Page 1

EUROPEAN LENSES +

TECHNOLOGY

A Jobson publication November 2012

COVER.indd 1

FGE Srl - Regione San Giovanni, 40 - 14053 Canelli (AT) - nr. 5/2012 - Anno XXIII - bimestrale

Collection EXTASE - Photo non contractuelle - Photos : Olivier MOLLARD

20/20 europe November 2012

www.henry-jullien.com

Frame Innovations What’s hot next season? > 24

Tommy Hilfiger TH1985/B/S UY7JS from SAFILO

Colour Trend Natural Obsession > 16

18/10/12 15.10


20/20

europe

EUROPEAN LENSES +

TECHNOLOGY

international eye fashion

TRY YOUR ONLINE SUBSCRIPTION NOW

IT’S FREE!

DOWNLOAD THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FROM www.2020europemagazine.com FGE S.r.l. - Fabiano Gruppo Editoriale - Reg. S. Giovanni 40 - 14053 Canelli (AT) - Italy Ph. +39 0141 1768903 - Fax +39 0141 1768900 - e-mail: 2020europe@fgeditore.it - www.2020europemagazine.com 2020052012

YES! I wish to subscribe to 20/20 europe (5 issues a year): 1 year printed version † 100 € for Europe † 250 € for all other countries

1 year † 100 € web online

I SHALL PAY: † By bank transfer to: FGE S.r.l. - IT57 Q060 8547 3000 0000 030 016 BIC CASRIT22 Cassa di Risparmio di Asti - Filiale di Canelli † By non-transferable bank cheque enclosed payable to FGE S.r.l. † By credit card

expiry date

CVV

PLEASE, PRINT CLEARLY (OR ATTACH BUSINESS CARD)

Card owner

Date of birth

Family name

First name

Company

VAT N° (strictly needed for Europe)

Address City

Country

Zip Code

e-mail Ph. Please specify:

COVER.indd 2

Fax

† Optician

† Company

Signature

† Other

18/10/12 15.10


P2 20/20 Europe: Editor’s comment P4 What’s on in Europe P14 In detail: Lindberg P16 Fashion feature: Natural Obsession P22 Brand profile: Original Penguin P24 Trends: Focus on Frame innovations P28 Products section P36 View from the US P37 European Lenses & Technology

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 1


EDITOR’S COMMENT

F

RAME INNOVATIONS SILMO was the place to be this year for those looking for fresh ideas and technologically impressive eyewear. Companies are working with extraordinary expertise to produce frames in interesting materials with clever detailing, and a true attention to all parts of the frame, from the hinge to the end tip. Comfort factors remain crucial in the design process and many companies have developed their own techniques for creating the ultimate designs for a combination of easy-wear features and exciting decorations, colourings and material combinations where new material pairings were a particularly clear trend. In this issue we also present some of the latest launches for the Autumn including a new line from LINDBERG – STRIP 9800 - and the latest on the hip street label Original Penguin, a cool retro fashion label with a men’s eyewear line that strikes the balance between former retro fashions and today’s aesthetic requirements. Keep up to date with the issue at our website: www.2020europemagazine.com/

Clodagh Norton, Editor; c.norton@fgeditore.it http://www.2020europemagazine.com/ PS Remember you can purchase an online subscription to 20/20 Europe. Contact info@2020europe.eu for your trial subscription.

2 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


W H AT ’S ON IN E U ROPE

Silmo launches and the best of the rest for Autumn 2012 and beyond…

Face à Face launch Woow Eyewear At Silmo, Face à Face launched Woow Eyewear, a brand conceived to make you smile and featuring friendly messages in the end tips such as “Come on!” and “Rock me!” The brand has its own new website at www.wooweyewear.com and is targeted at customers with a good sense of humour, ready to be coached by their frames. Woow has been created by Face à Face and is entirely manufactured in Italy from high quality acetates and components.

4 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


1 8 8 8 . 5 6 0.1 0 6 0 | o g i eyewe a r.co m

W H AT ’S ON IN E U ROPE

1 763.592.1493 | ogiframes.com

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 5


W H AT ’S ON IN E U ROPE

Cutler & Gross shows support for the Eye Show 2013, London Luxury British heritage eyewear brand Cutler and Gross is the latest high profile optical company to confirm its participation in the newly launched Eye Show, due to take place from 12-14 February 2013 at London’s ExCeL Exhibition and Conference Centre. Cutler and Gross is exhibiting within The Eye Show Fashion Zone and will be showcasing its ranges on the catwalk. Dawn Kime of The Eye Show comments, “As a new event in the industry, we felt it was vital to represent the leading luxury eyewear brands. We are delighted to welcome Cutler and Gross on board.”Charlotte Abbot for Cutler and Gross, added: “The Eyeshow 2013 will provide us with an ideal international platform on which to showcase our collections. We are looking forward to exhibiting at this debut event, which is set to become a great addition to the optical industry.” Cutler and Gross, founded in 1969 by Graham Cutler and Tony Gross, have an impressive array of collections and high profile designer collaborations, appearing in leading fashion publications and on the catwalk at international fashion weeks. Their reputation is built on handcrafted production in their own factory in Northern Italy. Each frame takes four weeks to handcraft and goes through 37 rigorous processes, manufactured by the finest craftsmen who combine traditional production techniques and beautiful material.

A contemporary look for LineArt Charmant The new collection from LineArt Charmant focuses on the sophisticated play between texture, colours and forms. The textures and colours of acetate, combined with the Rondo design, offers two classical designs with feminine elegance. The fronts are either a timeless and universal shape or a modern vintage flavour, and are also compatible with progressive lenses. The delicate square rings made of Excellence Titan for the temples represents an individualistic and graceful musical form, one after another, just like a duet, providing comfort, lightness and a gentle feel on the face. The modern mature woman can select from a stylish floating lens type or a natural half rim model, both with metallic appearance.

6 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


W H AT ’S ON IN E U ROPE

Vision Expo West attracts record number of show specials, new products, lines and launches Unaudited attendance figures indicated that 12,077 eye care professionals (ECPs) attended International Vision Expo West in September this year. Opening on the heels of the Labor Day weekend, exhibit hall attendance came in at 8,209 and was on par with last year’s attendance records. The education program delivered 350 hours of education and drew 3,868 eye care professionals during the four-day event. A complete, third-party audit of International Vision Expo West will be available approximately six weeks after the show. “International Vision Expo West is a healthy, energetic and vibrant event, and the number of loyal and satisfied visitors in attendance at this past week’s event was a true testament to that,” said Tom Loughran, vice president for Reed Exhibitions. “We remain committed to providing the entire ophthalmic community with a convenient location to network, hold meetings and source the best in products, education, innovative solutions and business-building tools for the health of their practice and their patients.” Dozens of strategic partnerships were formed at this year’s event between a diverse, global network of optometric associations, professional organizations, alliances and buying groups. The Optimum Program, comprised largely of million dollar practices, Vision Monday’s Top 50 Retailers and boutique optical buyers, grew by 22 percent and 11 new professional groups joined Vision Expo’s Partner Program, bringing the total number to 38. In addition, the growth of the Optometry (OD) Student Program enticed several organizations to host meetings at the show, including the Association of Practice Management Educators (APME) and Student Optometric Leadership Network (SOLN). A record number of show specials, new products, lines and launches were also key drivers at this year’s event. Nearly 475 exhibitors from around the globe offered more than 600 show specials and 5,000 brands, covering all aspects of eyecare, eyewear and accessories.

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 7


W H AT ’S ON IN E U ROPE

Lunettes Kollektion launch Constructivismo Inspired by the geometric shapes in the art and design of the Constructivists of the 1920’s, the Constructivismo frame by Lunettes Kollektion is architecture to be centered on the face of a true intellectual. The top edge of these rounded revolutionaries has a molded motif reminiscent of those from the Russian Avant Garde. Wear them for the good of the people. Constructivismo is available as optical frames and as sunglasses in the colors miele, tortoise and black.

Big designs for little faces French creative eyewear brand J. F. REY has launched Petite, a new line specialising in small frames for women of all ages. The line has been created to offer creative frames that fit well on women who are looking for more petite sizing while offering lots of style and creativity. Launched during the Paris exhibition SILMO, the range includes exclusive acetates and metal designs featuring mono or two tone brushed effects.

8 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

Mondottica Ltd - +44(0)1159 677912 www.mondottica.com

W H AT ’S ON IN E U ROPE

international eye fashion 9


W H AT ’S ON IN E U ROPE

Codeword studs! Italy’s Borsalino Eyewear has introduced the trend for studs into its new sunglasses collection. A unisex drop-shaped (B221) and a strong style for men (B222), are offered in three sophisticated colour variations. The sunglasses are produced in handmade acetate with matt metal details on the front and end-piece. Studs are an embellishment that stir up the “bad boy” dress code, a street look that high fashion cannot live without.

Italia Independent presents collection in London Italia Independent launched its latest collection of I-Touch sunglasses at the Berkeley Hotel’s Ferrari Atelier in London during London Fashion Week. The frames are painted with the same paint that is used by Ferrari for their cars for an interesting combination of fashion and technology. Italia Independent is a design label known for its use of bold colours and creative designs and is targeted at independent people and trendsetters.

