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V OLUME 5

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U TA H C AT T L E M A N

S EEDSTOCK

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A special edition of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association official publication. www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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L Y M A N L I V E S T O C K C AT T L E M E N T O C AT T L E M E N B U LL S A LE • S AT U R DAY • F E B RUA RY 2 4 • 1 P M • • P RO D U C E R ’ S L I V E S TO C K M A R K E T • S A L I NA , U T •

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E RIC L YMAN • 801.310.1570 K EVIN L YMAN • 801.376.5774 M IKE LUYMAN • 801.404.0587 tah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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UTAH CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Serving Ranchers Since 1890

Table of Contents Working For You

UCA PRESIDENT Mark Wintch, Milford

BEING A LIFTER NOT A LEANER..................................8

1ST VICE PRESIDENT Tracy Hatch, Randolph

INCOMING NCBA PRESIDENT.................................. 26.

2ND VICE PRESIDENTS Daniel Crozier, Roosevelt Toby Hoffman, Thatcher Jeff Young, Henefer Immediate Past President Joe Fuhriman, Nibley Executive Vice President Brent Tanner Utah Beef Council Director of Marketing Jacob Schmidt, RDN The Utah Cattlemen’s Association works to represent cattlemen in the legislative arena, provide educational information and assist with networking opportunities. If you own cattle and are not a current member, checkout our member benefits by visiting www.utahcattlemen.org The Utah Cattleman newsletter is published monthly with this one-time annual publication published in February. This publication is sent to all UCA members and its affliates as part of their annual dues as well as prospective members of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association. For advertising inquiries in future issues of this publication or in upcoming newsletters, contact Brent Tanner at (801) 355-5748 or utahbeef@aol.com POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Utah Cattlemen’s Association 150 S 600 E, #10-B Salt Lake City, Utah 84102

WHAT DOES SUSTAINABILITY MEAN?...................16 50 YEARS OF PLC................................................................. 48. NEW FACE AT USU EXTENSION..................................72.

Interest & Education WINTCH EXPRESSES LOVE OF LIFESTYLE..............12 ANGUS: DO YOU UNDERSTAND EPDS?................ 22 AGRICULTURE SEES TAX REFORM............................. 32 HEREFORD: AHA RELEASES BOLT EPDS.................36 ELIASON SERVES IN NATIONAL CAPACITY.........42 SIMMENTAL: FEEDER PROFIT CALCULATOR......54 CELEBRATING MONUMENT REDUCTIONS........ 58 INVESTING IN COW FERTILITY................................64 USMEF GROWS OVERSEAS BEEF DEMAND..........68 WEANING METHODS TO REDUCE STRESS......... 76 GELBVIEH: KNOWLEDGE IS POWER........................84 BEEFMASTER: CROSSBREEDING DELIVERS.........90 WILL YOU BENEFIT FROM NEW TAX LAWS?......96 THE BASICS OF EMBRYO TRANSFER.....................100 INDEX OF ADVERTISERS...............................................104

(ISSN #3933) mailed from USPS facility in Jefferson City, Mo.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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FEBRUARY 2018


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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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FOOD FOR THOUGHT

Take Pride In Your Contributions By Utah Cattlemen’s Association Executive Vice President Brent Tanner

I

recently had the opportunity to spend a day traveling from one end of Utah to the other. Rather than take the well traveled interstate, I chose to take some back roads which led me through the heart of Utah. Generally, when I am traveling I am in a rush and busy worrying about the issues of the day. I forget to look around at where I am traveling. However, occasionally I do slow down enough to see the beauty of this great state. Most people admire our beautiful landscape. Majestic mountains, colorful rock formations, and even the unique salt flats make our state a great place to travel. But on this particular day, it wasn’t the land formations that caught my attention. As I drove from community-to-community and valley-to-valley, what caught my eye was the influence that farms and ranches have on towns and counties. Each town that I approached was surrounded by farms and ranches. It made me reflect on the meeting I had just attended where some folks were proposing political strategies that could put a lot of these farmers and ranchers out of business. I thought to myself as I went through each valley, “What if these farmers and ranchers were to go away? What would become of this community?’ As I passed through each town, my mind drew up the people of that community that I know. Most of these towns are highly influenced by the good agriculture folks that live there. In most towns throughout Utah you don’t have to look too far to see ranchers who have taken time away from their businesses to serve on the city council, county commission, the volunteer fire department, coach the local ball team, teach in the school, volunteer on local boards and committees, or any number of other community services. The Bible speaks of “going about doing good.” Our ranchers are frequently found, going about doing good in their communities. I am not much of a betting man. But if I were, I would bet that on average, ranchers and farmers do a lot more for their local communities than the average citizen. It infuriates me when I see groups with political agendas trying to destroy agriculture and the good people who make it their livelihood. I doubt seriously if they know the rippling impact that it would have on communities. Glen Larsen, a well know rancher in the Leland area of Utah County and past president of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association, before his passing in 2011 would often quote from memory a poem penned by Ella

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

Wheeler Wilcox titled “Two Kinds of People.” I wish I was as talented as Glen and could quote it from memory, but the message sticks with me daily. As I made my way through each community, I was proud to say that a lot of the “lifters” in that area are cattlemen and cattlewomen. The “leaners” should be

Two Kinds of People

There are two kinds of people on earth today, Two kinds of people no more I say. Not the good or the bad, for its well understood, The good are half bad, the bad are half good. Not the happy or sad, for in the swift-flying years, Bring each man his laughter, each man his tears. Not the rich or the poor, for to count a man’s wealth, You must know the state of his conscience and health. Not the humble and proud, for in life’s busy span, Who puts on vain airs is not counted a man. No! The two kinds of people on earth I mean, Are the people who lift, the people who lean. Wherever you go you’ll find the world’s masses Are ever divided into these two classes. And, strangely enough, you will find, too, I mean, There is only one lifter to twenty who lean. In which class are you? Are you easing the load Of the overtaxed lifters who toiled down the road? Or are you a leaner who lets others bear, Your portion of worry and labor and care?

grateful for the impact that agriculture folks have on their local towns, counties, and even throughout the state. You can each be very proud of the impact you have on your local area. I want to take this opportunity to say, “Thank you.” Thank you for the extra effort you make on behalf of others. I especially want to thank those who take the time to volunteer for the Utah Cattlemen’s Association. Your leaders put in a lot of time and effort to lift the livestock industry.

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


Tattoo 7003 7061 754Z 7054 7055 7065 7071 742X 750X 767Y 791Y 796Y 7106 7010 7012 7019 7024 734Y 7459 7547 4066 7042 7056 7073 7079 7085 7130 7135 778Y 7143A 5036 7036 7094 7745 783Y 7002 7021 7035 7053 7060 7069 7139

Sire HA Cowboy Up 5405 HA Cowboy Up 5405 HA Cowboy Up 5405 Koupal Advance 28 Koupal Advance 28 Koupal Advance 28 Koupal Advance 28 Koupal Advance 28 Koupal Advance 28 Koupal Advance 28 Koupal Advance 28 Koupal Advance 28 Bruns Thunderbolt 963 Connealy Guinness Connealy Guinness Connealy Guinness Connealy Guinness Connealy Guinness Connealy Guinness Connealy Guinness Sitz Final Statement 8624 Sitz Final Statement 8624 Sitz Final Statement 8624 Sitz Final Statement 8624 Sitz Final Statement 8624 Sitz Final Statement 8624 Sitz Final Statement 8624 Sitz Final Statement 8624 Sitz Final Statement 8624 Sitz Final Statement 8624 Musgrave Big Sky Musgrave Big Sky Musgrave Big Sky Musgrave Big Sky Musgrave Big Sky Gaffney Game Time 370 Gaffney Game Time 370 Gaffney Game Time 370 Gaffney Game Time 370 Gaffney Game Time 370 Gaffney Game Time 370 Gaffney Game Time 370

Dam’s Sire CED BW WW YW Milk $EN 21AR Coal Bank C014 9 -0.1 59 103 14 -0.86 Mercer Vanguard 751 8 0.6 54 101 18 -2.67 S A V Final Answer 0035 11 0 67 117 17 -5.51 HA Windy 3410 8 1.4 61 102 28 -17.94 SITZ Logic Y46 11 0.1 56 97 28 -15.77 G A R Predestined 11 1.2 62 105 29 -16.21 KCC Werner Wall Street 1666 9 1.2 62 99 29 -14.38 KCC Right Time 57 11 -0.2 64 101 29 -13.89 S A V Bismarck 5682 8 1.7 69 112 30 -25 KCC Right Time 57 13 -1 68 107 31 -19.81 KCC Right Time 57 10 0.8 61 102 28 -17.94 KCC Werner Wall Street 1666 11 1 62 107 29 -21.45 Sitz Upward 10409 8 1.1 57 99 30 -19.29 Connealy Courage 25L 9 1.1 56 100 26 -14.45 SITZ Logic Y46 2 2.4 55 100 28 -17.07 S A V Final Answer 0035 7 1.1 55 97 30 -15.69 KCC Lunch Box 9740 4 1.8 57 94 26 -11.85 S A V Final Answer 0035 7 1.1 58 97 31 -17.14 Rito 2B94 of Rita 6K20 BW 6 1.4 58 97 32 -18.85 S A V Final Answer 0035 7 1.5 61 110 21 -4.92 Sitz Upward 10409 11 0.3 64 116 31 -28.12 SITZ Logic Y46 9 0.1 52 104 27 -17.5 S A V Registry 2831 10 0.5 57 106 27 -18.38 KCC Upward 328X 8 1 61 111 30 -24.56 S A V Registry 2831 7 1.2 58 107 27 -18.82 KCC Game Day 2601 7 0.9 57 104 26 -16.19 KCC Game Day 2601 9 0.5 71 126 28 -28.62 KCC Game Day 2601 8 0.5 56 101 27 -16.19 KCC Right Time 57 14 -2.2 65 117 28 -19.61 KCC Right Time 0740 10 0.3 65 114 26 -20.61 HA Windy 3344 3 3.7 57 99 25 -12.72 Cole Creek Black Cedar 46P 10 0.1 61 97 27 -14.45 KCC Game Day 2601 6 1.9 57 93 25 -10.13 Rito 2B94 of Rita 6K20 BW 12 -0.4 51 93 26 -10.77 KCC Right Time 57 9 0.8 62 108 26 -16.24 SITZ Logic Y46 2 4 58 104 29 -16.05 SITZ Logic Y46 7 1.9 53 99 31 -16.22 SITZ Logic Y46 8 0.9 59 102 27 -16.62 SITZ Logic Y46 6 2.1 55 99 27 -15.32 S A V Registry 2831 6 1.9 65 107 25 -16.22 S A V Registry 2831 5 2.4 56 96 23 -8.86 KCC Right Time 0740 3 2.7 60 97 24 -10.57

$W 44 43 59 60 57 66 68 74 69 80 61 61 58 52 49 58 54 64 64 57 63 46 53 59 53 52 66 53 70 61 45 63 53 50 60 51 55 57 49 60 47 53

$B 124 130 134 104 104 115 101 93 109 113 102 104 125 120 123 118 104 117 130 152 125 103 116 123 135 122 124 117 128 121 113 90 104 123 125 124 129 129 107 111 122 108


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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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FAMILY, FRIENDS AND THE FUTURE OF AGRICULTURE

UCA President shares passion of the industry for success of upcoming generations By Aubree Thomas for the Utah Cattlemen’s Association

T

he ranching lifestyle is a family affair for the newly-elected Utah Cattlemen’s Association President Mark Wintch. Through pulling long hours and working side-by-side with his family, Wintch is doing his part to carry on a century-long family tradition of caring for the land and livestock. Wintch calls the small town of Milford home. Located within the rural town is an even more isolated valley where Wintch and his family are the only residents. Wintch’s commercial cattle operation was first acquired by his family in 1896 and has been operating ever since. Along with his father and brother, Wintch runs 1,200 head of Hereford and Angus crossed cattle on private, federal and forest service ground. “Ranching is something that I love, it’s something that I know, and it’s been a good way to grow up and raise my family,” Wintch said. “I think that is what you get out of it. The best thing about ranching is that you have the opportunity to work with your children and get to know them on a personal level and they get to know you the same way, too.” Raising cattle isn’t an easy task, but ask any rancher and they will tell you the benefits of ranching far outweigh the costs. While living in an area where your closest neighbor is 25 miles away may seem lonely, Wintch said the benefits of living in a rural area extend well outside the realm of ranching.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

“The reason I love small towns and the rural way of life is because my kids can go do whatever they want to do,” Wintch said. “The people in my community know my kids and my kids know them. They have opportunities to serve in church, they can play any sport they want to play. If they want to be in the band, they can be. It’s all of the things everybody wants, but we actually get to do them.” Those with land and livestock are quick to note there is no such thing as a typical day on the ranch. Everyday is different, depending on the day and season, and daily tasks can range anywhere from fencing to weaning calves. This unique aspect is one of the things Wintch said he enjoys the most. “A typical day on the ranch starts out with a plan that is usually scratched by 8:30 in the morning,” Wintch laughed. “That’s one of the things I love most about my job is that everyday isn’t the same.” Ranching is truly a labor of love and it takes a special kind of person to dedicate their lives to raising cattle. Despite the work required, ranching is filled with many

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“If you’re not at the table, you are on the table and that is why we need more members to get involved in helping make decisions for the future of the ranching way of life.”

– Mark Wintch

fond memories, but perhaps none fonder for Wintch than those of the yearly spring and fall round-ups. Wintch described the round-ups as a way for family and friends to spend time and work together. In the fall, it involves riding mountain pastures to round up the cattle. In the spring, family comes together to brand calves and move them over 155 miles. Each round-up ends with a celebratory meal, which Wintch said is the perfect time to catch up and renew relationships. Those moments, along with the relationships made, are a big reason why Wintch stayed in the ranching business. “Ninety percent of ranching is work that people don’t like to do, but the other 10 percent of it is pure passion for what people love. That’s it for me,” Wintch said. “I don’t like fixing fence, I don’t like breaking ice, but I do it because of the fall and spring round-up, and all the other fun and rewarding benefits that come along with it.” With his family heritage, Wintch is no stranger to being involved in the beef industry. Participating in the UCA is something that was passed down to him from his father, and is a tradition he looks forward to passing onto the next generation. “About 20 years ago, my dad told me, ‘I’m old, my ideas are old and it’s time for somebody to go and enjoy being a member of the association and form friendships,’” Wintch said. “He basically just told me that I was going, and I have been going since.” Working with the UCA, Wintch said, has been a great experience and is something he looks forward to continuing both throughout his presidency and once his term is through. “There are just some great people that I have been involved with and been able to learn things from who do things maybe just a little bit differently than I have,” Wintch said, “I’ve been able to hear other people’s ideas and I’ve got to say that I have really enjoyed it.”

