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The Loon Call

An Annual Newsletter for all Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Associates & Supporters www.weslemkoon.com

SPRING 2019 Our Family Cottage Memories of the Lake Page 1 President’s Address, Director and Financial Reporting Page 3 through 16

My Favourite Stop Along The Way Page 4 Help Keep Track Of Our Loon Population How to get involved

Turtles w w w Crossing . w e s l And e m k o oMemories n . c o mof How To Help Page 6 Junior Loons Activities Geocaching and more Page 10

Weslemkoon Contributions from Sue Locke and Rebecca Coles Pages 13 and 14

ISSN# 1480-9583 Volume 60 Cold Water Swimming The proper how-tos and details Page 21
 Calendar of Events
 Page 24

Details on Page 24

Our Family Cottage

David and Margaret Hardy, Cottage #121

As we shared our last supper of the summer on the deck this year, sun sparkling on the water, breeze blowing in the pine trees, we once again thought of what a wonderful place this is. Parents and children and grandchildren have been together many weeks and weekends over the years to share experiences and food and drink and to talk and appreciate the family time together. The magic of our lake weaves its spell and calls us back when we are away. The lake has been calling us back for 50 years now and we reflect occasionally on what a journey it has been. Margaret and I were married in 1966 and some of her happiest memories from childhood were sharing time with her best and oldest friend in the summer at their family camp near Sudbury, where cottages are camps and every family seems to have one. Margaret’s parents preferred to travel so they saw a lot of country but no camp. As an eager young husband it was clear that my task was to fulfill this lifelong dream of hers so we got busy. A friend recommended that we look at this remote lake with the mysterious name “Weslemkoon”. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Our first visit was on a sunny June day in 1966 to the north end of the lake. At that time, the Caverleys were running Rockhaven lodge at the dam and Ted and Betty Carr ran Tanglewood. Ted had opened the Old Snow Road from Caverley’s to his new at that time marina. The Hartsmere Road was gravel and where it crossed out of Hastings County at the bridge it became rougher and narrow. Meeting a log truck was a trial on this stretch and we did it many times. We were impressed with the rocks, the tall pine trees, the blue sky and the dark mysterious waters of the lake. That summer, a letter to the Dept. of Lands and Forests office in Tweed yielded many maps showing surveys of Crown Land cottage lots for sale around the lake. On thanksgiving weekend 1966 we rented a cabin and a boat from Rockhaven and set out to see the lake. Fortunately the weather was calm and sunny and we visited all the locations, including West Bay, Mackie Bay and Regina Bay. There were dozens for sale. All were water access and owning no boat we saw a problem. While we were musing about what to do next we got a notification in 1967 from Tweed of a new subdivision being offered on the north shore. On our first wedding anniversary in August, we were in the woods following the surveyor’s path around this new offering. It looked promising as there was a road nearby and power ran through the lots. Some, with long shorelines, were over $1,000! A lot of money to a young married couple. Early one weekday morning we set off for Tweed to attend the first come first served sale confident that we were up in time to get our choice of lots.

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We arrived in the pre-dawn darkness to find a dozen or more people on the doorstep, some who had been there overnight! Big shock! Persistence paid off however and eventually we purchased our own piece of the lake for the grand sum of $625, for a lot 2/3 of an acre with 220 feet of shoreline. Can’t do that today! We visited the lot that Thanksgiving, going in by boat rented from Rockhaven, run now by Charlie and Ethel Aide. 1968 was a busy year since in order to get a patent to the land we had to get a cabin up and habitable inside of two years. Bierworth’s of Bancroft put in a road for us and Hydro installed a power panel on the nearest pole. We pitched a tent overlooking the lake and set up camp ready to start construction. During the previous winter I had borrowed a plan book from Beaver Lumber and based on a design I liked drew up our own plans and bill of material. One momentous day that summer, a truck pulled in with a huge load of lumber, backed up sharply and dumped it in our parking lot with a crash, the way they used to do it, and we got busy not knowing how much we didn’t know about building cottages. By the end of the summer and with much help from friends and Marg’s very handy Father and Uncle we had the shell up and doors and windows in. The roof was the last step that year and progress was slowed since the lake’s magic spell had done its work on us young campers and we found we were expecting. Marg could no longer handle full bundles of shingles but trooper that she is she continued with half bundles and work progressed assisted by a young lad from the Aide family.

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boat from Goodreau Boats in Tilbury was the first in our fleet. We still have it, on its fourth paint job and powered up to a 20 Merc from the Viking 15 we started with. That Viking used to take us all around the lake including to West Bay where we would shop for bread and pies at the bakery there. The years have gone by and almost yearly improvements have been made, decks, docks, water systems, some new windows and doors and who can forget indoor plumbing, one of civilization’s great accomplishments. We started building in 1968 and I don’t ever expect to finish. It will be a work for generations. Time moved on, Rockhaven changed hands and burned, Ted and Betty Carr left Tanglewood, the bakery on West Bay closed, Ted and Dot Jennings moved into Tanglewood and ran it for many years. Children married, grandchildren arrived and still we gather at the family cottage, winter break for skating, skiing and snowmobiling, spring ice-out, summer boating and swimming, and in the fall a visit to marvel at the colours and share a Thanksgiving Dinner with family and neighbours. A few years ago, Elaine and family bought a cottage on Picnic Island a ten minute boat ride from our place after a broad search for property in the area. Only this lake had the childhood memories and right amount of magic for their family.

We returned next spring with our newborn daughter Elaine, who has been coming to the lake since before she was born and still loves it. Since we had no power in the early days in the cabin and it was not bug proof we pitched our tent inside and when it was 2 o’clock feeding time, infant formula was warmed on the Coleman stove. This continued until wiring was complete and power connected and siding was on and caulking done, then we were able to live more comfortably. Meanwhile the magic worked again and we were expecting once more. In 1970 we returned to the lake again with two youngsters, Elaine and Mike. They slept in carry cots under the pine trees while the parents worked on the cottage. We now had a daughter and a son who both still enjoy the cottage and hanging out with their aging parents. They have both been a blessing to us and we love it in summer when we are often all together at the lake with the mysterious name. The next year with our patent to the land secured and the cottage well in hand we turned to the water and built the first of many docks and the yearly contest with the ice began. A steel " 2

In 2016 our children and spouses organized a wonderful fiftieth wedding anniversary for us. Local friends and neighbours, as well as family from England, came to the celebration held on our deck on an amazingly warm afternoon and evening, making more wonderful memories for us. All these joys and blessings come from time spent together under the magic spell of the cottage on the lake called Weslemkoon.

