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The Loon Call An Annual Newsletter for all Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Associates & Supporters www.weslemkoon.com

APRIL 2016 The Fish Whisperer

Guy and his pet fish. Page 14

President’s Letter Stuart Inglis writes. Page 2 Murray Memories A tribute to Murray Pipher Page 21

Wind Turbines and other LWCA articles Page 18

Is Weslemkoon a Healthy Fishing Lake? By Pete Kennington For the most part, I would say “yes”. But, there are some problems - some are real, others only potential for now. Firstly, introducing live bait from ANY other lake is not good. Most of the trout fishermen (and women!) in Weslemkoon use their own minnows that they have caught in Weslemkoon. But some bass fishermen - and women! - use larger minnows - 6”, 7”, even 8” - from other lakes. Of course, if you come here to fish for a week, you might not want to spend two days catching large, live minnows. So, you just buy them on the way in, and may not even know where they’ve come from. This has an obvious potential danger of bringing foreign matter into our lake. The solution is easy: artificial worms (or minnows, frogs, etc.) work just as well. You just need to learn how to use them. It is Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Directors’ Reports Lake levels, forestry, membership & more. Page 2-11

The Fisherman & Butterfly Collector Tribute to Derek McDermott Page 26-27

Easy Ways to Give Back to Weslemkoon Caring for our lake Page 16

Late September A poem by Bram Reed Page 15

Photo Contest Winners It was hard to choose! Page 24-25

Treasure Hunt 2015 An annual affair! Page 13

worth your time, because this helps our lake ten times over! Secondly, unwashed boat hulls from ANYWHERE are dangerous! The risk is greater if they are dirty, and if they are from across the United States border. If a hull is dirty it can be very hard to see hidden zebra muscles. There is no easy solution to

this. Border guards should check as boats cross the border, but if boats are coming in from other lakes, we have zero control! They could be carrying anything. If Asian carp ever got in to Lake Weslemkoon, EVERYTHING would be gone!

ISSN# 1480-9583 Volume 57 Junior Loons Report

From the Archives A look back at Loon Call history. Page 22

Articles from some of our young loons here on the lake. Page 10-11

A third problem is dirty septic beds. If they’re not maintained, of course they can cause a problem. But only some septic systems need to be pumped. Each cottager is responsible for the condition of their septic bed. Finally, not releasing what you catch needs to be monitored. Take out the two to three pounders; then there will be lots of chance for the little ones to grow. If you take out the big ones - five to six pounders - then they won’t be able to reproduce! This is especially important with female fish in the fall when they are full of eggs. Let her go immediately!! “Catch and release.” And when you catch, the release should be done almost immediately. Take the picture, and let ‘em go. Only about 40% of “live-well” catches survive. Big fish should be released within minutes of catching them. Watch our fish. They always “school up” in the spring and fall, looking for warm water. It’s fascinating to see them swim in schools around the warm water - shallow in the spring, deeper in the winter. 1


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Directors’ Reports LWCA P R E S I D E N T ’ S L E T T E R Lake Weslemkoon is blessed with clean water. We are very fortunate that our Lake is relatively isolated, fed by almost a dozen clean water creeks and most importantly, we have a passionate group of cottagers committed to keeping our water clean. Water Quality On the water quality front we have been busy working on a water quality initiative. As part of that effort we have contacted Bill Taylor, a limnologist, and Susan Inglis, my sister and marine biologist, to help us make the most of the water quality data we already have as well as to effectively use our Dissolved Oxygen (DO) meter to gather additional data going forward. We have been given some good tips on how to improve our data collection protocols including a recommendation to record the dates of the freeze and thaw each year, as well as collecting spring readings of DO and water temperature (in addition to the summer and fall values that we have been measuring). Our current project is to take our old water quality reports and see if any long-term trends can be identified. To learn more about the fresh water initiative read the article, ‘Keeping it Fresh’ on page 12 in this issue of the Loon Call. As septics are one of the key threats to water quality, we decided that it would be wise to create a new portfolio on the Board to deal specifically with that challenge. Mark Marsolais (#639) has kindly accepted the new position of Septics and Waste Water. The portfolio’s responsibilities will include keeping the Get Pumped program active, monitoring septic issues and providing useful tips and information on septic maintenance and care. Wind Turbines In the spring of 2015 two energy companies (NextEra and RES) proposed

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to place a number of wind turbines in Addington Highlands. The LWCA has been monitoring the situation and will continue to do so. Two emails were sent to our membership last year highlighting the relevant facts surrounding the issue. At the 2015 AGM cottagers debated both sides of the issue. Just as we were about to go on press, the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO; a not-for-profit corporate entity that determines which proposals to go ahead with) announced the projects that it will go ahead with. The proposals for the Addington Highlands were not included. We have included a review the events on page 18.

Stuart with his daughter Misha Communications We have been working out the best mix of the various communication tools that we have on hand as an Association. The mix includes emails sent on an as-needed basis to update the membership with time sensitive information, the LWCA website (a storehouse of useful information on the LWCA activities, cottage living and the surrounding ecosystem as well as method to sign up and pay your membership dues), The Loon Call (our annual report to you, the members, that records the activities of the year past and announces future plans) and the Lake Weslemkoon Facebook

group (https://www.facebook.com/groups/ weslemkoonlake/). Starting this year, we will be posting reminders of upcoming events on Facebook. Junior Loons The Junior Loons has been particularly busy. If you haven’t seen it already, Patti and Melissa have created a wonderful activity book for children to explore the Lake. There are prizes to win. Be sure to read their Junior Loon report and note the dates of the 2016 events. LWCA Board Last year saw the final year for Sean Boyle (#238) on the LWCA Board of Directors. Sean spent 15 years on the Board, first as the editor of the Loon Call, moving to become the vice president and then the president. In 2015 we also saw the departure of Pam Boucher (#231) Secretary, Kevin O’Hearn (#480) Marker Lights and Alison Myles (#228) Loon Call Editor. Thank you all for your terrific work and service. This year’s Board saw a number of new faces: Travis Walker (#381) - Secretary, Mark Warlow (#348) - Markers, Mark Marsolais (#639) - Septics and Waste Water, Carolyn Calhoun (#835) Membership, Terri Todosey - Loon Call Art Director, and Shawna Hiley (#201) Loon Call Editor. Welcome! Our Association is so fortunate to have people willing to put in the time and effort to keep our Lake great. A special thanks goes out to Shawna and Terri for the fantastic job on this Loon Call. Stuart Inglis

LWCA President

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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A Note From the Editor & Art Director

It has been a pleasure to collect and organize the content for this year’s Loon Call. I have been inspired by the diverse stories that have found their way across my screen, impressed by the passion that our contributors have for the lake as the common theme among them. It is an honour to follow in my grandfather’s footsteps as editor (40-ish years later) and to contribute to this small piece of our lake’s story. It feels somehow fitting, since my experiences at the lake have written so much of my story. Thank you to all who contributed, and thanks to you, our readers, for spending the time to read what we’ve put together for you. "

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Shawna Hiley, Editor looncall.editor@gmail.com

As you peruse through this years Loon Call, may your thoughts return with me to the lake, where the skies are blue and easy to breathe and the graceful pines against a rugged landscape climb up steeply from the rocky shores. A place where time slows down, yet much more happens. Where the daily grind and technical tethers are exchanged for more worthy pursuits, and intimate connections are once again given a chance to prevail. Return to where the stories are lived and adventures are long remembered. Where celebrations are shared, tragedies endured, recreation is explored and relaxation heals. Where forest cathedrals become our church and the lake becomes our playground for tranquil morning paddles and long treacherous hikes, sailing regattas, fishing derbies and even hunts for treasure! Return to this place amid the flora and fauna where the misty mornings and starry nights collide into a day of possibilities. As the loon returns each summer, remembering her call, hold fast to these things that restore the soul and bend faith towards something good, lest we forget how magical this place is.

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Terri Todosey, Art Director territodosey@yahoo.ca

Looking Towards Next Years Loon Call Photo Contest Keep your cameras ready to take that award winning pic for next years photo contest! Here are the categories for next years contest: Landscape - panoramas and beautiful lake and forest vistas. Wildlife - capture the birds, butterflies, moose, beaver, salamanders and all those wild animals and insects we share this beautiful place with. Pets - your family pets enjoy the lake as much as we do, so what is it that your pet likes to do here? Young Photographers - If you are 17 or younger we want to see your creative pics. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

People - Celebrations, events or just goofing around - send us candid shots of your time here on the lake. Winter on the Lake - When the ice is in, the lake becomes a whole other world of fun! Please email a max of one photo per category to the Loon Call Editor = Shawna Hiley (see above). All photos must be taken in the year 2016 by a LWCA member, at the lake and must be in jpeg format. Please use ‘Loon Call Photo Contest’ as email subject line and include your name, cottage number (optional), title of pic (with or without location) and category of entry within body of email. Entries must be received by December 31st, 2016.

