Page 1

FEBRUARY 2018

Common Malfunctions of

Refrigerated Trucks

and What To Do About Them

ICE Also Inside

Convenience Stores Go To The Future With Amazon Go, Thibault Joins AIS, AND MUCH MORE!


February 2018 Vol. 201 │ No. 2 ISSN #0034-3137

EDITORIAL STAFF Editor/Publisher Mary Y. Cronley refrigerationmag@gmail.com (404) 819-5446 Senior Staff Writer Joe Cronley cronley.joe@gmail.com (404) 295-5712

19 6

Postmaster: Send notice by form 3579 to: Refrigeration Magazine 2930 Cedar Knoll Drive Roswell, GA 30076 Annual Subscriptions: US: $49/year or $79/two years International: $79/year Single Copies: $6/copy

Copyright © 2018 by REFRIGERATION Magazine™. All rights reserved.

WHAT'S AHEAD

6 Inside Amazon Go: The camera-filled convenience store that watches your back

11 Beverages and Snacks Dominate Amazon Grocery Sales: One-click retail Amazon Grocery 2017 Review

21 Walmart Reportedly Developing Cashier-less Store Model

12 12 

FEATURES Eight Common Malfunctions Refrigerated Trucks Make and What To Do To Prevent Them

Mary Y. Cronley Editor/Publisher refrigerationmag@gmail.com (404) 819-5446 Established as ICE in 1906, Refrigeration Magazine™ is published thirteen times a year, including the Annual Buyer's Guide.

6

FEATURES

Art Direction Markurious Marketing info@markurious.com (678) 439-6534

ADVERTISING, SUBSCRIPTIONS, ACCOUNTS

18

17 Convenience Store Trends Can Drive Packaged Ice 19 Top Seven Food and Beverage Trends for 2018

18

INDUSTRY NEWS TIBOPAK Joins the AIS Team

DEPARTMENTS

4 spICE

Too Late For The Big Plan, But Just In Time For The Fine Tune

22 AD INDEX

A list of our advertisers

22 CLASSIFIED ADS

Classified advertisements by region

FIND OUT MORE AT refrigeration-magazine.com OR CONNECT WITH US AT facebook.com/refrigeration-magazine

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 3


spICE

F

Too Late For The Big Plan, But Just In Time For The Fine Tune February and August are dangerous months for the packaged ice producer. In August you’re at the end of your season, you can pretty reliably say whether it has been a good year or bad. This is with an exception to you in hurricane prone areas – a lot of bad stuff can happen before November that will take away your wonderful season. Most parts of the country, though, will go into the off season formulating plans for the next year, whether they involve only maintenance or perhaps a larger renovation or expansion. February is a month in which you know things will happen soon, and you may have the urge to push to make them happen sooner. If you do have plant renovations going on, they are hopefully on schedule and on budget. Your lender wants to know that you’re on top of the job and able to complete it as planned. February is not the month to come up with new big plans. It’s a great month to fine tune your program for the summer, whether it’s hiring seasonal help, improving the way your drivers and other staff interact with customers, or put a program in place to maximize route efficiency. These don’t require downtime or a complete revamp of your systems. It’s a great month to go ahead and buy that new truck or bring the fleet in for annual maintenance. Don’t let the antsy feelings of waiting for that first warm weekend push you into moving too fast to change something that requires substantial planning and downtime. We’ve heard too many stories of plant upgrades still incomplete as March and April roll around, and producers trucking in product from hundreds of miles away. Usually, the renovations started in October or November and were pushed back by a series of Murphy’s Law incidents. Many of you have experienced this firsthand. If a well planned and executed renovation can be delayed by months, just imagine how badly a last minute plan could go. Many of us mark the progress of Springtime by the sure signs of spring flowers: daffodils, tulips and crocus always appear early in the season. Even more than the groundhog, they point to warmer days. Try and bear in mind, though, that for all of those flowers to pop, the bulbs need to be in the ground before the fall freezes. They don’t get there overnight. Here’s hoping that daffodils and tulips will be poking through the snow or the leaves soon in your town. Soon afterwards, your routes will be calling for full merchandisers, your production lines will be humming full time, and you’ll be so deep in it you’ll think November can’t come soon enough. Ka-ching.

Happy Reading!

Mary Yopp Cronley

Editor, Refrigeration Magazine

4 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018

"February is not the month to come up with new big plans. It’s a great month to fine tune your program for the summer, whether it’s hiring seasonal help, improving the way your drivers and other staff interact with customers, or put a program in place to maximize route efficiency. "


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SANITATION

inside amazon go The camera-filled convenience store that watches your back By Drew Harwell and Abha Bhattara

T

he retail giant Amazon.com opened a new convenience store to the public on January 21, 2018 with none of the hurdles of a traditional supermarket: At Amazon Go in Seattle, there are no cashiers, shopping carts or checkout lines to slow shoppers down. But there’s a trade-off. In this store, the shoppers are on display, too, tracked by hundreds of cameras and sensors from the first swipe of their phone to their last step out the door.

