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The Loon Call An Annual Newsletter for all Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Associates & Supporters www.weslemkoon.com

SPRING 2018 Catch & Release Fishing for the future Page 18

Finding Flowers that will prosper at the cottage. Page 16-17

Nancy Dickinson and her family’s years on Weslemkoon Page 24

Directors’ Reports Find out what the directors have been busy doing to help support our LWCA members with a healthy and active lake community. Page 2-12 FOCA and the power of

LWCA Passings volunteerism Tribute to past members Page 14 Page 12

Photo Contest Winners Some incredible entries. Page 20-23

Alone Two brothers survived unthinkable conditions and came out winners. Page 26

ISSN# 1480-9583 Volume 59

Hiking, making soap and bat houses. Find out what our young loons have been up to. Page 11-12

Why Build A Bat House? This past summer for a Junior Loons activity we built bat houses so I decided to do some research on the bats in the Lake Weslemkoon area. First off, the main type of bat that lives in the area is the Little Brown Bat and it has a serious issue. That issue is White-nose syndrome. White-nose syndrome is a fungal disease that grows on the nose, ears and wings of bats. It causes weight loss, dehydration, electrolyte imbalances and death when the bats are hibernating over the winter. White-nose syndrome is a huge issue for the bats, having killed almost 7 million bats in 2012, and has caused many bat species to almost go extinct. White-nose syndrome came from Europe and Asia where the bats there have adapted to be less affected by white-nose syndrome.

Ken’s Top 10 and a letter from our new president. Page 2

By Thomas Tervit

Did you know that 1 little brown bat can eat about 7

these insects damage crops and carry disease.

thousand mosquitos every night and all together bats eat millions of pounds of insects a night? Loss of bats means more insects; this affects not only us as cottagers, but also farmers since

Building a bat house is a great way to give a bat or even a whole group of bats a home. Did you know that bats don't actually always live in caves? Bats only live in caves during

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Calendar of Events Check out the summer events of 2018 Page 28

Junior Loons

the winter; during the warmer months they live under bridges and in trees. When you are building a bat house the ideal idea is to mimic the space between the bark and trunk of the tree. Bat houses are also painted dark colours to soak up heat and keep the bats warm. Bat houses help bats in many ways like giving bats a safe place to live and raise their young. They are safer than other places because bat houses are built to keep predators out, unlike a tree where a raccoon or other predator could easily get a bat and its young. Since bat’s habitats are decreasing from forests being cleared a bat house is a way to give bats a home. The little brown bats are great natural bug controllers and they are having trouble. The perfect way to help? Build a bat house.

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Directors’ Reports LWCA P R E S I D E N T ’ S L E T T E R Welcome to 2018! We look forward to sunny skies and smooth, clean waters filled with bass and trout – because the past year saw lots of rain and water - and bugs! In 2017 we froze at the AGM (Stuart was bare-footed!) but we still enjoyed Ralph’s hot-dogs and hamburgers. One member quipped “Why doesn’t the LWCA hold their AGM in summer?” The executive was pleased to see new directors voluntarily come forward from the floor: Ian MacKenzie in charge of Water Quality, Steve Latto in charge of Custodial Visits, and a biggie: Janice MacKenzie in charge of Communications. She already has made major strides in updating the website, which has been an on-going struggle for many years.

regatta, hikes, Junior Loons events, the Jazz Concert at Cameron Island, the Treasure Hunt, the fireworks with a few decorated boats (let’s get more this year!), and the Thanksgiving bird on a cool, dank week-end. We have seen many new faces and cottages on our Lakes. Construction and renovations are flourishing, real estate is increasing. I want to thank all directors and members for your efforts and encouraging support. It has made this challenging position interesting and pleasurable. Ken at the potholes

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Ken Senter LWCA President

This year, we enjoyed: fun and frolic on Canada Day, cottage fireworks, the sailing

Ken’s Top 10 I miss David Letterman and his “Top 10” lists. Here’s my own list of the “Top 10 things I have learned to love about Weslemkoon” #10. The prevailing west wind in the whispering pines #9. The rising morning mist before sunrise #8. Sunrises and sunsets #7. The Lighthouse reminding you that you have arrived

#4. Water-play from the fish, otters and beavers #3. Swimming in the clean, dark, soft, silky water #2. Hearing the loons at night - then seeing the stars And the top thing I learned to love is: #1. When the AGM ends an hour early! Please feel free to make your own “Weslemkoon Top 10 List” … maybe we’ll include one in next year’s Loon Call!

#6. Countless quiet times #5. Hiking the trails and exploring the endless shoreline

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A Note from the Editor & Art Director

It’s hard to believe that this is my third year as Loon Call editor. As always, I love hearing your stories and seeing all of the amazing pictures submitted to our photo contest. It’s clear that you all love our lake as much as I do, and I am grateful to be part of such an amazing and unique community. I have lived outside of Ontario for the past 7 years (first in Santiago, Chile and now in Edmonton, Alberta) and as time away from ‘home’ goes on I am increasingly thankful for our little island in Squally Bay; it is a geographical constant in an otherwise changing world for my family and I. My grandparents (Bram and Eileen Reed) bought the pine-filled island and built a log cabin (nestled in the trees, facing the sunset, according to Bram’s childhood dream) in the early 50’s and saw their three children grow taller at the lake every summer (and occasionally on weekends in the winter). My daughters are the 4th generation to explore this magical space and make it home. We return every summer for a time to reconnect, refocus, recharge and reflect. And I wouldn’t trade it for the world. ! Shawna Hiley Editor looncall.editor@gmail.com

One of my favourite and most recognizable sounds from cottage country is the iconic call of the loon. It’s that first time we hear the call in spring and realize we have finally survived the short, cold days of winter. Just as we return to the lake in spring, so do the loons and it isn’t long after the snow melts when I launch my bright, yellow kayak and paddle deep into the quiet bay to greet them. Some years back in my journeys I came across a loon’s nest - the first time I had ever seen one. The parent loon was laying stone-still over the nest with its head down low, and I would have easily taken it for a rock and passed by if I hadn't noticed the reddish eye looking at me. Within a few minutes the other adult loon came towards me to investigate. He swam just under the water and around my canoe while looking straight up at me.  I quietly continued on, not wanting to cause them any undue stress, but it was an interesting encounter with nature that I was on the lookout to repeat again. Sure enough, over the following years I have had numerous experiences with

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

The day I had been anticipating finally came, when I paddled out and the loon was no longer sitting on her nest. I was excited and thinking the family might not be far, I sat for a while in my kayak and sure enough I spotted them. Two adult loons swimming closely together approached me, and parting slightly they gave me a glimpse of their little pride and joy. Congratulating them, I spent a little while there watching the baby splash around and finally went on my way. It’s a privilege to live peacefully alongside them, being blessed each day by their beauty and each night by their serene and haunting call. In return, we must be responsible caretakers of this delicate and beautiful lake, so that the diverse fauna continue to bless our children’s children long after we are gone. Terri Todosey Art Director

Loon’s nest - photo taken after the baby loon had left the nest.