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

As UCA’s president for the next two years, Wintch wants to focus on government overreach and support producers who are facing this problem. Roughly twothirds of Utah’s land is federally owned and Wintch is intimately familiar with the challenges this can cause cattle producers. “One of the major issues that I have been involved with, because we do run on federal land, is issues with sage grouse and wild horses,” Wintch said. “We have a big wild horse problem on our ranch, and it is always an issue we are dealing with. I don’t know if any of those will actually be dealt with or finalized during my presidency, but I want to continue to be involved that way.” Wintch also places a heavy emphasis on promoting the beef industry and protecting the producers. The industry is constantly changing, and while Wintch doesn’t know exactly what those changes will entail, he is ready to accept technology that will improve the industry and make it better for both the rancher and the consumer. “I think promoting the industry is something that is very important. As fast as technology is changing, there is going to be some significant changes made regarding the beef industry and cattlemen,” Wintch said. “For example, consumers are wanting to trace back their animals as they are standing at the meat counter, like they can in Japan. That is intriguing, yet scary, but I look forward to embracing all the technologies that will make our industry better.” When asked what advice he would give to Utah cattle producers, Wintch simply encouraged all producers to get involved, become a driver in the industry and take advantage of the benefits the UCA has to offer. “There is a saying in Washington, D.C., that I like and is frequently repeated. It says, ‘If you’re not at the table, you are on the table,’ and that is why we need more ...Continued on page 14

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...Continued from page 13 members to get involved in helping make deisions for the future of the ranching way of life. It would really help if people would come and be at the table to help us make those big decisions. To have a voice in a political realm is one of the major reasons, and is a huge factor, in why to be involved,” Wintch said. According to Wintch, the three major reasons why cattle producers should become members of the UCA are friendships, knowledge and involvement. “The biggest reason is to create friendships, associations, and learn things you can take back to your own operation,” Wintch said. “I would say that aspect is first and foremost. I used to think that was about third on the list, but the older I have gotten, the more important relationships have become to me.” The UCA is the only association in the state, and Wintch said they try to represent both members and non-members alike. Additionally, he stressed the importance of being available to members, especially if they have any questions, concerns or comments. “Pick up the phone and give me a call,” Wintch said. “I’m more than happy to listen to someone’s concerns. If you are facing a particular issue, we’d love to come as a

board and lend our support to anyone that we can.” Wintch said the face of agriculture is changing ranchers are becoming older, operations are smaller and politicians with less of an agricultural background are making important decisions regarding the industry. Wintch said this has an effect on the cattlemen’s membership and will change how he plans on reaching out to members. “It has become more and more difficult to reach out to people, especially the younger generation that is younger than I am,” he said. “We are going to have to do some changing, and, for example, we are going to have to adapt to get people who only have a few cows to come and join the association. Their voice is important as well.” Most of all, Wintch said he is honored to play a role in preserving the lifestyle he loves and sees as the key to America’s success. “I believe rural communities are the heartbeat of America by far,” Wintch said. “This is where our values, and our love of country and our love of God comes from. These rural communities are where people work hard and basically earn their bread by the sweat of their brow, not necessarily through desk jobs. They are just truly good, down-home people.”

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Private Treaty at the Ranch 14

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


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Sire: Woodside Rito 4P26 of 0242 • Dam: Riverbend Blackcap B1486 MGS: Riverbend Power Plant CED +12; BW +1.7; WW +79; YW +132; Milk +36 CW +70; MARB +.73; RE +.46; FAT +.079 $W +92.52; $F +84.48; $G +22.41; $B +150.53

Selling Sons of these Breed Leading Sires! Payweight 1682, Rito 4P26, Fortress Y331, Peerless 0016, Brigham C662, Jennings Z064, Rampage 0A36, Index 3282, Ingenuity 2623, Montana 104, Journey 1X74 and Ten X 5006B

OFFERING OVER 500 HEAD 250 FALL YEARLING BULLS 250 SPRING YEARLING BULLS 2880 N 55 W • IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO 83402 • 208-528-6635 Frank and Belinda VanderSloot | Owners Rhett Jacobs | General Manager | 208-681-9841 Dale Meek | Purebred Operations Manager | 208-681-9840 Chris Howell | Director of Customer Service | 208-681-9821 SALE MANAGEMENT 517.546.6374 www.cotton-associates.com

CALL 208-528-6635 OR E-MAIL BULLS@RIVERBENDRANCH.US TO BE PLACED ON OUR MAILING LIST

www.riverbendranch.us Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

15


THE “S” WORD

defining sustainability By Utah Beef Council Director of Marketing Jacob Schmidt, RDN

S

ustainability is something generated greenhouse gas (GHG) that has been discussed in emissions. However, this misses the media for several years an important part of the story. now, and it looks like we will see that What kind of positive impact does continue in the future. Sustainability something have on the economy and can be tricky to define. the environment? There are many factors that come In 2014 an economic analysis of into play, which makes it difficult to beef cattle production found that the nail down a definition that everyone beef cattle production and processing can agree upon. The classic definition industry directly contributed to refers to meeting the needs of the the employment of nearly 883,000 present without compromising workers across the United States. the needs of future generations. This resulted in more than $27 Today we see products, industries, billion dollars in labor income and and even ways of life receiving the $58 billion in value added to the U.S. label of being either sustainable or economy. unsustainable. The environmental When indirect and induced issues surrounding sustainability are impacts are added, the cattle very complex, and come with no easy industry’s total contributions to answers. the economy more than double to Who gets to decide whether almost 2.1 million jobs, $92 billion something is sustainable or not? in income and $165 billion in value Who gets to label the cattle industry? added. Meaning each cattle job It is critical that we share the beef generated almost 1.4 jobs in other story and not let others label the beef industries. Each $1 of cattle industry industry for us. labor income led to the creation of Beef has a positive sustainability story to tell. As a beef producer, you have a balancing act to perform with environmental responsibility, economic opportunity, and social diligence, while meeting the growing global demand for beef. This is no small task, and many improvements have been made over the years. Sustainability should be viewed and measured by continuous improvement. We usually only see one side of the story when sustainability is discussed. The focus is typically on how many resources are www.beefresearch.org used, or the impact of Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 16

over $2 in labor income elsewhere. Finally, each $1 generated by the cattle industry led to over $1.90 added value somewhere else in the economy. This is a very positive story to tell. Another factor often left out of the discussion is food waste. Food waste continues to be a problem here in the U.S. with 30 to 40 percent of the food supply being wasted2. Reducing food waste is one of the most impactful steps anyone can take to reduce their impact on the environment. Food that doesn’t get eaten wastes resources, and ends up in a landfill. Solid waste landfills are the number one source of methane emissions in the United States. Not to mention, that food waste costs the average American family $2,500 a year! Beef is one of the least wasted commodities produced in the U.S., ...Continued on page 18

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

17


...Continued from page 16 with around 20 percent of edible product going to waste. Sustainability could be improved by 10 percent simply cutting that waste in half. The Beef Checkoff introduced a food waste challenge last year that raised awareness and introduced simple changes to fight food waste. The Utah Beef Council will be joining with the Utah Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics (UAND) in promoting the food waste challenge for National Nutrition Month® in March. The theme this year is “Go Further with Food.” It encourages us to achieve the numerous benefits healthy eating habits offer, but it also urges us to find ways to cut back on food waste. Both UAND and the Utah Beef Council will promote the food waste challenge on social media and with other partners. The end goal in mind will be to draw attention to the problem of food waste and highlight ways that we can improve. UAND holds an annual meeting for more than 250 dietitians in the state. Using beef checkoff funds, the Utah Beef Council and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA), will be sponsoring a title presentation at this year’s annual meeting on beef sustainability. Sara Place, Senior Director of Sustainable Beef Production Research at NCBA, will speak on where beef fits in a sustainable future. Climate change is usually part of the sustainability conversation.

Multiple polls taken in 2017 reflect that more than 50 percent of Americans are concerned about climate change. One common suggestion in this discussion is to reduce meat consumption, especially beef. This issue is one that we have to face head on, and ensure that the correct information is being shared. Through this presentation, dietitians will be able to hear from one of the experts and be able to pass this information on to those they work with and teach. In just six years, the beef supply chain has improved its overall sustainability by 5 percent. It has Food Waste Infographic.pdf 1 3/2/2017 3:55:56 PM

also improved its environmental and social sustainability by 7 percent. Most of these improvements are from more efficient utilization of resources and a result of using manure to fertilize crop lands. There is no question that you want to do what is best for your cattle and the environment, while being as economically sustainable as possible. The Beef Checkoff is working to share that message, which allows people to feel good about eating the beef that they love. You can find additional information or resources on beef sustainability at beefresearch. org.

SIMPLE CHANGES,

BIG IMPACT. Food waste by the numbers

Did you know... C

M

Y

CM

MY

CY

CMY

K

Cattle help mitigate food waste by eating things like beet tops and bruised and misshapen vegetables.* Join the

Food Waste Challenge and share ideas and images of your commitment to fight food waste.

#WasteLess BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com/foodwastechallenge.aspx FactsAboutBeef.com

* From farm to fork to farm: Recycling grocery food waste into cattle feed, The University of Georgia College of Agricultural & Environmental Sciences, 2012

18

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


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Ideal for animals under stress, breeding stock, young calves and show cattle. Comes in steel or plastic.

Omega-lyx 12% Contains Omega-3 fatty acids. Ideal for bulls or females in preparation for breeding. Comes in steel.

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UNDERSTANDING EPDS what the numbers mean and how they will help your operation from Certified Angus Beef For some producers, understanding and implementing expected progeny differences (EPDs) is second nature, but for the majority, the waters are still murky at best. This article aims to help commercial cattlemen have a better understanding of EPDs and how they should use them when selecting bulls that will complement their cowherd and improve their calf crop year after year. Selecting for any one trait while ignoring others does not lead to a commercially successful livestock production. The key is balance in selecting for all traits that affect profit, both short- and long-term. However, balance need not mean “equal.” Strong selection pressure can be put on a few traits that greatly improve Certified Angus Beef ® acceptance rates without compromising other areas. UNDERSTANDING EPDS Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs) aren’t just for seedstock cattle producers. They comprise a useful tool that you should use every time you buy breeding stock for your commercial cow herd, and maybe even when you buy steers to feed. In concept, EPDs are the expected differences in performance and carcass quality of an animal’s sons or daughters, compared to a “zero base” that relates to foundation stock or a standard data year.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

Commercial cows generally do not have known EPDs, but that shouldn’t prevent producers from using EPDs effectively. After all, sire selection affects half the genetics of your calves, and you can shop for bred replacement females based partly on their sire EPDs. Evaluate what your records tell you is needed to complement the maternal base. Here are a couple examples to help illustrate how reading EPDs can impact your herd: Consider Bull A with a +40 EPD for weaning weight and Bull B at +20. On average, you can expect calves from Bull A to wean 20 lb. heavier than those from Bull B. Consider Bull C with a marbling EPD of –0.20 units, and Bull D at +0.20 units. On the average, calves would differ by a marbling score of 0.40. Is that important? Yes, because many of your calves can end up near the Choice-Select line of 5.0, or the premium Choice line of 6.0. EPD traits are correlated to high, medium or low degrees, positively or negatively, and with accuracy from a high of .99 (time proven) to less than .40 (best guess). ...Continued on page 24

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


EASIER CALVING. MORE GROWTH. BETTER MARBLING.

USDA analysis shows the superiority of Angus at every stage.

That’s the power of the reliable, registered Angus bull.

BREED

BW

YW MARB

Angus

1.3 5.6 1.2 5.1

91 50 53 80

Hereford Red Angus Simmental

0.59 -0.22 0.18 -0.20

Average 2014-born bulls, adj. to Angus base, U.S. Meat Animal Research Center Across-breed EPD Adjustments, BIF 2016. b Here’s the Premium study, 2014, Certified Angus Beef LLC c Packer Premium Survey, 2015, Certified Angus Beef LLC a

Some breeds talk about superior genetic merit. Registered Angus bulls prove it. They simply outperform the competition in calving ease, growth and marbling, according to USDA research.a That’s proof that the registered Angus bull you purchase comes with power and predictability, backed by a better balance of the traits you need to get profitable results. www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

An extensive, multi-year study shows Angus calves earn you more at sale time than similar calves of all other breeds – nearly $7/cwt.b more, on average. In fact, packers pay Angus producers $1 million in premiums per week.c

To subscribe to the Angus Journal®, call 816.383.5200. Watch The Angus Report 7:30 a.m. CST every Monday on RFD-TV.

That’s a lot of value brought to you by reliable, registered Angus bulls. Anything else is just hype.

ANGUS MEANS BUSINESS.

3201 Frederick Ave. | St. Joseph, MO 64506 www.ANGUS.org © 2017-2018 American Angus Association®

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

23


,,,Continued from page 22 When one trait is negatively correlated to another it means that, on the average, the value of that second trait will decrease as the value of the first increases. This is often called antagonism, and has been used as a reason to ignore or choose between certain traits in selection, but that can be a mistake. Today, EPDs are backed by more data than ever before. Many registered Angus breeders are using DNA to produce genomically-enhanced EPDs, which are especially helpful in cultivating more information on younger animals. The American Angus Association is leading the industry, showing how DNA can be incorporated into a whole suite of selection information. Always remember the EPD toolbox is all about averages: There are often individual sires that defy antagonisms and allow selection for several traits simultaneously. That allows for real progress and greater consistency in the beef supply. EPD RECOMMENDATIONS TO HELP YOU GET TO CAB-QUALITY GENETICS Below are general recommendations for selecting a herd bull or AI sire to target a quality endpoint of the Certified Angus Beef ® brand. When choosing sires that are right for your herd, it is important to consider marketing goals in addition to economically relevant traits. Using EPDs, you can select sires to compliment your maternal goals without sacrificing the ability to improve carcass merit of calves not retained on the ranch. Targeting the Brand recommendations are breed average

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

or better for marbling EPD and $ Grid of non-parent Angus sires. Actual EPD minimums are below, and are based on percentiles from the Spring 2018 Angus Sire Summary. A note on the accuracy (ACC) of EPDs or the reliability that can be placed on the EPD: When this number is close to 1.0, you can be more confident of the results in the next generation. The number of progeny and ancestral records in the database, along with genomic testing results, largely determine accuracy. When selecting an AI sire, consider utilizing bulls with high-accuracy carcass EPDs. When purchasing a herd sire, consider those that have been DNA tested and have genomic enhanced EPDs–as they will have greater accuracies. DNA SELECTION First there was eye appeal, then breeding values and sire summaries. Now expected progeny differences (EPDs) are the basis of many genetic decisions, but DNA technology is opening a whole new horizon of opportunities. The use of genomics testing for DNA markers can make EPDs more reliable and maximize the value of an animal’s genetic profile. “Integrity of pedigree is everything,” says Kevin Millner of Zoetis. “Genomics testing does not replace EPDs; it enhances them.” Purebred breeders aren’t the only ones who can benefit from the technology. Tests, made up of many of the “snips” (from SNPs, single-nucleotide polymorphisms), are being developed for everything from feed efficiency to carcass quality. Today, DNA technology is available to commercial Angus cattlemen with GeneMax™, a DNA tool to measure gain and grade in high-percentage Angus cattle. It’s designed to help identify females with the genetic potential to pass on the most profitable traits and select feeder cattle with the most potential to perform on the grid.