Cartoonist We have written a cottage cartoon and are looking for a cartoonist - amateur or professional, who is willing to share their artistic talents to help us produce a short strip cartoon for next years Loon Call. Please email Art Director - Terri Todosey (see above) if you are able to help.

Advertisers If you would like to advertise in the Loon Call, please email Pam Lawton at pamlaw@rogers.com by the end of summer.

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Membership Report By Pam  Lawton Thanks to last year’s members, our numbers were strong at 220 full members, 13 new members and 22 Friends of the Lake, totaling 256. Hurray! And I personally thank ALL of you for being so patient and accommodating. I made a lot of errors (and corrected them all!) and have enjoyed all the communications throughout my four years in this role. But my time is up! I asked for help at the last AGM and Carolyn Calhoun has come on board with the promise to present fewer errors! I know that your support will be with her also. As always we surely appreciate any help we can get with finding new members … they live right beside many of us! Again, thanks, good luck, and cheers to all!

Custodial Visits By Ken Senter Starting in the fall of 2015 the LWCA has a new visits custodian, Steve Murray, who most of you would be acquainted with him as manager of Weslemkoon Marina. Steve completed 227 visits in November 2015 with no major incidents other than a broken window caused by a large bird, which was remedied by Steve after notifying the owner. The custodian still has difficulty finding cottages with road access. Most of these members do not have their lake number displayed on their waterfront, which is the issue as the custodian uses a boat in the fall and a snow machine in spring visit.

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List of Directors: Past President Jon  Keeble President Stuart  Inglis Secretary Travis  Walker Treasurer Diane  Morden Membership Carolyn  Calhoun Loon  Call  Editor Shawna  Hiley Loon  Call  Art  Director Terri  Todosey Legal  &  Municipal  Affairs Paul  Bottos Custodian,  Lake  Levels Ken  Senter Communications Laura  Scrimgeour Junior  Loons Patty  Milne  &  Melissa  Tervit

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Water Quality By Kevin Moyser Lake water tests for 2015 showed that dissolved oxygen was generally down from the previous two years. The following provides a brief summary of the test results. In the October sampling, the dissolved oxygen (DO) for Lake Weslemkoon remained around 8.5 mg/L (or parts per million) to a depth of 17 meters. From 18 to 45 meters in depth, the DO fluctuated from 4.94 to 5.92 mg/L. A temperature drop of 7.5 °C between 17 and 23 meters identifies the thermocline. Otter Lake remained around 8.5 mg/l to a depth of 10 meters. From 11 to 33 meters in depth, the DO fluctuated from 4.24 mg/L to 6.78 mg/L. A temperature drop of 7.8°C between 10 and 15 meters identifies the thermocline. The results obtained for the DO in Lake Weslemkoon are quite similar to the 1973 Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) survey. In the 1973 survey the DO was given as 8.0 mg/L down to a depth of 90 feet or 27.4 meters whereas in 2014, I obtained a DO of 8.3 mg/Lto a depth of 55.8 feet or 17 meters.

Logging, Hiking Bruce  Magee

This declining lack of oxygen at greater depths could be due to an increase in nitrogen and phosphorous levels. This increase can support more plant life which in turn reduces the oxygen available to the fish population which ultimately can have a negative impact on the lakes.

Septics and  Waste  Water Mark  Marsolais

As cottagers we can easily help the lakes by remembering: When at the lake, get off the phosphate!

Shoal Markers Mark  Warlow Water  Quality Kevin  Moyser

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Lake Levels Report By Ken Senter It has been an uneventful year as far as water levels go, with high levels of 318.000m or more in June & August of 2015. The spring runoff was

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reduced by a long slow spring thaw and reduced snow cover. There is a new contact at the MNRF Bancroft, his name is Luke Hillyer, and he communicates with me by email and cell phone regularly when conditions arise.

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The MNRF operating plan has a very small differential from Summer Normal 317.950m, Possible Flood >318.100m, Winter Drawdown <317.800m. There is only .300m or 300mm between Winter Drawdown and Possible Flood or 12â&#x20AC;? (inches).

Please join the LWCA directors in thanking our advertisers for their support this year: visit their stores, use their services and when you do, tell them that you saw their ad in the Loon Call. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Forestry & Hiking by Bruce Magee

Forestry Harvest There are two blocks on the Annual Work Schedule (AWS) of our existing provincial 10year forest maintenance plan that will be harvested in the 2015-16 cutting season. They are both located at the far northeast end of Otter Lake. These cuttings will not encroach minimum set-backs from the Lake. If anyone would like to view a pdf of the maps of these areas please feel free to contact me, and I would be happy to e-mail them to you.

Hike Tree Health Inspection Hike: Saturday Aug 13th, 10:00am. Meet at the base of Canoe Lake Trail. We’ll hike up to Canoe Lake and do a number tree inspections for tree health, including stresses, insect and disease pressure. Near the end of the Canoe Lake trail we’ll view some of the best White Pine specimens a r o u n d L a k e Weslemkoon and we’ll learn how to measure their age, (without cutting them of course). Cottagers of all ages are welcome. Each hiker should be self-reliant and

able bodied. We’ll hike as a group in a low impact method, which means we’ll leave only the trail behind. The hike is estimated to take 1.5 hours in total. Come prepared with hat, insect repellent, and good hiking shoes. Additionally bring water and a camera if you like.

Tree Planting Project We’ll be offering nursery plantings again this year for those that would like to improve the management of their riparian zone around their cottage. The riparian zone is the ribbon of land around our lake from the high water mark to the densely forested woodland. From a conservation perspective this is a key strip of land, it must filter effluent from our weeping tile beds, and retain storm water run-off into our lake. To a large degree it controls the water quality of our lake, and by extension the ecosystem for Weslemkoon fish and wildlife habitat. AND, it goes without saying that lake water-quality is critical to our enjoyment at the cottage, for swimming, boating and the many water activities that we all so enjoy. We’ll have 20 seedlings available at cost for four cottagers that would like to have them planted on their property. We’ll

Contact Bruce Magee 6

have a small crew of young and old members to help plant the first or second weekend after spring ice-out. The cost of the seedlings is $1.29 each. If you would like to sign up for this planting on your property please call or email me.

Trail Clearing If you’re interested in helping maintain one of the hiking trails around our lake please read on. The LWCA is continuing its maintenance of our trails around Otter and Weslemkoon to other lakes. The goal is to keep our trails in clear and identifiable condition that allows hikers to be closer to nature. Work on a trail will consist of clearing limbs and foliage around the trailhead sign, and on the trail pruning back branches and sectioning dead falls that block the path. Keeping it simple/natural, marking the start of the path, and clearing the way to make it an easy hike is the motto of our work. If you’re interested in helping and would like to participate; get together a minimum of two people to form a trail maintenance team. Contact Bruce Magee by e-mail or phone. Please have the names of your team members ready/ committed to the task, and an anticipated date

Phone: 905-854-2014

to do the maintenance, as well as a couple of trail choices (in case your first choice is already signedup by another party). All trail maintenance teams will be identified and thanked in future issues of the Loon Call.

"Canoe Lake • Buck Lake • Green Lake (western trail) "Green Lake (eastern """"""""""trail) "Pikes Peak "Pot Holes

Maintenance Team Specifics: At the trail… Prune back the branches that would be in the way of portaging a canoe along the trail. Cut and remove the dead falls across the path area. Pick up any garbage and hike it out.

A big and hearty thank you for all those that contributed to trail maintenance in summer of 2015.

LWCA will supply the sign with post, and a blue recycling bag. Volunteers need to bring their own: • Pruning sheers • Bow saw or chain saw • Proper shoes clothing and protective gear Here are a few precautionary notes of things not to do: • Do not modify or improve the boat landing area (no approval for any dock work) • Do not clear excessively wide trails (reduces the closeness to nature) • Do not get hurt, be smart, enjoy the project and be safe. Here’s the list of trails that need maintenance: • Needs to be done in 2016 !Done in 2014-15 • High Dam "Ashby Lake Mink Lake "McKenzie Lake • Effingham Lake (Little Wes) "Shiner Lake • Little Long Lake

Cell: 416-432-3094

• Christopher and Cindy Roberts • Steve Lotto and Paul Lowes • Paul Bottos and Bruce Magee

Conifer Corner Q - What is the 50 Million Tree Program Trees Ontario administers the Ontario government's 50 Million Tree Program, part of the United Nations Billion Tree Campaign. The United Nations' goal is to plant one billion trees worldwide each year. Ontario is committed to plant 50 million trees by 2025. In our own small way the LWCA Tree Planting Project has planted 300 White Pine seedlings as our contribution to the Province’s 50 Million Tree Planting Goal. The goals of the program are to sequester carbon, enhance and diversify southern Ontario's landscape, increase the capacity to withstand climate change, and Continued on page 7...