Next Year’s Loon Call... Shawna Hiley and I have enjoyed serving the LWCA members for the past three years with the continuing production of this Loon Call. We’ve received some incredible stories, reports and photos from our directors and members, and we have thoroughly enjoyed ourselves. It is now time to pass the torch, and Alison Myles is excited to be taking over the Loon Call for a second time. Let’s help her out! Do you have a lake adventure to share, knowledge

the regal birds and I like to think I've built up a bit of a rapport with them. One nesting spot in particular has been a favourite of their’s year after year.  It’s fairly close to my cottage, so I’ve had the privilege of visiting them often. Always keeping a good distance, I would softly talk to the mama loon as I quietly passed by so she wouldn’t feel alarmed or threatened.

Photo Contest to teach, an event to chronicle or an advertisement to promote? Email it to Alison and you might have your article featured in next year’s Loon Call. Use the same looncall.editor@gmail.com address for photos, articles and anything Loon Call-related.  Remember, the Loon Call is only as good as the material submitted from our members.

All entries must be taken in the year 2018 by a LWCA member, at the lake and must be in .jpeg format. Please use ‘Loon Call Photo Contest’ as email subject line and include your name, cottage number (optional), title of pic (with or without location) and category of entry within body of email.  Entries must be received by December 31st, 2018.  Email Alison Myles at looncall.editor@gmail.com. 3


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Membership Report By Carolyn Calhoun Thank you to all Weslemkoon and Otter Lake LWCA Members and Friends of the Lake. I am pleased to report we have a total of 243 members and friends in 2017 consisting of 214 members (210 in 2016), 7 new members (9 in 2016) and 22 Friends of the Lake (23 in 2016). A strong membership base will ensure important initiatives can continue to move forward. I’d like to extend all new members and their families a “warm Weslemkoon welcome”. Thanks to the Olney Family for their hospitality in hosting the new members gathering again this past July. The 2017 Annual General Meeting was held at Tanglewood Marina on a very “blustery” Saturday. Thanks to all who braved the wavy waters to attend the meeting and BBQ. Our guest speaker, LWCA member and FOCA Director, Terry Beettam spoke about the benefits of belonging to the Federation of Ontario Cottagers’Associations. You can learn more about FOCA on page 14 of this issue in an article written by Terry. The 2018 AGM will be held on Saturday August 4, 2018 at Weslemkoon Marina. An email reminder will be sent out prior to the meeting. We hope to have another guest speaker this year. Don’t miss out on this opportunity to connect with fellow cottagers and stay informed about lake issues. Hope to see you there! I encourage members and friends to register and pay dues by May 1st. I may be reached at calhoun8822@rogers.com regarding membership issues. If you know anyone who might be interested in joining the Association as a member (property owner) or a friend please send them my way or registration is available on the website www.weslemkoon.com. The more the merrier! With the hard work of all our volunteers, members and friends we can conserve the beauty of our lakes and the water quality. Your continued support is greatly appreciated.

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List of Directors: Past President Stuart Inglis President Ken Senter Vice-President Patty Milne Secretary Travis Walker Treasurer Diane Morden Membership Carolyn Calhoun Loon Call Shawna Hiley Terri Todosey Legal & Municipal Affairs Paul Bottos Communications Janice Mackenzie Junior Loons Melissa Tervit Patty Milne Shoal Markers & Lake Levels Mark Warlow Water Quality Ian MacKenzie Forestry & Trails Bruce Magee Septics Patty Milne Custodial Visits Steve Latto

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Custodial Visits By Steve Latto Your LWCA membership includes two custodial visits (fall and spring) to check the security of your home-away- from-home. These are performed late in the fall (prior to freeze-up) and early in the spring (prior to ice-out). This past spring there were a total of 217 cottages visited and checked by the custodian. The fall visits numbered 220 and were completed by the end of November. There are a couple of items below that have arisen and need to be addressed. Cottage Buildings There are properties on the lake with more than one structure that could be mistaken for a cottage. We ask that you please let us know which building is the one you wish us to check. You can email a sketch or put a sign in a lake-side window that is easily seen from the water to indicate that this is the main building. If there is no sign or we have not been notified of which building to check, we check the one deemed to be most likely the main building. Cottage Numbering There were a few properties that we are a little unsure of. Please place either the cottage lake number or your family name (or both if you get really gung-ho on this) at the lake so that we can tell if we are at the correct property. If you find that your property did not receive the visit that it should have, kindly contact us so that we can clarify this for the future. Also, a reminder that if you have 2 or more properties, you are responsible for paying for additional custodial visit(s), if required. Each membership to the LWCA includes a fall and spring custodial visit to one property. Thanks for your cooperation and have a safe and happy winter season.

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Water Quality By Ian Mackenzie Maintaining the high quality of our Weslemkoon water is the highest priority of the LWCA. Key values being safety for swimming, visual/clarity of water, and the health of fish populations. This article will update three aspects: • Set out what the Association has been doing, and the program going forward, • Historic trends – what is the data telling us about our lake? • Implications of the trends, and what cottagers can do to influence improved water quality. 1)! LWCA water monitoring program Various water testing has been done over the years. The current program has been influenced by what we know to be important to swimming, clarity & fish, and within the constraints of our budget (lab testing is expensive). Currently we do two types of tests: a) " Deep water sampling of temperature and dissolved oxygen (DO). We’ve been monitoring two deep water locations – one off Elmardon in the main channel, and the second in Otter lake’s deep channel. We take a measurement of temperature and DO every metre. We will expand the number of deep water test locations next year. b) " Chemistry and Bacteria – we monitor 21 locations around the lake, and we do these tests every three years in order to monitor trends. Measurements of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, E-Coli and total Coliforms are taken.

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b) " Chemistry test results show a generally worsening water quality trend, particularly in the 4 south end sampling locations. Nitrogen levels are well above the target range at all test locations while Phosphorus levels are within the target range at all locations. E-Coli only appears in any significant level in the south end locations. Total Coliforms are generally above the target level at all locations, and significantly higher at south end location where creeks flow into the lake. To look at the details, go to LWCA website, Water Quality section. 3)! Implications and what we can do to Influence Lake Weslemkoon is classified as a highly sensitive lake trout lake. Tests show dissolved oxygen remains above the survival minimum of 6 mg/litre, but below their preferred range of 9.6-11.7 mg/l. It’s important to keep our lake trout, and important to keep our ‘highly sensitive lake trout lake’ classification, as the level of further human development on the lake is constrained by having this classification. Nitrogen and Phosphorus levels influence growth of aquatic plants and algae. The levels are significantly higher at the south end of the lake due to the higher level of development both on the shore and upstream of the creeks flowing into the lake.

2)! Historic Trends a) " The deep water test results are shown in Figure 1. The dissolved oxygen trends are relatively stable across the 1989-2008-2017 samples. The deepest section of the Otter Lake location actually looks a little better in 2017 than in 2008.

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

The above chart shows Average data for the four sampling years. Average data is not the best since individual levels vary quite a bit, but the above chart of averages shows a worsening trend.

