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:DUULRU J O I N T March 21, 2014 Vol. 5, No. 11

B A S E

L A N G L E Y - E U S T I S

P u b l i s h e d i n t h e i n t e re s t o f p e r s o n n e l a t J o i n t B a s e L a n g l e y - E u s t i s

ARMY EDITION

w w w. p e n i n s u l a w a r r i o r. c o m

TRADOC welcomes new YOUTH MINISTRY

Fort Eustis chapel kicks off spring program — Page 2

DIVERS

From guppies to great whites — Page 12

For more online content, check out www.JBLE.af.mil

$LU )RUFH 1HZV

HEALTHCARE Dental residents hone dental, leadeship skills — Page 10

commanding general – Page 3


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Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editorial Staff Joint Base Langley-Eustis Commander Col. John J. Allen Jr. Joint Base Langley-Eustis Public Affairs Officer Capt. Kevin Whitlatch • kevin.whitlatch@us.af.mil Joint Base Langley-Eustis Editor SrA Jason Brown • jason.brown.80@us.af.mil Fort Eustis Managing Editor Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward • fteustismain@gmail.com Per Air Force Instruction 35-101/Army Regulation 360-1, only stories and photos submitted by members of the Department of Defense community and DOD news services may be printed inThe PeninsulaWarrior. Any stories, photos or announcements must be submitted eight days prior to publication. Stories and photos should be submitted to the editor and/or assistant editor at 633abw.paedit@langley.af.mil or Public Affairs Office, 601 Hines Cir., Fort Eustis,VA 23604. Announcements for the Community Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. Announcements for the Outside the Gate Section should be submitted to fteustismain@gmail.com. For more information call 757-878-4920. Authors’ names may be withheld, but all letters must include the authors’ signatures and telephone number. The Peninsula Warrior is an authorized publication for all the members of the U.S. military. Contents of The Peninsula Warrior are not necessarily the official views of, or endorsed by, the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, Department of the Air Force or the Department of the Army. The PeninsulaWarrior is printed every Friday by offset as a civilian enterprise newspaper for the Public Affairs Office, U.S. Air Force by Military Newspapers of Virginia at 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510 under exclusive written contract with the commander, Joint Base LangleyEustis. MNV is a private firm in no way connected with the Department of the Air Force or Department of the Army. Printed circulation: 25,000. Everything advertised in this publication shall be made available for purchase, use or patronage without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, marital status, physical handicap, political affiliation or any other non-merit factor of the purchaser, user or patron. A confirmed violation or rejection of this policy of equal opportunity by any advertiser will result in refusal to print advertising from that source. All editorial content of The Peninsula Warrior is prepared, edited, provided and approved by the Public Affairs Office Joint Base LangleyEustis. All photographs are Air Force or Army photographs unless otherwise stated. The appearance of advertising in this publication, including inserts and supplements, does not constitute endorsement by the Department of Defense or MNV of the products or services advertised.

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA • HOME OFFICE: 150 W. Brambleton Ave., Norfolk, VA 23510 (757) 222-3990 • ADVERTISING SALES: 728 Blue Crab Road, Suite C, Newport News, VA 23606; (757) 596-0853; fax (757) 596-1473

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MARCH 21, 2014

)RUW (XVWLV FKDSHO NLFNV RII VSULQJ \RXWK PLQLVWU\ SURJUDP By Senior Airman Teresa J.C. Aber 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

In order to provide religious education for younger community members, the Regimental Memorial Chapel at Fort Eustis kicked off their spring non-denominational youth ministry program for youth ages 12-18 beginning Feb. 23. RMC reaches out to the local military community through church services, prayer breakfasts, youth groups, choirs, Bible studies and relationshipbuilding programs. Genevieve Hughes, RMC religious education director, has been recruiting volunteers and preparing for the kick-off since her arrival at Fort Eustis last October. “I served the community [at Langley Air Force Base] for more than five years and developed a youth ministry program that currently serves as the model for Fort Eustis,” said Hughes. “We have been training our future volunteers for Fort Eustis every Sunday at Langley during their congregation, which has given our folks some hands-on training and allowed some of our teens at Fort Eustis to participate as well.” Teens who participate in the program will have opportunities to attend retreats and worship services to discuss topics they may be struggling with relevant to school, home and society.

Courtesy photo

Members of the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Disciples Ready-In Mobilized Evangelization team perform during the annual Diocesan Youth Conference at the Richmond Convention Center, March 15.The JBLE DRIME team provides unity among youth who reach out to the community through their faith.

Topics include the Christian response to bullying, challenges to discipleship, making moral decisions, justice and truth, dating with purpose and dignity, finding their path and choices and commitments. Sessions include chaplain activities, such as icebreakers and small and large group discussions. The program also integrates the use of technology using Youtube clips and an online curriculum. The chapel has implemented joint activities with the Langley Chapel, which will help offset the costs of the program and provide unity and shared experiences among the youth. One of these programs is the Disciples Ready-In Mobilized Evangelization Team, a group Hughes describes as a form of “body worship combined with flash mob dance.” “We have a group of teens ages 14-18

Heritage Spotlight For nine months, Petersburg Va. was under siege by the Army of the Potomac and the Union commander, Gen. Ulysses S. Grant. The two great armies fought a bloody campaign in the spring of 1864, then settled into trenches that eventually stretched for 50 miles around Petersburg and the Confederate capital of Richmond. Lee could not win this war of attrition, but his men held out through the winter of 1864 to 1865. Lee realized the growing Yankee army could overwhelm his diminishing force when the spring brought better weather for an assault. He ordered Gen. John B. Gordon to find a weak point in the Federal defenses and attack. Gordon selected Fort Stedman, an earthen redoubt

who have performed in various venues including Busch Gardens in 2012,” said Hughes. “The DRIME team consists of both Catholic and Protestant teens working together to reach out through their faith to the community and perform.” The youth ministry program sessions meet at the RMC every Sunday through May 11. Hughes and the volunteers plan to implement a summer program and continue services into the fall and throughout the school year. “The chaplains, volunteers and I look forward to expanding the youth ministry programs and working with the youth of the Fort Eustis community,” said Hughes. “The only thing they have to do now is show up and get involved.” For more information, call the Fort Eustis Regimental Memorial Chapel at 878-5482.

The Battle of Fort Stedman with a moat and 9-foot walls. Although imposing, Gordon believed it offered the greatest chance for success since it was located just 150 yards from the Confederate lines--the narrowest gap along the entire front. On March 25, 1865, Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee made Fort Stedman his last attack of the Civil War in a desperate attempt to break out of Petersburg, Va. Some 11,000 Rebels hurled themselves at the Union lines. They overwhelmed the surprised Yankees at Fort Stedman and captured 1,000 yards of trenches. After daylight, however, the Confederate momentum waned. Gordon’s men took up defensive positions, and Union reinforcements arrived to turn the tide. The Reb-

els were unable to hold the captured ground, and were driven back to their original position. The Union lost around 1,000 men killed, wounded, and captured, while Lee lost approximately three-times that number, including some 1,500 captured during the retreat. Lee wrote to Confederate President Jefferson Davis that it would be impossible to maintain the Petersburg line much longer.The attack failed, and within a week, Lee evacuated his positions around Petersburg. On March 29, Grant began his offensive, and Petersburg fell on April 3. Two weeks after the Battle of Fort Stedman, Lee surrendered to Grant at Appomattox Court House, Va.

Courtesy photo

We want to hear from you. Contact us at fteustismain@gmail.com and 633abw.paedit@langley.af.mil or call 878-4920 or 764-2144.


MARCH 21, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

www.peninsulawarrior.com

TRADOC welcomes Perkins as next commanding general By Senior Airman Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

U.S. Army Gen. David Perkins assumed command of U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command from Gen. Robert Cone during a change of command ceremony at Fort Eustis, March 14. U.S. Army Chief of Staff Gen. Raymond Odierno was the guest speaker at the event. “Today, we have an opportunity to not only recognize two great leaders, but to celebrate TRADOC,” said Odierno. “Whether developing leaders, concepts or capabilities, TRADOC is dedicated to sustaining our Army and simultaneously moving [it] into the future.” Cone said he believed it necessary to have another exceptional leader take his place as he finishes his tenure in the Army. “I loved commanding here at TRADOC, but it is necessary to bring [new ideas] to the force and I am happy to see [Perkins] take the position,” said Cone. “TRADOC develops options for our total force, and I am gratified to pass that [responsibility] to an expert like [Perkins].” Perkins said he knows the tasks before him, and thanks to his predecessors, he hopes to con-

tinue the work Cone and the TRADOC team started. “After accepting the [TRADOC] colors today, I understood the responsibility placed in my rucksack,” said Perkins. “As we design the Army, we also design the future of our nation, and that is a responsibility I will not take lightly.” Perkins also explained his commitment not only to the American people, but to a U.S. Army Soldier on the front line who knew he was a part of TRADOC. “During [a deployment], a young [Soldier] came up to me and said he hopes I’ll ‘get it right,’ because those instructions and orders keep him alive,” said Perkins. “I hope to meet the standards set by [senior Army leadership], but my true commitment is to that [Soldier] and all the others fighting each and every day.” Perkins highlighted a few of the missions he hopes to improve. “During the downsizing of our force, it is critical to develop our leadership effectively,” said Perkins. “Individual responsibility will be higher in a smaller Army, but that doesn’t mean we will do less. We will look at different ways to accomplish the Army mission.”

Photo by Senior Airman Teresa J.C. Aber

U.S. Army Gen. David Perkins, incoming U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command commander, addresses the audience during a change of command ceremony at Fort Eustis, March 14. Perkins is the 15th general to take command of TRADOC. Perkins hails from New Hampshire.

Perkins assumes command after serving as the U.S. Army Combined Arms Center commanding general. He graduated from the United States Military Academy at West Point with a bachelor’s degree in science. Additionally, he received a master’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Michigan and a master’s degree in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College. For Cone, who commanded TRADOC since April 29, 2011, the change of command completes his last assignment before his retirement.

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“During [a deployment], a young [Soldier] came up to me and said he hopes I’ll ‘get it right,’ because those instructions and orders keep him alive. I hope to meet the standards set by [senior Army leadership], but my true commitment is to that [Soldier] and all the others fighting each and every day.” – U.S. Army Gen. David Perkins incoming U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command commander

6SRXVHV VXSSRUW VFKRRO )(6& GRQDWHV FORWKHV WR ORFDO VFKRRO By Senior Airman Austin Harvill 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Military spouses spend a lot of their time supporting U.S. Service members through attending unit functions, holding down the fort during deployments and, most importantly, by showing love and gratitude for their husbands and wives. Despite hectic schedules and family commitments, many spouses still find time to extend the service-wide dedication to the nation through volunteer events in their communities and beyond. The Fort Eustis Spouses’ Club maintains this spirit through numerous fundraisers, morale events and charities. Recently, they’ve focused their efforts on Project Prom, a program for nearby Woodside High School, designed to give girls and boys the opportunity to go to prom, regardless of their financial constraints. In addition, the FESC donates business attire so seniors looking for jobs after high school have something to wear to interviews, or other professional events like in-school internships and extracurricular business programs. “Without our communities, we would be lost. I think mil-

Photo by Senior Airman Austin Harvill

Karen Halverson (left) and Holly Dailey, Fort Eustis Spouses’ Club members, load clothes for donation in Newport News, March 10.

itary families as a whole really understand that concept, so naturally we want to build those up,” said Holly Dailey, FESC honorary vice president. “All of the spouses at Fort Eustis put that enthusiasm into practice via [Project Prom].” The majority of the Fort Eustis community’s teenagers

attend WHS, and the FESC members understand what it means to struggle to make ends meet and still give children the chance to be kids. “During this recent downturn in the economy, we want to make sure our community’s high school students could be just that: high school students,” said Dailey. “We don’t want them worrying about money – we want them to enjoy being kids.” FESC donations comprised more than 50 percent of the total donations this year, said Gracie Aponte-Hart, Project Prom sponsor. “Together, with Menchville High School, Project Prom helped 18 kids go to prom nearly free of charge,” said Aponte-Hart. “The donations weren’t just the clothes- the [FESC] and others donated money to help the young ladies and gentlemen with haircuts, accessories, tickets and anything else they needed for that perfect prom experience.” Aponte-Hart hopes to see the program grow across the northern Hampton Roads area, and with dedicated spouses from the FESC, Fort Eustis will be there every step of the way. To donate, contact Dailey at 660-2142 or holly dailey@ bajabb.com.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MARCH 21, 2014 Beginning March 18, the 633rd Air BaseWing Safety Office will offer multiple motorcycle safety courses throughout the Spring and Summer months. Before taking one of the advanced courses provided at JBLE, riders must take the Beginner Rider Course, consisting of a 5-hour class and approximately 10 hours on a motorcycle.

