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The Loon Call An Annual Newsletter for all Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Associates & Supporters www.weslemkoon.com

SPRING 2017 Protecting Our Lake How do we keep it safe? Page 12

Helping Others An orthopaedic medical mission to Ecuador Page 18

Lake Events Regatta, Treasure Hunt & Pig Roast Page 15-16

Directors’ Reports President’s Letter, Note from Editor and Art Director, Membership, Custodial Visits, List of Directors, Water Quality, Municpal Affairs, Water Levels, Forestry & Hiking, Finanical Report, Junior Loons LWCA Passings Tribute to past members Page 2-11 Page 16

Photo Contest Winners So many great entries! Page 19-21

Memories Treasured Lessons Learned Learning from the past. Page 14

Photo Contest Winner (Landscape)

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

ISSN# 1480-9583 Volume 58 Junior Loons

Calendar of Events Look ahead to all the events happening summer of 2017 Page 24

The young loons have been busy going on adventures and having fun! Page 10-11

Reflections. Pete Warren, Cottage 25, Otter Lake

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Directors’ Reports LWCA P R E S I D E N T ’ S L E T T E R I hope everyone had a good winter. With spring here, we start to feel the draw of the Lake Weslemkoon. We’ve had many projects on the go over the past year, and have plenty more planned for the 2017 cottage season. Here are some of the highlights … Water Quality. Every three years the LWCA conducts a large-scale water quality survey to collect a larger amount of water quality indicator data than is obtained in biannual testing with our dissolved oxygen meter. The deeper study, due to be completed this year, gives us a broader measure of the health of the Lake’s water. Kevin has more information on this year’s study in his report. The Junior Loons will be participating in collecting data using 
 the DO meter this summer. Septics. Faulty and poorly maintained septic systems can threaten our clean water. To help cottagers keep their systems working properly the LWCA started the Get Pumped program in 2004 and it has been going strong since. If need your septic pumped contact Fran at Kawartha Utilities (705-654-4000) to register your interest. When she has ten people on her list Kawartha Utilities sends a barge to the lake to complete the pumping service. If you’re unsure whether your septic needs pumping, the general rule is to get pumped at minimum every five years. Also, we have information septics on the LWCA website. Please do your part to maintain the health of our lake and maintain your septic system. On-Boarding Binders. To help with continuity on the Board we created an on-boarding binder for each board portfolio. The binders are to be passed down from director to director and serve as a record of what previous directors did. This makes it easier for a new Board member to get up to speed. The idea " 2

started when Jim Reynolds way back when he handed out binders to Board members, and Pam Lawton has done a great job putting a new set of binders together. Forestry. Bruce is offering seedlings again this year. I encourage all cottagers to consider planting some trees on your property to protect the riparian zone on the lake. The riparian zone is the ribbon of shoreline that is vital to the health of the water. If your shoreline is lacking in vegetation or trees, get in touch with Bruce. You might even want to plant a seedling as a family project. I planted a white pine near the cottage back in the 1970s and have been watching it grow ever since. See Bruce’s article for details. Juniors Loons. Our younger cottagers have been very busy: hiking, swimming and learning about nature. Back in October, Patti and Melissa held a draw for those who submitted a completed Activity Book. Kassia Deep was the person who won the sports video camera. (If you’re interested in the Activity Book you can download a copy from the LWCA website.) Lots of great stuff planned for 2017. Be sure to check Facebook for the latest upcoming events and activities. Communications. We’ve sent out the 2017 membership forms to everybody. If you didn’t receive yours please get in touch with Carolyn. Also, let her know if you’re not receiving email newsletters from us and would like to. Wind Turbines Update. Back in September 2016 the Ontario government suspended the second 
 round of Large Renewable Energy Procurement. This means the two proposals to put up wind turbines in the region of Lake Weslemkoon have been taken off the table.

Announcements. 2016 saw Ken Senter become the vice-president of the Association. Ken has been on the board for nine years working on the Lake Levels and Custodian portfolios. He is 
 a real asset to the Board and we are grateful for his commitment to the lake. This year saw Pam Lawton leave the Board. As the editor of the Loon Call from 2012-2015 she brought new life to the newsletter, and when she took on the membership portfolio, memberships reached new levels. We thank Pam for all the great work she has done for Lake Weslemkoon. Her energy and drive will be missed. Former LWCA president Terry Beettam joined the Federation of Cottage Associations (FOCA) board at the March 4th AGM. The LWCA has been a member of FOCA since its inception in 1963. They do a lot of good work helping protect Ontario’s cottage country; last year they provided the LWCA with a stack of booklets on shoreline health that were available at the marinas. If you didn’t get one, you can download a copy from our website. Cockeyed Loons. Let it be known that Sean Boyle was inducted into the Grand Order in 2016. A lot of work goes into creating and producing this newsletter. I want to thank Terri and Shawna for another great job on this year’s Loon Call, and Pam for working on the advertising and fulfilment. Enjoy! Look forward to seeing everyone this summer.