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


Adams Acres Fortress 0340 02-10-16

Sire: KCF Bennett Fortress, BW 76 , WW 765 , Ratio 103

Adams Acres Reputation 510 12/31/16 Sire: Sitz Reputation 689C, BW 83 , WW 814 , Ratio 110

#18748103 BW WW YW SC Doc Milk Marb RE $W $F $B -.1 +69 +108 +.73 +10 +28 +.34 +.44 +77.37 +52.30 +101.51

Rimrock Journeyman 02/08/2017 Sire: WR Journey-1X74, BW 91 , WW 832

#18886179 BW WW YW SC Doc Milk Marb RE $W $F $B +1.5 +69 +121 +.89 +11 +32 +.62 +.68 +78.46 +82.43 +143.83

WBVB BL Dragnet 664D 08-26-2016 Sire: Connealy Power Surge 3115, BW 80, WW 754, PAP: 41

#LFM2121228

#18515871 BW WW YW Milk Marb +3.1 +67 +108 +23 .57

RE $W $F $B I+.15 +64.41 +81.99 +194.99

CED +12

BW WW YW MK CEM SC DOC 0.2 +75 +121 +29 +6 +1.38 +19


A GLIMPSE OF THE FUTURE By 2018 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association President Kevin Kester

t

radition and heritage, the annual Cattle Industry Convention provides a welcome glimpse of the future. Cattlemen and women gather to talk about the latest trends. Exhibitors showcase the newest innovations. For NCBA, leadership changes guard and policy committees meet to chart the course forward. As I look ahead to 2018, I am honored to serve as your President. My friend and fellow producer Craig Uden led NCBA and our industry through a successful 2017. I am lucky to be taking the reins with a strong foundation and positive momentum. My term may only be one year, but my ultimate goal is to help position our industry for success over the next 100. The importance of ensuring our industry’s vibrancy for generations to come struck me during a recent trip to NCBA’s Washington, D.C. office. A photo displayed in the

study captures a session of the 1918 American National Livestock Association Annual Convention. Convention that year was in Salt Lake City, and one can detect both optimism and steely resolve in the faces of the attendees seated in an elaborate meeting hall. The topics of conversation were undoubtedly different a century ago. The horrors of the first World War would have been fresh on the minds of the men and women in the room. Feuds with railroad companies and uncontrollable animal diseases were endemic. With the benefit of hindsight, we can see the advances that allowed our industry to thrive over the last 100 years. Back then, such a future would have seemed far from certain. Today our industry faces a whole new set of challenges. Yet like our industry forefathers, we share a commitment to meeting the challenges head-on and banding together to find common solutions. That is what Convention is all about. All of us in the industry have a role to play in our future success. As we gather in Phoenix for the 121st Cattle Industry Convention and NCBA Trade Show, whether you attend or not, I encourage you to reflect on the contribution you can make by considering three questions. How can I make my voice heard on policy matters? Those of us who live and breathe farming and ranching understand how policies at the national, state, and local levels impact our operations. For almost everyone else, production agriculture is out

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

of sight, and out of mind. Unless we make the effort to speak up and advocate for ourselves, others will dominate the political dialogue. Through our various cattlemen’s associations, we can amplify our voices and find strength in numbers. If you are already a member, try recruiting a friend or neighbor who is not. Donating to the NCBA Political Action Committee is another impactful way to support the voice of beef in the political process. How can I support the next generation of producers? Much as we may want to, we cannot run our operations forever. Attracting and developing the next generation of cattlemen and women is key for ensuring the long-term success of our industry and heritage. We can all think of a mentor who played a key role in our personal growth as ranchers and businessmen. It is our duty to give back as mentors in the manner we had people help us. When future generations look back at this moment in our industry’s history, what will our legacy be? My hope is that we are remembered as the producers who helped navigate an increasingly challenging business and political climate with courage and smarts. By working together, we can protect our right to raise safe, wholesome, high-quality beef for families around the world to enjoy. Here is to the next 100 years of a vibrant beef cattle industry. I look forward to working with each of you to make sure future generations have the chance to be successful. Please know that my door is always open. VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


Selling 300 Yearling Angus Bulls Selling sons of SITZ Asset 402C, Koupals B&B Atlas 4061, Raven Powerball 53, KM Broken Bow, EF Commando, Quaker Hill Rampage and SAV Resource

Wednesday, March 14, 2018 | Dillon, MT | 12:30 PM (MDT) Broadcast on DISH Channel 998 / NorthernLivestock.com

SITZ Atlas 744E AAA# 18741039 Sire: Koupals B&B Atlas 4061 MGS: SITZ Investment 660Z

SITZ Powerball 737E AAA# 18741037 Sire: Raven Powerball 53 MGS: SITZ Investment 660Z CED BW 6 1.1

WW 74

YW SC Milk Marb REA $W $B 119 1.48 39 .95 .47 95.27 137.84

SITZ Commando 689E AAA# 18746789 Sire: EF Commando 1366 MGS: Nichols Extra K205 CED BW 7 1.8

YW SC Milk Marb REA $W $B 112 .65 32 0.72 0.70 79.5 139.89

WW YW SC Milk Marb REA $W $B 55 106 1.43 26 0.30 0.38 60.03 110.82

SITZ Asset 479E AAA# 18819580 Sire: SITZ Asset 402C MGS: Connealy Final Product CED BW 1 2.3

WW YW SC Milk Marb REA $W $B 73 126 .63 24 0.31 0.73 65.66 134.81

CED BW 11 0.7

WW 59

YW SC Milk Marb REA $W $B 110 2.64 31 0.50 0.72 66.85 153.73

SITZ Paygrade 616E AAA# 18740991

Sire: Spring Cove Paygrade 5064 MGSS: Connealy Final Product CED BW 6 1.2

WW 63

YW SC Milk Marb REA $W $B 106 .45 25 0.81 0.66 65.74 130.18

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WW 67

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SITZ Powerball 603E AAA# 18740985 Sire: Raven Powerball 53 MGSS: SITZ Logic Y46

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SITZ Angus Ranch was founded in 1923 on the core principle of producing seedstock that are practical, functional, and profitable in every segment of the industry—our family’s commitment for four generations!

SITZAngus.com // (406) 683-5277 Call for a sale book!

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

27


RED ANGUS EXPERIENCES RAPID GROWTH The Red Angus breed - often heralded by commercial producers as a consistent provider of fertility, longevity and overall herd profitability - is increasing its market share across the U.S. beef industry and has experienced two consecutive years of rapid growth. Bob Morton, President of the Red Angus Association of America, says, “Demand for Red Angus cattle is at an all-time high. We are gratified to see this growth because it’s driven by increased industry acceptance. Demand for Red Angus females is especially strong, as seen this year on both video and live sales. Our breeders have worked for decades to offer genetics that benefit all segments of the beef supply chain from cow to consumer and producers are recognizing that commitment.” RAAA reports that registrations have increased 66 percent during the past two fiscal years, reaching record levels for the breed in both of those years. Active cow inventories, as measured through RAAA’s Total Herd Reporting requirement, increased to 106,387 head in the 2016-17 fiscal year, a 27 percent increase over the same two-year period (see accompanying table). RAAA memberships have risen 13 percent, while the well-recognized “Yellow Tag” or Feeder Calf Certification Program grew 37 percent. DNA submissions have also risen substantially as Red Angus breeders seek to leverage the benefits of this emerging technology through verified parentage and genomically enhanced EPDs. “Such tremendous growth across multiple categories is reflective of the Red Angus breed’s long-standing focus Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 28

on serving commercial cattlemen,” according to RAAA CEO Tom Brink. “More cow-calf producers are incorporating Red Angus genetics into their herds because the females work and the steers are highly marketable.” Using registrations as the benchmark for comparison, Red Angus is now tied for third among the largest U.S. beef breeds. The Red Angus Association of America serves the beef industry

by enhancing and promoting the competitive advantages of Red Angus and Red Angus-influenced cattle. The RAAA provides commercial producers with the most objectively described cattle in the industry by seeking and implementing new technologies based on sound, scientific principles that measure traits of economic importance. For more information, visit www.RedAngus.org.

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


P OW E R F U L B U LLS WI TH E LE G A NT F E MA L E S A LL C R E AT IN G A S O LI D F O UNDATI O N T HE 20 18 R EES C A LE NDA R S P R I N G A N G U S B UL L S A L E A PRI L 2 8 • AT T H E R A NC H S E LLI N G 3 0 Y E A R L ING ANGUS BULLS

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Cattle that work in all environments!

Bulls with these genetics sell! C NJW 78 P 88 X S T E AK H O U S E 1 8 7 Z

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OUR BULLS CARRY A F UL L GUAR ANT EE T H ROUGH T H E FI RST YEAR AND STA ND B EH I ND OUR PRODUCT 100% .

Here at Rees Bros we operate a no nonsense performance oriented program. Our cows must calve every year in a 60 day breeding exposure and bring home a big calf. There is no forgiveness for low milk, poor udders, bad feet, cancer eye or poor temperament. They summer at 5000 to 8000 ft elevation on some 7000 acres of mountain forage. There is no creep feeding or hot rations. Our goal is to provide you with some of the freshest and most proven genetics that the industry has to offer; with bred in performance and an unconditional soundness guarantee. Come see for yourselves how Rees Bros can help your program. You'll be happy you did.

www.REESCATTLE.com Scott Rees (801) 949-8960 Jake Rees (801) 668-8613 Roger Rees, DVM (801) 913-5747 reescattle@gmail.com Take Exit 106 of I-84 Morgan, UT

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Selling 25 Bulls This Year! M os t l y a v a i l a bl e b y pr i v a t e t r e a t y ! F eb 1 0 G em S t a t e C l as s i c - T w i n F a l l s , I D A pr i l 7 U T A n g u s S a l e - O g d e n , U T SAV Brilliance 8077

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TAXED TO

DEATH By Bronson Teichert for the Utah Cattlemen’s Association

F

ollowing the GOP tax reform bill passed in late 2017, there is still continued debate among democrats and republicans on the feasibility of the tax overhaul. For the majority of farmers and ranchers in America, the tax bill is beneficial. Most farmers and ranchers don’t earn high incomes, but many of them are taxed as multi-million dollar businesses. According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, farmers and ranchers earned a median annual income of nearly $61,000 in 2010. The top 10 percent of earners in the field made about $107,000 a year, while the bottom 10 percent made less than $30,000. So why are people who work in the agricultural industry usually taxed so much? When you take assets into consideration, farmers are worth a lot, but they’re still different than most businesses. According to Ruby Ward, an expert on taxes for rural communities, most of the value comes from the land the farm or ranch uses to make a profit. “So if you have a large business that holds a portfolio of stocks and bonds and other types of assets, those assets are very divisible,” Ward said. “It’s somewhat easy to sell a certain portion of those to pay the estate taxes and then move on with the rest of them intact.” Farm land isn’t as divisible. According to Ward, selling a portion of the farm limits future operations and income. She said the same concept applies to small business with one or two main assets. In the past, depending on the year and inflation, a single farmer with assets worth around $5 million was subject to taxes. A married couple with assets of around $10 million would also pay taxes. In the new tax bill, those exemption amounts have doubled making it easier on farmers and ranchers. However, that only eliminates one of the financial

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

Tax impacts on agriculture How the tax reform bill may help

burdens that come with agriculture operations. A Cache Valley farmer, who we’ll refer to as “John” for the sake of privacy, shared what it can be like when the financial pressure becomes too much to handle. After John’s father passed away, the financial stress fell on John’s mother who had not been involved with the finances before. Without proper planning and nowhere else to go, the farm was sold. After decades of working on the land tied with the generations of a family legacy, it was gone. Without retirement savings, John now works as a forklift driver loading semis. He said his son worked on the farm and dreamed of continuing the family tradition. Here are a few questions posed to John, along with his answers.

Q: Why can dealing with finances in agriculture

be stressful for someone who isn’t familiar with it. Only 1.5 percent of the population are farmers. Why can it be difficult for someone outside of agriculture to understand that?

A

: Many farms are asset rich but cash poor. People see a piece of land and see what it’s worth and that just computes in their mind how wealthy or well-off a farmer is, but in actuality there are so many different rules on how you can distribute that and bring your kids on after you pass away to pass that on to them. If it’s not done the proper way and within the rules, it can really hurt the family bad, the family farm.

Q: How long has your family been farming? A: My Father had farmed his whole life and my

grandpa had farmed his whole life. Ever since they came to Utah in 1859, is when it was.

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FEBRUARY 2018


Q: What kind of farm did you grow up on? A: I grew up on a dairy farm, but in 1998 we

moved to the Cache Valley where we were mainly alfalfa and wheat.

Q: Farming can be kind of tough, there’s a lot of

things that go into it. Do things like estate tax, the death tax and the complications of handing down the farm from one generation to another effect the difficulties of farming?

A: When your parents really aren’t interested in

discovering avenues they need to take to protect the farm. If they don’t, if they are just depending upon a will or something. There’s going to be a breakdown. I tried and tried to get my parents to look at estate planning and they thought that after they talked to their attorney, they thought that everything was just fine. But, it turned out that it wasn’t.

Farming is risky because commodity prices can’t be controlled and neither can the weather. But coming up with a plan to transfer the assets to future generations is something farmers can do. “It’s really a roadmap to where you want to be,” Ward said. “If you don’t care where you end up or you don’t care whether or not it transitions as an on-going business to that next generation then you don’t really need to care. If you do, it’s something that has to be really deliberate because it’s not just about transitioning the assets, but also how to take on the risk and the responsibility and the financial components and all those types of things.” Ward said family farm businesses are important to the economy. Keeping the farm in the family requires more than just a will, there needs to be a plan. Ward is reaching out with Utah State University Extension to help farmers understand and prepare the future of their estates. Dick Patten is the president of the American Business Defense Council. He wants to repeal estate tax and the death tax completely, but he said family businesses are still being taken advantage of. “One of the things that just came into the light recently is that life insurance companies have a life insurance policy called survivability insurance,” Patten said. “It is constructed for one reason and one reason only, and that is for families to prepay their death taxes through life insurance companies.” The U.S Department of Treasury brought in $19 billion in death taxes last year according to Patten. The insurance companies brought in about $30 billion dollars in premiums for their second to die policies. “To see the insurance companies are making more off of the existence of the death tax than the government is shocking,” Patten said. “One of the studies that we did through our foundation found that 2,000 family businesses of size are sold each year either because they are anticipating www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

the death tax or they’re currently underwater and they owe death taxes.” Patten said when a family farm sells a section of land every time somebody dies, they become a smaller and smaller economic unit. At some point they cease to survive. “In West Texas there are the Leveritt brothers, their family ranch goes back to 1888,” Patten said. “Clayton and his brother grew up and their collective intent was to grow up on the ranch, work the ranch and wanted to raise their families on the ranch. Unfortunately for them, Grandma died and three years later Dad died, which meant they had two rounds of death taxes to pay. Unfortunately, Clayton had to leave the ranch, go to the largest mid-sized city to get a job. Most of that pay check goes to pay the death taxes.” Brandon Willis, who was the senior advisor to former Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, said many people outside of agriculture don’t realize that farmers and ranchers aren’t living in a house in the Hamptons. “Ranchers rely upon their land to earn income,” Willis said. “The margins in agriculture, regardless of what type of agriculture you’re in, they’re exceedingly tight. The estate tax has a disproportionately harmful impact on farmers and ranchers. It’s not the house in the Hamptons that’s being taxed, it’s their ranch. It’s their ranch where they earn income, it’s their ranch where they have a lot of risk. I think that is a very positive thing in the tax bill to lift that exemption. They do not do away with the estate tax. Just the doubling of that is a positive thing for agriculture.” The tax bill is projected to cost $1.5 trillion over the next ten years which has critics worried about the already large deficit. “I don’t know that I would call the bill a game changer, but overall it’s a net positive,” Willis said. “What you have to balance is a net positive with increased debt later. Right now we’re already spending about 9 percent of our federal budget on paying off debt. Is the benefit of a political win now worth the possibility of only making the deficit worse in the long run?” Family businesses are the most productive source of capital in the nation according to Patten. Removing financial barriers will make the tax bill worthwhile in the long run. “If you are confiscating that capital, then all of a sudden you lose jobs, capital and the government loses taxes,” Patten said. “If you leave that capital in place, it will grow. If you get rid of the death tax, you are losing a source of revenue, but by year seven getting rid of the death tax becomes financially positive.” From that point it becomes a significant source of revenue compared with having the death tax in place Patten said. The capital stays in the machine shops, the trucking companies and the farms and ranches. “If you’re only focused on ‘I’m the government and I want my money,’ then if they get rid of the death tax and after seven years they do get more money,” Patten said. “It’s like the old fairy tale of killing the goose that lays the golden egg. That’s essentially what they do when they take apart family farms and family ranches.” Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 33