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President’s Address

Ken Senter

The hot summer of 2018 is behind us, leaving memories of the unusual warm

lake. This dialogue outlining the advantages of LWCA will “build our

conversation should also extend to all users of the lake, for example, fellow

sleepless nights, trying to find the cool

brand” in our neighbourhood. This

cottage neighbours, year-round residents,

breeze we expect at night. Our AGM was held at the recently rebuilt Weslemkoon Marina where we were so graciously hosted by Paul Derumaux and Steve Murray. It has been years, or should I say beyond my memory since the AGM was held here, other than at Four Loons or Tanglewood marinas.

renters, campers, anglers, businesses,

List of Directors: Past President Stuart Inglis President Ken Senter Vice-President Patty Milne Secretary Carol Bell Treasurer Diane Morden Membership Carolyn Calhoun

As members of the LWCA and especially the directors do we recognize the importance of water quality of Lake Weslemkoon. Without it, the lake could lose its lake trout sensitive rating and face possible sale of existing Crown land lots, which would increase the pressure of degradation of our water quality. At the AGM a resolution was passed to increase the water testing of our lake from every three years to every two years. It was also resolved to access the Environmental Fund to alleviate the extra costs. This action reinforces our commitment to KEEP IT CLEAN, to protect our precious water that we swim in, play in and drink. Another important task that the LWCA has, is to increase membership on the lake and we have instituted a referral bonus for existing members that refer a new member. Hopefully this encourages more dialogue with new residents when they arrive at the

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

social media, and all visitors so that we all can work together to KEEP IT CLEAN, whether it be the water, land or social interactions. Again I would like to commend and thank profusely the members of the board who have worked so tirelessly and generously of their time. This effort has made my job appear invisible and I am truly grateful as I celebrate my fiftieth year on the lake and my final year of being president. The influx of new “young” board members working with the “old” directors will leave the LWCA in good hands for the years to follow. Bye for now, see you on the water, KEEP IT CLEAN.

Loon Call Alison Myles Legal & Municipal Affairs Paul Bottos Communications Janice Mackenzie Junior Loons Melissa Tervit Patty Milne Shoal Markers & Lake Levels Custodial Visits Steve Latto Water Quality Ian Mackenzie Forestry & Trails Bruce Magee Septics Patty Milne

Editor’s Corner Thank you for once again letting me share your stories. We scoot up one weekend each winter, thanking our friends for help in crossing to the island. How we love the blanketed, snowy silence. Now we anticipate the ice thaw in just a few weeks time to return, wondering how the ravens are fairing with a new family soon to arrive. Thank you as always to the Chiddy Family for introducing us to our Weslemkoon.
 Alison Myles
 Editor 2019
 looncalleditor@gmail.com
 Interested in editing the 2020 newsletter? Please contact the LWCA.

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Membership Report

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Carolyn Calhoun

Thanks to all Weslemkoon and Otter Lake LWCA supporters— we numbered 252 strong in 2018 which represents an increase from our 2017 total of 243. We’ve changed up our membership incentive program to encourage more new members to signup.  We now offer a $10 discount on membership fees if a current member refers a new member to enroll.  Similarly, if a current member refers a new friend of the lake to join the LWCA we can offer a $5 discount on their renewal fee.  As always, any assistance with recruiting new members and friends of the lake is deeply appreciated.  Thanks to all attendees of the 2018 Annual General Meeting held at Weslemkoon Marina.  We had a great turnout!    I encourage members and friends to register and pay dues by May 1, 2019.   You can reach me at calhoun8822@rogers.com concerning membership issues.  Once again thank you for your continued patronage of the LWCA enabling our various programs to thrive.

My Favourite Stop Along The Way Just after you pass Havelock - travelling east on Highway 7 - the greenery shows more grass than trees. Scre-e-e-eech on the brakes! There’s the Trading Post!Look at the tee-pees and totems. Let’s take a break. You turn in the old posts and down the driveway to the High Spring Trading Post entrance door. Is it a hotel? - post office? - a hardware store? Park. Walk in. You’re instantly calmed down by the quietness, the beautiful smell of fresh leather, the sight of entertaining and unusual and beautiful

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Members of the Cockeyed Loons inducting John Keeble during the LWCA 2018 AGM

Pam Lawton knick-nacks and artifacts. You slow down, look around. The colours are subtle, but vibrant. Deborah might greet you, or she might be in the back. Her Dad will be in the workshop, repairing any leather article folks bring in, or cutting skins of deer, cow, elk. You’ll turn down an aisle - whatever catches your interest. - and you’ll look on each side - admiring, wishing, wondering, remembering, feeling, smelling. The old west! - or north! Take your time - you’ll want many things - maybe buy one or two - or dream of native winter parkas, soft leather moccasins, affordable beaded tops, gorgeous deerskin jackets. The jewellery is stunning, affordable, unique. - much leather wear: saddles, belts, saddle bags (horse & motorcycle), chaps, vests. And Dad, Rick Mocon, repairs ANYTHING! It just goes on and on. t-shirts, gift cards, wallets, gifts - for all seasons, all ages. You’re relaxed now, even a bit dreaming. - a bit transported into another time. And you chuckle at the cards and gifts. Take your time; the dream-catcher has caught you! Enjoy!

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Water Quality Update with a focus on Lake Trout Habitat

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Ian Mackenzie & Lisa Thompson

This article will interpret the sampling done in 2018 of dissolved

In July, the surface waters at all sites were too warm for trout,

oxygen (DO) and temperature.

but the deeper waters were cooler; dissolved oxygen was still low in the bottom half of the lakes.

In order to monitor lake trout habitat quality, Ian sampled the temperature and dissolved oxygen in Weslemkoon Lake and

In August the layer of water suitable for trout became the most

Otter Lake four times, in May, July, August, and September 2018.

narrow (and therefore most limiting to the survival of the

Ian sampled four deeper water locations in Weslemkoon Lake:

population), because the surface waters became too warm for

in the main channel near the Lighthouse, Squaw Point,

trout, and the deeper water had too little dissolved oxygen.

Elmardon, and Bevis Island/Black Duck Island, as well as one

In September the surface waters cooled enough that they were

location in Otter Lake.

tolerable for trout, although not cold enough to be preferred.

Lisa Thompson (Sunset Trail) provided analysis and produced

The Elmardon site (the deepest part of Weslemkoon Lake) had

the accompanying graphs.

the thickest layer of water suitable for lake trout in all months. All these patterns are similar to what has been observed in

In all months, at all locations, there was a layer of the water

recent years.

column that was both cool enough and had sufficient dissolved oxygen for lake trout to be happy.

Further analysis will be done to better understand trends over the years. We are interested in understanding if the ‘sweet spot’

In May, both lakes were cold enough for trout from surface to

cool, oxygenated water layer is decreasing, increasing or keeping steady.

bottom, although the bottom half of the water column had too little dissolved oxygen.

A more detailed set of data and graphs will be available on the LWCA website. www.weslemkoon.com Lake Weslemkoon - Elmardon - August 2018 Dissolved Oxygen (mg/L) 0

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Orange: water too warm for lake trout (=>23 oC)

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Yellow: warmer than preferred, lake trout would make short forays here for food (13 – 23 oC)

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Depth (m)

KEY to the Graphs

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Blue: sweet spot – water cool (<= 13 oC) and dissolved oxygen level acceptable (> 6 mg/L)

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Temperature ( C)

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Cross-hatched: lake trout excluded due to low dissolved oxygen level (<= 6 mg/L DO, the bottom of the range set out in Provincial Water Quality Objective)

Temperature Dissolved Oxygen

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Helping Turtles 4

• DO NOT remove a turtle from their area – it reduces their chances of survival. If you find an uninjured turtle in the middle of a road, and it is safe for you to do so, simply help it across the road in the direction it is moving; watch this video on how to safely move a snapping turtle: https://vimeo.com/94872148 • DO NOT dig up nests to protect the eggs – you may damage the eggs AND it is against the law.