Stuart Inglis, President

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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A Note from the Editor & Art Director My favourite part about working on The Loon Call is the year-round connection to Weslemkoon that it provides. It was almost 6 years ago that my husband was presented with the career opportunity of a lifetime – an expat assignment in South America. When he first pitched the idea to me, his biggest concern was that I would say no because 
 I wouldn’t leave the lake behind. I agreed to go, with the condition that I would remain self-employed and able to spend summers at the lake. I might have to give up the shoulder seasons, but I was guaranteeing myself a solid 
 6-weeks of sanity every year. We returned to Canada in 2014, but 3400km northwest of Weslemkoon in Edmonton. The longer my off-season home is outside of Ontario, the stronger my connection to the lake becomes. Weslemkoon is more than my summer home; it’s my forever home. It is where I feel most grounded and most relaxed; steeped in history and surrounded by friendships than span generations. Life slows down enough to pick mint for margaritas, take a paddle board tour of the north end and catch up on a reading list that grows too long in the busyness of each school year. I could not have chosen a more appropriate place to take in the most Canadian moments of last summer: the surprise success of the Canadian women swimmers in Rio and Gord Downie’s farewell concert with the Hip in Kingston. I witnessed both bits of history huddled around an iPad (we don’t have a TV at the lake), the breeze blowing in off Squally Bay and the waves lapping gently against the rocks: it does not get more Canadian than that, and it was perfect. Thank you to all who contributed to this year’s Loon Call; thanks for entrusting me with your memories and stories. It was an honour to be involved in this edition of lake history. Shawna Hiley, Editor looncall.editor@gmail.com

Weslemkoon – the lake of many fish… or was 
 that beavers?… maybe both? I’ve heard a few meanings of the difficult-to-pronounce and equally hard-to-forget name, but if the interpretation was up to me I’d add mosquitoes 
 to the list as well. The first time I heard ‘Weslemkoon’, it was as a suggestion; a lake for us to look at in our vast search for the perfect cottage. I, like many, stumbled: “Wesle…what?” My husband, a 
 real-estate agent, set me up on Trebnet, an internet-based web of every property listed and sold, including cottages. I must have gone through every cottage listing within a fifty-mile radius, but we finally narrowed the listings down to a few we’d go and see. The kids, who were still kids back then, were horribly disappointed that we didn’t buy the first cute cottage we saw on Stoney Lake. “Patience,” I told them. “Our cottage is out there waiting for us to find it.” “But how will we know it’s the one?” they asked. “We’ll know,” I assured them. Not long after I came across a listing on this mysteriously named and recommended lake, Weslemkoon. We set up a viewing for the following weekend despite the possibility of rain and promise of blackflies. The listing agent (David Biernaskie) was a wonderful guy, giving us a tour of the lake and pointing out various points of interest, such as the jumping cliffs, Pike’s Peak and the lighthouse. We landed at the hopeful site – 
 a cozy cottage set high up on a rocky ledge overlooking a quiet bay. Seventy-two steps later we were at the pinnacle of our decision. The 
 birds were singing and the scent of pine needles warmed by the sun 
 filled the fresh air. The tranquility and stillness without traffic, and the miles of crown land to explore wooed us with endless memory-making possibilities. We stood holding hands on the deck overlooking an impressive vista that took our breath away and I knew this was the 
 place we would call our summer home. That was nine years ago and I can honestly say our decision to buy into this beautiful world was one of the best decisions we had ever made. It’s a magical place where each season has a new adventure and every resident has a story to tell. The lake calls to me when I’m thick in the chaos of life, inviting me to come and play. My soul aches for it when I’ve been away too long. Whenever I return, I am comforted in knowing I am home. Terri Todosey, Art Director territodosey@yahoo.ca

Next Year’s Loon Call... Photo Contest

Keep your cameras and phones with you and send in all your artistic shots! Email max of one photo per category to looncall.editor@gmail.com. All entries must be taken in the year 2017 by a LWCA member, at the lake and must be in jpeg format. Please use ‘Loon Call Photo Contest’ as email subject line and include your name, cottage number (optional), title of pic (with or without location) and category of entry within body of email. Entries must be received by December 31st, 2017.

Content Have a lake adventure to share, knowledge to teach, an event to chronicle? Contact us at looncall.editor@gmail.com with your ideas, because we need writers to help write articles for next year’s Loon Call. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Membership Report By Carolyn Calhoun Thanks to all Weslemkoon and Otter Lake cottagers who chose to support the LWCA in 2016. We have 210 full members, 9 new members, and 23 Friends of the Lake for a total of 242. Overall, this represents a decline of 5% from the previous year. Your help is appreciated in identifying potential new members and friends 
 of the lake. I can be reached at calhoun8822@rogers.com or registration is available at www.weslemkoon.com. I encourage all members to attend the Annual General Meeting to keep apprised of important issues affecting all of us. It's also a great way to connect with fellow cottagers. Hope to see you there on the Saturday of the August long weekend!

Custodial Visits By Ken Senter Due to dangerous ice conditions last winter and in March 2016 the winter custodial visits were limited to visits performed by boat after the ice out in April. Steve Murray our custodian was also hampered by time restraints of the marina opening. Custodial visits that were completed only numbered 117 unfortunately. The LWCA is considering conducting these visits in February to avoid spring ice conditions. Perhaps with the climate changes the visits could be conducted after the ice out in April. The fall custodial visits were conducted in the latter part of November and ended in the first week of December. A total of 216 visits were completed, some with ice and snow conditions prevailing. LWCA may consider placing lake numbers in the dock areas of members who have road access, as it is difficult for the custodian to determine the member’s cottage by boat or snowmobile. " 4

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List of Directors Past President Jon Keeble President Stuart Inglis Vice-President Custodial & Lake Levels Ken Senter Secretary Travis Walker

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Water Quality By Kevin Moyser In 2016 we saw a further decline in the dissolved oxygen at the deep water sites in Lake Weslemkoon and Otter Lake. Five years ago we were obtaining dissolved oxygen values as high as 13 milligrams per litre. This year’s dissolved oxygen values topped out in the mid 8 mg per litre. This is of concern because as the dissolved oxygen drops, it puts stress on the trout population. This year we will be doing the more extensive water quality study at the existing eighteen sites plus four additional sites. This testing involves measuring the nitrogen, phosphorous, coliform and E. coli levels. We also measure chlorophyll levels at the two deep water sites.