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FEBRUARY 2018


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P AUL M C P HER S ON F AM ILY 885 W 200 S • Ne ph i, U T 84648 (435) 623- 1421 • (801) 362- 7150 M c Ph e rs o n Fa rm s @ m s n . c o m Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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American Hereford Association Releases BOLT Genetic Evaluation from the American Hereford Association In late 2017, the American Hereford Association (AHA) released the first updated expected progeny differences (EPDs) and corresponding accuracies using the Biometric Open Language Tools (BOLT) genetic evaluation software Dec. 4. The new genetic evaluation also includes two new traits, Sustained Cow Fertility (SCF) and Dry Matter Intake (DMI), and updated profit ($) indexes. “It’s long been our goal to provide Hereford breeders the most advanced and reliable genetic evaluation possible,” says AHA President Kevin Schultz. “This new genetic evaluation gives us one of the best tools to identify breedleading genetics at a faster pace than ever before.” Due to the industry-leading Whole Herd Total Performance Records (TPR™) program, in its 17th year, and the current 53,000 Hereford genotypes on record, the AHA is poised for a stronghold in the DNA era, making Hereford cattle even more predictable. Last year the Association pursued a genetic evaluation overhaul to allow for better use of genomics in its evaluation. “BOLT provides a more robust evaluation by calculating true accuracy on animals,” says AHA Chief Operating Officer and Director of Breed Improvement Shane Bedwell. Utilizing BOLT, all factors associated with contemporary group makeup will be accounted for in the calculation of true accuracy. This genetic evaluation system moves away from a full multi-trait model, decoupling models to better estimate traits of interest. It also modifies contemporary group structure to allow for as much data as possible to affect the evaluation. In addition, BOLT utilizes a cutoff strategy which only includes animals born after 2001 and animals related by three generations of pedigree. “A genetic evaluation backed solely by Whole Herd TPR data strengthens the evaluation and takes out selection bias that occurred pre-Whole Herd TPR,” Bedwell says. Hereford breeder Jack Holden, Valier, Mont., was a member of the advisory committee - comprising of cattlemen and the scientific community - who was tasked Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 36

with reviewing the new genetic evaluation. “The process of generating the new genetic evaluation was really outstanding, and I feel comfortable with where we’re at now,” Holden says. “BOLT will give us better, more accurate indications of genetic potential in our animals. Any time we can identify that quicker, along with finding cattle that fit phenotypically, we can make faster genetic progress to improve our herd.” NEW TRAITS AND UPDATED $INDEXES Released with the new genetic evaluation are two new traits: SCF and DMI. The AHA’s new SCF EPD is a prediction of a cow’s ability to continue to calve from three years of age through 12 years of age, given she calved as a two-year-old. The EPD is expressed as a deviation in the proportion of the ten-possible calving’s to twelve years old expressed as a probability. “The new SCF EPD is a powerful tool,” Schultz says. “In a commercial cow herd, longevity and fertility are profit drivers. We’re providing a new tool for that purpose.” Feed intake records from AHA research projects and breeder data collection have been analyzed in a genetic evaluation to predict DMI EPDs. Reported in pounds of feed consumed per day, this EPD characterizes genetics for intake, with a lower numeric value being associated with less feed consumed on a dry matter basis. SCF and DMI will now be included in the AHA $Indexes, along with other economically relevant traits (ERTs), including carcass weight (CW) and mature cow weight (MCW). DMI and CW will be included in all three AHA $Indexes to help predict the cost associated with feed inputs and measure the end-product pounds that are critical for profit. “SCF will replace scrotal circumference as the predictor of fertility and be a large contributor to both maternal indexes,” Bedwell says. “Adding these ERTs into the profit indexes will provide a more robust and comprehensive selection tool for commercial producers to select Hereford bulls to be used on Angus based cows.” EPDs will be released once a week, an increase in frequency from the previous 10 times a year. VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


Western Region — Mark Holt

Ariz., Calif., Idaho, Nev., Ore., Utah and Wash. 208-369-7425 mholt@hereford.org

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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UTAH GETS NEW ANGUS REGIONAL MANAGER The American Angus Association recently welcomed Jake Pickering of Oroville, Calif., as the organization’s newest member of the regional manager team. Pickering begins his role Jan. 8 and will represent Region 11, which consists of Arizona, California, Nevada and Utah. As a regional manager, Pickering will serve as a bootson-the-ground representative for the Association and will attend various cattle events, sales and activities throughout the territory. Regional managers are responsible for helping cattle producers identify and accomplish herd goals, educating members on new programs and services, and they serve as a marketing resource for Angus breeders. “Jake has a passion for the animal industry, specifically in cattle, and he has a strong rapport with industry leaders and influencers,” said American Angus Association CEO Allen Moczygemba. “His work ethic and experiences in the agricultural industry will benefit our membership greatly in the western regional area.” Pickering graduated from Texas A&M University in December 2017 with a bachelor’s degree in animal science. He served as the Texas A&M assistant livestock judging coach during the last year of his college career. “It’s an exciting time for the Angus breed and an honor to work for the American Angus Association,” Pickering said. “I can’t wait to hit the road and get to personally meet the members of my vast territory. It’s an area I have a strong passion for, and I hope to be of

service for registered Angus producers.” Angus breeders in Territory 11 are encouraged to get in touch with Pickering and ask him questions about Association programs and services or for help locating Angus seedstock. Regional managers also advise producers on marketing opportunities available through the Association, including advertising through the Angus Journal, Angus Beef Bulletin, The Angus Report and other avenues. Prior to his time at Texas A&M, he was a member of the Northeastern Oklahoma A&M livestock judging team where he was recognized as an All American, based on his success in both the classroom and livestock judging contests. While on campus at Texas A&M, he was a member of the Saddle and Sirloin Club and interned with the State Fair of Texas. Pickering’s hiring comes with the news that 38-year Angus veteran Terry Cotton will be leaving his post as API President and regional manger as he retires from his career at the association.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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USDA CHANGES BEEF GRADING STANDARDS At the end of 2017, NCBA President Craig Uden released the following statement in response to the notice from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) that it is revising the United States Standards for Grades of Carcass Beef (beef standards): “Today’s update to the beef standards will benefit U.S. beef producers in every segment of our industry. By basing carcass quality grades on the most current scientific data available, we will improve grading accuracy and ensure that producers are getting maximum value out of each head. We are grateful to Secretary Perdue and the staff at USDA for implementing this decision, which demonstrates their continued commitment to supporting American cattlemen and women.” BACKGROUND Following a petition led by NCBA, USDA’s Agricultural

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

Marketing Service today announced that dentition and documentation of actual age will now be used as additional methods for classifying maturity of carcasses. The full notice in the Federal Register can be found here. Dentition is a method for measuring the age of cattle based on their teeth. Cattle with fewer than three incisors are classified as less than 30 months of age (MOA). Three or more incisors indicate cattle are more than 30 MOA. Prior to the change, a significant portion of cattle under 30 MOA were incorrectly deemed ineligible for USDA quality grades because of limitations in the process used to assess their age. Dentition and/or documentation of actual age provides a more accurate assessment method. Ultimately this will ensure that more carcasses are eligible for USDA quality grades and allow producers to maximize the value of each head. More details can be read in NCBA’s

comments on the issue here. A beef industry working group composed of representatives from the cow-calf, feeder, and packer segments conservatively estimated that incorrect classification of carcasses cost the industry nearly $60 million annually. Carcasses incorrectly classified were sold at an estimated discount of nearly $275 per head. Dentition assessments have long been used in U.S. federally inspected plants, with effective USDA Food Safety Inspection Service oversight, to meet the export requirements of many U.S. trading partners.

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Our cowherd is what keeps us in business! Broody | Efficient | Correct Good Udders | Heavy Milking | Pigmented

Our cowherd has been culled and worked on since 1915. Today, we have a consistent set of broody matrons who are fertile, easy keeping, and wean a high percent of their body weight each year. When you buy a bull from Daniels Hereford Ranch, you are buying the decisions we’ve made for over 100 years in making our cattle better! Call today, our bulls are being sold now! Dan - 208-339-2341

40 Bulls Avail able by Private Treaty!

Our newest herd sire...

/S Thor 44360 Champion Bull at the 2016 Western Idaho State Fair, Boise, Eastern Idaho State Fair, Blackfoot, NILE National Show, Billings, Division Champion at Reno Nugget National Show.

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*All these pictures were taken of random cows out on pasture. Two of these pictures are of two year olds. We feel our cowherd is built to last and would love to show them to you at any time. Call today!

Commitment to Quality since 1915 1350 N 2100 W | Malad, ID 83252 Dan 208-339-2341 | Teresa 208-339-2340 danielsherefordranch@yahoo.com Follow us on Facebook at Daniels Hereford Ranch! Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Box Elder County’s Dave Eliason represents the Beehive State in Washington from the Public Lands Council

tarting in September 2016, fifth-generation Utah rancher, Dave Eliason, stepped into the leadership role of chairman of the Public Lands Council. A lifelong public lands rancher, Eliason knows first-hand the importance of using public lands for cattle grazing. Similarly, through his real-world experience, Eliason also knows that livestock grazing is also essential to maintaining healthy public lands. Headquartered out of the Snowville area, Eliason works with his family to run cattle in both Idaho and Utah on private and public lands, and has long been a leader in his tight-knit community. In addition to his current position as the president of the Public Lands Council, he has been a local church leader, a scout leader, president of many state and local cattlemen and beef industry associations, and a member of the Utah state advisory board for the Bureau of Land Management (BLM). He was also appointed as chair of the Utah State Farm Service Agency board by President George W. Bush and the Governor’s Agriculture Advisory Board by Utah Governor Gary Herbert. Now, Dave’s four sons are in the business. His eldest son, Shane, is in the process of taking over the ownership and management of the ranch with his wife – they will be the sixth generation to run the family business. Another son, Derek, is buying his own ranch – 150 miles from Dave’s. His other two sons run a trucking company, but every chance they get they come back to the ranch to help out. “Ranching really is important to the family, it is who we are,” Eliason says.

“Anytime we have a big cattle move, people want to come out and help. Many members of the community love horses and cattle and come out to help – it really is amazing,” says Dave. Most of the time, Dave and his family join ranchers from five different ranches to run cattle together. Each rancher pays their own grazing fees and follows grazing plans outlined by the BLM. They work together – and with the BLM – to do what’s best for the 200,000300,000 acres they graze on, as well as the wildlife that live there. The work of these ranchers contributes directly to the economy. According to one study, the cattle industry contributes $60 million to the economy in Box ...Continued on page 44

A COMMUNITY LIFELINE Ranching is important to life in Box Elder County, Utah. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 42

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


Thomas Angus Ranch Spring 2018 Sales Saturday

February 17, 2018

hosted by Three String Cattle Company Noon • Burley, Idaho 100 BULLS Tuesday

March 6, 2018

March 15, 2018

11 a.m. • Baker City, Oregon

Gering, Nebraska

200 BULLS & 75 FEMALES

100 BULLS

42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Home: (541) 523-7958 • Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 Bryce Schumann, Manager of Cooperative Solutions • Cell (785) 424-0360 Gene Roberts, Wyoming Division • (307) 575-2663 www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Thursday

Sale Managers: www.cotton-associates.com 517-546-6374

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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...Continued from page 42 Elder County alone. The area is made up of many small communities that rely on the use of the public lands. Dave’s family pays taxes, supports local schools, and buys everything locally from fuel, automobiles and machinery parts to groceries and lumber. I love the land, and I love our life on the land. Cattle and sheep are amazing animals – they can take grass and convert it into meat, clothes, leather and a number of other commodities that people take for granted.“ “All of these small purchases make up the big picture,” says Dave. “If you take one cog out of the machine, it makes a big difference. If you take a bunch of those cogs out, pretty soon the whole economy will stop.” Investing in Public Lands In the areas Dave ranches, the availability of private grazing lands is scarce, so ranchers pay a public lands grazing fee to the federal government and follow BLM grazing plans. According to Dave, the difference in private versus public lands grazing is more than simply the cost of the grazing fee. Paying a private lands grazing fee allows the rancher to leave their cattle in the care of the landowner and graze them on land that is taken care of and maintained by the private land owner – without restrictions from the county, state and federal government. Ranchers who graze on public lands invest time, financial resources, and labor into preserving water sources, mitigating invasive species, building and fixing fencing, creating fire breaks, and ensuring that wildlife populations can thrive. “We have eliminated 2,000 acres of Pinyon juniper, and built miles and miles of pipeline and multiple water troughs to bring water to wildlife and cattle across the range,” says Dave. “Back in the 1970s, I helped start the community fire department. Before that, we didn’t even have a fire truck, but now we have a really successful firefighting team.” Dave uses ranching to minimize the damage from fires. “We try to manage the land in a way that prevents the spread of catastrophic wildfires,” he says. “It is our livelihood to take care of the land, and although we’ve had our share of big wildfires, we’ve tried to put in fire breaks to control the damage.” Dave also practices rotational grazing. He drives 40 to 50 miles each way to check on cattle depending on the season. Because of the efforts of Dave Eliason and other ranchers, wildlife populations are able to thrive. “We manage the lands to ensure that wildlife populations, like the Sage Grouse, are able to thrive,” says Dave. “We monitor our grass on the range, and if the grass starts to get short, we move the cattle. The land gets better year after year because of our management practices.” Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 44

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VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


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Lot 44

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 5

•

FEBRUARY 2018


SHAW CATTLE CO.

Annual Bull Sale Wednesday, February 21, 2018

Bu

sines s

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PUBLIC LANDS COUNCIL 50 years of success By Public Lands Council Executive Directory Ethan Lane “The President stole your land.” This statement has been the echo of corporate propaganda and activists across the country since the White House rescinded over two million acres of national monument designations in Utah last November. Those in support of the reduced monuments have been labeled greedy, uninformed, and a minority. Their voice has been pushed aside by big corporations who have hijacked the national monument debate for profit-driven marketing objectives. In the turbulent political world of Washington, D.C. and beyond, the Public Lands Council (PLC) has been an irreplaceable voice for these rural communities. Whether it is on national monuments or other regulatory issues impacting public lands ranchers, PLC is a dedicated advocate. Congressional leaders and agency officials rely on PLC to understand the interests and priorities of western ranchers who play an integral role in the fabric of our nation. PLC Impact: Relief from Past Administrations Reducing the burden of federal regulations on the western ranching community is at the heart of PLC’s mission. After visiting 12 western states and meeting with producers who truly felt the pinch of regulations from the past administration, our organization grasps the burdens facing public lands ranchers in today’s political climate. A vast number of challenges are shared across western public land ranching communities, but solutions are not. Ensuring each rancher is able to manage their operation appropriately given environmental and

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

operational differences has led to a major push for regulatory reform within our policy priorities. One notable example came late last year, during the controversy surrounding national monument designations. While leading the fight against abuse of the Antiquities Act, the Public Lands Council pushed consistent messaging from rural communities – the individuals actually impacted by designations - directly to congressional and agency officials. Our advocacy on Capitol Hill landed Dave Eliason, the PLC President, a front-row seat to President Trump’s announcement in Salt Lake City last December to appropriately size the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase Escalante National Monument designations. Moving forward, the Public Lands Council stands alongside congressional representatives as they shift their focus to finding a permanent solution to ending abuse of the Antiquities Act by future administrations. Another win in 2017 came when the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) proposed to rescind the onerous 2015 Waters of the United States rule. This egregious federal overreach would have given the federal government broad jurisdiction over land and water features that they have no business regulating. Today, the Public Lands Council is engaged with the EPA to find a permanent fix for the problem - developing language that will appropriately define and provide perspective of ...Continued on page 50


A r e your bul l s use d t o 10,000 fe e t ?

O u r s w er e raised there. We raise our cattle like commercial cattle! We expect them to survive the rigid conditions year-round with minimal inputs. As soon as our permit is ready, the pairs are taken to 10,000 feet to summer! If they can’t survive there, we don’t expect them to survive anywhere! Call today for more information or a sale catalog. Jeff 801-623-8308 Tamara 801-623-8309 Sired by these breed greats

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Plus BGGR Gravity 803A , Adkins Jack Pot 906W, KCF Bennett Y504, and Styles Cash R400

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Jeff and Tamara Loveless Spanish Fork, UT 801-623-8308 • 801-623-8309

Selling 50 Loveless Bulls along with bulls from Sorensen Angus and Circle 4 Simmentals! March 9, 2018 • 6:00 pm Spanish Fork Fairgrounds Spanish Fork, UT


...Continued from page 48 waters that should be under federal jurisdiction. Finally, PLC is pushing for reform of the Endangered Species Act. Grizzly bears in Yellowstone National Park were listed on the Endangered Species List for over 40 years prior to being delisted in June 2017, and have been a contention point to ranchers across the West. The act is characterized by its catastrophic failure, with only one percent of species listed every coming off. Species remain under protection due to arguments that species, regardless of science and population numbers, must remain under federal protection to survive. Ultimately, the Yellowstone grizzly bear decision has the opportunity to set a precedent for a full species delisting in the future. On that note, The Public Lands Council advocated reform to loosen the grip of radical environmental groups who utilized dirty “sue and settle” tactics during National Environmental Policy Act and Endangered Species Act reviews. It is a success to have congress acknowledging the abuse of programs such as EAJA by extreme activist communities. Because of our organization, political leadership heard sensible arguments that will stop

extreme environmentalist from handicapping public lands ranchers. Help Shape the PLC Legacy 2018 marks the 50th anniversary of the Public Lands Council. Over the past years, the Public Lands Council has grown in members, reach, and scope. While our organization expands, our goal remains the same: ensure ranchers continually have access to public land for livestock grazing so they may produce food and fiber for the world. Livestock producers interested in helping shape future policy initiatives for the Public Lands Council are welcome at the Spring Legislative Conference in Washington D.C. this April. The Public Lands Council Annual Meeting will be the highlight of 2018 and will be right in your backyard! Join the entire PLC leadership, officers, and board in Park City Sept. 27 to 30. To learn more, visit www.publiclandscouncil.org.