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Carefully place the injured animal in a well-ventilated plastic container with a secure lid (turtles can climb!). Most turtles can be picked up carefully with two hands. When handling snapping turtles keep a safe distance from their head as they will snap at you if they feel threatened. You may want to use a shovel or board to lift the turtle. Watch the OTCC online video clip for more tips for handling turtles.

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Patricia Milne

How many times do you see turtles on the road while you are driving to/from the cottage? We carry a special turtle stick in the car for gently prodding those snappers out of harm’s way, but just found out that there is a better way and even more that we can do thanks to the Ontario Turtle Conservation Centre, located in Peterborough: www.ontarioturtle.ca

The OTCC operates a turtle hospital that treats, rehabilitates, and releases injured turtles. Have a look at the photos on their web site, they have some pretty amazing shell repairs and recoveries. Never assume that a turtle is too injured to be treated. Even if you think that a turtle is dead (it actually takes turtles an extremely long time to die) if it is a female, the centre will check for and harvest eggs to add to their hatchling program. The OTCC instructs that if you find an injured turtle, to please do the following:

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Note the location (road, major intersections, and mileage) where the turtle was found to ensure it can be released according to provincial regulations. Call the OTCC at 1-705-741-5000 DO NOT EMAIL WITH INFORMATION ABOUT AN INJURED TURTLE. An injured animal needs medical attention as soon as possible! Do not transport turtles in water. Do not offer the turtle anything to eat. Wash your hands after handling the animal. If you have to keep a turtle overnight, place it in a wellventilated container with no water and in a cool, dark place, away from pets.  Leave us a message and we will get back to you when we open.

Turtles also can get entangled in fishing lines and hooks. If you find or accidentally hook a turtle, so not attempt to remove the hook yourself, this requires anesthesia and often the use of an endoscope to retrieve them. Call the OTCC hot line as the hospital is equipped to safely remove hooks form turtles. Seven of Ontario’s eight turtle species are now considered at risk. Snapping turtles are listed as a species of special concern and it is illegal to harm them. Every turtle of every type is vital to the population, let’s all do our part to protect and help these amazing animals!

GB Construction - Guy Boudreau Serving Weslemkoon Lake for 30 years Cottages, cabins and boathouses Additions Sleeping cabins Docks, decks and landscaping Roofing Custom cabinetry and interior design Stonework

Cell: 613-334-6425 Home: 613-332-6019 " 6

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Municipal Affairs I would like to take this opportunity to report to you regarding various matters which were dealt with by the L.W.C.A during the past year.
 
 1. DEVELOPMENT ON THE LAKE
 The L.W.C.A continues to receive copies of development applications in and surrounding the lake. The L.W.C.A looks forward to the continued receipt of this information from the Township. 
 2. COTTAGE NUMBERS
 The Township has advised that it passed the new Civic Address By-law in November of 2017 (you may obtain a copy directly from the Township on their website). The Township has indicated that, in collaboration with the County, that they have commenced the work required to “map” the cottages on the lake and that some additional work is still required to complete same, in particular with respect to islands on the lake. This is a challenge for the Township as only 14 islands have “official” names and until an island is “officially” named the address cannot be completed. The Township hopes to obtain further input this year from interested individuals. The by-law stipulates that addresses for properties on an island will consist of both a number and the name of the island and as such an official name for an island is required. This issue has arisen due to inconsistencies identified by emergency responders as they attempted to respond to calls on the lake. Lake Weslemkoon is expected to be the first lake in the Township to have its numbering re-done. The Township has not yet determined how the new “cottage number plates” will be installed but are considering the possibility of retaining a contractor to install them for consistency purposes. Please feel free to contact the Township should you have any further questions. 
 3. MUNICIPAL REPRESENTATIVES
 2018 was an election year in the Province. In advance of the election the L.W.C.A circulated questions to the municipal candidates and their responses were circulated to the membership in advance of the election in the hopes of assisting you in your decision making. Your newly elected municipal representatives are outlined here. 4. WATER BUBBLERS: Questions in regards to the use and operation of water bubblers during the winter months to keep an area free of ice was raised again at the AGM. This issue has been discussed previously at the AGM and in the Loon Call and the L.W.C.A. wishes to once again remind persons that the Criminal Code of Canada provides that:

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Paul Bottos 263 (1) Every one who makes or causes to be made an opening in ice that is open to or frequented by the public is under a legal duty to guard it in a manner that is adequate to prevent persons from falling in by accident and is adequate to warn them that the opening exists. Accordingly, there appears to be two duties for persons who create such an opening: firstly to guard that opening to prevent people from falling in, and secondly, to adequately warn people of the opening. This is in addition to any civil liability that may attach as a consequence of such an act or omission. The L.W.C.A. advises that the above is not to be treated as being legal advice and is not to be relied upon as such and that people should consult with their own attorney for legal advice.

Municipal Representatives Reeve
 Henry Hogg Deputy Reeve Tony Fritsch Councillor: Ward 1
 Tony Fritsch Councillor Ward 1: Kirby Thompson Councillor: Ward 2 Helen Yanch You may contact the Township as follows: ADDRESS: 72 Edwards Street P.O. Box 89 Flinton, Ontario K0H 1P0 Telephone: (613) 336-2286 Fascimile: (613) 336-2847 Website: www.addingtonhighlands.ca I trust the above keeps you informed as to the developments which have transpired in regards to municipal issues during the past year. Should anyone have any interest in the noted issues of have any other issues which may be of interest or concern, please do not hesitate to contact the L.W.C.A in order that same may be raised and discussed.

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Forestry and Hiking

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them out of the lake. This will

There is no change from last year for the

improve our water quality and our

2018-19 Mazinaw-Lanark Forest Inc.

fish habitat.

existing provincial 10-year forest maintenance plan with a harvest of Block 191, (North and South of Trout Lake Rd. north of Otter Lake) and 161 (South of Weslemkoon Lake Rd 2nd block west of the Lake). For the completion of the AWS between now and March 31 there may be some continued harvest on block 181 (South of Ashby Lake between Weslemkoon and Hwy 41). All these cuttings will not encroach minimum setbacks from the Lake.

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Bruce Magee

Forestry Harvest

Annual Work Schedule (AWS) of our

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2. To bolster your tree population diversity. Climate change is creating extreme temperature and weather fluctuation, which causes more stress on trees (e.g., drought, unseasonably lower temps in the summer, high winds, heavy ice in the spring). These additional stressors damage trees and cause secondary disease and insect infestations. Over years young (understory) and old mature trees (canopy) can be totally eradicated. If you periodically bolster your tree population

If anyone would like to view a pdf of the

lowers storm water run-off thereby protecting the lake from increased PO43and NO3- emission from your septic tile. We have a very thin layer of soil and organic matter around the lake, and in many places exposed Canadian shield. Keeping your ground cover dense and healthy is important.

maps of these areas please feel free to contact me, and I would be happy to e-

Low Cost Trees and Shrubs

mail them to you. My e-mail address is

Where can you order some trees and

bruce.magee@gbb-inc.com

shrubs for spring planting?