Treasurer Diane Morden Membership Carolyn Calhoun Loon Call Editor Shawna Hiley Loon Call Art Director Terri Todosey Legal & Municipal Affairs Paul Bottos Communications Laura Scrimgeour Junior Loons Patty Milne & Melissa Tervit Shoal Markers Mark Warlow Water Quality Kevin Moyser Logging, Hiking Bruce Magee Septics Water Patty

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and Waste Milne

The testing of phosphorous and nitrogen is particularly relevant because some of you have been asking about algae blooms. Briefly, algae and the resulting algae bloom is a catch-all term referring to a variety of aquatic organisms that generally rely on photosynthesis for energy and reproduction. These blooms which do occur naturally, become more prevalent as excess nutrients enter the water (entrophication) and the primary culprit is phosphorous however, nitrogen also plays a part in the equation. (Toronto Star [web format] July 24, 2016) (IISD-ela newsletter Headwaters June 2016) While there are many types of algae that form blooms in lakes, harmful algae blooms can produce toxins that are dangerous to other organisms including humans and aquatic life such as fish. (http://www.lakescientist.com/what-areharmful-algal-blooms/January 2017). The results of this year’s water quality testing will be made available once the testing has been completed. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Municipal Affairs By Paul Bottos I’d like to take this opportunity to provide a brief review of the municipal issues which were dealt with by the LWCA during the past year.

DEVELOPMENT ON THE LAKE The LWCA continues to receive copies of development applications in and surrounding the lake. The LWCA looks forward to the continued receipt of this information from the Township.

COTTAGE NUMBERS In the event that you require replacement cottage number or require a new cottage number to be assigned, please contact the LWCA as we work with the Township for the purposes of assigning same. Please note that roadside numbers are assigned directly by the Township and you should contact the Township directly with respect to same. The Township has indicated that it is currently in discussions with county representatives and others so as to possibly amend or alter this process and/or change the cottage numbers for the lake. These discussions were prompted by the County and are still at a somewhat preliminary stage.

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Your Municipal Representatives are as follows: Reeve: Henry Hogg Councillor: Ward 1 Tony Fitsch Councillor Ward 1: Kirby Thompson Councillor Ward 2 (and Deputy Reeve): Helen Yanch Councillor: Ward 2 Bill Cox You may contact the Township as follows: ADDRESS: 72 Edwards Street P.O. Box 89 Flinton, Ontario K0H 1P0 Telephone: (613) 336-2286 Fascimile: (613) 336-2847
 Website:www.addingtonhighlands.ca

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I trust the above keeps you informed as to the developments which have transpired in regards to municipal issues during the past year. Should anyone have any interest in the noted issues of have any other issues which may be of interest or concern, please do not hesitate to contact the LWCA in order that same may be raised and discussed.

Water Levels By Ken Senter 2016 Season High: 318.187m April 3, 2016 Flood Condtions: Approx. 318.10m: 318.053m June 9, 2016, 317.969m December 6, 2016 2016 Season Low: 317.67m March 15, 2016 Spring Drawdown, mid-season 317.81 mid-August 2016

January - June 2016

WIND POWER The Independent Electricity System Operator (IESO) made its decision last year confirming that neither the NextEra project nor the Res Canada project were approved for wind power development. This does not preclude them or any other party from making applications in the future in the event that opportunities become available.

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

July - December 2016

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Forestry and Hiking By Bruce Magee The Mazinaw-Lanark Forest Inc. will continue its 2017-18 Annual Work Schedule (AWS) of our existing provincial 10-year forest maintenance plan with a harvest of Block 191, (North and South of Trout Lake Rd. north of Otter Lake) and 161 (South of Weslemkoon Lake Rd 2nd block west of the Lake). For the 2017-18 season there will be tending of 2,000 pine and spruce seedlings in Block 163 (South of Seymour Creek and east of the Lake) and there will be harvest on block 181 (South of Ashby Lake between Weslemkoon and Hwy 41).   None of these cuttings will encroach minimum set-backs from the Lake. 

If anyone would like to view a pdf of the maps of these areas please feel free to contact me, and I would be happy to e-mail them to you. My e-mail address is bruce.magee@gbbinc.com

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The hike is estimated to take 1.5 hours in total. Come prepared with hat, insect repellent, water, and good hiking shoes. Additionally, bring a camera if you like.

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or second weekend after spring ice-out. The cost of the seedlings is $1.29 each. If you would like to sign up for this planting on your property please call or e-mail me at bruce.magee@gbb-inc.com, or call at (905) 854 2014.

TREE PLANTING PROJECT We’ll be offering nursery plantings again this year for those who would like to improve the management of the riparian zone around their cottage. The riparian zone is the ribbon of land around our lake from the high water mark to the densely forested wood land. From a conservation perspective, this is a key strip of land as it must filter effluent from our weeping tile beds, and retain storm water run-off into the lake. To a large degree it controls the water quality of our lake, and by extension the ecosystem for Weslemkoon fish and wildlife habitat. AND, it goes without saying that lake water quality is critical to our enjoyment at the cottage, for swimming, boating and the many water activities that we all so enjoy. We’ll

have

TRAIL CLEARING If you’re interested in helping maintain one of the hiking trails around our lake please read on. The LWCA is continuing its maintenance of

our

trails

around

Otter

and

Weslemkoon to other lakes. The goal is to keep our trails in a clear and identifiable condition that allows hikers to be closer to nature. Work on a trail will consist of clearing limbs and foliage around the trail head sign, pruning back branches on the trail and sectioning dead falls that block the path. Keeping it simple/

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natural, marking the start of the path, and

s e e d l i n g s

clearing the way to make it an easy hike

INSPECTION HIKE

available at cost

is the motto of our work.