P O L L E D H E R E F O R D B U L L S WI T H POWER • MATERNAL TRAIT S

O UR B ULL S ALE C ALENDAR ! F ALLON ALL B REEDS B ULL S ALE

PERFORMANCE

FA L L O N L I V E S T O C K E XC H A N G E F E B R UA RY 1 7 • FA L L O N , N V

U TA H H E R E F O R D A S S O C I AT I O N B U L L S A L E P R O D U C E R’ S L I V E S T O C K M A R K E T MARCH 3 • SALINA, UT

U TA H B E E F I M P R O V E M E N T A S S O C I AT I O N P R O D U C E R’ S L I V E S T O C K M A R K E T MARCH 17 • SALINA, UT

B A S I N A L L - B R E E D S B ULL S ALE BASIN LIVESTOCK MARKET M A R C H 2 4 • R O O S E V E L T, U T

P R I VA T E T R E A T Y

AT THE

A N T I M O N Y, U T

RANCH

FEATURING THE INFLUENCE OF THESE GREAT SIRES!

NJW

O UR C OMMITMENT

TO

73S W18 HOMETOWN 10Y

Q UALI T Y

We a r e a f a m i l y o p e r a t i o n d e d i c a t e d t o r a i s i n g t o p t i e r P o l l e d H e r e f o r d c a t t l e . We s t r i c t l y c u l l a n d s e l e c t o n l y t o p c a t t l e t o u s e i n o u r p r o g r a m . We a r e c o n fi d e n t t h e s e c a t t l e will work for you. Call us anytime, and we will do our best to help you.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

FRENZEN BAR JZ

BRUISER B30 100W, SIRE OF LJR ZEPHRY 190Z

P HIL ALLEN POLLED

AND

S ON

HEREFORDS

P O B o x 1 2 0 0 7 4 | A n t i m o n y, U T 8 4 7 1 2 Phil 435-624-3236 | Shannon 435-624-3285 s j a l l e n @ c o l o r - c o u n t r y. n e t

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


Spring Cove Ranch THE Pioneer Herd of the West

We’ve been raising registered Angus cattle at Spring Cove Ranch for nearly 100 years. Our bulls are raised outside on dry range conditions, are genetically designed to provide meat, marbling and muscle and to perform in our western environment while enhancing the durability, fertility and longevity in your cowherd and in ours.

Annual Production Sale Monday, March 12, 2018

Selling 175 Angus bulls , 75 Angus females & 40 JBB/AL Hereford & Red Angus Bulls

Spring Cove Reno 4021 Reg 17926446 Sired by: KM Broken Bow 002 MGS: CCA Emblazon 702 CED+11 BW-0.4 WW+78 YW+132 SC+1.34 Milk+32 CW+53 Marb+.80 Rib+.63 $W+88.33 $F+105.85 $B+171.68

Reno sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

Sitz Longevity 556Z

Sitz Longevity 556Z Reg 17179073 Sire: Connealy Final Product MGS: Woodhill Foresight CED+6 BEPD+.2 WEPD+60 YEPD+108 SC+.95 Milk+30 CW+38 Marb+.80 Rib+.34 $W+67.63 $F+79.58 $B+130.71 Longevity sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

Spring Cove Crossbow 4205 Reg 17924903 Sired by : KM Broken Bow 002 MGS: CCA Emblazon 702 CED+17 BW -1.6 WW+61 YW+110 SC+.17 Milk+17 CW+54 Marb+1.01 Rib+.53 $W+55.29 $F+73.16 $B+165.93 Crossbow sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

Basin Bonus 4345

Basin Bonus 4345 Reg 17904142 Sire: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: Connealy Consensus 7229 CED+9 BEPD+1.0 WEPD+75 YEPD+130 SC+.76 MEPD+38 CW+54 Marb+1.03 Rib+.54 $W+88.94 $F+98.06 $B+162.10 Bonus sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

Spring Cove Paygrade 5064 Reg 18251392 Sired by: Basin Payweight 1682 MGS: CCA Emblazon 702 CED+12 BW-.6 WW+55 YW+92 SC+.99 Milk+26 CW+34 Marb+1.04 Rib+.23 $W+64.45 $F+50.38 $B+123.55 Paygrade sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

S A V Resource 1411

Sitz Resource 525C Reg 18084910 Sire: S A V Resource 1411 MGS: Sitz SLS Rainmaker 6914 CED+9 BEPD+.9 WEPD+60 YEPD+113 SC+1.48 MEPD+16 CW+42 Marb+.50 Rib+.84 $W+52.22 $F+69.19 $B+131.21

525C sons and daughters sell March 12, 2018

Also Featuring 20 Sons of Basin Payweight 1682 Spring Cove Ranch

For Sale Books Call: 208-352-4332 www.springcoveranch.com

Angus since 1919 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Find us on Facebook

For more information call: Art or Stacy Butler Josh Mavencamp Sarah Helmick Bliss, Idaho 208-352-4332 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

51


( W

Offering over 100 Head of Registered Angus • Bred and Open • 2-year-old Bulls Heifers • Yearling Bulls

Featured Sire Represented Baldridge Jennings Z064

Other sires represented in offering:

• RB Tour of Duty • Baldridge Next Step • GAR Prophet For more information regarding the sale offering, call or email:

(

Chris Ward

W

Logan, UT 435-757-5140

chris@wardangusranch.com

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


39th Annual

UDY CATTLE COMPANY BULL SALE

CATTLEM CHOICEEN’S

THE SOURCE FOR QUALITY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14, 2018

LUNCH AT 12 NOON

sale at 1 p.m. • Rockland, Idaho

EPDs —

LOT 2 - UCC SENSATION 660

EPDs —

BW 1.0 WW 51 YW 83

BW -.01 WW 68 YW 104

MM

MM

30

LOT 41 - UCC DEFENDER 745U

14

135 BULLS AND 50 HEIFERS Hereford, Red Angus, Black Angus 2-year-olds and yearling bulls.

HEREFORD SIRES

NJW 73S W18 Hometown 10Y ET Churchill Sensation 2122Z UCC Victor 403

RED ANGUS SIRES

5L Defender 560-30Z Pie The Cowboy Kind 343 LSF Saga 1040Y

EPDs — BW 2.9 WW 62 YW 106

BLACK ANGUS SIRES S A V Resource 1441 Connealy Black Granite Barstow Bankroll B73

George 208-226-7857 • Cell 208-221-2277 James 208-221-1909 • jamesudy@hotmail.com Fax 208-226-7671 Sale Broadcast on:

Information online at:

udycattle.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

LOT LOT 41 83--UCC UCCDEFENDER RESOURCE745U 781

MM

23

Sale Location Nine miles south of Rockland, Idaho

Sale Day Phones 208-221-1909 208-548-2277

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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PATHWAY TO PROFIT

THE IGS FEEDER PROFIT CALCULATOR™ By the Amercican Simmental Association’s Director of Membership and Industry Operations Chip Kemp

I

n 2017, the American Simmental Association introduced the revolutionary International Genetic Solutions (IGS) Feeder Profit Calculator™ and its role in providing true awareness of feeder calf profit potential. In this article, we ‘ll walk through the simple process of getting an IGS Feeder Profit Calculator certificate generated on a specific set of calves. The first step is to get to the IGS website. You can either use the IGS link at the top of Simmental.org or you can go directly to InternationalGeneticSolutions.com. The IGS Feeder Profit Calculator link can be found in the upper right-hand corner. The second step will take you to the input form. Complete the form and submit that information. You will provide contact and location information, weaning and herd health specifics, marketing weights and timelines and of course registration numbers on sires. It is possible that staff will reach out seeking additional information, but roughly three business days following your submission you will receive an email providing you a digital copy of your IGS Feeder Profit Calculator certificate. Now it is time to interpret the information on your certificate. On the left side of the certificate will be all the information provided by the producer. This gives confidence and knowledge to a potential buyer, knowing you’ re hanging your credibility on the details you provided. The buyer is able to quickly gauge your management and health practices that built value into this set of calves. The lower right hand-side of the certificate focuses in on five categories that are crucial to feedlot and carcass success. The star metrics reflect the ranking of your calf genetics versus the IGS database. The upper right portion of the certificate is the true foundation and core of the IGS Feeder Profit Calculator. Using the largest genetic database in the industry and some of the elite minds in the business we have leveraged known genetics, herd health, current economic conditions, and basic accounting principles to provide the most robust indicator of feedlot profit potential to date. It breaks it down to a language we all understand — dollars and cents. Frankly, feedlot buyers want to know if a set of calves has a reasonable chance to turn a profit. THREE MEASURES ARE HIGHLIGHTED ON THE CERTIFICATE: RELATIVE GENETIC VALUE: Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 54

Predicted difference in value due to genetics between the calves being evaluated and the average Angus calves of the same sex, starting weight and management conditions. RELATIVE MANAGEMENT VALUE: Predicted difference in value due to management between the calves being evaluated and those same calves under the assumption of an industry average of 60 percent of calves being vaccinated against BRD and 60 percent of calves being weaned for 30 days or more. TOTAL RELATIVE VALUE: A combination of Relative Genetic Value and Relative Management Value. When evaluating each of the relative value categories it is important to be aware that the average in each category is zero. A$0.00/cwt means these calves reflect the breakeven potential of the average calf. There is no artificial adjustment to the base just for marketing advantage or to provide a feel-good effect. You expect the truth and the facts. So do your customers and your buyers. On the example certificate provided, we predict a breakeven price (at the time they are sold as feeder calves) based on their predicted feedlot performance of an additional $9.84/cwt. In laymen’s terms, that means the buyer at your local auction market or through your online platform could afford to pay an extra $9.84/cwt over the average animal on that day and still come out breaking even. To be clear, the buyer isn’t looking at these calves to break even. Like you, the buyer has an eye on profit. But in this example the buyer has true awareness, through IGS, that leads him to believe these calves are a safer bet. So is he looking to pay an additional $9.84/cwt? No. Is he willing to give $2, $3 or $4 more on a safe bet rather than risking everything? We think he is. Additionally, a second page highlighting all registration numbers and known genetics accompanies each certificate. It is really that simple. And you won’t pay a thing. Roughly 20 minutes of work will provide you with the most credible and trusted information available on the potential feedlot performance of your calves. Trust is the Gold Standard. Your success is wrapped up in the value of each year’s calf crop. You’ve invested years, significant dollars, and countless hours of sweat to get the calves to this point. Why leave calf knowledge to chance? You can either Know or Guess. Choose Know. VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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•

FEBRUARY 2018


THIS SPRING,

START CALVES STRONG WITH COMPREHENSIVE RESPIRATORY PROTECTION.

help protect calves from internal and external parasites with

DECTOMAX®.

INFORCE™ 3 HELPS GIVE CALVES A STRONG START. It helps prime the immune system for a strong memory response, which sets the stage for subsequent vaccinations later in life. • INFORCE™ 3 is the first and only respiratory vaccine labeled for prevention of disease caused by bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV). • The vaccine aids in the prevention of respiratory diseases caused by infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) and parainfluenza 3 (PI3) viruses. • Single-dose intranasal administration* helps stimulate local immunity with a quick immune response and helps provide protection where BRSV, IBR and PI3 viruses attack first.

ONE SHOT® BVD HELPS PROTECT AGAINST MANNHEIMIA HAEMOLYTICA AND BVD TYPES 1 AND 2 VIRUSES. • Unmatched protection against M. haemolytica, the No. 1 calf killer.3,4 • Protection from bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) Types 1 and 2 viruses, two of the major respiratory viruses that cause bovine respiratory disease (BRD). • Offers the same level of protection as ONE SHOT® and BOVI-SHIELD GOLD® BVD administered independently.

For complete respiratory and parasite protection this spring, use INFORCE 3 and ONE SHOT® BVD concurrently, along with DECTOMAX®. Talk with your Zoetis representative or veterinarian for more information.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: DECTOMAX Injectable has a 35-day pre-slaughter withdrawal period. DECTOMAX Pour-On has a 45-day pre-slaughter withdrawal period. Do not use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older. Do not use in calves to be processed for veal. DECTOMAX has been developed specifically for cattle and swine. Use in dogs may result in fatalities. *Calves vaccinated prior to 6 months of age should be revaccinated after 6 months of age. Brodersen BW. Bovine respiratory syncytial virus. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 2010;26(2):323-333. Griffin D, Chengappa MM, Kuszak J, McVey DS. Bacterial pathogens of the bovine respiratory disease complex. Vet Clin North Am Food Anim Pract 2010;26(2):381-394. U.S. Department of Agriculture. Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service. Mortality of calves and cattle on U.S. beef cow-calf operations. Available at: http://www.aphis.usda.gov/animal_health/nahms/beefcowcalf/downloads/beef0708/Beef0708_is_Mortality.pdf. Accessed January 10, 2014. 4 Powell J. Livestock Health Series: Bovine Respiratory Disease. University of Arkansas Cooperative Extension Service. FSA 3082. 2009. 1

2

3

All trademarks are the property of Zoetis Inc., its affiliates and/or its licensors. ©2014 Zoetis Inc. All rights reserved. GBF14021


Monumental REduction restoring ranchers as stewards of the land By Kenna McMurray for the Utah Cattlemen’s Association

R

ed rocks, stunning landscapes and historic features drive thousands of people to visit Utah’s national monuments every year. It’s a land of adventure, outdoor activity and beauty. It’s also a land that has grazed cattle and provided a livelihood to Utah ranchers for decades. “Utah is the 13th largest state in the nation and spans several topographies and ecoregions, allowing great variety in outdoor recreation activities,” said Sterling Brown, vice president of public policy at Utah Farm Bureau Federation. “Utah is 84,899 square miles, or 54.3 million acres. Of that, approximately 69 percent is under federal management.” Regulations regarding national monuments affect several groups, including many Utah ranchers and their families according to Wade Garrett, vice president of national government affairs at Utah Farm Bureau Federation. Dusty Reese, a stay-at-home mother of four and president of the Kane County Farm Bureau, grazes cattle on the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument. “The main problem that ranchers in the area have with the monument in general is that there seems a hesitation where people actually do vegetation treatments on this land,” Reese said. “I know a lot of ranchers in the area who are only running about half of the numbers we’ve been allotted just because there’s not enough feed so we voluntarily cut ourselves.” Ranchers have long been considered stewards of the land in preserving the integrity and usefulness of the land in order to keep it fit for grazing and the agricultural economy stable. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 58

“Economically, viable and sustainable ranching operations in the western public lands states are dependent on policies that allow access as well as reasonable regulations,” Brown said. “The historic cultural and economic contributions of livestock ranching in Utah is unquestioned. Livestock ranches are the economic mainstay of our rural communities.” President Trump recently announced a change which restores land in the Bears Ears and Grand Staircase monuments to public land in Utah, allowing locals more control over the land on which they graze. “We are grateful that today’s action will allow ranchers to resume their role as responsible stewards of the land and drivers of rural economies,” said Craig Uden, president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association. “Going forward, it is critical that we reform the Antiquities Act to ensure that those whose livelihoods and communities depend on the land have a voice in federal land management decisions.” Garfield County Commissioner, Leland Pollock, travelled to Washington D.C. to testify on the issue. “We’re all happy there’s going to be a change,” Pollock said. “It’s not been managed correctly, I’m sorry — it just hasn’t. It’s a good start. Management is about reality and reality is that you have to do range improvement projects.” The reduction comes after years of legislation efforts to restore the land to the public since the inception of the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, followed later by Bears Ears. “Farm Bureau has been on many fronts with that trying to keep grazing within the monument which was technically supposed to happen for the record,” Garrett VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


said. “They were promised grazing… it’s been 20 plus years fighting the devastating effects national monuments have on ranching.” Hal Hamblin, a fourth-generation rancher in southern Utah, experiences firsthand the issues regarding poor management where he grazes his cattle on national monument land. “As a monument they restricted [land management] and when they restrict it you get overgrowth of brush and overgrowth of trees and pinyon and juniper and pretty soon you can’t run as many cattle on the property, on the permit, as you did before,” Hamblin said. “So that hurts the cattlemen.” For some, the monument risks ranchers’ livelihood who graze in the area. “It’s very distressing when we get ourselves into debt to go buy a place and hopefully — in our lifetime — pay for it,” said Doug Cox, a Kane County rancher who runs cattle on the monument. “Then to have a monument come in and always be fighting with the bureaucracy to continue to run cows since we’ve bought the rights. And in the meetings we have with them they always seem to be trying to get rid of grazing. It’s extremely hard.” Trump’s new announcement will allow Hamblin, and others like him, to have more control of the stewardship of the land, allowing them to work the land as they did prior to the monument’s installation. “Hopefully now that the biggest part of this allotment has been taken out and given back to the field office… we can go in and take care of the land like we used to because we had a prestigious place when they discovered it,” Hamblin said. “That’s basically been my complaint all along.”