Email: bruce.magee@gbb-inc.com Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Municipal Affairs Report I’d like to take this opportunity to provide a brief review of the municipal issues that were dealt with by the LWCA during the past year. 1. GARBAGE Once again, considerable time was spent dealing with both garbage and recycling issues with the Township. This issue remains of importance to the LWCA and we continue to lobby for increased hours of operation for the landfill sites at both the North and South ends. We were able to achieve expanded hours that better served the needs of our members this past year and we will continue to monitor the status of same.

2. DEVLOPMENT ON THE LAKE The LWCA continues to receive copies of development applications in and surrounding the lake. The LWCA looks forward to the continued receipt of this information from the Township.

3. OFFICIAL PLAN REVIEW The Official Plan review process was completed and resulted in the Township’s adoption of Amendment No. 1 to the Official Plan that occurred on June 1, 2015. There were no appeals to the Ontario Municipal Board and same is now in force and effect.

4. COTTAGE NUMBERS In the event that you require replacement cottage number or require a new cottage number to be assigned, please contact the LWCA as we work with the Township for the purposes of assigning same. Please note that roadside numbers are assigned directly by the Township and you should contact the Township directly with respect to same.

5. ALGONQUIN LAND CLAIM ISSUES This remains an ongoing issue involving the LWCA, the Township and numerous other affected parties. The LWCA has had ongoing discussions and correspondence with various parties involved in this matter and continues to monitor developments in connection with same. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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by Paul Bottos

6. WIND POWER

7. MUNICIPAL REPRESENTATIVES

A further issue which arose this past year was the matter of the wind power applications which were submitted by NextEra and Res Canada. This is to confirm that there was considerable discourse among the LWCA Board and the LWCA membership in regards to what adverse impacts, if any at all, would result with respect to the lake and its environs if either or both of these wind power projects were granted approval. This is to advise that the LWCA attended some of the information sessions in regards to its matter and also forwarded information to the membership with respect to same in order to better inform the membership. This is also to advise that this matter was discussed at our annual general meeting and there was no clear direction given to the LWCA Board in regards to either objecting to or being a proponent of these projects.

Your Municipal representatives are as follows:

We wish to confirm that there was considerable debate at the Township in regards to whether or not the Township should provide an endorsement to the proponents of the projects that the Township would be a “willing host”. The vote was a 3 to 2 vote by the Township in support of deeming the Township to be a “willing host”. However, the ultimate entity which is to determine whether or not these projects are to proceed is the I.E.S.O. The decision by the I.E.S.O as to which projects are to be approved was to have been made by the end of 2015, however, the I.E.S.O has indicated that it required more time before making a decision and has now indicated that it will be providing its decision by the end of March 2016.

I trust the above keeps you informed as to the developments that have transpired in regards to municipal issues during the past year. Should anyone have any interest in the noted issues of have any other issues that may be of interest or concern, please do not hesitate to contact the LWCA in order that same may be raised and discussed.

Reeve:

Henry Hogg

Councillor: Ward 1:

Tony Fritsch

Councillor Ward 1:

Kirby Thompson

Councillor Ward 2: (and Deputy Reeve)

Helen Yanch

Councillor: Ward 2:

Bill Cox

You may contact the Township as follows: Address:

72 Edwards Street P.O Box 89 Flinton, Ontario K0H 1P0

Telephone: (613) 336-2286 Fascimile:

(613) 336-2847

Website:

www.addingtonhighlands.ca

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Forestry and Hiking - Conifer Corner increase wildlife habitat. The 50 Million Tree Program is designed to significantly reduce the costs to landowners of large-scale tree planting and thereby increase the number of trees planted across the province. Forests Ontario was created in 2014 as a result of the merging of not-for-profit organizations Trees Ontario and the Ontario Forestry Association (OFA). Trees Ontario is the forest restoration arm of Forests Ontario. Forests Ontario is committed to the re-greening of Ontario through tree planting efforts on rural lands and in urban areas, as well as the renewal and stewardship of Ontario's forests through restoration, education and awareness. 7


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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Financial Report For the Year Ended December 31, 2015 (unaudited)

Statement of Changes in Net Assets

Catherine Rathbun Memorial Environmental Fund

Lake Book Fund

Unrestricted

Total 2015

Total 2014

13,971

10,033

18,314

42,318

39,148

1,307

1,394

(3,687)

1,230

6,857

44,942

42,318

BALANCE, Beginning of Year Excess (Deficiency) of Revenue Over Expenditures

87

Transfer Between Funds, at Boards Discretion

1,000

(10,158)

Contributions - Net

1,105

125

BALANCE, End of Year

Statement of Financial Position ASSETS Current Assets Cash Term Deposit Inventory ------------Fixed Assets Water Testing Equipment - net ------------LIABILITIES & RESTRICTED FUNDS & NET ASSETS Current Liabilities Accounts Payable & Accrued Liabilities Restricted Funds Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund Book Project Fund Net Assets Unrestricted -------------

16,163

2015

2014

26,718 17,288 2,284 46,290

15,256 32,206 615 48,076

1,329 47,619

1,519 49,595

2,677

7,277

16,163 -

13,971 10,033

28,779 47,619

18,314 49,595

2015 Treasurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Report By Diane Morden Your board continues to be very active as reflected by the diverse expenditures reflected in the Financial Statements. Actual expenditures are in line with budgeted amounts. Custodial visit expenditures are lower this year because our new custodian does not charge HST. Your board decided to close out the Lake Book Fund since that project is now complete. The proceeds of the Lake Book Fund were transferred into the unrestricted surplus with the exception of $1,000 which was transferred into the newly named Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund. Surplus funds are invested in bank GICâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s earning 1.2% and will mature December 2017. Interest earned is shared on a weighted average basis between the general fund and the Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund. The Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

9,158

28,779

Statement of Revenues & Expenditures REVENUES Annual Fees Loon Call Revenues Interest Income Miscellaneous Sales Total Revenue EXPENDITURES Annual Meeting Bank Charges Bad Debt Expense Donation to ELA Administrative & Promotional Cost of Miscellaneous Sales Custodial Visits FOCA Insurance Loon Call New Shoal Markers Shoal Marker Maintenance Lake Activities Social Miscellaneous Web Site Development Costs Water Quality Testing Amortization of Water Test Equipment Total Expenditures EXCESS OF REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES (Expenditures over Revenues)

2015

2014

12,854 2,410 277 965

12,878 2,295 160 170

16,506

15,503

866 108 75 319 601 3,408 827 1,584 4,368 483 1,035 200 200 760 180 190

1,208 103 350 500 526 126 4,000 922 1,562 5,151 927 965 373 66 267 1,955 190

15,199

19,190

1,307

-3,687

Catherine Rathbun Environmental fund grew by individual contributions of $1,105 ($821 in 2014) and allocated interest. Expenditures from this fund are restricted in nature and require a majority vote by the membership at the annual general meeting. The remaining unrestricted surplus of $28,779 is available for the general purposes of the association. 9


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Junior Loons Report The first Junior Loons activity of the summer was held the sunny long

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weekend of July. Many people

took advantage of the warm weather to attend this

We had a great summer once again with the Junior Loons! Here are some thoughts from a few of our members:

event, which incorporated a short hike up Pike’s Peak to the little log cabin, a hot dog roast and much swimming. The après-hike hot dogs and Rice Krispie squares proved to be quite popular. The rock ledges overlooking the water were great to jump from, not to mention the warm temperature of the water itself. A lot of fun was had by all!

It was a nice summer day when we had our 2016 junior loons kayak paddle. We were joined by three other families and had a great time paddling around the bay near our cottage. We saw a loon nest which pretty much looks like a normal bird’s nest but is a lot larger and at

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about water level. It was on a small island near a beaver dam. The nest sadly had no eggs in it (probably because they had already hatched). When you are driving your boat make as small of a wake as you can so you don't flood the nest. After paddling around for

Last summer at the Lakefest the Junior Loons did face painting, relay races and a scavenger hunt. There were lots

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the morning we went for a swim. It really was a great day for a paddle!

of different designs for the face painting like vampires, butterflies, dogs and more! I got a rainbow painted on my face. There were also tattoos. My favourite relay race was the one when you put a marshmallow on a spoon and walk in a straight line to the pylon and back then pass the marshmallow and spoon to the next person on your team. There were other races like over-under too. For the scavenger hunt we had to follow clues to find toys and candy that were hidden around the pond. It was a lot of fun. 10

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Jr. Loons Activity Books Last summer we introduced a set of graduated activity books to help the Jr Loons better

understand the ecological aspects of Lake

Weslemkoon. The first booklet is aimed at “Hatchlings” in JK/SK, followed by

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learn about the lake as well as the plants and animals who live there, as well as give their

thoughts on solving some of our environmental

issues. Rewards will be given to the kids as they

complete each booklet. Booklets are available at Jr Loons events, and for download on the Lake Weslemkoon Facebook page, and the LWCA website.