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What can cottagers do to influence improvement to water quality? Have a septic system & be sure it’s working properly (see Septic report for how to get inspected) • Minimize water use – where possible take laundry home and avoid use of dishwasher • Choose soaps that are environmentally safe and don’t wash directly in the lake • Don’t use fertilizers and pesticides • Reduce erosion effects - maintain trees, shrubs & ground cover in the Riparian Zone by the lake

Water Levels By Mark Warlow The Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry (MNRF) had a difficult year trying to maintain the lake water levels in line with the planned Water level Management Plan, with high levels experienced for much of the early spring, causing flooding of some boat houses and docks. The LWCA was in regular contact with the MNRF to communicate our concerns regarding the high levels, however the amount of water they could release from the lake was limited to avoid damage to infrastructure downstream of the lake. On a more positive note, the long-awaited dam repairs started at the North End on September 11th 2017 and were completed on October 6th. The objective of the repair was to prevent leakage through the concrete on the west spillway, which in turn should facilitate better control of the lake water levels. The repair involved replacing approximately 1m of the spillway then re-pouring the new section with concrete. The project was completed without any impact on the lake water level as a small sandbag coffer dam placed in front of the spillway to drain and allow access to the damaged area. 5


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Shoal Markers By Mark Warlow

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Dissolved Oxygen - Temp Chart

In spite of some fairly inclement weather in the spring this year, Mike Watson managed to deploy the LWCA Shoal Markers over the first weekend after “iceout”. A number of challenges were encountered this year with the high water and winds contributing to several of the markers breaking loose or turning “turtle” over the summer. We continue to maintain 17 markers in designated spots on the lake, along with a couple of unlit markers as well. We are looking a new design of Courtesy Shoal Markers to try and address the issues experienced this year. We anticipate the new design to have a smaller cross-sectional area, thereby reducing their susceptibility to wind and wave action. Our intention will be to trial a few over the 2018 season and if successful, replace the remaining markers over the next couple of years. Thanks to all those who reported the markers when they did go missing or the lights malfunction. Please be aware that while every endeavour is made to replace these markers as soon as practically possible, there will inevitably be delays, as Mike is not on the Lake 24/7.

Figure: Dissolved oxygen and water temperature at depth for Site 7 (LakeWes) and Site 13 (Otter Lk) during the July surveys in 1989, 2008, and 2017. The graphs for 1989 were reproduced from the water quality survey documents and this represent estimates of the original data. The dotted green bar represents the dissolved oxygen minimum (6mg/l) preferred by many cold-water fish (PWQO).

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Municipal Affairs

By Paul Bottos

I would like to take this opportunity to report to you regarding various matters which were dealt with by the L.W.C.A during the past year.

DEVELOPMENT ON THE LAKE The L.W.C.A continues to receive copies of development applications in and surrounding the lake. The L.W.C.A looks forward to the continued receipt of this information from the Township. In particular, following concerns expressed to the L.W.C.A at the AGM this past year regarding the expansion of Hartsmere Road along the north shore of the lake, the L.W.C.A contacted both the Township and the M.N.R.F. to inquire as to whether or not the proper procedures/permits were followed in regard to the works carried out. The Township and the Ministry both advised that they would be investigating the matter as they indicated that they were not aware of the extent of the work(s) carried out. The Township did indicate that there was an application for the Township to purchase a portion of land from the M.N.R.F, in order to create a right of way from the end of the existing Hartsmere Road to a municipal right of way being part 22 on Plan 29R-9129. This would potentially extend the road practically to the narrows entering Otter Lake. The Township advised that the intent of the acquisition was not to create a maintained road, but that any road would remain unmaintained, and that the costs of acquiring and surveying the right of way would not be borne by the municipality but rather by the parties interested. The L.W.C.A will continue to monitor this matter. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Your Municipal Representatives are as follows: Reeve: Henry Hogg Councillor: Ward 1 Tony Fritsch Councillor Ward 1: Kirby Thompson Councillor Ward 2 (and Deputy Reeve): Helen Yanch Councillor: Ward 2 Bill Cox You may contact the Township as follows: ADDRESS:" " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " " "

72 Edwards Street P.O. Box 89 Flinton, Ontario K0H 1P0

Telephone:" (613) 336-2286 Fascimile:" " (613) 336-2847 Website: www.addingtonhighlands.ca

COTTAGE NUMBERS In the event that you require replacement cottage number or require a new cottage number to be assigned, please contact the L.W.C.A as we work with the Township for the purposes of assigning same. Please note that roadside numbers are assigned directly by the Township and you should contact the Township directly with respect to same. The Township has indicated that it is currently in discussions with County representatives and others so as to possibly amend or alter this process and/or change the cottage numbers for the lake and that a proposed new bylaw has been circulated for review and comment. The L.W.C.A will continue to monitor the progress of same and

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provide input. Should you require a cottage number please contact the Township and the L.W.C.A

THE ALGONQUIN LAND CLAIM The Province has continued to move forward with respect to the Agreement of Principle in regard to the Algonquin Land Claim and issued a draft Environmental Evaluation Report in regard to the proposed settlement lands (two of which are located on Weslemkoon Lake). The L.W.C.A circulated to all of our members a copy of the Notice of Opportunity to comment on the draft Environmental Evaluation Report, together with notice of various public open houses regarding the report. The M.N.R.F invited comments to be provided up until October 17, 2017 and advised that all comments received during the notice period would be considered in the preparation of the final Environmental Evaluation Report which will be released for final public inspection at a future point. I trust the above keeps you informed as to the developments which have transpired in regards to municipal issues during the past year. Should anyone have any interest in the noted issues of have any other issues which may be of interest or concern, please do not hesitate to contact the L.W.C.A in order that same may be raised and discussed.

Have you seen the new LWCA website? News, Events, Blog and more!

www.weslemkoon.com

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Forestry and Hiking By Bruce Magee

FORESTRY HARVEST There is no change from last year for the 2017-18 Mazinaw-Lanark Forest Inc. Annual Work Schedule (AWS) of our existing provincial 10-year forest maintenance plan with a harvest of Block 191, (North and South of Trout Lake Rd. north of Otter Lake) and 161 (South of Weslemkoon Lake Rd. 2nd block west of the Lake). For the 2017-18 season there will be tending of 2,000 Pine and spruce seedlings in Block 163 (South of Seymore Creek and east of the Lake) and there will be continued harvest on block 181 (South of Ashby Lake between Weslemkoon and Hwy 41). None of these cuttings will encroach minimum set-backs from the Lake. If anyone would like to view a pdf of the maps of these areas please feel free to contact me, and I would be happy to email them to you. My e-mail address is bruce.magee@gbb-inc.com

TREE PLANTING PROJECT We’ll be offering nursery plantings again this year for those that would like to improve the management of their riparian zone around their cottage. The riparian zone is the ribbon of land around our lake from the high water mark to the

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densely forested wood land. From a conservation perspective this is a key strip of land, it must filter effluent from our weeping tile beds, and retain storm water run-off into our lake. The cost of the seedlings is $1.29 each. If you would like to sign up for this planting on your property please call or e-mail me at bruce.magee@gbb-inc.com, or call at (905) 854 2014.