Saturday Aug 12th, 10:00am. Meet at the Seymour Creek Campsite. We’ll cross Seymour Creek together and hike onto block 163 and inspect modified cutting and tending practices. The Seymour Creek campsite is on the right-hand side hallway up Seymour Creek and before the Little Wes portage. We’ll hike as a group in a low impact method, which means we’ll leave only the trail behind.

for four cottagers that would like to have them planted on their property. We’ll have a small crew of young and old members to help plant the first

If you’re interested in helping and would like to participate; get together a minimum of two people to form a trail maintenance team. Contact Bruce Magee by e-mail bruce.magee@gbb-inc.com or phone (905) 854-2014, or cell (416) 432-3098. Please have the names of your team members ready/committed to the Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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task, and an anticipated date to do the

Canoe Lake

of peace is very apropos though; the

maintenance, as well as a couple of trail

Buck Lake

needles make a nice calming tea, full of

choices (in case your first choice is

Green Lake (western trail)

medical properties.

already signed-up by another party). All

Green Lake (eastern trail)

trail maintenance teams will be thanked

Pikes Peak

and identified in The Loon Call.

Pot Holes

Maintenance Team Specifics: At the trail… Prune back the branches that would be in the way of portaging a canoe along the trail. Cut and remove the dead

A big and hearty thank you for all those that contributed to trail maintenance in

A MUG OF WHITE PINE TEA 1.

summer of 2016. •

falls across the path area. Pick up any

Christopher and Cindy Roberts

garbage and hike it out.

Kevin Moyser

Paul Bottos and Bruce Magee

2.

Volunteers need to bring their own: •

Pruning sheers

CONIFER CORNER

Bow saw or chain saw

Eastern white pine (Pinus strobus) is one

3.

Proper shoes clothing and

of our families favourite Trees on the

4.

protective gear

Lake. When our children were younger they used to call it the “Tom Thompson

Here are a few precautionary notes of things not to do: •

Do not modify or improve the boat landing area (no approval for any dock work)

Do not clear excessively wide trails (reduces the closeness to nature)

tree”. I was so enamored with how Thompson developed impressionist art of our beautiful country, and at the same time I bestowed the virtues of our gorgeous white pines; the kids connected the two. So Thompsons’ jack pine took a back seat to the white pine.

Do not get hurt

Do be smart, be safe and enjoy

a proud heritage on the palette of

the project

Canadian life: sought after by the British

As our provincial tree, the white pine has

Here’s the list of trails that need

Royal Navy for ship masts, a quality

maintenance:

furniture wood, fabulous for moldings

Needs to be done in 2017

around the interior of your home, and

Done in 2015-16

tongue and groove V joint to beatify your

Ashby Lake

cottage on the lake.

Two handfuls of green white pine needles Cut, and grind in your hand and drop into a kettle of hot/boiling water Steep for 10-12 minutes Remove the needles with a strainer/filter.

There’s not much taste but this tea is loaded with antioxidants, vitamin C, vitamin A and it’s good for colds and chest congestion. It was also introduced by First Nations people to early settlers as a cure for scurvy, which is caused by the lack of vitamin C. Taste or no taste, it will warm you up and stave off a cold. Hope you enjoy it.

Mink Lake McKenzie Lake

In the Iroquois culture the tall white pine

Effingham Lake (Little Wes)

is known as the tree of peace–interesting as the Iroquois fought the Algonquin at

Shiner Lake Little Long Lake

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

the north end of our lake. Being the tree

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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Financial Report Statement of Changes in Net Assets as at December 31, 2016 (unaudited)

Catherine Rathbun Memorial Environmental Fund

Unrestricted

Total 2016

Total 2015

16,163

28,779

44,942

42,318

89

1,956

2,045

1,394

1,281

1,230

48,268

44,942

BALANCE, Beginning of Year Excess (Deficiency) of Revenue Over Expenditures Contributions – Net

1,281 17,533

BALANCE, End of Year

Statement of Financial Position as at December 31, 2016 (unaudited)

ASSETS Current Assets Cash Term Deposit Inventory Fixed Assets Water Testing Equipment - net

LIABILITIES & RESTRICTED FUNDS & NET ASSETS Current Liabilities Accounts Payable & Accrued Liabilities Restricted Funds Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund Net Assets Unrestricted

2016 Treasurer’s Report

Statement of Revenues & Expenditures 2016

2015

$29,875 17,535 1,689 $49,099

$26,718 17,288 2,284 $46,290

1,139 $50,238

1,329 $47,619

for the year ended December 31, 2016 (unaudited) 2016

REVENUES Annual Fees Loon Call Revenues Interest Income Miscellaneous Sales Total Revenue

$1,971

2,677

17,533

16,163

$30,735 $50,239

$28,779 $47,619

By Diane Morden

Your board continues to be very active as reflected by the diverse expenditures reflected in the Financial Statements. Actual expenditures are in line with Board approved budgeted amounts. Custodial visit expenditures are lower this year because the ice conditions during the winter of 2016 prevented our custodian from completing all custodial visits. Surplus funds are invested in bank GIC’s earning 1.2% and will mature December 2017. Interest 
 earned is shared on a weighted average basis between the general fund and the Catherine Rathbun Environmental Fund. The Catherine Rathbun Environmental fund grew by individual " 8

30,735

EXPENDITURES Annual Meeting Bank Charges Bad Debt Expense Administrative & Promotional Cost of Miscellaneous Sales Custodial Visits FOCA Insurance Loon Call New Shoal Markers Shoal Marker Maintenance Lake Activities Social Miscellaneous Web Site Development Costs Water Quality Testing Amortization of Water Test Equipment Total Expenditures EXCESS OF REVENUES OVER EXPENDITURES (Expenditures over Revenues)

2015

$12,296 2,285 158 617

$12,854 2,410 277 965

$15,356

$16,506

1,107 176 448 445 2,381 743 1,584 2,655 664 885 287 55 1,780 190

866 108 75 319 601 3,408 827 1,584 4,363 483 1,035 200 200 760 180 190

$13,401

$15,199

$1,956

$1,307

contributions of $1,281 ($1,105 in 2015) and allocated interest. Expenditures from this fund are restricted in nature and require a majority vote by the membership at the annual general meeting. The remaining unrestricted surplus of $30,735 is available for the general purposes of the association. Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Junior Loons Report HIKE TO MINK LAKE

One nice summer day, we and everyone else from Junior Loons went on a hike to Mink Lake. On the hike we saw lots of cool bugs and plants.