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Upcoming Jr. Loon Events for 2016

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July 3 – Little Lake Hike – Join us on our annual hike event where we will learn about the plants that grow in our area, take part in trail maintenance, then enjoy a cookout and a swim. Be sure to bring your Activity Book with you!

“Fledglings”, “Jr Loons” and “Sr Loons”. As the kids work through the activities they will

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July 23 – Water Day – This year we will learn how to test lake water, take a look at the water through microscopes to see what can be found and talk about ways to keep our lake healthy. We will also play some fun water games. Lakefest – Frank Smith has generously donated some of the proceeds from last summer’s fireworks to help fund the Jr Loons activities at Lakefest this year. The kids will once again enjoy Hula Hooping with Deejay, face painting and relay races.

Other events may be added throughout the summer. We will post notices at the marinas and on the LWCA Website and There is Only one for a Reason Facebook site. You can also contact me directly at Patrica.milne@sympactico.ca We look forward to seeing you! Patty and Melissa

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Keeping it Fresh By Stuart Inglis

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Depth ?

Depth ?

Monitoring the lake’s water quality is one discuss what we have done in the past monitoring. As mentioned in the of the LWCA’s top priorities. The first and what we should be doing to improve President’s Letter, they have study was done in the 1963, and no our methods. The first thing we decided recommended that we start taking significant numbers of E. coli bacteria (a to do was to go back and have a closer measurements in the spring to act as a commonly used indicator of fecal look of three reports that we have on baseline. They also recommended that we contamination) were detected in any of hand. With over 50 years of data points keep a record of the water levels data that the four locations tested. The water was we are going to see if there are any is being collected by DataGarison, as well considered potable. During the second discernible long-term trends. We are also as the weather. half of the 1960s there was a building going to have a look at the various boom on the lake, As some of you July 2008 - Site 7 October 2008 - Site 7 and in response to know, water quality the perceived decline is a very tricky thing in water quality the to determine. The Dissolved ? Dissolved ? LWCA initiated a timing and degree of A sample chart of the new 4 advanced graphing large and thorough freeze up and thaw 5 6 0 technique to show the 7 2 water quality study, may affect the 8 4 9 relationship of depth, 6 10 headed by Fred thermocline, which 8 10 temperature and dissolved Inglis (#565) in the in turn affect the oxygen. summer of 1971. dissolved oxygen That study numbers. If you concluded that the have a big rainfall surface water of the the E. coli or Temperature (C) Temperature (C) lake was not potable, phosphate levels and included the key recommendation to bacteriological and chemical variables may spike from washing out of the soil. ensure that septic systems functioned that were measured and see which ones Then there are the anomalies like the one properly, in particular because shoreline is we should keep, and in some cases, which we saw in our last testing. We got a largely characterized as quite steep with ones to go back to and have second look. surprisingly high E. coli number at the frequent rock outcroppings. The next Susan Inglis (#565) has kindly mouth of Seymour Creek. It is our hope large study was done in 1989-90. volunteered to write this report. We are that with our improved methods we’ll get Although there were a few bacterial hot planning to have it available at this year’s a better understanding on the status of spots on the lake, overall water quality AGM. the quality of our water. was pretty good. The 1995 study, headed by Mike Benson (#935) had similar Along with this results. Our 2008 study concluded that rationalization of existing the water quality on the lake was holding information, Bill Taylor up well. and Susan Inglis have We are planning to conduct our next provided us with a study in 2017. To prepare for it we number of helpful ways decided it would be worthwhile to that we can improve our consult experts on lake water quality to regular water quality Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Treasure Hunt 2015 by Nick  DeFreitas With  the   sun  beaming   down   and  just  a   few   clouds   in  the  sky,  one   could  not  help  but  get   excited   for   what   was   upon   us.   It   was   Saturday,   September   5,   2015,   and   people   from   all   areas  of  the   lake  were  preparing   to   make  the  pilgrimage   to  Tanglewood  Marina   for  the   annual   Lake   Weslemkoon   Treasure   Hunt.   This   was   the   DeFreitas   and   Vankoughnett   clans’   maiden   voyage   as   organizers   of   this   wonderful   event.  

deal of  this  took  place   at  our  cottage,  which   made  it  that  much  more   enjoyable.  Don’t  be   fooled   though,   this   does   not   mean   we   are   looking   to   do   it   again   soon,   but   it   was  a   lot   of  fun   to  collaborate   ideas   and   prepare   for   the  event.

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newcomers and   hope   to   see   them   back   in   future  years.   We   believe   the   event   was   a   huge   success   based  on   the   smiling   faces,  so   thank   you   to   all   participants   for   coming   out   and   being   good  sports!  Without   amazing   friends   from   around   the   lake   to   help   with   the   various   events,   this   would   never   have   been   possible.  Thank  you  to  Joan   and  Gerry  Kopp,   the  Raisanen  gang,  Chris  and  Diane   Morden,   Valy  and  Olga   Cherrin,  Ken   Senter   and   Pam   Lawton.   Last   but   deYinitely   not   least,  many   thanks   to   Ralph   for   being   such   a   gracious   host  and  making  all  of  this  possible.    Cheers!

Photos courtesy of Joan and Gerry Kopp

Considering the   amount  of  fun   we   had   last   year   with   The   Amazing   Race   theme,   we   decided   to   continue   with   that   trend   and   dubbed   the   2015   version,   Survivor   Weslemkoon!   Organizing   the   event   was   more   fun  than   some   of  us  thought  it  would   be  and  it  allowed  us  to  work  together,  share   ideas   and   problem   solve   together.   A   great  

We made   every   effort   to   include   events   of   all   nature;   physical   events   that   often   involved   team   work,  events   that  tested  the   brain   a   little   more,  events  that  would   bring   out   creativity   and   even   an   event   that   catered  to  those   with   an   appetite.  As  teams   poured   into   Tanglewood,   we   were   very   delighted  to  see  the   regular  faces   who   come   to   the   treasure   hunt   on   a   yearly  basis.   We   were   equally   happy   with   amount   of  

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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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THE FISH WHISPERER by Guy Austin “Can we come and see the pet fish today, Guy? Are they still here?” “Hmmm. Sept. 19? Well, you might find one or two, but only one of mine - old Zippo - is still around. They pretty much leave by now, and don’t come back until May 13.” “Where do they go?” “Out in the lake to the deep water for winter.” Is that true? How does he know such detail?

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Were there only these 5? Yes. Others came, but the five (who had a definite order of lining up around the circle) wouldn’t let them join in! Luckily Guy was more charitable than the 5 and fed the others outside the boathouse. What a softie! In time, these bass were accustomed to Guy’s feeding times, his boat arriving, and the minnows being held out for a meal. Each would get about 10 minnows and/or worms! He got minnows from minnow traps in Green Lake, which he retrieved daily. Now he doesn’t go to Green Lake so frequently, but saves that

In 1936, Karl and Jean Austin came to Lake Weslemkoon. They were frequent guests of many friends, and in ’68, Karl Austin and Em Richards became partners - with their good wives - at Four Loons (!) Marina - until ’76, when Karl and Jean retired to their cottage 738, where Guy was brought up.

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was in the boathouse. “Dad, she’s not there!” His Dad called to the fisherman “Would you please put our pet fish back into the water?” “No!” “She’s our pet!” With protestation and anger, he finally threw Gentle back into the water. By the time they walked into the boathouse to feed her, Gentle was already there! A West Bay friend later admitted to Guy that “yes, a visiting fisherman HAD caught his pet, and had to put her back!” It didn’t take too long before people were coming to watch. So Barb and Guy bought a Guest Book. It got filled! And the second book got filled with comments like, “The kids love the fish! particularly Gentle!”. And one day, when Gentle didn’t appear, it was obvious that she’d been either caught or died. One little girl came to see Gentle and Guy had to tell her “she’s been caught”. The little girl cried and cried and cried. “How can he protect them?” you might ask. Guy keeps a net in front of the boathouse all the time; he asks neighbours to feed them when he’s not on the Lake; he gets up VERY early when he knows there’s a Derby on the Lake and parks his boat about 10’ out in front of the boathouse; and he asks all fishermen trolling close to his boathouse not to take his pets. He loses sleep trying to protect them.