10 2 0 / 2 0 E u r o p e

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


W H AT ’S ON IN E U ROPE

OPAL launches New York Yankees Sunglasses Collection Following the launch of the New York Yankees optical collection, the Opal team announces the launch of the New York Yankees sunglasses collection. Previewed at SILMO, the new line of sunglasses is targeted at pre-teens, teenagers and young adults. This new collection is a clever blend of dash and discretion, according to the company. The brand’s famous logo adds a stylish finishing touch for a real “urban chic” look. Including 54 items to choose from, in a wide variety of designs, sizes and eye shapes, this is a sunglasses collection styled for the city as only New York Yankees know how!

Immagine presents colourful new X-Ide range A rainbow of colours explodes on the new X-IDE frames, the young eyewear collection with a strong personality by Immagine 98. The soul of the brand is reborn, but it always remains true to itself: X-IDE presents an eyewear collection where dynamic shapes and linear thickness are enhanced by refined details and innovative materials. Synthesis of different worlds and cultures, X-IDE optical frames express the creative thinking of those who look at the reality with inspiration and passion, observing life as a masterpiece, with the constant pursuit of the aesthetic pleasure and the rare particular. A distinctive feature of X-IDE is the workmanship, typical of made in Italy: creativity meets technology. The temples are the real protagonists of this collection. The model names are inspired by the most famous Italian tourist resorts: Portofino, Porto Cervo, Capri, Amalfi, Cinque Terre… dream places that stands out in the world for their unique and authentic beauty. N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

i n t e r n a t i o n a l e y e f a s h i o n 11


W H AT ’S ON IN E U ROPE

SILMO 2012 chosen as stage for relaunch of Genesis brand by Area Fresh, young and lively: this is how Genesis has always been, but on the occasion of Silmo 2012 the most “casual” brand by Area 98 aimed to surprise visitors of the French exhibition, offering a completely renewed collection. Elisio Tessaro, the Company’s Brand and Product Marketing Director, introduced 18 new unisex models that combine the past and the future thank to a retro style that speaks of elegance combined with modern colours and an ergonomic design. Designed for a young and casual audience, the new Genesis collection gives to the frames delicate hues, choosing high quality materials and aesthetic details that are particularly charming to create eyewear that boasts simple style without sacrificing creativity. Unique models that know how to guarantee to their wearers comfort and performance at a very competitive price. The informal tone that distinguishes the new trend of this brand represents the basis of a marketing communication strategy designed to support its new launch. In addition to a new look, Genesis will be supported by an original advertising campaign that also focuses on a young and dynamic world.

12 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


no adverts, just buy our glasses

‚uuuh, what a man! Makes me wonder: am I hetero? Homosexual? Should I better be a woman? Should I better stop thoughts like that and tell you, that Patrick King is the choreographer and mastermind behind Salon K? You also can admire him in our psycho lookbook, or on stage, when he performs again. Check out salonkexperience.com‘ R.A. N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

W H AT ’S ON IN E U ROPE

‘klavierspieler klaus’ worn by Patrick - Choreographer

international eye fashion 13

145


IN DE TA IL

Softly

does it Danish spectacle company LINDBERG is continually tweaking, improving and extending its eyewear collection. With no fewer than 13 different ranges, 20/20 EUROPE got a glimpse of just some of the new releases on show at SILMO last month.

14 20/20 Europe

What did you launch at SILMO this year? Our latest designs, which were presented in Paris reveal a subtle yet distinct trend. We have boosted and expanded several of our key ranges, with softer more curvaceous frame shapes. This reflects the growth in consumer demand for less rectilinear shapes, verging towards retro-inclined cat-eye designs with almond-shaped uppersurface curvature and the temples mounted relatively high on the frame. The shapes are well suited to the female face, and female wearers appreciate the eye-catching blend of classic minimalism and Lindberg’s fashion-conscious aesthetics. Are there advantages in the collections for the optician? We believe that our latest selection of designs have the key commercial advantage of being backed by the company’s proven long-term design credibility N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


IN DE TA IL

and amazing record of awards for both design and technology. Please give an example of a new product line you are launching now. Our LINDBERG 9800 Strip range has gone even more visible but it is incredibly light. We have introduced new shiny or matt colours and four new designs, adding to the remarkable demand for this range. Two models are in classic round and oval and one is markedly rectangular, with a slimmer more sporty appearance. There is a model with a classic retromodern combination in keeping with Mad Men/JFK fashion influences. We are very pleased with the technological achievement in this range where our solution allows for a frame that has no screws or glue. Of course we are also extending the LINDBERG 1000 Acetanium line, and the much appreciated Air Titanium Rim, where N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

there are three new designs including the sporty new “ditte” model. Lindberg has also resurrected a style called “Corona”, in new sizes and new colours, including an upper section in red. Are you introducing new n.o.w. products since the official launch at MIDO this year? The eye-catching new LINDBERG n.o.w. range features some curvaceous new designs. These include three pronounced cateyes, two of which swoop upwards, and model 6514 is more petite and well suited to the Asian market. Influences here include the 1980s. How is the Horn line developed for the new season? The excusive hand-finished horn collection has been extended this with 3 new shapes: a panto, a rectangular design and a slimmer design that is also well suited to the Asian market.

Have you developed any other innovations for the collections next season? Lindberg has upped the ante with a new range of subtle engraved surface designs for the temples in Lindberg frames, beginning with the SPIRIT range.

New equipment and new inhouse engraving capabilities enable us to constantly challenge new techniques to provide distinctive surfaces that add a subtle-ye-scintillating extra dimension to Lindberg frames.

international eye fashion 15


FASHION FEATURE

Natural

obsession

Think of warm natural colours for this season and into next... latte and cappuccino shades, classical tortoise, or neutrals inspired by the natural world around us...

Photographer & Styling: Valentina Eleonora Costa Make up artist: Selene Brognara Lighting: Sergio Sarnicola Model: Corinne Piccolo Thanks to Giorgia Chiampan

16 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


FASHION FEATURE

ITALIA INDEPENDENT mod. 092V/011 2.0 N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 17


FASHION FEATURE

Dolce & Gabbana DG3140 2542 by Luxottica

18 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


FASHION FEATURE

Model Ovidio tr from the Epos Classic line by EPOS

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 19


FASHION FEATURE

Tommy Hilfinger TH1985/B/S UY7JS from SAFILO

20 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


FASHION FEATURE

Model MOUJIK nude 3.1 Phillip Lim by MODO N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

i n t e r n a t i o n a l e y e f a s h i o n 21


BRAND PROFILE

Original Penguin: A new classic in eyewear Nostalgic styling, with an exciting dose of clever detail, Original Penguin’s eyewear range for men, produced by Kenmark Optical, was launched in Autumn 2011. 20/20 Europe took a look at the latest collection at SILMO with Jason Wehlage, Kenmark product designer and specialist in men’s eyewear design.

22 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


BRAND PROFILE

t

he Minneapolis-based Munsingwear, an underwear/military supply company, became the touchstone of suburban sport with the introduction of the iconic golf shirt, an Original Penguin in 1955. Since then, the Original Penguin label has grown into a complete lifestyle brand that offers classic sportswear and accessories collections for men, women and boys, who are attracted by style and casual yet fashion-referenced clothing. “For the eyewear line in the season ahead, there is a strong ‘American in Paris’ theme with the 1940s being the most important decade for fashion influences in the range,” explains Jason Wehlage of Kenmark Optical. “We have looked at reinterpreting past eras, by studying moments in history, and looking at the clothes and spectacles that people wore, via images that were popular back then. I study ways of reinterpreting the designs in eyewear and making them more playful with an expression to fit with our times.” Colour is a key element in the line, where natural vintage tonal combinations are particularly prevalent. “The collection is geared towards men. I start with what works for a man, both in terms of shape and colour. I work closely with the colour palette of the Original Penguin clothing lines, and adapt and explore those tones in the frames. We have been using Mazzucchelli acetates, and lots of colour-blocking techniques for the designs. We have also got an important wood-look theme coming through the line, which is reflected across the Original Penguin accessory lines.” The shapes of the frames have a slightly military-esque design, referencing again the 40s designs. “We have updated those shapes by incorporating the colour blocking and exploring matt finishes, which are starting to be very desirable,” explains Wehlage. “When you incorporate a colour

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

like transparent crystal or different translucent tones, and you insert the lens, there is always a highlight of the lens inside the plastic and the frame can become too bright for a lot of men. By creating a matt finish for the frames, we find that they become more wearable. It is a very successful look in the collection.” Detail is also very carefully considered in the Original Penguin frames and the design team go to great lengths to use interesting design details and finishes. “We have used typical details that are part of the brand, but in ways that work for the frames.” What looks like a silver insert on the temple which gives the effect that it is joining two parts of the temple (although it is in fact one whole piece), is in fact a metal foil, laminated when the pieces of the frame themselves are made. “I have tried to inject some fun for the younger consumer who buys Original Penguin accessories. It is a collection with plenty of choice and great style for the 20 and 30 something male customer.” Original Penguin’s Autumn/Winter collection includes a range of 33 optical frames and 12 sunglass styles. The collection is currently available in the following European countries: UK, Italy, Netherlands, Germany, France and Turkey. www.kenmarkoptical.com international eye fashion 23