Why Plant and Protect Your Riparian

There is a fantastic Tree & Shrub Program

Zone

provided by the Bancroft Area Stewardship Council (BASC). The

What is the riparian zone?

program offers low-cost tree and shrub

In general the riparian zone is that area

species suitable for naturalizing shorelines

between the high water mark of the lake

and / or bolstering the riparian zone at

and 200 feet back on your lot. Why should you build up the riparian

your cottage. All orders are placed using the BASC online store at

zone?

www.bascstore.ecwid.com.

1. To protect the lake from effluent

with

Seedling Planting Tips,

coming from your septic tile bed. Plants

diverse species of seedlings you ensure a

1. Planting is best done by hand, all you

build up the soil's organic mater and fungi

healthy tree population around your

need is a sharp spade and two, 5 gallon

population/density. This allows the soil to

cottage.

pails of water. One half full and the

3. To protect fungi and tree root systems.

other full.

retain and break down the phosphates (PO43-) and nitrates (NO3-) in the effluent from your septic tile bed, basically keeping

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Adding native shrubs improves ground

2. Pick the best sites for your seedling. A

cover which increases water retention for

site in your riparian zone, with as

your trees and saplings. Ground cover also

much soil as possible and not near Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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water holes, or stumps, is best. In

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7. Place the seedling as upright as

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Trail Clearing

general the riparian zone is that area

possible in the whole while holding the

between the high water mark of the

growing point about 1 to 2cm below

If you’re interested in helping maintain

lake and 200 feet back on your lot.

the level of the land. Gently fill around

one of the

This area should have as many trees as

the roots with the soil from the V that

hiking trails

possible so that the riparian zone soil

you dug out. (The growing point is

around our

and fungi are held in-tact and they are

where the stem starts and there are no

lake please

healthy enough to work as a tertiary

more roots. For two or three year old

read on.

filter of the effluent from your septic

seedlings the growing point is where

The LWCA is

tile bed.

the main root changes colour to the

continuing its

natural bark colour).

maintenance of

3. Un-wrap the seedling stock and place only the seedlings you can plant in an

8. The seedling should not be leaning any

hour in the half full bucket of water so

more than 10 degrees from vertical.

the roots are in the water but not the

Even on a slope try and plant your

needles or buds. It’s very important not to let the roots dry out. Re-wrap

seedlings as vertical as possible. Straight trees transport water and nutrients more easily and thus they’ll be healthier and stronger to handle wind and snow loads. 9. Never leave roots exposed to the air,

our trails around Otter and Weslemkoon to other lakes. The goal is to keep our trails in clear and identifiable condition that allows hikers to be closer to nature. Work on a trail will consist of clearing limbs and foliage around the trail head sign, and on the trail pruning back branches and sectioning dead falls that block the path. Keeping it

and never bury the branches. Firmly

simple/natural, marking the start of the

pack the soil to close the air pockets.

path, and clearing the way to make it an

Air cavities will kill the roots. But

easy hike is the motto of our work.

don’t stomp on the roots too hard as to

4. the seedlings you are not going to plant and store them in a cool dark location. 5. Take one tree out of your bucket at a time. Spread the roots out gently, never plant them rolled up. Seedling roots maximize water and nutrient uptake when they are spread out. 6. With your spade, cut a V hole as deep as the roots are on the seedling. Pour enough water from your full bucket around the interior of the whole so that

damage or shear them. Seedlings need

If you’re interested in helping and would

every root hair to be connected so they

like to participate; get together a

can maximize nutrient and water-up

minimum of two people to form a trail

take in their new home.

maintenance team. Contact Bruce Magee

10. Never cut seedling roots to fit them in the hole. The more roots the better for translocation of nutrients and water. 11. Give good spacing to your seedling

by e-mail bruce.magee@gbb-inc.com or phone (905) 854-2014, or cell (416) 432-3098. Please have the names of your team members ready/committed to the task, and an anticipated date to do the

plantings but also be accepting of the

maintenance, as well as a couple of trail

fact that mortality will be 20 to 50%

choices (in case your first choice is

due to the limited soil we have around our lake, so over planting is best.

already signed-up by another party). All trail maintenance teams will be thanked and identified in the Loon Call.

you’ve poured an inch or two in the bottom of the whole, and the sides of the hole are wet too.

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Junior Loons Report

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Melissa Tervit

New for summer of 2019! – Lake Steward Volunteer Program – We will be launching this program for all youth ages 12 and up who wish to gain volunteer hours and experience by becoming involved with conservation activities on our lake. There are opportunities to help with water testing, trail maintenance, loon counting, and at LWCA events. Contact Melissa Tervit melissastout@sympatico.ca, or on FaceBook (Melissa Stout) for more information. Geocaching Geocaching was our first activity for the summer of 2018. Geocaching is a fun combination of treasure hunting and orienteering. With the help of a GPS device, or your cellphone and the Geocaching App or website, you follow clues to find hidden treasure called caches. Caches are usually small camouflaged containers that are well hidden in the outdoors, though they do vary in size. They contain a logbook for you to sign and date, and often also contain small treasures. The coordinates of caches are logged on the Geocaching website (https://www.geocaching.com/ play), along with clues as to how to find each cache. Whenever or wherever you wish to go Geocaching all you need to do is open the App or log into the website, and a plethora of hidden caches are available for you to select and find. They are hidden all over the world, including here on Lake Weslemkoon. At the beginning of July the Jr Loons set out in their boats and hid caches in some of their favourite locations to visit on the lake. They creatively named their caches Picnic Rock 5, Root Salvation, Rocky Reef, Acapulco, Pike’s Perch, and Rainbow Rump Resters. Each cache contains a log book, and treasure. It is expected that if you wish to take a treasure from the cache you put another treasure (anything that is small, non toxic, not dangerous or not edible) into the cache, so it is good to be prepared. There are also 2 caches hidden on Weslemkoon by other cottagers. We hope that you will download the Geocaching App and get Geocaching on Weslemkoon! Water Day The Jr Loons found relief from the hot August weather by spending a fun filled day at the Bell’s beach. On August 11, 25 kids with boats and crazy floats turned up for a day of races, snacks, prizes and fun. The races began with Ping Pong Ball Pick Up, where each participant was required to scoop as many ping pong balls out of the water and into their kayak as they could. The competition was tough this year! Next up was the Floaty Race, which was very exciting as teams worked together to propel their floaties to victory. After the excitement of the races we enjoyed our favourite fresh baked cookies from 4 Loons Marina, Freezies and drinks. Prizes were awarded for Best Sibling Team, Most Enthusiastic Participants, Most Amusing Floaty Team, Best Group Effort, and All Round Effort, then the rest of the afternoon was spent enjoying the beach and each other’s’ company. Thank you very much to the Bells for allowing us to descend upon their beach with all our bright floaties and boats, to Four Loons for donating a prize, and to all the parent volunteers who helped to lifeguard so that we could enjoy a safe and fun filled Water Day 2018.

