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The Lincoln

OCTOBER 2019

BUSINESS Journal

Vol. 22 No. 10 $2.00

Reaanddit Reap!

Holiday Office Parties Pages 4-6 Blueprints....................Pages 8-9 Retirement .....................Page 10 Lincoln’s Sun Valley Lanes plans major expansion.

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Lincoln Business Journal — inside OCTOBER 18, 2019

THE BUSINESS NEWSPAPER OF GREATER OMAHA, LINCOLN AND COUNCIL BLUFFS

THIS WEEK 'S ISSUE:

$2.00

VOL. 45 NO. 42

REI prioritizes national transportation industry market share by Richard D. Brown

Omaha’s tech firms diverse in size; lack diversity among women entrepreneurs, people of color. – Page 2

yee plo fits m E ene B

Health plan structures, ancillary benefits further reward wellness of employees. – Page 4

In its 81 years as a family-owned business, Omaha-based REI has evolved from a company that repaired radio communication equipment during WWII into a vertically integrated engineering and manufacturing company that designs, manufactures and services innovative surveillance, fleet management, safety and entertainment solutions for the global transportation industry. Over the past 11 years global revenues have increased from $25 million to more than $40 million. The firm has 164 employees operating out of its 180,000-square-foot headquarters at 6534 L St. Several hundred thousand dollars is being invested in renovating that structure, which was built in the 1950s and has had few upgrades, to accommodate the emerging needs of the fast-growing business. In addition to its Omaha presence, REI also operates a 15,000-squarefoot lite manufacturing facility in Sao Paulo, Brazil. Its staff there is being reduced from 35 to 17 as the electronics solutions supplier is Continued on page 10.

ief inancial Officer e in Herrmann e firm is expanding as it sees gro t in need for elec(Photo by MBJ / Becky McCarville) tronics for commercial transportation such as buses.

Thrive Space focuses on building community on business campus by Savannah Behrends

Pet parents increasingly crave ‘human-grade’ level of services, food products. – Page 11

What do you do with a former elementary school sitting on 10 acres of land? You turn it into a business complex suitable for small-to-medium sized businesses. Or at least that’s what Traci and Ryan Gratopp had in mind when they purchased DC West Elementary School in Waterloo, Nebraska in January 2018 and began renovations for what would

become Thrive Space. While the facility is now at 85% capacity, the duo said the project was a leap of faith. “We bought [the property] without any contingencies, so if we couldn’t get it rezoned as commercial then there was nothing we could have done with it,” Ryan Gratopp said. Re-zoning the medium-density Continued on page 13.

Founder Taylor Keen at the Sacred Seed Pop-Up garden at 13th and Leavenworth streets … Collecting, planting, harvesting and sharing indigenous and heirloom corn seeds and Native American culture.

Sacred Seed Pop-Up garden aiming to preserve heritage by Becky McCarville

Founders Ryan and Traci Gratopp … Repurposing a former elementary school into a business campus that offers tenants the opportunity to network and support other local businesses.

Taylor Keen, founder of nonprofit Sacred Seed, is harvesting the fruits of a labor of love at the Sacred Seed Pop-Up garden at 13th and Leavenworth streets. As each ear of corn is husked, unique hues of rose, purple, blue and yellow emerge. “Everything’s a surprise, [like] unwrapping little presents,”

he said. During the two-month pollination period, Keen is at the site “most nights, and we’re taking the pollen that is fresh to plants that are ready. In general, we’ve got pretty good pollination rates here.” In its fifth year, Sacred Seed’s mission is to preserve heirloom Continued on page 12.


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

Omaha’s tech firms diverse in size; lack diversity among women entrepreneurs, people of color by Michelle Leach

Seemingly, a city can’t be strong without a robust technology sector. In Omaha, tech firms are increasingly diverse in size, and opportunities to “break in” to careers increasingly abound as the metro further solidifies itself as a beacon for other communities in the state struggling with a loss of talent. “When I was a young technologist, I looked around and there weren’t any openings with interesting companies. I wanted to go to California where there were interesting companies,” said Flywheel CEO Dusty Davidson Davidson. “Instead, I stayed. The No. 1 thing for me was just the availability of really interesting, innovative technology companies and jobs … It’s not about the availability of workers; it’s the availability of interesting opportunities. Are we losing workers to places that have interesting opportunities?” As Davidson scans the strides made, he’s encouraged by the number of “really exciting companies at every scale.” “For a long time, there would only be small or big companies, and today you see extraordinary tech startups, and Flywheel-sized with 250 employees, to your Buildertrends and Hudls at 500 or 2,000 employees, and all that has happened in the last 10 years,” he said.

in the development of Omaha’s emerging hub, Millwork Commons, as an anchor organization. Do Space’s role in the greater tech ecosystem is, as Executive Director Rebecca Stavick put it, where the talent pipeline begins. “You can’t get into technology unless

Re ecca Sta ic executi e director o Space Davidson commended increasing sup- Omaha-grown firm was acquired by WP port at the state and city level; for instance, Engine, a Texas-based firm that boasts the likes of Lincoln-born Hudl’s growth upwards of 1,000 employees. While the or Boston’s Toast coming to town are ex- acquisition injects resources into Flywheel amples of changing the conversation and that allow it to make an even bigger imshowcasing what’s possible. pact, Davidson emphasized how often its “There is a natural excitement, and that leadership’s commitment to Omaha came buzz compounds,” he said. “We’ve gotten up during conversations with WP Engine. enough companies to a size where people “Anything that gutted our presence are paying attention.” here was a non-starter,” he said. “We care Davidson’s own Flywheel has at- too much about the impact we make here.” tracted national attention; recently, the That impact includes Flywheel’s role

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Brown Smith you’re first inspired by technology, and you can’t become inspired by technology if you don’t have access to hardware and software,” she said. “Do Space is the only organization in Omaha that exposes the general public to a wide array of hardware and software. Do Space challenges community members to take their digital skills to the next level in a welcoming, inclusive environment.” Stavick said Do Space has played a role in helping entrepreneurs launch tech startups, and in inspiring thousands of Omahans of all ages to explore computer programming. “At Do Space, we believe in active, project-based learning,” she said. “Our DIY attitude challenges Omahans to guide their own learning experience. This approach to community learning encourages our citizens to adopt an entrepreneurial mindset, which in turn gives Omahans an Continued on page 14.

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The Midlands Business Journal (ISSN 0194-4525) is published weekly plus one by MBJ Inc. and is available for $2.00 per individual copy or $75 per year. Editorial offices are 1324 S. 119th St., Omaha, NE 68144. Periodical postage paid at Omaha NE POSTMASTER; Send address changes to Midlands Business Journal, 1324 S. 119th St., Omaha, NE 68144. All submissions to the Midlands Business Journal become the property of the Midlands Business Journal and will not be returned.

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Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •

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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

Employee Benefits October 18, 2019

A section prepared by the staff of the Midlands Business Journal

Health plan structures, ancillary benefits further reward wellness of employees by Michelle Leach

While there are a multitude of trends specific to each type of employee benefit, generally there are more options for employees and ways to incentivize good health than ever before. So, employees may rethink leaving workplaces for perceived “greener pastures.” “A few trends in the employee benefits field are health savings accounts (HSA), partial self-funding plans and wellness programs,” said Renaissance Financial Group Benefits Sales Executive Andrea Gall. “These three concepts are a way to develop a more cost-effective benefit and will help drive down the cost of health insurance premiums and claims.” Described as underutilized and undervalued, Gall did emphasize education to assure HSAs are used in a way where the full benefit can be enjoyed. Plan sponsors are becoming attracted to partial self-funded plans, an underwritten product that evaluates the risk of the overall enrolled group and looks and feels like a traditional medical plan. “But the behind the scenes are different” she said. “Plan sponsors can track the group claims throughout the year and are able to monitor the overall health of the group.” Plan sponsors are encouraged to, for instance, allow flexibility with time off so wellness exams can be completed, or host

“One of the topics we are hearing more and more inquiries about are the individual coverage health reimbursement accounts (ICHRA), which allows employers to reimburse employees for individual health insurance premiums,” said OCI Insurance and Financial Services President Charles Olson II. “While not a solution for all employers,

ndrea all group enefits sales executi e at Renaissance inancial. weight-loss competitions; these healthy em- ness programs as a huge part of our society ployees, she said, have higher productivity, and we are seeing more carriers implementincreased employee morale and less health ing them,” Gall said. claims. She also referenced how almost all car“Health insurance companies see well- riers offer virtual visits.

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Olson Drueke-Collins especially large ones, it can be an option for small employers who want to provide a benefit without paying for a full-blown group plan.” Additionally, Olson noted a big transition is level-funded plans, which enable employers to be underwritten as stand-alone groups with potential savings based on the group’s health. “The level-funded plans fall outside of the ACA regulations that require community rating, which allows for the rates specific to their group,” he said. “The big carriers are now offering these types of plans as an option to try and combat increasing premiums so many groups are looking to this as an option for 2020.” Swartzbaugh-Farber & Associates Vice President of Employee Benefits Mary F. Drueke-Collins noted “level-funded” plans are really self-funding. “But the contract is based on a monthly level premium amount, like the employer would pay under a fully insured plan,” she said. “Unlike with traditional self-funding, if a covered member experiences a larger than expected claim, the employer’s maximum liability is the monthly premium amount. So, the cost to the employer is much more predictable.” At the end of the contract year, if the insurance company paid fewer claims than expected, the employer may be eligible for a return of a portion of the premium. “This is a great option for employers with a healthier than average workforce,” Collins said. “We are seeing a lot more interest in ontinued on next page.


Employee Benefits •

Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •

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Technology is changing the way we interact with health providers

Ryne Bessmer director of gro t for Strada Healt

Reward wellness

are. (Story at right)

by David Kubicek make it difficult the schedule an office visit. Technology is changing the way individuMobile apps are also popular. According als access and navigate the health system and to a recent UnitedHealthcare survey, 37% how they interact with health care of Americans overall and 50% of professionals. millennials said they had used the “These advances can help us internet or mobile apps to comparbecome savvier users of health ison shop for health care during care and can lead to better access the past year. to care, better health outcomes “We’ve created an app that enand a better consumer experiables members to help determine ence,” said Rob Broomfield, if their doctors are in-network, CEO of employer and individual compare treatment costs, review benefits for UnitedHealthcare of claims, and find more information Nebraska. about their health plans,” BroomFor example, telemedicine field said. allows doctors to conduct “virtual Broomfield Another trend is the emergence visits” with patients who live in of incentive-based well-being prorural areas or who have other conflicts that ontinued on next page.

of the ancillary benefits becoming completely “Also, [artificial intelligence] is making its employee-paid,” Collins said. “We way into the space, and we’ll conare also seeing an increase in the tinue to see more tools to enhance type of benefits being offered. Emour ability to be better consumers of ployers are offering a larger variety health care,” he said. “One example of options to their employees inis companies like BendHSA that are cluding legal plans, identity theft, learning consumers spending habits pet insurance, even discounts on and helping to identify HSA eligible homeowners and car insurance.” expenses on their behalf.” Omaha Association of Health Scholz said OAHU continues Underwriters President Paul Scholz to spend a lot of time and resources said members are still seeing inadvocating for legislative changes, novation in tracking and awarding some of which have impacts on perScholz employees through a program cussistent cost challenges; for instance, tomized to them. he referenced the National Association of

Continued from preceding page. these plans in the marketplace, both on the carrier side with more insurance companies offering these products and on the employer side, with more employers offering this type of coverage to their employees.” More network choices abound for insurance companies in the metro; for instance, the full preferred provider network network and smaller networks that include a smaller selection of providers. “Because of the high cost of medical insurance, we are also seeing a trend towards more

Health Underwriters support of Congressional efforts to prohibit balance billing for all emergency services and requiring consumers only be held responsible for the amount they would have paid in-network. These types of actions are taking on the issue of “surprise billing,” of which one agency alone saved consumers more than $2 million in 2018 by negotiating and resolving billing issues. At a national level, Scholz also noted that NAHU has a done a lot of work to provide in-depth certification courses for members and staff to enhance professional development. New courses are being added on an ongoing basis.

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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal • Employee Benefits

Paid leave programs are highly sought after by incoming workforce by Gabby Christensen

Employers are adding and modifying paid leave programs at a historic pace for a number of reasons, according to local experts. In fact, John Schembari, partner at Kutak Rock, said the most obvious reason is the proliferation of state and local laws that mandate a certain level of paid leave. “There are currently 13 states, plus the District of Columbia, that mandate paid leave,” Schembari said. “Nebraska is not one of these Schembari states. In addition, at least 25 cities and counties have implemented paid leave ordinances.” Looking down the road, Schembari said

he doesn’t expect the trend of state and local regulation of paid leave programs to slow down and many employers are starting to expand the types of leave that are eligible. “While paid maternity leave has been around for many years, paid paternity leave is relatively new,” Schembari said. “In addition, paid leave for adoption, the care of seriously ill family members, bereavement, and domestic abuse are becoming more common.” In addition, Schembari said many larger companies are recognizing the value of long term employFoley ees and the effect that burnout can cause on one’s happiness, wellness and performance. “For example, some companies will permit, or even require, employees with 10

or more years of service to take a paid leave of 30 to 90 days,” Schembari said. Schembari said a second way in which employers are modifying paid leave programs is by increasing the amount of paid leave. Additionally, Schembari said increasing paid leave programs can create strong feelings of loyalty among current employees. Bob Foley, vice president of employee benefits at Mutual of Omaha, said time off is even more important to millennials because they’re seeking a balance between work and leisure.

Technology changing the health care landscape Continued from preceding page. grams, which are now offered by a majority of U.S. employers. Many of these include financial incentives for healthy activities like walking, going to the gym or meeting certain health benchmarks. Small business owners can make good

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“They seem to place maybe even a higher value on that compared to previous generations,” Foley said. “And a big part of how we can help balance the demands of work and family is through our paid leave programs.” According to Foley, the more flexibility and options given, the better. “It’s really about making sure our benefits are contemporary and meeting the needs of the younger generation entering the workforce,” Foley said. “As an employee, you feel the difference when you work for ontinued on next page.

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health insurance decisions by choosing a health plan that provides their employees with multiple choices, a simpler onboarding process to alleviate administrative hassle and member tools — like an app or video explanation of benefits — to improve the member experience. In the past year, many firms have reached the point where it doesn’t make sense fiscally for a company with 30 to 40 employees to offer a group plan because of a high cost to quality ratio, according to Dan Wichmann, health and benefits director for Oracle Insurance Agency. “We have a 10-person business in the past week that we transitioned out of group health because they were paying between $6,000 and $7,000 per month for a mediocre policy,” he said. “If the employees were to drop their group health they would be eligible to enroll in an exchange plan where every single employee went from paying $800 per month to probably $150 to $300 per month for a great plan through the exchange.” The days of putting a group health plan in place and calling it good are over. Even the best health insurance plans today have deductibles ranging from $1,000 to $3,000 — and maximum out-of-pocket costs between $5,000 and $10,000 — per individual. “Employers want to put a strategy in place not only around group health, but they also want to look at the gaps,” Wichmann said. “Employers make voluntary benefits available alongside of their group health because employees like to tailor their benefits. Some employees like to put short-term disability in place. Some are really concerned about maternity coverage, some want vision, others want dental. From an employer standpoint, you must tailor the match around what the employees want.” With insurance costs continuing to rise, many employers can only afford high deductible plans, so many companies are pairing their insurance policies with direct primary care to save money, according to Ryne Bessmer, director of growth for Strada Health Care. “When you file more claims, it drives up the cost of insurance cost,” he said. “Things cost more with insurance than they do with cash.” For instance, an MRI paid for with insurance may cost $2,500, but at local imaging shops the price may be as low as $369. “We think insurance is important for catastrophic illnesses but you don’t need it to purchase primary care,” Bessmer said. “Sophisticated employers are working to unbundle these contracts to lower costs by third party payers and having patients pay physicians directly.”


Employee Benefits •

Paid leave programs

Continued from preceding page. an employer who is supportive and makes the balance of work and home life easier rather than harder. It becomes a tangible benefit that’s highly valued. Employees are more satisfied and stay with the company longer.” Dusty Davidson, founder/CEO of Flywheel, said the company currently provides a parental leave program offering 12 weeks paid maternity leave and eight weeks paid paternity leave to new parents. In 2020, Davidson said the company will make the switch to 16 weeks fully paid maternity leave. “When we started out, we wanted to build a company that was inclusive and great for new families,” Davidson said. “All too often, leave programs don’t offer the paid benefit and definitely don’t offer enough time for the primary caregiver to recover and spend much needed time with their new little one. Our program really sets us apart from other employers, especially as we compete for the best talent in the area.” Davidson said that employees are appreciative and proud of the fact that Flywheel values time spent as a new family. “We’ve also found that people who come back from leave are more well rested and ready to get back to work, versus families who don’t have that time,” Davidson said. “Dealing with the stress of a new little one and coming back into the workforce so soon doesn’t allow the proper time needed for families. We want our employees to come back to work refreshed and ready to hit the ground running.”

by Gabby Christensen

As might be expected, satisfied and engaged employees lead to higher levels of productivity — and when it comes to motivating employees, area experts say a unique benefits package can make all the difference. Julie Nelson, CEO of the Olson Group, said it’s completely vital that employers attempt to match employee benefits with employees’ backgrounds. “The more customized you can Becker make your benefits offerings, the more your employees will be engaged and value your employee benefits plan,” Nelson said. “For example, if you have many employees who have children, or elder parents, caregiver leave is an excellent benefit that helps these caregiver-employees. Or, if you have several millennial workers, a benefit such as student loan repayment matches with what these employees care about the most.” Nelson said these kinds of benefits help align employer and employee values. “In turn, this alignment helps build loyalty amongst your staff,” Nelson said. Nelson said high engagement with a benefits plan can also help power business growth. “Improved benefit engagement, through customized benefits, helps your firm both

Julie Nelson, CEO of the Olson Group. recruit and retain talent,” Nelson said. “Simi- said, the nation is currently in one of the most larly, organizations with high benefits enroll- competitive labor markets. ment tend to have healthier employees, with “National unemployment is at record better levels of both employee productivity lows hovering around 3.6%,” Becker said. “It and happiness.” is even lower in Nebraska. Benefits packages Additionally, Nelson said the more en- and tailoring benefits packages for employees gaged employees are with their benefits, the is almost a requirement in an effort to attract more likely they are to enroll and use said and retain top talent.” benefits. Because of this, Becker said companies ontinued on next page. Aaron Becker, CEO of Growductivity

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Customized benefit package leads to engaged, loyal employees

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Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal • Employee Benefits

Benefit package leads to engaged, loyal employees Continued from preceding page. are becoming progressive in many ways. For example, he said companies may offer flexible schedules with paid time off policies that don’t actually track time off. “It is an honor system,” Becker said. “Employees can take time off when they need it.” He said another example includes employers contributing more dollars to an employees’ health savings account to help pay for out of pocket medical expenses beyond the premiums being paid. According to Becker, employee discounts and perks programs are also starting to emerge, although they tend to have less of an impact. “I have a colleague who saved almost $3,000 on his new vehicle purchase as a result of a perks program his company was involved with,” Becker said. “It is a nice benefit that is beyond the paycheck that helps employers retain top talent and become an employer of choice.” Meredith Ryan-Reid, senior vice president of Group Benefits at MetLife, said today’s workforce is extremely diverse, with very unique needs. “When employers tailor their offerings to

their company’s unique work culture, they are demonstrating a deeper level of care for the holistic wellness of their workforce, communicating that their employees’ needs are valued, and most importantly — that they’re committed to their employees’ success,” Ryan-Reid said. However, Ryan-Reid said this is a twoway street. “It’s also important for employees to spend time understanding what their company is already offering them — they may even be surprised to know their company offers things like legal plans or auto and home insurance,” she said. Additionally, Ryan-Reid said it’s critical that employees raise questions about how the different benefits their employer may offer can best work together. “People don’t like talking about their benefits,” she said. “But by honestly assessing their personal situation, having a meaningful conversation with a trusted friend or colleague, and leveraging educational resources available from their employer or provider, employees are setting themselves up for success and the ability to mitigate financial stress down the line.”

Invest in employees by taking a holistic approach to well-being y asmine Heimgartner be the single focus. Strategies need to be Success requires optimizing every facet multidimensional.” of business operations and ensuring smooth, A budget remains an integral part of seamless execution. Like a busioperations, and finding ways to ness is a whole system, not just its accommodate soaring health care parts, so are the people within an costs is important, but looking at organization. Rethinking wellness the bigger picture can ease those is a beneficial way businesses can budget concerns. keep employees engaged and en“In addition to the physical rich their lives. clinical measures, employers can “Traditional wellness is quickalso reduce health care costs by ly becoming a thing of the past, including mental health improveand organizations are realizing the ment initiatives as part of their importance of a holistic strategy wellness programs,” said Emicentered around total well-being ly Langdon, attorney at Fraser Payne and engagement,” said Ali Payne, Stryker. “Productivity loss, absenpractice leader for Organizational teeism, job abandonment and higher turnover Wellbeing at Holmes Murphy. “Traditional are often directly linked to poor mental health. wellness of the past primarily focused on Employers can focus on assessing and/or imphysical health and missed the mark. While proving employee mental health by ensuring physical health and cost management strate- that employees have access to mental health gies can still play a role, they can no longer ontinued on next page.

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Invest in employees Continued from preceding page. benefits through an employee assistance program or similar mental health wellness program. EAPs are especially helpful because such programs can provide referrals to mental health professionals and other services while still maintaining employee confidentiality.” Along with physical and mental well-being, other dimensions include career, financial and community. Recognizing these five components can provide various ways for a business to nurture and support all forms of well-being. Professional development and recognition, financial support and planning, workplace flexibility and time off, grants and volunteer opportunities, and health-related testing and fitness memberships, are just a few ways a business can ensure employees understand their importance and often already present. “Most organizations don’t realize they currently offer benefits and resources within each of the five dimensions of well-being,” Payne said. “Typically, that’s because most organizations think of their benefits and resources in silos and don’t connect them with a holistic approach. It’s important to evaluate not only the programs and resources an organization offers internally, but also through their current carrier and vendor partners.” When considering which benefits or resources to add, an organization needs to understand what is currently available, where there might be a gap and what is best for its unique environment. “Businesses need to consider their size and employee population,” Langdon said. “It is important to be cautious in the area

Employee Benefits of mental health and to be very respectful of employee privacy while at the same time offering employees with access to mental health benefits. Employers can provide their employees with an opportunity to complete a health risk assessment, which usually includes mental health questions.” It’s also important for an organization to understand its culture and workforce demographics. “If they don’t understand their demographics, it can make their job very difficult because they’re trying to offer the right resources at the right time to four different groups of employees — entry-level, mid-career, established and pre-retiree,” Payne said. “Employees want and value different benefits at different career stages. Just because someone is categorized as entry level, mid-career, established or pre-retiree, that doesn’t mean they’re wanting or needing the exact same things as someone else in that same career stage. Each individual employee will have unique wants and needs.” As an organization delves into the best options it can provide, it is important to maintain employee privacy. “There are very significant differences between employee files and employee benefits files that contain protected health information,” Langdon said. “Employers should consult with legal counsel to assist with the design and implementation of any wellness program, including mental health wellness programs such as EAPs.”

Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •

9

How companies can improve employees’ retirement security by Janet Kidd Stewart

There’s a wide gulf between what employers think they are doing to help workers retire comfortably and what workers are actually experiencing, a new survey shows. Seventy-five percent EmployEE BEnEfits of employers consider their workplaces to be “aging friendly,” but just 54% of workers say their employers are aging friendly, according to the Transamerica Center for Retirement Studies, which surveyed 1,825 employers and 4,649 workers for its long-running retirement survey. And just 18% of employers offer a phased retirement program. Among employers, 46% strongly agreed that their workplace is supportive of employees working beyond age 65, but just 31% of workers felt the same. Just 26% of employers said they have diversity policies that specifically mention age. There is agreement on one issue, however, and it’s grim. Just 17% of employers

and 18% of workers are very confident in workers’ ability to retire comfortably. Employers could be doing much more to help workers achieve financial security in retirement, said Catherine Collinson, president and chief executive officer of the Transamerica Institute. “Whether it be providing a retirement plan, extending benefits to part-time workers, becoming aging friendly, or implementing phased retirement, employers can update their business practices and enhance their benefits offerings, thereby improving retirement security among American workers,” she said. “They’re in a position to help employees even more than they currently are.” Currently, for example, many employers offer phased retirement programs — which allow employees to work part-time schedules while beginning to draw retirement benefits — only on a case-by-case basis, leaving workers fearful that if they bring up the idea and it is shot down, they will be marginalized in the future, Collinson said.

“It’s a reality of our retirement system that some employers are much more engaged in helping employees achieve a secure retirement,” she said. “Robust benefits and flexible work arrangements go hand in hand with attracting employees.” It’s all about extending the number of years people spend in the workforce, which helps employers avoid worker shortages as baby boomers age and helps workers finance their ever increasing longevity, she said. So, if proposing to work long hours over the holiday season in exchange for summers off sounds appealing, pitch it to the boss as a way to cover the seasonal rush as well as providing flexibility to workers. Just be ready to defend the idea: 27% of employers cited administrative complexity as a reason for not doing more with flexible scheduling. Other retirement experts say automation is the best way to make those confidence numbers grow. The Employee Benefit Research Institute created a model predicting Continued on page 15.


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

REI prioritizes national transportation industry market share Continued from page 1. directing more resources to increasing its U.S. market share. Scott Hays, third-generation president of the firm founded by his grandfather Clyde Hays,

Radio Engineering Industries Phone: 402-339-2200 Address: 6534 L St., Omaha 68117 Product/Services: integrated manufacturing of commercial electronic for transportation and agricultural industries Founded: 1938 by Clyde Hays as Radio Engineering Industries Employees: 164 One-year goal: Complete Omaha headquarters expansion and relocation of sales and marketing employees to a second location Industry outlook: strong growth opportunities for specialized firms that invest in cutting-edge technology and quality delivery of school bus surveillance services Website: www.radioeng.com

said Omaha expansion plans include moving more than 30 sales and marketing workers out of the L Street building and into 15,000 square feet of office space at 11128 John Galt Blvd. “This new, open and modern workspace is conducive to collaboration between these two teams, which will ultimately lead us to be more responsive to our customers,” Hays said. “Our success is reliant on innovation, quality and exceptional customer support and for us to exceed the needs of our customers (more than 2,000) additional space for engineering and manufacturing is needed at our headquarters.” Technological investment is crucial to REI’s

Bill Schutz makes parts using a computerized punch. aggressive plans to increase its North American “Technology is developing around predictive market share, said Kevin Herrmann, chief finan- behavior and facial recognition of whose on cial officer. The Millboro, South Dakota native the bus.” He called the L Street facility’s upgrade, and business administration graduate of the University of South Dakota, joined REI in 2012 which is in progress, “as giving REI a true manufacturing facility and corporate office with after stints at KPGM and Ballantyne Strong. Among his responsibilities: take the fam- a wow factor” that will send visitors ranging ily-owned company to double-digit annual from top school district administrators, transgrowth via an emphasis on gaining market share portation directors, technology staff, and others by stressing the implementation of processes a strong message about the firm’s leadership in necessary to do business with Fortune 500 the transportation industry. Future plans include adapting products and companies. “The future for our industry is in algorithms, services for use by the taxicab industry. Herrmann told Midlands Business Jourand radar/sonar technology for surveillance of the perimeter around a bus that will not only nal that REI, which has long had a strong observe and record a bicyclist on the sidewalk commitment to investment in research and next to where a school bus is stopped,” he said. development, spent more than $1.5 million in that category last year and is accelerating expenditures this year as it positions itself to stay abreast of software development needs and especially smart cameras, which are the latest in the school bus safety industry. “We hired our first software engineer seven years ago and now that’s a sub-department of engineering,” he said. “Four years ago we added our software engineering lab.” The transportation surveillance business is becoming more software and services-oriented, a fact that Herrmann said REI has addressed by packaging hardware and software, plus offering installation and servicing equipment. “In growing our market share we hope to double our sales of equipment for school buses and we want to focus more on motor coaches,” he said. “We also want to grow by selling equip-

ment to city transit authorities not only for their buses but also mini-buses.” He said the latter will require use of more cameras at a time and at different price points and the hiring of transit specialists in various parts of the country. Since 2013, REI has piloted stop-arm technology that utilizes the use of a pod placed on the side of a bus that can take a picture of a passing car and zero in and identify its license plate number. Enhanced technology enables an identification to be made at 70 miles an hour, even at night and in a rainstorm. Data collected is turned over to school authorities. Sixteen states allow for the evidence to be admissible as a ticketing factor. Nebraska, at present, does not. Herrmann said REI benefits from its decades of experience in serving the transportation industry and that school bus video requires frequent review and the development of processes to hold staff accountable. Issues range from safety to bullying. In June, REI rolled out its ARMOR Cloud service to handle customers’ server management responsibilities. “With ARMOR available in the cloud, we’ve made the adoption of these wireless technologies even easier,” said Software Engineer Manager Dan Mancuso. “Customers no longer need to worry about managing servers, software updates or uptime — we handle it all from our headquarters.” Next year REI will set up REI Technology Services, Inc. — a wholly owned but separate entity that will install and service equipment, including that used by customers that was not provided by the Omaha firm. Another initiative at REI involves plans to install a Microsoft based Enterprise Resource Planning System, which over three to five years, will help lead the firm to a paperless environment. Herrmann said REI is successful because the firm has long had processes in place for the testing and evaluation of all equipment before it goes out. Two years ago, REI’s customer service received a hefty challenge when more than a hundred hard drives went to customers with a glitch that needed to be reset. “We went to the customer, swapped them out and put in a new DVR or hard drive for them,” Herrmann said. That caused REI an expenditure of about $200,000 and required just over a year to accomplish, but showcased the company’s commitment to its customers, something Herrmann said has helped the firm acquire additional accounts.

S emee a Har ey uilds amps.


Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •

11

Pet parents increasingly crave ‘human-grade’ level of services, food products by Michelle Leach

The death of brick and mortar retail? Stores specializing in products and services for pets are very much alive and well. Total pet industry expenditures in the U.S. have climbed every year since 1994 — the earliest available statistics from the American Pet Products Association — even throughout the Great Recession of the late 2000s. “I’ve been here for two and a half years, going on my third year, and it’s boomed pretty dramatically,” said Nick Mathey, general manager of Dogtopia, which offers day care, boarding and spa services. “It’s one of the biggest markets to be in on, and millennials are leaning more toward buying pets than having children — it’s apparent.” Mathey indicated opportunities abound for businesses that distinguish from the competition with quality services akin to what one would expect from care for a young child or senior family member. To accomplish this, Mathey said their webcams are motion-activated, and alerts are sent directly to his phone when he’s not onsite. The webcams themselves provide a level of transparency; pet parents can check in on their furry children day or night remotely, regardless of where they’re at in the world. The metro community has responded, as Mathey said the company’s daily volume has increased 25% to 30% and it’s in expansion mode. Specializing in top-grade, unique supplies and stress-free grooming, Long Dog Fat Cat Natural Pet Food opened its third location in Midtown Crossing around two years ago. “As far as emerging trends, I have noticed a growing number of pet parents asking about holistic solutions in lieu of synthetic solutions — food-based medicine,” said Store Manager Eric Nault. “More and more are looking to add fresh foods because the health benefits from both a solution and a prevention perspective are undeniable.” Born in 1998, Nature Dog has grown in Omaha alongside a widespread hunger from consumers for all-natural dog and cat foods, free of byproducts, chemical

elissa Hoo er o ner at ature og it preservatives and fillers. Last year, owner Melissa Hoover isolated CBD and hemp oil products as emerging areas of wellness. “CBD products seem to be everywhere now, with new ones appearing every day,” she said. “I have stayed with three major companies that I know and trust. They have expanded their product lines significantly now to include water-soluble chews, honey, peanut butter and coconut oil as well as the original tinctures.” New forms, she said, offer valuable alternatives for customers whose pets are difficult to administer tinctures to, and Nature Dog staff continues to hear positive feedback about their effectiveness on the likes of relief from pain, seizures and anxiety. “I have been seeing a trend toward inclusion of ancient grains in kibble diets for dogs,” Hoover said. “These provide a choice for people looking for a non-legume-based carbohydrate source. There has also been an uptick in sales of raw food diets for dogs and cats. I anticipate that this

er rescue dog Stan.

trend will continue, particularly among the more nutrition-conscience consumers.” What was “trendy” or fringe two to five years ago, particularly five-plus years back, is more mainstream now, with Wag’s Eryn Wisdom Swan noting “natural” foods aren’t just in mom and pop shops like hers; they’re frequently found in big box stores. “Petco just moved to completely exclude artificial colors, flavors and preservatives in all their food and treats they carry this year,” she said. “We hear that what we as humans put into our bodies is fuel. Why is it any different for our pets?” Even though it’s fortified with vitamins, cereal, for instance, is still a processed food. So, Swan noted, nobody would consider eating the same bowl of cereal every day for every meal as a healthy diet. “Not to mention, growing sick of eating Cheerios or Coco Puffs day in and day out,” she said. “Your dog or cat doesn’t want to eat the same bowl of processed kibble every day either, nor is it the healthiest way for he/she to eat. I think a quality diet is one of Continued on page 13.


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

Sacred Seed Pop-Up garden aiming to preserve heritage Continued from page 1. and indigenous corn and, in the process, share Native American history, culture and practices. The Cherokee flour corn seeds that were planted (an heirloom variety called Japonica), some from the 1800s, have been collected from various seed saving organizations and repositories like the Cherokee Nation Seed Bank, which obtained some of its seeds from anthropological collections. “There’s multiple sources,” he said. “The field of anthropology did a lot around this.” Other corn varieties include flint corn, typically grown in the north because of its shorter growing season, popping corn and sweet corn. Flour corn is the most durable, he said. Even though the origin of corn goes back 10,000 years to Mesoamerica, rice in Asia and wheat in Europe, today seed diversity has nearly been depleted because of the prevalence of patented hybrid seeds, he said, referencing the documentary Seed: The Untold Story. Heirloom corn is not the sweet corn that most Americans are familiar with. “Case law has evolved to protect the American farmer,” he said. “What is lost in the shuffle is that all corn is Indian corn to the point today that probably most Americans would see that and go, ‘can you eat it?’ Because somewhere somebody did a hell of a marketing job on Indian corn. The only time you ever see it is decorative to this time of year — Thanksgiving.” If genetically modified corn were to cross-pollinate with heirloom seeds, a seed company would then own that corn because of patents around intellectual property, which is the reason Keen plants tribal seeds in urban settings — downtown or in people’s backyards. Up until fairly recently, it was illegal for in-

Variations of rose hues are prevalent in the harvested corn from the Sacred Seed Pop-Up. dividuals to trade seeds in the state of Nebraska, headquarters. he said, and Betsy Goodman, who spearheaded After the building was razed a few years the Common Soil Seed Library at the Benson ago, Janis Regier, owner of Natural Therapy at branch of the Omaha Public Library, helped 1219 Leavenworth St., was tired of looking at change that law. There are also seed libraries the vacant land and obtained permission from at the Elkhorn and Millard branches of the Warren Distribution CEO Bob Schlott to plant Omaha Public Library and the South Omaha a garden. Public Library. Organizations like Kinghorn Gardens, the The Sacred Seed Pop-Up garden, in its Nature Conservancy, No More Empty Pots, the second year, is a collaborative effort by partners Bemis Center for the Contemporary Arts, Kaneand neighbors of the plot of land at 727 S. 13th ko, along with Master Gardener Nancy Scott, St. that was formerly Warren Distribution’s “seed ambassadors” and volunteers have teamed together to create a serene dose of nature amid downtown buildings and hardscapes. Sacred Seed planted the “Three Sisters:” corn, beans and squash, a complementary planting methodology in Native American cultures, along with the Omaha tribe’s fourth sister, the sunflower. Corn takes nitrogen out of the soil and beans replenish it, he said. Squash keeps racoons out of the garden and sunflowers take out heavy metals. The predominately rose hue of the corn is specific to the plot of land that it’s grown on. “The corn plant is fascinating,” he said. “What results is a combination of the soil quality, water quality, sun, wind. When these plants were thriving and alive, all of the pollen anthers were different colors and the silks were different colors. Might be a deep purple, could be a deep red of the pollen. The silks are oftentimes purple or red or lime green. Each kernel is adapting to this area and to the conditions. That’s why you have those common colors … everything that I pull out has some different variation because of this location.” Keen, who was encouraged to start the seed saving project 13-14 years ago by his mentor, Chair Emeritus at the University of Colorado, Boulder’s anthropology department Dr. Deward Walker, views the project as an homage to his ancestors who survived European settlers and the devastation brought on by European diseases like smallpox. “Here in Nebraska, we know that there were at least four different waves of smallpox that hit here: 1780, 1800, 1830 and 1860,” he said. The cumulative effect of that was a 95% decimation rate. That’s beyond any genocide and so that’s what allowed European populations to just walk through here, he said. The

tribes here in Nebraska — the Pawnees numbered somewhere between 14,000-21,000. They were down to 1,400. The Omahas were over 3,000, down to 332. “We’re a miracle, those who lived. [This is] an homage to them and all the peoples that lived on this land — that’s why I do the work. To homage all those that toiled and created all these food systems for us thousands of years ago. Today we still honor them and honor their spirit by keeping this up.” Keen, volunteers and partners — from No More Empty Pots and Mosaic to bikers riding down the street and people out on the town — try to do everything by hand in keeping with tradition, including pollinating the corn. They also try to reuse everything. After harvesting the corn, a Cherokee artist and friend of Keen’s will make cornhusk dolls. Corn stalks will be uprooted and turned into compost. Most of the harvested corn will be braided together and dried, seeds graded and saved. In the spring, according to Omaha tradition, the men will help prepare the land and the women who are of childbearing age will typically plant on the new moon in May. Anyone is welcome to help with the weeding. “Probably what I’ll do is keep all the rose-colored good seeds, name it after this plot and develop new strains,” he said. “So there will be a whole new rose strain, Omaha Rose or whatever we want to call it, and when we plant those again then they will be all rose typically.” Some of the corn will be made, by hand, into a nutrient-rich hominy, which can be used for tamales. Corn silks can be deep fried with herbs. Over the years, innovative local chefs, like Jason Siroise of Ika San and Paul Kulik of Le Bouillon and Via Farina, have used Sacred Seed’s produce. The nonprofit has held a number of alternative Thanksgivings. Keen is a professor at Creighton University’s Heider College of Business, teaching the capstone course for the undergraduate and master’s programs. He also teaches entrepreneurship and has his own strategy/planning/facilitation services firm. He has a manuscript for a book and is regularly asked to give talks about the Sacred Seed project. Sacred Seed also has a partnership with the Land Institute in Salina, Kansas. His Cherokee grandmother was part of the Wild Potato Clan and always had a garden, which left an impression on him. He also has roots in the Omaha tribe. “As an indigenous person, I want more indigenous people to do this, whether it be my tribe or other tribes because you come into the patterns of season, you get your hands into the soil,” he said. “I think it’s healed me; it helps. Because when I’m down here I’m happy. I don’t think about anything else. I just watch the butterflies and the bees. “I think it’s important what indigenous people have to say — our philosophies, our traditional ways of living, I think are important lessons for all Americans to understand. And we’re still here and we always will be, and part of our role as indigenous people is to help be present with the land and this is an example of it. I know that my ancestors are proud of me for what I’m doing with this. And that somewhere amongst all of this, the plants are thankful for us too, and that we’re doing good work for them and all this is hopefully helpful to people — nourishment for the body, for the soul, somewhere between heart and art.”


Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •

13

Thrive Space focuses on building community on business campus Continued from page 1. residential area presented one of the biggest obstacles for the couple, followed by renovations that topped what they purchased the property for. The school, which takes up 51,500 square feet, was built in the 1950’s before Nebraska adopted codes from the National Fire Protection Agency. “One of the biggest safety improvements was installing a fire sprinkler system,” Ryan Gratopp said. “Oddly enough the school never had a fire sprinkler system.” To cut down costs and keep the school's personality intact, the Gratopps worked to SUPER CROSSWORD

reuse equipment left behind to create an aesthetic that’s part industrial, part rustic and part modern. “Our mantra was anything goes as long as it’s cool,” Ryan Gratopp said. Bleacher wood from the old gym was used throughout the building and wheels were repurposed for decoration. In the kitchen, football tackle dummies were re-welded into countertops and part of the backsplash was composed of hot dog trays. The building is split up into five rental categories: a dedicated desk, a store/bay/ shop, a suite for one to two people, an extra WHAT DO THEY ALL HAVE?

large suite for three to five people and a wing don’t know them,” Ryan Gratopp said. “I for over 20 people. have to trust them too because I’m not going “We knew that the sports would come to refer someone I don’t trust.” because we heard that sports facilities were The Gratopps also mentioned how isoat a premium,” Ryan Gratopp said. “But lating and challenging it can be to be the sole would other businesses come and buy into employee or a small business. this weird concept?” “If there’s 20 skillsets I need to run a When the facility successful business I opened in spring of Thrive Space might only have four 2018 it started with Phone: 402-934-0090 of them but I need two tenants, both of Address: 800 N. Front St., Waterloo people that are good which are still offic- 68069 at the other 16,” Ryan ing out of the facility. Founded: January 2018 by Traci and Gratopp said. They have been joined Ryan Gratopp Officing in a comby 35 other business- Service: Former elementary school plex with a variety of es ranging from a pa- turned business complex offering turndifferent businesses tio restaurant, a snow key rental spaces for small to mid-sized makes finding those cone company, and a companies. skillsets a bit easier. fitness center, just to Outlook: The facility is currently housing For example, if somename a few. one needs marketing 35 businesses at 85% capacity. Lead“I don’t think that ership hopes to fill the last 15% with help, Phantom Marpeople get it until Waterloo’s first and only coffee shop. keting is on the camthey walk through Goals: Foster more relationships pus. If your company the doors and feel between officing businesses through is growing and you the vibe,” Traci Gra- networking events. need staffing help, topp said. “It’s the Website: thrivespaceco.com River’s Edge Recruitculture that wins peoing is on campus. ple over.” Traci Gratopp said that building in opThe included amenities are also a conportunities for these companies to meet each tributing factor. Rent includes utilities, inother and network is the next step. ternet, trash service, maintenance, cleaning, “If we don’t perpetuate it then it’s too access to the gym and meeting/conference easy for people to just say ‘I’ll do that torooms and 24/7 access to the building. morrow,’” she said. The communal kitchen, as well as the The duo noted that some businesses Ping-Pong table and the pool table, are part have already started doing this, including of phase two of the project: initiating and one men’s group who meets for breakfast fostering relationships between officing twice a month. Other activities so far have businesses to create a community. included horse tournaments, an ice cream “I can’t refer my neighbor, use my sandwich day and a bring-your-dog-toneighbor or advocate for my neighbor if I work day.

Pet parents increasingly crave ‘humangrade’ level of services, food products

Answers on page 14.

Continued from page 11. the easiest and most important things we can do for our pets for their overall health and longevity. I think we are moving toward that with better education and access to that information.” As it relates to lodging and day care services providers, Dogtopia’s Mathey encourages pet parents to do their research. “Look at what other people’s experiences have been,” he said. “If it feels like someone is rushing you out the door or holding things back, those are red flags.” Long Dog Fat Cat’s Nault urges readers to not rely on any one source or person for information related to choosing natural products. “There are many differing perspectives and many different experts who recommend different things — that’s why there are so many different products,” he said. “In order to get the best idea of what to use, seek out multiple sources of information. That’s what we do in our own studying, and it gives us the most accurate perspective we can have.” The overriding caveat for Nature Dog’s Hoover, when asked about how to explore popular or “buzzworthy” products, is that “there is no panacea.” “I would advise pet parents not to seek or expect a single product that is ‘the best’ for all animals,” she said. “Every dog, ev-

ery cat, like every human, is unique. What works well for one, may not work well for another. We have to know our pets and be observant of their responses to different foods and supplements. Always look for natural, real food ingredients and offer a variety for a well-balanced diet.” As it relates to finding a groomer, Wag’s Swan alluded to media reports about groomers mistreating and even killing pets in their care. “We often see one bad experience a pet parent has will keep them from going back to any groomer for a long period of time,” she said. “This will only drive another bad experience at even the best groomer, as your pet will likely be matted, which may result in sores, bruising and pain for them. It will also likely result in the next groomer having to shave your pet very short, which many pet owners do not like.” A low-stress, kennel-free groomer, Wag founder Swan encourages readers to call around to different salons and ask them about their process. “Once you find a good groomer you trust, tell them about the kind of cut you’d like to keep your pet in and how often you brush at home,” she said. “They can provide you with a suggestion of how often to bring your pet in to keep their coat healthy and mat-free, which will result in the best experience for both you and your furry friend.”