UNLOCK OPPORTUNITY WITH A CYBERSECURITY DEGREE FROM UMUC

Photo by Airman 1st Class Austin Harvill

UG $%: 6DIHW\ RIIHUV $LUPHQ PDQGDWRU\ PRWRUF\FOH FRXUVHV By Senior Airman Teresa J.C. Aber 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Prepare for a career in a fast-growing industry offering high-paying job opportunities. Get noticed with a bachelor’s or master’s degree in cybersecurity from University of Maryland University College (UMUC). Our innovative online educational programs; cutting-edge curriculum; and award-winning, globally ranked cyber competition team have helped make us a recognized leader in the field. At UMUC, you can • Take courses that address industry-standard certifications on the DoD 8570 list. • Earn credit for military service, industry certifications, and DANTES and CLEP exams. • Talk to advisors who understand military benefits.

• Continue your program wherever you go with online classes.

AT YOUR SERVICE SINCE 1947 Ì

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On-site classes offered this spring at Joint Base Langely Eustis and everywhere online Call 757-510-3787 or visit military.umuc.edu/jblecyber

As the snow begins to melt and temperatures rise, motorcyclists can look forward to brushing the dust off their bikes and hitting the roads. However, they must first brush up on safety. Beginning March 18, the 633rd Air Base Wing Safety Office will offer multiple motorcycle safety courses on Tuesdays and Wednesdays throughout the spring and summer months. “Many Service members don’t realize the courses are required, even if they are not planning to ride on base,” said Dawn Joyner, 633rd ABW Safety technician. “The courses are mandatory for any personnel at Joint Base Langley-Eustis who wish to ride a motorcycle.” According to Department of Defense Instruction 6055.4, DoD Traffic Safety Program, all requirements for motorcycle operations apply to: Active-duty military on or off any DoD installation ■ DoD civilians when the motorcycle is operated on a DoD installation, and off the installation if the individual is in a duty status. ■ All others when the motorcycle is operated on the installation. In addition, riders must be properly licensed to operate a motorcycle in Virginia or by their home state of record before taking the courses. Outside of the required training cours-

es, the DoD mandates the following clothing and personal protective equipment must be worn at all times when operating a motorcycle: ■ Department of Transportation or Snellcertified motorcycle helmet. ■ Full-fingered gloves designed for motorcycle operation. ■ Long-sleeved upper garment ■ Long pants ■ Sturdy, over-the-ankle boots with a heel ■ Foot protection – sturdy, over-the-ankle footwear that affords protection for the feet and ankles. ■ Eye protection – goggles, shatter resistance glasses or helmet face shield. Fairing windshield does not meet requirement ■ Daylight operation – Brightly covered upper garment or reflective material such as a vest worn over all other garments. Vests may be worn over military uniforms while operating motorcycle. The courses at JBLE are limited to 12 individuals per class, and active-duty military personnel from both installations receive priority. All motorcycle training will be conducted at Fort Eustis. Before taking one of the advanced courses provided at JBLE, riders must take the Beginner Rider Course, consisting of a 5-hour class and approximately 10 hours on a motorcycle. Riders can take the course at Fort Lee or Joint Expeditionary Base Little CreekFort Story on a stand-by basis free of charge. SEE MOTORCYCLE PAGE 7


MARCH 21, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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Friday, March 21st and Saturday, March 22nd d Star Caerd, Accept icles GSA Veohme Welc

10% O Auto S ff All For Miervice Personlitary nel

FREE ! Hot Dog

Monday-Friday 0600 to 1800 Saturday 0600 to 1700 Closed Sunday

Fort Eustis • 757-234-7577

www.FirestoneCompleteAutoCare.com

Building 1383, 13th St. Lee Boulevard

GRAND OPENING TIRE SPECIAL! Offer Valid Friday, March 21st and Saturday, March 22nd at Fort Eustis Location Only!

100

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OFF any set of four Bridgestone or Firestone tires!

See store for complete details. Redeem this coupon at your participating Firestone Complete Auto Care store. Not to be combined with another offer on same product. Offer void where prohibited.

Special

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Install new oil filter, refill up to 5 quarts Kendall ® motor oil. Price includes oil filter recycling. Good synthetic blend $18.99 Better high mileage $28.99 Best full synthetic $38.99

Inspect steering and suspension, align to manufacturer’s specifications.

save now thru 3/31/14 Most vehicles.. See store for complete service description and details. Redeem this coupon at your participating Firestone Complete Auto Care store. Not to be combined with another offer on same product or service and not to be used to reduce outstanding debt. No cash value. Offer void where prohibited.

Special

10

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25

OFF Most vehicles.

save now thru 3/31/14 Save off regular price. See store for complete service description and details. Redeem this coupon at your participating Firestone Complete Auto Care store. Not to be combined with another offer on same product or service and not to be used to reduce outstanding debt. No cash value. Offer void where prohibited.

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Install new brake pads, resurface rotors, inspect brake components.

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save now thru 3/31/14 Save off regular price.

save now thru 3/31/14 Save off regular price.

See store for complete service description and details. Redeem this coupon at your participating Firestone Complete Auto Care store. Not to be combined with another offer on same product or service and not to be used to reduce outstanding debt. No cash value. Offer void where prohibited.

See store for complete service description and details. Redeem this coupon at your participating Firestone Complete Auto Care store. Not to be combined with another offer on same product or service and not to be used to reduce outstanding debt. No cash value. Offer void where prohibited.

A FLAT SCREEN TV OR APPLE iPAD PLUS, OTHER IN-STORE PRIZE DRAWINGS DURING THE WEEKEND CELEBRATION.

◊New to the Neighborhood Sweepstakes sponsored by Firestone Auto Care: During our grand opening weekend celebration, this new store will draw and award two (2) Apple iPads and two (2) flat-panel TVs from entries received. Winner need not be present to claim prize. No purchase necessary to enter. A purchase will not increase your chances of winning. Odds of winning subject to the number of entries received. Open to legal residents of all 50 United States and Washington D.C., must be 18 years of age or older to participate. Void where prohibited or restricted by law. For complete official rules, see participating Firestone Complete Auto Care locations or send a self addressed stamped envelope to Firestone Complete Auto Care New to the Neighborhood Sweepstakes, 333 East Lake Street, Bloomingdale, IL Shop supply charges in the amount of 6% of labor charges will be added to invoices greater than $35. These charges will not exceed $25 and represent costs and profits. Shop supply charges not applicable in CA or NY. Non-mandated disposal or recycling charges, if any are disclosed above, may also represent costs and profits. *If you do not achieve guaranteed mileage on your properly maintained tires, your Firestone retailer will replace your tires on a pro-rated basis. Actual tread life may vary. All warranties apply only to original owner on originally installed vehicle. See retailer for details, restrictions and copy of each limited warranty.

(Behind Burger King)

Fun for the kids on Friday and Saturday from 11am to 2pm. Appearance by Spider Man and Bubbles the Clown! Plus Bounce House. Pictures at “Bubbles by Wanda”

ENTER FOR YOUR CHANCE TO

WIN!

Friday, 3/21 and Saturday 3/22


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MARCH 21, 2014

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By Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

For U.S. Air Force Airmen on the hunt for the next stripe, the Weighted Airman Promotion System lays the groundwork for accessions. The system is used by the U.S. Air Force to select Airmen for promotion to the grades of staff sergeant, technical sergeant and master sergeant. As the 2014 testing cycle approaches, Airmen at Langley Air Force Base are buckling down to get some serious study time in before test day. WAPS is comprised of six factors that measure an Airman’s potential, which include the Specialty Knowledge Test, Promotion Fitness Examination, decorations and Enlisted Performance Report, time in service and time in grade. Each section is weighted objectively in relation of its importance of advancement. These values, measured in points, are totaled, resulting in an Airman’s WAPS score.

The PFE and SKT together are accomplished by promotion hopefuls each year. Each 100-question exam tests Airmen on Air Force knowledge and career field information. “Every person studies and comprehends differently; I simply had to read and re-read the Professional Development Guide seven times to get it to stick,” said U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. Samantha Lyman, 633rd Force Support Squadron career assistance advisor. “WAPS studying is all about what works for you. There are many different methods, but what may work for some does not always work for others.” There are multiple resources available that cover the material needed to succeed, such as electronic flashcards, mobile applications, audio books and free testing websites. “Every Airmen should be familiar with the Air Force Instructions and the evaluation systems,” said Master Sgt. Liesbeth Bowen, 633rd Air Base Wing Staff Agencies first ser-

geant. “But once you understand the promotion process, you will be more confident and successful at improving your WAPS score.” Senior Airman Trevor Harenza, 1st Maintenance Squadron munitions technician and current Airman Leadership School student, said a lot of what is tested on can only come from hands on training and being involved with the organization. “I always made an effort to learn something new at work that applied to my Career Development Courses,” said Harenza. “By actively learning and keeping track of your progress, you will acquire all the skills you need to do the job efficiently, which in turn could help you score well on the test.” Reviewing past performance reports with previous evaluators or a supervisor will help you to recognize the areas that you are weak in and should devote extra attention to, said Harenza. For more information, visit www.omsq.af.mil/TE/EPRRC.pdf or www.omsq.af.mil/PD/.

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MARCH 21, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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JBLE job fair expands career opportunities By Airman 1st Class Victoria H. Taylor 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

TheArmyCareerandAlumniProgramwilljoinforceswiththe Army Community Service and the Virginia Employment Commission to host a job fair, March 27, at the Fort Eustis Club from 9 a.m.to2p.m. The job fair will be open to all active-duty U.S. Service members,Reservists,NationalGuardsmen,retireesandmilitaryspouses.Theeventisscheduledtofeaturemorethan70employersseekingcandidatesinavarietyofcareerfields. Employers present will include federal agencies, government contractors and private sector employers in law enforcement, healthcare and associated fields, seeking professionals with militaryexperience. “The job fair is targeted specifically to those with military training and experience,� said Reba Gordon, ACAP transition service manager. “Employers are encouraged to conduct on-site interviews,soattendeesshouldbeprepared.� Gordon said job fair attendees should come “dressed for success,� and should have several copies of their resumes in hand. Participants are encouraged to pre-registeratwww.eventbrite.com/e/jnble-jobfair-tickets-10734921439 to secure a listing ofemployersandmakeareservation.

