable to reach your assigned member representative, please contact the representatives listed in your area.

6. Tony Jandernoa Fowler 989-593-2224 7. Eric Frahm Frankenmuth 989-652-3552 8. Scott Lamb Jeddo 810-327-6135

NOVEMBER 2016 | MESSENGER

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