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

Want to help your kids buy a house? Better read this first by Carla Fried

Buying a home is increasingly a multigenerational family affair. Four in 10 parents recently surveyed said they expect to help their children buy a home. That’s more than double the percentage of parents who themselves got help financial from their parents when they bought their first home. Home prices that have been rising faster than wages, combined with burdensome levels of student debt, are fueling this trend. Moreover, helping with home ownership is a here-and-now assist that can transform a child’s financial life, rather than waiting to bequeath money down the line. Whether you are the Bank of Mom and Dad or the adult child eager to buy, a successful intra-family deal requires careful consideration of the various options: Can you afford it? OK, parents, it is hereby stipulated that you, of course, want to help. Now the hard question: Can you cope with the long-term ramifications? A $10,000 gift you make at age 65 would be worth more than $26,000 at age 85 if it kept growing at a 5% annualized rate. A $50,000 housing stake today would

be worth more than $130,000 at age 85. If you have any inkling you could use that extra cushion in retirement, you probably shouldn’t be gifting money today. You could consider making it a loan — more on this below — but also keep in mind that if you intend to pull the money out of a traditional 401(k) or IRA, you not only will owe taxes, but a large withdrawal could bump you into a higher tax bracket for the year. Got a boomeranger at home? Help them save for a down payment. According to the Pew Research Center, about 15% of today’s millennials are living at home, nearly double the rate when their parents were in their 20s and 30s. Making it a financial free ride does nothing to help your child build adulting muscles. If they’re focused on paying off student loans, great. But if they have ample cash flow and want to eventually buy a home, now’s the time they should start to save. You should insist that they set up a separate savings account and have automatic monthly deposits zapped into it from their checking account. A $500 monthly contribution is a down payment fund of more than $6,000 in just one year. That can be more than enough to qualify for a low down payment mortgage in many

Omaha’s tech firms diverse in size; lack diversity among women entrepreneurs, people of color Continued from page 2. edge at school and in the workplace.” This summer, The Greater Omaha Chamber and The Lincoln Partnership for Economic Development announced the joint Opportunities in Tech Initiative (OPTiN). In collateral developed in conjunction with the announcement, it was noted that the Greater Omaha Chamber’s Prosper Omaha 2.0 campaign set its sights on attracting 10,000 tech workers in the next five years. OPTiN will reportedly begin by marketing to talent in four select areas: Denver, Chicago, Detroit and Sioux Falls. “There are some lessons we’ve learned in Omaha and Lincoln, and they are transferable,” said Greater Omaha Chamber President and CEO David G. Brown. “The Fremonts and Hastings and Plattsmouths, they have a desire for growth … and we shouldn’t be afraid to take those lessons and apply them to other communities across the state.” The technology sector and related jobs comes up frequently in Blueprint Nebraska’s report to build upon Nebraska’s strengths and address challenges to growth; in fact, broadband access is one of the first initiatives to be taken from theoretical stage to implementation phase. “Omaha certainly is a leader in economy and in the creation of jobs in our state,” said Executive Director Jim Smith. “So, it’s important for Omaha to have a good relationship with Greater Nebraska, when it comes down to the Legislature, and representatives in state government. This urban-rural divide really holds the state back.” And, with the world being so “digitally-connected,” Smith indicated the

state can outperform other peer states and overcome geographical challenges. Ten years ago, Davidson noted, the types of conversations represented by the likes of Blueprint Nebraska weren’t occurring. He wants to see these different, likeminded groups coalesce. “Or align their messaging and goals,” he said. “You don’t want people to be working against each other.” Davidson also emphasized the importance of having buy-in at every level, starting with general awareness and direction toward an identity — “being a state where high-tech jobs flourish” — and then moving to the “doing” part from the talking/ coalescing stage. Stavick characterized Omaha’s biggest tech sector-oriented challenge at present as the “lack of diversity.” “Women and individuals of color are underrepresented at every level,” she said. “As a business community, we must understand that our greatest asset is our people. There is no way for us to truly compete with other cities if we fail to make diversity a core value of our business community.” Accordingly, this year, Do Space launched its Women’s Innovator Fellowship to challenge three local women in tech and startups with designing and developing a new tech project to help other women in tech. “Each Fellow was awarded a stipend of $10,000 for their participation in this intense, six-month program,” she said. “The result of the program is three new digital tools which benefit Omaha’s tech community, and three women who have taken their leadership skills to the next level.”

regions of the U.S. Gift vs. loan. Gifts are the easiest and cleanest way to help finance a home purchase. In 2019 anyone can give another individual $15,000 without any tax implications. That means Mom can give $15,000 and Dad can give $15,000 to a child, and another combined $30,000 to a child’s spouse or significant other. (You can give more, but you will need to file a federal gift tax return. You won’t likely owe a penny in tax as the first $11.4 million — in 2019 — is part of each individual’s lifetime estate tax exclusion. But you need to file the paperwork.) Grandparents, aunts, uncles and generous friends are free to join in the gifting. If your child will be applying for a mortgage, you will need to submit a letter verifying that the money you contribute is a gift, not a loan. If the money you contribute to the cause will be a loan, a lender is going to factor it into the calculation of your child’s debt-to-income ratio. That’s not necessarily a deal-breaker, but something to be aware of. And you definitely want a quick huddle with your tax pro to make sure you pass muster with IRS lending rules. You will need to charge your kid interest. The IRS publishes minimum rates each month. The long-term rate for loans made in May 2019 was 2.74%. Co-sign carefully. If your finances and credit score are in great shape, stepping in as a co-borrower on the loan will likely get your child a better mortgage deal. Before you take this step, you might want to check in with a trusted financial advisor

who can walk you through the math and the consequences. Even if you expect your kid to make all the payments, in the eyes of the lender you are 100% on the hook as well. If something were to happen to your kid — a layoff, an illness — would you be able to easily step in and cover the mortgage, property tax and insurance? If you just hit pause when reading that, consider it a valuable warning. If you do decide to co-sign a mortgage, and your child is single, make sure your kid immediately takes out a term life insurance policy. In the event your child dies prematurely, the proceeds from the death benefit can help cover mortgage payments and other housing costs until you are ready to sell. I explained the term life insurance market in a prior column: https://www.rate. com/research/news/some-personal-financial-challenges-are-actually-easy-to-overcome. Make a joint move. Depending on family dynamics, you might want to consider moving with your kid into a home that can work for all of you. Financially, it can help ease everyone’s burden. Sure, it will take some major adjusting for all parties, but before you knock down the idea, consider the upsides. Shared housing costs. Built-in grandparents for grandchildren — potentially helping with some childcare — and no worries for how the adult children will be able to step in if needed to help care for an aging parent. ©2019 Rate.com News Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

SUPER CROSSWORD PUZZLE ANSWERS

Puzzle on page 13.


Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •

15

Trump announces ‘Phase 1’ deal with China, but comprehensive solution still looks far off by Don Lee

After a resumption of high-level trade talks in Washington, President Donald Trump announced that the Chinese would buy more U.S. farm goods and take some other steps in what he called a “Phase 1” deal between the two Economy largest economies in the world. In exchange, Trump agreed to put off new tariff hikes on imports from China that were set to take effect last week. Over the last 15 months, the president has slapped punitive taxes on more than $360 billion of imported Chinese goods. Another round is still scheduled for December. The agreement marked progress after a breakdown in talks in May, but was far from a major breakthrough or the kind of comprehensive deal that Trump has promised in order to rebalance trade and address long-standing American concerns about China’s unfair economic practices. The agreement could open the way for a bigger substantial deal, but it also could turn out to be another short-lived truce in Trump’s unpredictable trade war with China, punctuated by tit-for-tat tariffs. Stock markets rallied in anticipation of an agreement, with the Dow rising more than 300 points. Trump’s announcement came after he met at the White House with China’s top

trade envoy, Liu He, who led a delegation from Beijing for two days of talks in Washington with senior administration officials. David Loevinger, a former senior Treasury Department official on China affairs, said even a “super-skinny deal” is better than a deepening trade war. But given the off-and-on nature of Trump’s trade war with China and a widening of tensions with Beijing, especially over technology competition, he asked: “How long is it going to last?” China’s pledge to buy more U.S. soybeans and other agricultural goods — which Trump has repeatedly called for — is something they offered to do earlier this year. “Agreeing to import more ag products is no big concession for the Chinese,” said Loevinger, who’s now an analyst for TCW Emerging Markets Group in Los Angeles. “They have to eat, and they’re running out of pigs,” he added, referring to a staple of the Chinese diet lately threatened by an outbreak of disease. More importantly, Beijing has given no indication that it’s prepared to give ground on key structural industrial policies and mercantilist practices that the U.S. side wants stopped, including government subsidies to state-owned enterprises and various ways in which American companies are pressured to hand over technology

and trade secrets in order to access Chinese markets. “Whatever kind of deal it is, it’s not a solution, not an answer,” said Clyde Prestowitz, president of the Economic Strategy Institute and a former trade negotiator in the Reagan administration. “It will become increasingly difficult for China and the U.S. to live together in the way we have been living together,” he said, noting that the fundamental problem is trust and the difference in values. Derek Scissors, a China expert at the American Enterprise Institute, said that as much as Trump likes tariffs, the president had good reason to back away from imposing the new upcoming taxes on China. Along with the tariffs, Trump’s planned Dec. 15 tariffs presumably would be lifted if a deal is finalized. The December one is significant as it will add 15% tariffs on some $160 billion of mostly consumer goods, including cellphones, laptops and toys — something that businesses warn will pinch American households and risk a further slowing of economic growth, which would almost certainly hurt Trump’s reelection bid. “Nobody right now wants those tariffs,” said Scissors, who regularly talks with administration officials. A suspension or rollback on tariffs could pave the way for further negotia-

Democrats warm to Trump’s revised NAFTA trade deal after Mexico pledges labor reforms y ennifer Ha er orn

One of the remaining obstacles to passing a new North American trade agreement could soon be cleared after Mexico promised top House Democrats that it would improve enforcement of new labor standards to protect workers’ Economy rights in that country. Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador also assured Democrats during meetings in Mexico recently that his government would increase funding to ensure compliance with the pact’s provisions, the lawmakers said. The road to passage for President’s Donald Trump’s revised NAFTA, known as the USMCA, will be significantly easier with Mexico’s concessions, assuming Lopez Obrador’s assurances are put into writing as Democrats have demanded. The trade pact could be one of the only major bipartisan legislative accomplishments approved this year in a Congress increasingly preoccupied with impeachment. “We were looking for a series of assurances. Those assurances were verbalized and now we hope they can be put into writing,” House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Richard Neal, D-Mass., said in an interview after returning from a two-day trip to Mexico with four other Democrats. Among other things, Democrats want Mexican workers to have the right to organize a union and hold free elections. They also want the new labor requirements, spelled out in a recent law passed in Mexico, to be subject to independent inspections. In addition to details of pharmaceutical policy, the labor issues are the chief sticking points Democrats want addressed before they approve the deal. Before signing off, Neal said Demo-

crats would consult with U.S labor unions, a key Democratic constituency. Final passage of the USMCA is still not expected for several more weeks, if not months. Lopez Obrador’s administration also agreed to provide funding to bolster inspections as well as the courts that settle labor disputes, said Rep. Jimmy Panetta, D-Calif., another lawmaker on the trip. “The president demonstrated their commitment not only to the labor standards, the enforcement that is necessary, but also the budget,” he said. Representatives of the two countries left the meeting “on the same page.” The assurances came during a 90-minute meeting between Lopez Obrador, his finance and labor ministers and five Democratic members of Congress. The delegation included Neal and Panetta as well as Democratic Reps. Jimmy Gomez of California, Dan Kildee of Michigan and Bill Pascrell of New Jersey. The Mexico trip comes nearly a year after Trump and leaders of Mexico and Canada signed the new trade pact. Congress has not approved the deal. Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said it won’t come up for a vote in the House until their concerns are resolved. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer has worked closely with a small group of House Democrats who are trying to thread a needle. They must appease Democrats by improving the policy around labor, pharmaceutical and environmental issues, but not change so much that it would require reopening the agreement with Mexico and Canada, which would derail the process and potentially lose Republican support. Pelosi has said Democrats are on a “path to yes. … We have a good working

relationship. Believe me, the quiet you hear is progress. “ Her remarks came at a news conference recently in which she attempted to focus attention on Democrats’ work on the USMCA and prescription drug policy rather than the impeachment inquiry. Lawmakers insist they can work on trade policy even as the House moves forward with its inquiry of Trump. Democrats were initially skeptical of giving Trump a political “win” by approving his trade deal. But as impeachment commands even more attention in Washington, some rank-and-file Democrats believe they have even more of a reason to prove they can work with a president they oppose politically in areas where they have a common interest. Plus, like Trump, they want to be able to tout legislative victories on the campaign trail in 2020. It could be particularly potent in parts of the country with significant rural and farming populations. “For my district, the central coast of California, NAFTA was a benefit to my agriculture producers,” Panetta said. “We want to continue trade to our No. 1 partner in Mexico.” When asked whether the impeachment inquiry will help or hurt the USMCA’s chances, Neal, who supports the inquiry, said those in the working group are keeping their “heads down” and working on the trade pact. Neal declined to say how soon the deal may move forward except that he hopes it is this year. The White House is not expected to send the final language to the House until the major points of contention are resolved. ©2019 Los Angeles Times Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

tions, but a comprehensive deal that Trump has said he wants appears to be a long way off. And it may not be possible at all, given that the U.S. confrontation with China has escalated far beyond trade. Ahead of the talks recently, the Trump administration cited human rights violations in restricting visas for some Chinese officials, and it put more Chinese entities — in addition to the telecom giant Huawei — on a U.S. blacklist that would prevent prominent tech companies from buying crucial American components. The administration also is reportedly considering a range of other measures to clamp down on China, including restricting Chinese access to U.S. capital markets and blocking American pension funds and universities from Chinese investments. Technology is a key battleground. “The Chinese are coming more and more to the view that tariffs are really a second-order consideration in the overall economic relationship,” said Nicholas Lardy, a China economy expert at the Peterson Institute for International Economics. “I think the evidence is very clear that those people in the Trump administration that want a technology decoupling have gained the upper hand and they’re moving on every front possible to reduce the flow of U.S. technology to China.” Trump previously has said that Huawei could be a part of the trade negotiations, and news reports in recent days have indicated that Trump was prepared to approve some licenses that would allow for nonsensitive U.S. components to be exported to Huawei. ©2019 Los Angeles Times Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Retirement security Continued from page 9. how various household groups, including single females and families, would benefit from having their old 401(k) plans automatically transferred to their new employer when they change jobs. They found significant improvement in retirement security simply due to the lack of “leakage” around those times of job transition. “Employers can and do tremendously influence employees’ ability to save,” said Transamerica’s Collinson. Like the old investment saying about time in the market being more important than market timing, the same goes for time in the workforce. Creating opportunities to keep employees on the job longer may be even more important than the contribution dollars flowing into their retirement plans. ©2019 Tribune Content Agency Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

LEGAL NOTICES MBJ legal notice instructions The following are some guidelines to consider when posting legal notices with the Midlands Business Journal: 1. Submit a written notice in either Microsoft Word or as a PDF document to Beth Grube at legals@mbj.com, fax to 402-758-9315 or mail: 1324 S. 119th St. Omaha, NE 68144. For trade names, submit a copy of approved (bar code in upper right hand corner) Application For Registration of Trade Name from the Secretary of State to the same email address. Please include your billing address and the desired duration you’d like your notice to run (trade names run for only one week). 2. You will receive a confirmation and price quote. Legal notices, except for trade names, are charged per line. The flat fee for a trade name is $50. Payment options are cash or check. 3. Deadline is 5 p.m. Tuesday for a notice to start publishing that Friday. 4. All costs include fees to file the notice with the Secretary of State and/or any appropriate courts. 5. You will receive a paid invoice copy and a courtesy proof of the notice the first week it runs and a copy of the affidavit filed with the courts the last week.

BARBARA MEDBERY-PRCHAL, P.C., L.L.O., Attorney 10305 Joseph Circle La Vista, Nebraska 68128 NOTICE OF INCORPORATION OF SVEHLA & ASSOCIATES, INC. Notice is hereby given that a corporation has been formed under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the corporation is SVEHLA & ASSOCIATES, INC. The corporation is authorizied to issue 10,000 shares of common stock. The name and street address of the corporation’s initial registered agent is Law Offices of Barbara Medbery-Prchal, P.C., L.L.O., 10305 Joseph Circle, La Vista, NE 68128, and its incorporator is Austyn Svehla, 8600 Executive Woods Drive, Suite 200, Lincoln, NE 68512. Austyn Svehla, Incorporator First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 AMANDA M. BARRON, Attorney P.O. Box 597 Fremont, Nebraska 68026 LEGAL NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT(s), MATTHEW P TORRISON & JAMIE L TORRISON You are hereby notified that Credit Bureau Services, Inc., a corporation, filed its complaint in the County Court of DOUGLAS County, Nebraska on 06/20/2019 on Case Number CI19-14610, the object and prayer of which is to recover the sum of $673.95, plus interest, attorney fees and court costs. You are required to answer the complaint of the Plaintiff on or before 11/18/2019 or the allegations in said complaint will be taken as true and judgment entered accordingly. CREDIT BUREAU SERVICES, INC., A CORPORATION First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 AMANDA M. BARRON, Attorney P.O. Box 597 Fremont, Nebraska 68026 LEGAL NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT(s), EZEKIEL J GASCA & ELIZABETH L GASCA You are hereby notified that Credit Bureau Services, Inc., a corporation, filed its complaint in the County Court of DOUGLAS County, Nebraska on 06/20/2019 on Case Number CI19-14609, the object and prayer of which is to recover the sum of $222.78, plus interest, attorney fees and court costs. You are required to answer the complaint of the Plaintiff on or before 11/18/2019 or the allegations in said complaint will be taken as true and judgment entered accordingly. CREDIT BUREAU SERVICES, INC., A CORPORATION First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 DENNIS P. LEE, Attorney LEE LAW OFFICE 2433 South 130th Circle, Suite 300 P.O. Box 45947 Omaha, Nebraska 68145 NOTICE OF SUIT TO: DYMONIQUE BREWER, 14931 Binny St, Omaha NE 68116, you are hereby notified that on August 15, 2019, American Family Mutual Ins. filed a suit against you in the Douglas County Court at docket CI19-17932, the object in prayer of which was to secure a judgment against you in the amount of $3,165.11, together with court costs, interest and attorney's fees as allowed by law. Unless you file your Answer with the Douglas County Court on or before the 25th day of November, 2019, the Petition against you will be considered as true and judgment will be entered against you accordingly. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 25, 2019 C R O K E R , H U C K , K A S H E R , D e W I T T, A N D E R S O N & GONDERINGER, L.L.C. 2120 South 72nd Street, Suite 1200 Omaha, Nebraska 68124 NOTICE OF AMENDMENT TO ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OF THE WALLING COMPANY The Walling Company of Iowa amended its Articles of Incorporation effective July 30, 2019, to change Article I to provide that the name of the corporation shall be RPH, Inc. Robert D. Henrichs, President First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019

BARBARA MEDBERY-PRCHAL, P.C., L.L.O., Attorney 10305 Joseph Circle La Vista, Nebraska 68128 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF OMAHANFS, LLC Notice is hereby given that a limited liability company has been formed under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the company is OmahaNFS, LLC The name and street address of the company’s initial registered agent is Law Offices of Barbara Medbery-Prchal, P.C., L.L.O., 10305 Joseph Circle, La Vista, NE 68128. The designated office is located at 18801 Lafayette Ave, Omaha, Nebraska 68102. David Ping, Members First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LAPair, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company, filed its Statement of Dissolution with the Nebraska Secretary of State on September 27, 2019, and the company is in the process of voluntary dissolution. The terms and conditions of such dissolution are, in general, that all debts and obligations of the company are to be fully paid and satisfied or adequate provision is to be made therefore, and that the balance of any remaining assets are to be distributed to its Member. Keeley Lammers will wind up and liquidate the company’s business and affairs. If you have a claim against the company, please provide the following information with respect to your claim: (1) your name or the name of your entity; (2) the nature of your claim; (3) the amount of your claim; and (4) the date your claim arose. All claims shall be mailed to 13323 California Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68154. A claim against the company is barred unless an action to enforce the claim is commenced within five (5) years after the publication date of the third required notice. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF BLUE CHIP HUMAN CAPITAL, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Blue Chip Human Capital, LLC has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office of the limited liability company is 431 North 62nd Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68132. The registered agent and office of the limited liability company is Koley Jessen P.C., L.L.O., 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. The limited liability company commenced business on September 26, 2019. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 MARY E. VANDENACK, Attorney VANDENACK WEAVER LLC 17007 Marcy Street, Suite 3 Omaha, Nebraska 68118 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LINKFAB LLC Notice is hereby given that LINKFAB LLC has been organized as a limited liability company under the Nebraska Uniform Limited Liability Company Act. The address of the initial designated office of the company is 17007 Marcy Street, Suite 3, Omaha, NE 68118-3122. The agent for service of process for the Company is VW Agents LLC located at 17007 Marcy Street, Suite 3, Omaha, NE 68118-3121. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 MAX J. KELCH, Attorney VANDENACK WEAVER LLC 17007 Marcy Street, Suite 3 Omaha, Nebraska 68118 AMENDED NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF NEBRASKA CUSTOM TILE, LLC Notice is hereby given that NEBRASKA CUSTOM TILE, LLC has amended its organization as a limited liability company under the Nebraska Uniform Limited Liability Company Act. The amended notice of organization reflects a member resigning and a new member being added. The address of the designated office of the company is 11334 Jaynes Street. The new agent for service of process for the Company is VW Agents, LLC located at 17007 Marcy Street, Suite 3, Omaha, NE 68118-3121. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019

NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION of a Limited Liability Company Notice is hereby given the registration with the Nebraska Secretary of state’s office of Garmex Construction, LLC under the laws of the State of Nebraska as follows: The name of the company is Garmex Construction, LLC. Registered agent and office of Garmex Construction, LLC at 3433 S 14th Street, Omaha, NE 68108. Initial members: Eduardo Garcia. General nature of the business is to transact any and all lawful business for which limited liability companies are allowed by statute. The LLC was organized on September 2019 for the perpetual duration and is managed by its members. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF SNC INSURANCE LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that SNC Insurance LLC has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office of the limited liability company is 1120 S 101st Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. The registered agent and office of the limited liability company is Koley Jessen P.C., L.L.O, 1125 S 103rd Street, Suite 800, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. The Certificate of Organization was filed with the Nebraska Secretary of State on September 19, 2019. First publication September 27, 2019, final October 11, 2019 WHITMORE LAW OFFICE LLC 7602 Pacific Street, Suite 200 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION Notice is hereby given that ABR Time, L.L.C. (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office of the Company is 7602 Pacific Street, Ste. 200, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. The registered agent of the Company is Thomas E. Whitmore, 7602 Pacific Street, Ste. 200, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. The Company was formed on September 25, 2019. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 MARK J. LAPUZZA, Attorney PANSING HOGAN ERNST & BACHMAN LLP 10250 Regency Circle, Suite 300 Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3728 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LEWIN INVESTMENTS, LLC Notice is hereby given of the organization of Lewin Investments, LLC. 1. The name of the limited liability company is Lewin Investments, LLC. 2. The street and mailing address of the initial designated office is 5818 Woolworth Ave, Omaha, Nebraska, 68106, and the name and street address of the initial agent for service of process is Derick Lewin, 5818 Woolworth Ave, Omaha, Nebraska, 68106. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 RUSSELL J. KREIKEMEIER, Attorney KREIKEMEIER LAW OFFICES 126 East Grove Street West Point, Nebraska 68788 NOTICE OF INCORPORATION Notice is hereby given of the incorporation of PREP TECH, INC., with its registered office address at126 East Grove Street, West Point, Nebraska, 68788. The general nature of its business is to develop, own, acquire, use, manufacture, assemble, patent, lease and sell technical equipment, supplies and other products including associated software development, sell or otherwise dispose of trade names, trademarks, inventions, formulae, improvements and processes, of any nature whatsoever, copyrights, patent rights and letters patent, or any interest therein, of the United States and all foreign countries and including the transaction of all or any lawful business or engagement in any commercial venture permitted by the Nebraska Model Business Corporation Act. The authorized capital stock of the Corporation is $10,000.00 and such stock shall be issued at such time and under such conditions as the Board of Directors may determine. The Corporation commenced doing business on the 20th day of August, 2019 and shall have perpetual existence. The affairs of the Corporation shall be conducted by a board of directors, and such officers as may be provided in the bylaws of the Corporation. DATED the 30th day of September, 2019. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019