6 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018


WHAT'S AHEAD

The futuristic grab-and-go market represents a test of new technology that could soon spread nationwide, as Amazon and other grocery giants seek to win business from shoppers craving selection, ease and speed. “The number one problem for people is time poverty,” said Dilip Kumar, vice president of technology for Amazon Go, while standing in the store during its grand public opening. “People want good food fast, and they want it to be convenient.” The store relies on a vast and sophisticated datagathering operation to transform the shopping experience, and privacy experts worry that Americans may not fully understand what they’re giving away in every aisle. “It’s not just the transaction,” said Danielle Citron, a law professor and privacy expert at the University of Maryland’s law school. “Powerful companies like Amazon don’t just have what you bought at the grocery store, but they’re also connected with and combined with nearly every aspect of your life,” including where people live and what they buy, read and watch. Shoppers walking into the store scan their phone on a subway-station-like turnstile, connecting their presence in the store (as well as their family members or other fellow shoppers) with their Amazon profile. (Amazon chief executive Jeffrey P. Bezos also owns The Washington Post.) The boxy, black cameras in the ceilings don’t have the look of classic surveillance cameras — a benefit, some said, given that hundreds of them blanket the 1,800-square-foot space — but they operate in a similar way, tracking shoppers’ movement and what items they pick up or put back down. The store’s cameras include infrared sensors, but the company says it does not employ facial recognition.

The number on problem for people is time poverty... People want good food fast, and they want it to convenient. Dilip Kumar Vice President of Technology for Amazon Go REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 7


Some items have large, camera-friendly

vision figures out which items are taken.

for America’s second-most common

codes to help the cameras understand

Machine-learning algorithms also

job: About 3.5 million Americans work

which items have been grabbed; the

determine which item it is.”

as cashiers nationwide, federal data

computers combine that information

John Verdi, the vice president of policy

show. Amazon and other retailers say

with data from weight sensors installed in

at the Future of Privacy Forum, a think

employees will work on different tasks,

every shelf.

tank that counts Amazon among

including helping guide shoppers to the

its corporate donors, said the data

right items. Amazon Go’s few employees

When shoppers are done, they simply

collected by Amazon’s store is no more

check drivers’ licenses for alcohol sales,

walk back out through the porcelain-

than what most people give away at

stock shelves or prepare meal kits like a

white turnstiles — and their phone

other supermarkets by using their loyalty

$19.99 salmon donburi plate.

updates with a receipt, along with

and credit cards.

a “trip timer” telling them how many

“Grocery stores work on a very thin

seconds they spent on the shopping trip.

“Are consumers comfortable with that

margin, so a cashier-less store is

The process was so breezy that first-day

level of data collection and use? I

financially very appealing for the

shoppers like Harriet McClain said it felt

suspect many are,” he said.

industry,” said Ryan Hamilton, a professor

“like shoplifting.”

at Emory University’s Goizueta Business Alvaro Bedoya, the executive director

School. “This has the potential to cause

“Even in a small town, people shoplift,”

of the Center on Privacy & Technology

as much upheaval to cashier jobs as self-

McClain said, before motioning toward

at Georgetown University’s law school,

driving cars could to truck drivers and

the overhead cameras. “But a local

said “it’s highly likely” that Amazon Go

taxi drivers.”

grocery store could never afford to put

collects “more information than any

in this kind of stuff.”

retail setting out there now.”

Amazon has not shared details on the

“When you shop with a discount card,

Amazon redefine one of retail’s core

methods involved in its “Just Walk Out”

you know what information the store’s

moneymakers, impulse buying, by

technology, but says it mimics some of

collecting,” namely what things you

eliminating the few lingering barriers

the techniques seen in self-driving cars,

just bought, Bedoya said. “But Amazon

that might make shoppers rethink

including machine-learning systems that

is tracking you throughout the store.

what’s in their bag — a process Amazon

improve over time, as well as computer

Are they really only tracking you when

has already mastered online through

vision, the image-processing technology

you lift the item off a shelf? Or are they

techniques like one-click purchasing.

used in Facebook photo tags.

tracking where you move throughout

But the store’s format, consumer psychologists said, could also help

“The majority of sensing is from above,”

the store, what you’re looking at, what

“The less time we have to think about

sections you’re dwelling in?”

how much we’re spending, the more

said Kumar, the Amazon Go executive.

removed we are from the process,” said

“Cameras figure out which interactions

If the cashier-free technology expands,

Kit Yarrow, a professor of psychology

you have with the shelves. Computer

the stores could deeply erode the need

and marketing at Golden Gate University. “What Amazon Go does is take away all of the negatives. It

Grocery stores work on a very thin margin, so a cashier-less store is financially very appealing for the industry... This has the potential to cause as much upheaval to the cashier jobs as self-driving cars could to truck drivers and taxi drivers. Ryan Hamilton Professor at Emory University Goizueta Business School

8 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018

doesn’t give you time to consider how much you’ll be spending or how that will impact your budget. It puts all of the emphasis on the pleasure of what we’re consuming in that moment.” Amazon has not shared any plans of a nationwide rollout, though some analysts expect it: The company now runs roughly a dozen brick-and-mortar bookstores and spent $13.7 billion last


SANITATION

year buying hundreds of Whole Foods

nonprofit Center for Democracy &

But most of those who showed up were

grocery stores nationwide.