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minimum of two people to form a trail maintenance team. Contact Bruce Magee by e-mail bruce.magee@gbb-inc.com or phone (905) 854-2014, or cell (416) 432-3098. Please have the names of your team members ready/committed to the task, and an anticipated date to do the maintenance, as well as a couple of trail choices (in case your first choice is already signed-up by another party). All trail maintenance teams will be thanked and identified in the Loon Call.

CONIFER CORNER TRAIL CLEARING If you’re interested in helping maintain one of the hiking trails around our lake please read on. The LWCA is continuing its maintenance of our trails around Otter and Weslemkoon to other lakes. The goal is to keep our trails in clear and identifiable condition that allows hikers to be closer to nature. Work on a trail will consist of clearing limbs and foliage around the trail head sign, and on the trail pruning back branches and sectioning dead falls that block the path. Keeping it simple/ natural, marking the start of the path, and clearing the way to make it an easy hike is the motto of our work. If you’re interested in helping and would like to participate; get together a

Protect your Riparian Zone Protecting the biodiversity of the riparian zone is of paramount importance to protecting the water quality of our lake. The riparian zone is that 30 to 100 metre area of land from the high water mark to the tall canopy of the forest. When we don’t disturb or cut the trees, bushes and ground cover of the riparian zone their roots keep the soil intact and this acts as a filter to the leachate of our septic systems. Without a natural diverse and healthy plant system in our riparian zone at the front of our cottage properties, we run the real risk of increasing the phosphates and nitrates in our lake and thus reducing the quality of water for fish habitat and human consumption. As shown in the picture to the right, clear and use only a narrow path to the lake Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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and allow junipers, ground cover, bushes, trees and saplings to flourish along your riparian zone. We all want a healthy lake for generations to come and if we all manage our riparian zones on our cottage properties we’ll be filtering the leachate from our septic systems and protecting our cherished Lake Weslemkoon.

Trees To Plant In Your Riparian Zone

Tree Specie Rela,ve Sunlight Requirements Paper Birch Tamarack Jack Pine Aspen Silver Maple Red Pine Red Maple Red Oak White Pine Yellow Birch Balsam Fir White Spruce Sugar Maple Basswood Cedar Sources: Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry, Michigan Forests Forever

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To select the right seedlings to plant in your riparian zone, consider this… we are all sensitive to sunlight, and some of us are more tolerant than others. Did you know that trees are sensitive to sunlight too? It’s commonly known that trees and plants need sunshine to live. However, not all trees need the same amounts of sunlight. Trees that require high amounts of sunlight are sensitive to shade. Foresters call this sensitivity "shade tolerance" or just "tolerance". The shade tolerance of some tree species will vary with age. Tree species such as aspen, cherry, paper birch, jack pine, and red pine require lots of sun and are not tolerant of shade. Around our lake, that’s part of the reason stands of these species tend to be all about the same age. The big fire back in the 20’s is another reason. Seeds of these species that germinate under a canopy of shade do not survive. Other tree species that are more tolerant of shade, are maple, beech, balsam, hemlock, and cedar. They can survive as seedlings or saplings under a fairly heavy canopy of shade for many years.

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When exposed to light, the small trees (not always young trees!) can quickly grow to take advantage of the new light regime. There are a number of tree species that fall into the moderately tolerant category, such as red oak, red maple, yellow birch, white ash, white pine, and white spruce. They may be able to grow under the light canopy of an aspen or paper birch stand, but would not be very successful under the shade of a maple or basswood stand. If you want to build the biodiversity of the riparian zone on your cottage property, inspect your canopy and select seedlings that will have the most success of establishing into healthy saplings given the amount of sunlight they’ll have.

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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Financial Report Statement of Changes in Net Assets as Dec 31, 2017 (unaudited)

Catherine Rathbun Memorial Environmental Fund

Unrestricted

Total 2017

Total 2016

17,533

30,735

48,268

44,942

83

(559)

(476)

2,045

674

1,281

48,466

48,268

BALANCE, Beginning of Year Excess (Deficiency) of Revenue Over Expenditures Contributions - Net

674

BALANCE, End of Year

Statement of Financial Position as at December 31, 2017 (unaudited)

ASSETS Current Assets Cash Term Deposit Inventory Fixed Assets Water Testing Equipment - net LIABILITIES & RESTRICTED FUNDS & NET ASSETS Current Liabilities Accounts Payable & Accrued Liabilities Restricted Funds Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund Net Assets Unrestricted

18,290

Statement of Revenues & Expenditures 2017

2016

30,235 17,760 1,542 49,537

29,876 17,535 1,689 49,100

949 50,486

1,139 50,239

2,020

1,971

18,290

17,533

30,176 50,486

30,735 50,239

for the year ended December 31, 2015 (unaudited) 2017

REVENUES Annual Fees Loon Call Revenues Interest Income Miscellaneous Sales Total Revenue

2017 Treasurer’s Report By Diane Morden Your board continues to be very active as reflected by the diverse expenditures reflected in the Statement of Revenues & Expenditures. Actual expenditures are in line with Board approved budgeted amounts. Custodial visit expenditures appear higher this year because the ice conditions during the winter of 2016 prevented our custodian from completing all custodial visits. Current custodial expenditures are in line with pre-2016 years. Shoal marker maintenance expenditures appear higher due to a one-time charge in the change-over to our new maintenance contract. Surplus funds are invested in bank GIC’s earning 1.55% and will mature December 2019. Interest earned is shared on a weighted average basis between the general fund and 10

30,176

EXPENDITURES Annual Meeting Bank Charges Administrative & Promotional Cost of Miscellaneous Sales Custodial Visits FOCA Insurance Loon Call New Shoal Markers Shoal Marker Maintenance Lake Activities Social Miscellaneous Professional Web Site Development Costs Water Quality Testing Amortization of Water Test Equipment Total Expenditures EXCESS OF REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES (Expenditures over Revenues)

2016

12,901 2,130 142 1929

12,296 2,285 158 617

17,103

15,356

756 224 115 255 3,432 775 1,617 2,556 653 2,389 469 90 1,672 201 2,269 190

1,107 176 448 445 2,381 743 1,584 2,655 664 855 287 55 1,780 190

17,662

13,401

(559)

1,955

the Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund. The Catherine Rathbun Environmental fund grew by individual contributions of $674 ($1,281 in 2016) and allocated interest. Expenditures from this fund are restricted in nature and require a majority vote by the membership at the annual general meeting. The remaining unrestricted surplus of $30,176 is available for the general purposes of the association. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Junior Loons Report

by Melissa Tervit

Water Quality Activity & Hike

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chemicals out of our septic systems and make sure that no soap gets into the water. What awesome responses from our fabulous group of environmentally savvy kids!