Guy and and his Dad, Karl, loved trout fishing. This meant they had to catch a lot of minnows. They’d keep the minnows in the boathouse - discarding the dead ones right into the water. The bass loved this, and quickly became “regulars”. So, for 23 years, five smallmouthed female bass kept coming to Guy’s boathouse for minnows. How did he know they were female? Their size and white bellies. Guy and his wife, Barb (an amazing gardener!), named the five fish with the help of the children who visited to feed them! The two originals were the favourites. They called the biggest one (about 7 lbs.) Gentle, because she would come out of the water and gently take the minnows. She even took a minnow out of one kid’s mouth (now there’s a fish story!?) for the Amazing Race! The other was called “One Eye” (guess why??). She required a special feeding zone (around the side of the boathouse) because the others took advantage of her disability and weren’t so gentle with her. “Capone” had a scar on her face, “Catcher” caught minnows as they were thrown and “Zippo” would hide under the dock, zoom out from under as soon as the minnows were offered and take one right out of your hand!

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They called the biggest one Gentle, because she would come out of the water and gently take the minnows. effort and buys some - from local stores spending hundreds of dollars a year!? He also has a few friends that give him minnows. But he has fed these same five bass for 23 years now! It wasn’t all roses. One morning when he and his Dad went at the regular time to feed Gentle (22 years ago before the others were around), they saw a fisherman pulling away from the boathouse. Guy looked to see if Gentle

With a life-span of about 30 years, most of them have disappeared. Only Zippo is left, and she brings two friends with her. So ... the beat goes on. Any ideas for names? Guy feels proud that so many young people say “Mr. Austin, I’ll never keep a big fish!” - and that so many people come to see them - and that they keep on comin’!! And WE feel proud to have Guy and Barb protecting our bass! And if you ever catch a bass, it’s probably a descendant from those five pets.

Since this article was written, Guy and Barb have sold their cottage and will not return, but the new owners promised to try to keep up the tradition of feeding and protecting the bass.

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Late September !

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Another Fall – I hear the call To turn away from city smog Its crowds, its noise and traffic jams, And seek a place of solitude With quietness, so rare Amid life’s busy rounds, In late September at the lake.

Each passing day I “feel” the stillness, Deep within my soul’s refreshed. Time slows – tensions go, From simple things real pleasures flow, And rich contentment settles in. Life’s clutter loses meaning here, In late September at the lake. Days grow shorter – shadows longer, Weather’s mixed but oh the wonder Of the fall. No sound of wind tonight; The sun has gone, And set the sky aflame with lingering rays, As to its rest it sank But still they come – the “Night Hawk” flights of “Honkers” etching paths in starry skies To warmer climes, In late September at the lake.

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by Bram Reed

The Beaver carves a ripple wedge Across the placid lake. He changes course, and heads for yonder Poplar’d shore For evening dinner that’s in store

‘Time slows - tensions go, From simple things real pleasures flow.’ And mother Loon prepares her young For distant flight, In late September at the lake. Today the silent artist lifts his brush To paint each tree, With delicate or brilliant hue, Oaks, maples first, and Sumach’s too. So soon, beneath my feet The muffled crunch of leaves now dead, Tells all that winter’s near.

It’s late September at the lake. The old wood stove its story tells Of baking bread and simmering stews, Or “Woody” taste in bacon crisp, While kettle sings its sleepy tune. Day is done – now night’s arrived, Wind’s coming up, rain’s in the air. The swaying pines their needles shed While threat’ning clouds skid ‘cross the sky. In late September at the lake. The fire takes another log, And shadows dance from wall to wall. The lamps are lit, the cabin’s snug. Guess what? I’ve got the reading bug. Ho Hum! It’s time for bed at last, And as the tired flames die down I sit and watch with sleep eyes And linger on ‘ere turning in. In late September at the lake. Tomorrow I must pack and lock the door, And say good-bye to this blest place, In late September at the lake.

About the Author of this Poem - Bram Reed Bram and Eileen Reed purchased Island K (then a piece of crown land, now known as camp 201, or Reed Island) in 1952. He and his young family were quickly enfolded into the fabric of Weslemkoon; Bram served a number of terms on the LWCA and was recognized with a Cockeyed Loon award. Every September he spent 3 weeks alone in the simple log cabin – his beloved ‘Fall Retreat’. He captured his sentiments about this special time at the lake in this poem that he wrote the early 1970s. Bram passed away in October 2008; Eileen in August 2013. The cottage is now owned by their granddaughter and her family. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Easy Ways to Give Back to Weslemkoon by Melissa Stout Our lake   is   precious   and   beautiful,   and   it   gives   us   so   much   pleasure   throughout   t h e   s e a s o n s .   H o w e v e r ,   Weslemkoon  needs  our  help  if   we  want  to  keep  it   healthy  for   us   humans,   and   the   animals   who   call   it   home,   to   enjoy   well   into   the   future.   I   have   put   together   a   list   of   Easy   w a y s   t o   G i v e   B a c k   t o   Weslemkoon.   If   you   are   already  following   the  list   that   is  awesome,   if  not   I   hope  you   will  Bind   a  few   ideas  that   you   can  implement.

Minimize the   wake   from   boats.   Boat   wakes   can   lead  to   shoreline   erosion,   disturb   aquatic   ecosystems,   and   swamp  the  precarious  nests  of   loons.   Keep   in   mind   that   in   Ontario,   by   law,   boats   must   slow  down  to  10  km/h  within   30   m   of   the   shore;   at   that   speed  there  should  be   little  or   no  wake.  

reproductive potential  and  the   result   is   a   Yish   that   is   very   vulnerable   to   the   impacts   of   our   activities.     Here  are  some   ways   to   help   the   trout,   and   help  keep  our  Highly  Sensitive   Lake  Trout  Lake  designation: Avoid   the   use   of   pesticides   and  fertilizers.   Both  harm  the   natural   balance   of   our   lake’s  

Maintain a   healthy   septic   s y s t e m .   P a t h o g e n s   i n   improperly   treated   waste  can   carry  serious  diseases  such  as   hepatitis   and   dysentery.   Excess   nutrients   may   also   be   present   in  improperly   treated   waste;  these  can  harm  aquatic   life,   and   may   cause   algal   blooms   or   unwanted   weed   growth  in  the  lake.  

Prevent Soil & Shoreline Erosion Erosion is   bad.   Not   only  does   it   literally   wash   away   your   land   investment,   it   also   carries   into   the   lake   the   precious   soil   that   our   large   trees   need  in  order  to  survive   a n d   m a y   l e a d   t o   s e d i m e n t a t i o n   o r   e v e n   eutrophication   of   our   lake.   Luckily,   soil   erosion   can   be   easy  to  combat. Leave   a   natural   riparian  zone   along  the   lake   edge.  Leave   all   the   rocks,   dead  branches   and   natural   vegetation   found   along   the   waters   edge.   Add   new  vegetation  if   needed,   but   be   sure   to   plant   only   native   plants.  Contact   Bruce  Magee   if   you   need   trees   to   plant;   an   extensive   list   of   native  plants   for   all   conditions   is   available   on  loveyourlake.ca. Create   walkways   that   follow   the   natural   contours   of   the   land   in   an   S   curve   pattern   from  your  cottage  to  the   lake.   C o v e r   e x p o s e d   s o i l   o n   pathways   with   woodchips   or   pine   needles   to   help   prevent   the   soil   from   being   washed   into   the   lake.   Utilizing   built   features   such   as   boardwalks,   terraces   or  stairs   can  also  help   to  reduce  soil  erosion.

U s e b i o d e g r a d a b l e   a n d   natural   products   for   washing   dishes,   clothes   and   your   b o d y / h a i r   ( E c o L o g o ,   o r   G r e e n S e a l   C e r t i Y i e d ) .     Remember  that  with  our  small   septic   beds   set   on  rock  pretty   much   every   chemical   that   goes   into   our   tanks   will   eventually  end  up  in  the   lake.   Ensure   the   products   you   use   do   not   contain   phosphates,   fragrance,  sodium  laurel  ether   sulfate   (SLES)   or   triclosan.   Better   yet,   make   your   own   products.   See   davidsuzuki.org   for  some  great  green  cleaning   recipes.