Kassia Deep

There were many trips, but everyone made it

We had lots of fun with the Jr. Loons during the summer of 2016! Here are some of the highlights.

Cottage 453

there safely. Once we were at Mink Lake, we

learned about many plants that we saw. We also

went swimming, and played a few games of manhunt. We also had some yummy snacks. We had a blast at Mink Lake and we are sure everyone else did too!

WATER DAY

Today I went to this year’s Junior Loons water day. It was

really fun! We started out talking about why we need to keep our lake healthy and how we keep our lake clean. After that

everyone got ready for a kayak race. The race was really fun, and so was the water day. I can't wait to go back next year!Â

Emily Lay

824 Mackie Bay

Once again we wish to thank Frank and Freda

Smith for inviting the Jr. Loons to Lakefest and

for generously funding our activities for the day. We were treated to Hula-hoop lessons with DeeJay, awesome bouncy slides and an

obstacle course race that kept us entertained for the afternoon as we raced each other many times over, and an amazingly talented face

painter who created masterpieces on our faces. We rounded out the day with some fun relay

races and watermelon seed spitting contests

before enjoying a great meal with all our friends. " 10

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Hike – We will start off the

summer with our annual hike to reconnect with old friends and meet new ones. July 8th 1:00pm. Location to be announced – check the Facebook page and marina posters.

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Upcoming Jr. Loon Events for Summer 2017

Water Testing – in the summer of 2016 we began to learn about how to protect the water in our lake from contaminants. This summer we continue to learn about water protection and will help Kevin Moyser from the LWCA complete some of the annual water tests. We will also make our own environmentally friendly hand soap. Date to be announced – check the Facebook page and marina posters.

Lakefest – Frank Smith has generously donated some of the proceeds from last summer’s fireworks to help fund the Jr Loons activities at Lakefest this year. The kids will once again enjoy Hula Hooping with Deejay, face painting and relay races.

Jr. Loons Activity Book Contest We wish to congratulate

Kassia Deep on winning the draw for the action video camera. Kassia

completed her Jr Loons A & B: Activity Book

and submitted her work by the Thanksgiving draw date.

Bat House Building – The Little Brown Bat is now on the endangered species list due to mass die-offs from white nose

syndrome. To make life easier for the bats who remain around 
 Lake Weslemkoon we will be constructing bat houses. July 15-16. Pre-registration required – contact Melissa (melissastout@sympatico.ca 905-466-1700) Poster Contest! – Create a poster to teach cottagers and visitors to our lake about an important conservation issue. Posters can be any size you like and may be created by hand or using a computer. There are 2 prize categories – best Primary grade poster and best Jr/ Intermediate grade poster. Deadline for entries is Labour Day. Submit posters to Patti or Melissa.

Other events may be added throughout the summer. We will post notices at the marinas and on the “Weslemkoon, There is Only one for a Reason” Facebook site to keep you updated. We look forward to seeing you! Patti and Melissa

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Protecting Our Lake

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By Patty Milne

We love our lake, how do we keep it safe from harmful ingredients while cleaning our clothes, dishes, boats and even ourselves? NO SOAP,

including boat wash and shampoo, should ever be allowed IN THE LAKE. For soaps to biodegrade they must meet the soil where bacteria live… no soap will biodegrade in water. This is why even biodegradable soaps should be used at least 200 feet away from water sources in order to prevent pollution. Wash your boat with a brush and lake water (this is a great way for the kids to help!) or move your boat away from shore (at least 200 feet) if a more intense cleaning is required. Standard dishwashing detergent is full of chemicals. Although phosphate content is now regulated to 0.5%, any phosphates in the water can promote algal bloom, increase weed growth and kill fish. Phosphates are also contained in lawn fertilizer, which should never be used on properties on our lake. Conventional laundry detergents contain chemicals called phthalates which are suspected hormone disrupters. These chemicals can mimic the female hormone estrogen, and have reproductive effects on aquatic animals. When phthalates buildup in the environment, they are toxic to aquatic organisms.

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How to tell if lake foam is natural or harmful: Natural foam: • appears as light tan or

brown in color, but may be white • smells earthy, fishy or

has fresh cut grass odor • can occur over large

areas and accumulate in large amounts, especially on windward shores, in coves and eddies • dissipates fairly quickly,

except when agitated (as in high wind conditions)

Unnatural foam from human activity: • appears white in color • gives off a fragrant,

perfumed or soapy odor • usually occurs over small

area, localized near source of discharge

Remember, even though waste water runs first to your septic system, it eventually filters through and make its way to the lake. To keep lake water safe, please opt for detergents and soaps that do not contain phosphates, fragrance, sodium laurel sulfate (SLS) or triclosan. Triclosan, found in hand sanitizers, most hand soaps and even toothpaste, is extremely toxic to aquatic life. Castile soap, made from plant oils is readily available in health food stores, and the green section of grocery stores. It is an effective, inexpensive, all-purpose cottage cleaner for scrubbing hair, bodies, dogs, babies, floors, counters, and pretty much anything that needs cleaning. I have found that it is not great as a dish soap, so prefer to use eco-friendly soaps such as Seventh Generation, Ecover or Method (to name just a few). All of these companies have full product lines that are readily available. There is no perfect soap, but just a bit of research will allow you pick one that works for you and is a better choice for our lake. When making your selections, a great rule of thumb is: “If you wouldn’t drink it, don’t put it in the lake.” Thank you for helping to preserve our lake! Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Bowes & Cocks Limited, Brokerage Bancroft Office