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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Goodbye! We wish to thank all the Jr Loons for their enthusiasm during our events over the past 5 years. We have had so much fun organizing the events and getting to know you and your parents! This was the last year that we will be Directors of Jr Loons; next summer we pass the torch on to Kristen Humphrey, Laurie Bourne and Carrie Howes. All our best! Patty and Melissa Welcome Kristen, Laurie and Carrie, planning upcoming Junior Loons events for Summer 2019! Watch the website for details.

Four Ways to Keep In Touch Janice Mackenzie

Communiques: via email From time to time you will receive a communique from the LWCA. This comes in the form of an email, so please be sure to inform us if / when your email address changes. Communiques provide information on issues that are arising in and around the lake essentially keeping you informed about issues / information that we believe are important (e.g., Municipal elections, membership, septic maintenance services).

Website: weslemkoon.com The LWCA has a fabulous website that lets any cottager or visitor to the lake learn a little bit more about the LWCA and its mandate. The website also has a blog feature. Blog posts are essentially articles about various topics. They can be submitted to the Communications Director by any LWCA member. Each time a new blog post is written it is pushed out to the membership, but it remains attached to the website. If you would like to contribute an article for the blog, please contact janicemackenzie@icloud.com

Instagram: lwca_ontario Please follow our Instagram account! It is not a private account, so anyone can view the photos that are posted there (all are posted with permission and credits are given to the photographers). Note: If you have an account on Instagram and like to post pics of your visits to the lake, consider adding #lakeweslemkoon so that others can search the # and see a wide variety of photos.

Facebook group: LWCA We have a closed group on Facebook, which means that members have to be approved to view the content there. This allows us to avoid “trolls” who have no vested interest in our lake. The group is run by directors of the LWCA. We post current information and answer questions pertaining to conservation and related activities on the lake. If you’re on Facebook, please join our group and add your voice to discussions there! If you have any concerns, comments or suggestions about how the LWCA communicates with you, please contact Janice Mackenzie, Communication Director. janicemackenzie@icloud.com Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Custodial Visits All of the autumn custodial visits went off without a hitch. We managed to complete the visits on time, despite the early onset of winter. Thanks to all of those who helped us to identify their cottages by putting the cottage number on the lake side. This is a huge help as this is how we access the cottages for inspections. Speaking of cottage numbers, you're probably all aware that the cottage numbering system will be changing in the coming years. The intention is to synchronize the LWCA numbering with that of the municipality in the event of an emergency and the use of the 911 system. New number signs will be issued (that is the intention), 1 per cottage. We are discussing with the municipality the fact that some of our residents have both lake and road access and will need an extra sign.

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Our intention is to install an additional marker at the Narrows to Otter Lake. We have had issues with dead wildlife floating up on shore in the Northwest Passage and we will post speed limit signs there. Due to the shallowness of the water, a wake does considerable damage to the shoreline and to any species that are living near or below the waterline. As we are all aware, the speed limit near a shoreline is 10 kilometers per hour. This will be posted at both ends of the Northwest Passage simply as a reminder. These signs do not necessarily mean that people will slow down, but we are hoping they will be a gentle reminder that those who enjoy a full throttle in this area will take nature into consideration. Thanks very much to all of the cottagers and residents who let us know when markers come loose or go missing.

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I hope everyone had a great winter, and I'm sure with the arrival of this newsletter that you are all looking forward to returning to the lake. Have a great summer. And if you are on Weslemkoon, how can you help it?

Lake Levels We did have an excessive lowering of the lake last fall. I have been in contact with the MNRF and they were anticipating more rain to bring the lake level up than we actually received. It is hard to believe that Mother Nature does not always cooperate with us! The lake levels did return to an Autumn standard level by early November. The chart indicates the proposed and actual lake levels as set out by the MNRF during the course of the year. Steve Latto

Courtesy Markers We are continuously changing old marker lights and are also in the process of changing out the markers themselves. We are experimenting with new styles and are trying to find the right ones for our lake.

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• Rock Removal/Breaking • Certified Septic System Installer • Trucking • Topsoil / Gravel / Sand • M.O.E. Licenced

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Annuals • Top Soil, Triple Mix Perennials • Outdoor giftware Mulch Recycled Plastic Furniture Lawn & Garden Supplies

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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As Shared by Sue Locke When we were young we lived at the cottage with my mom and grandparents all summer long. Dad would come in Saturdays in time for dinner and head out Sunday to go home. There are many treasured memories from this time. 1.

Madoc Dairy was a special stop on the way up and on the way home - that was our treat…….( every time we go back and forth to the cottage, I still crave ice cream ). 2. After the Dairy the next stop would be my grandparents “treat time” at a little parkette on Jordan Lake. We would go and play in the water while my grandparents shared a toddy LOL. 3. After the 4 mile boat ride to the island, we would have to trudge up and down the hill with all the groceries and gear for a couple months 4. The pantry had to be lined up like a grocery store with cans right side up with English label out 5. I can remember lighting the pilot light in the fridge and stove being an experience. There was always a curse word or two as a draft would blow out the match. 6. We ran the generator for exactly one hour a day…. No more, no less. 7. At night we would listen to the radio as we coloured or played games/cards but at the first flicker, it was off to bed 8. For years we had a toad named Jeremy on our back stoop. Quite often I would try to sneak Jeremy into bed in our little cabin beside the main camp but my mom would have no part of that. (She was never very fond of Jeremy). One night I thought I would outsmart her and stuck Jeremy into my shorts. Of course mom noticed and reached in to retrieve what she thought was a toy. Needless to say, screams echoed around the lake that night. 9. My grandparents favourite game was to bet on the exact time of the sunset. After dinner we would move down to the dock and place our wagers. If time allowed and it was warm enough, skinny dipping was in order. 10. Every morning my grandparents would play 3 hands of gin rummy, no more, no less. My sister and I would alternate between sitting behind each of them. If you got Nana, your chore was to brush her hair and put it in a pony for the day. If you got Gump, a deep tissue massage was in order (something that my hubby had benefitted from). 11. WM48099 was our call sign on the Photo: Grandpa Gump, Bud Davidson, Nana, Marg Davidson, John Davidson and my Dad, Chuck intercom system. We talked to Bedlam Point, Uncle Brucie and Aunt Winn, the Carrs and Gunters and many others. Our call signal was imbedded deep in my mind for sure. 12. From time to time, cocktails were in order so we would travel with our grandparents to Grahams, Cawkers, Heaths and more depending upon who’s turn it was to host. There are a multitude of other memories that I have, each treasured for one reason or another. In later years, my mom and dad created similar traditions for our children and I hope that someday, I will get an opportunity to do the same. Most of the family has passed on but I know that Weslemkoon is where they are. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

“This picture is of the far cabin which my family took over and renovated. It was originally built for Lawerence Aide and his wife to live in during the winter as caretakers for my great-grandfather.  They lived there all winter and took ice from the lake, filling the ice house for use in the summer.” " 13