MOTORCYCLE FROM PAGE 4 JBLE is now offering BRC on a reimbursement plan with local colleges. All active-duty Service members assigned to JBLE who use this option will be reimbursed the training fee. The Service member must have a Memorandum for Reimbursement from the 633rd ABW Safety ofďŹ ce with their unit commander’s signature of approval before taking the course, which the member must pay for. After successfully completing BRC, the member must present the signed letter and the BRC completion card to the 633rd ABW Safety ofďŹ ce for reimbursement. The BRC-2 is available to riders who own a motorcycle and have completed the BRC. Riders must be properly licensed, have their own motorcycle, possess a valid state inspection and maintain registration and proper insurance. There is no classroom portion for this course. “Participants will ride for approximately six hours with their own bikes,â€? said Joyner. “The courses are designed to teach students how to handle their speciďŹ c bike and ďŹ ne tune their skills on the road.â€? Much like the experienced course, MSRC is designed to perfect a rider’s skills, but it deals speciďŹ cally with sport bikes because they require different training. Interested riders should contact the 633rd ABW Safety ofďŹ ce at 501-8261, 501-8230 or email usaf.jble.633-abw.mbx.eustis-safety-ofďŹ ce@mail.mil. The Langley Safety ofďŹ ce can be reached at 764-5058.

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

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MARCH 21, 2014

FeatureStory

-%/( KRVWV &DQDGLDQ $LU &DGHWV VWUHQJWKHQV LQWHUQDWLRQDO ERQGV By Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Photos by Staff Sgt. Katie Gar Ward

ABOVE: U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Christopher Elder, B Company, 2nd Battalion, 210th Aviation Regiment, 128th Aviation Brigade instructor, explains cockpit controls of a UH-60 Black Hawk maintenance trainer to Canadian Air Cadets from the 180th Mosquito Squadron during a tour at Fort Eustis, March 12. RIGHT: Canadian Air Cadets from the 180th Mosquito Squadron learn about obedience training toys during a military working dog demonstration with the 3rd Military Police Detachment at Fort Eustis. More than 50 cadets watched MWD obedience and search training, an aggression demonstration and used patrol car equipment.

Photo by Airman 1st Class R. Alex Durbin

Royal Canadian Air Cadets from the 342nd Bedford Lions Squadron listen to a brieďŹ ng at the 633rd Logistics Readiness Squadron during a tour of Langley Air Force Base, March 12. The tour showed more than 30 cadets the U.S. military mission, teaching them about international partnerships.

U.S. Service members from Joint Base Langley-Eustis hosted more than 100 Royal Canadian Air Cadets from the 180th Mosquito Squadron, 173rd Tiger Squadron and the 342nd Bedford Lions Squadron, March 12 and 13. The tours on each installation showed the Canadian units the U.S. military mission, teaching the cadets about international partnerships. The tours also upheld the Canadian Air Cadet Program mission to bring the military ethos to youth and develop citizenship, said Jonathon Levy, 180th Mosquito Squadron civilian instructor and administration ofďŹ cer. “Being a military-sponsored organization, we try to focus on learning military structure, speciďŹ cally aviation,â€? said Levy. “We hope to see what other countries’ military organizations are like. The cadets love [the experiences].â€? The 180th Mosquito Squadron visited Fort Eustis, touring the U.S. Army Transportation Museum, 128th Aviation Brigade, 7th Transportation Brigade (Expeditionary) vessels at 3rd Port, and received a military working dog demonstration from the 3rd Military Police Detachment. U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Hector Reyes, 3rd MP Det. plans and training noncommissioned ofďŹ cer, facilitated a demonstration by explaining the various training aspects to the cadets and showcasing patrol car equipment to the 180th Mosquito Squadron. At Langley Air Force Base, The 342nd Bedford Lions Squadron visited the 633rd Logistics Readiness Squadron, 633rd Security Forces Squadron and the Shellbank Fitness Center. The unit ďŹ nished the visit with a meal at the Crossbow dining facility. U.S. Air Force Tech. Sgt. Mark Leslie, 633rd SFS MWD kennel master, led a demonstration and answered cadets’ questions. Leslie said the demonstration taught the cadets about JBLE’s joint mission. “We do a number of military working dog demonstrations every year for junior ROTC units and members of the public. I like having fun with the kids while also trying to teach them something about the mission,â€? he said. “The international cadets seemed interested [in our mission] and asked a lot of questions to better understand what we do.â€? The following day, the 342nd Bedford Lion

“Being a military-sponsored organization, we try to focus on learning military structure, speciďŹ cally aviation. We hope to see what other countries’ military organizations are like. The cadets love [the experiences].â€? — Jonathon Levy 180th Mosquito Squadron civilian instructor and administration ofďŹ cer

and 173rd Tiger Squadrons teamed with the Civil Air Patrol’s Langley Composite Squadron to tackle the leadership obstacle course at Fort Eustis. Cadet Rolan Naiman, 17, 180th Mosquito Squadron warrant ofďŹ cer, said the trip was “unique and a beneďŹ cial experience.â€? “It was really interesting because we got to see how diverse the U.S. [military] is,â€? he said. “Within our cadet program, we can be in our own ‘bubble’ in Canada. We do promote global citizenship in the program, and [tours like this] tie to the classroom. It puts [cadets’] hands on equipment we learn about.â€? While the tour was beneďŹ cial to the cadets, Leslie said the tour had far-reaching effects, helping to foster strong international relationships. “It is important to share our American military culture with our international allies so they can get a better understanding of the way we operate,â€? he said. “While conducting joint operations, many [Service members] have the opportunity to work hand-in-hand with other nations. Sharing our culture and understanding each other is a necessity to working together.â€?


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HealthCare

Photo by Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle

U.S. Air Force Capt. Julie Anderson, 633rd Dental Squadron advanced educational general dentistry resident and Airman 1st Class JacobYglecias, 633rd DS dental assistant, perform a dental procedure at Langley Air Force Base, March 13.Anderson is part of the AEGD program, a one-year residency that provides new dentists clinical, in-class and hospital experience at the post-doctoral level. Anderson hails from Florence, Ky. andYglecias from El Paso,Texas.

Dental residents hone dental, leadership skills at Langley YOU LIVED IT. NOW USE IT. Your military training and previous college courses may have earned you credits toward a Bachelor’s degree. Learn more about your potential transfer credits and the Ashford Military Grant to get a head start on your education. CALL 888.841.2458 VISIT MILITARY.ASHFORD.EDU

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By Airman 1st Class Kimberly Nagle 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

With more than 300,000 U.S. Air Force Airmen stationed world-wide, proper dental care is critical to maintaining a capable, mission-ready force. Fortunately, the U.S. Air Force has a program to help train new dentists to keep Airmen mission ready. After completing medical school and Air Force Officer Training School, a select few new Air Force dentists will get the opportunity to become a resident at one of 10 possible assignments, through the Advanced Educational General Dentistry program. At Langley Air Force Base, up to six residents are able to train at the 633rd Dental Squadron, through the one-year program, which provides clinical, in-class and hospital experience at the post-doctoral level. “The residents use this as an additional training to advance their skills,” said U.S. Air Force Col. Joseph Muhlbauer, 633rd

Dental Squadron dental residency flight commander. “They also get the opportunity to hone their leadership skills.” The residents train further on anesthesia, pediatric or child dentistry, and receive forensic training. “They learn a lot more skills [than they do right out of school],” said Muhlbauer. “[After they complete the training] they are able to go to a smaller base and have the ability to do so much more.” The residents get to work on active-duty U.S. Service members, and civilian patients. During each of their rotations, the dentists are supervised by specialists in that field. “[We] get to learn from specialists and receive advanced training [while in the program],” said Capt. Adam Eichler, AEGD resident. “I feel more prepared now than when I first started [the program]. Muhlbauer said the program is a “confidence builder,” giving residents an extra year of education and exposure to more complicated dental work.


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The U.S. Army Advanced Individual Training school at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., trains a special brand of U.S. Army Soldiers who can weld, build and tear down just about anything. These Soldiers, armed with concrete, caulk and carbide drills, construct everything from concrete monoliths to rebar fortifications - and they do it all underwater. These special engineers undergo different training, and are held to a higher standard by both the Army and the dive teams at Fort Eustis. “Our Soldiers must exceed the standard set forth for others in almost every category,” explained U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Milton Prater, 569th Engineer Detachment (Dive), 30th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade. “Before they even come to [this unit], they have already outperformed other Soldiers who could have been here.” After Basic Combat Training, dive students undergo phase one of their training at Fort Leonard Wood. For three weeks, they learn the basics of diving, spending hours in a pool practicing breathing techniques and proper form. They also learn a specific branch of medical treatment called dive medicine, which focuses on underwater medical conditions, such as decompression sickness, more commonly known as “the bends.” “We look at phase one as a weeding-out process in addition to their rudimentary training,” said Capt. Daniel Arnold, 569th Eng. Det. Commander. “They are put through a lot of physical and mental testing to ensure we receive only the best and brightest.” After the rigors of phase one, those divers who passed travel to the Naval Diving and Salvage Training Center in Panama City, Fla., for their final phase of training. Here they work with divers of all branches for six months to learn more of their craft skills like underwater welding, construction and concrete pouring, in addition to more advanced dive techniques and equipment familiarization. Officers go through the same progression of phase one and two. However, they also attend additional training to prepare them for mana-

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U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Christopher Green, 74th Engineer Detachment (Dive), 30th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade first sergeant, briefs a dive team before a training scenario at Fort Eustis, March 12. Divers go through two phases of training before being assigned to a unit.

“We don’t want to go into any environment with rusty tools, and that includes are minds. Our divers need to be comfortable with the task at hand, so we provide them with the time and training to see that through.” — Capt. Daniel Arnold 569th Eng. Det. Commander

gerial positions once they graduate. Upon graduation, Soldiers become 2nd Class Divers, which means they are ready to get to work, with a little on-the-job training from their unit. “Divers from school have the capability to dive, but we don’t send them down without By Senior Airman Austin Harvill / 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS help from one of our more experienced divers,” said Prater. “Having a Salvage or Master Diver with them ensures we complete the mission effectively and set our new Soldiers up for success in their future.” The training doesn’t stop after school. In order to become a Salvage Diver, Soldiers must dive at least every 90 days, eight times a year, and they have to pass other advanced certifications. Divers must also attend the Advanced Leader Course, and upon promotion to sergeant, can wear the title of Salvage Diver. After a similar progression of OJT and certification, Soldiers who attended Senior Leader Course reach the final echelon of divers - Master Diver. However, even the most experienced divers never stop learning. “No matter if a Solider is a 2nd Class or Master Diver, there is always something to learn,” said Prater. “We have to be ready for just about anything, and it is near impossible to remain proficient in everything at once, so we train often.” Before any mission, divers take a few weeks to get familiar with the mission at hand. If the job involves excessive welding, divers will use the dive tank on post to practice their technique, which ensures mission success every time, said Arnold. “We don’t want to go into any environment with rusty tools, and that includes our minds,” said Arnold. “Our divers need to be comfortable with the task at hand, so we provide them with the time and training to see “Our Soldiers are smarter, stronger and that through.” more well-rounded than most Soldiers in With all of the training, from phase one to the Army. Before they even come to [this Master Diver certification, Prater is confident his people can get the job done. unit], they have already outperformed “I enjoy our Soldiers because they are simply other Soldiers who could have been here.” a cut above the rest,” said Prater. “With their — U.S. Army 1st Sgt. Milton Prater expertise, above-average total fitness and enPhoto byy Senior Airman Austin Harvill 569th Engineer Detachment (Dive) A 569th Engineer Detachment (Dive), 30th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade diver practices welding in preparation for a mission att Fort Eustis, March 12. thusiasm, I know we can tackle anything under the waves.” Phase one of dive training teaches U.S. Army Soldiers the fundamentals of diving and dive medicine.

Becoming an Army dive er

The 74th Engineer Detachment (Dive), 30th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade dive team prepares to dive before a training scenario at Fort Eustis, March 12. After assignment to a unit, divers still undergo in-the-job training to enhance their skills.