Bev McCaw Broker / Manager

613-334-5316 (Call or Text)

bevmccaw@gmail.com

www.sellbancroft.com Buying or Selling? Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

e lm l a C t! Firs

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Memories Treasured - Lessons Learned By Nancy Cornish (daughter of the late Bram Reed, cottage 201 Reed Island) My first memory of Lake Weslemkoon comes from the winter of 1953-54. As we drove on to the lake at Camp Dardanella (now Hidden Cove Cottages), my dad instructed us to roll down our windows so that we had an easy escape if the car went through the ice on our drive to our island in Squally Bay and the newly built log cabin that awaited us there. For the children, the excitement and anticipation were greater than any fear we might have felt, though I’m not sure that my mom felt the same way. We reached the cabin safely and ate Mom’s hot stew sitting on piles of lumber in front of the wood stove. This was my introduction to one of the most wonderful places and ongoing parts of my life. The memories of more than 60 years at Weslemkoon are too numerous to record and too rich to do them justice on paper. Here are just a few.

Memory

Memory

Memory

The simplest events at the cabin always seemed special. I remember how excited my brother and sister and I would be when the plan for the evening was for our whole family to row around to the back of our island into Beaver Bay (on the shore of Picnic Island) to watch the beavers going in and out of their lodge, creating a ‘V’ in the water as they carried the freshly cut salad supplies for their evening meal in their mouths. Of course, every outing was made even more special by taking snacks or treats in the boat with us… but when we were beaverwatching, the snack choices were limited to oranges or bananas so that there was no noise from crinkly wrappers that would scare or distract the beavers and prevent them from giving us the grand finale we were waiting for – a loud smack of their tail on the water.

Another wonderful memory I continue to enjoy is of the clear nights when our family would lay on our backs on our rocky point, reclining against inner tubes and being soothed by the sound of the water lapping gently against the shoreline. Using a cardboard Star Finder, Dad helped us to locate and identify the Big and Little Dippers so that we could locate true north by the North Star and many other parts of the starry canopy above us.

One of the traditions associated with going to the cabin was taking special treats that we would not normally have at home. Bacon was one of those treats. I can still smell the aroma and hear the sizzling of the bacon cooking on the wood stove in the heavy old black cast iron frying pan while the eggs waited for their turn to be done over lightly or sunny side up, and as the toast was made on a vertical wire rack over the open flame.

Lesson Learned Regardless of age, much can be experienced and learned in silence by being still, quiet and patient, waiting and watching with great expectation for N a t u r e ’s u n a n n o u n c e d performances.

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Lesson Learned You don’t always need a compass to find your way. The North Star is located on the end of the handle of the Little Dipper which is directly above the two end stars of the bowl of the Big Dipper. If you locate the North Star, it is easier to orient yourself to your position, and the direction in which you need to go.

Memory

Memory

There were about 3 years between each of the 3 siblings in my family. While my older brother, younger sister and I rarely played together at home, at the cabin it was different. If we wanted companionship, we could not be choosy about its form. The three of us spent hours together, building forts in the woods, making boats from construction scraps and pulling them around the shoreline by a string attached to a stick. We played in the water for hours each day, and put on daily aquatic performances for Mom and Lesson Learned Simply put… Bacon always Dad who watched from their colourful Adirondack chairs tastes better at the cabin. at the top of the rock. In the evenings, under the light of The island and the cabin the coal oil Aladdin lamp, we have been a constant, a played Clue, Chinese solid anchor in my life. C h e c k e r s , S o r r y, a n d It has provided stability Careers, energized with Jiffy Pop popcorn and grape when so many other Freshie. We actually had fun situations, people, and together, and this special places have changed. It has been a safe haven, bonding between us that happened because we were at a ‘loyal friend”, and an the cabin eventually was exceptional classroom. carried over to some of our Being surrounded at the activities and interactions at lake by such incredible home.

natural beauty without distraction continues to make me more acutely aware of the presence of God, and of the reality of His awesome creation.

When the cabin was originally built, the kitchen was part of the main room. A few years later Dad and Mom decided to add a kitchen to the back of the cabin, but there was one significant hindrance… a huge rock that was too close to the cabin to blast away with dynamite. Rather than seeing this as an obstacle that would end the plans, it became a challenge to overcome. With an attitude of “if you can’t beat ’em , join ’em” and “where there’s a will there’s a way”, Dad built a stone wall up and over the rock, such that part of it was outside and the larger part was inside the kitchen, where it became an integral characteristic of the cabin. It was affectionately referred to as “the elephant”, and remains there today.

Lesson Learned

Having “an elephant in the room” is not necessarily a bad thing. Don’t let what appears to be an obstacle defeat you. Embrace the challenge, be enriched by Lesson Learned the satisfaction of your Sometimes l i f e ’ s accomplishment, and make circumstances reveal to us the experience part of the that some of our best friends tapestry of your life. are the ones we didn’t get to choose.

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Lake Events Weslemkoon has an active lake community for the young, the old, and everyone in between. ANNUAL PIG FEST Pam Lawton

TREASURE HUNT 2016 Janice Mackenzie

with the news – it’s not enough that the O’Rourke family runs the annual sailing regatta, now they get to run the treasure hunt as well!!