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As Shared by Rebecca Coles

THE BEST PART OF OUR SWIMMING LESSONS

When our parents decided it was time that my sister and I learned how to swim, they hired a college student to teach us. She swam on her school swim team and was a certified life guard; and her family’s cottage was not far from ours on West Bay. Our swimming teacher was six feet tall. She was taller than my father, who didn’t normally have to look that far up when talking with such a young woman. She had long, straight, black hair and broad shoulders. Her muscles were smooth and firm, like a tuna fish; whose special, smooth, super-oxygen-carrying muscles are capable of huge surges of power. She was a good teacher. She was patient and sympathetic with the fact that it is hard to learn how to swim. Our swimming teacher’s family cottage was at the top of a high granite cliff, and her father had installed a diving board right into the rock. The best part of our swimming lessons was the end, when my sister and I were timed treading water. That was when we would ask our swimming teacher to dive off the diving board. “Pleeeeaaaaase?!” She slowly climbed up to the top of the cliff, ensuring that my sister and I achieved the treading time required by the lesson. Then, she ceremoniously approached her dive, walking to the very end of the board, high over Lake Weslemkoon, launching up off the board from her tiptoes, arms sweeping up overhead. As she dove, first up into the air, then down, every part of her body was where she put it - body straight, toes pointed, fingers touching toes, then straight again. For those moments, our swimming teacher was priestess to the soaring, rugged cliff, and the tall pine trees growing above it, and the hawks circling above the trees, and all the other life and air and water there. For my sister and me, furiously treading water, mouths intermittently gasping air, bulging eyes at water level like the frogs we caught for bait at Little Long Lake, this was the best part of our swimming lessons because we were included.

Like the smallest creatures

of the cliff, even we were part of the majesty of those moments.

BLACK BALLS Black balls were marble-like black candies that my sister and I penny candy counter at “the landing,” which is how our what is now the Four Loons Marina. Black balls were breaker, and liquorice flavored. The black color on the black ball came off right away, turning the inside of our after which point the candy was white and

bought from the family referred to hard, like a jaw outside of the mouths black, sweeter and

milder. Black balls were a currency back at the

cottage. “If

you take my turn drying the dishes I will give you

10 black

balls.” “I will trade you 20 black balls for your piece

of cake.”

“I am sorry I ripped the cover of your new comic

book.

Here are 10 black balls. Are we OK now?” My carefully rationed her black balls, allotting

sister herself a certain

number throughout the days until our next trip

to the landing. I was

the opposite. I greedily ate as many black balls as

I wanted. Before I left

my bag of uneaten black balls unattended, I took

precautions. First, I

emptied the bag. As I put the black balls back in one, making sure each one was good and wet as it

the bag, I licked each went back in the bag,

as a deterrent to anyone who might want them.

Then, just to be sure,

I hid the damp paper bag in my bedding or in my

frogging sneakers or

behind the comic books. But despite the

precautions, my

black balls rarely lasted more than a couple of days. from an Edgar Allan Poe story, the torture began. The still had her bag full of pristine black balls, and the

Then, like something torture was the knowledge that my sister additional confidence that she likely wouldn’t know the difference

if one or two went missing. Cont’d on page 23….

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Photos: Rebecca & sister Jen piloting in the stern, and Rebecca on the rock, her Mom Carolyn in the background Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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NEW STOVES & CHIMNEYS

WE ARE FULLY INSURED WE ARE FULLY TRAINED WE ARE WETT CERTIFIED

OUR PROFESSIONAL SERVICES INCLUDE: DUCT CLEANING CHIMNEY CLEANING

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WE SELL & INSTALL:

CONTACT INFORMATION: Jason Reynolds Top Hat & Tales p. 613 338.2878 w.tophatandtales.ca e.jason@tophatandtales.ca Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Eat Drink And Be Merry Treasure Hunt 2018 On Saturday, September 1, people from around the lake gathered at Tanglewood Marina as a community for the much anticipated, annual Treasure Hunt. The ‘Hunt’ is such a family oriented event, with people of all ages coming together for a day filled with laughs, food, entertainment and even a little competition. The event was well attended and Mother Nature was very kind, providing everyone with warm rays of sunshine for the majority of the day.

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Nick DeFreitas

Lowes families for taking home the Loon Trophy as winners of the event and the organizers for 2019. The winning team was the Lowes-Myles, ready to host their first hunt in 2019. Aye maties be ready for a REAL TREASURE HUNT!

The theme for this year’s Treasure Hunt was Eat, Drink and Be Merry! which embodies a lot of what people come to the Treasure Hunt for. It is a chance to get together with family, friends and people who might not have saw each other since the previous year’s event to have fun. Organizing the event this year was the DeFreitas/Vankoughnett family from cottage #277 in Regina Bay. Although the DeFreitas’ and Vankoughnett’s did the majority of the planning, the event was not possible without help from family and friends from around the lake, who gave up their time to assist with running the various stations. Events included ‘drink’ pong, flip cup and a photo booth, which was probably the most popular. We would like to thank everyone who came out this year to make the 2018 Treasure Hunt a huge success. Participants, helpers and especially Ralph Seamons, who lends Tanglewood as the base for the event, are the ones who truly make the event memorable. Special mention goes out to the Myles and

Septic Report It was a busy year on the lake for the septic portfolio. This year we had our first round of septic reviews performed by Geoff Gordon of Citadel Home Inspections. Geoff checked systems and provided detailed reports for approximately 10 cottages. The cottagers having inspections done teamed together to ferry him around the lake which reduced costs. Generally, people were very happy and found his reviews helpful and informative; most systems were performing as intended with no need for additional pumping which provided great peace of mind and saved the cost of a pump! For those that found pumping was required, the Kawartha Utilities pumper arrived on the lake at the end of August and pumped out over 20 cottages. There are no plans to have the pumper return in 2019, but please contact them if you would like to have your name added to the list for the next pumping round, once they reach 13 cottages they schedule the pumper to come to the lake. Phone 1-705‑654‑4000 or email: kus@nexicom.net. " 16

Dressed-up en route Perry, Alison, Paul & Elaine

Patty Milne Geoff will continue to provide septic reviews on the lake in 2019 and you may contact him directly to arrange. Telephone 1-613-334-9050 or email: citadelhomeinspections.ca. We are calling these septic reviews to differentiate from the provincially mandated inspections required in some townships which require a different level of licensing for inspectors. The LWCA encourages all cottagers to have their systems reviewed, it is much easier to fix small issues (in many cases just removal of shrubbery was required) than to have your system malfunction later. A well maintained system protects our lake! If you have any questions about either program, feel free to contact me at: patricia.milne@sympatico.ca

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It’s A Bird, It’s A Plane, It’s the International Space Station

Pam Lawton

Several years ago, we learned (from John and Laurie Lymer) how to “ spot the station” moving through our skies. John reports that: NASA  has up-dated their site, and you can find the International Space Station viewing times for any town in the world. For your International Space Station viewing pleasure when at Weslemkoon, just go to:     http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/ and enter your area of interest. Now, just click on the blue pin displayed in the map that is closest to your town. If you don't see a blue pin, use the zoom-out button (the minus) in the lower right corner of the map to see if any blue pins enter your map. Keep zooming out until one turns up. When a pin or a yellow number enter the map, click on it, then click on the words "View Sighting Opportunities" that pops up in the white box. This takes you to a list of viewing times and directions for that location for the next two weeks. The page includes some instructions along the left column showing how to convert the numbers in the sighting table into where to look if you're standing on your dock! It's updated regularly so you can always look two weeks ahead.   Enjoy!