“It only makes sense that the ones who live off the land are the ones to take care of it. The ones that are affected by it every day and have to make their livelihood off of it.” – Dusty Reese KAne County rancher

...Continued on page 60 U.S. Interior Sec. Ryan Zinke tours Bears Ears near Blanding with area ranchers in May 2017.

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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...Continued from page 59 The new change will put the stewardship of the land into the hands of those who use it at the local level. “Most of the folks who live in these areas want to protect what is there,” Garrett said. “If you ever get on the ground with these folks you’ll realize that these areas are protected and they are protected because these locals care about it.” Not only do these locals care about the beauty of the land, but for many their livelihood is affected by the quality of the area for grazing. “It only makes sense that the ones who live off the land are the ones to take care of it,” Reese said. “The ones that are affected by it every day and have to make their livelihood off of it.” For these ranchers, this change is empowering and a giant step in a long-fought battle. “We feel that someone is finally listening to us,” Reese said. “Someone is finally taking an interest in rolling back a little bit of the bureaucracy and government regulation which is something we haven’t seen in quite awhile. I think that’s the biggest takeaway is that somebody is finally listening and willing to let the public use the land.” According to the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, the change will improve the land and make it more profitable in the future. “Ranchers who hold grazing permits on public land do vital work that benefits public land including the improvement of water sources, conservation of wildlife habitat, and maintenance of the open space that Americans enjoy,” said the NCBA. “Limitless power to make massive designations under the Antiquities Act poses a serious threat to that noble mission and rich heritage.” The Utah Farm Bureau Federation also said while this is a big step forward, there is still much to be done in the future to protect the land and the ranchers who work it. “I think the biggest thing is that we can work with our congressional delegates,” Garrett said. “I think our big fight now is to work on some type of Antiquities Act reform and more control over that.” Further legislation and support is needed to keep

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

the land in the hands of ranchers and not under federal control. “We have to find congressional support to keep these boundaries locked up so the next president or even the court systems can set the boundaries back to where they need to go,” Reese said. “I think the battle is just beginning and we need to continue to be involved and to speak out and make sure people understand how we feel about the changes that have been made.” Ranchers will be involved in the land management projects in order to make sure they are restored to a fully operational condition. “You have to take care of the land,” Pollock said. You have to respect it and take care of it… that’s what we’re trying to to.” There is also a lot to be done to restore the land to protect it from erosion and overgrowth of pinyon, juniper, sagebrush and other harmful species. “This is just the start, I believe,” Reese said. “Now we need to hold people accountable so we can start doing vegetation treatments. That we can develop the water. That we can make this land usable and at first it’s always a battle. However, ranchers have more motivation than just business objectives. Raising livestock and raising a family go hand-in-hand and many hope to pass on the business to future generations. “I want to say what a blessing it’s been to raise my kids in agriculture,” said Cox. “My kids all love it, my grown kids come back and even the grandkids. It’s a wonderful blessing.” For many, passing on the business of agriculture will require hard work and responsible grazing practices which will be allowed with the reduction of national monuments. “We’re doing this whole ranching thing so our kids can do it someday,” Reese said. “That’s the whole drive for what many of us do in agriculture is that we want to continue this for our kids to teach them hard work and being outdoors and being able to work in the environment. I mean, these are all things we hold dear and that we love and we want to pass it on to our kids and so we have to treat the land to the best of our abilities or we’ll have nothing to pass onto our children.”

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


Angus • SimAngus

• Fleckvieh

TM

Friday, March 23, 2018 • 1:00 p.m. at the ranch in Bancroft, Idaho

Offering over

125 Head Angus, SimAngusTM, & Fleckvieh

50

HAR PINEBANK 443 202 Angus reg. 17505028

Pinebank Waigroup 41/97 x DDA Ally 69C

Angus Sons Sell

Crossroad Radium 789U Fleckvieh reg. 2705810

Registered Bulls

MF MR Evan x BHR Doorn

Yearling & Coming Two’s

Full Fleckvieh Sons Sell

Negative BVD-PI Tested, Performance Tested, Fertility Tested and

PAP TESTED

O C C Zamir 412Z

Angus reg. 17771569 O C C Jet Stream x D D A Fahren 21X PAP 39 Angus & SimAngus Sons Sell

60 Commercial Angus & SimAngusTM Heifers 15 Registered Heifers 10 SimAngus Heifers 5 Angus Heifers

Meyer VE Red Raider 101B SimAngusTM reg. 3062018 OCC Jetfleck x OCC Jet Stream SimAngus Sons Sell

Draft Horse Team

OCC Mitchell 831M

Angus reg. 14456400 OCC Hunter x OCC Emblazon Angus & SimAngus Sons Sell

Golden Dawn Decker

SimAngusTM reg. 3042281 MFI Center Cut x HEMR Samurai SimAngus Sons Sell PAP 38

Dirk & Marnie Johnson

2055 Ivins Road • Bancroft, ID 83217 Cell: (208)390-6619 • Home: (208)425-9169 simroot57@yahoo.com

www.verticaledgegenetics.com

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Call or email to join our mailing list. Stay tuned to website for pictures & videos. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 5

•

FEBRUARY 2018


“Best of the Best” 325 HEAD SELL

150 Hereford Bulls • 65 Angus Bulls

38th Annual Production Sale Monday, February 26, 2018

INCLUDES 2-YEAR-OLDS, JUNIOR AND SENIOR BULLS. COMPLETE PERFORMANCE DATA INCLUDING EPDS, SCROTAL MEASUREMENT, ULTRASOUND AND CARCASS DATA.

Catalog Available at www.hereford.com

Selling Sunday Evening: 40 Hereford Heifers

At the Ranch • Bruneau, Idaho

11 Angus Heifers • 50 pregnant recips due Fall 2018

Live internet Bidding at

Lot 13 • C 5280 105Y CATAPULT 7036 ET

Lot 84 • C CJC 5280 MCKEE 7257 ET

Lot 21 • C 4212 BLACK HAWK 7057 ET

these lots were in Colyer’s 2015 string of pen bulls at Denver! BW

2.4 WW

58

YW 81

MK 40

IMF .03

URE .58

A calving ease, maternal young sire with power. He is a well made bull with lots of body and muscle. His mother “4038” is one of the good young donors in the breed. She is a daughter of “1311” a full sister to “Miles” and the donor dam of 2017 National Champion “Double Your Miles.” Member of the Reserve Grand Champion Pen of Three at the National Western Stock Show.

Lot 59 • C 5192 BAILEES VIC 7180 ET

BW

3.6 WW

52

YW 84

MK 28

IMF .15

BW

2.2 WW

55

YW 82

MK 27

IMF .12

URE .58

This one has as much look and eye appeal as any. Smooth made and great front end with a perfect hip and hind leg. He should sire some tremendous females. His mother is one of our standout young donors that has a great udder.

URE .54

BW

3.0 WW

55

YW 87

MK 37

IMF .37

URE .56

LOT 172 • CCC RESOURCE 7050

Lot 256 • C 1008X 7325 ET

4.6 WW

58

YW 93

MK 35

IMF -.02 URE .59

March polled female that has all the right pieces. She blends together “Bailee” and “1008X” who have been the most consistent producers of National Champions for us. She is a dark red, deep-sided female that will make a great breeding tool.

Guy, Sherry & Katie Colyer (208) 845-2313 Kyle & Bobby Jean Colyer (208) 845-2098

GUY CELL (208) 599-0340 • GUY@HEREFORD.COM KYLE CELL (208) 250-3924 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

BW

1.3 WW

59

YW 108 MK 20

MB

.22

2.7 WW

56

YW 88

MK 30

IMF .11

URE .70

Lot 50 • C 5280 KAT 7138 ET

Lot 89 • C 4088 WILDCAT 7270 ET

First sons of herd sire “5192” who was a member of the 2016 Unique individual that has as much red as you could want on one. pen of bulls and sold to King, Micheli and Sonoma Mountain. Powerful built and out of a great young donor “4088.” One of the This is a well bred prospect who blends together some of our most maternal oriented young sires available that blends together most elite donors “2052” and Bailee” into one pedigree. He is a some of the breed’s most consistent cow makers. With his look and genetics he should sire the cattlemen’s kind in volume. deep sided, soggy made horned calf. Member of the Reserve Grand Champion Pen of Three at the National Western Stock Show.

BW

BW

One of the unique breeding tools in the offering. First sons of the two time Fort Worth Champion “Black Hawk Down” out of a full sister to “Wildcat.” Low birth with tremendous performance and look. He is a rare combination.

REA .89

Powerful son of “Resource” with extra ribeye and performance. This one is bred to sire extra muscle shape and pounds to a set of cattle. Big square hip and lots of body width. He ranks in the top 4% of the breed for REA.

BW

4.1 WW

58

YW 83

MK 29

IMF .07

URE .45

Tremendous phenotype and quality in this young polled prospect. His full sisters have topped past sales and we will have two full sisters to him in the Denver string. He will be a member of our Denver pen. Member of the Reserve Grand Champion Pen of Three at the National Western Stock Show.

LOT 185 • CCC BLACK GRANITE 7080

BW

0.7 WW

58

YW 100 MK 26

MB

.57

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31058 Colyer Road Bruneau, ID 83604 Fax: (208) 845-2314 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Investing in Your Cowherd’s Fertility from BioZyme, Inc.

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eproduction is the most important trait in beef cattle production. There are many factors that have a tremendous impact on reproductive performance of cattle; however, nutrition is one of the few factors producers help control. Depending on when nutrients are limited, reproduction is one of the first functions to be sacrificed. To meet the nutritional requirements, cow-calf producers have found investing in a mineral program that includes Concept•Aid® will help them see increased rates in fertility and pounds of calves weaned. In a recent study conducted, pregnancy rates, calving rates and weaning weights from nearly 5,000 breeding age heifers and cows were collected from across the United States. Five breeds from both the purebred and commercial cattle segments were represented, with the data being compared with national cow data from independent studies. “An animal uses nutrients for lots of different purposes, and reproduction is like a luxury to the animal,” said Dr. Lynsey Whitacre, Business Development and Field Support for BioZyme® Inc., who analyzed the data. “We typically associate nutrients with maintenance and general health, but livestock won’t start putting nutrients toward reproduction until they are available. It’s a luxury to the animal, not a necessity, so if there aren’t extra nutrients there, they won’t even try toward reproduction because they will keep the nutrients to maintain themselves and not maintain the pregnancy.” The study revealed that females who were fed Concept•Aid showed increased fertility and reproductive success compared to the national average. Pregnancy rates for those on Concept•Aid were recorded at 94%, compared to the national average of 91%. When specific geographic regions are compared, even greater success is seen in Concept•Aid pregnancy rates. For example, the Texas cow-calf standardized performance analysis (SPA) data reports a pregnancy rate of 88.8%, but of the 1,700 cows bred in Texas and reported to the Concept•Aid database, the pregnancy rate is 96.2%. Similarly, in Oklahoma the SPA data reported an average pregnancy rate of 89.4%. The average pregnancy rate of cows in Oklahoma in the Concept•Aid database is 93.8%. These statistics further demonstrate enhanced reproductive success using Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 64

Concept•Aid with Amaferm® in purebred and commercial cow-calf operations. “Amaferm helps them digest and absorb the nutrients better that they are already getting, and helps with intake,” Dr. Whitacre said. “The idea behind Concept•Aid is to provide really high-quality vitamins and minerals used in breeding so it helps supplement whatever they are getting from the pasture or whatever their feed source is.” Perhaps the most significant data in the study showed that Concept•Aid doesn’t only aid in getting cows bred, but more importantly, keeping them bred. In addition to an increase in pregnancy rates while on Concept•Aid, more live calves were born with more pounds of calves weaned, putting more dollars of profit in the producers’ pockets if they sell at weaning. Cows on Concept•Aid had a birth rate of 93.6%, while the national average is nearly six points lower at 87.8%. And at weaning, cows that were fed Concept•Aid, weaned a calf that weighed, on average, 590 pounds, compared to the national average of just 531 pounds. “With weaning weight, we saw quite heavier calves coming off our Concept•Aid cattle. Not only did feeding Concept•Aid help with the pregnancy, but it also helped the animal maintain itself through the lactation period and helped the calf also,” Dr. Whitacre said. “We wanted to show the positive effects Concept•Aid has on breeding and calving rates as well as the lasting impact it has on the calf, and the weaning weight data helped us understand that a little bit better. Hopefully our customers will see the rewards they are getting for using a premier product like Concept•Aid.” In addition to the Amaferm advantage, Concept•Aid offers proteinated trace minerals (Copper, Zinc, and Manganese), that play a critical role in reproduction. These are the most stable, bioavailable organic trace minerals on the market. Concept•Aid is also high in Vitamin E, an antioxidant that plays an essential role for general cell wall integrity and muscle repair, and is proven to be helpful in short-term periods of stress. Calving is a stress that requires repair of the reproductive track. Furthermore, Concept•Aid is available in different Phosphorus levels that will complement various grains, by-products, or stored forages you may be feeding. VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


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Hyline Right Answer 273 • 17443662 BW WW YW Milk -1.2 80 116 26

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BANNER YEAR FOR

BEEF

U.S. BEEF GARNERS STRONG DEMAND IN PACIFIC RIM from the U.S. Meat Export Federation

W

hile China’s removal of its 13-year ban on U.S. beef captured major headlines in 2017, reopening of the Chinese market was just one of many exciting developments for U.S. beef in key Asian markets. As anticipated, beef shipments to China began relatively slowly due to limited eligible supplies. From the mid-June market reopening through the end of October, exports to China totaled 1,570 metric tons (mt) valued at $17.2 million. But Joel Haggard, U.S. Meat Export Federation (USMEF) senior vice president for the Asia Pacific, says China’s long-term potential is extremely bright. “Markets take years to build, and China is no exception.” Haggard said. “U.S. beef certainly faces challenges in China, but USMEF is very optimistic about the future.” To mark U.S. beef ’s return to China, USMEF participated in a media reception in Beijing that featured U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue, U.S. Ambassador to China Terry Branstad and a host of leaders from the U.S. beef industry. Haggard emceed the event, thanking Perdue and his USDA team for negotiating the final agreement that restored access for U.S. beef, which had been absent from the Chinese market since the December 2003 BSE case. The following day, Perdue helped reintroduce U.S. beef into China’s commercial channels with a retail promotion at a Shanghai supermarket. In late September, USMEF initiated an initial, ambitious step toward developing demand for U.S. beef in China, conducting the U.S. Beef China Roadshow. This weeklong series of events brought exporters and importers together in China’s three largest cities – Beijing, Shanghai and Guangzhou. More than 300 Chinese importers – buyers who were selected and screened by USMEF – attended each of the three roadshow events.