TRENDS FEATURE

Focus

on innovations New material applications, special colourations and techniques for colour, state-of-the-art detailing and some ingenious handcrafted elements are just some of the recent developments in the frame collections on display at SILMO that signalled the future of frame design. 20/20 Europe picks a selection of labels showing creativity and innovation in this field for 2012/13.

f

rame technology is a hot subject this year, and the standards for luxury and top end labels are really at a very exciting high point. A look at the collections exhibited at Silmo suggested a strong interest in fine-tuning traditional techniques, and many companies proposed clever new twists on typical frame details to create something both aesthetically exciting and super comfortable. Colour has been an important theme for some time, and this year collections show off a range of clever tone effects as well as super shiny or super matt finishes which continue to be perfected or reinterpreted. Materials are also being used in new ways, with carbon fibre, wood, leather and buffalo horn playing new roles in the creative collections. 20/20 Europe picked out some of the highlights:

24 20/20 Europe

Alain Mikli AL1150 from the new Chamarel Collection

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


TRENDS FEATURE

Alain Mikli’s study in coloured cellulose acetate Chamarel by Alain Mikli is a new line by the Paris based designer, exploring Alain Mikli’s love of the frame material, cellulose acetate. Mikli has chosen the chequered pattern in acetate as the overall theme of the line, that is both colourful and distinctive and an expression of the years of experience the designer has had in creating alluring acetate designs that make a statement of character and also of quality.

Gotti Switzerland Stainless steel is very popular this year. The new stainless steel models from Gotti Switzerland, Tedy, Tilo and Tofy are thin and discrete and combine contemporary shapes with a saddle bridge and the innovative 360 rotating Spin&Stow temples. Practical features, sophisticated workmanship and cutting-edge design are part and parcel of this collection. The ergonomic saddle bridge keeps the glasses in place when worn for a very long time.

Photo engraving for the Bloody Lys by J.F Rey J.F. Rey has launched the innovative Bloody Lys, a sunglass design which uses photo engraving and achieves lace-inspired patterning both on the frames and the lens. The main motif used is the “fleur de lys.” Used in two previous collections by the French designer, this is the first example where the effect is extended onto the lenses of the sunglasses. The design was nominated for a SILMO d’Or in the Sunglass Category this year in Paris.

Seraphin Japanese Vintage by OGI Eyewear Seraphin proudly introduces the Japanese Vintage Collection to its line of finely crafted neoclassic eyewear. Inspired by the timeless designs of vintage Japanese couture eyewear, this collection brings a bold new perspective to a legendary design. Seraphin fuses handmade materials, intricate detailing and exquisite craftsmanship to create new standards of luxury eyewear.

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 25


TRENDS FEATURE

Wood and titanium at Feb31st Experimentation and research are key to the Italian creators of Feb 31st whose brand is focused on frames in wood. At SILMO, the company launched their first wood with titanium designs, an uncommon material pairing, that has resulted in a range of frames offering elegance, refinement and sobriety. The brand has also developed a split colour theme so that the front and arms of each design can have different finishing in contrast or in harmony according to the many moods of the Feb31st range.

Luxury craftsmanship at Maybach Eyewear A Maybach frame is made by hand in workshops in Germany. Each design is painstakingly created and inspected using traditional frame-making techniques

Jewellery in the frame by Henry Jullien

based on decades of experience, according to the company. A wide variety of

Accomplished artisanal techniques continue to grow in eyewear this season. At

luxury materials are featured including gold, horn, leather and titanium. For ex-

Silmo, HENRY JULLIEN launched a “High Jewellery” version of their PARADISE

ample, the Character – an expressive dark frame - is created in natural buffalo

model, again proving their calibre as an artisan spectacle-maker. Fifty 8/10 dia-

horn with solid titanium end pieces and Carl Zeiss Sunlenses.

monds adorn the new model’s contemporary lines, creating a frame of extreme

Maybach, a high-end automobile brand, symbolises exacting standards in quality

refinement, according to the company. Set by a renowned artisan the 25 stones

and luxury. The eyewear collection unites the traditional values of a luxury label

on each hinge-piece are perfectly in keeping with the desires of the eyewear

and modern aspects of spectacle production.

creator.

26 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


TRENDS FEATURE

Derapage MoleCubes by Nico Design Derapage MoleCubes bring to the eyewear a world first, according to the company. This hinge system is patented and made in Italy. Formed of three strips of steel held together by a square pivot which vanishes into the temple structure, the Derapage MoleCube hinge joins the temple to the front with a pop-in system that has never been used before. The hinge means that there is a limited number of components in the frame, cutting down the production stages for a more eco-friendly process. The frames uses thin blades of chemically-cut or laser-cut Beauty and dash at X-Ide

steel to give the traditional Derapage streamline effect. Overall the product has

A distinctive feature of X-IDE is the workmanship, warranty of made in Italy: crea-

an understated, linear look that makes cool design sense.

tivity meets technology. The temples are the real protagonists of this collection. The model names are inspired by the most famous Italian tourist resorts: Portofino, Porto Cervo, Capri, Amalfi, Cinque Terre‌ dream places that stands out in the world for their unique and authentic beauty, just like the features that distinguish X-IDE frames. The combination of three-layers acetate front and metal temples creates a beautiful contrast, with a nylon sewed along the temples, giving to the Portofino frame an exclusive look that shows the extreme love and attention for every detail. Creativity in selection of materials is innovation of Porto Cervo frame, evolution of Eggert, one of the bestseller of the previous collection. The transparent resin, covering the inside metal core of the frame, grants the comfortable fit typical of the plastic frame, but at the same time the transparency making the frame look lighter, and acts as a magnifying glass elevating the gradient colours and the processing of the inside metal parts. N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 27


NEW PRODUCTS

Frame

From top: The Emperor IV P – WJ – Z25 by Maybach: an elegant effect is given by the platinised and brushed solid titanium; Art Couture by Flair shows the luxury offer at this traditional German frame company; Eric Jean Sunglass from Ca Va Se Voir

28 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


NEW PRODUCTS

flair

This month, following SILMO, we explore some of the new trends for 2013. Find pure, minimal shapes with a retro elegance, exciting decoration, and some new sensational colours and tonal combinations.

From top: Armand Basi AB 52449 by OPTIM, a large lensed retro style with laminates on the side bars; Agatha Ruiz de la Prada AR61349 by OPTIM – a feminine acetate frame with embossed metallic heart-shaped adornments and volumetric prismatic side bars; Blackfin BF672 by PRAMAOR comes in this bright fashion oriented turquoise

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 29


NEW PRODUCTS

From top: Eric Jean 009 from Ca Va Se Voir offers a unique shape and interesting layered effect for a overall creative design; Ted Baker’s Squintessential Collection by Mondottica, the embodiment of Ted’s passion for originality, style and panache; Litote by Lafont, a new optical frame for women available in 6 exclusive colours, made in France

30 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


NEW PRODUCTS

Ben 10 BTS007 sunglasses by Inottica: made of acetate in shaded colours with a sporty shape. Black shades of into grey, midnight blue tones down into sky blue and green into orange

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

i n t e r n a t i o n a l e y e f a s h i o n 31


NEW PRODUCTS

From top: Rodo by Epos from the classic line by this popular Italian label: Clash from Anne et Valentin comes in creative colour combinations and features a distinctive key hole nose shape; Milky01 from Little Paul and Joe Eyewear, winner of the SILMO d’Or 2012, children’s category; Vanni BLADE by Nico Design, the Italian label’s exciting acetate line with statement patterns

32 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


NEW PRODUCTS

www.blackfin.eu

model: BF650 WESTRAY

produced and distributed by PRAMAOR.COM

Marilyn by the Danish design firm Orgreen features a slender trendy shape and comes in a variety of punchy colours including this bright purple

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 33


NEW PRODUCTS

From top: Cape Town by Coppe and Sid is a classic acetate style made for ease of wear and elegance; ENJOY E1840 from Nigura is a classic women’s optical frame with a fun decorative temple; model Sovereign by Rolf Spectacles. This balanced model is based on the classic car manufactured by British court purveyor, Daimler. Harmonious smooth lines and high-end materials link the eyeglasses with the vehicle. Lucas de Stael 05 Walnut is the winner of the Silmo D’Or in the optical category 2012 and shows a super understanding of the beauty of wood

34 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


NEW PRODUCTS

:RZ0DGHLQ.UHD 7RR)OH[LEOH 3HUIHFW)DFH)RUP

1HZ0DWHULDO 7RR/LJKW

)OH[LEOHl /LJKWl )LWWLQJ

.UHD8OWHP

.2,6& .RUHD2SWLFDO,QGXVWU\6XSSRUW&HQWHU

1RZRQGRQJJD%XNJX'DHJX.RUHD 7)