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Eucalyptus and Rosemary essential oils; Theives smells great and is promoted to help reduce the spread of cold viruses and bacteria. Here is the recipe that we used: Fill foaming hand soap container 1/2 full of water Add 2 tbsp of Liquild Castille Soap Add 6-10 drops of your favourite essential oil

This year our first Jr Loons event focused on water quality. We began the day by having the kids brainstorm the topic “Things that Affect Water Quality”. The kids felt that humans were the number one factor. They thought that humans pollute the water with garbage, by using boats that leak oil, gas or bilge fluids, and by using soap in or near the water. When asked “Why do we care about water quality?” the responses included having a healthy lake, helping the fish survive, allowing us to live and be healthy, and ensuring that we can go swimming and enjoy other water activities. They came up with some great ideas on how to protect the lake: use only non-petrol based boats (think solar powered boats!), pick up all garbage, make sure boats don’t leak fluids into the lake, keep harmful things such as oils and

Our activity was to make foaming hand soap. Homemade foaming hand soap is great for use at the cottage because it contains liquid castile soap, water and essential oils, all of which are naturally based and therefore septic safe. Castille soap is a 100% plant derived soap which is easily broken down in our septic systems. Because of this, castile soap is great to use at the cottage for laundry, as a shampoo, household cleaning, and hand soap. Dr. Bronner’s and Green Beaver both make castile soap in unscented, and scented varieties. We put the liquid soap into refillable bottles which produce foam when air is added to the mixture by the hand pump. Another great thing about using foaming hand soap at the cottage is that there is no need to pre-wet your hands, just pump, rub your hands to produce a lather then rinse. The kids added combinations of lemon, lavender and Thieves essential oils to the soap to create their own customized natural scent. Lemon essential oil is known for its usefulness as a degreaser, natural disinfectant and for its mood boosting freshness. Lavender essential oil has a calming scent and it is known to help reduce itchy skin from mosquito bites. Thieves is an oil blend made by Young Living which contains Clove, Lemon, Cinnamon Bark,

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

After our activity we went for a hike into Mink Lake where the kids enjoyed a fun time swimming and building friendships. It was a great start to the summer of 2017.

Bat House Building

One evening last summer I noticed a lone little brown bat flying near our cottage. I was so happy as I recalled how we used to have many bats flying each night, eating all the mosquitos that were drawn to the light of our gas 11


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I found plans to build a bat house suitable for our area on the Bat Conservation International website (batcon.org), and the kids put in a full day of work constructing 3 single chamber bat houses. We hope to have all three bat houses mounted at sites around, so keep your eyes open for them and to see if they have been inhabited.

lamps. Sadly, the Little Brown Bat’s population has suffered a sharp decline due to White Nose Syndrome. This inspired me to plan a bat house building activity for the Jr Loons, as I figured that if there was at least one bat left on the lake, it deserved a house to help with its survival.

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day, and a Loon Nesting platform building project. Please check the Marina bulletin boards, and the Weslemkoon Facebook page for event details. Remember that if you are missing the lake over the winter you can always download and work on the Jr. Loons Activity book.

See the plans we used on the next page, so you too can build a bat house for your property. If you do build one for yourself be sure to follow the mounting guidelines found on the batcon.org website to help ensure that your bat house will be inhabited. For the summer of 2018 we are planning a hike day, a water activity

By the end of July, all signs had disappeared. - even the egg shells. But another early morning in September, there was a Great Blue Heron standing in the same area.

LWCA Passings The LWCA is saddened to hear of the passing of the following members and friends:

Our Adventure

with a Snapping Turtle

Early on the morning of June 24, looking out our living-room window, I spotted a huge snapping turtle! She’s laying eggs! The earth is certainly messy and ruffed up. It’s close to the water but bathed in sunlight. Did she wait long for the sunlight?" Oop! She’s lifting her tail! She’s moving on. Her tail is sweeping earth over the hole. Now she’s just lying in the sun, relaxing after laying a lot of eggs. And then she moves on - into the water. Wait a minute. A lot of those eggs are emptied shells. - already? Does she lay some eggs each day? - and at night, other animals enjoy eating those eggs? I hope some survive.

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Written by Pam Lawton who was recently inducted in to the Cockeyed Loons for her tremendous volunteering spirit on our lake and within the LWCA.

• Courtney Stoate 1924-2017, Cottage #279 • Fred Goerke. Aug 11 (his partner Carole is part of the Aide family) • Bud Fischer. Had a stroke late August at the lake and was transferred to New Jersey for treatment where he died on Sept 27 • John William Nisbett, camp 610 Sept 3rd • Roger Allen Finnamore born July 4, 1944, in Polegate, England is son of Charles Allen and Donetta Ticefurt Finnamore. He died at 73, on Jan 3, 2018 and is survived by his wife Linda Parr, Cottage #292 • Honor Florence Burke 1934-2018, Cottage 441

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FOCA

and the Power of Volunteerism by Terry Beettam Each spring, all of us are primed and ready to make the first trip of the season to our cottages in anticipation of another memorable season at the lake. We are truly the lucky ones who can enjoy this year after year. But things are never perfect. As cottagers we deal with rapidly changing weather patterns, invasive species, degrading water quality, too much or too little government regulation and many other issues which complicate an otherwise simple cottage experience. Fortunately, we have among us those who give their time to buffer these imperfections. All across cottage country we have lake associations comprised of hard-working volunteers. I was one such volunteer from 2001 to 2013, when I retired as past president of the LWCA. During this time our board focused on a variety of initiatives, in particular, water quality. Our current board continues to work hard for the betterment of our members.

volunteer monitoring program. Lake Weslemkoon and Otter Lake have been sampled many times in the past, but we are in need of new volunteers to take up this important citizen science work! Find out more here: https://foca.on.ca/lake-partnerprogram-sampling-assistance/. FOCA works all year ‘round on behalf of Ontario waterfront owners. They share news and updates about cottage country issues in their monthly Elerts (e-newsletters), on social media, through brochures and publications, and on the FOCA website where you can always search by topic for answers: https:// foca.on.ca/resources/. I encourage you to connect with them online.

In 2017, I joined the Board of Directors of the Federation of Ontario Cottagers’ Associations (FOCA). The Board is made up of current or former executives of member associations who are still very involved with issues that exist within the cottage communities. The LWCA has been a FOCA member association since the early 1990s. FOCA itself has been around since 1963, when 125 people from 40 cottage associations met in a Toronto hotel to come together as a provincial organization. Today, FOCA has more than 500 member Associations, representing 50,000 waterfront families across Ontario!

FOCA manages programs for lake associations about invasive species prevention, cottage succession and volunteer liability, among other topics. FOCA also keeps pace with policy changes and government developments that may affect waterfront property owners. Whether it is electricity pricing, mining rights, land claims, water quality or taxation, FOCA sits at the table where individuals cannot.

The issues have changed over time, but the motivation remains the same: to protect the waterfront for our kids, and their kids. Over the years, FOCA fought hard for government action on the issue of acid rain, and secured municipal voting rights for waterfront property owners in our cottage ridings. (By the way: get ready to vote again this October.) For over 30 years, FOCA’s Lake Stewards have been at the core of the Lake Partner Program, the world’s largest freshwater

Over the past two years, FOCA challenged the Ministry of Natural Resources and Forestry to clarify dock permit rules which were thrown into limbo during the summer of 2015, and remained mired in red tape throughout 2016. After sustained effort, FOCA saw the Ministry post new regulations in June 2017 that reinstituted the common sense elements of a “free use” approach to modest docks and single-storey boathouses on public lands without the need for permits.