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Among well-established markets for U.S. beef, Japan continued to be the pacesetter in 2017, with JanuaryOctober export volume climbing 22 percent from a year ago to 260,517 mt, valued at $1.59 billion – up 29 percent and already setting a new single-year, postBSE record. Chilled beef exports to Japan accelerated at an even faster rate, increasing 40 percent in volume (124,699 mt) and 43 percent in value ($918.8 million). “The U.S. beef industry has really broadened its reach in Japan, expanding the range of cuts offered and the retail and foodservice venues in which they are featured,” said USMEF President and CEO Dan Halstrom. “But USMEF remains concerned about market access barriers in Japan, as we face significantly higher tariffs than our main competitor, Australia, and import safeguards that could hinder further growth.” In late July, the Japanese government announced that its frozen beef imports in the previous (AprilJune) quarter were large enough to trigger a tariff rate increase – from 38.5 percent to 50 percent – for frozen beef imports from countries that do not have a trade agreement with Japan. The higher tariff will be in place through March 2018, and applies to frozen imports from the U.S., Canada and New Zealand – but not Australia. Under the Japan-Australia Economic Partnership Agreement, which took effect in 2015, Japan’s imports of Australian beef are currently subject to a 27.2 percent tariff. U.S. beef exports to South Korea totaled 148,998 mt through October, up 7 percent year-over-year, valued at $979.3 million – 20 percent above the previous year’s record pace. Demand for U.S. chilled beef is especially strong in Korea’s retail sector, with chilled beef exports up 88 percent from a year ago to 36,773 mt valued at $329 million, up 93 percent. Demand has also been bolstered by the Korea-U.S. Free Trade Agreement (KORUS), which took effect in 2012 and has dropped the tariff rate on U.S. beef from 40 percent to 24 VOLUME 5

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Buyers at meat case in Guangzhou.

Consumers at a food show in Tokyo.

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

percent. Over the next 10 years, tariffs on U.S. beef are set to fall to zero under KORUS. 2017 saw a major boost for U.S. beef in Korea when Costco officially converted its imported chilled beef selection from Australian beef to 100 percent U.S. product. The move followed a multi-year effort by USMEF to persuade store managers that sales of U.S. beef – a popular item at Costco – would match or exceed Australian beef sales due to revived consumer confidence in the safety of U.S. beef. “Regaining Costco-Korea’s chilled beef business is a milestone on several fronts,” said Haggard. “Not only will U.S. sales soar at this iconic beef retailer, but Costco’s beef merchandising decisions are a bellwether for overall Korean consumer sentiment toward U.S. beef.” Despite a slow start to the year, January-October beef exports to Hong Kong climbed 12 percent from a year ago in volume (97,334 mt) and 23 percent higher in value ($646.1 million). Beef exports to Taiwan were 4 percent ahead of their 2016 pace at 36,719 mt, valued at $335.6 million (up 18 percent). With a strong finish to 2017, Taiwan will easily top the previous year’s value record of $362.8 million. Led by strong increases in Indonesia and Vietnam, beef exports to the Association of Southeast Asian Nations (ASEAN) increased 57 percent in volume (34,777 mt) and 46 percent in value ($173.5 million). Exports were also higher year-over-year to the Philippines, but Indonesia surpassed the Philippines as the ASEAN region’s largest volume destination for U.S. beef. “Up and down the Asian continent, in established as well as emerging markets, it was an outstanding year for U.S. beef,” Halstrom reflected. “But our competitors also recognize the value these markets deliver, so the U.S. industry must remain aggressive in 2018 and beyond if we intend to win additional customers and defend our market share.”

Costco customers in Seoul, South Korea, line up for samples of U.S. beef. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 69


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Extension Service

Whole System Consideration, Downstream effects By Utah State University Beef Extension Specialist Matthew Garcia

T

he Intermountain West is a very unique and challenging environment for the state’s beef producers. Being a native of a New Mexico cow-calf beef operation I understand that producers in this part of the world must really be in touch with and innovative with how they utilize their resources in order to remain profitable and sustainable. Being trained as a beef cattle geneticist many producers have heard me talk about multiple trait selection and matching your genetics to your production environment and resources. However, even I acknowledge that this is only one piece of the puzzle that must be considered in order to keep a beef production operation profitable. As such a major part of my USU beef cattle extension program has focused on whole system considerations and how a producers decision making process at one part of the production system will greatly influence production practices and outcomes downstream from that decision for years to come. For example, decisions made during breeding season will not only influence your operation at calving and marketing. The decisions at breeding have the potential to influence how well your newly incorporated cows utilize your range resources, how well they integrate as replacement breeding animals, the efficiency of your supplementation program, and they have the potential to influence your system for multiple years. The fact beef extension is focusing on whole system considerations and trying to provide information on novel topics to as many beef producers as possible has led us to incorporate novel approaches to disseminate extension materials. The first is that we are utilizing digital media and social media to disseminate our whole system consideration program. Our digital newsletter incorporated applied production information for beef cattle systems, forage systems and agricultural economics. This accompanied by the use of the USU Beef Extension Facebook page has allowed us to take advantage of these technologies that have not been vastly utilized in the past. The second part of our program that we have implemented is a beef producer educator program. This program generates and provides beef producers with materials to disseminate to the public to properly Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 72

educated and dispel some of the misconceptions of the beef industry. The beef producer educator program is vital as public perception can drive how our consumers feel about our product and subsequently if they decide to purchase it. The third thing we are implementing is an evaluation of technology and how it can be applied to the beef production system. For example, one project that we have proposed (as a multi extension specialist team) is the utilization of GPS technology in conjunction with genomic technology to critically evaluate actual bull power due to behavior in range systems. In this project bulls will be fitted with GPS collars prior to breeding season and their movements tracked. At calving season, all calves will have DNA extracted and we will be able to determine how many calves each bull is actually siring. This will allow us to correlate bull behavior and sire ability to give us another tool to critically evaluate which bulls will work in our system. The last part of our program affects how we conduct our traditional on-site extension programs. Traditionally, many of the extension specialists gave programs separate from each other and conducted programs that were not correlated in subject matter or production practices. Currently, myself, Dr. Eric Thacker (Range Extension Specialist) and Dr. Ryan Larsen in conjunction with Utah State University county faculty are developing on-site extension programs that encompass applied beef production practices, rangeland utilization and agricultural economics to further our program of whole system considerations. As we all know, these areas of beef production do not operate separately from each other, so why should our educational programs not take into consideration all these topics as well.? We believe that by conducting on site programs that present applied production system subject matter on multiple topics that have the potential to effect downstream production is necessary. As such, we look forward to future collaborations with our industry, our county faculty, our producers, and welcome any suggestions of new programs that need to be developed. As such please feel free to contact any of us with questions or concerns. VOLUME 5

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You have one day to get her pregnant.

Trust the professionals.

For more information, contact Erin Bronson // 940.212.0171 www.crinet.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org Š 2018 Genex Cooperative, Inc. All rights reserved.

A-17437-18

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WEANING STRATEGIES

TO REDUCE CALF STRESS

by Utah State University Extension Specialists Matthew Garcia, Kerry Rood and Clark Israelsen

W

eaning is considered one of the most stressful periods in the beef production system for beef calves. During this process calves are subjected to a variety of stressors including removal from their mothers, new diets, processing (vaccination, dehorning, castration etc.), and possibly even new pen or pasture environments. These stressors, singly or in combination, can result in behavior or physiological distress in calves including increased vocalization and a suppression of the calves’ immune response leading to sickness. While the process of weaning is always stressful on the calf, a producer can utilize different weaning methods to possibly reduce the impact of weaning stress. Calf stress can be minimized by implementing strategies that incorporate slow changes in diet, separation and take advantage of environmental familiarity. This fact sheet will evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of two commonly applied low-stress weaning methods.

FENCELINE WEANING

Fenceline weaning is a process that aims to take advantage of environmental familiarity and close proximity to the calves’ mothers. Cows and calves are kept in the same pasture, but are separated by a fence that prevents nursing, while allowing the calf to have visual contact with its mother. This method reduces stress for both cow Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 76

and calf because it allows for visual contact and close proximity vocalization.

ADVANTAGES

Previous studies have reported that fence-line weaning reduces calf stress while improving weight gain when compared to abrupt weaning strategies. These results were attributed to the fact that the calves were in a familiar environment and within eyesight and earshot of their mothers. As a result, calves spent more time eating, less time laying down and gained 50 percent more weight than calves that were abruptly weaned. Calves weaned with this method have also been shown to retain more weight 10 weeks’ post weaning (about 30 pounds) when compared to calves that were abruptly weaned and had less stress factors that could be detected with bloodwork

DISADVANTAGES

Although the benefits of this system are well documented to reduce stress on the calves there are still some disadvantages. The first is that the producer must have good fences to keep the calves and cows apart. This may include building or maintaining a pasture fence for this process which means increased inputs and labor for the weaning process. Second, if a calf does get through the fence, it must be caught and returned to the weaning pasture. This process will obviously result in VOLUME 5

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increased stress for the calf and requires the producer to modify or fix fencing to complete the weaning process.

TWO-STEP WEANING

The two step weaning process, also referred to as quiet weaning, is a weaning strategy in which the calf first stops nursing and then is separated from the cow. Specifically, a plastic nose flap is inserted into the calf ’s nose for a short period of time before separation from the cow. The nose flap prevents the calf from nursing on the cow but does not inhibit the calf from grazing or drinking water. Thus, the calf remains in the same pasture with its mother and is slowly acclimated to a new diet without the stress of full separation from its mother.

that calf must be handled to replace the nose flap or separated in order to be weaned, causing an increased amount of stress to the calf.

SUMMARY

While both weaning methods have great potential to reduce stress and increase short-term performance in the calf during the weaning process, the application of both methods warrant some considerations. While both methods have been documented to be effective they may not be applicable to all producers. The effectiveness and utility of each method is going to be specific to each producer, their resources and how they intend to market their calf crop after weaning.

ADVANTAGES

This method allows the calf to remain in a familiar environment and not endure the stress of separation from the cow. Producers can use the nose flaps in multiple years and the placement and removal of the nose flaps can coincide with a preweaning vaccination program to not increase the number of times the calf is handled. Furthermore, the benefits of using this method have been documented in previous studies that have reported significantly less vocalization, less time laying down, more time eating and more time resting after complete separation from cows when compared to calves that were abruptly weaned. However, average daily gain pre- and post- weaning was not significantly different from abruptly weaned calves

Springtime fenceline weaning demonstrated in an Angus herd.

DISADVANTAGES

While the benefits of utilizing this weaning method have been documented there are a few drawbacks that must be addressed. The first is that the animal must be handled multiple times to place and remove the nose flap, which may lead to undo stress if not coordinated with other processes that require handling the calf. The second disadvantage is that the producer has to buy and replace broken or lost nose flaps every year as inevitably there will be a percentage that are not re-usable. Finally, if the nose flap comes off during the weaning process

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Quiet weaning, shown here, also has unique adnantages, but also comes with a more costly and time-intensive investment.

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USU EXTENSION RECEIVES GRANT FOR TRAINING NEXT GENERATION OF FARMERS Utah State University Extension recently received a grant worth $599,615 from the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program to help increase the number of beginning farmers in the Mountain West. The grant, provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, will be used to establish three farm incubator sites across Utah that will include space for demonstration gardens. The grant will also cover workshops and training designed to increase understanding, knowledge and success for future and current farmers. According to Kynda Curtis, USU Extension food and agricultural marketing specialist, this grant comes at an important time for Utah agriculture. “Increasingly, farmers nationwide are reaching retirement without a transition plan to keep their businesses operating,” Curtis said. “In Utah, the average specialty crop farmer is 60 years old – four years older than the national average. That’s why USU is providing programming and services to increase the number of new producers.” This project places a special focus on Native American and refugee beginning farmers as well as high school students involved in FFA and 4-H. A total of 65 new refugee farmers, 16 Native American farmers, and 250 agricultural students will be served by the project. USU Extension will partner with New Roots, an agriculture and food access program that already provides farmer training for refugees and immigrants. USU Extension will use this grant to further expand New Roots by providing additional land and the resources needed to make this program accessible to additional refugee farmers in the Salt Lake area. Additionally, two incubator sites in rural areas will be focused on assisting Native American farmers with their operations. High school students involved with FFA and 4-H will receive instruction at farm demonstration sites and will receive training for and assistance with urban farming projects. “This project will lead to increased understanding of small-scale farming systems and provide important economic development and access to fresh produce in rural areas,” Curtis said. “Leveraging the agricultural expertise of USU Extension faculty and staff, and drawing on their statewide resources, this collaboration will have positive benefits for generations to come.” For more information about USU Extension programs, visit extension.usu.edu. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 78

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C A NNON

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THE GIFT OF KNOWLEDGE by Angela Vesco for the American Gelbvieh Association

K

nowledge is power. How many times have you heard that in your lifetime? How many times have you seen it come to fruition? Knowledge about an industry, a specific subject, or whatever is usually what gives people the power to succeed. How do you acquire knowledge? I am sure that I would hear a different response from everyone. But what it really boils down to is that you acquire knowledge by being studious. You take the time to read, to listen, to absorb, to think, and then put it into practice. So why am I talking about knowledge? Well, we are coming up on the spring bull sale season and there is a lot of data that goes into putting a bull sale together. When you print your catalog, you probably have expected progeny differences (EPDs), some genomic-enhanced EPDs, percentile rankings (at least I hope all seedstock suppliers print percentile rankings), and ratios. But, what good is data if no one understands it? The beef industry continues to advance and finds more ways to select for higher quality genetics and as a result we have an ever-growing repertoire of genetic selection tools. How many of your commercial producers fully understand how to effectively utilize those genetic tools? That is where you, the seedstock supplier, can give the gift of knowledge. Educating your customers on the genetic tools you offer is one of the best things you can do from a customer service standpoint. You want them to be able to make educated decisions when they are buying your bulls. The more knowledge commercial producers have, the better they will be able to select bulls and manage their cowherds. Is it not one of the goals of the beef industry, which you are apart of, to make the fastest Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 84

genetic progress possible? If your commercial customers understand EPDs, know that genomics enhance the reliability of EPDs, and why you print ratios for weights rather than actual weights, then they can help move the industry closer to that goal of genetic progress. So how many opportunities do you have to educate your customers? Well, you have your catalog, for one. I know that adding more pages to your catalog can increase the cost, but I would encourage every seedstock producer to have a page explaining what each EPD is and its intended use. Also, a great time to visit with your customers is the night before the sale. Many of them are traveling in the day before to look at the bulls first thing in the morning so why not take that opportunity to hold a free dinner the night before; everyone likes free food. This provides a great opportunity to go over your process for selecting the genetics and other relevant information. Bull delivery is another opportunity to visit with customers and answer any questions they have. Of course, not one of your customers is like the other. There are varying levels of knowledge so you will have to adjust your conversations accordingly to ensure that you are giving them the gift of knowledge. Now, in order for you to give the gift of knowledge, you must possess that knowledge first. Giving yourself the gift of knowledge is also very valuable. Educate yourself on what is happening in the industry. Read those magazine articles, attend meetings within your county or state, read the proceedings and attend the Beef Improvement Federation annual convention, attend the national conventions of your breed association. Do all that you can to understand all the aspects of our industry. As Benjamin Franklin said, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.� VOLUME 5

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FEBRUARY 2018


MEETING MODERN INDUSTRY DEMANDS Moderate Mature Cow Size

Greater Cow Herd Longevity

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Genetics and programs for the commercial cattle business.

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ABSGLOBAL.COM | 1 .800.ABS.STUD Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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FEBRUARY 2018


27th Annual • 120 Bulls Sell Feb 23, 2018 • Montrose, CO • 12 noon

Gelbvieh and Balancer Bulls - Yearlings, Long Yearlings, and coming Twos Lunch will be provided

Bulls can be seen on video after February 14 with online bidding through DVAuction.com Online bidding the day of the sale with sight unseen purchase is guaranteed. Delivery can be arranged!

Tested for Fertility, PAP, Trich, and PI-BVD

Producing bulls that work at high elevation, rough conditions, calve easy, produce heavy weaning weights, and produce females that are efficient, breed back, and wean a high percentage of their body weight. Call us so we can help pick the bulls that will work best for you! This sale will be broadcast live on the internet.