Technology. “You now have a full

fascinated. Jing Chou, 26, a University

record of everything you’ve purchased

of Washington engineering student from

The company will likely have competition

— but it’s going to exist for all time, and

the city of Changsha in southern China,

from retail giants like Walmart and

it’s going to be owned by Amazon.”

and a fellow student from Beijing spent

Kroger, America’s largest stand-alone

much of their Monday-morning visit

grocery chain, which are rolling out or

The first day of shopping brought out

snapping photos of the shelves, trying to

planning ways in hundreds of stores for

some demonstrators, including Joy

figure out how Amazon did it.

shoppers to skip the cashier by, say,

Carter of Seattle, who wore a cat mask,

scanning their items with their phone.

she said, to avoid the cameras.

They noted how their home country has similar cashier-less stores, but shoppers

Privacy experts say Amazon will likely

“We’re rejecting the future they’re

there have to meticulously scan each

face questions about what data they’re

imposing on us,” Carter said. “This

item before leaving. “I want to know

gathering on shoppers if the technology

grocery store is a fantasy like there’s

how they track it,” Chou said, gazing at

continues to grow.

innovation here. But the implications

the ceiling cameras. “And if you bring

are that the workforce is split into two

something back, how they know.”

“It’s really blurring our offline and online

classes: the people making $100,000

lives together,” said Joseph Jerome,

and up and others who have to scrape

policy counsel for the Washington

to survive.

Julia Duin contributed from Seattle.

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 9


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10 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018


WHAT'S AHEAD

Beverages & Snack Foods

DO MIN ATE

Amazon's Grocery Sales One Click Retail Amazon Grocery 2017 Review In 2017, Amazon earned 18 percent of U.S. online grocery sales, valued at $2 billion, according to Sandy, Utah-based ecommerce solutions firm One Click Retail’s latest report, "Amazon Grocery 2017 Review." According to the report, Amazon saw cold beverage sales — driven by bottled water and sports/energy drinks — and coffee — driven by disposable pods — earn more than double the next leading categories, with cold beverages increasing 65 percent year over year. Nonperishables continue to dominate Amazon's grocery sales, evidenced by the remaining top categories: snack foods, breakfast foods, and candy and gum.

Other findings include:

• Weekly sales of Amazon Fresh more than doubled over the course of the year, rising from $3 million to more than $7 million in 2017, to reach an estimated sales total of $350 million in total sales. Dairy drew the highest sales by value, estimated at $85 million, while most of the top Fresh items were fruit and vegetables. • "Organic" was a key search term, with roughly 25 percent of all Amazon Fresh sales going to products with the word in their titles. • AmazonBasics held the No. 1 spot among bestselling private labels, with Whole Food Market's 365 Everyday Value brand taking the No. 2 spot. • The Seattle-based ecommerce giant also saw growth of more than 50 percent in its two other biggest markets: the United Kingdom and Germany. REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 11


COMMON MALFUNCTIONS Refrigerated Trucks Make AND WHAT TO DO TO PREVENT THEM Refrigerated trucks are complex machines; there are many parts that need to be working correctly for them to function as designed. So, we wanted to expand your knowledge in this area by looking at some of the most common malfunctions that refrigerated trucks face, and what can be done to prevent them. Preventing malfunctions will reduce your downtime and service fees and leave that money on your bottom line.

ICE

8 SENSOR MALFUNCTIONS

Sensors in the refrigeration unit need to be calibrated and working. For example, If the return air sensor is damaged or malfunctioning, it will cause inaccurate readings of temperatures; these temperatures will also be incorrect on the display reading. Like faulty calibration, this is one area that may go unnoticed for some time. A driver may think everything is good with a load, but if the sensor is broken, they will have no way of knowing if there is an issue. Make sure that this area is also checked when your refrigerated truck is serviced, and take care of the issue as soon as you notice a problem.

Give your trucks a thorough pre-season inspection or get them to your service center. Downtime is doubly costly: you lose product and can’t run your routes, plus you pay for repairs.

12 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018

7

DOOR SEALS DAMAGED

Door Seals Damaged – the doors of a refrigerated truck need to have a complete seal on them to contain the ambient temperature in the trailer. For example, if the door hinges are broken, the seal on the trailer will be affected. Drivers should make sure that they examine their trailer door hinges and test that the door seals completely when closed prior to each trip.


FEATURE

DAMAGED AIR CHUTE

On all loads, it is recommended that that air chute be installed, with no compression or interference. As ice is loaded in and out of the truck, it is very easy for a chute to become damaged. Rips and tears in a chute are common occurrence, and the result is improper air distribution and flow from the reefer unit to the rest of the truck. This will create cool and warm spots in the trailer, and potentially allow melt and/or refreeze. Drivers should examine their air chutes on a regular basis to ensure they are intact.

2

1

3

E

CONDENSER ISSUES

The condenser is one of the key components to the refrigeration unit. If there are any kind of issues in the condenser, they will surely affect the load. Examples of issues are broken or damaged coils, clamps or bolts missing, and leaks.

BLOCKED BULKHEAD

If you bulkhead your trucks to reduce load as your route is run, a blocked bulkhead can affect the temperature at different areas in a trailer. Blockages can cause freezing or melt near the bulkhead. Drivers should make sure all air passages are clean, and periodically remove the bulkhead and make sure the airways are clean and free of debris.