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Remembering Jean

Patti Greer

Jean Isobel Austin was born on September 19, 1920 and passed away on September 6, 2018 in Please join her 98th year. A Funeral Service was held at the John R. Bush Funeral Home, Belleville, ON, the LWCA on Friday, September 28th, 2018. Jean was a Retired Music Teacher, Church Organist for Stockdale, Wooler and Frankford United Churches, and a Life Member of the U. directors C. W. She in married her high school sweetheart, Karl Austin in 1938 and Guy was born in 1939.thanking

our

She and Karl fell in love with the lake and eventually built a summer home. Their cottage was on the west side of Waddell Island, cottage number 738, and was known as advertisers The Bear Camp. Guy and his wife Barb both recall many musical weekends of fun and entertainment. Jean was one of the original four partners in the Four Loons Marina on the south end of the lake. She and Karl partnered with Em and Edie Richards and bought Smith’s Marina in 1968. They worked non-stop, offering housekeeping cottages, a snack bar, groceries, a Laundromat, live and artificial bait, boats, motor rentals, and a tent and trailer park during the summer months. Winter brought winter fishing, duck and deer hunting, and snowmobiling. After many years, it was time for retirement and they sold the business to Mike and Honor Burke in 1978. Both Karl and Jean were members inducted into the “Order of the Cockeyed Loons” in the 80’s for “adding a little something to the social life of the Lake.” They passed on their love of the lake and the art of fishing to Guy. Jean passed on her secret, and superb recipe for a BBQ ‘fish fry’ to Barb. Many visitors could be seen at their cottage every year to sign the log after witnessing and feeding the school of ‘pet bass’ in their boathouse. Even after Karl’s death, in her 80’s, Jean continued to play the piano and could be seen at Capers Restaurant in Belleville. She moved to the Belmont Long Term Care Facility where she passed away peacefully surrounded by the love of her family. We have lost another stellar promoter of Lake Weslemkoon. May she rest in peace.

Bowes & Cocks Limited, Brokerage Bancroft Office

Bev McCaw Broker / Manager

613-334-5316 (Call or Text)

bevmccaw@gmail.com

www.sellbancroft.com Buying or Selling? " 18

e lm l a C t! Firs

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New Life

Releasing Rescued Turtles

Carolyn Calhoun

Lynne Vegter, Cottage 111

Carolyn Calhoun

Am I The King? Pam Lawton

Photo Contest Winners 2018

Polypores Lois Richards

We have such a beautiful landscape in which to focus both our eyes and our lenses. It is hard to choose only a selected few to feature. Next year’s contest will invite photographers to capture; “Out Paddling”, “Reflections” and “Out Houses”. Please continue to share your favourites. looncalleditor@gmail.com

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Winter Sky Lynne Vegter

Fire On The Dock Lynne Vegter

Scenic Patti Greer

Skating on Weslemkoon, December 2018 Alicia, Josh and Claire Chiddy

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Cold Water Swimming: The Thrills and Skills I’m sure many of you had the thrill of taking a plunge into cold water. The instant shock turns your metabolic system into overdrive. With your skin sensitivity so max’d it burns, your mind panics: Get out now! However, you also know how great you feel after you get out. Well, that’s because your brain has released copious amounts of the pleasure chemical, dopamine. Think of it as a runner’s high on steroids. People in cold climates like Russia and the Scandinavian countries have been jumping into cold water for ages. In the last few years Wim Hof, also called the Iceman, has been preaching the benefits of taking the plunge into ice water and has created a sensation with his superhuman feats. He holds or has held several world records including the furthest swim under ice (57.5 m / 188.6 ft) and in 2007 he reached 7,200 metres (23,600 ft) up Mt. Everest with nothing more than a pair of shorts and shoes. Wim says anyone can do it. All it takes is training in cold water and breath work. I did his course a few years ago and have been a fan of cold water ever since. It starts with cold showers. Learn to enjoy them. You can start with a warm shower but finish cold. It’s an invigorating way to start the day. Why cold water swimming. Well, research is coming out with all sorts of positive benefits of getting into cold water. The reported benefits range from an immune system booster, enhanced mental clarity, better skin quality, improved fertility, and not to mention a great way blast clean your vascular system. And, with the current popularity of mindful meditation, ie, of being in the now – this is your short cut. No need to spend years of meditation practice to learn how to be totally present. Instead, just jump into Lake Weslemkoon at Thanksgiving or in early May. I guarantee that you will not be thinking about what to eat for lunch, the bills to pay or anything else on your to do list. No. You will be 100% in the moment. Before going into the water it’s a good idea to do a heart pumping warm up such as jumping jacks, burpies, or a short run. It will help your body adjust if your blood is already pumping. If you want to try the Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Wim Hot method do three rounds of 30 deep breaths. It’s a form of hyperventilation that is promoted by him. Now the idea is not to jump into the water, freak out and then scramble to get out. While that’s fun to do in group such as at a New Years’ Polar Bear Plunge, instead, try to enter the water slowly with determination and without hesitation. Immerse yourself to the neck and breath. Use your breath to maintain control over the situation. With the mind calm, let the burn wash over your body. Don’t fight it. Let it happen. Keep breathing. As you surrender to the sensation, the body will relax the tight cellular constriction and blood will begin to flow again. As this happens, you’ll actually start to feel warmish. Now you are in a good spot to start swimming. Start with the breast stroke as putting your face into the water is the next level of difficulty. As you get comfortable with this stage, start practicing putting your face into the water and try doing the crawl. Cold water swimmers wear goggles, a couple of bathing caps and sometimes ear plugs. Some even rub fat/ oil on their skin. I cheat with neoprene gloves and booties. The Holy Grail for the hardcore masochists there is the Ice Mile. Yes, one mile. To qualify the water temperature needs to be sub 5°C. To swim a mile takes about a half hour to do. Needless to say it has been achieved by very few people. For the less crazy there is a annual competition in Vermont where they have a more sane distance of 100 yards. Weather. The season for cold-water swimming goes from October to May. The water temperature in October is generally around 10°C. In the winter months it goes down to near 0°C and in the spring around 5°C. Personally, my favourite time of the year is April. The water is still freezing (sub 5°C) but at least when you get out it you feel the glorious warmth of the springtime sun. Getting out of the water on such a day feels amazing. No need to rush to change into warm dry clothes. In fact, it’s a great time to stay in your bathing suit and do some yoga/ exercise on the beach. You’ll be amazed how warm you’ll feel.