Preserve Water Quality & Aquatic Wildlife H a v i n g g r o w n   u p   o n   W e s l e m k o o n ,   w i t h   i t s   abundance   of   trout,   I   had   no   idea   that   Lake   Trout   lakes   w e r e   r a r e .   H o w e v e r ,   according  to  the  MNR  only  1%   of   Ontario’s   Lakes   contain   Lake   Trout;   this   makes   our   lake   even   more   special  in   my   opinion.   Lake   Trout   are   speciYically  adapted  to  survive   in  oligotrophic   lakes  (i.e.  lakes   with   low   levels   of   nutrients,   high   dissolved   oxygen   levels   and  deep   areas  with  very  cold   water)   such  are   ours.   Add  to   this   the   trouts’   slow   growth   rate,   late   maturity   and   low  

ecosystem. Pesticides   can   be   absorbed  and  ingested  by   Yish   and   other   aquatic   animals,   a n d   l e a d   t o   d e a t h ,   reproductive   failure,   tumors,   lesions   and   deformities.   Fertilizers  that  run  off   into  the   lake   increase   the   phosphorus   load   of   the   water,   which   can   not   only   harm   the   Yish,   but   also  lead  to  algal  blooms.   Bathe  only  in  your   cottage,  or   on   land   well   away   from   the   waters   edge.   Soaps   and   shampoos   of  any  kind  contain   chemical   compounds   that   damage   water   quality.   Even   environmentally   friendly   biodegradable   products   can   damage   the  lake  if  they   enter   t h e   w a t e r   b e f o r e   Y i r s t   breaking   down   through   soil   contact.  

Avoid any   products   that   will   kill   the   active   beneYicial   bacteria   in   your   septic   tank   such   as   chemical   cleaners,   solvents   and   cigarette   butts.   Keep   food   waste   out   of   the   tank   by   scraping   plates   and   pots   clean   before   washing.   A   good   rule   is   “If   you   didn’t   produce   it,   it   shouldn’t   go   down  the  drain.” Avoid   products   containing   microbeads.  These  tiny  plastic   beads   are   added   to   many   personal   care   products   such   a s   s c r u b s ,   s o a p s   a n d   toothpastes.     Once   they   are   washed   down   the   drain   m i c r o b e a d s   e n t e r   t h e   environment   where   they   do   not   breakdown,   are   ingested   by  wildlife  and  are  impossible   to   remove   from   the   aquatic   environment.   For   a   complete   list   of   products   that   contain   m i c r o b e a d s   s e e   beatthemicrobead.org.

Please visit our website at www.weslemkoon.com/septic-and-grey-well-information for more on how to love your septic. 16

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Landmarks & Upcoming Events Pig Roast & Music Fest Saturday August 6th - Check www.weslemkoon.com and the LWCA Facebook page for details closer to the date.

Treasure Hunt 2016 You're invited to a Wedding Treasure Hunt at Tanglewood Marina. September 3rd, 2016 at 2:00pm Be ready to plan the perfect wedding!

Sailing Regatta Sunday July 31st. Meet at cottage #820 at 12:30, ready to race around 1pm when the afternoon wind begins to pick up. After an afternoon of fun on the water, sailors and any members of the cheering section assemble for refreshments, official results, awards and sociability.  Boats of all sizes are welcome with Albacores and Lasers being the most common.  All boats are welcome and no racing experience is required (and in some cases not even much sailing experience) so it’s a great way to learn some of the basics of sailboat racing.  We have seldom called a bad weather day since Weslemkoon mid-summer weather changes every few hours anyway!

Mike and Honor Burke are celebrating their 40th year as property owners this year 1976-2016. Jean and Courtney Stoate of Regina Bay celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary with dinner at 4 Loons in 2014. (Picture seen top left)

Members We Have Lost Ann Cronyn (#940) Ann & Hume Cronyn’s eldest daughter Nancy shared the sad news that her mother passed away. Nancy’s time at Weslemkoon began before she can remember, when her mother was pregnant with her in 1955. The LWCA is very grateful for the generous contribution of $500 to the Katherine Rathbun Environmental fund in memory of Ann. Derek McDermott, 432 (see pg 22) Jane McDermott, 432

CPR Certificate Course Diane Morden will run a weekend CPR certification course at #286 if there is sufficient interest. Minimum 10 people required to run the course at a cost of approximately $100 each. Interested persons should contact Diane by email before May 15th; if there is sufficient interest she will move forward. The intention is to run the course toward the end of June so that participants will have benefit over the summer. Contact: diane.morden@sympatico.ca

Tree Health Inspection Hike:

Joanne Brown, 420

Saturday Aug 13th, 10:00am. Meet at the base of Canoe Laker Trail. For details see Bruce Magee’s report in this Loon Call. (see page 5-6)

Rob Stinson, 520 (April 2015) Murray Pipher, 210 (see pg 19) Veronica Carruthers, 249 Luigi Cudini, 383 Fred Eustace Jean Stoate, 279 Joy McCauley, 555 (January 2016)

Lake Landmarks 2015

Terrific metal 'Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association' plaques similar to ones sold in the 1960's are for sale! Cost is $10 (cash and exact change only please) and the plaques are available from Diane at #286 in Regina Bay most Sunday mornings at 11:00 am (as long as she’s at the lake, so please

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Contact: diane.morden@sympatico.ca

Gary Beaudoin

Anyone interested should send an email to psandiford@outlook.com or call Peter at 613-291-4088.

Nancy and Paul Cornish celebrated their 25th wedding anniversary on Thanksgiving weekend. Nancy (Bram Reed’s daughter) and Paul were thrilled to celebrate this landmark surrounded by family and history at the lake (cottage 201 - picture seen top middle)

send an email in the shoulder season to prevent disappointments!). Supply is limited, and any remaining will be available at the AGM. (picture of Sean Boyle holding plaque top right)

LWCA AGM Held at the 4 Loons Marina - Saturday July 30th, Registration 9:30am. Meeting starts at 10:00am.

LWCA Plaques Please check the LWCA Website www.weslemkoon.com and Facebook page closer to date for updates and rain dates for all events. 17


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Wind Turbines in Addington Highlands Late last spring the LWCA received news that the construction of two wind farms had been proposed near Denbigh. The sites are close enough to Weslemkoon and Otter Lakes that we started to monitor the situation closely. We have informed the membership of key developments via email, sending three separate communications over the past year. Below are the key points from those emails. • The two companies who have submitted proposals are Florida-based NextEra, and Renewable Energy Systems Canada (RES).

currently signing 50-year leases with private landowners, which will only take effect if their bid is successful. In an attempt to gain the support of the township for the project, NextEra is offering the Addington Highlands council: • A “vibrancy fund” of $1750 per generated Megawatt each year for 20 years, which may be contingent on council’s approval for the project. NextEra has been quoted at a public meeting of saying its project could produce, at best, 200 MW per year

• Local residents opposed to the development formed a non-profit organization called BEARAT (Bon Echo Area Residents Against Wind Turbines). They have been very active in trying to stop the development. • According to Ontario’s Green Energy Act, 300 MW of wind energy will be awarded in each of 2015, 2016 and 2017. The task of awarding contracts is given to the Crown corporation, Independent Electricity Systems Operator (IESO). IESO will evaluate proposals based on a points system: although the exact number has not been made public, the majority of the points are awarded for producing energy at the lowest cost, 80 points are awarded for the support of the township local landowners and 20 points are awarded for support of local Aboriginal communities. • Under the Ontario Green Energy Act, the township does not have the authority to forbid the development; at most, councilors may declare the township an “unwilling host”. On July 6, 2015, the Addington Highlands Council voted to declare Addington Highlands a “willing host”. Reeve Hogg, Councilors Yanch and Cox voted in favour, while Councilors Fritsch and Thompson opposed. • IESO is planning to make its decision this spring. Here is what we know about the two proposals: NextEra has indicated that they are seeking the public’s support to place 100 – 150 turbines on 12,000 acres of a combination of both private and crown land (see NextEra project area map below for details). While the turbine specifications (height, blade length, generator output) have not yet been established yet, NextEra estimates that the towers will be 80 to 100 meters high. The newer turbines make less noise than older ones, but do still make some noise and if residents request larger set-backs than the provincial requirement of 550 meters, the company will take the request under consideration. NextEra has also declared that they will determine bird migration routes as part of their project planning. The company is 18

and have retained Chuck Birchall (a top environmental lawyer from Ottawa) and John Laforet (Strategist, President of Broadview Strategy Group and former President of Wind Concerns of Ontario). On September 1, NextEra and RES dropped off their bids to Ontario's Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO). On the same date, BEARAT dropped off a counter-package as to why the development should not go ahead. It included petitions of non-support for the turbines in both Addington Highlands and North Frontenac Townships, petitions of nonsupport for the Addington Highlands (AH) Council, other evidence of a lack of Community Support and legal opinions on potential conflicts of interest at AH Council. According to the survey on AH’s website 81% of AH residents are not in favour of the Wind Turbine development in the township. As part of their strategy to stop the development, BEARAT also dropped off at IESO copies of a formal complaint that they filed to the U.S. Department of Justice against NextEra and RES. This may force the IESO to pass the project files to the Ontario Attorney General's Office.