U.S.Army Staff Sgt. Ray Cortwright, 74th Engineer Detachment (Dive), 30th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade dive supervisor, adjusts dive equipment before training at Fort Eustis, March 12. Divers must dive once every 90 days and at least eight times a year to remain proficient.

Photos by Senior Airman Austin Harvill


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JointTaskForce

-7)&6 GLVFXVVHV PLVVLRQ ZLWK ORFDO HPHUJHQF\ UHVSRQVH WHDP By Petty Officer 1st Class Brian Dietrick JOINT TASK FORCE CIVIL SUPPORT

More than 50 local emergency response volunteers gathered for their quarterly meeting in Chesapeake, March 10, where U.S. Marine Corps Col. David Olszowy, Joint Task Force Civil Support deputy commander, was the guest speaker. Olszowy discussed the unit’s mission and the employment of a specialized response force during a man-made or natural disaster in the United States, and explained the various ways JTF-CS would provide support. “We provide planning support to various national special security events, [such as] an inauguration, a presidential summit or catastrophic event, like a nuclear detonation,” said Olszowy. “We can go from a small-scale to a large-scale event pretty quickly.” JTF-CS anticipates, plans and prepares for CBRN-Defense Support of Civil Authorities response operations and provides command and control of the defense chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear response force. The DCRF, which has 88 military units located at more than 36 locations through-

out the U.S., provides a variety of lifesaving and sustaining response operations. These operations are focused around six core capabilities: mission command, hazard identification and detection, search and rescue, decontamination, medical triage and stabilization and medical evacuation. “We have four task forces located around the country that provide our robust, wellrounded capability,” said Olszowy. “Our unit is the head of the snake that coordinates the response and provides command and control to the task forces.” While JTF-CS supports national level response, the Chesapeake Emergency Response Team provides similar support locally. The CERT is an all-volunteer team comprised of more than 200 people, most of which are U.S. military veterans. They are responsible for educating people about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area. CERT trains Chesapeake residents in basic disaster response skills, such as fire safety, team organization and disaster medical operations. “We conduct basic emergency response training classes that are about six weeks long, and we also conduct emergency response drills with surrounding cities

Photo by U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Brian Dietrick

U.S. Marine Corps Col. David Olszowy, Joint Task Force Civil Support deputy commander, explains the JTF-CS mission to the Chesapeake Emergency Response Team during a visit to Chesapeake, March 10. Olszowy discussed the capabilities that can be employed during a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear disaster response in the United States. The CERT educates the community about disaster preparedness for hazards that may impact their area and trains in basic disaster response skills. JTF-CS anticipates, plans and prepares for CBRN-Defense Support of Civil Authorities response operations.

once every three months, said Ken Belkofer, CERT training coordinator. “Training is very important and keeps our skills sharp.” Using the training learned in the classroom and during exercises, CERT members assist others in their neighborhood or workplace following an event when pro-

fessional responders are not immediately available. CERT members are also encouraged to support emergency response agencies by taking a more active role in emergency preparedness projects in their community. SEE MISSION PAGE 15

JTF-CS hosts federal homeland response leaders By Petty Officer 1st Class Brian Dietrick JOINTTASK FORCE CIVIL SUPPORT

More than 50 military leaders and emergency response representatives from across the U.S. met at Fort Eustis, Feb. 25-27, to discuss enhancing the ability to rapidly respond in the event of a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear disaster in the United States. The three-day conference, hosted by Joint Task Force Civil Support, allowed military representatives from the Defense CBRN Response Force to review response processes and revise the essential life-saving equipment list to help mitigate suffering following

a man-made or natural disaster in the U.S. “What we are doing [at the conference] is vital,” said U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Jeff W. Mathis III, JTF-CS commander. “The discussions we have had ... are so important, because if we cannot make the response timeline that the president and Secretary of Defense expect us to make, we cannot successfully accomplish our mission.” JTF-CS provides command and control of the DCRF, which includes 88 military units located at more than 36 locations throughout the U.S. The response force provides a variety of life saving and sustaining response operations focused around six core capabilities: mission command, hazard identification

and detection, search and rescue, decontamination, medical triage and stabilization, and medical evacuation. The DCRF is comprised of four different task forces; operations, aviation, logistics and medical. The purpose of the conference was for the task forces to discuss essential equipment they would need to successfully complete their assigned mission. If the task forces lighten their total equipment load and leave non-mission essential equipment at home station, their response time to the incident site could drastically decrease. “The DCRF cannot get to the incident site fast enough,” said U.S. Marine Corps Col. David Olszowy, JTF-CS deputy commander.

“Our units have a very tight response timeline and need to be absolutely critical about the equipment that they are bringing.” Simplifying the equipment lists can improve DCRF deployment timelines by preventing the transportation and over-abundance of equipment, some of which may not be absolutely necessary in order to impact the disaster response operations. With the updated task force equipment list, gear that is needed to do the job will be brought with the units and non-mission essential equipment will be brought on at a later date during the response. SEE HOSTS PAGE 15


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Photo by U.S. Navy Petty Officer 1st Class Brian Dietrick

U.S. Army Maj. Gen. Jeff W. Mathis III, commander, Joint Task Force Civil Support, explains the importance of simplifying response timelines to successfully accomplish the mission to attendees during an operation response enhancement discussion at Fort Eustis, Feb. 27. Joint Task Force Civil Support hosted more than 50 military leaders and emergency response representatives from across the U.S. to discuss how to enhance the ability to rapidly respond in the event of a chemical, biological, radiological or nuclear disaster in the United States. JTFCS anticipates, plans and prepares for Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear Defense Supprt of Civil Authorities response operations.

HOSTS FROM PAGE 14 “This is the first of many discussions we’ll have in the future to further simplify the deployment process and equipment lists,” said U.S. Army Maj. Ben Anderson, JTF-CS future operations planner. “A field training exercise in the future will allow us to validate the list the task forces have established as mission essential and we can make changes as necessary.” Vibrant Response 2014 will likely be the

MISSION FROM PAGE 14 Olszowy also explained that CBRN incident response is the command’s primary focus, however, the unit also has the expertise and training to respond to natural disasters, such as earthquakes and hurricanes. In November 2012, JTF-CS rapidly deployed to Joint Base McGuire-Dix-Lakehurst, N.J., in support of Hurricane Sandy relief efforts. During the command’s twoweek deployment, JTF-CS coordinated a variety of federal military support to aid relief efforts, including 80 strategic airlift missions conducted by the Air Mobility Command, 600 U.S. Army Corps of Engi-

field training exercise that allows the units to validate their equipment lists. Vibrant Response is the largest DOD confirmation exercise for specialized response forces to validate their capability to execute mission command, perform technical tasks and conduct other life-saving missions. The exerciser will take place in Camp Atterbury, Ind. and is tentatively scheduled to for the end of July. For additional information on JTF-CS, visit www.jtfcs.northcom.mil or www.facebook. com/jtfcs.

neers personnel dewatered 11 tunnels in both New York and New Jersey and delivered more than two million meals by the Defense Logistics Agency. The CERT also responded to Hurricane Sandy. They assisted the Office of Emergency Management and the Chesapeake Fire Department by notifying more than 1,200 homes in flood prone areas. The team deployed 22 members who went door-to-door delivering informational flyers about flooding and damages. The team donated 199 hours of service to the City of Chesapeake. For additional information on JTF-CS, visit www.jtfcs.northcom.mil or www. facebook.com/jtfcs.

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MARCH 21, 2014 Briella Cose, a U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley patient, visits with Lothair and Molly,American Red Cross certified therapy dogs, at Langley Air Force Base, Feb. 14. Lothair and Molly visit the U.S.Air Force Hospital Langley everyWednesday to brighten the spirits of patients and hospital staff members.

Therapy dogs visit USAF Hospital Langley patients By Senior Airman Aubrey White

“I’ve seen firsthand the positive effects the dogs have had on patients, Eyes widen, faces light up and mouths staff and visitors’ emotional health.” bear ear-to-ear smiles as the pitter-patter 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

of paws echoes through the halls of U.S. Air Force Hospital Langley. Patients, visitors and staff members exclaim, “The dogs are here!” For the last six years, Melanie Paul and her four Shetland Shepherds have been welcomed at the hospital to serve a cause near to her heart. The canines work as therapy dogs, providing emotional support to patients through the Langley Air Force Base Pet Therapy program. Because she was unable to join the military due to hearing loss, Paul said she believes this is her way of serving the U.S. Air Force. “I would have loved to join the military myself,” Paul said as tears formed in her eyes. “I love to be on base, interacting with the hospital staff, [American] Red Cross volunteers and patients. I think this is my part of doing something for the Air Force.” The program began when Paul approached a former 633rd Medical Group

— U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Sarah Jun 633rd Inpatient Operations Squadron clinical nurse nurse with the idea of starting an animalassisted therapy program to cater to hospital patients, she explained. “A dog visit can decrease a patient’s anxiety and increase communication and socialization. We met with [an American Red Cross representative] and launched the program.” To become qualified therapy dogs, the “Shelties” needed to pass a basic training course and be evaluated in 12 areas of the American Kennel Club Canine Good Citizen certification test. The dogs’ personality, obedience and socialization skills with humans and other dogs are observed during the test, in addition to their reaction to unfamiliar hospital equipment, Paul said. They must re-

Photo by Senior Airman Brittany Paerschke-O’Brien

main calm and quiet, and cannot be startled by the unpredictable behavior of children. The dogs begin each visit at the hospital’s Multi-Service Unit to determine which patients require therapy. After visiting the MSU, the canines make their way to the Pediatrics Clinic to comfort children awaiting treatment, before ending their visit in the emergency room waiting area. “Mental and emotional health are very important aspects of a person’s overall wellbeing,” said U.S. Air Force 2nd Lt. Sarah Jun, 633rd Inpatient Operations Squadron clinical nurse. “I’ve seen firsthand the positive effects the dogs have had on patients, staff and visitors’ emotional health. It’s important to continue the program so the dogs can con-

tinue to impact people in positive ways.” Paul wishes to carry on the program as long as the Air Force welcomes her and her dogs. Ultimately, she wants to influence enough people to begin pet therapy programs at all Air Force bases. “I hope [the patients] remember my dogs and how they came to brighten their day, make them feel good and help them understand dogs serve different purposes in their own lives,” she said. Patients, hospital staff and visitors can interact with Paul and her “Shelties” most Wednesday afternoons. For more information about therapy dog programs, visit www.akc.org/dogowner/ therapy/index.cfm.

0DUFK PDUNV %UDLQ ,QMXU\ $ZDUHQHVV 0RQWK By Airman 1st Class Devin Scott Michaels 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

In the next minute, three Americans will experience traumatic brain injuries that likely could have been avoided, according the Center for Disease Control and Prevention. Since 2000, more than 294,000 U.S. Service members have suffered brain injuries due to mishaps in the field and accidents at home. This March, members of the Joint Base Langley-Eustis community bring TBIs to the public’s attention with the goal of preventing more from occurring by observing Brain Injury Awareness Month. In recent years, U.S. military leaders have taken an aggressive approach to combatting TBIs. In an effort to aid victims, the military established the Defense and Veterans Brain Injury Center and other programs to treat TBIs and study the psychological health effects.