On September 3rd, approximately 20 families gathered at Tanglewood Marina for the annual th Saturday August 5 , 2016 was the day for the treasure hunt – this year run by Tim Bourne, 4th annual Lake Weslemkoon Pig Fest, hosted Rachael Russell, Maddy McGrath & Annie by Frank and Freda Smith. The Junior Loons Ross. It was a wedding theme, as Tim and Rachael were in the midst of planning their started off the afternoon with amazing faceown wedding (held on Thanksgiving painting and games, and then enjoyed the weekend). The weather was fine, the clues huge slide that was rented for the occasion. were well-hidden and both the live and visual Guests sat around, catching up on news and clues were fun and challenging enough to meeting new friends. We ate the gorgeous roasted pig, and were entertained by groups of slow some folks down. talented local musicians. Travelling home After the kids got their loot bags and a few under a fabulous Weslemkoon sunset was the draw prizes were given out, families enjoyed perfect end to a great night. a potluck dinner as well as Ralph’s hots and hams. It was a grand spread – lots of amazing Sadly however, attendance was down and the salads and desserts to try out. event didn’t break even, so it’s not certain that the tradition will continue. It’s a lot of work If you’ve never come to a Treasure Hunt for the Junior Loons leaders and helpers, and before, consider joining in next year. It’s for Frank and Freda Smith. We surely always on Labour Day Saturday. Sign up is at appreciate all the hard work put in by the Tanglewood Marina in August. $10.00/team. Smiths and the Junior Loons leaders, and are hoping that if there is enough interest they might reconsider hosting once again.
 The points were tallied and the big winners were announced: Gloria O’Rourke and her boyfriend Michael Spiess won by a slim margin of 2 points, ahead of the DeFreitas family who were THRILLED with the result!! The third place team of Marilyn and Kevin (Gloria’s mom and dad) was not as thrilled Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Sailing Regatta By Marilyn O’Rourke A big thank-you to the Sandifords for 
 hosting again! Weather: Mix of sun and cloud, winds medium to heavy from the east-southeast, resulting in waves of at least 30cm. Race Committee: Marilyn O’Rourke 2016 Sailing Regatta Results OVER Boat/Sail ALL Number 1st Laser 204077 2nd Albacore 7142 3rd Laser 134026 4th Wayfarer 4679 5th Albacore 7471

Brendan Aulthouse Kevin & Jimmy O’Rourke Peter Sandiford

Peter Sandiford, Christian Weber

We have seldom called a bad weather day since Weslemkoon mid-summer weather changes every few hours! After an afternoon of fun on the water, sailors and members of the cheering section assemble for refreshments, official results, awards and sociability.

March to see her newest grandson. In July, Jenny and Rich’s family came to the lake   to spend some quality time at the cottage, where grandma showed   the kids how to canoe, do a front flip off the dock (!), and love the environment. Daphne was bubbling with joy! Her second round of chemo began; there were complications,     and suddenly Daphne’s adventure was over. Our lady of the lake – the   optimist, the giver, the unselfish Daphne Nicholls:  
 leader and lover of life – was gone, and April 21, 1946 – Aug. 22, 2016 
 her loss made our lake swell with tears. By Pam Lawton Thank you, Daph, for leaving only Daphne was a passionate footsteps – and part of your soul at environmentalist, naturalist, artist, Weslemkoon. canoeist, trekker, leader and hostess. She loved teaching, mothering, reading, photography, music, sports and Bill Gunter April 10, 2016 travelling.

Lake Passings

Daphne had always dreamed of owning cottage on Lake Weslemkoon. That dream came true when she and Gord bought in 2003. They fit in to the lake family beautifully and were fabulous dinner hosts. They were ardent members of the LWCA: Daphne   (and Gord)   wrote book reviews (“Lake Land”); won photo contests (Easter Moon,   Snow Highway); wrote articles on lake flora; and led many of us on adventures – exploring natural water sources in new environments, Boats of all sizes and sailors with any paddling Aide’s Creek, and hiking to new level of experience are welcome. places (Pine Ridge), exploring   local Albacores and Lasers are the most artists’ studios.   common vessels, and absolutely no racing experience is required. This is a In 2015, Daphne was diagnosed with great way to learn some of the basics of cancer. After a successful first round of sailboat racing. chemotherapy she went to Sweden in 2017 Regatta Information The 2017 regatta will again be held on the Sunday of the August Civic Holiday Long Weekend (the date this year is August 6th). The land-based part of the event is held at cottage #820, where people typically arrive with their boats around 12:30. Racing general begins shortly after 1pm when the afternoon wind begins to pick up.

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Janet Foster (wife of Richard) #612 & #613 March 2017 Paul Reed (son of the late Bram and Eileen Reed, founders of #201) January 2017    Dianne Foley Harper   #343 Sandy Craig Peter Calambakas Christopher May Ray Eddington Rose Broad

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter


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Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Helping Others Operation Walk is a not-for-profit volunteer medical service organization that provides joint replacement surgery to patients in developing countries. Operation Walk Canada has been running missions to Guatemala since 2006 and Ecuador since 2008. Bob and Donna Bourne, residents of London, Ontario and long-time cottagers on Lake Weslemkoon, have been on every one of these twenty missions and have been the key elements that have made the missions such a success. Bob, a retired orthopaedic surgeon, looks after the medical side while Donna looks after all the planning and organization before, during and after the missions. Each mission is different, each is challenging to organize, each is endlessly rewarding, and each is exhausting! My husband Terry and I have been fortunate to take part in the missions to Cuenca, Ecuador in 2014 and 2016. This year, we were joined by Laurie Bourne, Bob and Donna’s daughter. In 2015, lake residents Joyce Mackenzie (Donna’s sister), Ellen Goldey and Byron McCane joined the mission. We were among the 40 or so volunteers that included surgeons, anesthesiologists, nurses, physiotherapists, translators (Spanish), representatives of Smith and Nephew (the medical supply " 18