THOMAS H. PENKE, Attorney 12020 Shamrock Plaza, Suite 200 Omaha, Nebraska 68154 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION Notice is hereby given that Weaver Investments, LLC, has organized pursuant to R.R.S. Section 21-101 et seq. The registered office is 12020 Shamrock Plaza, Suite 200, Omaha, Nebraska 68154 and the registered agent is Thomas H. Penke. The nature of the business to be transacted is any lawful business. The business commenced on October 1, 2019, and is perpetual. The affairs of the company are to be conducted by the President, Secretary and Treasurer, and is member managed. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019

ALLAN M. ZIEBARTH, Attorney 1702 S. 10th Street, Suite 2 Omaha, Nebraska 68108 NOTICE OF AMENDED/RESTATED CERTIFICATE OF ORGANIZATION ON 09*26*2019, THE STRUT LOUNGE, LLC filed an AMENDED AND RESTATED CERTIFICATE OF ORGANIZATION repealing and replacing its Certificate of Organization in its entirety, changing its name to: STRUT LOUNGE OMAHA LLC, and the following: Designated Office: 1702 S. 10 St., Suite 2, Omaha, NE 68108 Initial Agent/Address For Service: Allan M. Ziebarth/1702 S. 10 St., Suite 2, Omaha, NE 68108 First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019

ALLAN M. ZIEBARTH, Attorney 1702 South 10 Street, Suite 2 Omaha, Nebraska 68108 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF THE STRUT LOUNGE, LLC Designated Office: 1437 S. 17 St., Omaha, NE 68108 Initial Agent/Address For Service: Kenneth L. Merritt/1437 S. 17 St., Omaha, NE 68108 First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019

ALLAN M. ZIEBARTH, Attorney 1702 South 10 Street, Suite 2 Omaha, Nebraska 68108 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF Designated Office: 1702 S. 10 St., Suite 2, Omaha, NE 68108 Initial Agent/Address For Service: Allan M. Ziebarth/1702 S. 10 St., Suite 2, Omaha, NE 68108 First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019


Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 • LEGAL NOTICES LEGACY DESIGN STRATEGIES 9859 South 168th Avenue Omaha, NE 68136 NOTICE OF INCORPORATION The name of the Corporation is CARA COLVERT INSURANCE AGENCY, INC. The address of the registered office of the Corporation is 9859 South 168th Avenue, Omaha, NE 68136 and the registered agent of the said Corporation is Matthew R. Deaver. The Corporation has Ten Thousand (10,000) shares of common stock authorized, each having the par value of $1.00. The Incorporator is Matthew R. Deaver, 9859 South 168th Avenue, Omaha, NE 68136. Matthew R. Deaver, Incorporator First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 DANIEL J. WATERS, Attorney LAMSON, DUGAN and MURRAY, LLP 10306 Regency Parkway Drive Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3743 NOTICE OF THE ORGANIZATION OF HRDLICKA ENTERPRISES, LLC Notice is hereby given of the formation of a limited liability company under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the limited liability company is Hrdlicka Enterprises, LLC. The name and address of the registered agent and office is LDM Business Services, Inc, 10306 Regency Parkway Drive, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. The general nature of the business to be transacted is all lawful business. The company commenced existence on September 24, 2019 and shall have perpetual duration. The affairs of the company shall be conducted by the Members, as prescribed by the Operating Agreement. LDM Business Services, Inc., Organizer First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019

NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION Notice is hereby given that A. Stout Coaching, LLC, a Nebraska Limited Liability Company, has been organized under the laws of the state of Nebraska, with its initial designated office at 8507 S. 47thAve, Omaha, NE 68157. The initial agent for service of process of the Company is Legalinc Corporate Service Inc., 706 N. 129thStreet, Suite 121, Omaha, NE, 68154. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 BARBARA MEDBERY-PRCHAL, P.C., L.L.O., Attorney 10305 Joseph Circle La Vista, Nebraska 68128 NOTICE OF INCORPORATION OF 4519 MASON, INC. Notice is hereby given that a corporation has been formed under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the corporation is 4519 MASON, INC. The corporation is authorizied to issue 10,000 shares of common stock. The name and street address of the corporation’s initial registered agent is Law Offices of Barbara Medbery- Prchal, P.C., L.L.O., 10305 Joseph Circle, La Vista, NE 68128, and its incorporator is Bob Callahan, 4519 Mason Street, Fort Calhoun, NE 68037. Bob Callahan, Incorporator First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 BARBARA MEDBERY-PRCHAL, P.C., L.L.O., Attorney 10305 Joseph Circle La Vista, Nebraska 68128 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF N6, LLC Notice is hereby given that a limited liability company has been formed under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the company is N6, LLC The name and street address of the company’s initial registered agent is Law Offices of Barbara Medbery-Prchal, P.C., L.L.O., 10305 Joseph Circle, La Vista, NE 68128. The designated office is located at 23647 Hackberry Road, Council Bluffs, NE 68118. Brian Nelson, As Trustee of The Brian Nelson Revocable Trust Dated November 21, 2016, Member First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 BARBARA MEDBERY-PRCHAL, P.C., L.L.O., Attorney 10305 Joseph Circle La Vista, Nebraska 68128 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF FOUR ALARM FERTILIZATION, LLC Notice is hereby given that a limited liability company has been formed under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the company is Four Alarm Fertilization, LLC The name and street address of the company’s initial registered agent is Law Offices of Barbara Medbery-Prchal, P.C., L.L.O., 10305 Joseph Circle, La Vista, NE 68128. The designated office is located at 9603 S. 24th Street, Bellevue, NE 68134. Rob Russel, Member First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 DVORAK LAW GROUP LLC 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LM HOLDINGS, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that LM Holdings, LLC (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The Designated Office Address of the Company is 16225 California Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68118. The Registered Agent of the Company is DDLG Business Services, Inc., 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019

DVORAK LAW GROUP LLC 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF GCP AUGUSTA PLYMOUTH GP, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that GCP Augusta Plymouth GP, LLC (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office address of the Company is 10340 North 84th Street, Omaha, NE 68122. The name and address of the registered agent of the Company is Zachary A. Wiegert, 10340 North 84th Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68122. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 DVORAK LAW GROUP LLC 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF GCP AUGUSTA PLYMOUTH LP, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that GCP Augusta Plymouth LP, LLC (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office address of the Company is 10340 North 84th Street, Omaha, NE 68122. The name and address of the registered agent of the Company is Zachary A. Wiegert, 10340 North 84th Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68122. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 DVORAK LAW GROUP LLC 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF GCP II PLYMOUTH GP, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that GCP II Plymouth GP, LLC (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office address of the Company is 10340 North 84th Street, Omaha, NE 68122. The name and address of the registered agent of the Company is Zachary A. Wiegert, 10340 North 84th Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68122. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 DVORAK LAW GROUP LLC 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF GCP II PLYMOUTH LP, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that GCP II Plymouth LP, LLC (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office address of the Company is 10340 North 84th Street, Omaha, NE 68122. The name and address of the registered agent of the Company is Zachary A. Wiegert, 10340 North 84th Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68122. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 DVORAK LAW GROUP LLC 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF AFFILIATED FARM MANAGEMENT, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Affiliated Farm Management, LLC (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The Designated Office Address of the Company is 1303 South 72 Street, Suite 209, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. The Registered Agent of the Company is DDLG Business Services, Inc., 9500 W. Dodge Rd., Suite 100, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that G & S Realty, L.L.C., a Nebraska limited liability company, filed its Statement of Dissolution with the Nebraska Secretary of State on September 20, 2019, effective on October 1, 2019, and the company is in the process of voluntary dissolution. The terms and conditions of such dissolution are, in general, that all debts and obligations of the company are to be fully paid and satisfied or adequate provision is to be made therefore, and that the balance of any remaining assets are to be distributed to its Members. The Manager will wind up and liquidate the company’s business and affairs. If you have a claim against G & S Realty, L.L.C., please provide the following information with respect to your claim: (1) your name or the name of your entity; (2) the nature of your claim; (3) the amount of your claim; and (4) the date your claim arose. All claims shall be mailed to 31622 South Hackberry Lane, Oracle, Arizona 85623. A claim against against G & S Realty, L.L.C. is barred unless an action to enforce the claim is commenced within five (5) years after the publication date of the third required notice. First publication September 27, 2019, final October 11, 2019 ABRAHAMS KASLOW & CASSMAN LLP, Attorneys 8712 West Dodge Road, Suite 300 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION Overloved Occasions, LLC has been organized as a limited liability company under the Nebraska Uniform Limited Liability Company Act. The street and mailing address of the initial designated office of the company is 8712 West Dodge Road, Suite 300, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. The name and street and mailing address of the initial registered agent of the company for service of process are Robert M. Schartz, Abrahams Kaslow & Cassman LLP, 8712 West Dodge Road, Suite 300, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019

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AMANDA M. BARRON, Attorney P.O. Box 597 Fremont, Nebraska 68026 LEGAL NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT(s), DANIELLE K STUDNICKA You are hereby notified that Credit Bureau Services, Inc., a corporation, filed its complaint in the County Court of DOUGLAS County, Nebraska on 06/14/2019 on Case Number CI19-13709, the object and prayer of which is to recover the sum of $300.00, plus interest, attorney fees and court costs. You are required to answer the complaint of the Plaintiff on or before 11/18/2019 or the allegations in said complaint will be taken as true and judgment entered accordingly. CREDIT BUREAU SERVICES, INC., A CORPORATION First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF MJJT HOLDING, LLC The name of the Company is MJJT Holding, LLC. The Designated Office of the Company is: 11414 West Center Road, Suite 215, Omaha, Nebraska 68144. The Registered Agent and Office of the Company is: Koley Jessen P.C., L.L.O., 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. This limited liability company commenced business on October 1, 2019. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LAUNCH BREWING, LLC The name of the Company is Launch Brewing, LLC. The Designated Office of the Company is: 1915 South 38th Avenue, Omaha, Nebraska 68105. The Registered Agent and Office of the Company is: Benjamin A. Katt, 1915 South 38th Avenue, Omaha, Nebraska 68105. This limited liability company commenced business on October 4, 2019. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF CONVERSION OF C & A INDUSTRIES, INC. AND ORGANIZATION OF C & A INDUSTRIES, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that C & A Industries, Inc. has been converted into C & A Industries, LLC under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The Designated Office of the company is 13609 California Street, Suite 500, Omaha, Douglas County, Nebraska, 68154. The Registered Office of the company is 233 South 13th Street, Suite 1900, Lincoln, Nebraska 68508 and the Registered Agent at such address is CSC-Lawyers Incorporating Service Company. The conversion of the corporation into the limited liability company was accomplished by the filing of Articles of Conversion and Certificate of Organization with the Nebraska Secretary of State on October 1, 2019. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF MERGER NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Articles of Merger of Lindsay Transportation, Inc., a Nebraska corporation and Lindsay Manufacturing, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company, were filed with the Nebraska Secretary of State on August 29, 2019 in accordance with the Nebraska Uniform Limited Liability Company Act. The merger was effective on August 31, 2019. The surviving entity in the merger was Lindsay Manufacturing, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company. Lindsay Manufacturing, LLC has changed its name to Lindsay Irrigation Solutions, LLC. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF MERGER NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Articles of Merger of Lindsay Transportation Solutions Sales & Service, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company and Lindsay Transportation Solutions, LLC, a California limited liability company, were filed with the Nebraska Secretary of State and effective on September 30, 2019, in accordance with the Nebraska Uniform Limited Liability Company Act. The surviving entity in the merger was Lindsay Transportation Solutions, LLC, a California limited liability company. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF TECHNICAL TRAINING VENTURES, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Technical Training Ventures, LLC has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office of the limited liability company is 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. The registered agent and office of the limited liability company is Koley Jessen P.C., L.L.O., 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. The limited liability company commenced business on October 3, 2019. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

LEGAL NOTICES KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF TRIPLE B ENTERPRISES, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Triple B Enterprises, LLC has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office of the limited liability company is 4021 North 158th Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68116. The registered agent and office of the limited liability company is Elliot Bassett, 4021 North 158th Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68116. The limited liability company commenced business on September 18, 2019. First publication September 27, 2019, final October 11, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF MADISON VENTURA FINANCIAL SOLUTIONS, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Madison Ventura Financial Solutions, LLC has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office of the limited liability company is 13512 Seward Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68154. The registered agent and office of the limited liability company is Koley Jessen P.C., L.L.O., 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. The limited liability company commenced business on September 20, 2019. First publication September 27, 2019, final October 11, 2019 ERICKSON l SEDERSTROM, P.C., Attorneys 10330 Regency Parkway Drive, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF 505 Main Street Group, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that 505 Main Street Group, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company (the “Company”), has been duly organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska, designating its registered agent as Erickson | Sederstrom, P.C., a Limited Liability Organization, with its registered office at 1110 N. Skyline Drive, Elkhorn, NE 68022. The Company was organized for the purpose of engaging in the transaction of any lawful business and the performance of any lawful activities that a limited liability company may engage in under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The Company shall have perpetual existence unless dissolved in accordance with its Certificate of Organization, its Operating Agreement or the Limited Liability Company Act. Unless otherwise provided in the Company’s Operating Agreement, the affairs of the Company are to be managed by its members. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 SEAN D. MOYLAN, Attorney 1010 South 120th Street, Suite 320 Omaha, Nebraska 68154 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF TWO HERDS PROPERTIES, LLC Notice is hereby given that TWO HERDS PROPERTIES, LLC, a Nebraska Limited Liability Company, is organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska, with its initial designated agent Sean D. Moylan and designated office at 1010 South 120th Street, Suite 320, Omaha, Nebraska 68154. The purpose for which TWO HERDS PROPERTIES, LLC has been established is to engage in the buying, selling and renting of real property, and any and all lawful businesses for which a limited liability company may be organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. Perpetual existence commenced on September 24, 2019. Management of the company shall be vested in its Members. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 DANIEL J. WATERS, Attorney LAMSON, DUGAN and MURRAY, LLP 10306 Regency Parkway Drive Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3743 NOTICE OF INCORPORATION OF JANCO ASSET MANAGEMENT, INC. Notice is hereby given that a corporation has been formed under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the corporation is Janco Asset Management, Inc. The corporation is authorized to issue 25,000 shares of common stock. The name and street address of the corporation’s initial registered agent and office is LDM Business Services, Inc., 10306 Regency Parkway Drive, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. The name and address of the incorporator is LDM Business Services, Inc., 10306 Regency Parkway Drive, Omaha, NE 68114. LDM Business Services, Inc., Incorporator First publication September 27, 2019, final October 11, 2019 DENNIS P. LEE, Attorney LEE LAW OFFICE 2433 South 130th Circle, Suite 300 P.O. Box 45947 Omaha, Nebraska 68145 NOTICE OF SUIT TO: Nicholas Yaksich, 15205 Elmwood Drive, Bennington NE 680071719, you are hereby notified that on July 26, 2019, FORD MOTOR CREDIT COMPANY, LLC filed a suit against you in the Douglas County Court at docket CI19-16571, the object in prayer of which was to secure a judgment against you in the amount of $11,632.60, together with court costs, interest and attorney's fees as allowed by law. Unless you file your Answer with the Douglas County Court on or before the 18th day of November , 2019, the Petition against you will be considered as true and judgment will be entered against you accordingly. First publication September 27, 2019, final October 18, 2019

BARBARA MEDBERY-PRCHAL, P.C., L.L.O., Attorney 10305 Joseph Circle La Vista, Nebraska 68128 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF ALLISON EVANS COACHING, LLC Notice is hereby given that a limited liability company has been formed under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the company is Allison Evans Coaching, LLC The name and street address of the company’s initial registered agent is Law Offices of Barbara Medbery-Prchal, P.C., L.L.O., 10305 Joseph Circle, La Vista, NE 68128. The designated office is located at 7812 Shirley Street, Omaha, NE 68124. Allison Evans, Member First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 BARBARA MEDBERY-PRCHAL, P.C., L.L.O., Attorney 10305 Joseph Circle La Vista, Nebraska 68128 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF POLARIS PROPERTIES, LLC Notice is hereby given that a limited liability company has been formed under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the company is Polaris Properties, LLC The name and street address of the company’s initial registered agent is Law Offices of Barbara Medbery-Prchal, P.C., L.L.O., 10305 Joseph Circle, La Vista, NE 68128. The designated office is located at 2712 N. 175th Avenue, Omaha, NE 68116. Lisa J. Harris, Members First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 AMANDA M. BARRON, Attorney P.O. Box 597 Fremont, Nebraska 68026 LEGAL NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT(s), KRISTA HERDER & RANDALL HERDER You are hereby notified that Credit Bureau Services, Inc., a corporation, filed its complaint in the County Court of DOUGLAS County, Nebraska on 07/10/2019 on Case Number CI19-15379, the object and prayer of which is to recover the sum of $212.90, plus interest, attorney fees and court costs. You are required to answer the complaint of the Plaintiff on or before 11/25/2019 or the allegations in said complaint will be taken as true and judgment entered accordingly. CREDIT BUREAU SERVICES, INC., A CORPORATION First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF KLM HOMES, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that KLM Homes, LLC (the "Company") has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The Designated Office Address of the Company is 18954 Manderson Street, Elkhorn, Nebraska 68022. The Registered Agent of the Company is USCA, Inc., 1603 Farnam Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68102. The Company was organized on July 9, 2019. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 MARTIN P. PELSTER, Attorney CROKER, HUCK, KASHER, DEWITT, ANDERSON & GONDERINGER, L.L.C. 2120 S. 72nd Street, Suite 1200 Omaha, Nebraska 68124 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF WELCHERT ACRES, LLC The name of the limited liability company is Welchert Acres, LLC. The address of the initial designated office is 11220 North 108th Street, Omaha, NE 68142. The name and address of the initial agent for service of process is Martin P. Pelster, 2120 South 72nd Street, Suite 1200, Omaha, NE 68124. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 GNUSE & GREEN LAW OFFICES, P.C., Attorneys 11311 Chicago Circle Omaha, Nebraska 68154 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF CRM SNOW AND ICE REMOVAL, L.L.C. A Nebraska Limited Liability Company Notice is hereby given that CRM Snow and Ice Removal, L.L.C., a Nebraska Limited Liability Company, has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska, with its designated office located at 1227 N. 161st Circle, Omaha, NE 68118. The general nature of its business is to engage in and do any lawful act concerning any and all lawful business for which a limited liability company may be organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The Certificate of Organization was filed in the office of the Nebraska Secretary of State on October 7, 2019. The Company commenced business thereon and shall have perpetual existence. The affairs of the Company are to be conducted by the Members. Rodney G. Gnuse, Organizer First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 DENNIS P. LEE, Attorney LEE LAW OFFICE 2433 South 130th Circle, Suite 300 P.O. Box 45947 Omaha, Nebraska 68145 NOTICE OF SUIT TO: WHITNEY HARRIS, 11912 Amerado Blvd #322, Bellevue NE 68123, and CEDRIC RIGSBY, 3902 N. 48th St, Omaha NE 68104, you are hereby notified that on August 26, 2019, AMERICAN FAMILY MUTUAL INS. Co., S.I. filed a suit against you in the Douglas County Court at docket CI19-18904, the object in prayer of which was to secure a judgment against you in the amount of $9,865.20, together with court costs, interest and attorney's fees as allowed by law. Unless you file your Answer with the Douglas County Court on or before the 2nd day of December, 2019, the Petition against you will be considered as true and judgment will be entered against you accordingly. First publication October 11, 2019, final November 1, 2019

ABRAHAMS KASLOW & CASSMAN LLP, Attorneys 8712 West Dodge Road, Suite 300 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION KLA Minerals LLC has been organized as a limited liability company under the Nebraska Uniform Limited Liability Company Act. The street and mailing address of the initial designated office of the company is 8712 West Dodge Road, Suite 300, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. The name and street and mailing address of the initial registered agent of the company for service of process are Thomas J. Malicki, Abrahams Kaslow & Cassman LLP, 8712 West Dodge Road, Suite 300, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 DENNIS P. LEE, Attorney LEE LAW OFFICE 2433 South 130th Circle, Suite 300 P.O. Box 45947 Omaha, Nebraska 68145 NOTICE OF SUIT TO: Ashley R. Donovan, 3734 Gayle Avenue, Bellevue NE 68123, you are hereby notified that on July 22, 2019, FORD MOTOR CREDIT COMPANY, LLC filed a suit against you in the Douglas County Court at docket CI19-16068, the object in prayer of which was to secure a judgment against you in the amount of $6,973.68, together with court costs, interest and attorney's fees as allowed by law. Unless you file your Answer with the Douglas County Court on or before the 25th day of November, 2019, the Petition against you will be considered as true and judgment will be entered against you accordingly. First publication October 4, 2019, final October 25, 2019 JAMES R. SACOMAN, Attorney 14707 California Street, Suite 5 Omaha, Nebraska 68154 LEGAL NOTICE In the County Court of Douglas County, Nebraska. PR19-1494 Estate of ARTHUR L. NELSON, Deceased Notice is hereby given that on September 24, 2019, in the County Court of Douglas County, Nebraska, the Registrar issued a written statement of Informal Probate of the Will of said Deceased, and that CINDY D. HOLDFORTH, whose address is 2817 South 117th Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68144, has been appointed Personal Representative of this estate. Creditors of this estate must file their claims with this Court, located at Courtroom No. 30, Third Floor, Probate Division, Douglas County Hall of Justice, 17th & Farnam Streets, Omaha, NE 68183, on or before December 4, 2019 or be forever barred. CARROL L. MILLS Registrar First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 CHARLES E. DORWART, Attorney MASSIH LAW, LLC 226 N. 114th Street Omaha, NE 68154 LEGAL NOTICE In the County Court of Douglas County, Nebraska. PR19-1526 Estate of Marlin L. Strenger, Deceased Notice is hereby given that on September 27, 2019, in the County Court of Douglas County, Nebraska, the Registrar issued a written statement of Informal Probate of the Will of said Decedent and that Larry Sterba, 4705 Glasgow Avenue, Omaha, NE 68157 was informally appointed by the Registrar as Personal Representative of the Estate. Creditors of this estate must file their claims with this Court, located at Courtroom No. 30, Third Floor, Probate Division, Douglas County Hall of Justice, 17th & Farnam Streets, Omaha, NE 68183, on or before December 4, 2019 or be forever barred. CARROL L. MILLS Registrar First publication October 4, 2019, final October 18, 2019 WHITMORE LAW OFFICE LLC 7602 Pacific Street, Suite 200 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION Notice is hereby given that KAFU International, L.L.C. (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office of the Company is 13310 Jayne Plaza, #305, Omaha, Nebraska 68164. The registered agent of the Company is Thomas E. Whitmore, 7602 Pacific Street, Ste. 200, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. The Company was formed on October 8, 2019. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF AMENDMENT NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Certificate of Organization of CFM Adventure, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company, has been amended as follows: the limited liability company has changed its name to Easy Street Hospitality, LLC. The Amended Certificate of Organization was filed with the Nebraska Secretary of State on October 9, 2019. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION Notice is hereby given that Lind Construction LLC has been created in compliance with the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office of the limited liability company is 8150 Barrington Road, Lincoln, NE 68516. The registered agent of Lind Construction LLC is Jack Gregory Lind. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019


Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 • LEGAL NOTICES DANIEL C. PAULEY, Attorney LAMSON, DUGAN and MURRAY, LLP 10306 Regency Parkway Drive Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3743 NOTICE OF THE ORGANIZATION OF RLMJR, LLC Notice is hereby given of the formation of a limited liability company under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the limited liability company is RLMJR, LLC. The name and address of the registered agent and office is LDM Business Services, Inc, 10306 Regency Parkway Drive, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. The general nature of the business to be transacted is all lawful business. The company commenced existence on October 4, 2019 and shall have perpetual duration. The affairs of the company shall be conducted by the Members, as prescribed by the Operating Agreement. LDM Business Services, Inc., Organizer First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 WHITMORE LAW OFFICE LLC 7602 Pacific Street, Suite 200 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF INCORPORATION Rung Reuang168, Inc., whose registered agent is Chinnapat Wirachakul and registered office is 810 S. 59th Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68106, was formed on October 3, 2019 to engage in any lawful business. The corporation has authorized 10,000 shares of capital stock. Thomas E. Whitmore, Incorporator First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 ERICKSON l SEDERSTROM, P.C., Attorneys 10330 Regency Parkway Drive, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF AMENDMENT TO ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION On October 4, 2019, Articles of Amendment to the Articles of Incorporation of Lanphier, Kolasinski & Sagar, P.C. were filed to change the name of the company to Lorraine M. Kolasinski, P.C. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 ERICKSON l SEDERSTROM, P.C., Attorneys 10330 Regency Parkway Drive, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF BEHAVIORAL HEALTH OF OMAHA, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Behavioral Health of Omaha, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company (the “Company”), has been duly organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska, with its designated office at 7253 Grover Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68124 and designating its registered agent as Erickson & Sederstrom, P.C. a limited liability organization with its registered office at 10330 Regency Parkway Drive, Suite 100, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 ERICKSON l SEDERSTROM, P.C., Attorneys 10330 Regency Parkway Drive, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF INCORPORATION Corporate Name: Nebraska World Affairs Council Type of Corporation: Public Benefit Registered Agent: Erickson & Sederstrom P.C. a limited liability organization Registered Office: 10330 Regency Parkway Drive, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 Members: Corporation will not have Members Incorporator: Virgil Johnson 10330 Regency Parkway Drive, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 CATHERINE E. FRENCH, Attorney LAMSON, DUGAN and MURRAY, LLP 10306 Regency Parkway Drive Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3743 NOTICE OF DISSOLUTION Notice is hereby given of the dissolution of Community of Grace, an Evangelical Lutheran Church, a Nebraska nonprofit corporation (“Corporation”), effective October 1, 2019. The terms and conditions of such dissolution are, in general, that all debts and obligations of the Corporation have been fully paid and satisfied and any remaining assets will be distributed in accordance with the Plan of Dissolution. The President of the Corporation is to manage the corporate affairs and distribute the corporate assets. Parties with claims against the Corporation are directed to submit them in writing to the attention of Lamson Dugan & Murray LLP, 10306 Regency Parkway Drive, Omaha, NE 68114. All claims against the Corporation will be barred unless a proceeding to enforce such claims is commenced within five (5) years after the publication of this Notice. COMMUNITY OF GRACE EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH, a Nebraska nonprofit corporation, By: Anthony Stella, President First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF FRANKLIN PROPERTIES, LLC Notice is hereby given that FRANKLIN PROPERTIES, LLC (the "Company"), has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The Designated Office and Registered Office Address is 111590 West Dodge Rd., Omaha, NE 68154. The Registered Agent of the Company is Steven P. Ahlf. First publication September 27, 2019, final October 11, 2019

KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF AMENDED AND RESTATED ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION Notice is hereby given that the Articles of Incorporation of Midwest Women and Children’s Services have been amended and restated in their entirety as follows: Article I states the name of the Corporation as Midwest Women and Children’s Services. Article II states that the Corporation is a public benefit corporation. Article III states the registered agent and office as Janet White Phelan, 7701 Pacific Street, Suite 200, Omaha, Nebraska 68118. Article IV states the purpose. Article V states the powers. Article VI states the Corporation shall have no members. Article VII states the provisions relating to dissolution. The Amended and Restated Articles were filed with the Nebraska Secretary of State on October 10, 2019. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 DVORAK LAW GROUP LLC 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LOCAL X1 FUND, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Local X1 Fund, LLC (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office address of the Company is 4400 Lucile Drive, Suite 201, Lincoln, Nebraska 68516. The name and address of the registered agent of the Company is DDLG Business Services, Inc., 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 DVORAK LAW GROUP LLC 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LOCAL X1 FUND MANAGER, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Local X1 Fund Manager, LLC (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The designated office address of the Company is 4400 Lucile Drive, Suite 201, Lincoln, Nebraska 68516. The name and address of the registered agent of the Company is DDLG Business Services, Inc., 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 DVORAK LAW GROUP LLC 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF GCP II KC UPTOWN HOTEL, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that GCP II KC UPTOWN HOTEL, LLC (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The Designated Office Address of the Company is 10340 North 84th Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68122. The Registered Agent of the Company is Zach Wiegert, 10340 North 84th Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68122. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 ERICKSON l SEDERSTROM, P.C., Attorneys 10330 Regency Parkway Drive, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OFAMENDMENT TO CERTIFICATE OF ORGANIZATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on October 10, 2019 Siems City Properties, LLC filed an amendment to its Certificate of Organization changing its name to Siems Flying Service, LLC. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 BENJAMIN J. PICK, Attorney PANSING HOGAN ERNST & BACHMAN LLP 10250 Regency Circle, Suite 300 Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3728 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF TRUSTED HOME GROUP, LLC Notice is hereby given of the organization of Trusted Home Group, LLC. 1. The name of the limited liability company is Trusted Home Group, LLC. 2. The street and mailing address of the initial designated office is 10250 Regency Circle, Omaha, Nebraska, 68114, and the name and street address of the initial agent for service of process is Benjamin Pick, 10250 Regency Circle, Omaha, Nebraska, 68114. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 DANIEL J. WATERS, Attorney LAMSON, DUGAN and MURRAY, LLP 10306 Regency Parkway Drive Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3743 NOTICE OF AMENDMENT TO ARTICLES OF INCORPORATION OF COMPANY #605, INC. Notice is hereby given that the Articles of Amendment to the Articles of Incorporation of Company #605, Inc., f/k/a Offsite Integrated Structures, Inc., were adopted on September 17, 2019 to change the name of the corporation. The name and street address of the corporation’s registered agent and office is LDM Business Services, Inc., 10306 Regency Parkway Drive, Omaha, NE 68114. The full text of such Articles of Amendment to the Articles of Incorporation is on file with the Nebraska Secretary of State. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019

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DANIEL J. WATERS, Attorney LAMSON, DUGAN and MURRAY, LLP 10306 Regency Parkway Drive Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3743 NOTICE OF THE ORGANIZATION OF OFFSITE INTEGRATED STRUCTURES, LLC Notice is hereby given of the formation of a limited liability company under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the limited liability company is Offsite Integrated Structures, LLC. The name and address of the registered agent and office is LDM Business Services, Inc, 10306 Regency Parkway Drive, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. The general nature of the business to be transacted is all lawful business. The company commenced existence on September 17, 2019 and shall have perpetual duration. The affairs of the company shall be conducted by the Members, as prescribed by the Operating Agreement. LDM Business Services, Inc., Organizer First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 KARINE E. SOKPOH, Attorney SOKPOH LAW GROUP 10730 Pacific Street, Suite 247 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF INCORPORATION OF TOGOLESE AMERICAN WOMEN VOICE, INC. Notice is hereby given that Togolese American Women Voice, Inc. has been incorporated as a public benefit non-profit corporation under Nebraska laws, with its registered office at 15445 Rosewood Street, Omaha, NE 68138. Its agent at that office is Efakone Eunice Olympio. The corporation shall have members and its incorporator is Karine Sokpoh whose address is 10730 Pacific Street, Suite 247, Omaha, NE 68114. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 CATHERINE E. FRENCH, Attorney LAMSON, DUGAN and MURRAY, LLP 10306 Regency Parkway Drive Omaha, Nebraska 68114-3743 NOTICE OF THE ORGANIZATION OF REMEDY BEAUTY BAR, LLC Notice is hereby given of the formation of a limited liability company under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the limited liability company is Remedy Beauty Bar, LLC. The name and address of the registered agent and office is LDM Business Services, Inc, 10306 Regency Parkway Drive, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. The general nature of the business to be transacted is all lawful business. The company commenced existence on October 2, 2019 and shall have perpetual duration. The affairs of the company shall be conducted by the Members, as prescribed by the Operating Agreement. LDM Business Services, Inc., Organizer First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 AMANDA M. BARRON, Attorney P.O. Box 597 Fremont, Nebraska 68026 LEGAL NOTICE TO THE DEFENDANT(s), DANITA M MURRAY You are hereby notified that Credit Bureau Services, Inc., a corporation, filed its complaint in the County Court of DOUGLAS County, Nebraska on 07/09/2019 on Case Number CI19-15381, the object and prayer of which is to recover the sum of $268.00, plus interest, attorney fees and court costs. You are required to answer the complaint of the Plaintiff on or before 11/25/2019 or the allegations in said complaint will be taken as true and judgment entered accordingly. CREDIT BUREAU SERVICES, INC., A CORPORATION First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 RADLEY E. CLEMENS, Attorney 5717 North 127th Street Omaha, Nebraska 68164 LEGAL NOTICE In the County Court of Douglas County, Nebraska. PR19-1350 Estate of Joseph J. Welter, III, Deceased Notice is hereby given that on October 4, 2019, in the County Court of Douglas County, Nebraska, William D. Welter 1st, whose address is 22935 N. 68th St., Scottsdale, Arizona, 85251, was informally appointed by the Registrar asPersonal Representative of the estate. Creditors of this estate must file their claims with this Court, located at Courtroom No. 30, Third Floor, Probate Division, Douglas County Hall of Justice, 17th & Farnam Streets, Omaha, NE 68183, on or before (two months after first publication date) September 15, 2016 or be forever barred. KELLY J. GOLDEN Clerk of the County Court First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF MERGER NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that Articles of Merger of Executive Outdoor Living, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company, with and into Executive Lawn & Landscaping, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company, were filed with the Nebraska Secretary of State on October 10, 2019, in accordance with the Nebraska Uniform Limited Liability Company Act. The merger was effective upon the filing date. The surviving entity in the merger was Executive Lawn & Landscaping, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company. Upon completion of the merger, Executive Lawn & Landscaping, LLC filed an amendment to change its name to: Executive Outdoor Living, LLC. The name change was filed with the Nebraska Secretary of State on October 11, 2019. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

LEGAL NOTICES DVORAK LAW GROUP LLC 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100 Omaha, Nebraska 68114 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF MAH, LLC NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that MAH, LLC (the “Company”) has been organized under the laws of the State of Nebraska. The Designated Office Address of the Company is 5110 Mayberry Street, Unit 2118, Omaha, Nebraska 68106. The Registered Agent of the Company is DDLG Business Services, Inc., 9500 West Dodge Road, Suite 100, Omaha, Nebraska 68114. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 BARBARA MEDBERY-PRCHAL, P.C., L.L.O., Attorney 10305 Joseph Circle La Vista, Nebraska 68128 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF LINDA MILLER AGENCY, LLC Notice is hereby given that a limited liability company has been formed under the laws of the State of Nebraska, and that the name of the company is Linda Miller Agency, LLC The name and street address of the company’s initial registered agent is Law Offices of Barbara Medbery-Prchal, P.C., L.L.O., 10305 Joseph Circle, La Vista, NE 68128. The designated office is located at 808 S. 181st Street, Elkhorn, NE 68124. Rob Russel, Member First publication October 11, 2019, final October 25, 2019 KOLEY JESSEN P.C., L.L.O., Attorneys 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, One Pacific Place Omaha, Nebraska 68124-1079 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF TAMBAJR6, LLC The name of the Company is Tambajr6, LLC. The Designated Office of the Company is: 16108 Leeman Street, Bennington, Nebraska 68007. The Registered Agent and Office of the Company is: Koley Jessen P.C., L.L.O., 1125 South 103rd Street, Suite 800, Omaha, Nebraska 68124. This limited liability company commenced business on October 15, 2019. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 MONTE L. SCHATZ, Attorney VANDENACK WEAVER LLC 17007 Marcy Street, Suite 3 Omaha, Nebraska 68118 NOTICE OF ORGANIZATION OF GOLDEN YEARS RELOCATION, LLC Notice is hereby given that GOLDEN YEARS RELOCATION, LLC has been organized as a limited liability company under the Nebraska Uniform Limited Liability Company Act. The address of the initial designated office of the company is 7811 Military Ave., Omaha, NE 68134. The agent for service of process for the Company is VW Agents LLC located at 17007 Marcy Street, Suite 3, Omaha, NE 68118-3121. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 DENNIS P. LEE, Attorney LEE LAW OFFICE 2433 South 130th Circle, Suite 300 P.O. Box 45947 Omaha, Nebraska 68145 NOTICE OF SUIT TO: NATALYA HARRIS, 1217 S 25th Ave Apt 6, Omaha NE 68105, you are hereby notified that on August 12, 2019, AMERICAN FAMILY MUTUAL INS. Co., S.I. filed a suit against you in the Douglas County Court at docket CI19-17652, the object in prayer of which was to secure a judgment against you in the amount of $4,379.55, together with court costs, interest and attorney's fees as allowed by law. Unless you file your Answer with the Douglas County Court on or before the 9th day of December, 2019, the Petition against you will be considered as true and judgment will be entered against you accordingly. First publication October 18, 2019, final November 8, 2019 THOMAS H. PENKE, Attorney 12020 Shamrock Plaza, Suite 200 Omaha, Nebraska 68154 LEGAL NOTICE In the County Court of Douglas County, Nebraska. PR19-1237 Estate of MICHAEL P. HANNON, Deceased Notice is hereby given that a hearing was held on a Petition for Formal Probate of Will of said Decedent, Determination of Heirs, and Appointment of Personal Representative on October 1, 2019, and that Scott W. Hannon, whose address is 304 North 245th Circle, Waterloo, Nebraska 68069, has been appointed as Personal Representative of this Estate. Creditors of this estate must file their claims with this Court, located at Courtroom No. 30, Third Floor, Probate Division, Douglas County Hall of Justice, 17th & Farnam Streets, Omaha, NE 68183, on or before December 18, 2019 or be forever barred. CARROL L. MILLS Registrar First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION OF TRADE NAME Trade Name to be registered is: Snowshoe & Company Name of Applicant: Snowshoe Candy Co. LLC Address: 12505 Ponca Road, Omaha, Nebraska 68112 Applicant is a Limited Liability Company If other than an Individual, state under whose laws entity was formed: Nebraska Date of first use of name in Nebraska: 8/30/2019 General nature of business: Online retailer with handmade goods ALISON YAHNKE Signature of Applicant or Legal Representative October 18, 2019

NOTICE OF INCORPORATION OF ROOM FOR ROOTS, INC., A NEBRASKA NONPROFIT CORPORATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned have formed a corporation under the Nebraska Nonprofit Corporation Act. The name of the corporation is ROOM FOR ROOTS, INC., A NEBRASKA NONPROFIT CORPORATION, with a registered office at 17213 Sage Street, Omaha, Nebraska 68136, and the registered agent is BRIDGETT M. BELSKY. The general nature of the business is a public benefit corporation and shall have for its additional purpose providing for managing any benevolent, charitable, civic, educational, fraternal, athletic, patriotic, social and labor organization or society, as well as the making of donations to the public welfare or for charitable or educational purposes, and to perform services of every kind and nature whatsoever, which are not inconsistent with law. The corporation commenced June 20, 2019, and shall have perpetual existence. The corporation will have members. ANTHONY L. GROSS, Incorporator CATHERINE L. WHITE, Incorporator 3018 South 87th Street, Omaha, NE 68124 First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019 CHARLES E. DORWART, Attorney MASSIH LAW, LLC 226 N. 114th Street Omaha, NE 68154 LEGAL NOTICE In the County Court of Douglas County, Nebraska. PR19-1566 Estate of Alan P. Hurlbut, Deceased Notice is hereby given that on October 8, 2019, in the County Court of Douglas County, Nebraska, the Registrar issued a written statement of Informal Probate of the Intestacy of said Decedent and that Deborah Hurlbut, 4452 Shady Lance Circle, Omaha, NE 68105, was informally appointed by the Registrar as Personal Representative of the Estate. Creditors of this estate must file their claims with this Court, located at Courtroom No. 30, Third Floor, Probate Division, Douglas County Hall of Justice, 17th & Farnam Streets, Omaha, NE 68183, on or before December 18, 2019 or be forever barred. CARROL L. MILLS Registrar First publication October 18, 2019, final November 1, 2019

In the eyes of business leaders, ‘social purpose’ has replaced ‘shareholder capitalism’ by Bruce DeBoskey

Nearly 50 years ago, Milton Friedman launched the era of “shareholder capitalism.” At that time, the Nobel-Prize-winning economist admonished American business leaders that their only responsibility was to maximize profits. The world has changed a lot since then — for better and for worse. Some still espouse this theory. According to Friedman and his proponents, social responsibility — and the purpose of building healthier, safer, fairer, environmentally sustainable and inclusive communities — should be the province of philanthropy individuals or nonprofit organizations. If businesses focus on making money for the shareholders, the good stuff will fall into place. Friedman’s theory in question A half-century later, Friedman’s theory about the eventual benefits to society of shareholder capitalism hasn’t worked out that way. One glaring example is income inequality. In the United States, the top 1% of households own 40% of the country’s wealth. This is more than the bottom 90% combined — and the highest discrepancy since 1962. In 2017, the gap between the pay of CEOs and average workers was nearly nine times larger than in 1980. In one survey of large U.S. companies, the average CEO earned $13.94 million, while the average worker earned $38,613. Plus, women still earn about 80% of what men earn for the same work. On a global level, the eight richest people control the same wealth as half the world’s population. The fortunes of the world’s 2,043 billionaires grew by $762 billion in 2017, while the poorest half of humanity saw no increase. The “good stuff” seems to be staying at the top. At the same time, there is a dramatic loss of support for capitalism among younger Americans. A 2016 Harvard study found that 51% of U.S. respondents between the ages of 18 and 29 do not support capitalism. One-third favored a turn to socialism. A 2018 Gallup poll found similar results — only 45% of this demographic viewed capitalism positively. This was a drop of 23 percentage points from 2010. And there’s the environmental and climate consequences of focusing on profit, often at the expense of planet. Businesses rethinking social purpose Business is waking up to these seismic shifts. Just last month, the Business Roundtable (an association of the CEOs of America’s top 200 companies) released a statement rejecting “shareholder primacy” and redefining the very purpose of a corporation as “to promote an economy that serves all Americans.” This is a dramatic departure from its historic position. The statement mentions shareholders only near its end, where it states a business’ commitment to serve all stakeholders — including customers, employees, suppliers, communities, the environment and, finally, shareholders. This revolutionary statement is a reaction to the rapidly growing body of evidence that social purpose and profit go hand-in-hand. Research shows that if a company has a strong corporate social purpose, its employees will feel greater meaning and impact in their jobs. Research also show that companies with high levels of purpose outperform the market by 5-7% per year — at the same level as companies with best-in-class governance and innovative capabilities. In addition, they grow faster and are more profitable. A new commitment to triple bottom line Business philanthropy is a key component of any corporate “social purpose” strategy. Chief Executives for Corporate Purpose was founded 20 years ago as a panel of CEOs to encourage corporate philanthropy and “to call for a serious acknowledgement that corporations play an important role in society, beyond their ability to make money for shareholders.” According to Giving USA, U.S. corporations in 2018 donated more than $20 billion in cash to charities — and billions more in in-kind and volunteer donations. Likewise, the rapid growth of impact investing — esontinued on next page.


Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •

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Scammers are fooling millennials out of millions of dollars: Here’s how by Susan Tompor

Stefanie Rinna, 26, initially was pretty happy to get a text from a prospective employer who said she spotted the young woman’s information on the job site Indeed.com. So Rinna jumped on the chance in September to do an interview via Google trEnds Hangouts. The interviewer for the food packaging company seemed to want to fill a real job. “At first, she seemed pretty legit,” said Rinna, a mother of three who lives in Taylor, Mich. “She was pretty formal.” No, they never talked by phone. No, they didn’t do a video chat. Just chatting by text via Google Hangouts. But maybe, Rinna hoped, this could be a real job as an administrative assistant. The pay was great: $26 an hour during her training period and after that $29 an hour. Who interviews for a job via Google? Then the company ended up sending a cashier’s check via FedEx for around $1,099. She was to deposit the check in her bank and use the money to buy a fax machine, a copy machine and a MacBook Pro to work from home. OK, but all that stuff would have cost her around $3,000, based on her estimates. She began to wonder if the check was even real. She called the bank that supposedly issued the check out of the Washington, D.C., area. She discovered it was a fake check, thankfully before she deposited it. “If I would have put that into my checking account, I would have owed all that money back and I don’t have all that money to pay back,” she said. The first red flag, she says now, should have been that interview: “Who does an interview through Google Hangouts, for one?” Millennials are losing cash to scammers So you think retirees are the only ones being targeted by scammers? Not at all. Millennials in their 20s and 30s are falling at a fast clip for online shopping fraud, con artists who pretend to be your boss, imposters who pretend to be from the federal government, fake check scams and business opportunities or work-at-home jobs. Millennials, for example, are twice as likely as people who are 40 and older to report losing money while shopping online, according to reports to the Federal Trade

Social purpose Continued from preceding page. pecially with philanthropically committed capital — reflects the importance of social purpose in business objectives. Currently, $12 trillion (one out of every four U.S. dollars under professional management) is now invested using a sustainable-, responsible- and impact-investing lens. Prominent among the many factors considered by these investors are community and employee engagement, philanthropic commitment and social purpose. The broadening of the definition of corporate purpose fortifies U.S. businesses to work alongside government and nonprofit partners to become true and impactful agents of social change. This is the true definition of the “triple bottom line” for businesses — a positive impact on people and planet, as well as profit. ©2019 Bruce DeBoskey Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Commission’s Consumer Sentinel Network. And it often doesn’t start with a robocall. Millennials are 77% more likely to report losing money to a scam that starts out with an email. And millennials are 93% more likely than people age 40 or older to report losing money to fake check scams — which can be part of some frauds that are designed to look like a one step along the way for finding a cure for a financial headache. Rinna remains baffled by that job scam. “I’m not sure what their motive was and I wasn’t sticking around to find out,” she said. “The only thing they got out of me was my name and address and a signature. A very poor quality signature.” In similar job scams, though, the fraudsters often give the consumers a list of businesses where they’re supposed to buy the equipment or specific suppliers. “Those ‘businesses’ are usually websites the scammer has also setup. It’s a very sophisticated scheme. She was probably correct in thinking the items would cost more on a legitimate website,” said Laura Blankenship, director of marketing for the Better Business Bureau Serving Eastern Michigan & the Upper Peninsula. Alexa, why are you charging me a fee? Scammers, of course, chase the latest trends and now they’re trying to convince consumers that they must pay $80 to $100 to activate a new media player, virtual assistant, and other tech device, such as Roku, Google

Home or Alexa, according to a new warning from the Better Business Bureau. Here’s how the scam works: You search for a customer support number online. But instead of getting the official website, you end up with a phony, look-alike site. You call that number and you are told there is a new policy in place: All device users must now pay an activation fee. The scammers may ask for prepaid gift cards, or they may ask directly for your credit card number. “In some cases, they may ‘help’ you come up with a new username and password, thereby gaining access to your device account,” the BBB warns. Scammers have more luck using social media New fraud research — a joint report by the FINRA Investor Education Foundation, the Better Business Bureau and the Stanford Center for Longevity — indicated that people are most likely to be ripped off when it comes to online purchases and scams that start off via social media or fake websites. “When phone and email were used by scammers to target consumers, relatively few consumers engaged with the scammer or lost money,” according to the report called “Exposed to Scams: What Separates Victims from Non-Victims?” “However, when exposed to a scam on social media, 91% engaged and 53% lost money.” Those more likely to become victims, according to the report, included: Someone

who feels lonely or experiences being isolated, perhaps widowed or divorced. Younger adults who are under financial strain. What can help someone avoid a scam: Some media buzz about a particular scam or hearing word-of-mouth warnings about ripoffs. rip One-third of consumers who were targeted by a scammer — but did not engage — already knew about a specific scam, according to the “Exposed to Scams” research. It’s not hard to lose $400 to $600 The “Exposed to Scams” researchers surveyed 1,408 Americans and Canadians who were targeted by scammers and reported the fraud to the BBB. Nearly half of those surveyed did not engage with the fraudster. However, nearly a quarter lost an average of $600. Millennials reported losing $400 based on the median individual loss — where half of the losses are higher and half are lower, according to FTC data. That’s much lower than other age groups where a median loss of $500 was reported for those age 40-59; a loss of $640 was reported for people age 60-79; and $1,700 was reported for people 80 an older. We’re talking about hundreds of millions of dollars lost to clever crooks. Millennials reported losing nearly $450 million to fraud in just the past two years, according to the FTC — and online shopping accounted for $71 million in losses. ©2019 Detroit Free Press Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Why hospitals are getting into the housing business y

ar ian Ha rylu

One patient at Denver Health, the city’s largest safety net hospital, occupied a bed for more than four years — a hospital record of 1,558 days. Another admitted for a hard-to-treat bacterial infection needed eight weeks of athome IV antibiotics, hEalth carE but had no home. A third, with dementia, came to the hospital after being released from the Denver County Jail. His family refused to take him back. In the first half of this year alone, the hospital treated more than 100 long-term patients. All had a medical issue that led to their initial hospitalization. But none of the patients had a medical reason for remaining in the hospital for most of their stay. Legally and morally, hospitals cannot discharge patients if they have no safe place to go. So patients who are homeless, frail or live alone, or have unstable housing, can occupy hospital beds for weeks or months — long after their acute medical problem is resolved. For hospitals, it means losing money because a patient lingering in a bed without medical problems doesn’t generate much, if any, income. Meanwhile, acutely ill patients may wait days in the ER to be moved to a floor because a hospital’s beds are full. “Those people are, for lack of a better term, stranded in our hospital,” said Dr. Sarah Stella, a Denver Health physician. To address the problem, hospitals from Baltimore to St. Louis to Sacramento, Calif., are exploring ways to help patients find a home. With recent federal policy changes that encourage hospitals to allocate charity dollars for housing, many hospitals realize it’s cheaper to provide a month of housing than to keep patients for a single night.

Hospital executives find the calculus works even if they have to build affordable housing units themselves. It’s why Denver Health is partnering with the Denver Housing Authority to repurpose a mothballed building on the hospital campus into affordable senior housing, including about 15 apartments designated to help homeless patients transition out of the hospital. “This is an experiment of sorts,” said Peg Burnette, the hospital’s chief financial officer. “We might be able to help better their lives, as well as help the financials of the hospital and help free up capacity for the patients that need to come to see us for acute care.” Spending To Save Money Denver Health once used the shuttered 10-story building for office space but opted to sell it to the housing authority and grant a 99-year lease on the land for a minimal fee. “It really lowers the construction costs for us,” said Ismael Guerrero, Denver Housing Authority’s executive director. “It was a great opportunity to build additional housing in a location that’s obviously close to the hospital, close to public transit, near the city center.” Once the renovation is complete in late 2021, the housing group will hire a coordinator to assist tenants with housing-related issues, including helping those in the transitional units find permanent housing. The hospital will provide a case manager to help with their physical and behavioral health needs, preparing them for life on their own. Denver Health expects most patients will be able to move on from the transitional units within 90 days. The hospital will pay for the housing portion itself. That will still be far cheaper than what the hospital currently spends. It costs Denver Health $2,700 a night to keep someone in the hospital. Patients who

are prime candidates for the transitional units stay on average 73 days, for a total cost to the hospital of nearly $200,000. The hospital estimates it would cost a fraction of that, about $10,000, to house a patient for a year instead. “The hospital really is like the most expensive form of housing,” Stella said. Growing Interest A recent report from the Urban Institute found that while most hospital officials are well aware of how poor housing affects a patient’s recovery, they were stymied about how to address the issue. “It’s on the radar of almost all hospitals,” said Kathryn Reynolds, who co-authored the report. “But it seemed like actually making investments in housing, providing some type of financing or an investment in land or something that has a good amount of value seems to be less widespread.” The report found housing investment has been more likely among hospitals with their own health plans or other types of arrangements in which they were receiving a fixed amount of money to care for a group of patients. Getting patients into housing could lower their costs and increase their operating margins. Others, particularly religiously affiliated and children’s hospitals, sought housing solutions as part of their charitable mission. Reynolds said the trend is due in part to the Affordable Care Act, which requires hospitals to perform a community needs assessment to help guide their charitable efforts. That prompted more hospitals to consider the social needs of their patients and pushed housing concerns up the list. Additionally, the Internal Revenue Service clarified in 2015 that hospitals could claim housing investments as charitable spending required under their tax-free status. And provisions included Continued on page 24.


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

UPCOMING

SECTIONS

IN THE MIDLANDS BUSINESS JOURNAL

OCTOBER 25

INVESTING IN NEBRASKA

HOME HEALTH CARE NOVEMBER 1

PHILANTHROPY & CHARITY

EXECUTIVE GIFT GUIDE

To advertise your company’s products or services in one of our upcoming sections, contact one of our MBJ advertising representatives at (402) 330-1760 or at the email addresses below. Julie Whitehead - Julie@mbj.com • Catie Kirby - Catie@mbj.com Karla Steele - karla@mbj.com • Joe Misiunas - joe@mbj.com Space and materials deadline is the Friday prior to the publication date. You may email us your insertion orders directly, or fax them to us at (402) 758-9315. We will acknowledge receiving your instructions.

REGIONAL LANDSCAPES

Briefs…

The Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District Board of Directors voted to approve the fiscal year 2020 general operating budget that called for a decreased property tax levy of .037384 per $100 of assessed valuation. This means a homeowner with property valued at $100,000 would pay a total of $37.38 in property taxes next year to support NRD projects. The budget calls for an estimated $26 million in revenue from the NRD’s property tax levy. The Papio-Missouri River NRD’s property tax levy amounts to less than 2% of the total property tax bill for residents living within the District’s six-county area. Heartland Bi e S are Executive Director Benjamin Turner has stepped down to take a position as the marketing and community relations manager with Omaha’s new United Soccer League professional soccer team. Turner took the reins of Omaha B-cycle in Dec. of 2012, overseeing the growth of the system from five stations and 33 bikes into 33 stations and 180 bikes across two states. In 2016, he formed Heartland Bike Share. Heartland Bike Share secured a contract to launch bike share in Lincoln, added 34 stations in Omaha, and introduced shared electric pedal assist bikes in Nebraska. Currently, the combined programs have over 90 stations and 450 bikes. Avalon, a national provider of eDiscovery, digital forensics, cybersecurity, managed services, and traditional litigation support services to law firms and corporations, has opened an office in Omaha. Avalon, which has a history of commitment to small- to mid-sized businesses, selected these markets because the increased consolidation in the litigation-support industry is creating a void of mid-market providers. The company expects to add 20 additional team members to these three offices by the end of the year due to the growing need for litigation support services, including digital forensics, eDiscovery, and managed office services. Throughout October, drivers can help Fuel the Cure for breast cancer by choosing American Ethanol at the pump. More than 30 Nebraska gas stations will donate three cents for every gallon of higher ethanol blends — E15 to flex fuel E85 — sold between Oct. 1 and Oct. 31. All donations will support cancer research at the Fred & Pamela Buffett Cancer Center in Omaha. Nebraskans for Solar, Seventy Five North Revitalization Corp., and Omaha Public Power District have completed the installation of a 4-kilowatt solar system on a home in the Highlander neighborhood, a mixed-income community in north Omaha. The solar panels and components were funded by Nebraskans for Solar’s Green Watts for Good program through individual contributions to the fund as well as donations to the nonprofit’s Omaha Gives campaign sponsored by the Omaha Community Foundation. Labor to install the project was donated by Michael Shonka, owner of Solar Heat and Electric, and Great Plains Renewables. VCA MidWest Veterinary Referral & Emergency Center is nearing the end of an ambitious two year remodel and expansion. VCA MidWest is a full-time veterinary hospital dedicated to specialty & emergency medicine. Board-certified veterinarians work in partnership with primary care veterinarians by referral throughout Nebraska,

Iowa, South Dakota and Kansas. When the project is complete in Spring 2020, the new 17,000-square-foot facility will feature 11 exam rooms, four operating theaters, a dedicated ICU with telemetry and long-term mechanical ventilation capabilities, separate GI and respiratory isolation wards, supplementary step-down unit, and comprehensive in-house laboratory equipment. It also will have ultrasonography, video rigid and flexible endoscopy, Stryker laparoscopy/arthroscopy tower, digital radiography, helical computed tomography, and on-site magnetic resonance imaging.

Health care notes…

According to research led by Eric Bredahl, Ph.D., assistant professor of exercise science and pre-health professions at Creighton University, even low impact exercises, such as walking and yoga, can make a noticeable difference. Bredahl, who is working alongside undergraduate researchers, has found low-intensity exercise can help slow tumor growth, in addition to reducing damage to the heart that occurs during chemotherapy. Bredahl is collaborating with the Creighton School of Medicine to examine compounds that could be given while patients undergo chemotherapy. The goal is to help stave off deterioration of heart and skeletal muscle tissue. The University of Nebraska Medical Center’s Center for Reducing Health Disparities is conducting the first statewide assessment of the status quo of Nebraska’s community health workforce. The study will review some of the health issues addressed by health workers in their routine work, as well as the challenges and barriers they face. It will also explore demographic and socioeconomic aspects of these positions along with training needs, working relationships and environmental concerns. For this purpose, the study team plans to interview employers of community health workers across the state to get their perspectives.

Education notes…

Creighton University and the Suzanne & Walter Scott Foundation announced a $14.6 million scholarship program established for Heider College of Business students. The commitment re-creates and extends the Scott Scholars program. The Scott Scholars program will recruit students to Creighton and develop them for careers in Omaha and Nebraska. Through the nine-year commitment, five students from Nebraska and 10 from outside the state each year will receive full tuition and room and board while studying at Heider College of Business. The University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing has received a four-year, $1.67 million grant to launch a residency program for recently graduated nurse practitioners in rural and underserved areas. Residency training exposes recent graduates to a myriad of experiences, which not only allows them to gain proficiency in specialized skills, but also receive support by supervising health professionals. Residents also will learn skills for working with primary care patients as well as medically complex and socially vulnerable patients and their families. The grant is funded by the Health Resources and Services through the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. A $1.4 million federal grant will help the University of Nebraska at Omaha build upon a successful program that prepares fuontinued on next page.


Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •

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REGIONAL LANDSCAPES Continued from preceding page. ture high school math teachers. The NebraskaMATH Omaha Noyce Partnership partners UNO with Metropolitan Community College and Omaha Public Schools. Over the next five years, the grant will provide scholarships, research opportunities, internships and mentorship to students pursuing careers as high school math teachers. The program is open to students in UNO’s Bachelor of Science in Mathematics/Teacher Preparation program and students studying or preparing to graduate from the pre-math track in MCC’s Liberal Arts/Academic Transfer Associate in Science degree program. The Metropolitan Community College Foundation was awarded a $70,000 gift from the Johnny Baxter Carriage House Foundation. The donation will be used to help students in the MCC Automotive Technology, Auto Collision Technology and Diesel Technology programs via equipment upgrades, instructional support and scholarships. A grant from the National Science Foundation will allow faculty from the University of Nebraska at Omaha to join faculty from across the country to enhance the ways universities teach math concepts. The $299,999 grant will go to help fund an ongoing project led by Patrick Rault, Ph.D., associate proMEETINGS AND SEMINARS Tuesday, Oct. 22 Notre Dame Housing is hosting an Educational Seminar: Understanding Alzheimer’s and Dementia from 1:30 p.m. to 2:30 p.m. This free seminar will cover detection, causes, risks, stages and treatment. Registration can be made online or through Brianna Lock, bllock@alz.org, 800-272-3900. This seminar will also be offered on Oct. 25 at Engage Wellness from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Oct. 23 American Marketing Association Omaha is hosting its October workshop on Why Podcast? The discussion will take place from 11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at SilverStone Group. Pat Safford and Jill Thomas, co-founders of Parkville Media, will be discussing what a podcast is, how they can work for different companies and how to produce content. Registration is available online. The Iowa Western Small Business Development Center is hosting a seminar on xcel Basics from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. at Iowa Western’s SBDC Office. This seminar introduces the skills necessary for productive development of workbooks. It includes tasks to explore Excel, use basic workbook skills, work with ranges, create simple formulas, copy and move data, and use page setup. The student will also learn basic formatting of columns and rows, numbers, text, and cells. Registration is online. Friday, Oct. 25 e onprofit ssociation is hosting a workshop on irty Sexy oney e Role of Finance Committees from 9 a.m. to 11 a.m. Is the role of your finance committee about as clear as mud? Do you have a finance committee that is struggling? What is a finance committee supposed to do anyway? Come to this session to learn about the role of the finance committee, its relationship to the Board of Directors, typical functions of a finance committee, and more. Registration is online.

fessor of mathematics, which builds on the growing body of research about the positive impacts of inquiry-based learning techniques in math classrooms across the country. Specifically, the project will investigate the potential impact of regional communities of IBL practitioners to support faculty in adopting, sustaining and promoting the use of IBL in undergraduate mathematics education. Metropolitan Community College and Facebook have partnered to offer an online digital marketing program, set to begin in Jan. 2020. The nine-month certificate program is fully online with instructors that will provide guidance, grading and feedback. The program consists of six modules that build essential skills businesses look for when hiring and promoting digital marketers, including content marketing strategy, analytics and performance optimization, social media and email marketing and search and display advertising. Upon completion, each student will receive a digital badge (a verifiable learning credential) and materials to create an e-portfolio that prospective and current employers can review.

Activities of nonprofits…

The Dollar General Literacy Foundation awarded more than $14,000 for youth literacy grants in Nebraska that work to help students and educators reach their literacy goals throughout the academic year. These funds are aimed at supporting youth literacy programs within a 20-mile radius of a Dollar General store or distribution center across the 44 states Dollar General serves. The grants awarded to Nebraska organizations are expected to positively impact the lives of more than 4,000 students. Autism Action Partnership (AAP) has become a Certified Autism Center, making it one of only two organizations in the state of Nebraska to attain that designation. The CAC designation is granted by the International Board of Credentialing and Continuing Education Standards (IBCCES). Kellogg Company has partnered with online retailer Boxed and United Way of the Midlands to help local families still struggling in the aftermath of this spring’s devastating flooding in Nebraska and Iowa. During the month of October, people can visit boxed.com/betterdays and shop bulk groceries and other supplies that United Way of the Midlands has curated based upon the needs of families still impacted by the devastating floods that hit the community earlier this year. Boxed will ship purchases to United Way of the Midlands, which will distribute the donations to those in the community who need them most. Stephen Center, a south Omaha-based homeless shelter, permanent supportive housing and co-occurring treatment center, has earned a three-year accreditation from the Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities for its emergency shelter, permanent supportive housing and HERO Co-Occurring Treatment programs. CARF establishes national consumer-focused standards to help organizations measure and improve the quality of their programs and services. Stephen Center’s emergency shelter, PSH and HERO programs have all been accredited. Midlands Community Foundation is bringing back its MCF Matching Charitable Program, beginning Dec. 1, 2019, and ending Jan. 6, 2020. Under the Matching Charitable

Program, MCF will provide matching funds for new contributions made to existing and newly created Affiliated General, Designated, Donor Advised, Field of Interest, and Scholarship Funds. Matching donations will be made on a dollar-for-dollar basis up to a limit of $5,000 per donor, and subject to a maximum of $100,000 of matching dollars being available in the aggregate for all funds. If more than $100,000 is contributed on an aggregate basis to all funds, the matching dollars will be pro-rated among such donors based on the total contributions made.

Arts & events…

This year The IO Summit has moved to Oct. 20-22 to coincide with Lincoln’s Startup Week and has expanded to include Talent, Technology, and The Future of Innovation. The conference will be held at the new Carson Center for Emerging Media Arts and have a lineup of innovators, entrepreneurs, authors, and investors from places like AirBNB, Nike, NASA, DreamWorks, Hudl, and others. Like last year, there will also be a Startup Showcase with over 50 startups. There will be a pitch competition with some of the startups competing for LPED’s $25,000 Launch LNK grants. Registration is available online. Trick-or-treat throughout The Durham Museum and snag some sweets from historical characters on Oct. 22 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. for the reat Hall-o een Haunt. Visit the Creepy Curator to discover what eerie artifacts she found in the collection vaults. Join dancing zombies in the Suzanne and Walter Scott Great Hall, tour the Haunted Train and make your way through our Cobweb Caboose. The Swanson “Ghoulery” carnival is full of ghostly games including boo bowling, spider sling, zombie duck race and Frankenstein operation. Plus spooky soda fountain treats, crafts with Mangelsen’s and a costume conga line to end the night. Come in costume, grab some candy and enjoy the frightful fun. Enjoy ghost stories, basement tours and a haunted train at The Durham Museums’ ages 21 and older History ystery event on Oct. 24 from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Guests will enjoy guided tours of our collection storage area to see some eerie artifacts, hear ghost stories with Nebraska Story Arts, experience never-before-seen areas of the original Union Station and tour our haunted train. Plus, a cash

bar and spooktacular soda fountain specials. Tickets include admission and one drink ticket. Purchase tickets online. Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts presents its Benefit rt uction oncert on Oct. 25 at 5:30 p.m. The Benefit Art Auction + Concert unites local and national artists with the organization’s community of art patrons to support participating artists and raise critical resources for Bemis Center programs. Bemis partners with Maha to present the concert featuring indie-rock band Deerhoof, the first show in Bemis’s new performance venue, which is part of the Sound Art + Experimental Music Program launched earlier this year. Doors for the concert open at 9:30 p.m. Tickets can be purchased online at bemiscenter.org/benefit. Wear Yellow Nebraska is hosting the The Spoo s Spo es Sca enger Hunt Ride on Oct. 27 starting at 12:30 p.m. at Stinson Park in Aksarben Village. Teams of two will be given a number of questions and will have to ride their bikes across the trails of Omaha to find clues and answers. There will be no riding on major streets and all teams must return to the registration booth by 5 p.m. to see how they fared. A post event will be held at LIV Lounge were winners will be announced. Registration is available online for this event. The Sarpy County Museum’s October Sunday Series Lecture will feature Cindy M. Van Bibber, director of Omaha/Fort McPherson National Cemeteries. Her lecture will be on Oct. 27 from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Sarpy County Museum in Bellevue. This program is free of charge and light refreshments will be served. Bibber’s presentation will highlight United States participation within global conflicts, specifically deaths associated within each chapter of American history. The lecture will connect the role of these conflicts to National Cemeteries and then in greater detail Omaha National Cemetery. The Durham Museum is turning the lights down low for Durham After Dark on Oct. 29 from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m. Enjoy spooky stories with Nebraska Story Arts, a dance party complete with glow sticks, a zombie flash mob and much more. Mangelsen’s will be on hand to demonstrate Halloween make-up tricks. Plus tour the Haunted Train and complete our creepy scavenger hunt. Halloween costumes are optional.


24

• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

Woman’s invention led to a business and a key piece of gear when racing the Chicago Marathon by Lauren Zumbach

As a kid, Arielle Rausin had little interest in sports — even before the car accident that paralyzed her from the waist down at age 10. She remembers being forced to participate in gym class at her Florida middle school, until she met a teachEntrEprEnEurship er who invented ways for her to play alongside her classmates. “It was the first time I realized sports could be really fun even though I was in a wheelchair,” said Rausin, 26. She joined the cross-country team and discovered she liked to race, even when that meant pushing a regular wheelchair around the grass course. She got her first racing wheelchair in high school. By the time Rausin graduated, she’d landed a spot on the University of Illinois’ wheelchair track team and a place in its business school. That’s where she got the idea for a class project that she has since turned into a growing business and a key piece of gear she’ll rely on when racing the Chicago Marathon on Sunday. Rausin, who will compete in the marathon’s elite wheelchair racing field, is the founder of a company that uses 3D printing technology to make the gloves wheelchair athletes wear when competing. In the three years since launching Ingenium Manufacturing, she says she has sold more than 4,000 pairs to athletes in 31 countries, while continuing to chase her own athletic goals at races around the world. It started with an assignment for a course on 3D printing at the university’s Urbana-Champaign campus. Rausin had to choose an item to scan and print. Her coach suggested she try to make a racing glove. “I thought it would be a prototype,” Rausin said. “I was shocked when it worked and was durable and strong.” At first, she carried a backup in case they splintered during a training session. But the gloves held up and she raced in them for the first time at the 2015 Boston Marathon. “Right then, my teammates started saying ‘Hey, can you make me a pair?’” she said.