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(Search “dock permits” at the FOCA link, above, for the full story.) This is one of many ways that FOCA works behind the scenes on our behalf. They continue to ensure our interests are heard by policymakers, help lake associations to effectively organize, and work tirelessly to protect waterfronts across Ontario. Together, we have a strong voice. I am glad the LWCA supports FOCA in their ongoing efforts on behalf of every family who loves the cottage. Over the past several years FOCA has developed publications and “toolkits” for the benefit of individual families and associations. Examples are:

“Managing Your Waterfront Property in a Changing Climate”

“A Shoreline Owner’s Guide to Healthy Waterfronts”

“A Shoreline Owner’s Guide to Invasive Species”

“Lake Planning Handbook for Community Groups”

And I can’t begin to relate the astonishingly rich storehouse of information encompassed in the FOCA website. Experience it for yourself! When spring arrives in 2018, we will all be ready to begin a new cottage season. You can be sure that FOCA will be ready too, continuing to protect our interests. Did you know? Every member of the LWCA is a member of FOCA! You can access FOCA member benefits and discounts, including: 30% off purchases made online at Coleman Canada (use the code SAFEBOAT at checkout); a discount on Cottage Life Magazine subscriptions, and exclusive access to CottageFirst – the first group insurance program dedicated to cottagers. Find out about all your FOCA member benefits here: https://foca.on.ca/member-services/ benefits/. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Fully Insured | Satisfaction Guaranteed Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Finding Flowers That Will Prosper At The Cottage by Steve Murray

selection by identifying whether the plant you are looking at needs full sun, or full shade, etc.

Each spring many of us get excited at the opportunity to visit the local nursey or garden center so we can admire the many different and gorgeous flowers on display. And if you're like me, give in to the temptation to buy those that have caught our eye because we know that it'll look absolutely stunning in our flower garden! I'm only guessing but I think that many have also shared my experience of planting those “beauties” only to find on our return visit a few weeks later that they had perished!  After a few experiences like that I was ready to buy artificial flowers!   Those experiences fortunately taught me that I had to know more about the plants I was selecting and more about the location they were going to be planted at. So let's start with the location.   There are some basic things you need to know before selecting your flowers/plants. Is it in a shaded part of your property that never gets full sun, like the north wall of the cottage. Or full sun, like a southern exposure? Or like a lot of cottage property... partly shaded with a few hours of direct sunlight. Most plants purchased at a garden center have a information tag that will assist you in your 16

The next thing you need to know about your location is the amount of moisture in the soil. Is it a low lying area that turns into a puddle everytime it rains? Or maybe it is a sandy hillside that is very dry all the time? Most locations will tend towards one or the other and that becomes critical in your plant selection. So once we can identify the conditions that exist where we are going to locate our flowers it becomes easier to choose flowers that will most likely prosper at our cottages. Another important consideration in choosing flowers for the cottage is that for many of us, you don't live at your cottage all summer to water them. That is particularly important when planting in containers or sandy, well drained soil. If you remember our summer in 2016 it frequently went several weeks without rain. Great for enjoying the cottage but not so great for many plants when you only come up on the weekends! My recommendation for most of us is to look for drought resistant flowers and plants for planting at the cottage. Bear in mind that even drought resistant plants need supplemental watering while they get established. So if you know much sunlight your locations is going to get and you combine that with drought resistant types you'll

greatly improve your chances for a successful flower garden a the cottage. Some suggestions to look at when next you go to your local garden center.

Variegated leaves with pink flowers in the fall. 4. Purple cornflower: Full sun and well drained soil. Winter hardy and grows to 5' tall. Blooms most of the summer. Makes a great cut flower. Butterflies love them. 5. Amsonia: Full sun and well drained soil. Winter hardy and grows to approx. 2'. Blooms late spring with clusters of sky blue flowers. In the fall the foliage turns to brilliant shades of gold.

Perennials: 1. Yarrow: Full sun and well drained soil, winter hardy for this area and grows to approx. 4'. Deer and most other critters won’t touch it. Also makes a great cut flower. Comes in a number of varieties with blooms in colours ranging from yellow, orange, red, pink and white.

2. Blanket Flower: Full sun and well drained soil. Winter hardy for this area and grows to 3'. Comes in bright shades of red and yellow. 3. Sedum (especially 'Frosty Morn'): Full sun and well drained soil. Winter hardy and grows to 18”.

6. Asters: Full sun to part shade. All types of soil but most varieties prefer welldrained soil. Winter hardy. Comes in a wide variety of heights and colours, ranging from white and pastel blues and pinks to deep scarlet and purple. Deer resistant.

7. Phlox: Full sun to part shade. Well drained soil. Winter hardy. Comes in a variety of types ranging from ground cover to 4' tall. Colours range from pink to purple to white. Annuals: 1. Portulaca: Full sun to part shade. Blooms all summer till frost. Mix of colours. 8 10”

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2. Celosia: Full sun. Blooms all summer and into the fall. 6” to 3' tall. Different varieties have different colour foliage and flower colours range from orange, red, pink, purple and white

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6” to 12”. Orange, pink, red, white and yellow flower colours.                        6. Dusty Miller: Full sun. Silver foliage makes a great backdrop for bright flowers. 6” to 3' high and up to 2' across.

3. Globe Amaranth: Full sun. Blooms nearly non-stop with pom-pom type flowers that are great for cutting. Attfacts butterflies. 1' to 3' in height. 4. Zinnia: Full sun with dry to well drained soil. Comes in all shapes and sizes from 1' to 8' and in all colours. Great for cutting and butterflies love them. 5. Gazania: Full sun. Extreme heat and drought tolerant.

I will finish by mentioning what most know are my personal favourites, dahlias and lilies. Most day lilies are winter hardy and do well with little care once they are

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established. I also find that few of the animals ever bother them unlike oriental & hybrid lilies which the rabbits love to eat! If you can keep the rabbits away then these types of lilies also do well under most conditions.

July through to frost is more than worth the extra effort! I hope everybody has a great winter and look forward to seeing you again when we open up at Weslemkoon Marina for the 2018 season.