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An orthopaedic medical mission to Ecuador — By Pam Boucher

company that donates the implants and loans the equipment used in the surgeries), the group from SPD (Sanitary Procedures Department) who wash and sanitize the surgical instruments after each operation, a pedorthist to work on adjusting shoes for patients, and a group of enthusiastic but medically unskilled volunteers… our group. I helped by working with the SPD team washing instruments

hospital stay and provides medical support after the mission ends. The surgeries done in Ecuador are challenging and complex total hip replacement procedures to treat developmental dysplasia of the hip (DDH). This condition is screened for in infants and easily treated in Canada but often left untreated in developing countries. It leaves people (mainly women)

This type of surgery would otherwise be unavailable for these patients and their gratitude was heart-warming and infinitely rewarding for all of us. and Terry assisted by portering patients to and from surgery, arranging for lunches and water, running errands and doing anything else that needed to be done… except operating on patients! Most of the team on this mission were from Ontario but each mission also includes a small team from the US, this time from Lima, Ohio. Another key member of the team is Dr. Manuel Avila, a local doctor in the Cuenca area who screens all the patients before the team arrives, assists patients and their families during their

with pain, osteoarthritis, hip deformity and uneven leg length. The surgery performed during the mission is life-altering for the patients. They can go from being significantly disabled to leading full and normal lives. An important aspect of the mission is providing education in Ecuador about DDH. On this trip Dr. Bob and another orthopaedic surgeon, John Gordon, stayed a few days afterwards to visit other hospitals and doctors to talk about how to prevent DDH in young children. During the 2016 mission, over 80

patients were assessed by the doctors with 27 surgeries performed over a period of four days. Patients stayed in the hospital for a few days to be monitored and to start the physiotherapy that is so important to their recovery. In Ecuador, families remain at the hospital to help the patient and the rooms and hallway were full with smiling, cheerful people who could not do enough to thank all members of the team. This type 
 of surgery would otherwise be unavailable for these patients 
 and their gratitude was heartwarming and infinitely rewarding for all of us. In addition to Bob and Donna, these life-changing missions are made possible by the volunteers who pay their own expenses, donors who contribute to Operation Walk, and sponsors such as Smith and Nephew. 
 For more information on the organization or to read more about the missions, go to www.operationwalk.ca. There 
 is much information about the organization, and some interesting articles and pictures that Donna has posted. Being part of a medical mission or contributing to one financially is a very rewarding experience, and a great way to “give back”.

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Photo Contest Winners!

LANDSCAPE – Second Place: Sunrise on West Bay. Gillian Stoker-Lavelle, Cottage 640

PEOPLE Breakfast Chef Gillian Stoker-Lavelle Cottage 640

PETS Labranoodling at Weslemkoon Lynne Vegter, Cottage 111 Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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Special Mention

WILDLIFE

I Love Winter Sooo Quiet Steve Blakeley Cottage 634

First Place: Loon Baby and Parent in Fall Mist Barry Evans Cottage 926

YOUNG PHOTOGRAPHER First Place: Dive Michael Raisanen Cottage 828 " 20

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YOUNG PHOTOGRAPHER Second Place: Flower Molly Henderson Cottage 15 Otter Lake

Thanks to all members who took the time to submit photos to this year’s contest. We love living (and re-living) your lake memories! Next year’s categories will stay the same, so keep your cameras and phones ready for the 2018 Photo Contest. Submissions to looncall.editor@gmail.com by December 31, 2017.

WINTER Sun Snow Lynne Vegter, Cottage 111

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Please join the LWCA directors in thanking our advertisers for their support this year: visit their stores, use their services and when you do, tell them that you saw their ad in the Loon Call. " 22

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Fitness Training Camp

LWCA AGM

Over the summer I’ll be sharing the training methods, techniques and nutrition tips that I’ve learned over the last few years

DATE: August 5, 2017

preparing for an Ironman. The training starts on the May long weekend and ends on Labour Day long weekend. It consists of

TIME: Meet & Greet at 9:30 am 
 Starts at 10:00

both theory and practice. All fitness levels

LOCATION: Tanglewood Marina

welcomed. Best suited to individuals who want before and after results. Send me an email if you’re interested and I’ll send details. Stuart (atawolf@speakeasy.org)

Quick Reference Calendar of Events SUNDAY

MONDAY

JUNE 25

2

9 Full Moon

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY

26 Did you know? Summer Solstice or Midsummer 3 falls on June 21st this summer and also marks the 10 longest day of the year.

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Day 2 - Jr. Loons Bat House Building 23

THURSDAY

FRIDAY 30

JULY 1

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28 29 The Delta Aquarids Meteor Shower is at its peak

2

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4 LWCA AGM 5 Meet & Greet 9:30am Starts at 10am

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12 Tree Health Inspection Hike 10am

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Did you know? Fishing season opens the 3rd Saturday in June this year.

Did you know? The meteors from the Perseids shower seem to come from the direction of the Perseus constellation in the northeastern part of the sky.

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AUGUST 1

6

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13 The Perseids Meteor Shower is at its peak

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Sailing Regatta 12:30pm

SATURDAY

Full Moon

Super Moon

Canada Day!

7 Jr. Loons Hike 1pm

Jr. Loons Bat House Building

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SEPTEMBER 1 2 Treasure Hunt 2pm Labour Day Tanglewood Marina

Please check the LWCA website www.weslemkoon.com and Facebook page closer to date for updates and rain dates for all events! " 24

Lake Weslemkoon Conservation Association Newsletter

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