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 35


VIEW FROM THE US

What’s that

Piece of Junk on Your Face?

a

llow me to qualify myself before my rant. I don’t design frames. I don’t manufacture them. I don’t sell them. But …I DO write about them and have a hand in portraying said frames to professionals who DO design, manufacture and sell (dispense) them. So in that humble scribe capacity it annoyed the hell out of me that a “reporter” on the nationally broadcasted TV network show “60 Minutes” tersely defined eyewear as some pieces of plastic, wire and glass. I’m supposing by “glass” she was describing the lenses and I’d guess that “wire” description might have something to do with the hinge or the fact that eyewear is often made of metal. As for the plastic designation: Yes, zyl is plastic via its cellulose nitrate origins. That said, I’d like to stick a pair of basic glasses as described (dismissed) on her misinformed face. How does that feel missy? What? Your nose hurts? Your ears feel irritated? Those lenses are too heavy for you? You’d like a bit of color and something more in line with those designer shoes you are wearing? The hinge looks funny with that paperclip stuck in there where a screw should be functioning? Perhaps a band aid might relieve some of the pressure on the bridge of your nose? The lens just fell out? Maybe you could stick it back in with some super glue? Excuse me but did you just say that you can’t see? You want a prescription for your lenses? I’m sorry but I wouldn’t advise that for that piece of junk you have there on your face. Have you ever thought about getting a nice pair of eyewear? Too expensive? Maybe you should sell off some of your shoes.

James J. Spina, 20/20 US, Editor in Chief 36 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


NOVEMBER 2012

SAFILENS ON THE FUTURE CE: SERIES CONTINUES NEW INNOVATIONS


NOVEMBER 2012

EUROPEAN LENSES +

TECHNOLOGY

SAFILENS ON THE FUTURE CE: SERIES CONTINUES NEW INNOVATIONS

November 2012

FRONT COVER IMAGE: SPRING SUMMER 2013 COLOR TRENDS: Re-Creation / CARL ZEISS VISION SUNLENS

40 42 48

INTERVIEW Safilens’ Vincenzo Bruno talks about the acquisition of the company by Bruno Pharma and future business targets

CONTINUING EDUCATION Eyewear design and development: Looking Beyond Logos and Markings By Mike Hundert and Nicolas Roseillier

INNOVATIONS New products

A

s 20/20 EUROPE places focus on innovations in frame making, for this issue of European Lenses and Technology we bring you a must-read piece on Eyewear Design and Development which will help you get to grips with the value of a frame, the design that goes into it, and facts on production and frame finishing and assembly. The issue also includes an interview with the Italian contact lens producer, Safilens, recently acquired by Bruno Pharma, and our useful updates on new innovations, with the latest on launches at the Paris show, SILMO. This issue will be available at the Hong Kong Optical Fair so we wish those of you visiting the show there a pleasant and successful stay. CLODAGH NORTON, Editor


EUROPEAN LENSES & TECHNOLOGY

Interview

New ventures for Italy’s SAFILENS European Lenses and Technology spoke to Vincenzo Bruno, Managing Director of SAFILENS Srl, following the acquisition of the company by Bruno Pharma. Vincenzo Bruno, Managing Director, SAFILENS

S

ince founding the company in 2001, please take us through, in a summary, the key achievements in contact lens product development at Safilens. The first remarkable milestone in the short and successful history of Safilens came back in 2005 when the world’s first contact lens with delivery of hyaluronic acid during wear was patented. This “hydromade™ system” led to the Safe-Gel brand, a complete range of contact lenses and solutions. In the following years, the increasing interest in this innovative contact lens made it possible to open the opportunity to new markets in Europe and the Middle East.vIn December 2009, the Safe-Gel Contact Lens achieved FDA approval and is, at present, sold in the USA under the “Safigel” brand name. Today our main focus is on “fusion technology”, a patented delivery system of a bio-copolymer composed by Hyaluronic Acid and TSP, the two most effective natural tear film substitutes.

Please comment on the acquisition of Safilens by Bruno Pharma. As a result of the experience and success of Bruno Farmaceutici and the commitment to innovation of Safilens, the main developments in the near future for our company will include new products, a more effective presence in the European markets and, generally speaking, the results that Safilens deserves. The most important 40

European Lenses and Technology

thing that Bruno Farmaceutici brought to Safilens is an increasing self-confidence in its achievements so far and of its potential in the future. This awareness will make Safilens a main player in areas where it has not yet been involved. Where are your main markets today and where are you expanding? The main market is, of course Italy, where we sell around 75% of our products. We’re establishing subsidiaries in strategic and demanding countries such as the UK, Scandinavia and Spain in order to consolidate the presence in these key regions. Besides, new partnerships in central Europe and in the Balkans will shore up Safilens presence Europe-wide.Moreover a strong effort in the USA, with great targets, will take place in 2013; in the next months we’ll disclose the details. In a market dominated by very large players where does SAFILENS find its successes? The answer is very simple: Safilens has always been and still is very focused on product development and has been leading the path to innovation in the world of contact lenses. Some of the most significant improvements in the history of this market come from our R&D department thanks to experience, training and constant attention to the needs of contact lens wearers.

November • 2012


Interview

Please summarise the contact lens technology you are offering. Our portfolio now includes the following: - Safe-Gel: HA delivery system: 1day, 7days, Monthly, All-inOne solution, Comfort Drops - Fusion Technology: HA+TSP delivery system: 1day, 7days, All-in-One solution. Both of our main brands include the weekly replacement: this exclusive wearing period for the first time is given by the effectiveness of the lens; the tear film substitutes delivered during wear last for the entire week. Explain the key benefits for the contact lens wearer. The insufficient quantity or alteration of the tear film is the primary reason for pathologies and discomfort whilst wearing contact lenses. This situation is often the result of a reduction in the number of caliform cells which lead to a reduction in mucin production.The natural tear film substitutes thanks to their mucomimetic qualities help to maintain and restore the pseudo-mucinous part of the tear film, reducing the most common symptoms of dry eye normally stemming from: - mechanical stress (use of CL) - environmental stress such as wind, air-conditioning, smoke - visual stress from computers, reading, close work.

Add details of the company’s activities in 2012. “Spreyes”, a comfort drop with hyaluronic acid that can be vaporized directly on the open eye, was launched in Italy at the beginning of this year. Spreyes was developed as a way of combining a cosmetic and a pharmacological product in one; promoting both ocular wellbeing in the anterior eye (cornea, sclera and conjunctiva) and around the eye and eyelid. The cosmetic element relates to the skin around the eye while the pharmacological element is dedicated to tear film substitution. As already mentioned, after the acquisition by Bruno Farmaceutici, the strategy involved consolidation of the Italian and the international markets, with a focus on the R&D activity for the creation of new products that will be presented in the next years. Will you attend any European trade shows in the months ahead? For the first time we’ll be as exhibitor at OPTI MUNICH (January 2013), taking the chance for the formal presentation of “fusion technology” on the European market together with the results of international comparative studies on Fusion 1day CL. Next March we’ll also be attending MIDO in Milan for the first time, a chance to reveal the important developments for the years ahead.

November • 2012

European Lenses and Technology

41


EUROPEAN LENSES & TECHNOLOGY

Continuing Education

Eyewear Design And Development Looking beyond logos and markings By Mike Hundert and Nicolas Roseillier

Learning Objectives: Upon completion of this program, the participant should be able to: 1. Understand today’s eyewear manufacturing dynamics, from country of origin to methods and materials. 2. Better understand how to evaluate the eyewear purchased for your office. 3. Learn how to best choose and describe quality eyewear for every patient.

M

ost people, sellers and consumers alike assign a value to a product according to the credentials of a designer’s insignia, the store in which it was bought or the stated country of origin. In the world of eyewear frames especially, that has often been the case. However, to really evaluate a frame’s value, it’s more than just its logo or “alleged” country of origin. UNDERSTANDING FRAME VALUE Value is a combination of: brand, design, product components, material quality, manufacturing and the vendor from which the frame is purchased. Brands: Brands affect perceptions and attitudes, cre-

42

European Lenses and Technology

ating the ability to charge a “brand premium.” That is matched with the need for higher prices to offset both royalty payments and marketing commitments. A brand guardian’s (i.e., eyewear licensee) job is to deliver on its promises, which includes creating a lifestyle perception embodied in its products that a consumer can choose to experience. Eyewear may be the easiest way that a consumer can have access to an aspirational brand, usually out of reach financially. For example, you can spend $4,000 to drape a Chanel handbag over your arm, or a tenth of that ($400 or less) for a pair of Chanel sunglasses that declare, “You’re a Chanel woman.” Every brand has a set of core values. It’s in its DNA. Review the brands highlighted, and discover for yourself what comes to mind to sense the emotions a brand can emote. Build a brand book for your office. List the three to five most important characteristics of every brand in your office. Visit every brand’s Web page or grill your representatives to help build your brand book. Design: The design process is a collaboration between designers and factory engineers to ultimately create the CAD drawings that lead to manufacturing. The designer is an artist that draws inspiration from culture and practicality. After all, eyewear is both a fashion accessory as well as a medical device. Combining cues from the fashion world with the wisdom of opti-