Zoe Whitaker, McDonald Army Health Center mTBI nurse case manager, said it is possible injured Service members continue to return from deployments without having received treatment. “Service members who come back from a deployment may have experienced harmful events, but are trying to ignore or hide their symptoms and are really hurting inside,” said Whitaker. “We want to help them realize there are places they get help.” Despite this, Whitaker said seeking treatment sometimes requires wingmanship or the “battle buddy” concept. “When TBIs occur, it’s very important to get the victim in the hands of medical personnel,” said Whitaker. “The victim might not think clearly or fully remember the event, so a battle buddy should escort that person to receive care.” Without medical care and professional direction, TBIs may cause depression, con-

tribute to post-traumatic stress disorder or cause a victim to suffer further physical injuries, such as falls or collisions. Although some TBIs still go untreated, Service members are seeking treatment more often than before. “The culture is changing, particularly when it comes to behavioral health, because people realize there is no shame in seeking help,” said Whitaker. “It’s equivalent to seeking help for a broken foot or wrist. Behavioral health clinics are about figuring out what is wrong and fixing it.” In addition to promoting treatment, Brain Injury Awareness Month also emphasizes understanding TBIs can happen without foresight, even though they are preventable. “TBIs can occur anytime, anywhere and to anyone,” said Whitaker, “However, people can often reduce the chance of a TBI by using basic safety precautions such

Graphic Courtesy U.S. Army

as using a seatbelt, having someone hold a ladder and wearing safety gear.” The healing process for those with TBIrelated problems can be long and painful, so recovering patients may need encouragement. However, Brain Injury Awareness Month is dedicated to supporting those who have suffered due to accidents in the field or at home. For more information or to seek treatment for a TBI, contact the Fort Eustis Behavioral Health Clinic at 314-7558 or the Langley Air Force Base Behavioral Health Clinic at 764-6840.


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WomenInAviation

:$63V /HDGLQJ WKH ZD\ IRU IHPDOH SLORWV By Airmen 1st Class Areca T. Wilson and Kimberly Nagle 633RD AIR BASE WING PUBLIC AFFAIRS

Since 1942, female pilots have paved the way for women in aviation, their influence opening doors for today’s female pilots. In August 1943, the Women’s Auxiliary Ferrying Squadron merged with Jackie Cochran’s training program, forming the Women Airforce Service Pilots when the United States entered World War II. More than 1,000 women participated as civilians and were attached to the U. S. Army Air Forces. The program disbanded one year later due to the influx of male pilots. Former Chief of the Air Corps, Gen. Henry H. “Hap” Arnold, paid tribute to the WASPS during their final graduating class. “You have shown that you can fly wingtip to wingtip with your brothers,”

my’s first female pilot. She received her wings to fly the UH-1 Huey helicopter, June 4, 1974. According to her official biography, after pinning on her wings, she was asked if she would recommend flight school for other women. “I definitely encourage women to apply for it, if they are interested in doing something out of the ordinary,” Woolfolk said. One of the women able to follow in Woolfolk’s footsteps was U.S. Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Christy Craemer, CH-47 Chinook helicopter pilot from the 159th General Support Aviation Battalion at Fort Eustis. Craemer flew Chinooks and UH-60 Blackhawks for more than 18 years. “Female or male, it doesn’t matter,” Craemer said, encouraging U.S. Service members to follow their dreams of flight. “Just don’t stop being who you are; be the best pilot regardless of gender.”

The journey of female pilots in military aviation began in 1942, when they were first employed by the Ferrying Division of the U.S. Army Air Corps Transportation Command to help meet the need for personnel. said Arnold. “If ever there was doubt in anyone’s mind that women could become skilled pilots, the WASPs dispelled that doubt. I want to stress how valuable the whole WASP program has been for the country.” Though 1,074 WASPs flew more than 60 million miles during WWII, they were not considered the first female military pilots. The U.S. Army officially recognized 2nd Lt. Sally D. Woolfolk as the Ar-

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CSAF: Every budget decision hurts By Claudette Roulo AMERICAN FORCES PRESS SERVICE

“Every major decision reflected in

our (fiscal year 2015) budget proposThe U.S. Air Force is the finest in the al hurts. Each of them reduces capaworld, “and we need to keep it that way,” bility that our combatant commandAir Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. ers would love to have and believe they need. There are no more easy cuts.” Welsh III, said here, March 14. The Air Force’s fiscal year 2015 budget request was built to ensure its combat power remains unequaled, Welsh told members of the House Armed Services Committee. But, he added, that does not mean it will remain unaffected by reduced funding. “Every major decision reflected in our (fiscal year 2015) budget proposal hurts,” Welsh said. “Each of them reduces capability that our combatant commanders would love to have and believe they need. There are no more easy cuts.” The sequestration scheduled to return in fiscal 2016 cannot be ignored, the general said. To prepare, the Air Force must cut people and force structure now to create a force that is balanced enough it can afford to train and operate beyond 2016, he said. The Air Force began its budget planning by making two significant assumptions, Welsh said. “The Air Force must be capable of fighting and winning a full-spectrum fight against a well-armed, well-equipped, well-trained enemy,” he said. And, today’s readiness and modernization for the future “cannot be an either-or decision.” But, the general said, the overwhelming majority of reductions in the Air Force

— Gen. Mark A. Welsh III Air Force Chief of Staff budget come in the readiness, force structure and modernization accounts. “That’s where the money is we can affect,” Welsh continued. “Understanding that, we tried to create the best balance possible between readiness, capability and capacity across our five mission areas.” The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2013 allowed the Air Force to fully fund its readiness accounts in fiscal year 2015, he noted, but it didn’t address the service’s future needs. “Even with continued funding at that level, ... it’ll take us 10 years to return to full readiness,” the general said. “It’s a complicated equation. There’s lots of things we’ve let slide to fund activity over the last 14 years.” Trimming around the edges wouldn’t be enough to reduce the budget by the billions of dollars required by sequestration and other budget reductions, he said. “So, we looked at cutting fleets of aircraft as a way to create the significant savings required. ... (But) eliminating an entire fleet would leave us unable to provide air superiority for a full theater of operations. And

no other service can do that,” Welsh said. And, he said, combatant commanders wouldn’t support cuts to the intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance mission. Next, the Air Force considered cuts to the mobility fleet, the general told committee members. But, he noted, Army Chief of Staff Gen. Ray Odierno told him the Army will need to be more responsive as it downsizes, and a further reduction of airlift assets was not a good idea. “We looked at our refueling fleets, and we did consider divesting the KC-10 (Extender) as an option, but ... we would have to cut many more KC-135 (Stratotankers) and KC-10s to achieve the same savings. And with that many KC-135s out of the fleet, we would not be able to meet our mission requirements,” Welsh said. In looking for cuts to the strike mission fleet, he said, the Air Force considered several options. The A-10 Thunderbolt II, the F-16 Fighting Falcon and the F-15E Strike Eagle were all on the table, the general said. “I am an A-10 pilot by trade,” he said. “That’s where I grew up in this business. And Betty and I have a son who is a Marine Corps infantry officer. Close air support is not an afterthought to me, and it is not going to be a secondary mission in the United States Air Force. “But, close air support is not an aircraft,” he continued. “It’s a mission, and we do it very, very well with a number of airplanes today.” Cutting the A-10 provided the best value with the least loss of aircraft, Welsh said.

Photo by Scott M. Ash

Secretary of theAir Force Deborah Lee James and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. Mark A. Welsh III answer questions on the Air Force's fiscal year 2015 budget request before the House Armed Services Committee in Washington, D.C., March 14.

The force would save $3.7 billion across the Future Years Defense Program by eliminating the fleet, and another $500 million in cost avoidance for upgrades that would no longer be needed, the general said. “To achieve the same savings would require a much higher number of either F16s or F-15E’s,” he said. The Air Force conducted a detailed cost analysis of several options: cutting the A-10, the F-16 or the B-1 Lancer strategic bomber; deferring procurement of F-35 Lightning II joint strike fighters or standing down a number of fighter squadrons, the general said. “The result showed that cutting the A-10 fleet was the lowest risk option from an operational perspective. And while no one, especially me, is happy about recommending divestiture of this great old friend, it’s the right decision from a military perspective,” he said. The decision is representative of the extremely difficult choices that the service is forced to make, Welsh said.

$LU )RUFH UHVXPHV IRUFH PDQDJHPHQW SURJUDPV By Air Force News Service U.S. Air Force leaders announced a resumption of all force management programs March 15, following a recently discussed strategic pause. “After providing senior leadership a chance to evaluate the programs and assess our early progress, we are ready to resume immediate processing of voluntary applications in most categories and begin notifying Airmen of their status,” said U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Sam Cox, Air Force deputy chief of staff for manpower, personnel and services. “We expect to receive fi-

nal approval authorities early next week for a select few categories, like rated and health professions, at which point we will be actively processing all voluntary applications.” Notifications to Airmen could start as early as next week, the general added. Cox also confirmed previously-announced force management boards would proceed as currently scheduled. The eligible populations for those boards will remain the same with the exception of a small group of about 500 Airmen who will no longer be eligible for the current voluntary or involuntary programs. Those individuals will be personally notified of their

eligibility status by the Air Force Personnel Center. “Resuming the current programs on the previously announced schedules and under the same basic criteria means minimal changes for our Airmen,” Cox said. One item assessed during the pause was the pace of the programs and whether or not the Air Force could achieve required reductions on the original schedule. The analysis revealed the need to include a second round of programs in 2015. “Airmen who were eligible for programs during the first round in 2014 will not be eligible for the retention boards in 2015, unless they have specific negative quality

force indicators,” Cox said. Ensuring well-performing Airmen are not subject to multiple involuntary programs is key, according to the general. Details on the nature and timing of the second round of programs will be announced in the coming weeks. The general continues to encourage eligible officers and enlisted Airmen to apply for the Temporary Early Retirement Authority and Voluntary Separation Pay programs. The current TERA application window remains open to March 26, and the VSP application window is open to May 1. For more information, visit https:// mypers.af.mil.


MARCH 21, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MCAHC program aims to provide better continuity of care for patients

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According to their mission statement, the McDonald Army Health Center at Fort Eustis continuously strives to find new, innovative ways to provide quality healthcare to the Joint Base LangleyEustis community. While medical advances typically come in the form of new clinics, equipment or practices, MCAHC professionals are looking at a different focus – the patients. Through implementation of the Patient Centered Medical Home clinics at MCAHC, the health center hopes to improve the way patients interact with medical teams, and change the outlook of healthcare from expending resources curing ailments to prevention. MCAHC first designated Troop Medical Center 2 as a PCMH clinic to test the program in early 2013. After a successful trial period, MCAHC received approval to expand the clinics at the beginning of 2014. “Patient comfort remains a priority throughout these changes,” explained Samara Walker, MCAHC registered nurse. “In a PCMH clinic, patients will see the same team of providers to improve continuity of care and make the patient feel more familiar with [MCAHC] staff.” Patients seen by one of six PCMH teams will have one continuous primary care manager as in the past, but they will also work with the same group of healthcare assistants, nurses and specialists in order to feel more comfortable. The six teams belong to four clinics. TMC2 and Internal Medicine each have one PCMH team. The Family Health and Pediatric clinics each have two teams. All four clinics also have one independent clinical social worker, who aims to improve a patient’s mindset towards treatment and prevention. “Helping our patients understand their care can increase their overall health since they are more willing to engage in their treatment,” said Walker. “[These social workers] work with patients at a deeper level – they want to know if the treatment causes any prob-

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McDonald Army Health Center Patient Centered Medical Homes aim to provide better continuity of care to patients through a more interactive approach to healthcare.