4 FLUID LEAKS

This is a common malfunction mainly because there are so many working parts and different types of fluids in a reefer unit. Most common leaks include engine oil and coolant (for example, coolant leaking from your reefer’s equalizer tube). Keep your unit on its maintenance schedule and get into a service center as soon as you see a leak of any kind to prevent further issues due to leaking fluids.

6 FAULTY BELTS & HOSES

Ccracks, tears, and wear on belts and hoses can affect the reefer’s performance; it may have to work overtime to accommodate the wear, and might not cool effectively if there is, for example, a crack or hole in a cooling hose. Examine the condition of the belts and hoses related to your reefer unit as part of your regular inspection.

5

FAULTY CALIBRATION

In some ways, this malfunction could be the most dangerous as it may go unnoticed. A driver may think everything is fine with his reefer, but in fact, it is out of calibration. A non-calibrated reefer can cool at a slower or faster rate than desired. Make sure that your reefer’s calibration is checked at each service interval. REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 13


REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 15


16 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018


FEATURE

CONVENIENCE STORE TRENDS CAN DRIVE PACKAGED ICE

T

he top tier of the convenience store industry is working hard to change its image. It only takes a trip around town to look at new stores and a trip inside to see a retail environment more like Whole Foods than the neighborhood market. Remember, this is an industry that the ice industry literally invented when the Southland Ice Company in Dallas started carrying milk and eggs at its neighborhood ice sales stop. Their history is our history. We’re their number one vendor-supplied profit item, and only barely behind their high cost hot food and cold fountain drink segments. So trends in the c-store industry should be important to us. Professionalism and inviting image are top of the list, according to the National Association of Convenience Stores. In some cities, chains such as #3 Speedway (2,800 stores), #11 Quik Trip (740 stores) and #20 RaceTrac (430 stores) are engaged in a building spree, erecting new stores across their market, including innovations such as no-parking, no-gas downtown locations. These new locations are staffed by newly trained, well compensated, uniformed, enthusiastic staff. There aren’t any plexiglass bullet shields. The stores are clean and customers can depend on rotation of the hot foods and coffee. Some have small kitchens with made to order pizza and other foods. The Whole Foods comparison may not be too close, but they’re a lot closer to that standard than they are to a dingy, cluttered place to buy beer, smokes and lottery tickets.

What does this mean for packaged ice? A couple of ideas come to mind: FIXTURES A store with a new location will want a new, clean merchandiser, and should be willing to pay for it. Some chains are now buying their own fixture for uniformity, and at least one is even using All Over Media wraps to make a brick facing on the merchandiser, allowing it to blend into the front wall of the store. DELIVERY IMAGE Do your trucks look like they belong at a brand new store? Even if you clean daily with food grade disinfectant inside the truck, if the outside is dirty or requires cosmetic maintenance, you’re detracting from the c-store’s overall goal. Graphics are important as well. YOUR DRIVER Are your drivers uniformed? Their staff is. Do they smoke in the truck or on the job? Their staff doesn’t. Are they customer service trained, and periodically tested? Their staff is. If you want to be part of their sales, you should strive to meet their image. Every other Direct Store Delivery vendor the c-store relies on – Cigarettes, beer, food vendors – is sending people to corporate and into the stores to help with merchandising and profitability. If you make sure your stores know you are working to help them, you make yourself a partner in the store’s profitability. You are that partner, whether you embrace the role or not. REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 17


INDUSTRY NEWS

TIBOPAK Joins the AIS Team

Gabriel Thibault, owner and operator of TIBOPAK (left) and Doug Carpenter, President of AIS.

T

he new year brings with it continued growth

superior solutions for most market challenges.

for Automatic ICE™ Systems. TIBOPAK has

Gabriel Thibault has brought quality packaging

recently joined the AIS team of professionals

solutions to the ice market for over 15 years.

and will serve as their new Northeastern Region

He is an expert with flexible packaging and

Representative.

understands the unique needs of packaged ice producers. This understanding also comes from

Doug Carpenter, President of AIS, is excited

his first-hand experience in the industry. Gabriel’s

to have Gabriel Thibault, owner and operator

family owned and operated an ice company

of TIBOPAK, bring packaged ice producers

for three generations in Montreal, Canada. The

throughout the Northeast their value-added

family business may have been sold, but his

products and services. “AIS has seen great

passion for the ice industry continues at TIBOPAK.

success supporting and growing ice producers throughout most of the country, and we feel that

A good relationship starts with a great fit. AIS

Gabriel’s presence in the northeast will open the

has a proven track record with over 100 major

door to new client opportunities,” stated Doug.

projects completed over the last five years, while TIBOPAK brings its strong experience with the

AIS understands that each region has its unique

Northeast packaged ice market. Both companies

challenges and concerns; however, with market

share the same vision and are focused on

experience throughout North, Central, and South

bringing value and innovations to the market.

America, as well as, Europe, Australia, Asia, and the Middle East, they believe that they can offer

18 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018


FEATURE Ice is food, right? That’s what we’ve been selling for 20+ years. And, since many of your businesses have a significant customer base in providing ice extra production for the food & beverage industry, it helps to have a good feel for where things are going. The restaurant business is fickle, here today, gone tomorrow, so with this qualification we give you...