November • 2012


Continuing Education

November • 2012

European Lenses and Technology

43


EUROPEAN LENSES & TECHNOLOGY

Continuing Education

cal experience builds a high quality frame that will enhance a consumer’s experience. The designer must also be aware and manage the costs associated with the design. Each brand has a competitive matrix that must be respected from the price perspective. The designer begins by establishing the foundation based on the brand’s following and its consumer demographics, including age, income and lifestyle considerations. Technically, both design and engineering examine shape and form. They look for details such as the sharpness of angles that may make an acetate frame provocative on paper but difficult to achieve since standard “tumbling” that is used to give frames their luster rounds off edges and may destroy the designer’s intent. The more successful models that fit a wider variety of faces are balanced, i.e., neither too “wingy” nor too “sad.” Does the style and design reflect the brand’s appropriate quotient of imagination, inventiveness, excitement, sophistication, fashion and uniqueness, faithful to the brand’s core principle? A designer usually creates some characteristics, often components, that are used consistently from model to model, weaving a cohesive story that brings a common identity to each style in a collection. Take the temple example from the John Varvatos Collection. Each of its temples are capped-off with a metal piece that carries the brand’s iconic symbols. When building a sunglass collection, lenses and coatings are identified to be used throughout the brand’s sun collection, creating an opportunity for additional storytelling that makes sense with the lifestyle of the consumers who best identify with that brand. The difference between a brand and a product is that a brand has many “brand extensions,” often in the form of licensed products, such as accessories... and eyewear. Designers of these various products share inspiration in an effort to ensure products under a brand are seamless in their attributes and consistent

Shoes are Boring, Wear Sneakers The Converse website says that it is “a brand that honors its heritage of seeing things a little differently, loving people who want to change the world for the better, and basically celebrating the spirit of rebellion and originality in basketball, Rock & Roll and anywhere else you find it.”

44

European Lenses and Technology

in delivering similar experiences. Using those keys to trigger the imagination, the designer combines intuition and experience to develop a fashion-leading product. Most often, those ideas are then matched with the commercial realities that might temper the design. Or the objectives for one model might call for a style that screams out to garner attention for the collection at the expense of sales. LOOK FOR… Materials and production—Check how well the frame is polished, especially around the hinges of an acetate frame. On metal, poor polishing is most easily observed at solder points. The connection should be smooth, with no extra solder. Poor polishing can lead to color prematurely peeling due to lack of proper adhesion of the spray color on the metal part.

THE COLLECTION PLAN At REM, we call it “The Perfect World.” Those responsible for design, brand management, sales and inventory management agree precisely on how many models should be in a collection “in the perfect world.” This is a living document, revisited and re-evaluated regularly throughout the year. We maintain such a plan for two years in advance given that product ideas often take 18 months or longer to bring to market. The Perfect World includes an outlook of how many new models will need to be phased out and introduced each year. For instance, today we would consider a trendier brand having more acetate (perhaps 50 percent) than is average (about 20 to 25 percent). The trendier the collection, the quicker the rotation. Women’s collections generally turn over more frequently. Men are usually more conservative in their choice, making it unnecessary to create as many new styles each year. A decision on how much color and what colors are appropriate is decided upon, often including the brand’s licensing managers in that discussion. Creating a Perfect World in a dispensary is sound advice. A frame buyer (optician, manager, doctor) has the responsibility to know their clientele, including the local demographics. A buyer can create a product perfect world plan that matches that insight. If there are schools nearby be sure to have the appropriate choices for that age group. And remember: Don’t judge a frame on how it looks on you! You may be far from the intended market for that frame. MANUFACTURING Production is the serious culmination of the design process. Manufacturing is complex, and the steps taken to make a resulting beautiful frame can often be taken for granted. It is not unusual for as many as 250 technical operations to take place to make high-quality

November • 2012


Continuing Education

frames. The resultis a combination of high special techniques. Beta titanium is a springy alloy 1. Utilizing the design platform. Utilizing the design platform, and knowing cousin to pure titanium (think 2. For different models. the number of models to be created: Silhouette’s three-piece mount3. Choose colors 1. Draw the styles, freehand and using ing). This material is unique to a. On metal, any Pantone color is illustrator software. work with as well. In this case it possible. 2. Refine and define specifics, including all is neither soldered nor welded. b. In acetate, review options in dimensions of materials. If it does have a hinge (unlike target colors from a dozen difa. Evaluate screw-to-screw distance. ferent manufacturers. Silhouette) the barrels of the b. Review depth for multifocal c. Determine whether to use hinge is stamped into the temple friendliness (more important domestic or imported acetates. for some collections than for others as it is being formed into a single 4. Refine and make prototypes depending on the target market). piece. of each color with any design “Foil transfer” coloring is more revisions. complicated and is usually con5. Agree on final target design(s). SECURE ALL PRELIMINARY APPROVALS fined to metal frames. A design 6. Get final approval internally and 1. Brand and trademark use. is created on a computer, which from licensor if a brand is licensed. 2. Determine any market restriction. is then printed on a foil. The plated frame receives a clear technology and creati-vity—the blending of science lacquer coating. The foil is wrapped over the area and art, just as frames are both a fashion accessory where the color pattern is desired. It is then baked and a medical device. Read through these steps, look in an oven where the ink on the foil essentially melts at the photos and imagine a tour of the factory. from the foil into the lacquer coating. Once cooled, the foil is peeled off and the color appears on the PRODUCTION frame. CNC and/or laser cutting is often used to 1. Organize production lines. Develop the tools reveal various layers of a laminated material. It is posand jigs as well as any molds and dies necessary for sible to “dial in” the depth of the laser cuts desired to production. control what layer is revealed. 2. Identify machinery needs. They may be any vari4. Plastic handmade frames (not injection molded) ety of CNC, laser, injection molding machines, etc. can vary greatly by design. Materials are cut into 3. Metal frame production begins with cutting the rectangular pieces about the height and width of the rim wires. This requires extreme precision, which frame front. Modern factories have invested highly in often differentiates one factory from another. The the past decade to automate the milling steps. While quality of a factory can often be judged by their eyetraditionally each cut of plastic meant moving the wire cutting processes. Remember, production from one order must be identical on all subsequent orders. This ensures that the ECP and their lab’s experience is consistent from order to order. Eyewires are soldered to endpieces and the bridge, while temples are being machined and hinges are being attached. The metal frames are tumbled and hand polished for a smooth finish before going to plating and/or being subjected to other coloring techniques. The quality of coloring is affected by the quality of the frame’s surface. A base is applied by electroplating, usually in gold, silver or a shade of gunmetal. The frame may then be coated with a color spray paint. The best quality paints for eyewear come from Switzerland. Titanium frames are more expensive for several reasons. The raw material is more expensive, but frame from one machine to another, today’s computer the larger cost difference is due to its fabrication assisted “CNC” machines feature multiple cutting requirements. Titanium is extremely hard, requiring blades that are directed to make specific cuts and huge presses to stamp any impression into the matebevels, including the eyewire groove, before spitting rial. Special welding equipment is used for titanium, as it out and grabbing a new piece of material. Multiple opposed to soldering equipment used for other metlayer acetate provides infinite opportunities to cut als. Coloring titanium is not always simple either since and reveal various layers and colors. Tumbling for days colors adhere differently to this material requiring amidst polishing agents and materials brings out the DEVELOPMENT PROCESS

BUILDING PROTOTYPES

November • 2012

European Lenses and Technology

45


EUROPEAN LENSES & TECHNOLOGY

Continuing Education

material’s shine, which is then finished by hand polishing. Too much polishing can wear through the frame, destroying it. Meanwhile, temples are shaped and then “shot” with a wire core. Temple ornaments or plaques are attached in a variety of ways, including imbedding them into the plastic. 5. Injection molded frames are made in yet another way. Materials for optical injected frames are usually propionate, TR-90 (or its derivative), carbon graphite or similar. In each case, the materials come in sacks of pellets. The machine melts the pellets and forces them into a mold of the model’s shape. When removed and cooled the part is popped out of the mold and another one is made. Meanwhile that frame part is tumbled smooth. Coloring can be done in the mold. In other words, if you want a black frame you can use black pellets. Other colors are usually spray-painted with paints that can be absorbed by these materials. Patterns can be made on the materials by masking off sections, or even by simply holding a mask up to the plastic when spraying it with color. If you want tortoise, then color the whole frame in a light brown, followed by holding up a mask that has a series of holes and then spraying that mask with a dark brown. Pull the mask away and you have a tortoise-like look. Molds for injection molding can be very expensive so high volume is required for a company to usually invest in molded products. Some designs call for pad printing or digital printing. Pad printing is simple, printing what is created on a metal plate, the same technique used for most temple and demo lens markings. Digital printing is a relatively new art for eyewear. It is used most often to print any design on a plastic temple. The part is inserted into a special printer that applies the graphic to the plastic. 6. Acetate temples most commonly have their wire core “shot” or ultrasonically embedded into the plastic temple. Sometimes the wire core is also laminated into the temple. There are many core options, which is determined during design. Temple tips may have