Through implementation of the Patient Centered Medical Home clinics at MCAHC, the health center hopes to improve the way patients interact with medical teams, and change the outlook of healthcare from expending resources curing ailments to prevention. lems at home or work, and how to resolve those issues without risking the benefits of treatment.” For patients requiring constant care, such as cancer patients, PCMH clinics offer nurse care managers who stay with the patient through a stream of treatment plans and personnel changes. Other specialists not attached to a specific PCMH clinic still play a vital role in the PCMH mission with their expertise. “If our patients feel at home with their PCMH group, branching out to specialists will be easier because they have a base of care established at their ‘home’ clinic,” Walker explained. “The patient’s PCMH group will provide in-depth in-

formation to the specialist, instead of a patient walking in with a handful of papers, trying to explain their injury or illness.” In addition to patient comfort, access and continuity of care, MCAHC hopes PCMH teams will put the responsibility of treatment on themselves and the patients equally. “ We don’t want to just give our patients medication and send them out the door,” said Walker. “We want to give them a new way to prevent their health issues by placing the care in their hands through diet, exercise and specialized home treatment.” Because patients and PCMH groups have a closer relationship, Walker believes caretakers can pinpoint treatment plans to better accommodate a patient’s schedule and desires. If all of those aspects of PCMH clinics come together, Walker knows MCAHC patients will leave healthier and happier. “The patient is a caretaker’s greatest resource for treatment,” said Walker. “The more they do for themselves, the more comfortable they feel – those factors mark the difference between treatment at some hospital and the care provided here at MCAHC.”

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

EustisCommunity JBLE Job Fair The Army Career and Alumni Program, Army Community Service and Virginia Employment Commission will sponsor the Joint Base Langley-Eustis Job Fair from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., March 27 at the Fort Eustis Club. More than 50 employers will be on hand to network and offer employment opportunities. Job seekers should come dressed for success and bring several copies of their resumes. The event is open to active-duty U.S. Service members, Reservists, retirees, National Guard, veterans and military spouses. Minor children are not allowed. For more information, call 878-0906.

Women’s History Month observance The Joint Base Langley-Eustis Women’s History Month observance will be held from 10 to 11:30 a.m., March 28 at Jacobs Theater. This year’s theme is “Celebrating Women of Character, Courage and Commitment.” The guest speaker is retired Command Sgt. Maj. Michele Jones. The event will feature music by the U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command band, a video presentation and a mentoring session to prepare Service members for successful transition from the military. Refreshments will also be served. For more information, contact Capt. Samantha Hoxha at 501-5566 or samantha.r.hoxha.mil@mail.mil.

Child care position available The Fort Eustis Regimental Memorial Chapel is accepting applications for Child Care Provider and Coordinator. Applicants must provide a resume listing recent experience in a similar position for children eight to 11 years old. Applications must be submitted by 4:30 p.m., March 28 and must include three letters of recommendation. For more information or an application packet, email ray.d.mooneyham.mil@mail.mil or call 878-1985.

Range schedule Ranges, training areas and associated facilities are off limits to personnel not engaged in scheduled firing, operations or inspections unless clearance is obtained (in person) from the Range Control Fire Desk or a designated Range Control technician. The range operations schedule through March 26 is: ■ Friday – BTRACS, Range 1, 2, 3, 5 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) ■ Saturday – Range 1, 2, 3, 5 (7 a.m. to 3 p.m.) ■ Sunday – Range 2, 3, 5 (7 a.m. to 3 p.m.) ■ Monday – BTRACS, Range 1, 2 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) ■ Tuesday – BTRACS, Range 1 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) ■ Wednesday – BTRACS, Range 1, 2 (7 a.m. to 10 p.m.) All personnel are required to check in and out with Range Control before going into or departing from any range or training area. For more information, call Range Control at 878-4412, ext. 226 or 878-3834, ext 234.

Florida Tech Decision Day The Florida Institute of Technology’s Department of Extended Studies invites prospective graduate students to attend an Instant Decision Day from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., April 2 at the Bateman Army Education Center at Fort Eustis. Pro-

MARCH 21, 2014

Submit Eustis Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com spective students can learn about the following master’s degree programs: business administration, acquisition and contract management, computer information systems and project management. The application fee will be waived and attendees will receive instant enrollment decisions. For more information, call 887-2488 or visit http://es.fit. edu/ off-campus/hroads. To register, visit http://blog.fit. edu/esd-instant-decision-day-hampton-roads.

Army Community Service Army Community Service classes and workshops for March will include: ■ Baby and Me Play Group – 10 to 11 a.m. on Thursdays at 501 Madison Ave. ■ Civilian Professional Development – 10 to 11:30 a.m., March 28, Successful Team Dynamics. Registration is required. ■ Developing Your Financial Plan – 9 to 10 a.m., March 25. ■ Family Readiness Group Fund Custodian Training – 1 to 3 p.m., March 26. Registration is required. ■ Play Mornings Play Group – 10 to 11:30 a.m. on Wednesdays at 1102 Pershing Ave. ■ Spouse Resilience Training – 9 a.m. to noon, March 24-27. Unless otherwise noted, classes and briefings will take place in Bldg. 650, Monroe Ave. For more information, call 878-3638.

Certified lifeguard class An American Red Cross certified lifeguard class will be held from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m., April 7-11 at the Aquatic Center. A mandatory pre-test will take place from noon to 2 p.m., March 29. Pre-registration is required and the class size is limited to 12 students. The cost is $175 for active-duty U.S. military members and $200 for all others. The fee includes instruction, a manual, CPR mask and certification. Applicants must be at least 15 years old to participate and must attend all classes to receive complete certification. Bring a lunch or snack to class each day. To register and for more information, call 878-1090 or 878-1091.

Officer Professional Development The Hampton Roads Chapter of the Rocks, Inc. will sponsor an officer professional development briefing at 6 p.m., April 14 at the McDonald Army Health Center dining facility. The topic will be “Transition Briefs.” For more information, contact Maj. Riecharde Prenell at riecharde.t.prenell.mil@mail.mil or call (615) 974-0877.

Motorcycle rider courses The 633rd ABW Safety office is offering the following motorcycle courses: ■ Experienced Rider’s Course (BRC-2) – 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 26, April 9 and 16, and May 7 and 21. The course will take place at training area 14-A at 3300 Wilson Ave. ■ Military Sport Bike Rider’s Course (MSRC) – 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., March 25, April 1, 8 and 15, and May 6, 13 and 20. The course will take place at 705 Washington Blvd., room 169. Motorcycle courses are offered to active-duty U.S. military

members on a first-come, first-served basis. Family members, retirees, Department of Defense civilians and contractors will be scheduled on a standby basis only. Currently, the Beginner Rider’s Course is not offered at Fort Eustis, however, active-duty military can take the BRC at Fort Lee or Little Creek free of charge. Thomas Nelson Community College also offers the BRC for a reimbursable fee of $135. To register for the BRC-2 or MSRC courses, email usaf. jble.633-abw.mbx.eustis-safety-office@mail.mil and include the following information: desired course date, first and last name, last four digits of social security number, rank, age, branch of service, unit, and phone number. For more information, call 501-8261/8230/8263.

Featuring events on the JBLEvents calendar The JBLEvents calendar is the official calendar of Joint Base Langley-Eustis, featuring a variety of upcoming event listings at Langley Air Force Base, Fort Eustis and in the surrounding community. Events listed in the calendar, located at www.jble.af.mil/jblevents.asp, are viewable via the JBLE website, the JBLE mobile app and are listed in the Peninsula Warrior. To submit your event, visit www. jble.af.mil/jblevents.asp, download and complete the submission form, and email the completed form to 633abw. paedit@langley.af.mil for Langley AFB events, and fteustismain@gmail.com for Fort Eustis events. For more information, call the 633rd Air Base Wing Public Affairs office at 764-5701.

Colorectal cancer information booths The McDonald Army Health Center Gastroenterology Clinic will provide two colorectal cancer information booths every Monday at the DFAC McDonald Army Health Center and the Post Exchange at Fort Eustis, every Monday during March. Service members, dependents and retirees are welcomed.

Sexual Assault Awareness Month In recognition of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, the following events will take place at Fort Eustis: ■ 5K Run – 6:15 a.m., April 4 at McClellan Fitness Center. The event is open to all authorized patrons and preregistration is not required. Physical training uniforms for military members are not required and participants are encouraged to wear teal. For more information, call 8788759 or e-mail sarah.e.rhodes21.civ@mail.mil. ■ “3 on 3 Hoops” – 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m., April 19 at Anderson Field House. The basketball event is free to activeduty U.S. military members, dependents and Department of Defense civilians. Divisions will include open, co-ed and female. To register, contact Sgt. 1st Class Lisa Lopez at lisa.m.lopez.mil@mail.mil. ■ “Speak Up” self defense course – 9 a.m. and 1 p.m., April 23 at 1025 Monroe Ave. The event is open to Soldiers, spouses and civilians. Participants should wear gym clothing and bring flip flops. To register, contact Sgt. 1st Class Lisa Lopez at lisa.m.lopez.mil@mail.mil. ■ “Strike-Out Sexual Assault” bowling tournament – 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., April 25. The event will take place at the bowling center at 675 Jackson St. To register, e-mail stacy.l.taylor2.mil@us.army.mil.


MARCH 21, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

LAFBCommunity TRICARE Service Center closure Beginning April 1, the TRICARE Service Center will close. U.S. Service members will be able to enroll or purchase plans, file or check claims, view referrals and prior authorizations, find a doctor, change their primary care manager, view their coverage, compare plans and manage prescriptions online at www.tricare.mil. For more information or to receive enrollment assistance, call (877) 874-2273 or visit www.hnfs.com.

Mandatory BAH recertification From March 1 to Dec. 31, all U.S. Air Force Service members receiving dependent-rate Basic Allowance for Housing are required to recertify their entitlement. Those affected are required to provide the financial services office a signed Air Force Form 594 and source document validating the requirement for dependent-rate BAH. Service members will be notified via email when they are required to recertify and may use a marriage certificate, youngest child’s birth certificate or court order attesting to physical custody. Those that do not respond by the established suspense date will have their BAH reduced to single rate until they recertify. For more information, contact the FSO at 764-3333 or 633cpts.service@us.af.mil.

Hispanic Heritage Salsa Cosmic Bowling The Hispanic Heritage Council will host the Salsa Cosmic Bowling event from 1 to 4:30 p.m., March 21. The event will include a DJ and free pizza for all bowlers. Those interested must RSVP by March 20. For more information or to register, contact LHHC@ us.af.mil.

Women’s History Month Floating Museum The Women’s History Month has created a floating museum to showcase prominent women in military history at various locations on Langley Air Force Base. The portable museum contains symbolic artifacts of women’s accomplishments. Below are the dates and locations the museum can be found at: ■ March 18 to 23 – Community Center ■ March 21 – Shellbank Fitness Center ■ March 24 to 27 – Military Personnel Section ■ March 29 to 31 – Air Force Inn For more information, contact SMSgt Michelle Browning at michelle.browning@us.af.mil or the Equal Opportunity office at 764-5878.

AFBP blood drive The Armed Services Blood Program will conduct a blood drive at the Langley community commons from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. March 26. For more information visit www.militaryblood.dod.mil or e-mail Ralph.peters@med.navy.mil.

Strengthening Bonds The Family Advocacy Program will host “Strengthening Bonds” classes from 9:30 to 11 a.m. each Wednesday through March 26. These classes will aim to enhance

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Submit LAFB Community announcements to pw@militarynews.com the knowledge and skills to strengthen marriages through a combination of discussions and exercises.

For more information, contact Tiffany Owen at tiffany. owen. 3.ctr@us.af.mil or 764-8141.

Exchange Game Division

Asian Pacific American Heritage committee

The Army and Air Force Exchange Service will now buy used video games from shoppers in exchange for gift cards through its new program, Game Division. Shoppers can visit the Exchange PowerZone to sell games, consoles and accessories including from Xbox One, Xbox 360, PS3, PS4, PSP, Wii, Wii U, Nintendo and Nintendo 3DS games. For more information, call 766-1282.