Dahlias are the principle flower in my gardens but do require a lot more care. To prosper they will need regular watering and want lots of sunshine. And for many the biggest deterrent in planting dahlias is that they are not winter hardly and have to be lifted in the fall before the ground freezes. A soaker hose buried in the flower bed will eliminate the need for watering and the display of colour they produce from late

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Catch and Release Looking for the ‘big one’ is an almost daily ritual, but there are obvious ways to be safe and responsible when fishing. By Nick DeFrietas Like many visitors who come to Weslemkoon, regardless of how frequent or infrequent the visits are, the ‘thrill of the catch’ is something I chase and yearn for. Looking for the “big one” is an almost daily ritual while I am at the cottage. I believe Weslemkoon and those who fish it are blessed with a healthy population of smallmouth and largemouth bass, but I wonder, is that population as healthy as it once was? When I look through the Lake Book that was published a few years ago, I am left to conclude that the fish population now it is not as healthy now as it was ‘back in the day’. However, for those that have spent time on our beautiful lake and other lakes fishing for bass, I think most would agree Weslemkoon holds a healthy population of both bass species. The fish that inhabit Weslemkoon do not face the same fishing pressure that lakes along the Trent-Severn waterway system do, that is for certain, but the pressure is increasing. As anglers and friends of the lake, it is very important to practice safe and responsible behaviour whilst fishing. By safe and responsible behaviour, I am not referring to anything related to zero alcohol while boating, having the proper safety equipment in the boat or being careful not to hook fellow anglers, although those are all important safety 18

issues. What I am referring to relates to practicing ‘catch and release’ and staying within reasonable limits when keeping fish for consumption. There are a few glaringly obvious ways to be safe and responsible when fishing. First, there is nothing wrong with keeping a few fish for consumption and people should enjoy this luxury. However, people should act responsibly, only take what they need and not over indulge. There is no need, at least in my opinion, to keep and eat fish every single day while at the lake. I have witnessed and conversed with people who boast about catching and keeping a large amount of fish and even worse, doing so on a regular basis. Instead of bragging about this and being proud, I believe this should bear embarrassment. Second, it is important to remember what fish are likely to reproduce the most, and make sure these fish are set to swim again if caught. The general rule is that larger fish produce more eggs and therefore more fry (baby bass). A study by Davis and Lock states that, “Females average about 4000 eggs per pound of body weight”, and “larger fish tend to have larger eggs and therefore larger fry”. Thus, if you are lucky enough to catch a ‘monster’, do your part and release the fish upon capture.

Once the fish has been caught, take a minute to get a photo or two to share with family, friends and on the Weslemkoon Facebook page. Some may be thinking, a picture just doesn’t satisfy the beauty and size of the fish. If you would like a keepsake or more visual memory than a picture can provide (like a mounted fish for your wall), take photos and measurements of the fish and look for someone who will make a replica. This is the ‘new age’ of taxidermy that some people may not realize is available. Lastly, for all of those who wet their lines, I encourage you to be a voice and advocate for the fish. Promote catch and release on Weslemkoon. Not only will you be doing the fish a favour, you will also be doing yourself and future generations a favour. Fishing is a wonderful way to enjoy the outdoors, and together we are the ones responsible for keeping it safe and healthy. We are the ones who need to practice and promote good habits. We have been blessed with a great lake and fishery, why not strive to keep it that way for many more years?!

James T Davis and Joe T Lock, “Largemouth Bass: Biology and Life History”, Southern Regional Aquaculture Center, August 1997. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Please join the LWCA directors in thanking our advertisers for their support this year: visit their stores, use their services and when you do, tell them that you saw their ad in the Loon Call. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Photo Contest Winners! LANDSCAPE First Place: Tanglewood Alan Thomas, Cottage #133

WILDLIFE First Place Potholes Philip Calambakas

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nce again we received so many great digital

captures of great times at the lake, and choosing

winners was more difficult than ever (especially in the people & landscape category!). Thank you to all who submitted photos to this year’s contest. Keep them coming to looncall.editor@gmail.com before the Dec 31, 2018 deadline.

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PEOPLE First Place Every Morning Starts a New Page in Your Story Carrie Howes, Cottage #23

WINTER First Place Little Long Lake Jennifer Passalant Cottage #637 Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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WINTER Second Place: Lighthouse in 2017 Pam Lawton

PEOPLE Second Place: Skiing Alan Thomas Cottage #133

WILDLIFE Second Place Lovely Loons Carolyn Calhoun 22

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LANDSCAPE Second Place: Mirror Kee Sakamoto Cottage #780

PETS First Place Fetch! Glen Shortt Cottage #26

HONORARY MENTION Art Imitating Nature Carolyn Calhoun

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Gilmour. They were taken to the Lake by Mr. McMurray. Louise was pregnant with Nancy. They stayed with Duncan Cameron on Cameron Island. This was the last summer on Cameron Island.

Nancy Dickinson by Eugene and Sharen Heath Nancy has been a mainstay on Weslemkoon Lake for many years. In 2016 she made a decision that many long time cottagers face: with mixed emotions, she came to the conclusion that it was time to sell. The following dates and events will outline the story of how she and her family came to be and stay at Weslemkoon beginning in 1910. 1910 Hugh Cameron (Nancy’s uncle), Duncan Cameron (Nancy’s grandfather) along with a group from Trenton and Belleville took a train from Belleville to Gilmour. Hugh Cameron was the Minister of a Presbyterian Church in Detroit. Henry Ford belonged to this church. Duncan Cameron was also a minister, his church being in Pittsburgh. During those years, ministers had the summer off. From Gilmour the men walked and the women rode on a wagon to the Lake. They camped at the Ketcheson hunting camp on Ketcheson island (# 360). 1912 Hugh Cameron purchased the land where the lighthouse is now. 1913 Duncan Cameron purchased Cameron Island. Being before the new dam was built, they could walk and wade between the lighthouse property and Cameron Island when the water was low at the end of the season. 1920 C. M. Reid built a cottage on Ketcheson Island (now Heath’s #350). In the early 1920’s, Nancy’s father, Bill, would row from Cameron Island to the Reid cottage to see a Reid daughter. 1925 Bill and Louise Cameron (Nancy’s parents) took a train from Pittsburgh to 24

1926 – 1941 Bill and Louise Cameron stayed at the Cameron cottage (which became the Bryan cottage #320 in 1949) with Duncan Cameron. 1930 Nancy first came to the Lake at the age of 4 ½, and visited every year until 1949. The lighthouse was built in 1930 and caused quite an uproar. Many thought it was ugly and too commercial. 1945 When Nancy was at the Lake, they didn’t hear anything about the bomb being dropped on Nagasaki until they were on their way home going through Peterborough. 1947 When they came this year, they rented the neighbouring cottage from the Grubb’s (#325) 1948 – 1963 They did not come to the Lake. 1964 – 1965 Nancy’s husband, Hill fell in love with the Lake and they began looking for property to build on. 1966 They purchased the land for #327 from the Grubbs. 1968 They stayed at the Grubbs and built an A frame.

summer. Nancy had many gatherings at her cabin and seldom passed up an invitation to go out. There were Book Club meetings, ladies lunches, neighbourhood parties, annual parties or just drop in get togethers. Nancy was on everyone’s A list. Everyone was always interested in her stories of the Lake with the background information. We had many theme parties over the years and Nancy would call Sharen in May to find out what the theme was so she could arrive dressed for the role. She could be in her Red Cross Volunteer uniform (it still fit), the bearded lady at the circus, dressed like The Queen or whatever was just right. We and many others miss her but we still keep contact with her year-round as she likes to keep up with all the happenings. Weslemkoon Lake just doesn’t seem the same without her.