Food and restaurant consultants Baum+Whiteman “Hottest Trends That Will Take Over The Food And Beverage Industry This Year.” 1. PLANT-BASED FOODS GO MAINSTREAM.

7

TOP

FOOD & BEVERAGE TRENDS FOR 2018 by Jessica Montevago, TravelMarketReport.com

As consumers – mainly Millennials, Gen X, and Gen Z – shift to plant-based diets, restaurants are meeting the growing demand for meatless dishes. According to market research firm Mintel, between 2012 and 2016 there has been a 25 percent increase in vegetarian claims and a 257 percent rise in vegan claims in new products in grocery stores. Expect to see more restaurants offering options like vegan cheese for burgers and pizza, meatless entrees like the popular Impossible Burger, or vegan frozen desserts.

2. THREE NEXT-WAVE CUISINES FROM UNEXPECTED DESTINATIONS.

From the Philippines, expect to see more dishes like lumpia, sisig, longganisa, and kare-kare as Google searches for Filipino food have doubled since 2012, Baum+Whiteman said. Indian food offerings will move beyond the standard curry towards fast-casual street food, with options like tandoori chicken poutine or spicy lamb burritos or chicken masala pizza. Upscale Korean restaurants are the next big thing, incorporating fermented food, umami, and lots of spice into complex dishes.

3. THE AVOCADO TOAST CRAZE ISN’T GOING AWAY JUST YET. The popular dish from 2017 will live on into next year, but restaurants are going artsy with the avocado dishes.

4. “FLAVOR INJECTORS” MIX THINGS UP.

Sweet and spicy flavor make unexpected appearances in food, from Sriracha mayonnaise to jelly-swirled Nutella into sushi and donuts.

5. ONE-ITEM RESTAURANTS MAKE A COMEBACK.

Quirky restaurant concepts are popping up all over the U.S. – think Pokeonly eateries or bacon-dedicated shops. Baum+Whiteman highlighted an all-cream cheese restaurant that opened earlier this year in New York's East Village; and XO Marshmallow Cafe in Chicago, serving marshmallow-based variations on s'mores, lattes and affogatos (a coffee-based dessert).

6. THE NEXT RAMEN.

A broth-less version of ramen, mazemen is a noodle dish topped with traditional or unconventional flavors, including bacon and eggs; chili oil and tahini; or pork.

7. LIQUORED UP DESSERTS.

Part alcoholic beverage, part frozen dessert, these new concoctions are popping up everywhere from Disney Springs serving red wine slushies, to Suga and Ice in Georgia with its strawberries and champagne ice cream. Other popular options include boozy popsicles and Frose (frozen Rose). REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 19


ASSOCIATIONS

MISSOURI VALLEY ICE MANUFACTURER’S ASSOCIATION Board of Directors and Officers NAME

TITLE/TERM

COMPANY

CITY

PHONE

Jeff Messerschmitt

President

Messerschmitt Ice

Ottumwa, IA

641-684-6207

Jerry Burns

Vice President

J & K Delta Ice

W. Memphis, AR

870-735-1352

Jeff Tyler

Treasurer

Tyler's Super Quality Ice

Tyler, TX

903-597-8245

Tom Howat

Secretary

Modern Ice

St. Peters, MO

800-235-9088

Tony Dickson

2017-2021

Olmsted Ice

Olmsted TWP, OH

440-23-8411

Terry Triller

2017-2021

TNT Plastics, Inc.

Perryville, MO

573-547-1051

Tommy Sedler

2015-2020

Home City Ice

Cincinnati, OH

513-574-1800

John Whitmer

2015-2020

Vogt Ice

Louisville, KY

800-853-8648

Saad Abbo

2014-2019

U.S. Ice Corporation

Detroit, MI

313-862-3344

Brett Beeksma

2014-2019

Arctic Ice LLC

Ashland, WI

715-682-5108

Laron Hilke

2013-2018

Hilke's Ice Co.

Freeburg, MO

573-744-5500

Walter Berry

2013-2018

Berry's Arctic Ice

Topeka, KS

785-357-4466

Leer, Inc.

New Lisbon, WI

815-505-1342

Bags, Inc.

Oklahoma City, OK

800-622-2470

OFFICERS 2017 – 2018

DIRECTORS

SUPPLIER REPRESENTATIVE Charlotte Maginnis

2016-2018

IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT Scott Currie

20 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018


WHAT'S AHEAD

Walmart Reportedly Developing Cashierless Store Model Innovation continues across all channels of retail. Now Walmart Stores Inc., soon to be known as Walmart Inc., are testing a future without cashiers. According to Recode, the retailer's startup incubator, Store No. 8, is working on an initiative known as Project Kepler. The project looks to reshape the in-store shopping experience with the help of technology. Sources familiar with Project Kepler said the goal is to create a physical store without a checkout line or cashiers, similar to Amazon's Amazon Go store. In Amazon Go, which has seen its debut delayed, a combination of technologies adds items customers pick up to their virtual cart. Anything returned to the shelf will be deleted from the virtual cart, as CSNews Online previously reported. A Walmart spokesperson declined to comment to Recode. The Bentonville, Ark.-based retailer's new subsidiary, Code Eight, is also testing a personal shopping service in New York. The goal is for busy customers to get product recommendations and make purchases through text messaging, Recode reported. The target customer of Code Eight is described in an online job listing as a "high-net worth urban consumer," the outlet added.