46

European Lenses and Technology

an embedded logo, which requires precision cutting, laying in of a foil logo and covering with epoxy. 7. Nosepads are chosen to meet a variety of functional and design needs. Size and system is decided upon during the design phase and is made to order during production, including the dimensions and orientation of the pads. Metal frames also require choosing the type of nosepad arms and pad shape/size. Acetate frame design requires selecting the size and angle of the pad placement, which depends on the audience. For Asian and African-American fits (those people with a “flatter” bridge) part of the production may have different nosepads, fit lower and with increased depth, flaring wider and faster. 8. Finally the frame is assembled to bring all the component parts together. Frames are adjusted and compared to a CAD drawing to make sure the arc of the front and the bend of the temples are consistent and according to expectations of designs. 9. Cases and packaging are made in parallel at specialty case manufacturers. 10. Nonprescription sunglasses require a decision about bezel design. That determines whether the frame will also be Rxable. A “U-shaped” groove is commonly used for nonprescription sunglasses. A “V-shaped” groove is the common shape for products that will be Rxed. Sun lens material, colors, coatings and if polarized are determined in the design phase. They are sourced from lens manufacturers, and usually edged and glazed at an assembler. Where the sunglass lens work is completed often is the country of origin marking that appears on the frame. As an example, the frame can be made in China and shipped to a lens company in Italy. There, the lens company makes and glazes the lenses into the frame. Expect that frame marking to read “Made in Italy.” This is yet another example why you need to know how to evaluate product well beyond the country of origin marking. QUALITY ASSURANCE AND CONTROL The frame has been manufactured but the quality of the intent must be confirmed. Quality assurance means that quality happens at all stages, not just at the end of production (quality control). Material quality is checked when received from component manufacturers (for example, hinge size and

November • 2012


Continuing Education

finish, nose-pad color and consistency), then at every stage of production and finally before packaging. After a visual inspection, the frame is adjusted to the specs for front curve and tilt (pantoscopic angle). Batch testing is used to ensure that all the design and operational features are delivered as specified. The functioning of hinges can be tested using a mechanical device that opens and closes the temple hundreds of times to ensure that the hinge will not wear excessively or the screw design won’t back itself out of the hole in the first week of wear. The finish is tested using a standard 3M-tape test. Like AR coatings, tape can be used to test adhesion with results predicting years of wearability under normal conditions. In fact, there are a variety of internationally agreed standards that frames meet and in some countries are required. For example, a common test for Europe’s CE mark includes a sweat test to determine metal leachFRAME DURABILITY TESTING ing as well as • Chemical resistance • Cloth abrasion finish durabil• Cosmetic inspection • Cycle humidity QUV ity. Drop ball • Horizontal stress • Lateral bridge stress impact and Outdoor 45° rack Saltwater soak • • optical tests • Steel wool abrasion • Temple bending for sunglasses • Titanium content • Vertical bridge stress and reading • Vertical stress glasses are (List taken from the COLTS Labs testing required. catalogue at colts-laboratories.com) YOUR CHECKLIST: QUALITY VS. VALUE Using the attribute table, review a product’s attributes. Consider using the same checklist when showing customers the differences between that $100 and $400 frame. Mix and match the results for each of the categories. In summary, know your materials. Understand that processes like casting, acid etching, coloring techniques, finishing steps and care, and the like all add to a frame’s price. Brand names add to the cost through their required royalty ATTRIBUTE QUALITY payments and marMaterial cost $, $$, $$$ keting Precision finishing (visual inspection, ✓,✓✓, ✓✓✓ tumbling, polishing, color) requireSmooth functioning (flex strength) ✓,✓✓, ✓✓✓ ments— not necTemple consistency (returns to original ✓,✓✓, ✓✓✓ adjusted position when worn) essarily Components—add value, structure ✓,✓✓, ✓✓✓ because Attention to detail (milling, beveling, ✓,✓✓, ✓✓✓ the frame engraving, transitions, construction) is any Fit (from temple tips to nosepads) ✓,✓✓, ✓✓✓ better Function (hinges, bridge, adjustment) ✓,✓✓, ✓✓✓ or more expensive to manufacture. And please don’t decide whether to carry a frame based on how it looks on you. You are one of many target markets.

VENDOR AND VENDOR PROGRAMS And finally, make sure the suppliers you choose have your best interests at heart. Make certain they support you with information, education, point-of-sale materials, a good warranty, and keen knowledge of the industry and products they sell. What is their longevity record? Where are they when you need them? What is their fill rate? Nevertheless, timely resupply is the responsibility of your vendor. Ask about a company’s “fill rate.” The most reliable companies will have a fill rate (orders received today are shipped today) of about 95 percent. This company prides itself in a fill rate above 97 percent. Look for frame suppliers whose knowledge, commitment and passion for the supply chain are superior, who can talk-the-talk of how their products are made that can help you educate consumers in ways that elevate your credibility and their comfort in following your advice. PUTTING IT ALL TOGETHER With the material presented in this course, you can now rely on a new knowledge, which is more accurate than evaluating a product based on its country of origin marking. Clearly, the country in which a product is made no longer assures its quality or value. More pertinent is the “factory of origin,” since each is individually owned by people who have different commitments to excellence. Since you can’t evaluate those factories, we hope this primer will assist you in defining product value that can lead to the ultimate objective—creating customer delight.

November • 2012

European Lenses and Technology

47


EUROPEAN LENSES & TECHNOLOGY

Innovations

Lenses & technology 1. CARL ZEISS VISION SUNLENSES/MYKITA FOR ZEISS 100 In 1912, Carl Zeiss revolutionised the market with the launch of “Punktal”, the first precision eyeglass lens.This year, celebrating “100 years of precision lenses – 100 years of Better Vision” now concludes in the most fashionable way with Mykita, the Berlin eyewear company.The two companies have been partnering for several years with all MYKITA sunglasses being equipped with Zeiss lenses – so it was natural for both brands to team up for a project where excellence and innovation come together. Mykita has created a Limited Edition sunglasses line – The Mykita for ZEISS 100 Birthday Edition, which includes 100 numbered pairs of Wynton, a classical panto that has been transferred into Mykita’s ultralight stainless steel concept.The glasses come in the corporate colours of ZEISS, and feature blue ZEISS nylon sunlenses, exclusively developed for this edition. www.sunlens.zeiss.com

2. WELCH ALLYN iExaminer Welch Allyn, a leading medical diagnostics device manufacturer that specializes in improving patient outcomes, announces it has utilized advanced ophthalmology technology already in the hands of physicians to create the Welch Allyn iExaminer™—a product that consists of a hardware adapter and associated software that allows healthcare providers to capture, store, send and retrieve images from the Welch Allyn PanOptic™ Ophthalmoscope using the iPhone™ 4 or 4S. The PanOptic features patented optical technology that creates a viewing area of the fundus and retinal nerve in an undilated pupil that is 5 times larger than that of a traditional ophthalmoscope and increases magnification by 26 percent to more easily see retinal details. Now available in select international markets, the iExaminer rapidly captures and transmits the retinal images created by the PanOptic for easy, cost-effective eyeground image documentation. “The iExaminer allows healthcare providers to easily capture and share the images of a fundus in a moment’s notice, helping to improve the quality of care provided—especially for remote users who may not have easy access to specialists,” said Rick Farchione, senior manager, physical assessment at Welch Allyn. “It will increase workflow efficiency by allowing providers to capture and share images from any clinical environment. It is a low-cost way to digitally capture eye imaging and will also make it easier for providers to share images with their patients, helping to improve patient knowledge and compliance.” www.welchallyn.com

3. ESSILOR Varilux S series Essilor was awarded the top prize for Varilux S series in the Vision Category at the SILMO d’Or Awards in Paris in October. “This award demonstrates the success of our innovation strategy, which enables us to offer consumers ever more innovative and effective solutions for correcting their vision and procuring the best possible visual comfort.We are proud of this recognition by our peers of our ongoing efforts to improve vision around the world, a mission to which all the Group’s teams are committed each day, in every country where we do business,” declared Hubert Sagnières, Essilor Chairman and Chief Executive Officer. This Silmo d’Or rewards the technological achievement of Essilor’s teams who have created new lenses that revolutionize presbyopia correction. More than 50 years after the invention of Varilux, the new Varilux S series range of progressive lenses is a major technological advance designed to bring better vision to the nearly two billion presbyopes around the globe. Two patented* technologies, NanoptixTM and SynchroneyesTM, push technological barriers and make Varilux S series truly unique lenses that offer a large field of vision, equilibrium in motion and reduced adaptation time. www.varilux-s-series.com