The Asian Pacific American Heritage planning committee will host its next meeting at 11 a.m., March 21, April 4, 11, 18 and 25 and May 2, 9, 16, 23 and 30 at the Langley Chapel Auditorium. For more information, contact Master Sgt. Darwin Mallari at 574-5004, or the Equal Opportunity office at 764-5878.

ABU Maternity Uniform shortage The Defense Logistics Agency is in the final phases of switching over to the lighter weight fabric Airman Battle Uniforms. Due to this change, Army Air Force Exchange Services Military Clothing Sales stores now have an approximately 90-day shortage of ABU maternity uniforms. The blue maternity uniforms are currently in stock and commanders have the ability to authorize their wear until the supply system recovers approximately May 2014.

Langley undergoes network modernization Langley Air Force Base is undergoing a major networking upgrade to 210 buildings. Throughout the process, users should expect some lapses in communication connectivity. The project is expected to be completed by Dec. 31.

Meet Your Victim Advocate events The Sexual Assault Prevention and Response office will host “Meet Your Victim Advocate” events at the Langley Exchange from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., every Wednesday and Friday, and at the Langley Commissary from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Tuesday and Thursday. The events will offer games, free prizes and literature, to teach the Joint Base Langley-Eustis community about the program that “makes it their business in helping others.” For more information, contact the SAPR office at 764-7272.

Right Start The Right Start Orientation and Information Fair will now take place at the Eaglewood Golf Course from 8:15 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Orientation includes a welcome and mission briefing by the 633rd Air Base Wing commander, information various base agencies and time to complete medical inprocessing. Participants are required to bring one copy of orders, and the uniform of the day is mandatory for all military members. Spouses are highly encouraged to attend and free childcare may be provided based on availability. For more information, contact the Airman & Family Readiness Center at 764-3990.

Better Body Better Life The Health and Wellness Center at Langley Air Force Base will host “Better Body, Better Life” classes from 9 to 11 a.m. on Tuesdays, and from 1 to 3 p.m. on Thursdays. The program will feature a weight management series of four workshops, each including a different nutrition, behavior modification and physical activity component.

SAPR poetry slam The Langley Sexual Assault Prevention and Response office will host a poetry slam at Memorial Park at 9 a.m. April 20. Poems entered must be related to consent, sexual assault, healthy dating and relationships, surviving sexual assault and “no means no.” Entries must be submitted by April 15, and the winning poet will receive a signed copy of Command Chief Master Sgt. Trae King’s book, “B-Trae’d,” and their poem will be published on the Joint Base Langley-Eustis website. For more information, contact Vanessa Williams at 7643359 or clara.williams.3@us.af.mil.

Standing Together Against Rape Road Rally The Standing Together Against Rape Road Rally will take place at Memorial Park at 9:30 a.m., April 30. Registration is free, but participants must complete the motorcycle safety course prior to the event. Safety checks and registration will take place at 7:30 a.m. For more information, contact Vanessa Williams at 7643359 or clara.williams.3@us.af.mil.

Featuring events on the JBLEvents calendar The JBLEvents calendar is the official calendar of Joint Base Langley-Eustis, featuring a variety of upcoming event listings at Langley Air Force Base, Fort Eustis and in the surrounding community. Events listed in the calendar, located at www.jble.af.mil/jblevents.asp, are viewable via the JBLE website, the JBLE mobile app and are listed in the Peninsula Warrior. To submit your event, visit www.jble.af.mil/jblevents.asp, download and complete the submission form, and email the completed form to 633abw.paedit@langley. af.mil for Langley AFB events, and fteustismain@gmail.com for Fort Eustis events. For more information, call the 633rd Air Base Wing Public Affairs office at 764-5701.

Thrift Shop hours of operation The Thrift Shop will be open Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., and 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. for consignments.

‘Correct your weakness’ The Health and Wellness Center now hosts “Correct your Weakness” at 3 p.m. on Tuesdays at the Shellbank Fitness Center at Langley Air Force Base. The course will go through April 1, 2014, and consists of four classes which address issues that occur during strength training. Attendees are required to wear physical training gear to the program.


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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

OutsideTheGate York County history fair TheYork County Historical Committee, in conjunction with the Historical Museum, will host a history fair from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m., March 23 at the Freight Shed at 331 Water St.The event is free and open to the public. Visitors can learn about local organizations that play significant roles in preserving and celebratingYork County history. A limited menu of eat-in and carry-out lunch and dinner items will be available for purchase. Parking will be available in the two-story parking terrace across from the Freight Shed. For more information, call Lois Winter at 898-0782 or Bonnie Karwac at 898-3727.

Job fair and education expo The Hampton Roads Chamber of Commerce and Centura College will sponsor a Military Transition Job Fair and Education Expo from 3 to 7 p.m., March 25 at the Westin Virginia Beach Town Center at 4535 Commerce St. The event is free and open to U.S. military personnel, spouses and dependents. Featured employers will include those in the areas of aviation, insurance, shipbuilding and tech trades. Various colleges and technical institutes will also be represented. Business attire is recommended along with copies of your resume. For more information, contact Sharon Dail at 664-2501 or sdail@hrccva.com or visit www.hamptonroadschamber. com.

VA-ACME golf tournament The Virginia Advisory Council on Military Education will host its fourth annual golf tournament, March 25 at Naval Air Station Oceana’s Aeropines Golf Club in Virginia Beach. The event will kick off with a four-person scramble shotgun start at 9:30 a.m.; registration begins at 8 a.m. All proceeds will benefit the Virginia Wounded Warrior Program. The cost is $80 per player or $300 per foursome, which includes greens fees, cart, breakfast, lunch and beverages. Checks must be received in advance, payable to VA-ACME. For more information, contact Michael Camden at 4518203 or michael.camden@troy.edu.

Mid-Atlantic Home and Garden Show TheTidewater Builders Association will host the 2014 MidAtlantic Home and Garden Show April 11-13 at the Virginia Beach Convention Center at 1000 19th St. More than 200 exhibitors will offer expert advice and gardening activities for the entire family. The event will feature the Great Meatball Challenge and Dreaming of Design contests, Xpogo Stunt Team, displays, seminars and more. Special guests will include Home and Garden Television hosts William Moss and Alison Victoria, and the Food Network’s “Top Chef” host Mike Isabella. Admission is $10 for adults and free for children ages 12 and under. A $2 discount is available for active-duty and retired military members and senior citizens ages 62 and older. Parking is free. Hours are 10 a.m. to 8 p.m., April 11 and 12, and 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., April 13. For more information, visit www.midatlantichomeshow. com.

MARCH 21, 2014

Submit Outside The Gate announcements to pw1@militarynews.com

Peninsula Fine Arts Center ■ American Impressionism tour – 6 p.m., March 25. Vis-

itors can learn about the history of the American Impressionism movement during a talk and tour given by Virginia Museum of Fine Arts curator Sylvia Yount. Admission is $3 for members, $10 for nonmembers and free to PFAC Circle members. To RSVP, contact Joan Dobson at 596-8175 or email jdobson@pfac-va.org. ■ Community Day – 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., March 29. The community is invited to enjoy free admission to the galleries and participate in Impressionism-inspired art projects, which require a $2 activity fee. Art activities will include painting in the open air, using paint chips to create Impressionist masterpieces and creating paintings with common tools instead of brushes. Visitors can also attend the Artistic Verses event from 10 to 11:30 a.m., featuring high school students’ creative writing and an awards ceremony. ■ Homeschool Day – 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 2. Homeschool students can tour the Masterworks of American Impressionism and Portraits from the Boston School exhibits. Following the tours, students will have the option to either explore the concept of pointillism by creating paintings made entirely of dots or study color theory using paint chips to design impressionist-inspired collages. The morning session is geared toward students in first to fifth grade and will take place from 10 a.m. to noon.The afternoon session is geared toward students in sixth grade or older and is scheduled for 1 to 3 p.m. Pre-school students can participate in the Art Start guided activity at 10:30 a.m. Registration is $3 per student, $6 per adult and free for children under age 5. Art activity registration is an additional $3 per child. The deadline for registrations is March 28. To register and for more information, call 596-8175 or email jdobson@pfac-va.org. The Peninsula Fine Arts Center is located at 101 Museum Drive. Hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.Tuesday through Saturday, and 1 to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call 596-8175 or visit www.pfac-va.org.

HarlemWizards basketball The Virginia Peninsula Foodbank presents the Harlem Wizards versus K C Showtime basketball game at 6 p.m., April 4 at Heritage High School in Newport News. Bring the family and enjoy basketball tricks, wizardry, comedy and entertainment. Advance tickets are $7 for students and $12 general admission;Tickets will be $10 for students and $15 general admission at the door. Tickets are available at 2401 Aluminum Avenue or online at www.hrfoodbank.org or www.harlemwizards.com. For more information, contact Jacquelyn Linder at 5967188.

Veterans coffee hour The United Way of Greater Williamsburg will sponsor a veterans coffee hour at 2 p.m., March 27 at the Thomas Nelson Community College Historic Triangle Campus. The event will take place in room 320 at 4601 Opportunity Way in Williamsburg. Representatives from the United Way, Department of Vet-

eran Services, The Mission Continues, Disabled American Veterans and the Virginia Wounded Warrior Program will discuss benefits, services and volunteer opportunities available for veterans. Refreshments will be provided. For more information, contact America Luna at 229-2222.

Hot Rod and Custom Car Show The Virginia Hot Rod and Custom Car Show will be held from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., March 29 and from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m., March 30 at the Hampton Coliseum at 1000 Coliseum Drive. The event will feature hot rods, restored classic vehicles and custom cars. Admission is $12 for the general public, $10 for military personnel, $5 for children ages five to 11 and free for ages four and under. For more information, visit www.vacarshow.com.

Marine Science Mini-Camp Saint Mary Star of the Sea School will host a Marine Science Mini-Camp from 9 to 11:30 a.m., April 7 and from noon to 2:30 p.m., April 8 at its new waterfront classroom and lab. The event is open to students in first through sixth grade. Students will learn about marine and coastal life while enjoying hands-on activities including fishing, crabbing and netting for creatures along the shoreline. Participants are asked to bring a towel, change of clothes, water shoes or old tennis shoes, sunscreen and bottled water.The materials fee is $15 and class size is limited to 25 students. To register online, visit www.saintmarystarofthesea.com. For more information, contact Maritza Davila at 723-6358.

Isle of Wight Easter Egg Hunt Isle of Wight County will host the Piggy Cottontail and the Great Egg Hunt at 2 p.m., April 19 at Boykin’s Tavern at 17130 Monument Circle. A traditional egg hunt will take place on the tavern’s lawn, followed by crafts, storytime, games and snacks. The cost is $5 per child and reservations are required. Boykins Tavern, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, was named for Francis Boykin who served as a lieutenant with Patrick Henry and later camped with George Washington at Valley Forge. It is the only surviving structure associated with the Isle of Wight Courthouse of 1800. To make reservations and for more information, call 3570115 or email jwilliams@isleofwightus.net.

Spring plant sale The Hermitage Museum and Gardens annual spring plant sale will be held from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., April 18 and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., April 19. The sale will feature heirlooms, annuals, perennials, shrubs and native and wetland plants and trees. Admission is $5 for adults, $3 for students, $2 for children ages six to 18, and free for members, active-duty military members and children ages five and under. The Hermitage Museum and Gardens is located at 7637 N. Shore Road in Norfolk. For more information, call 423-2052 or visit www.thehermitagemuseum.org.


MARCH 21, 2014

• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

•

Classifieds TO PLACE AN AD...