General Information on Wind Turbines • Contributing $450,000 in tax revenue per year • 6-10 permanent employees • Upgrades to bridges and roads • A 5000 sq ft Operations and Maintenance building for the generators • Training for high altitude fire suppression for the volunteer fire department RES Canada is proposing a 30 – 50 wind turbine farm producing up to 170 MW on crown and private lands near Denbigh, with a 230kV transmission line running south to connect with an existing transmission line. They are requesting the Township to enter in to discussions with them and to eventually support their proposal (by July 2015). The Ontario government has accepted an application from RES for several parcels of crown land. The nearest of these parcels to us is roughly 10 km, as the crow flies, north of Otter Lake. We do not know if RES intends to submit applications for other parcels of crown land; this is a possibility as their total proposed project area comes right to the shores of Otter.

Local Opposition and Next Steps In June of 2015 a group of local residents opposed to the Wind Turbine project came together as BEARAT (Bon Echo Area Residents Against Turbine). They are very well organized

There are both positives and negatives about wind turbines. On the positive side see Canadian Wind Energy Association's community engagement page here (http:// canwea.ca/communities). For the negatives you can reference Wind Concerns Ontario (http://www.windconcernsontario.ca).

Action If you wish to send a letter to key management at the IESO, the provincial government, NextEra, Renewable Energy Systems or BEARAT you can use the contact information on the following websites: IESO (http://www.ieso.ca/Pages/ContactUs.aspx) Ontario Ministry of Energy (http:// www.energy.gov.on.ca/en/contact-us/) NextEra (http://www.nexteraenergycanada.com/ contact.shtml) RES Canada (http://res-americas.com/en/ contact-us) BEARAT (http://www.bearat.org/whatcanido/)

BREAKING NEWS On March 10th the Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) announced its decision not to go ahead with the NextEra and RES proposals for the the Addington Highlands. This is the first of a three-year process. It is expected that the proponents will resubmit their proposals for the 2016 round. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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ARBONNEÂŽ( pure,(safe,(beneďŹ cial(TM(

Contact(me(if(you(are( interested(in(learning( more(about(Arbonne( skin(care(and(nutriAon( products(that(are( pracAcal(for(coCage(life!((

Holly(Sine( Independent(Consultant( District(Manager( ( 416.452.7307( pagnangroup@gmail.com( www.arbonne.ca(

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Epistle to The Contented CottageGuest

You’ve had your fill and enjoyed our lake, Ate plenty of food, but for you now to take A leak, a tinkle, a wee little pee, There’s a potty, a crapper, a WC. We call it the Outhouse, it’s not far away, But who knows what could happen to you on the way, Where monstrous spiders lurk under the seat And mosquitos seem rather immune to the DEET. The fetor of feces is a whole other matter, With no water to flush down, the smelly stool splatter. It’s a dark dismal hole that you’d best not look down, Where the waste pile’s high, and the paper is brown And the deposits of others, who have gone there before Are a feast for the houseflies and maggots galore. BUT... if you’re privy to the ways of the responsible guest, Who’s aware that our septic tank does need a rest And know how to throw all of your TP away, In the garbage nearby to be burned the next day, It is those who don’t flush when they pee, only poo, Who are welcomed inside to our sweet smelling loo.

Inspired by the Cottage Life Magazine ‘Potty Poetry’ Contest. I did not win, however I had a lot of fun writing it and thought you’d enjoy it too - Terri Todosey

Preface to Murray Pipher Memorial Murray Pipher, a sixth generation resident of the Markham community, spent many years cottaging on and painting Lake Weslemkoon. Last summer, in his 82nd year Murray lost the race with brain cancer but won the prize of eternal life in heaven. He has been a devoted husband to Isobel (Keffer) for 58 years and a loving father to Rod (Cathy) and Doug. He adored his grandchildren Mathew (Rita), Michael (Nicole), Amelia (Bram) and Joel as well as Samantha, Jessica and Jordyn his great granddaughters.

of local heritage, presenting a unique view of familiar things. Murray retired at the end of 1999 from a career in advertising and sales promotion and

In the many introductions written of Murray, he is described as; a devoted cottager, with his wife Isobel and family, a keen observer of nature and a devotee

"It's simply a great hobby," Pipher was quoted. "I paint because I enjoy it and like to share it with other people….I've always joked that my dream in life is to be the barnyard Bateman".

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began painting again after a hiatus of almost 40 years.

By Alison Myles

We had only just begun to get to know Mr. Murray Pipher, fellow cottager on Picnic Island. During our few visits we were welcomed with open arms. Our boys were treated to a tour of Murray’s incredible studio and the “fish wall”, where marked silhouettes outline years of big catches with the name and date of each. We thank Murray for our few secret trails, memories and his beautiful Weslemkoon scenes, his legacy. We asked Glenn Thompson, another Picnic Island cottager and longtime friend of Murray’s who spoke of their significant history during the memorial service, to further share his cottage memories with us on following page.

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Murray Memories — An excerpt by Glenn Thompson It is hard to capture 74 years of close friendship in a few paragraphs so I’ll stick to our young years together. My friendship with Murray began in 1942 when I was 6 and Murray was about 8. It all started because of the Second World War when banks closed alternate branches in Ontario towns. The Commerce closed in Campbellford and the Scotia closed in Stouffville. We moved to Stouffville so my dad could run the Bank of Commerce that remained open there. Murray lived directly across the road from our house in Stouffville and his whole family was very welcoming to this shy new kid on the block. I soon felt right at home. For us the war was an exciting drama. Most boys wanted to be pilots. We were shielded from the awful events in Europe and the UK. I remember finding two large Ceylon tea boxes big enough to sit in with one side removed. These boxes soon became our

fighter plane and with many rubber tubes and connectors from the family player piano we had a make shift communications

The war and gas shortages sent the farmers back to horses and since our homes were near a feed mill we spent lots of time riding on

We often escaped to fish at Mink Lake running all the way with poles and tackle boxes. system from the pilot to the co-pilot. We were air aces.

large bags of grain on the sleighs that passed by.

It won’t surprise those of you who know of Murray’s distinguished commercial art career that he was always drawing. And the two of us were usually reading comics. Murray’s lovely sister, Olive, worked in a local drug store and when a comic was not sold the cover was sent back but the book remained. Olive was our supplier of an unending stream of exciting reading material.

Perhaps most importantly we had two Morse Code sending devices with lights on top and many important messages were sent from one bedroom to the other across the street. It likely helped the war effort!

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

And then the war, thankfully, ended and we rode our bicycles up and down the village streets people yelling and waving Canadian flags. Gasoline soon became available again

and that meant going to the family cottage on Weslemkoon Lake. Murray and I spent many summers together at the lake. We had a very small punt that we used to haul up a wooden ladder and then go down on rollers into the water. Hours were spent … until it was time for the required blueberry picking. Murray and I often recalled the occasion when we filled the baskets half full of leaves. It didn’t work! We often escaped to fish at Mink Lake running all the way with poles and tackle boxes. The old metal punt that leaked would just get us to the big island across the lake where we thought the fishing was best. Then there was making a round board to ride on behind the boat and to rotate while passing the handle around our body. We arrived at 6 on Friday evening and by 7 we were trying it out. We even made our own water skis, bending the boards by driving my dad’s car up on Continued on page 28 21


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From The Archives By Janice Mackenzie A look back at Loon Call history. There is no indication of who the editor was in 1962, but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s clear that he or she had a great sense of humour. Here is a glimpse into lake life nearly 55 years ago. For more Loon Call history, visit the LWCA website www.weslemkoon.com/loon-calls.

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Photo Contest Winners! Nature & Landscape First Place - Francisca Quinn, Cottage #973 - Skinners Island. Seen above.

Second Place - Rich Crowley, Islands in the Midst.

The editors would like to say a huge thankyou to all who entered submissions in the Loon Call photo contest. We had some very difficult choices to make, particularly in the Nature & Landscape category, which received by far the most entries. We appreciate you sharing your cottage memories with us all and do hope that you keep your cameras close at hand in 2016.

Third Place - Carolyn Calhoun, Cottage #835

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Pets at The Lake Ellen Goldey, Cottage #253. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is my husband, Byron McCane, in the hammock with Beau - a rambunctious and affectionate two-year old Lab.â&#x20AC;?

Cottage Fun Carol Day, Cliff Jumping at Sunset, Mackie Bay

Kids Logan Myles - Water fight, Picnic Island.