1969 They began building the new cottage. 1970 They moved into the new cottage. 1994 Hill died. He had achieved the rank of Lieutenant General 3 Star in the U.S. Army 2016 Nancy sold the cottage to her niece Mary Danka and her husband Bob who are from Baton Rouge Louisiana. Our first memories of Nancy were in the early 1970’s when Eugene’s parents (Harold and Carolyn) would visit back and forth with Nancy and Hill. Whenever we were together the discussions were always enlightening. In Hill’s presence, I felt like I should stand at attention and salute. After Hill’s passing, Nancy continued to make the 14-hour trip from Arlington, VA for the

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Alone

An interview with one of the brothers who survived unthinkable conditions and came out a winner on the hit TV show, Alone Photo Credit - Left Field Pictures

Many of us know that Jim and Ted Baird (cottage 611) were 1 of 7 pairs that competed in “Alone”: 2017’s self-shot T.V. reality show on the History Channel. The Loon Call was able to interview Jim on Thanksgiving weekend after the results were made public on Aug. 17th during the last episode. The brothers spent 75 days (late October to early January - missing both Christmas and New Years!) alone in the rain forest on Vancouver Island’s isolated northwest boundary. They were provided with camera equipment, but the show was selfshot - no “camera crew” on hand! We’re so proud: out of 7,500 applicants, seven teams were chosen to participate on the show! Jim and Ted were the only Canadian team chosen, And they won! Here’s what Jim told us about their adventure: LC: Has the exposure made a difference to your life? Jim: Yah, people return my calls, they notice me, they point “Hey! you’re the guy from Alone!” - and walk away. It’s helped my adventure business - and the biggie: finally, Tori and I could get married (late September). 26

LC: What were the 10 articles you were allowed to take? Jim: They gave us five: one fire steel, one knife (each), our own sleeping bags, and 2 10 x 10 tarps to protect their camera gear. Then they gave us a long list of suggested items, from which we were allowed to select ten. The 10 we chose were: an axe, saw, 10x10 gill net, a multi-tool, a pot, fishing line and multiple hooks (selecting several different types and strengths of line), 4 x 10 gill net, 2 lbs. of pemmican (animal fat and dried meat mixture), and 3 1/2 lbs. of snare wire. LC: How did you decide which one would stay and which one would travel? Jim: We decided that I would travel because I have more experience in bush-whacking with a compass, and had recently completed a major 36day solo Arctic adventure trip with my dog, Buck. (The Discovery Channel actually aired a spot on that trip!) " LC: What was the stationary one to do besides build a shelter, gather wood and forage for food? Jim: Ted did all that, and explored the territory. He figured out how we

would sustain ourselves day after day: get food under the boulders at low tide - gather food every day and THEN do the larger projects. He also started building a boat - and organized the time. Canadian laws do not allow any trapping, and it's illegal to eat seagulls.

was shivering. And then the weather switched, and we got through it. We did talk about what would make us quit: it would be “the last straw” when we were worn down and might feel we couldn’t go on. In the end, we thought we might have been able to do 90 days.

LC: And what DID you eat most of the time?

LC: How did you treat your water to be sure it was potable? And what about “outhouse” necessities?

Jim: We did get ducks (did you see Jim get one with his hat?!! Tilley loved that!) and once I threw a stick at a grouse on the snow, but missed! And we got gunnel fish (eels) under rocks at low tide. - there were usually some there. And thousands of limpets (snail-type things in low water), gum-boots, shore crabs, and real fish when we were lucky … most of this was GROSS! LC: Was one of you “the leader”? And, did you discuss who would “push the button”? Jim: Leader? it was never decided we both were. About “pushing the button”, we didn’t discuss who would do it. Ted got close once because we ate our rations so late in the game and it gave him nasty acid reflux … his clothes were also wet for days - he

Jim: We collected rain water in a tarp and just drank it. There was a fresh-water creek somewhat near-by. - that water we would boil if we were out of rain water. For elimination, we each had our own area. - although there was a “barn-yard” smell at times! So simply: sometimes we had horrible diarrhea or terrible constipation! But, when you’re not eating so much, there’s not that much elimination. LC: You didn’t really build a large shelter Why? Jim: The nearest trees, etc. were too big, and we didn’t really need it. We used heated rocks to keep our sleeping bags warm. Continued on page 28...

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---continued from page 26

LC: Did you talk about why you wanted the prize money? Jim: Yup! - to get a “jump in life” … and to finally marry the girls. We really missed them and our family. (ed. note in Nov.: Buck was Jim’s “ring bearer” in his out-door, Sept. wedding!! and Ted was his best man.)

missing. Others were more active, such as the curling station (where participants had to roll a rock onto the button …harder than you might think!), pin the tail on the beaver, and singing O Canada in both official languages. It was a lot of fun!

three weeks without hearing from anyone. LC: Has this adventure further bonded you two? Jim: Yes, it’s a cool thing we’ll remember for the rest of our lives.

LC: How often did they check you?

You might be interested in more of Jim’s adventures particularly his UWO presentation of the Ungava Bay solo journey with his dog, Buck:

Jim: Production did random medical checks every once in a while. Once it was only 10 days, but usually we'd go for two or

https://www.youtube.com/ channel/ UCqNjB7rqcH1XFBW4sMfx9 VQ?view_as=subscriber

Treasure Hunt By Janice Mackenzie The 2017 treasure hunt was organized by the O’Rourke family. Michael and Gloria took the lead, putting together 14 stations with a Canada 150 theme. Some of them were pretty tricky … such as searching through a pile of photos and determining which of the Prime Ministers was

The winning team was the DeFreitas family. This will be their second time winning – the first time their theme was “amazing race – survivor”. Congratulations! We look forward to next year ’s hunt. From left to right: Nick DeFreitas, Mike DeFreitas, Taina DeFreitas, Brent Vankoughnett and Sari Vankoughnett.

Quick Reference Calendar of Events SUNDAY

MONDAY

JUNE 24

Did you know? Being a LWCA member not only supports a JULY 1 Canada Day! healthy, active LWCA Director’s lake community, Meeting but it also comes with 8 membership privileges.

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WEDNESDAY 26

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THURSDAY

27 Did you know? Weslemkoon Lake is within the Fisheries 4 Management ZONE 18 where Bass fishing opens the 3rd Saturday in 11 June this year.

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FRIDAY

SATURDAY

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Full Moon 7 Jr. Loons Event

Did you know? A micro full moon looks around 14 percent smaller than a supermoon because it coincides with apogee - the point in the moon’s orbit farthest away from Earth.

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Micro Full Moon 3 LWCA AGM 4 Meet & Greet 9:30am Starts at 10am Weslemkoon Marina

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The Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower is at its peak

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AUGUST 1

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12 The Perseids Meteor Shower is at its peak

Full Moon

TUESDAY

2018

2

Jr. Loons Event

11

31 SEPTEMBER 1 Labour Day Weekend! Treasure Hunt 2pm Tanglewood Marina

Please check the LWCA Website www.weslemkoon.com and Facebook page closer to date for updates and rain dates for all events! 28

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Loon Call 2018  

Loon Call 2018  

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