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 21


AD INDEX

Ad Index

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING

American Ice Equipment Exchange, aieexchange.com............................ 21 & 23 Classified Ads....................................................................................................... 22 – 26 Ice Systems & Supplies Inc. (ISSI), issionline.com............................................ 16 & 24 Ing-Tech Corporation (ITC), itcpack.com....................................................... 10 & 22 Keet Consulting Services, LLC (KCS), kcsgis.com.................................................... 11 KEITH Walking Floor, keithwalkingfloor.com............................................................. 10 Matthiesen, matthiesenequipment.com................................................................... 5 Modern Ice, modernice.com........................................................................... 25 & 27 Polar Temp, polartemp.com............................................................................ 22 & 28 Polar Temp Block Maker, polartemp.com................................................................. 2

Rates are $1.00 per word, with a minimum charge. Any blind ads, with an assigned box number c/o publisher, add $10.00. Deadline for upcoming issue is the 1st of the previous month. For advertising and listing information, contact Mary at (404) 819-5446 or refrigerationmag@gmail.com.

Polar Temp Express, polartemp.com...................................................................14-15

NATIONWIDE/INTERNATIONAL

FIX UP - STOCK UP WINTER SPECIALS – 10% discount on wire orders over 200 Lbs – 10% discount on out of stock Hamer parts orders $250.00 or more. – 10% discount on Polar Temp parts when ordered with a merchandiser.

Call the factory sales location near you today. CA 866-746-0437 CO 877-376-0367 TX 866-598-4206 TN 877-984-5945 GA 800-554-4852 SC 866-827-3232

USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 1-800-599-4744 www.itcpack.com ICE MAKERS

PACKAGING

•V  OGT P24A ICE MAKERS (2) • VOGT P34AL W/ HIGH SIDE

•HAMER 125 – NEW, USED AND REBUILT

REFRIGERATION

• HAMER 125 W/ STAND & CONVEYOR

• 20 HP KRACK CONDENSER

• HAMER RING CLOSER W/ CONVEYOR

• LIQUID OVERFEED VALVE PACKAGE

• HAMER 310 W/ 125 CLOSER

• 6.5 BOHN W/ EVAP CONDENSER W/UNIT COOLER

• PALLET DISPENSER

• MARLEY TOWER W/ PUMP

• SS SHAKER W/ STAND

BLOCK MAKERS

BAGGERS

• LEER BL39 W/ REMOTE CONDENSER

• VLS - 510

• TURBO BP-360 BLOCK PRESS

SUPPLIES • LEER ICE MERCHANDISERS IN STOCK • BAGS AND WIRE • PARTS

VISIT US ON LINE WWW.POLARTEMP.COM 22 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018

• SLIP SHEET DISPENSER

• SPARE PARTS

• VL - 510

SCREW AND BELT CONVEYORS • HYTROL BELT CONVEYORS 10’ & 12’ • PORTABLE FOLDING INCLINE CONVEYOR MODEL R • POWER 90 BELT CONVEYOR


CLASSIFIEDS

SOUTHEAST 

USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE • • • • • • • • • •

Turbo CF8SCER 2007 5 Ton Ice Maker Turbo BF40SC, 20 ton Ice Maker Turbo BF28SC 15 Ton Ice Maker Arctic Temp 4000 Lb Ice Maker Vogt P34 High-Side Vogt HE40’s 7/8 Vogt HE30’s 7/8 Vogt 118’s 5 Ton Ice Maker 7/8, W/ Clinebell CB300 300lb Block Makers Clinebell S-60 Snow Cone Block Maker • Ice Max 3 Ton Moving floor Ice Bin • MGR 3000SD Stainless Bin • Mannhardt 2801 Ice Bin

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

• M  atthiesen Bagger Take-Off System, Less Conveyor • Matthiesen VLS, Bottom Load Bagger, Galv • Matthiesen VL510, Top Load Bagger, Galv • Belt Conveyor, Hytrol TA 6 • Belt Conveyor, Hytrol BA 10’ • Belt Conveyor, Hytrol TA 12’ • Belt Conveyor, Hytrol BA 16’ • 9x10 Galvanized Portable Screw conveyor • 9x12 Stainless Portable Screw Conveyor

Amcot ST-25 Cooling Tower Marley 4821 Cooling tower Hamer 125 Bag Closers with Stands Hamer 310 Form, Fill, & Seal Hamer 525 Form, Fill, & Seal Machine Vivian Manual Block Press Kalamazoo 4000M-SA Stretch Wrapper 19x30x12T Walk In Freezer 10LB Ice Cans (45) 4.5” x 8” x 14”T Snow Cone Block Cans 16lb Wicketed “misprint” Ice Bags 5lb Wicketed Ice Bags 1/2HP drop In Refrigeration Units

AND MUCH MORE!