Arielle Rausin, founder of Ingenium Manufacturing, uses her custom wheelchair racing gloves during practice at the National Training Center for Wheelchair Track at the University of Illinois in Champaign, Ill. (Zbigniew Bzdak/Chicago Tribune/TNS) As Rausin and her teammates competed she said. Before 3D printing was an option, plastic with them, other athletes would email and ask gloves had to be molded and sculpted by hand. for the gloves. “I realized it was something other people That means they’re custom-built to the athlete’s liking, but because they’re made by hand, it’s could benefit from too,” she said. There are two main styles when it comes virtually impossible to get the left and right to gloves that protect athletes’ hands when gloves exactly symmetrical or perfectly dupushing racing wheelchairs: soft gloves, made plicate a worn-out pair, said Adam Bleakney, from rubber and leather, and hard plastic gloves. Rausin’s coach at the University of Illinois. After logging thousands of miles with one Which is best comes down to what works for the athlete, coaches said. But many prefer set of gloves, “even a small, minute change feels plastic because the hard surface absorbs less like miles of change,” Bleakney said. The 3D printer makes it easier to replicate energy when athletes push the wheel than soft materials tend to, said Teresa Skinner, executive gloves, and they’re lighter. Over the course of director of ParaSport Spokane, a Washing- a marathon, which requires roughly 10,000 ton-based organization that provides athletic arm strokes, even small differences add up, programs for kids and adults with physical Bleakney said. All but a couple of the 28 members of the disabilities, including track and field and road University of Illinois team now use 3D printed racing. “Whatever energy you apply to the rim is gloves, Bleakney said, as do some athletes at actually going to driving the chair forward,” Great Lakes Adaptive Sports Association in

Continued from page 21. in the 2017 tax cut bill provided significant tax savings for investors in newly designated opportunity zones, increasing their interest in affordable housing projects. Some hospitals, she said, may use their cash reserves to invest in housing projects that generate a lower return than other investment options because it furthers their mission, not just their profits. In other cases, hospital systems play a facilitator role — using their access to cheap credit or serving as an anchor tenant in a larger development — to help get a project off the ground. “Housing is not their business,” Guerrero said. “It’s not an easy space to get into if you don’t have the experience, if you don’t have a real estate development team in-house to understand how to put these deals together.” Cutting Costs In the southwestern corner of Colorado, Centura Health’s Mercy Regional Medical Center has partnered with Housing Solutions for the Southwest to prioritize housing vouchers for frequent users of the emergency room. Under a program funded by the Catholic Health Initiatives, Mercy hired a social worker and a case manager to review records

of frequent emergency room patients. They quickly realized how big an issue housing was for those patients. Many had diabetes and depended on insulin — which needs refrigeration. Kidney failure was one of the most costly diagnoses for the hospital. Once patients received housing vouchers and found stable housing, though, costs began to drop. “We now knew where they were. We knew that they had a safe place to live,” said Elsa Inman, program coordinator at Mercy Regional. “We knew they would be more effective in managing their chronic conditions.” The patients with stable housing were more likely to make it to their primary care and specialist appointments, more likely to stay on top of medications and keep their chronic conditions in check. The combination of intensive case management and patient engagement helped to halve ER visits for the first 146 patients in the program, saving nearly $495,000 in Medicaid spending in less than three years. “Hospitals are businesses and nonprofits are businesses,” said Brigid Korce, program development director for Housing Solutions. “They are bottom-line, dollars-and-cents people.”

Why hospitals are getting into the housing business Inman acknowledged that the hospital might have missed out on some revenue by reducing ER use by these patients. Hospitals are still largely paid by the number of patients they treat and the number of services they provide. But most of those patients were covered by Medicaid, so reimbursements were low anyway. And the move freed up more ER beds for patients with more critical needs. “We want to be prepared for life-threatening conditions,” Inman said. “If you’ve got most of your beds taken up by someone who can be receiving patient care outside in the community, then that’s the right thing to do.” That was less of an issue for the inpatients at Denver Health. Because hospitals are generally paid a fixed amount for a given diagnosis, the longer a patient stays in the hospital, the more money the hospital loses. “They’ve basically exhausted their benefit under any plan because they don’t meet medical necessity anymore,” Burnette said. “If they had a home, they would go home. But they don’t, so they stay in the hospital.” 2019 aiser Healt e s Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.

Lake Forest. “When top athletes are using them, and you see the success those athletes have, we look for best practices,” said Cindy Housner, the association’s executive director and founder. Initially, all Rausin’s gloves were custom-made. She still makes custom gloves for elite athletes but wanted to offer an option that would be accessible to a wider audience, including beginners and youth athletes, and designed a version sold in a range of sizes online. Those gloves sell for $150, though Rausin said she gives racers under 18 a discount since the cost of equipment — particularly racing wheelchairs — can be a barrier to entry in the sport. Soft gloves from Harness Designs, a popular brand, cost $190. Custom-molded gloves are even more expensive if an athlete or coach can’t make them on their own, Rausin said. She tried to make her own pair in high school but spilled boiling water on her leg when trying to heat the plastic and stuck with soft gloves until college. A Canadian company, Revolution Sports, also has begun making 3D printing gloves, but Rausin said it hasn’t affected sales and thinks the competition is good for innovation. Innovation can be slow when it comes to gear for adaptive sports because the lack of visibility makes it easy for people to underestimate the potential market, Skinner said. “Regardless of how big it gets, I so appreciate that she decided to take on this project and turn it into a business and continues to promote the sport with technology that should have been there a long time ago,” she said. Rausin wants to keep developing products for people with disabilities, and not just athletic equipment. Many products on the market today were designed decades ago by medical companies, she said. They’re functional, but “weren’t designed with the 2019 user in mind,” she said. Founding her own company means she can try to fill those needs. It also makes it easier to keep chasing her athletic goals, scheduling work around twice-daily practices and travel to races like Sunday’s Chicago Marathon, which serves as the U.S. Paralympic Team Trials. The top two American men and women across the finish line will represent the U.S. in the marathon at the 2020 Paralympic Games in Tokyo, provided they also have completed a marathon below a certain time standard: 1 hour, 34 minutes and 57 seconds for women, or 1 hour, 19 minutes and 32 seconds for men. Rausin’s fastest time — 1 hour, 40 minutes and 51 seconds, set at Grandma’s Marathon in Duluth, Minn., in June — ranks fifth among American women in the Chicago Marathon’s elite field. It’s more than an hour and a half faster than her marathon time as a college freshman, in 2012. Though she raced in high school, there weren’t many programs for adaptive sports in her area and Rausin said she didn’t start training seriously until joining the university team. When she graduated in December 2016 and watched friends start careers, she wasn’t sure continuing to train and race at a high level was the right call. Then she qualified for the national team at the Boston Marathon the following spring and decided to chase her goal of qualifying for the Tokyo Games. “I’m only young once, and I’ll only have this body once,” she said. “There’s a lot of time later in life for all the things I want to do.” ©2019 Chicago Tribune Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •

Investing in

Nebraska

25

Home Health Care

A section prepared by the staff of the Midlands Business Journal

Topics may include:

A section prepared by the staff of the Midlands Business Journal

Investment market outlook • Maximizing retirement funds Choosing a type of investing that best fits you • Hot stocks Investing in Nebraska companies • Wealth management

Topics may include:

Outlook • Digital health care • Staffing trends Paying for home health care • Resources for caregivers

Issue Date:October 25 • Ad Deadline:October 17

Issue Date:October 25 • Ad Deadline:October 17

Philanthropy and Charity A section prepared by the staff of the Midlands Business Journal

This focus section will be published in the November 1st issue of MBJ with the advertising deadline set for November 2nd.

Topics may include the following: • Philanthropy and Charity overview • Selecting a nonprofit organization • Financial/tax planning considerations • Corporate philanthropy trends/volunteer activities • Planned giving • How crowdfunding and peer-to-peer funding ••Impact Impact investing

Issue Date: November 1 • Ad Deadline: October 24 To advertise your company’s products or services in one of our upcoming sections, contact one of our MBJ advertising representatives at (402) 330-1760 or at the email addresses below. Julie Whitehead - Julie@mbj.com • Catie Kirby - Catie@mbj.com • Karla Steele - karla@mbj.com • Joe Misiunas - joe@mbj.com


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

In the Spotlight Paid Content CONSTRUCTION

ACCOUNTING

ACCOUNTING

VALUATION SERVICES

Hired

Hired

Hired

Hired

Quinn Texmo

Thomas Pargett

Maya Serhan

Jason Wietfeld

Nebraska Business Development

Wealth Advisor

Staff Accountant

Director

BerganKDV

O’Donnell, Ficenec, Wills & Ferdig

Acclaro Valuation Advisors, LLC

Turner Construction Company

Quinn Texmo is bringing her 12 years of experience working in the A/E/C industry to Turner Construction Company’s new Omaha Office. As the Nebraska Business Development lead for the largest builder in the United States, she will work to develop and maintain industry relationships. Texmo is actively involved in CREW Omaha Metro (Commercial Real Estate Women) and SMPS Nebraska (Society for Marketing Professional Services). Texmo’s notable achievements include 2019 CREW Network Impact Award winner; 2018 Graduate of Leadership Nebraska; Alumni Advisory Council; 2017 Midlands Business Journal 40 under 40; CREW Omaha Metro Past-President; SMPS Nebraska Past-President, Regional Conference Chair; and Women’s Fund Circles (2017-present).

BerganKDV recently hired Thomas Pargett as a Wealth Advisor in the Omaha market. Pargett’s primary focus in his role is to work with individuals, families and business owners to enhance their wealth through comprehensive financial planning. Pargett began his career as an educator before transitioning to wealth management and enjoys using his educational skills to help clients understand their whole financial picture including financial planning, investment strategies, risk management and estate planning. His deep level of knowledge about the wealth management industry also comes from his involvement with Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards where he is a CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™ and serves on the CFP® Mentor Program. In addition, Pargett has studied financial behavior through the Financial Psychology Institute. “Having Thomas join the BerganKDV team is something I am extremely excited about,” said Wealth Management Solutions Leader Matt Cosgriff, CFP®, “He is a very well-respected professional in the wealth management industry and his guidance and advice will be invaluable to our clients.” Pargett holds a bachelor’s degree in education from Morningside College and is a Creighton University Master of Business Administration (Financial Psychology) 2020 candidate.

O’Donnell, Ficenec, Wills & Ferdig, LLP (OFWF) is pleased to announce Maya Serhan has joined the firm as a Staff Accountant. Serhan has a passion for learning and started her education with a degree in political science from Lebanon University. She then pursued a business degree at Bellevue University and discovered a love for numbers where she graduated with Bachelor of Science in Business Administration followed by a Master of Science in Accounting in 2018. She is a CPA candidate and expected to acquire her CPA in 2019. Besides her gift of business analysis, she loves language and speaks French, Arabic and English. Since 1951, O'Donnell, Ficenec, Wills & Ferdig, LLP, has been more than accounting. They view every client relationship like a partnership and truly believe the firms’ success is a result of the clients’ success. They take pride in giving assurance that the professional service a client receives comes from years of advanced training, technical experience and financial acumen and provide the highest quality of personalized auditing, tax, valuation, accounting and consulting services in response to the clients’ specific and personal needs.

A/E/C

BANKING

BANKING

Hired

Promoted

Promoted

Courtney Dunbar

Melanie Petersen

Ryan McConahay

Site Selection & Economic Development Lead

Office — Wholesale Loan Operations

Vice President — Customer Service

Union Bank & Trust

Union Bank & Trust

Burns & McDonnell

Courtney Dunbar, CEcD, EDFP, AICP, joins Burns & McDonnell to manage the site selection and economic development consulting practice for the firm’s Global Facilities Group. Courtney brings 20 years of comprehensive experience in the site selection, economic development recruitment, finance and planning industries. Her career has centered on industrial development, creating solutions for both corporate and institutional clients across the U.S. and delivering multimillion-dollar, bottom-line growth.

UBT recently promoted Melanie Petersen to Officer — Wholesale Loan Operations. In her new role, Petersen will lead the Wholesale Loan Operations area, driving the standardization of commercial loan documentation and business practices across the entire department. She will also collaborate with others in the division to identify and solve a variety of management objectives.

UBT recently promoted Ryan McConahay to Vice President — Customer Service. In his new role, McConahay will be responsible for managing the Customer Service department, which includes 16 Lincoln branches, 12 greater Nebraska branches, and one branch in Bonner Springs, Kan. Additionally, he’ll oversee training programs and recruitment for the department, comprising nearly 240 employees.

Jason Wietfeld has joined the staff of Acclaro Valuation Advisors, LLC, as a Director. Acclaro Valuation Advisors, LLC, is an independent valuation firm specializing in the appraisal of closely held businesses with its headquarters in Omaha and branch offices in Washington, Florida, and Illinois. Mr. Wietfeld will be based out of Greater Chicago. Mr. Wietfeld previously worked for Acclaro from 2007 to 2010. Prior to re-joining the firm, he worked for Houlihan Capital and Duff & Phelps, both in Chicago. He regularly performed valuations for public and privately held companies and other business interests for merger and acquisition, employee stock ownership plan, gift and estate planning, financial accounting, tax reporting, and fairness and solvency opinion purposes. Mr. Wietfeld earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in Finance from the University of NebraskaLincoln. He also holds a Master of Investment Management & Financial Analysis Degree from Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. For more information about Acclaro Valuation Advisors, visit www.acclarovaluation.com or call 402-8956222.

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Midlands Business Journal • OCTOBER 18, 2019 •

27

In the Spotlight Paid Content REAL ESTATE

REAL ESTATE

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Installed

Hired

Selectred

Steve Coram

Mike Pekas

Paul West

2020 President

Real estate salesperson

Managing Partner

Nebraska REALTORS Association

NAI NP Dodge

Carson Wealth

Steve Coram has been installed as the 2020 President of the Nebraska REALTORS® Association. The Inaugural Gala event was held during the Association’s Annual Fall Business Meetings September 9-11, 2019, in Lincoln, Neb. Coram, who has been a licensed REALTOR® since 2003 and is the Broker/co-owner of HOME Real Estate of Kearney. Coram has served the Association in various capacities at the local and state levels. At the local level he was President of the Buffalo County Board of REALTORS® (now known as the REALTORS® of Greater Mid-Nebraska) in 2009 and 2013. Coram currently serves as the Nebraska REALTORS® Association PresidentElect and serves on the Governmental Affairs, Strategic Planning, Statewide Professional Standards committees and is a RPAC Trustee. Coram currently resides in Kearney with his wife, Colleen. They have 2 children, Melissa Coram and Amy Harris (Matt Harris), 1 granddaughter and 4 grandsons. In his remarks to NRA members, Coram said he looks forward to a great year as President in 2020 and would like to carry on with the NATIONAL ASSOCIATION of REALTORS® theme of “That’s Who We R” with a little Nebraska twist of “Nebraska, That’s Who We R.”

NAI NP Dodge has added Mike Pekas, as a licensed real estate salesperson. He provides comprehensive commercial real estate brokerage services with specializations in retail and multi-family properties. Pekas most recently worked as senior associate broker for Omaha-based Sage Capital. Earlier in his career, he was an agent for New York Life Insurance Company and an intern at Northwestern Mutual. A native Omahan, Pekas has a Bachelor of Business Administration degree in Finance, Investment Sciences and Real Estate Land Use Economics from the University of Nebraska at Omaha. NAI NP Dodge is the commercial real estate division of NP Dodge, Omaha’s largest full-service real estate company. The firm is one of Omaha’s most diverse commercial real estate agencies, offering leasing of offices, retail centers, industrial buildings and mini-storage facilities. Sales include all types of land, owner/user facilities and investment properties. In addition, professional property management is available. Submit your company’s employee announcements to

Spotlight@mbj.com

Paul West, CFP®, Managing Partner of Carson Wealth, has been named to Barron’s Top 100 Independent Wealth Advisors List for the second consecutive year and is the top ranked Nebraska advisor on the list. West advises the complex financial planning needs of families in Nebraska and across the country

and leads the Private Client Services division. West hosts client events and educational workshops in the greater Omaha area to inform investors on a variety of topics, from retirement planning to taxes, social security and estate planning. He has made it his personal mission to increase trust among financial professionals and provides proactive and transparent communications to clients, from weekly market commentary to his nationally syndicated radio show and weekly podcast, Wealth From Wisdom. into their future both personally and professionally.”


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• OCTOBER 18, 2019 • Midlands Business Journal

Honoring 2019

40 business leaders in the Greater Omaha area under the age of 40

Friday, Nov. 8 at 11am Embassy Suites-La Vista Visit MBJ.com to make your reservation by Oct. 25 Contact 4040leaders@mbj.com for more information Exclusive this year

A tribute to late MBJ founder Bob Hoig

Presented by


The Lincoln

OCTOBER 2019

BUSINESS Journal

Vol. 22 No. 10 $2.00

Holiday Office Parties Pages 4-6 Blueprints....................Pages 8-9 Retirement .....................Page 10 Lincoln’s Sun Valley Lanes plans major expansion.

Page 2


2

• OCTOBER 2019 • The Lincoln Business Journal

Lincoln’s Sun Valley Lanes plans major expansion by Dwain Hebda

If all goes as scheduled, longtime Lincoln bowling center Sun Valley Lanes will be all but unrecognizable next summer, thanks to a planned $4 million in improvements. The 42-year-old center began taking bids on the project Oct. 2 with an eye on work starting later this month.

Sun Valley Lanes Phone: 402-475-3469 Address: 321 Victory Lane, Lincoln Service: Bowling/entertainment center Employees: 32 Website: sunvalleylanes.com

Plans call for expansion of the existing 30,000-square-foot building by 6,250 square feet, doubling the indoor spaces, as well as incorporating an adjacent property that will add roughly 25,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor amenities. The center’s 32-employee headcount will increase by about 20 as well. Owner John Losito, who began working at the bowling center in the 1980s and bought out his partner owners in 2011, said the improvements will bring the landmark into the modern times. “I’m quoted as saying there hasn’t been a traditional bowling center built in this country in more than a decade, which is pretty accurate. That’s not far-fetched,” he said. “When this facility opened, about 80% of the bowling income came from league play. Today, it’s about 32%. So obviously that’s a big change. “The overall business itself is doing

Owner John Losito … The 42-year-old bowling alley has announced $4 million in improvements to transform the business into a family entertainment center. just fine. The mix of the business has anymore.” To offset that change, the bowling alley changed dramatically over the years. We know there’s still some people that will launched 10-week leagues. But, Losito adds, modern bowling always bowl leagues and it’s going to be a core base of our customer group, but peo- centers offer more than one entertainment ple can’t commit to the 35-week leagues option and that’s what the new Sun Valley

Lanes and Games will feature. Plans include laser tag, sand volleyball courts and a miniature golf, a concept so novel Losito declined to talk about it in detail. “The bowling itself is just an anchor, and I don’t mean ‘anchor’ in a bad way,” he said. “I mean anchor as in a good foundation for a center because everybody can bowl, basically. When you combine that with other entertainment options, the more that you can offer, the more potential for success there is.” Losito has already shown a propensity to stay on the cutting edge of industry trends. In addition to shorter league schedules, he’s also introduced hyper bowling, a feature that eliminates gutter balls by adding rails with targets, giving even rank beginners a chance to be competitive. Sun Valley has also upped the quality of its food beyond standard snack bar fare, which is why the kitchen will be expanded in the forthcoming renovations. “We do some stupid numbers out of our kitchen, great numbers in the space that it currently utilizes,” he said. “We started making that change about a decade ago, going to fresh ground beef and offering more healthy menu items like wraps. [Food] trends have changed dramatically. People expect more.” Losito said he once toyed with the idea of switching locations altogether but is staying put thanks to growth in west Lincoln. “I decided this was actually a pretty good location because it’s close to the interstate, it’s close to downtown,” he said. “And then you’ve got all the other sports hubs, the baseball stadium, the ice arena, the football stadium, and the big practice place that’s coming up to the west of us. “It’s really becoming a hub out here for this type of activity, so I just thought that it was a good fit to build it here. I thought, let’s just go ahead and do it.” The Lincoln Business Journal Established in 1996

PUBLISHER & FOUNDER, Robert Hoig

ADMINISTRATION VP OF OPERATIONS, Andrea “Andee” Hoig

EDITORIAL EDITOR & VICE PRESIDENT OF NEWS, Tiffany Brazda EDITORIAL ASSISTANT, Savannah Behrends STAFF WRITER, Becky McCarville

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The Lincoln Business Journal • OCTOBER 2019 •

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• OCTOBER 2019 • The Lincoln Business Journal

Holiday Office Parties A section prepared by the staff of the Lincoln Business Journal

Venue selection can help to determine party success by Gabby Christensen

There are many details that must be considered during holiday office party planning, but perhaps one of the most vital elements is the choice of venue, which experts say can help establish the theme, mood and experience of an event. Lauren Taylor, venues and events coordinator at Nebraska Alumni Association, said The Center hosts weddings, meetings, conferences and other special events, and clients can choose between four approved caterers. “We offer several different spaces, each with its own character and distinctive feel,” Taylor said. “This allows us to be flexible and creative in fulfilling our clients’ needs.” According to Taylor, the centerpiece of

DeJong said a venue should the Wick Alumni Center is the also help guide clients through Pascale Great Hall. the alcohol liability and the de“With vaulted ceilings, two cisions on purchasing beverages, dramatic staircases and magnifwhile also offering flexible and icent windows, this room epitcreative menu options. omizes sophistication,” Taylor Jaylynn Schubauer, catering said. manager at Graduate Lincoln Cathryn L. DeJong, director Hotel, said the Hotel has a full of catering at Graduate Lincoln service staff including servers, Hotel, said a safe, comfortable, bartenders and on-site security. and relaxing environment away Free projection screens, from the office where team memLeners standing full-sized podiums, bers can get together and not event staging, Wi-Fi and other event amefocus on work is really important. “Offer clients dates that are accommo- nities are also available. Lately, Schubauer said casino themes, dating to all employees and their work shifts and days — consider suggesting offseason murder mystery themes, and Topgolf parties have been very popular. holiday party dates,” DeJong said.

October 2019 Additionally, Schubauer said outdoor games that are indoors, such as giant Jenga, floor checkers, cornhole, washers, ladder ball and beer pong have also been trendy. When it comes to hosting important meetings, Shoira Khamidova, CEO at RBC Event Space, said it’s always nice for venues to have a television, good quality sound system or a projector screen on hand. “This is something lots of venues incorporate because clients can then express their important memories, show their projects or in some cases, play their favorite music with surround sound,” Khamidova said. Khamidova said themes are always very critical when it comes to party planning. “It’s also important to consider venue parking,” Khamidova said. “It’s good to have a cozy, and at the same time, not deContinued on next page.


Holiday Office Parties •

The Lincoln Business Journal • OCTOBER 2019 •

5

Beverages take center stage; companies hungry for engaging, morale-boosting party options by Michelle Leach

As company parties gain in prominence, food and beverages are taking center stage. “We have definitely seen a reemergence in organizations’ willingness to invest in their holiday parties,” said Aaron King, director of food and beverage at The Lincoln Marriott Cornhusker Hotel. “This is potentially driven by the changing job market. Company culture has become one of the largest focuses to maintain and attract associates.” In turn, King indicated, companies can reach their financial goals by way of top,

loyal associates. Alchemy Operating Partner Evan Barrett said he’s seen clients who combine parties with raffles, investing in the likes of Keurig machines for giveaways. “No matter how much money they spend, it’s always a morale-booster,” he said. “Whenever you can give back a little bit, it definitely helps.” In addition to Boiler Brewing Co.’s downtown event spaces, Thad Aerts said it’s opening a new taproom at the Village Gardens development at 56th Street and Pine Lake Road in November. “From my vantage point, and overlook-

Venue selection can help to determine party success Continued from preceding page. serted place.” Khamidova said RBC Event Space has taken hold of a modern and sleek design. “We have great parking, surround sound, a separate room for meetings, and canvases that really stick to the modern theme,” Khamidova said. “We also have a full kitchen with a sink and fridge, and an island for setting out food.” Recently, Khamidova said she’s noticed that gold and silver have really been popular at events. According to Stacy Leners, owner/vice president at Blur Parties, one trend that has picked up momentum over the past couple of years has been gatherings centered around larger events such as concerts, sporting events and festivals. “These gatherings are used to reward employees for hitting sales objectives or

used for employee appreciation parties, such as holiday gatherings, to businesses saying ‘thank you’ to clients or entertaining prospects,” Leners said. “Centering a party around another event gives longevity to the day or timeframe to enjoy multiple experiences and create unique memories to make the most of the gathering.” Leners said Blur Parties has entertained groups celebrating various occasions from company outings, bachelor and bachelorette parties, bridal showers, wedding anniversaries, class reunions, birthdays to even wedding receptions. “We create environments centered around different events,” Leners said. “For example, Nebraska home football home games, the College World Series and various festivals in which groups can plug into the entertainment provided to create their own custom experience.”