Tragedy on Otter Lake A beautiful early summer weekend turned tragic last July when a guest at a cottage on Otter Lake experienced a medical emergency while swimming with her friends. Despite the best efforts of cottagers, marina operators and emergency personnel the woman could not be resuscitated. The sobering experience incited a discussion among LWCA members on specified landing sites for helicopters carrying emergency Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

Photo of Otter Lake by: Tim Rollwagen By Shawna Hiley

medical personnel, as well as the question of whether the LWCA should install defibrillators at key locations on the lake (i.e. marinas). After much research it was conceded that it was not practical for the LWCA to follow-through with this. Defibrillators, to be effective, must be accessible within 6 minutes of every camp. The geographical size of our lake, combined with the number of wateraccess cottages creates a situation where

6-minute access is not feasible from a logistics or cost point of view. With respect to helicopter landing, the LWCA creating and maintaining designated landing sites has serious and complicated insurance implications. However, Terry Beettam has obtained permission from Beans Snider to land a helicopter on his property (located at the north end of the lake) should another emergency arise. 25


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The Fisherman & Butterfly Collector Derek McDermott 1937-2015 By Chris McDermott Editor of the Loon Call 1982-1991 President Lake Association 1979-1981 Order of The Cockeyed Loons 1981 This past August, the lake lost another kindred spirit: friend, neighbour, avid fisherman, past president of the Association, and my father, Derek McDermott.

Derek shared this spirit with all those he got to know on Weslemkoon over the many years he had been coming here, from the very first summer he arrived with his beloved wife Jane, in the late 1950's. Even though old Doctor Buckley thought of him as some “ivory-towered Irish academic”,

Spending the summers at Buckhaven, our family cottage on the lake, Dad and I would go out many an early morning either to fish or collect butterflies. Depending on the weather and our inclinations, either of these two rituals would take us across the big lake and into one of her many hidden bays and lush green shores.

A good fisherman should have a combination of skill, patience, creativity and good fortune. An experienced butterfly collector should be persistent, optimistic and wise enough to imagine how a Monarch butterfly would move through the marshes and the milkweed. Through his love for fishing and butterfly collecting, Dad would share and teach, learn and guide in a most loving and nurturing way. It was Derek's very nature, his essence and his spirit to teach, not just as a profession but as a way of life. 26

It was Dad's very curious mind and voracious appetite for unlocking the enduring secrets and mysteries of life, and to always be learning. He shared these secrets with everyone interested: as the editor of the Loon Call and president of the Lake Association, the many encounters at the marina or the dockside at Buckhaven. It was in his kind and gentle nature to share these attributes with others particularly those on the lake. Dad's life as a teacher and student, father and friend didn't just happen on those beautiful summers at the lake; his life like this was a way of being. Always teaching in it’s many manifestations.   Always learning through his desire to satiate his curious mind.

Father and son. Teacher and student. In many respects, fishing for the beautiful bronze backs off the rocky shoals, or chasing the elusive Mourning Cloak Butterfly somewhere past the washed out logger's dam down Seymour creek, were essentially, living metaphors for Dad's life.

and share whatever knowledge he had. He loved Weslemkoon as so many of us do.

Dad proved more adept at the ways of roughing it in those early days when the lake was unfettered with the modern trappings of hydro, indoor plumbing, satellite TV/internet, cell service and large boats; all things which came to the lake in his 60+ years at the lake. He became the steward of our family's sacred space and a purveyor of the lake's history and many wonderful stories.  As the editor of the Loon Call for a decade, Dad was dedicated and passionate about the wonderful history of the lake was passed on and recorded.  As well with The Lake Book, Dad was happy to help

Derek lived the life of putting others before one's self whether this was for his wife, sons, family, students or Weslemkoon neighbors.   On several occasions Derek helped fight cottage fires with one of the lake fire pumps or rescue capsized boaters that got in trouble on the big lake. It was at Weslemkoon and Buckhaven that Dad also taught me the love of nature and all its intrinsic beauty.  This appreciation of comprehending how one's spirit and soul flows from nature has helped me garner much understanding of the good life; quiet mornings fishing and beautiful twilights,   together out on Weslemkoon: sharing practical Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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wisdom like removing hooks without harming the fish and tying strong knots, to more metaphysical knowledge like where we are from and how we come to understand what we know and how we know it. Lessons that are with me every day, particularly now when I'm in those immutable and transcendent spaces that make up Weslemkoon. Derek didn't just teach esoteric knowledge. He was a professor of practical things, like how to chop wood, build fires, shoot the old Winchester 1890 with laser accuracy, work all the finicky old devices at Buckhaven (old piston pump with the four hidden drain cocks) and most importantly -- navigate the lake on a moonless blackened night, avoiding the labyrinthine bogs and lower unitdestroying rocky shoals.   Knowing Shelter Island would always provide refuge from whitecap inducing fall storms was invaluable knowledge I learned from Dad at an early age; and have used several times in my years on the lake.

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This past year has been a particularly difficult one as we lost Jane McDermott (nee McMurray) my Mother and beloved wife of Derek of 53 years in March of 2015 to Alzheimer's and cancer.  Although this article is about Derek and all his commitments and passion for Lake Weslemkoon, it was his love Jane who first brought him here as so many husbands and wives (or future husbands and wives) come to find this sacred place. Jane was a true daughter of Weslemkoon, having come here every year since her first birthday in 1940, right up until her final trip at Thanksgiving, 2014. The granddaughter of Wright Buckley (builder of Buckhaven in 1924) Jane was ultimately Derek's teacher and mentor on the Lake; she was navigating the Lake's many bays and bog laden channels as a little girl when Derek was just a boy back in Northern Ireland, and the majestic Weslemkoon a mere undiscovered figment in his wild imagination. I know you'll be there with us this summer Mum and Dad; out trolling the Green Shore, tinkering in the little boathouse, baking a fresh picked blueberry pie, watching the swallows come and go feasting on the evening flies having a icy cocktail, listening to the hooting owl out across the lake under the glowing warm moonlight, waiting with a   fire burning for us to come home from fishing. *Derek was a poet who wrote his entire life -- much of which he kept private and to himself. Many of his works were inspired by his time at Weslemkoon and travelling the old roads to and from the lake.  This is one which speaks to me on many levels and invokes his wise, poetic spirit.

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Shadows There  Are

By Derek McDermott

Shadows there are across the graveled roads And powdered margins Of forgotten Townships south of Faraday, And shadows too beneath the Birch and Hemlock That line the shores Of secret lakes north of Elzevir, Shadows on all but sunless days That mark the passing hours And give certainty  To those who wandering far Have lost their way.  But shadows there are of darker shade That do not heed the sway Of wind or sun or weather And are not governed By the passing seasons.  These are no earthly shadows Of landscape, lake and light  But those of less material kind That do not our fears allay When they gather  To pierce the heart, Cloud the mind And darken sight Of all that's lovely, clear and bright And do not fade away At break of day But turn each hour to night.

Wayne Todosey 905-436-0990 1-866-436-0990

Serving The Durham Region and Greater Toronto Area for Over 30 Years Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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...Continued from page 21

Murray Memories

the soaked wood. The harness was made of rubber from truck tire tubes! One day my Dad had us moving rocks from quite a distance for ballast in a dock. We each had a punt

and dad overloaded Murray’s. As it went to the bottom full of stone Murray was calling, “She’s sinking”. My wife Gloria’s early memory of Murray is when she, her sister Marilyn and another girl hid his bike under leaves while he was delivering newspapers and watched in hiding while he looked puzzled. Little did Isobel know that Murray was being pursued by girls long before she met him. Murray and I talked endlessly and I am sure we

shaped one another’s ideas about the world. And throughout life we have been able to pick up our conversations after long breaks as though we had talked the day before. We were both fortunate to marry wonderful partners and as couples the friendship has flourished with our cottages not far apart. Murray was much influenced by Lake Weslemkoon as many of his paintings attest and, with

The Weslemkoon Book, he has created a record of our lake that many cottagers treasure. He was also a great painter of farm animals and early day farm implements. He liked to call himself the “Barnyard Bateman”. The conversations have ended, except in our mind, but the wonderful memories will go on and we treasure of continued friendship with Isobel and her sons and grandchildren.

Quick Reference Calendar of Events SUNDAY

MONDAY

JUNE 26

Jr. Loons Little Long Hike

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Did you know? Blackfly season is typically mid May to late June

TUESDAY 27

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Full Moon

Sailing Regatta 12:30pm

THURSDAY 29

FRIDAY 30

SATURDAY

JULY 1

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Canada Day!

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WEDNESDAY

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12 Did you know? 13 Visibility at night can vary greatly depending on 19 the moon phase 20 and clouds. Boat lights should be on 26 half hour before 27 sunset regardless

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23 Jr. Loons Water Day

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30 LWCA AGM 9:30am

The Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower is at its peak

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AUGUST 1

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11 The Perseids Meteor Shower is at its peak

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13 Tree Health Inspection Hike 10am

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Did you know? 16 Fog can settle in quickly over a lake when it rains or during 23 the cooler fall nights. Be prepared if you plan to travel 30 by boat.

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Pig Roast & Music Fest

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Full Moon 24

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SEPTEMBER 1 Annular Solar Eclipse

Labour Day Weekend! Treasure Hunt 2pm

Please check the LWCA Website www.weslemkoon.com and Facebook page closer to date for updates and rain dates for all events! 28

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