If you have discontinued ice bags or used equipment you would like to sell PLEASE CALL. SEE OUR USED EQUIPMENT WEB PAGE AT WWW.AIEEXCHANGE.COM. Call for surplus ice! Polar Temp Equipment Mike Landino - Toll free - 1-877-376-0367 E-mail (NEW ADDRESS): mlandino@polartemp.com Don’t forget to call if you have a quality piece of used equipment for sale.

TRAILER FOR SALE

COLD PLATE TRAILER FOR SALE

45 foot refrigerated trailer with electric refrigeration. Evaporator in trailer w/ 5 HP condensing unit on the ground. Great for cross-docking.

16ft gooseneck trailer with tandem 8000lb axles. 2hrs low temp condensing unit with cold plates. 7ft wide outside and 78” tall inside. Pulls great with pickup.

Tennessee Valley Ice Company Call Gary at (423) 698-6290

Call for pictures. Hamilton, Ms. $7,500 OBO

TRAILERS FOR SALE

Call 662-319-7460

Two 1998 Pup Trailers – Road Ready $7,800 each Contact Ruben Walden at (239) 936-3876 or metroice@embarqmail.com

More Southeast classifieds on the next page »

USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE • Turbo Tig 33 Ice Maker, 98 model • Mycom N6WB Compressors w/125 HP motors skid mounted with oil separators (used with Vogt P34AL ice makers) • Turbo CB38 Rake • Screw Conveyor Drive Packages for 9" and 12" conveyors (great condition) • Hammer RBC with conveyor • Stainless 9" and 12" screw conveyors • 21' Hytrol belt conveyor • Turbo CB87 with plastic chain and sprockets and stainless steel flights • Morris 18 ton Tube Cube Maker, R22, 2006 model complete with evap condensor 1" ice • Vogt 218, rebuilt in 2005, complete with cooling tower

"NEW" KAMCO PARTS Ice Systems & Supplies Rock Hill, SC Toll free (800) 662-1273 or (803) 324-8791

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 23


CLASSIFIEDS

SOUTHEAST (continued) PLANT MANAGER & REFRIGERATION TECH WANTED

PACKAGED ICE BUSINESS FOR SALE

We are looking for a Plant Manager and a Refrigeration Tech for a distribution center in Southwest Louisiana.

Central North Carolina Southeastern Virginia

45 year old business

Business 220 Rockingham to North of Martinsvilla, Va.

Resumes may be faxed to 337-238-5095, or e-mailed to westlaice@bellsouth.net.

100 miles wide

Candidates may apply in person or mail a resume to:

Wanting to retire in 2 years

West Louisiana Ice Service, 1707 Smart Street, Leesville, LA 71496-1507.

Interested parties call

336-634-9547

MIDWEST AFFORDABLE ELECTRICAL COMPONENTS AND LED LIGHTING FOR SALE – NEW & USED REFRIGERATION & ICE MACHINE SPECIALITY • Soft starters

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING • Improve efficiency and extend equipment life

• VFDs • Starters and Overloads • Control Panels

• Reduce your electric bill • Fewer breakdowns

– EFFICIENT AND COOL RUNNING LED LIGHTING – ALL WORK AND EQUIPMENT GUARANTEED – EQUIPMENT AND FIXTURES PAY FOR THEMSELVES

• Panel Rebuilding • Custom Control Panels •Miscellaneous Electrical Parts

ICE FOR SALE A Family Owned Ice Company Tube Ice, 7, 10, 20, 22 lb Bags Over a million bags in stock. Shipped or Picked up PIQCS Plus Accredited Arctic Ice Inc. Call Steve Camenzind

(314) 989-9090 FOR SALE

Call Mark at 309-786-4233

FOR SALE • Universal Vibrating Screen 3’x5’ with 7/8” Screen Openings • Hamer 540 Roll Stock Assembly

Please email at jimmy@serv-ice.com or call 920-231-7784 and ask for Tom

WANTED Used trailer to haul frozen foods – small, only up to 12'

Email: info@WellsFamilyFarms.com

• 36 " x 8' suction accumulator, 150# vessel good cond. • 9- 36" 2 hp direct drive fans, 220 volt • 3 evaporators evapco two fan, runs on ammonia, good condition • 200 amp three phase 240 volt,disconnect

Contact Jim Riley

231-218-5868 or jriley417@gmail.com

24 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018

ICE PLANT FOR SALE Well established plant, wholesale and retail sales in the Ozark Mountains. 45 ton production capacity. Excellent tourist area. Owner wants to retire.

Contact us at CONGR8@COX.NET


CLASSIFIEDS

NORTHEAST

USED EQUIPMENT FOR SALE 1-800-543-1581

www.modernice.com Ice Makers • Vogt Ice Maker – P24A • Morris Ice Maker • Vogt Ice Maker – P118 • Turbo Ice Maker – CAR120 • Turbo Ice Maker – CF40SCER • Vogt Ice Maker – P418 • Vogt Ice Maker – HE30 • Kold Draft Ice Maker

Merchandiser Parts for all brands at competitive prices.