Alchemy also has a take on Harry Poting the craft beer industry, what I would recommend to people is to step outside ter’s ‘Butterbeer’ with butterscotch sauce, their comfort zone,” the taproom manager and it’s making a lot more drinks with the said. “Craft beer is becoming much more likes of apple butter brandy and pumpkin of a household name than I ever thought spice for martinis. “We do a lot of office parties,” he said. it would become.” This means don’t adhere to the “old “We can custom-make cocktails around what they may like and name it rules” (i.e. heavier beers were after their group.” made for the winter only), acHistorically, Aerts said, bevcording to Aerts. erage-food pairings were built “Food stations, beverage around the food. Now it’s the pairings, and ‘mocktails’ are other way around. a great way to start conver“We have tunnel vision when sation topics, think of them we think about beer, but we have as ‘ice-breakers,’” King said, seen chefs create menus for a emphasizing that parties should particular event and then come encourage good conversation. up with a beer to pair,” he said. “These styles avoid the common “Now, we’ve got the beer that pitfall of a long buffet line with a you want to highlight and figure carving station at the end of the Aerts out what food to go with it. Beer line. The traditional buffet can lead to an event with low energy and not achieve the has become much more of the focus and food takes a backseat.” goal of building company culture.” Aerts put a spotlight on “pastry stouts”; Barrett said Alchemy is getting a lot of requests for fresh, health-conscious, regular, double, triple, and even quadruple low-carb and gluten-free menu items; for IPAs. “These are thicker, richer beers,” he instance, he referenced the popularity of their flatbreads (roasted red pepper hum- said. For instance, he referenced a double mus, English cucumbers, carrots, kalamata olives with buttermilk naan). Bite-sized mashed Russian Imperial Stout, made with options such as a smoked salmon and ca- twice as much roasted barley. He indicated these beers can be a pers dip are also popular. Generally, though, food accounts for “blank canvas” for all kinds of different flavors from coffee, to coconut and chocabout 5% of its sales. “As far as beverages go, we rolled out olate, to peanut butter and chocolate. A couple beers are a take on Girl Scout a fall menu and have a fall old fashioned with cinnamon and smoked applewood cookies, such as the popular Thin Mint and Caramel Delight cookies. maple syrup,” Barrett sad.


6

• OCTOBER 2019 • The Lincoln Business Journal

• Holiday Office Parties

Experts give best suggestions for holiday party success by Dwain Hebda

Corporate holiday get-togethers can be a source of stress, making sure everyone has a good time while sticking to a budget. But it doesn’t have to be, as long as companies pay attention to the most important things. “Priority one would be food,” said Tami Nagle, corporate sales manager for Wilderness Ridge. “Priority two would be timing, because you can plan to do hors d’oeuvres or plan a meal depending on the time. You can even go a little bit later and just do hors d’oeuvres and save some money on that end.

“That also works with your budget in regard to liquor, wine, beer or bar service. If you do it in the afternoon, people aren’t going to stay and drink as much.” Nagle said food is the last place to cut corners, as it’s often the make-or-break for the event itself. “The No. 1 mistake companies make is not ordering enough food,” she said. “It makes them look bad and it makes the venue look bad.” Crystal Meister, facilities manager for Apothecary Loft and Ridnour Room, said

one element that drives up food costs is in charge; some places will charge you for the fine print dictating where the food must dishware and things like that,” she said. “We be purchased. do not, but we have found out over time that “The three main costs of an event, no there are people that do. These are hidden matter what, would be the facility cost, then costs that people are not aware of, charging the food and beverage,” she said. “We offer you for dishware, linens.” our venues on a very unique apKipper said paying attention proach. At most venues when you to such details frees up more book their space, you’re locked money for where it’s really appreinto their food options, their drink ciated, like the quality of the food. options and you have absolutely “Look at our website and no control over anything. you’ll see the cost of our food, “When companies book with plus tax and gratuity,” she said. us, they basically just book the “With others, that looks like this space from us and then they are place has a lot of cheaper food, in the driver’s seat from then on remember, our quality is excellent out and have control over everyand our service is amazing. By thing.” the time you average all that in, Meister Meister said the same goes we’re the same cost as everybody for beverages, giving clients control over else.” what’s served, in what quantities and where Other things to ask any venue you conthe beer, liquor and wine comes from. sider is the amenities your rental dollar gets “We let all of our clients control the you, said Blaine Coffey, general manager drinks,” Meister said. “If they want to go and owner of Suite One Eleven. out for their own beverages off site and bring “Never cut corners on your venue selecit in, they’re welcome to do so. They just tion,” Coffey said. “Suite One Eleven offers can’t sell it at the activity unless they have a full-service craft cocktail bar, sophisticated a liquor license.” lighting and audio equipment with in-house Tammie Kipper, general manager for DJ and party planning for different budgets. Misty’s in Havelock, said there are other “Having the expertise and seeing many elements of the fine print, which can have a different types of holiday parties, we major impact on cost. can offer ideas to help make your party “Always check to see if there is a room a success.”

Port moving from the fireside afterdinner drink to pre-dinner cocktails by Lisa Futterman

When you think of drinking port, does your mind go to a) a sessionable and sparkly aperitif (the refreshing porto tonico, or white port and tonic) that’s enjoyed before dinner all over Portugal, or b) a pink spirit that’s perfect for Dining rose-tinted cocktails? Or do you think of c) cigars and smoking jackets and autumnal colors — those traditional ruby and tawny hues — sipped neat before a glowing fireplace?

The correct answer is now d) all of the above. Siroco, a dry white port, and Croft Pink, a rosé style recently released in the U.S., in particular are delicious served solo over ice as you would vermouth. We talked to Adrian Bridge, CEO of the Fladgate Partnership in Portugal, about the newer apertivo-style ports, already popular in Europe, that are coming across the ocean to satisfy Americans’ deep thirst for spritzstyle cocktails. (The conversation has been edited for length.) Q. What about how Americans are drinking led you to believe they would be ready for apertivo-style ports? A: We used to sell Taylor Fladgate Chip Dry and Fonseca Siroco in the U.S. and decided in the late 1990s to focus only on Chip Dry. Because of cocktails, the demand has increased and it is now clear that we need to expand our offer, so we are re-introducing Siroco and Chip Dry. Croft Pink is different. We introduced this in 2008 in order to stimulate the apertivo market and give the mixologists something to work with in the bar — thus taking port out of being just in the hands of the sommelier. Its growth has demonstrated that people not only love the flavor, but also that there is a strong market for port as an aperitivo. Q. Can you compare the Siroco to Taylor Fladgate Chip Dry? Are they similar or is one drier? A. Taylor Fladgate Chip Dry is more dry, structured and rich. Fonseca is a more rounded, plumper, generous style and this shows itself well with Siroco. There is a greater fullness in the mouth. ©2019 Chicago Tribune Distributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC.


The Lincoln Business Journal • OCTOBER 2019 •

7

Nebraska Book Festival, year-round community support a testament to Lincoln booksellers’ strength by Michelle Leach

The seat of government is arguably also the state’s literary capital, as Lincoln’s collective intellectual curiosity and enthusiasm for events such as the recent Nebraska Book Festival and its inaugural Bookwalk, combine to support the local bookseller community. “The Bookwalk idea came from the Nebraska Book Festival committee as a fun, creative way to get the local bookstores involved in the promotion of the festival, as well as help community awareness of our great local bookstores,” said Rosemary Sekora, the coordinator for the fest that started in 1991 as the Nebraska Literary Festival. Sekora said the event has traveled across the state, with different organizations leading the charge; in 2015, Sekora’s University of Nebraska Press took the helm. “We’ve extended the programming to include a children’s event as well as invite regional authors with Nebraskan authors,” she said. Walkers visited participating bookstores throughout August, where a special bookmark was punched to redeem happy hour prices or book-related prizes at Zipline Brewery, culminating in the Nebraska Book Festival Sept. 7 at University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s city campus union. A retired librarian and President of the Nebraska Literary Heritage Association Board, Meredith McGowan completed the Bookwalk and acquainted herself with several bookstores for the first time, where she bought several used and new books for the NLHA’s 35th Annual Adult Spelling books fundraiser’s silent auction. As a “support group” for the Jane Pope

Geske Heritage Room of Nebraska Authors Those “good day of sales” appear to be at Bennett Martin Public Library, a service of replicated year-round, outside of special events. Lincoln City Libraries, McGowan indicated the “As with the shop small business promoNLHA itself demonstrates a unique tion in November, local bookstores contribution to literary circles. benefit from local business, too,” “I know of local history and Sekora said, noting the added draw genealogy collections in public liof “great atmospheres and people.” braries, but I am not aware of many McGowan described several public library collections that feature stores as “very active,” citing a authors from their state,” she said. number of author visits, readings Francie & Finch Bookshop and programs. owner Leslie Huerta noted how “When I visit the used bookthe Bookwalk promoted this year’s stores, there are always other people festival, an event her team has parthere at the same time,” she said. “It ticipated in for three years. is my thought that they are doing Dokken The event worked as designed; well.” every day Huerta said people came into the Huerta said Francie & Finch prides itself in shop to get bookmarks punched. sourcing books that can’t be found elsewhere, “We met a lot of new customers,” she said. unless the shopper were looking for them; A Novel Idea Bookstore owner Cinnamon translated novels to local authors, sophisticated Dokken described the bookmark as leading graphic novels to stunning coffee-table books. folks on a “treasure hunt” through Lincoln’s In-store events are a shop specialty; a movie bookseller community. has been filmed at the downtown location, a “I had to keep calling Rosemary [Sekora] paranormal investigation was hosted and a for more,” she said. “It was a great lead-up to monthly Journal Club helps patrons discover the Nebraska Book Festival.” live music from an assortment of performers. Dokken said the store filled the elevator “Foot traffic is great but still we are limited at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln student in the number of customers that happen upon union, wheeling in tubs of books, wooden us,” she said. “So, it is vital that we create crates, wire racks, mannequins and tiny suit- our own opportunities to get more folks into cases to give people a taste of their permanent the shop and also to sell outside of these four location in a pop-up shop. Books signed by walls.” Mari Sandoz and Jimmy Carter joined Novel Community-building events on the horizon Idea merchandise. include “Shop the Blocks,” which incorporates Dokken said she didn’t expect to sell any- all downtown businesses. thing. She just wanted to support the event, and A Novel Idea hosts a Thank You Tuesday advertise its “real shop.” philanthropy program to support organizations “We had a very good day of sales,” she said. such as Nebraska Transition College, which

helps youth with autism, and Heartland Books for Prisoners, which helps incarcerated people develop a love of learning. Dokken said the existence of several quality independent bookstores (Novel Idea alone is in its 29th year), is a credit to the way Lincoln values learning and local businesses. “Lincoln is an intellectually-curious and socially-conscious community,” she said. “There are people whose parents used to bring them into the shop as infants. We would greet them with open arms and hold those babies while their parents shopped.” Now, Dokken said, those babies are grown up. “They hand us their babies when then come into the bookstore,” she said. “It's a wonderful feeling to be a part of people's lives in this way.” In the past three decades, several episodes seemingly threatened local bookstores. First, Barnes and Noble opened on O Street. “B&N just added more new books to the market and gave us wider choices for better used-book inventory,” she said. “Then, there was the Internet. Again, more books became available to us — and we began selling books online, gaining a wider market.” After that, e-readers — yet, physical books held a charm absent from an electronic medium. “People come into our shop because the human connection is meaningful to them,” Dokken said. “We are able to recommend books that are just the right thing at the right time. People come to our shop because they can forget about their stresses and be in a world where they are surrounded by ideas and stories. They can hand us their babies, pet our cats and discover new things.”


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• OCTOBER 2019 • The Lincoln Business Journal

BLUEPRINTS A section prepared by the staff of the Lincoln Business Journal

October 2019

Repurposed spaces, infrastructure breathe new life downtown and communitywide by Michelle Leach

From the refashioning of a historic farm implements structure into housing units, to updating aging infrastructure, and momentum with the Downtown Master Plan, a myriad of projects are reshaping the city core and farther afield. “A lot of the accomplishments of the past year related to the Downtown Master Plan are getting a number of studies underway that will, when completed, provide the detailed implementation strategies for the Music District concept, the Cultural District concept, the potential conversion of some one-way streets to two-way streets, and streetscaping plans for several downtown streets,” said Lincoln-Lancaster County Planning Department Planning Director David R. Cary. “There also

and rebuilding them is costly in has been specific design work on the core.” the West Park catalyst project in Furthermore, Marvin referred West Haymarket. And the TIF (Tax to a situation where communities Increment Financing) projects that may grow like a “donut, leaving a are moving forward … they are hole in the middle of the city due helping implement incrementally to the additional costs.” the concepts in the Downtown He indicated the Huber will Master Plan.” help to keep downtown alive when Those TIF projects include the repurposed with residential units Huber Building at 803 Q St. on the second floor of the building. “That building was built in Marvin also addressed an1905 and it was a farm equipment Porter other TIF project, the Nebraska machinery company, and that was not a use going on in the Haymarket Innovation Campus hotel and plans for an anymore,” said City of Lincoln-Urban De- office building. “A teaching function was carved out velopment Department Director Dan Marvin. “The idea is that, as your city grows, you want with hospitality education,” he said, a nod to repurpose [buildings]. Tearing them down to opportunities for students to get hands-on learning at the Marriott-affiliated property. “All of these [projects] have transformative aspects to them.” He referred to the explosion of growth in downtown living — condos and student housing — around 10 years on since the approval of the Pinnacle Bank Arena, as well as synergistic developments (restaurants, a downtown grocery store). A number of opportunities are available for redevelopment in the growing areas south of N in the Haymarket. Cary described the Downtown Master Plan update as taking the arena and West Haymarket development to “another level.” “The new Downtown Master Plan sets the stage for this by identifying new catalyst projects that build off these advancements in the downtown,” he said. The strategy put forth injects a “significant amount of new residential development,” Cary said. “And, with that, lays out a strategy for creating an urban neighborhood that people will want to live in,” he said. “The most significant part of this strategy is planning for and creating a significant amount of green space in the downtown. This concept is represented by the West Park and linear green space catalyst projects in the plan.” The use of aforementioned TIF with redevelopment provides an opportunity to implement some of the plan’s concepts, such as improved streetscapes and pedestrian experiences along sidewalks where new development is happening. “A portion of the increment created by more value from the projects can be used to invest in the public improvements highlighted in the Downtown Master Plan,” Cary said. When asked for key Lincoln Electric

System projects, Customer and Corporate Communications Manager Kelley Porter said it’s soon to complete its Duct Installation Project. “Launched in 2012, LES and its contractors installed duct adjacent to the existing cable that is 30 years or older using directional boring,” she said. “The need for this project arose following a study of how to best address the aging underground cable system.” Porter said, in Lincoln, there are around 600 miles of cable aged 30 years and older without a spare duct. “By installing spare duct underground, the project addresses the issue of underground distribution cable reaching the end of its useful life, prepares for the cable replacement and maintains our system reliability,” she said. “The Duct Installation Project will be completed in 2020.” Over the near term, within the next few years, Cary said plan efforts may include implementing the West Park green space, the conversion of the final few blocks of 13th Street into a two-way street with bike lanes to make a continuous two-way from University of Nebraska-Lincoln through Downtown and the Near South neighborhood, and a “freshening up” of O Street with streetscape treatment and removing and replacing ash trees. “There also are a number of housing projects either underway or coming through the approval process that will help implement the increase in downtown living units strategy,” he said.

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• OCTOBER 2019 • The Lincoln Business Journal

Retirement A section prepared by the staff of the Lincoln Business Journal

October 2019

Growing senior population, care giver shortage challenge retirement industry by David Kubicek

Since 2010, the population of Nebraskans age 65 and older has increased by 30%, which is straining the systems that support older adults such as medical care, housing and transportation. “This large increase in the senior population is causing an increased market demand for independent living, assisted living and memory care,” said Aging Partners Director Randall S. Jones. Compounding this challenge is that between 2015 and 2050, the number of Nebraskans age 85 and older is projected to nearly triple, from 42,000 to 121,000, a jump from 2% to 5% of the U.S. population, and by 2025 Nebraska’s nursing shortage is expected to increase by 34%, according to Joyce Ebmeier, senior vice president of strategic planning for Tabitha. On the positive side, the private sector has increasingly focused on creating tools and solutions for seniors, Jones said.

Jones Ebmeier Many of these include the use of new technology like telemedicine, wrist-wearing technology that measures blood pressure and also notifies emergency centers when someone has fallen and GPS for locating Alzheimer’s patients who may wander from home or a facility. There’s a shift in the industry away from lo-

Knecht Dykeman-Schoening cal providers, according to Jennifer Knecht, vice president of marketing and sales for Immanuel Communities. “Many senior and retirement communities in the area are being run by for-profit investors who operate chains all over the country,” she said. “This causes a sharp disconnect between resident

needs and profit-driven corporate decisions.” The new generation of retirees, the baby boomers, see retirement differently than their predecessors. They want tailored choices, intuitive amenities, a chance to re-define themselves and find new purpose. “This new generation of retirees is well informed,” Knecht said. “They’ve done their research, they’ve explored communities online, they really do want to make the best choice for themselves when it comes to living well for years to come.” Ebmeier said Nebraska’s nursing facilities are being closed down at an unprecedented rate due to funding shortfalls. “This year alone a staggering 15 facilities have closed,” she said. “Even worse is that these closings often come following a change in ownership from a local Nebraska entity to an out-ofContinued on next page.


The Lincoln Business Journal • OCTOBER 2019 •

Health care industry is focused on healthy living initiatives by Gabby Christensen

Health care professionals across the city agree that there are substantial changes happening in the industry right now. As the health care industry moves toward a value-based system, Kylie Ensrud, chief people officer at Alivation Health, said keeping people healthy and out of the hospital will be crucial. Ensrud said there will be a significant shift from treating symptoms and illness to driving preventative care and overall wellness. “We are currently working on new wellness options that once available, will provide a new way for people to reach their best self,” Ensrud said. “It is always our goal to provide the most comprehensive and accessible care possible. In doing so, we are continuing to grow in our ability to serve more patients through integrated care.” Ensrud said the organization has also implemented an incentive that rewards people for participating in company-provided health screenings and attaining or improving their results. “Wellness programs like this have become popular among employers because they are successful at improving people's health and helping to control rising health care costs,” Ensrud said. As the baby boomer population rises, Karla

Hudson, associate executive director for the Downtown YMCA, said the industry is realizing an influx of middle-aged and older adults seeking wellness opportunities to maintain and improve their health. “The Lincoln Y has partnered with a number

Melissa Walker, health and wellness program director at the Fallbrook YMCA, said the YMCA of Lincoln also offers a “Know Your Numbers” goal setting session whereby an individual meets with a wellness specialist to assess weight, percent of body fat, body mass index, resting heart rate

Ensrud Hudson of corporate groups to bring wellness opportunities through the workplace,” Hudson said. “We have recently collaborated with Arbor Day Foundation and the Lincoln Police Department with a 90-day wellness challenge for their employees this fall. Additionally, employees from KidGlov enjoy a monthly yoga class at the Y together, helping them build team morale and decompress together.”

Walker Rauner and blood pressure. “We coach the individual on those results identifying any risk factors and discuss goals to either maintain current healthy habits, transition into a healthier lifestyle or seek medical advice,” Walker said. Doug Wyatt, executive administrator at Lincoln Orthopaedic Center, said the Center continues

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to grow with the addition of two new physicians, Dr. Brad Webb and Dr. Ben Woodhead. “This year Lincoln Orthopaedic Center (LOC) celebrates 20 years since opening their Ambulatory Surgery Center (LOC Surgery Center),” Wyatt said. “With the changes in health care and patients having to pay higher premiums and more costs out of their pockets, providing a safe and less expensive option to hospital facility charges has been a benefit to the patients at Lincoln Orthopaedic Center who qualify to have their surgery done as in outpatient at LOC Surgery Center,” Wyatt said. Dr. Bob Rauner, president of the Partnership for a Healthy Lincoln, said the organization recently received a five year CDC grant to help combat health disparities in Lincoln. According to Rauner, the U.S. spends more money on health care than any other country in the world, even though the performance isn’t as ideal. However, Rauner said the formation of accountable care organizations will improve the current outlook by remaining accountable to patients and third-party payers for the quality and efficiency of the health care provided. “Right now, there are eight active organizations in Nebraska,” Rauner said. “This will certainly help to change the dynamic of health care and end up saving people money and keeping them healthier.” Rauner said another hot topic right now is price transparency. “In Nebraska, I have seen hospital prices varying from two to 10 times what Medicare would pay,” Rauner said. “Patients do not know how much the cost of services will be until they receive their bill. This is intentionally hidden from people and I think once this topic receives more traction, we’ll start to see a healthier country.”

Retirement industry Continued from preceding page. state, profit-incentivized multi-facility owner.” Tabitha, which provides a high percentage of its services to seniors who rely on Medicaid, begins each year with a more than $1 million deficit because the Medicaid program falls short of paying for the cost of providing care. “Changes currently proposed by Nebraska’s Division of Medicaid will significantly reduce funding essential to keeping locally owned, notfor-profit nursing home doors open in both rural and urban communities,” Ebmeier said. “The proposed cuts are planned to go into effect next year and would reduce Tabitha’s Medicaid funding by an additional $1.6 million dollars annually.” Kristine Dykeman-Schoening, director of development for Bridge to a Better Living, said that due to Medicare initiatives, seniors who had been hospitalized are going home more quickly rather than first being transferred to skilled nursing home facilities. “With 10,000 seniors turning 65 each day in the U.S., businesses must buckle down to decide how to best serve seniors,” she said. “We’re seeing Medicare and Medicaid tightening their dollars. Just [recently] we heard an announcement that four nursing homes in rural Nebraska are potentially closing due to funding shortages.” There’s a movement of private pay among retirees going into senior living communities because many of the communities being built today don’t accept Medicaid or only limited Medicaid. “We’re seeing lots of senior living communities built right now,” Dykeman-Schoening said. “I think that will continue for several years and then level out. We’ll see an explosion in home health care and an increase in the use of technology like telemedicine which will allow us to better serve rural Nebraska.”


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• OCTOBER 2019 • The Lincoln Business Journal

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Midlands Business Journal October 18, 2019 Vol. 45 No. 42 issue  

The Midlands Business Journal is a weekly news publication based in Omaha, Nebraska featuring in-depth business coverage of the Greater Omah...

Midlands Business Journal October 18, 2019 Vol. 45 No. 42 issue  

The Midlands Business Journal is a weekly news publication based in Omaha, Nebraska featuring in-depth business coverage of the Greater Omah...

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