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Stuart Inglis In contrast, going swimming in February you have to be careful not to get frost bite, especially if it is windy. Sometimes your hair and bathing suit will turn to ice before you’ve had a chance to change. To be efficient in getting dressed, it’s a good idea to lay your clothes out in an orderly manner before you go in. That is, don’t quickly peel off your layers and make a messy pile as it’s important to get dressed as fast as possible. It’s also a good idea to bring along a thermos of hot sweet tea or some soup broth. One piece of gear that is nice to have is a “dry robe”. It’s a cross between a bathrobe and a sleeping bag. Loose, warm and comfy. Even if you’re not into cold water swimming once you’ve seen a dry robe you’ll probably want one to have at the cottage. Risks. You have to respect cold water. It can kill you. Things that can go wrong: You can have a heart attack if you jump in and are not healthy; People have drowned by gulping in water when they hit the cold water as the first automatic response of the body to gasp. Then there is hypothermia. At the first sign of it you should get out – while you still can. It is possible to lose motor control. Then you’re in big trouble and your spotters need go into action. Yes, you should have spotters. You’d be amazed how impaired your judgement can get and how it can sneak up on you. Another safety precaution that I follow is to swim along the shore instead of going out into the lake. That way if you need to get out quickly you’re only a few strokes away. Even better, stay in shallow water where you can touch bottom. But don’t get hung up on the dangers. Just be sensible and you’ll be fine. Coldwater swimming is surprisingly fun and has a number of health benefits to boot. Give it a try.

Photo Credit: The International Swimming Association

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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association
 Statement of Changes In Net Assets


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for the year ended December 31, 2018
 (unaudited) BALANCE, Beginning of Year

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Catherine Rathbun Memorial Environmental Fund

Unrestricted

Total 2018

Total 2017

18,290

30,176

48,466

48,268

163

509

672

(476)

820

674

49,958

48,466

Excess (Deficiency) of Revenue Over Expenditures Contributions - Net

820

19,273

BALANCE, End of Year

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association
 Statement of Financial Position


Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association
 Statement of Revenues & Expenditures


as at December 31, 2018 
 (unaudited)

for the year ended December 31, 2018 
 (unaudited)

REVENUES Annual Fees Loon Call Revenues Interest Income Miscellaneous Sales Total Revenue EXPENDITURES Annual Meeting Bank Charges Administrative & Promotional Cost of Miscellaneous Sales Custodial Visits FOCA Insurance Loon Call New Shoal Markers Shoal Marker Maintenance Lake Activities Social Map Inventory Write Down Miscellaneous Professional Fees Web Site Development Costs Water Quality Testing Amortization of Water Test Equipment Total Expenditures EXCESS OF REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES

2018

2017

13,268 2525 265 60

12,901 2,130 142 1,929

16,118

17,103

1,339 223 157 40 3,520 917 1,617 2,574 653 1,648 422 975 35 1,299 190

756 224 115 255 3,432 775 1,617 2,556 653 2,389 469 90 1,672 201 2,269 190

15,609

17,662

509

(559)

30,685

ASSETS Current Assets Cash Term Deposit Inventory Fixed Assets Water Testing Equipment - net

LIABILITIES & RESTRICTED FUNDS & NET ASSETS Current Liabilities Accounts Payable & Accrued Liabilities Restricted Funds Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund Net Assets Unrestricted

2018 Treasurer’s Report

2018

2017

12,839 38,189 527 51,555

30,235 17,760 1,542 49,537

759 52,314

949 49,537

2,356

2,020

19,273

18,290

30,685 52,314

30,176 50,486

Diane Morden

(Expenditures over Revenues)

Your board continues to be very active as indicated by the diverse nature of expenditures reflected in the Statement of Revenues & Expenditures. Actual expenditures are in line with Board approved budgeted amounts for the year. The only unusual item this year is a map inventory write down of $975. In November 2017 the Municipality of Addington Highlands approved a new 911 numbering system at the request of Emergency Responders. 
 
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Cont’d from Page 22…. The new numbering for our lake was completed by December 31, 2018 and the municipality anticipates that the new 911 numbers will be installed during the summer of 2019. As a result it is unclear what value, if any; our remaining map inventory has and so it has been written off for accounting purposes. The maps will still be available for sale in the spring and your board will attempt to realize any remaining value of these maps. Surplus funds are invested in two bank GIC’s of $20,000 and $17,738, earning 1.8% and 1.55%, and will mature September and December 2019 respectively. Interest is recognized on an accrual basis and is shared on a weighted average basis between the general fund and the Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund. The Catherine Rathbun Environmental fund grew by individual contributions of $820 ($674 in 2017) and allocated interest of $163 ($83 in 2017). Expenditures from this fund are restricted in nature and require a majority vote by the membership at the annual general meeting. The remaining unrestricted surplus of $30,685 is available for the general purposes of the association.

Cont’d from Page 14 Memories…. The worst part was she didn’t hide her bag! She left her bag of black balls in full view, a mere arm’s length away, unguarded. Oh, how I suffered. “Do I take a couple? If I do she probably won’t notice. But they are hers. That’s stealing. That’s wrong. That’s not fair to her. But she doesn’t really even like black balls that much anyway. If she liked them as much as I do, they would be gone just as mine are! What more proof do I need?” Eventually, I succumbed and took one. Then two. Then, there was a noticeable dent in her supply; which eventually resulted in accusations (hers) and tears (both of us) and apologies (mine) and debt (mine) and, worst of all, more Edgar Allan Poe torture from knowing there were yet more uneaten black balls still left in my sister’s bag. Many years have since passed, and my sister and I are Photo Credit - Left Field Pictures both mothers now. After many years of not thinking at all about black balls, I remembered. When I remembered, I felt bad about stealing my sister’s black balls and I apologized to her. She laughed and said she was not still mad about it. Then, last Christmas she gave me a pound of black balls, procured from who knows where, and I knew she really forgave me.

Lynne Vegter

lynne.vegter@outlook.com

905-718-6524

I accept commissions for cottage art. Open for summer visits from the lake to view paintings and various clay sculptures! Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Counting Our Loons

Patricia Milne

The LWCA will be conducting a Loon Survey this summer to count and track our loon population. We need many volunteers to make this happen.  Each volunteer or group will be responsible for counting loons in their area of the lake. This is a very simple task that involves just noting how many loons and nesting pairs are present in June, how many pairs produce chicks and how many chicks and loons are present in August. Once you sign up, more detailed information will be provided in May. Find the Volunteer sign-up at www.weslemkoon.com

Calendar of Events SUNDAY

MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

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JULY 1

2

3

4

5

6

10

11

12

13

17

18

19

20

26

27

23

30

2019

Canada Day!

FUN FACT!

LWCA Director’s Meeting

World UFO Day

7

8

9

14

15

16 Full Moon

July 2nd is World UFO Day. If you think you see a UFO the Canadian division of MUFON wants to hear from you.

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22

23

24

25

28

29

30

31

AUGUST 1

7

8

2 LWCA AGM 3 Meet & Greet 9:30am Starts at 10am Four Loons Marina

FUN FACT! 4

11

Full Moon

5

12

You may have heard of a Blue Moon. A Black Moon is when there is a second New Moon in a single calendar month

Black Moon 6

9

10 Jr. Loons Event

13

18

19

20

25

26

27

FUN FACT! August 20th is National Lemonade Day. Who wants to put together a lemonade BOAT STAND?

14

15

16

17

21

22

23

24

28

29

Full Moon

Labour Day 30 31 Weekend! Treasure Hunt 2pm Super New Moon

Tanglewood Marina

Please check the LWCA Website www.weslemkoon.com closer to date for updates or rain dates for all events! " 24

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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LWCA Loon Call 2019  

LWCA Loon Call 2019  

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