(877) 984-5945

USED ICE MAKING EQUIPMENT FOR SALE Tig 85 SC, SN 941010, Alum panels Tig 33 SC, SN 910170 Alum panels CF 40 SC, SN 8325500 SS panels BF 3690, SN 7801300, SS panels Morris TNT SN 785-388 Alum panel

Packaging • Matthiesen Heat Seal Bagger • Matthiesen Baler (3 Available) •H  amer Form, Fill, and Seal Machine - 310

Check our most recent inventory online at www.modernice.com!

Contact Bob Morse @ Getchell Brothers, Inc. 800-949-4423, bob.morse@getchellbrothers.com

Handling • Matthiesen Shaker Belt with Stand • Shaker •1  2” Stainless Steel Auger (Several Lengths) •1  2” Stainless Steel Shroud Trough Cover

EQUIPMENT FOR SALE Suction Accumulator - Chil-Con, Model #AA24084, 24” x 7’ high, with boil out coil – Like new condition $6,000.00

VOGT ICE FOR SALE

Receiver 12’ x 30” with warming loop used with Vogt ice makerLike new condition - $6,000.00

5, 7, 16 & 40 lb. bags. Water is lab tested for purity. Delivery or pick-up. Six generations of quality.

Toshiba 125 HP Motor, Premium Efficiency Contact Kyle at Long Island Ice & Fuel Corp.

(631) 727-3010 or (516) 790-6842

Long Island Ice & Fuel Corp.

FRICK BLOCK ICE PLANT, TURBO TIGAR & AMMONIA REFRIGERATION COMPONENTS FOR SALE

Call (631) 727-3010

40’ Frick herring bone coil & new coil 1,800 block ice 40 gal. cans, 50 36-can grids, 2 5-HP Pond Agitators 2 Shephard Niles 9–ton cranes, 40’ span, controls, spare parts

YOUR AD HERE To place a classified ad, contact Mary at (404) 819-5446 or refrigerationmag@gmail.com.

50 ton Turbo TIGAR ice maker, 2 CB 50 Turbo rakes and controls Compressors: 150 HP FES screw, 350 HP Frick screw, 4 – CrePaco 100 HP recips. Accumulators, Surge vessels, receiver, valves & VFD controls 20 HP fan IMECO & 50 HP BAC evaporative condensers Scott Memhard, Cape Pond Ice Company, Gloucester, MA

Tel. 978-283-0174; email: scott_m@capepondice.com

ICE CARVING TOOLS

ICE FOR SALE Vogt Mini tube ice, 8, 20 & 40 lb. bags. All ice is screened, palletized & stretch wrapped.

Plastic liners for clear block makers - $1.24/ea Reusable drip pans – from $6.50/ea Over 500 items in stock for Ice Carvers

www.IceSculptingTools.com

or (440) 717-1940

We deliver or you pick up. Our water is treated with ozone for sterilization. No chlorine added!

Martin's Ice Company

Phone (717) 733-7968 or fax (717) 733-1981 PA

REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018 25


CLASSIFIEDS

SOUTHWEST WANTED

FOR SALE

Vogt 6000 and Vogt 9000

(1) Vogt P118 Reconditioned, runs on R404 Freon

Call Charlie Bolton Houston, TX

(1) Mini Tube Vogt, air-cooled 404 Freon

(713) 643-0573

(1) Mid Tube Vogt, air-cooled 404 Freon (1) Rebuilt CB P118 Call Charlie Bolton (Houston, TX)

(713) 643-0573

COMPLETE ICE PLANT FOR SALE P24 Freon Vogt w/ cooling tower (no compressor) P18 Freon Vogt w/ compressor (no cooling tower) Matthiesen 10 ton bin Screw conveyors from maker to bin Matthiesen bottom feed bagger

ICE PLANT FOR SALE 4 P118 7/8 tube with cooling towers, 16 ton Kamco steel bin, 1 Matthiessen VLS top load bagger and 1 bottom load bagger. 4 Hamer 125 bag tiers Screw conveyors with drive motors

For information call Tom

Visit mirelesice.com/used-equipment for more info.

email jesse@mirelesice.com call (210) 842-1977

(817) 475-2459

WEST BUSINESS FOR SALE Full service ice manufacturing and water purification business for sale. Located in western Arizona on three parcels with living quarters consisting of one bedroom. Two 10-ton ice machines as well as commercial water purification system. Too many assets to list: trucks with refrigeration, store front with 24-hour vending, trucks with 10,000+ water tanks, over 60 ice merchandisers. Solid customer base in addition to seasonal contractors during growing seasons. Owners wish to retire.

Please call 928-859-4233.

26 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018


Modern works with packaged ice clients who face increasing costs and require financing solutions and technical and engineering assistance to decrease downtime and increase their profits.

Modern helps those clients with sales and terms programs, the best equipment and automation solutions, our Freeze Force technical support team, and by utilizing the best buying practices and inventory controls. Contact us to review your critical concerns – we are the company to partner with to create solutions for your business!

CALL US TODAY at

1-800-543-1581

Learn more about Modern at

WWW.MODERNICE.COM


CLASSIFIEDS

28 REFRIGERATION Magazine │ February 2018

Profile for Markurious Marketing Group

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February issue of Refrigeration Magazine features the Common Malfunctions of Refrigerated Trucks, the future of convenience stores, and much...

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