48

European Lenses and Technology

November • 2012


Continuing Education

November • 2012

European Lenses and Technology

49


EUROPEAN LENSES +

TECHNOLOGY

European Correspondence Office FGE srl – Fabiano Gruppo Editoriale, Reg. San Giovanni, 40 - 14053 Canelli (AT) - Italy Tel (+39) 0141 1768903 Fax (+39) 0141 1768900 email: 2020europe@fgeditore.it EUROPEAN LENSES +

Editorial direction by Boyd Norton Associates Editor: Clodagh Norton: Tel +44 (o) 1580 852 445 email: c.norton@fgeditore.it

TECHNOLOGY

Publishing director/Direttore responsabile Ferdinando Fabiano

A Jobson publication November 2012

Editorial correspondents: Paul Barfoot, Joan Grady, Kerstin Vosshans, Lorna Hall, Tamsin Kingswell Design & production by FGE srl - Fabiano Gruppo Editoriale Operations Manager: Nicole Togni Production Manager: Pierpaola Eraldi Image consulting for fashion shoots: Giuliana Benatti Targioni Publisher/Redazione FGE srl – Fabiano Gruppo Editoriale, Reg. San Giovanni, 40 - 14053 Canelli (At) - Italy

International sales France, Italy, United Kingdom, Spain, Austria, Germany, Denmark, Benelux, Switzerland, Scandinavia, Liechtenstein, Czech Republic, Poland and East Europe Sales Director Matilde Sometti Tel (39) 045-8036334 Fax (39) 045-590740 matilde@studiozanasi.it Sales Director USA – Dennis Murphy Tel (1) 212 274 7101 Fax (1) 212 431 5579 DMurphy@jobson.com Sales Director Israel – Asa Talbar Tel (972) 3 562 9565 Fax (972) 3 562 9567 talbar@talbar.co.il Sales Director Asia (excl. Japan & Korea) – Mary Ng Tel (852) 2730 2282 Fax (852) 3121 0348 futuramktg@netvigator.com Sales Director Korea – Young-Seoh Chinn Tel (822) 481 3411/3 Fax (822) 481 3414 jesmedia@unitel.co.kr Sales Director Japan - Sho Harihara Tel (81) 6 4790 2222 Fax (81) 6 4793 0800 sho@yukarimedia.com

FGE srl - Fabiano Gruppo Editoriale is publishing 20/20 Europe under license from Jobson Medical Information LLC, owner of the trademark 20/20. FGE srl - Fabiano Gruppo Editoriale is solely liable for the content of 20/20 Europe.

Subcriptions:

Annual Subscriptions €100 for customers based in Europe and €250 for all other countries. Payments in British Pounds Sterling and U.S. Dollars are accepted at the exchange rate published in the London Financial Times on the first business day of the month in which the payment is received. Address your subscription enquiry to the European Correspondence Office. Payment must accompany your order. If you have any questions regarding a current subscription, please contact the European Correspondence Office. Print and reproduction: FGE srl - Fabiano Gruppo Editoriale - Canelli (AT), Italy No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form, without the prior permission of the Publisher. Aucune partie de cette publication ne peut être reproduite, enregistrée par un dipositif de restitution de l'information, ou transmise sous une forme quelconque sans l’autorisation préalable de l'editeur. Die Vervielfältigung, Speicherung in einem Informationswidergewinnungssystem oder die Vermittlung jeglicher Teile dieser Veröffentlichung in welcher Form auch immer ist ohne die Genehmigung des Herausgebers untersagt. È vietata la riproduzione, memorizzazione in un sistema che ne permetta il recupero o qualsiasi forma di trasmissione parziale o totale di questa pubblicazione senza la precedente autorizzazione dell’editore. Queda prohibida la reproducción total o parcial de la presente publicación, así como su almacenamiento en un sistema de consulta de datos y su transmisión en cualquier forma que sea, sin previa autorizacíon del editor.

FGE Srl - Regione San Giovanni, 40 - 14053 Canelli (AT) - nr. 5/2012 - Anno XXIII - bimestrale

For subscription/circulation enquiries contact the Circulation Department Tel (+39) 0141 1768903 Fax (+39) 0141 1768900 email: 2020europe@fgeditore.it

Frame Innovations What’s hot next season? > 24

Tommy Hilfiger TH1985/B/S UY7JS from SAFILO

Colour Trend Natural Obsession > 16 N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 1


Advertisers The November 2012 issue is now closed. If you wish to make any amendments for the January 2013 issue, please contact Pierpaola Eraldi at email: p.eraldi@fgeditore.it or fax (+39) 0141 1768903 by 19th December 2012. Any material received after this deadline will automatically be inserted into the next available issue of 20/20 EUROPE.

As a service to its readers, 20/20 EUROPE provides the complete telephone and fax numbers of European manufacturers, importers and distributors (as supplied by these companies). Each listing is in alphabetical order by country code. Whilst every care is taken to ensure that data in this Directory is accurate, the Publishers cannot accept and hereby disclaim any liability to any party for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions resulting from negligence accident or any other cause.

International Country Code and Telephone Codes Australia

AU

61

Finland

FIN

358

Latvia

LV

371

Serbia e Montenegro SCG

Austria

A

43

France

F

Belgium

B

32

Germany

Bulgaria

BU

359

Canada

33

Lithuania

LI

370

Singapore

SG

65

D

49

Luxembourg

L

352

Slovakia

SK

42

Greece

GR

30

Malta

M

35

Slovenia

SL

386

CA 1514

Hong Kong

HK

852

New Zealand

NZ

61

Spain+Canary Islands E

34

Sweden

S

46

Cyprus

CY

357

Hungary

H

36

Norway

N

47

Switzerland

CH

41

Croatia

HR

385

Iceland

IC

354

Poland

PL

48

The Netherlands

NL

31

Czech Republic

CZ

42

Ireland

IRL

353

Portugal

P

351

Turkey

TR

90

Denmark

DK

45

Italy

I

39

Romania

R

40

Ukraine

UA

38

Estonia

EST

372

JP

81

Russian Federation

RU

7

United Kingdom

UK

44

Japan

381

Advertiser listings AREA 98

cover 1

Ic! Berlin

Carl Zeiss Vision Italia

49

Mido

DIOPS

35

Modo

Essilor International

43

Henry Jullien

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

cover 4

13 cover 2

Opti

38

Optim

31

3

Pramaor

33

Mondottica

9

The Eye Show London

56

OGI

5

i n t e r n a t i o n a l e y e f a s h i o n 51


Directory listings

AREA 98 SRL

DIOPS

www.essilor.fr

Italy

Korea

FIN Essilor Oy

Tel +39 0432 646 411

Tel +82 53 350 78 30

Tel 358 9 34 80 800

Fax +39 0432 646 451

Fax +82 53 353 78 12

Fax 358 9 34 80 84 30

area98@area98.it

www.diops.co.kr

ESSILOR INTERNATIONAL

www.essilor.fi

Instruments Department

I Essilor Italia Spa

www.organising-vision.com

Tel 39 02 535791

A Essilor Austria Gmbh

Fax 39 02 53579260

Tel 43.22.36 680.250

www.essilor.it

Fax 43.22.36 680.29250

IRL Essilor Ireland Ltd

B Essilor Belgium S.A. N.V.

Tel 353.61 22.85.53

ELCE

Tel 32.2 559.72.56

Fax 353.6130.25.22

France

Fax 32.2 520.11.84

N Essilor Norge A/S

Tel. +33 3 84 42 43 01

CH Essilor Suisse

Tel 47 32 72 62 79

Fax +33 3 84 42 42 77

Tel 41 22 827 47 27

Fax 47 32.72.62.00

BRANDS O.I.

cabaud@elce.com

Fax 41 22 827 47 97

www.essilor.no

Italy

www.elce.com

www.essilor-instruments.ch

NL Essilor Nederland

Tel +39 0438 403399

D Essilor Gmbh

Tel 31 316 580 580

Fax +39 0438 491025

Tel 49 180/500 47 18

Fax 31 316 580 585

info@brands-oi.it

Fax 49 180/500 47 19

www.essilor.ni

www.brands-oi.it

www.essilor.de

P Essilor Portugal

DK Essilor Danmark A/S

Tel 351 219 179 890

Tel 45 70 20 84 44

Fax 351 219 162 690

Fax 45 70 20 84 45

savinstrumentos@essilor.pt

EPOS SRL

www.essilor.dk

S Essilor Ab

Italy

E Essilor Espana Sa

Tel 46 8 621 26 00

Tel +39 02 89159174

Tel 34 91 334 32 00

Fax 46 8 760 95 91

Fax +39 02 89180181

Fax 34 91 358 50 86

www.essilor.se

CARL ZEISS VISION SUNLENS

info@eposmilano.com

www.essilor.es

UK Essilor Ltd

Italy

www.eposmilano.com

F Essilor France

Tel 44 1454 423454

Tel 39 0331 851 300

Tel 33 820 210 220

Fax 44 1454 423444

Fax 39 0331 858 095

Fax 33 1 72 70 76 85

www.essilor.co.uk

www.sunlens.zeiss.com

Mail : Scinstr@Essilor.Fr

www.area98.it

52 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


Fax 33 384 43 58 825

Fax +49 2656 9526299

Distributors’ list on request

info@ivko.de www.ivko.de

FLAIR

www.natural-eyewear.com

Germany

HONG KONG OPTICAL FAIR

www.maybach-eyewear.com

Tel +49 2521 84 00 0

China

Fax +49 2521 84 00 80

Tel +852 25 84 43 33

flair@flair.de

exhibitions@hktdc.org

INSPECS Ltd

www.flair.de

www.hktdc.com/ex/hkopticalfair/17

Tel +44 (0) 1225 717000

KENMARK GROUP

sales@inspecs.com

USA

www.inspecs.com

Tel +502.266.8966

FREDERIC BEAUSOLEIL

IC! BERLIN BRILLEN GMBH

Fax +502.267.4486

FRANCE

Germany

Distributors’ list on request

Tel 0033 142772829

Tel +49 30 41 71 77-76

Fax 033 142777726

Fax +49 30 41 71 77-11

contact@beausoleil.fr

mail@ic-berlin.de

www.beausoleil.fr

www.ic-berlin.de

INTERCAST EUROPE S.p.A.