BY PHONE:

BY FAX: (757) 853-1634

MILITARY NEWSPAPERS OF VIRGINIA

Call: (757) 222-3990 Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Wanted To Buy

Furniture-Household

WWII Relics. Retired Vet seeks WWII helmets, medals, daggers, etc. 757-869-1739

Pine qs bed, 2 nt stands, armoire, dresser, mirror, steps $900 like new 757-564-1542

Computers-Equipment Dell 3000cn printer, $269, excond, not comp w/Win 8, new toner cart incl, 478.714.4468.

Furniture-Household Birch dining room set, $300. Ex cond, solid wood, 74w x 40d w/leaf. 478-714-4468. Living Room Elegant Table purchased from Haverty's - $300 (Hampton)Brand New, tags still on 63"L x 34W" glass top stunning table. Call 201-803-3482

Brand New Layaway Available MATTRESS SETS Full- $99, Queen- $129, King- $169 40% Military Discount on all other sets!

Can deliver. 757-706-3667

For Rent-House (All) Gloucester, 3BR, 1BA, detach gar, hw flr, fp, central heat/air, $950/mo. Call 910-366-0048 or 757-715-1227 anytime.

For Rent-Townhomes Gorgeous 3/3 townhouse 3 blocks to ocean. Pets OK. Available now! $1700 mo. 757-286-8890

Motorcycles Yamaha 25hp o/b motor $1100. Manual start and exc cond. Call 757-876-1675 for more info. Taking this Shortcut Can Shorten your Life! Stay Off! Stay Away! Stay Alive!

23

www.peninsulawarrior.com

BY MAIL:

DEADLINE: Reader & Display Thursday 5:00 p.m. (week prior)

BY EMAIL:

PENINSULA WARRIOR adswork@militarynews.com CLASSIFIEDS 150 W. Brambleton Ave. Norfolk, VA 23510

Call 222-3 990 today!

go red. anyway you want... eat red - apples, cherries, tomatoes. leave red kisses on someone’s cheek. laugh so hard your face turns red. but whatever you do, do it for your heart. take a moment everyday and put your hand on your heart. and then make your own promise to be heart healthy. www.goredforwomen.org 1-888-MY-HEART

!!                              

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Restrictions: • Only 5 ads per week, per household • Renewals, corrections and cancellations cannot be taken by phone and must be resubmitted • Illegible, too long or otherwise do not conform to instructions will not be published and must be resubmitted for the next issue • Automotive ads must begin with make, model and year • Real estate ads must begin with name of city, neighborhood and must be your primary residence. • Ads will not be accepted via official mailing channels such as guard mail or postage and fees paid indicia. • Free ads cannot be of a commercial nature (i. e., business opportunities, help wanted, etc) and must be personal property of the eligible member. Should not represent a sustained income or business or listed through agents or representatives. • When advertising a home for rent or home for sale, the home must be THE PRIMARY RESIDENCE. (All rental properties are considered paid ads.) WE DO NOT ACCEPT CALLS FOR FREE CLASSIFIED ADS Deadline Thursday, 5 p.m. for the following week’s publications


24

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• The Peninsula Warrior - Army

MARCH 21, 2014

JUST ANNOUNCED

THE TOYOTA MILITARY INCENTIVE IS NOW EXTENDED TO RETIREES OR VETERANS HONORABLY DISCHARGED WITHIN ONE YEAR OF SERVICE AND HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS OF ELIGIBLE QUALIFYING MILITARY PERSONNEL.

THANKS TO ALL THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN FOR YOUR SERVICE TO OUR COUNTRY.

NEW 2014

CAMRY

2000

$

Includes Hybrids

Cash Back Or

(excludes 2014.5 models)

From Toyota**

NEW 2013

1,000

$

U.S. Military

Incentive

*

CAN BE COMBINED WITH TOYOTA SPECIAL CASH BACK OR SPECIAL FINANCING OR SPECIAL LEASES!

RAV4

1250 Toyota

$

Finance Cash†

APR Financing LEASE AN LE FOR For Up To 5 Years*** $ mo. Or Plus at signing 24mos. $2999 due

179

Toyota

500 $2000 Cash Back

NEW 2013

HIGHLANDER (excludes hybrids)

NEW 2013

PRIUS LIFTBACK, v AND c COROLLA LE

APR Financing For Up To 5 Years*** Plus

0% $

NEW 2014

0%

Finance Cash†

Or

0%

APR Financing For Up To 5 Years*** Plus

500 Toyota

From Toyota**

$

2000

0%

$

Cash Back

††

tax, registration, insurance and dealer fees are extra.

Finance Cash†

APR Financing For Up To 5 Years*** Or Up to Plus

From Toyota**

1500 Toyota

$

Finance Cash†

LEASE FOR

$

159mo. 24mos. $1999

due at signing ††

tax, registration, insurance and dealer fees are extra.

NEW 2014

Up to

TUNDRA

1000 Or

$

Cash Back

From Toyota**

CASEY TOYOTA

601 East Rochambeau Drive • Williamsburg 757-259-1000 • caseytoyota.com

CHARLES BARKER TOYOTA 1877 Laskin Road • Virginia Beach 757-437-4000 • charlesbarkertoyota.com

CHECKERED FLAG TOYOTA 5301 Virginia Beach Blvd. • Virginia Beach 757-490-1111 • checkeredflagtoyota.com

FIRST TEAM TOYOTA

3400 Western Branch Blvd. • Chesapeake 757-673-2345 • firstteamtoyota.com

GLOUCESTER TOYOTA 6357 George Washington Hwy. • Gloucester 804-693-2100 • gloucestertoyota.com

PEARSON TOYOTA

12978 Jefferson Ave. • Newport News 757-874-6000 • pearsontoyotascion.com

As low as

0%

APR Financing***

PRIORITY TOYOTA GREENBRIER 1800 Greenbrier Parkway • Chesapeake 757-366-5000 • prioritytoyota.com

RK TOYOTA

2301 W. Mercury Blvd. • Hampton 757-838-5000 • rktoyota.com

Smartphone users scan here for more incentive information. Go to gettag.mobi to download the free application. *HOW TO QUALIFY: 1.BE IN CURRENT ACTIVE DUTY STATUS IN THE U.S. MILITARY (NAVY, ARMY, AIR FORCE, MARINES, NATIONAL GUARD, COAST GUARD AND ACTIVE RESERVE) OR A U.S. MILITARY INACTIVE RESERVE (I.E., READY RESERVE) THAT IS PART OF THE INDIVIDUAL READY RESERVE, SELECTED RESERVE AND INACTIVE NATIONAL GUARD. RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL ARE NOT ELIGIBLE EXCEPT FOR RETIREES OR VETERANS HONORABLY DISCHARGED WITHIN ONE YEAR OF SERVICE AND HOUSEHOLD MEMBERS OF ELIGIBLE QUALIFYING MILITARY PERSONNEL. 2.PROVIDE VERIFIABLE PROOF OF MILITARY STATUS OR ACTIVE SERVICE AT THE TIME OF PURCHASE: LEAVE AND EARNING STATEMENT OR MILITARY IDENTIFICATION CARD. 3.RECEIVE A SALARY SUFFICIENT TO COVER ORDINARY LIVING EXPENSES AND PAYMENTS FOR YOUR TOYOTA. 4.RECEIVE CREDIT APPROVAL THROUGH A TOYOTA DEALER AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. INCENTIVE OFFERED BY TOYOTA MOTOR SALES, U.S.A., INC. ON LEASE CONTRACTS INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE AMOUNT DUE AT LEASE SIGNING OR TOWARD THE CAPITALIZED COST REDUCTION. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE MUST BE APPLIED TOWARD THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE OR LEASE TRANSACTION. NOT COMPATIBLE WITH THE TOYOTA COLLEGE GRADUATE INCENTIVE PROGRAM. FINANCE OR LEASE CONTRACT MUST BE DATED BY MARCH 31, 2014 FOR INCENTIVE OFFER. THE MILITARY INCENTIVE PROGRAM IS SUBJECT TO CHANGE OR TERMINATION AT ANY TIME. OFFERS ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH A PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALERSHIP AND TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TERMS, CONDITIONS AND RESTRICTIONS APPLY, INCLUDING A MAXIMUM TERM OF 60 MONTHS ON FINANCE CONTRACTS. PROGRAM IS AVAILABLE AT PARTICIPATING DEALERS IN MARYLAND, VIRGINIA, WEST VIRGINIA, PENNSYLVANIA, AND DELAWARE; AND MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE IN ALL STATES. NOT ALL APPLICANTS WILL QUALIFY. SEE PARTICIPATING DEALER FOR DETAILS. **PURCHASERS CAN RECEIVE $2000 CASH BACK FROM TOYOTA ON CAMRY (EXCLUDES 2014.5 MODELS), CAMRY HYBRID (EXCLUDES 2014.5 MODELS), HIGHLANDER (EXCLUDES HYBRIDS), UP TO $1500 CASH BACK ON PRIUS LIFTBACK, PRIUS C, PRIUS V AND UP TO $1000 CASH BACK ON TUNDRA OR CAN APPLY CASH BACK TO DOWN PAYMENT ***0% APR FINANCING UP TO 60 MONTHS (36 MONTHS ON TUNDRAS) AVAILABLE TO QUALIFIED BUYERS THRU TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. TOTAL FINANCED CANNOT EXCEED MSRP PLUS OPTIONS, TAX AND LICENSE FEES. 60 MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF $16.67, OR 36 MONTHLY PAYMENTS OF 27.78 FOR EACH $1000 BORROWED AT 0%. NOT ALL BUYERS WILL QUALIFY. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. †INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA IN ADDITION TO 0% APR FINANCING IF VEHICLE IS PURCHASED AND FINANCED THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. ON FINANCE CONTRACTS, INCENTIVE WILL BE APPLIED TO THE DOWN PAYMENT. ONE INCENTIVE PER FINANCE TRANSACTION. FINANCE INCENTIVE IS AVAILABLE ON APPROVED CREDIT TO QUALIFIED CUSTOMERS THROUGH TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES. SEE DEALER FOR DETAILS. ††ALL LEASE OFFERS CUSTOMER IS RESPONSIBLE FOR EXCESSIVE WEAR AND EXCESS MILEAGE CHARGES OF $.15 PER MILE IN EXCESS OF 24,000 MILES. YOUR PAYMENT MAY VARY BASED ON DEALER PARTICIPATION AND FINAL NEGOTIATED PRICE. NOT ALL CUSTOMERS WILL QUALIFY. TAX, REGISTRATION, INSURANCE, AND DEALER FEES ARE EXTRA. RAV4 DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $2,820 DOWN, (AFTER APPLICATION OF $500 TOYOTA LEASE CASH INCENTIVE FROM TOYOTA FINANCIAL SERVICES), FIRST $179 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2013 RAV4 2WD 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 4430, MSRP $24,295. COROLLA DUE AT SIGNING INCLUDES $1840 DOWN FIRST $159 PAYMENT, AND NO SECURITY DEPOSIT. 2014 COROLLA LE 4 CYLINDER AUTOMATIC MODEL 1852, MSRP $19,110. †††TOYOTACARE COVERS NORMAL FACTORY SCHEDULED SERVICE. PLAN IS 2 YEARS OR 25K MILES, WHICHEVER COMES FIRST. THE NEW VEHICLE CANNOT BE PART OF A RENTAL OR COMMERCIAL FLEET, OR A LIVERY/TAXI VEHICLE. SEE PARTICIPATING TOYOTA DEALER FOR PLAN DETAILS. VALID ONLY IN THE CONTINENTAL U.S. AND ALASKA. ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE DOES NOT INCLUDE PARTS AND FLUIDS. OFFERS DO NOT INCLUDE DEALER FEES. OFFERS END 03/31/14.


Peninsula Warrior March 21, 2014 Army Edition