L.G.R. SRL

Italy

Italy

Tel 39 0521 607555

Tel +39 0643413879

GÖTTI SWITZERLAND GMBH

IMMAGINE 98

Fax 39 0521 607916

Fax +39 0683605553

SWITZERLAND

Italy

info@nxt-vision.com

infi@lgr-sunglasses.com

Tel 0041 44 7826047

Tel +39 0435 50 11 37

www.nxt-vision.com

www.lgr-sunglasses.com

Fax 0041 44 7826041

Fax +39 0435 50 70 98

contact@gotti.ch

info@immagine-eyewear.com

www.gotti.ch

www.immagine-eyewear.com INTERNATIONAL VISION EXPO USA

LUNEAU TECHNOLOGY OPERATIONS

www.visionexpoeast.com

France Tel +33 232 989 132 Fax +33 235 020 294 contact@luneautech.com

HENRY JULLIEN

IVKO GMBK

www.visionix.com

France

Germany

www.briot.com

Tel 33 384 35 88 28

Tel +49 2656 952620

www.weco-instrumentsd.com

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 53


MIDO Srl Unipersonale Italy Tel 39 02 32673673 Fax 39 02 324233 www.mido.it

sales@mondottica.com www.mondottica.com NL Mondottica Nederlands BV

The Netherlands Tel 0031 493 399964 Fax 0031 493 322458

Tel: 0031 172 497 449 Fax: 0031 172 501 526 FR Mondottica France Tel: 33 1 45 62 24 94 Fax: 33 1 45 63 31 25

MODO EYEWEAR Italy

OPAL

Tel +39 02 4399 8986

France

Fax +39 02 4398 3908

Tel +33 47 26 98 450

Europe@modo.com

Fax +33 47 26 98 451

www.modo.com

OGI EYEWEAR USA

info@opal.fr www.opal.fr

Tel 1 7635921493 Fax 1 7635373933 MARCHON EUROPE

info@ogiframes.com

The Netherlands

www.ogiframes.com

Tel 31 20 581 5050

Italy

Fax 31 20 581 5069

Tel 390248712569

CS@marchon.com

Germany

www.marchon.com

Tel 49.8024.9917.40

OPTI Germany www.opti-munich.com

Fax: 49.8024.9917.44 Israel Tel 97.23.960.1997 Fax: 97.23.960.1996 MAZZUCCHELLI 1849 SPA

New Zealand

Italy

Tel 64.9.532.9201

Tel +39 0331 826111 Fax +39 0331 826301 info@mazzucchelli1849.it www.mazzucchelli1849.it

54 20/20 Europe

MONDOTTICA United Kingdom Tel: 44 1159 677 912 Fax: 44 1159 677 179

Fax: 64.9.532.9306 Switzerland Tel 41227315519 Fax 41227387204

OPTIM SA Spain Tel 34 93 480 9393 Fax 34 93 480 2032 export@grupoptim.com www.grupoptim.com Distributor list on request

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


Tel 33 1 30 14 44 00 Fax 33 1 30 43 08 14 FIN Fenno Optikka OY Tel 358 40 485 7578

PPG Optical Materials USA Tel 1 724 325 5915 www.cr39casters.com www.ppgtrivex.com European Office Contact Fréderic LeFranc Tel 33 1 4698 8138 Fax 33 1 4698 8263 flefranc@ppg.com

PRAMAOR Italy Tel +39 0437 660 523 Fax +39 0437 733 115 commerciale@pramaor.com www.pramaor.com

RODENSTOCK

Fax 358 92 763 6113

SAFILENS S.r.l.

Germany

GR Union Optic

Italy

Tel 49 89 720 2745

Tel 030 2310 79 7786

Tel 39 0421 272616

Fax 49 89 720 2749

Fax 030 2310 79 7852

Fax 39 0421 770614

A Rodenstock Österreich

I Rodenstock Italia SpA

safilens@safilens.com

Tel 43 1 599000

Tel 39 02 31041

www.safilens.com

Fax 43 1 599 00150

Fax 39 02 310 4200

B Rodenstock Benelux N.V.

N Rodenstock Norge A/S

Tel 32 3 880 1550

Tel 47 32 770220

SAFILO

Fax 32 3 880 1556

Fax 47 32 770270

Italy

BUL Opticommerce Ltd

NL Rodenstock Nederland

Tel 39 049 6985111

Tel 359 2 986 9030

Tel 31 50 544 1441

Fax +39 049 6985360

Fax 359 2 986 9031

Fax 31 50 541 7134

www.safilo.com

CH Rodenstock Schweiz AG

P Neppach Importacoes Lda

Tel 41 1 823 1444

Tel 351 21 441 3654

Fax 41 1 823 1474

Fax 351 21 442 8270

THE EYE SHOW LONDON

CZ Rodenstock CR s.r.o.

P Prats Lusitania S.A.

United Kingdom

Tel 42 0186 346501

Tel 351 1 410 7177

Tel +44 (0)14 42 87 15 77

Fax 42 0186 346121

Fax 351 1 410 9453

Marketing@theeyeshow.com

D Rodenstock GmbH

PL Rodenstock Polska Sp.z.o.o.

www.theeyeshow.com

Tel 49 89 72020

Tel 48 32 201 6240

Fax 49 89 7202 629

Fax 48 32 206 8358

DK Rodenstock Danmark A/S

S Rodenstock Sverige AB

ZILLI Eyewear

Tel 45 86 26 33 11

Tel 46 1 818 8000

France

Fax 45 86 26 31 88

Fax 46 1 855 9631

Tel +33 4 72 19 21 04

E Industrias de Optica Prats

UK Rodenstock (UK) Ltd

Fax +33 4 72 19 19 99

Tel 34 93 640 0708

Tel 44 1474 325555

eyewear@zilli.fr

Fax 34 93 640 6495

Fax 44 1474 535490

www.zilli.fr

F Rodenstock France S.A.R.L.

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2

international eye fashion 55


56 20/20 Europe

N OV E M B E R 2 01 2


20/20

europe

EUROPEAN LENSES +

TECHNOLOGY

international eye fashion

TRY YOUR ONLINE SUBSCRIPTION NOW

IT’S FREE!

DOWNLOAD THE SEPTEMBER ISSUE FROM www.2020europemagazine.com FGE S.r.l. - Fabiano Gruppo Editoriale - Reg. S. Giovanni 40 - 14053 Canelli (AT) - Italy Ph. +39 0141 1768903 - Fax +39 0141 1768900 - e-mail: 2020europe@fgeditore.it - www.2020europemagazine.com 2020052012

YES! I wish to subscribe to 20/20 europe (5 issues a year): 1 year printed version † 100 € for Europe † 250 € for all other countries

1 year † 100 € web online

I SHALL PAY: † By bank transfer to: FGE S.r.l. - IT57 Q060 8547 3000 0000 030 016 BIC CASRIT22 Cassa di Risparmio di Asti - Filiale di Canelli † By non-transferable bank cheque enclosed payable to FGE S.r.l. † By credit card

expiry date

CVV

PLEASE, PRINT CLEARLY (OR ATTACH BUSINESS CARD)

Card owner

Date of birth

Family name

First name

Company

VAT N° (strictly needed for Europe)

Address City

Country

Zip Code

e-mail Ph. Please specify:

COVER.indd 2

Fax

† Optician

† Company

Signature

† Other

18/10/12 15.10


EUROPEAN LENSES +

TECHNOLOGY

A Jobson publication November 2012

COVER.indd 1

FGE Srl - Regione San Giovanni, 40 - 14053 Canelli (AT) - nr. 5/2012 - Anno XXIII - bimestrale

Collection EXTASE - Photo non contractuelle - Photos : Olivier MOLLARD

20/20 europe November 2012

www.henry-jullien.com

Frame Innovations What’s hot next season? > 24

Tommy Hilfiger TH1985/B/S UY7JS from SAFILO

Colour Trend Natural Obsession > 16

18/10/12 15.10

20/20 Europe - November  

20/20 Europe - November Issue

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you