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Selected for Calving-Ease, Growth, Carcass, Disposition, and Soundness Most bulls are AI sired by top Angus and Gelbvieh bulls

For more information or a catalog, call or visit: Mark 970-209-1956 or Dave 970-209-6833

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Rigby Cattle Services -Carcass Ultrasounding

-Certified UGC Utrasound Technichian -A.I. Servies -SEK Semen Distributer -Universal Semen Distributer

Michael Rigby 435-469-0402 rigbys1@hotmail.com

It’s under the hide that counts! Bulls available at

- UBIA Bull Test March 17, 2018 - online DV Auctions AMAA Maine Max Performance Bull Test March 29-30, 2018. - Bulls and heifers always available private treaty

88

Utah Cattleman

Michael and Jennifer Rigby 435-469-0402 Cell or 435-427-3267 rigbys1@hotmail.com V S E Indianola, Utah eedstock

dition

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www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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CROSSBREEDING THAT DELIVERS ALL THE ESSENTIALS by Beefmaster Breeders United Executive Vice President Bill Pendergrass When Tom Lasater developed the Beefmaster breed, the beef industry of the 1930s – 1950s was very different than today. There were no modern selection tools such as Expected Progeny Differences (EPDs), ultrasound for live animal carcass evaluations or genomics (DNA) to help identify superior animals. Making genetic progress was difficult, but over time it helped develop the Beefmaster breed. Through following a well thought-out breeding program that utilizes a cross of Hereford, Shorthorn and Bos Indicus genetics, then selecting the most adaptable, performance oriented animals and breeding only the best, the Beefmaster breed was then born in the harsh brush country of South Texas. While there has been much written about the Lasater Ranch and the development of the Beefmaster breed, a simple, effective philosophy that is rooted in profitable beef production emerged. Known as the six essentials: fertility, disposition, weight, conformation, hardiness and milk production are the core traits that the entire Beefmaster breed was selected for and developed upon. Those six essentials are what makes the Beefmaster breed such a powerful crossbreeding tool for today’s U.S. beef industry. The genetic combination of roughly 25 percent Hereford, 25 percent Shorthorn and 50 percent Bos Indicus (specifically Gir, Guzerat and Nelore) proved to be very prolific. The resulting composites were selected using the Six Essentials and over time proved themselves to be very predictable. The unique genetic makeup of Beefmaster yields 63 percent retained heterosis, a vital statistic for the profitability of commercial cattlemen. The U.S. Department of Agriculture recognized Beefmaster as a breed in 1954. Why is crossbreeding important? The U.S. has the smallest beef cow herd we have seen as a nation since the 1950s. While our cow herd has become smaller, our human population continues to increase at a rapid pace. The demand for protein in higher quality diets across the world has increased the demand for beef. It takes a long time to expand a cow herd. That is why it is so important to create as much efficiency as possible in the beef supply chain. Planned crossbreeding with Beefmasters is the fastest way to create efficiency and profit in the cattle business. The U.S. cow herd is dominated by black hided, British breed-influenced genetics. These females excel at raising calves that produce high quality carcasses for the consumer Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 90

and that is very important. Over time, to earn premiums for their calves, many producers have begun straight breeding their commercial cows. True, those black hided British calves earn a premium at the sale barn but at what cost to the producer? Crossbreeding using Beefmasters is a proven method to increase maternal efficiency and calf performance, resulting in more cost savings and profit for the beef producer. How do we know that crossbreeding works? There have been countless scientific research projects on the effects of Heterosis (the scientific name for the result of hybrid vigor that occurs with crossbreeding) in livestock production. Time and again, crossbreeding has proven to be the single most effective way to increase productivity in commercial cow herds. Heterosis or hybrid vigor, is the result of crossbreeding. Heterosis leads to performance advantages in crossbreds over the average of their straight-bred parents. When used properly, as in a well-planned crossbreeding program, heterosis can lead to big improvements in performance and efficiency. That in turn leads to more profit for the beef producer. There are three types of heterosis and how well a breeder harnesses these types will determine how much impact hybrid vigor will have on his calf crop. Individual heterosis, directly affects several traits that are economically important. These improvements actually begin before the crossbred calf is born because the fetus is more viable and resilient. After birth crossbred calves are more vigorous resulting in more live and healthier calves. Growthier, heavier calves at almost every point are a result of crossbreeding. True, crossbred calves can also have heavier birth weights but the improved calf survivability of crossbred calves overshadows those concerns. Who can say no to more live calves born, more calves surviving to weaning and the bonus of those calves weighing more? Maternal heterosis are the effects that come from using crossbred cows. Those effects are very profound for maternal traits. It all begins with fertility which lowly heritable. Crossbreeding leads to big improvements in lowly heritable traits such as fertility, resulting in more calves born in a shorter time frame. The calves of crossbred mothers are more vigorous, grow faster and weigh more. As long as we sell cattle by the pound, these improvements are vital. While this is impressive, the big ...Continued on page 92

VOLUME 5

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FEBRUARY 2018


BEEFMASTER PROVEN MATERNAL

PROVEN EFFICIENCY

PROVEN HETEROSIS

Beefmaster ranked second,

for both steers and heifers, in an

18-breed feed efficiency test

conducted by the U.S. Meat Animal Research Center.

beefmasters.org www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Steers ADG,DMI = 0.203 Heifers ADG,DMI = 0.096 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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...Continued from page 90 impact of crossbred cows come from having a longer productive lifetime and producing more calves. Given the cost of replacement heifers in today’s market, a cow that produces for three more years (at a minimum) is a big advantage. Beefmasters excel in maternal traits. Beefmaster sired females add even more punch to your crossbreeding program. Table 1, to the right, demonstrates the impact on individual and maternal heterosis on production is truly eyeopening. As you can see, crossbreeding pays dividends. Old time cattlemen used to say that “hybrid vigor is the only free lunch in the cow business.” Keeping a crossbreeding program simple is the key to success. Stressing the genetic differences between breeds used in crossbreeding is important. The more unrelated the breeds being used are; the more of an impact heterosis will have. Crossing British breeds such as Angus x Hereford works very well but there are genetically similar. Crossing British breeds with Continental breeds such as Angus x Charolais yields better performance results because those two breeds are less related than Angus x Hereford. Crossing British breeds with an American breed such as Angus x Beefmaster leads to even greater advantages because of the Bos Indicus influence in Beefmaster. The roughly 50% Bos Indicus content in Beefmaster is totally unrelated to the British genetics in this cross; resulting in even higher heterosis impacts for all traits. The icing on the cake for this particular cross is the outstanding maternal heterosis that leads to superior females that are more fertile, wean more and larger calves and live longer more productive lives. To maximize heterosis potential and to keep a crossbreeding program simple, many ranchers use a terminal crossbreeding program. A great example is Angus x Beefmaster to produce a crossbred female that is designed to maximize maternal heterosis. Then those Angus x Beefmaster crossbred females would be mated to Continental bulls such as Charolais to maximize performance potential in their calves. This mating system leverages the genetic diversity across British, Continental and American breeds resulting in higher performance at every level and exploits breed complementarity needed to maximize production and profit. In today’s beef industry that demands efficiency, Beefmasters answer the challenge by being exceptional convertors of feed. In multiple all-breed bull development facilities that measure feed efficiency and residual feed intake, Beefmasters consistently rank as the most efficient convertors when compared to other breeds in the same facilities. In commercial feedyards, dry matter conversions in the five pound range are typical for Beefmaster sired steers. Ask any cattle feeder and they will tell you the importance of feed conversion and performance. While maternal heterosis is the main calling card for Beefmasters, it should be noted that carcass merit is not overlooked in this versatile breed. Given the prominence of black hided commercial cows in today’s industry, it is interesting to look at a Beefmaster progeny test performed by Texas A&M University from 1998-2001. Commercial Angus cows from the Texas A&M University (TAMU) McGregor Experiment Station were mated to five Beefmaster bulls. TAMU staff collected the complete performance information from the calves that were all born, grown and finished at the McGregor Station. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 92

TABLE Acrossbreed breedcomparisons comparisonsofofefficiency efficiencyevaluated evaluatedusing usingeither eitherpostweaning postweaninggain gain(PWG) (PWG)ororaverage average Table:1.Across daily dailygain gain(ADG) (ADG)during duringfeed feedintake intakedata datacollection collection(SE) (SE)ofofeighteen eighteensire sirebreeds breedsrelative relativetotoAngus Anguswith withaamore more positive number indicating a more efficientbreed breed positive number indicating a more efficient Steers

Heifers

Breed

ADG,DMI

PWG,DMI

ADG, DMI

Angus

0.000

0.000

0.000

PWG, DMI 0.000

Hereford

0.099 (0.051)

0.067 (0.038)

0.094 (0.037)

0.069 (0.030)

Red Angus

-0.014 (0.050)

-0.004 (0.037)

-0.004 (0.035)

0.014 (0.029)

Shorthorn

0.070 (0.057)

0.036 (0.042)

0.025 (0.041)

0.012 (0.034)

South Devon

-0.041 (0.118)

-0.090 (0.087)

0.203 (0.094)

0.197 (0.078)

Beefmaster

0.203 (0.062)

-0.029 (0.046)

0.096 (0.047)

0.046 (0.039)

Brahman

0.100 (0.063)

-0.147 (0.046)

-0.023 (0.045)

-0.081 (0.037)

Brangus

-0.002 (0.060)

-0.118 (0.044)

-0.049 (0.045)

-0.073 (0.037)

Santa Gertrudis

0.119 (0.060)

-0.006 (0.044)

0.012 (0.042)

-0.002 (0.035) -0.063 (0.035)

Braunvieh

0.073 (0.063)

0.019 (0.046)

-0.078 (0.042)

Charolais

0.070 (0.052)

0.033 (0.038)

0.030 (0.037)

0.021 (0.031)

Chiangus

0.130 (0.060)

0.025 (0.044)

0.008 (0.041)

0.002 (0.034) -0.026 (0.029)

Gelbvieh

0.107 (0.050)

0.016 (0.037)

-0.027 (0.035)

Limousin

0.206 (0.051)

0.039 (0.037)

0.017 (0.035)

0.014 (0.029)

Maine-Anjou

0.130 (0.060)

0.045 (0.044)

0.031 (0.042)

0.034 (0.035)

Salers

0.070 (0.060)

-0.011 (0.044)

0.002 (0.042)

-0.011 (0.035)

Simmental

0.027 (0.052)

0.025 (0.038)

-0.004 (0.038)

-0.009 (0.031)

Tarentaise

0.050 (0.120)

0.011 (0.089)

-0.081 (0.081)

-0.041 (0.067)

Significant breed differences (P <0.05) in bold.

Additionally TAMU scientists and USDA Graders collected the carcass data, including Warner-Bratzler Shear Force tests after the cattle were harvested at Sam Kane Beef Processors in Corpus Christi, Texas. The results for the 258 Beefmaster x Angus progeny were impressive. Seventy-two percent of the cattle received a quality grade of Choice or Prime while the average yield grade was 3.28. In today’s sophisticated grid marketing systems, these cattle would have earned solid premiums. Since that project was conducted, Beefmaster breeders have worked very hard to add even more carcass merit by utilizing ultrasound carcass data and now genomic tests to improve the quality of their end product. Time and again Beefmasters have proven themselves a great crossbreeding partner with black hided and Continental cattle both in the yard and on the rail. No breed of cattle is perfect. Beefmaster breeders realize that. That is why planned crossbreeding is so important to the future of the beef industry. Beefmasters are the most versatile crossbreeding tool available. Beefmaster’s 63 percent retained heterosis means superior females, more fertility, heavier weaning calves, more longevity, significantly more lifetime production and the list goes on. If you want to add more productivity and efficiency to your herd then add Beefmasters to your crossbreeding program.

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


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New Tax Laws and the Livestock Industry by John Alan Cohan, Attorney at Law The new tax law signed by President Trump, called the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act (TCJA), has several provisions beneficial to owners and breeders in the horse and livestock industries. I will discuss some of the highlights. New Deduction for Pass-Through Businesses: The new law changes how “pass-through” entities, such as sole proprietorships, partnerships, S corporations and LLCs, are taxed. This includes 85% of owners in the horse and livestock industries. Now, for the first time ever, the owner’s qualified business income (QBI) from passthroughs is allowed a 20 percent deduction, subject to restrictions that can apply at higher income levels. This constitutes a 20 percent tax cut for pass-through filers. QBI is generally defined as the net amount of qualified items of income, gain, deduction and loss from any qualified business of the noncorporate owner. (QBI does not include certain investment items, reasonable compensation paid to an owner for services rendered to the business or any guaranteed payments to a partner.) Also, the new law provides the top rate on income earned by owners of pass-through business at 37 percent -- which is a slight reduction from the former 39.6 percent rate. The pass-through provisions are an incentive for employees to become independent contractors. Many personnel working in the horse and livestock industries are already independent contractors, such as trainers, laborers, farriers, veterinarians, vendors, etc. Immediate Expensing and Bonus Depreciation: For property placed into service in tax years beginning after Dec. 31, 2017, the new law increases the maximum amount a taxpayer may deduct (or “expense”) to $1 million, and increases the phaseout threshold to $2.5 million. The “bonus depreciation” deduction for breeding stock, race horses, farm machinery and equipment will 96

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

now be 100 percent, an increase from the former 50 percent rate, for property placed in service after Sept. 27, 2017. This applies to new or used property purchased by the taxpayer. (Starting in 2023, bonus depreciation will go down to 80 percent.) Estate Tax: The long-disputed estate tax has been modified so that the exemption for married couples will be $10.98 million, compared to the former exemption of $5.49 million. This will greatly reduce the number of family businesses susceptible to the estate tax. New Corporate Tax Rate: For operations conducted as C corporations, the new law reduces the corporate income tax rate from 35 percent to 21 percent. Many large breeders and ranchers, as well as racetracks, conduct business as C corporations. Limitation on Losses: There are stricter rules for deducting losses. The maximum amount of taxable income that can be offset with net operating loss (NOL) deductions is generally reduced from 100 percent to 80 percent. NOLs can be carried forward indefinitely. However, NOLs can no longer be carried back to an earlier year, except for certain farming losses, which can be carried back for two years. The “hobby-loss” rules remain the same in terms of the taxpayer’s need to prove that the activity is engaged in for profit if there is a history of losses. This means that, as before, it is important not only to keep records to prepare accurate income tax returns, but to also keep records that measure your activity’s financial performance. The IRS is already grappling with a prolonged funding cut, a staff reduced by 23 percent since 2010, and outdated computers. The IRS will need to write countless guidelines and regulations to clarify key terms and concepts in the new law, as well as design new forms. Thus, enforcement and auditing capabilities are likely to drop significantly. VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


LISONBEE ANGUS& O L D ROY D A N G U S present the

Angus in the Basin Bull Sale

M A RC H 19, 2018

S A LE T I M E : 1

PM

( MT ) • D UC H E S N E C O U N T Y F AIRG RO U N D S • D U CH E S N E , UT

50 A NG U S B UL L S • 10 REGIS T ERED ANGUS F EM A LES P LU S 6 0 CO M M E RCIAL YE AR LING FEMALES - OPEN AND READY TO BR E E D

These bulls sell!

LISON BEE WARSAW 7 3 1 • 2/21/17 • +18966353 CED +9, BW +1.8, WW +90, YW +169, M +29 MB +.41, REA +.59, $W +92.53, $B +176.20 BASIN PAYWEIGHT 1682 X SITZ UPWARD 307R

This power fu l line up of bulls w ill o ffe r breed- lea ding E P D s a nd will inc lud e ca lv ing ea se bulls t h at a lso excel fo r grow t h a nd ca rca s s value s!

OA R PAY W E IG H T 687 • 2/21/17 • +18966353 CED I+7, BW I+1.1, WW I+56, YW I+97, M I+26 MB I+.74, REA I+.42, $W +64.79, $B +120.69 BASIN PAYWEIGHT 1682 X CONNEALY CONSENSUS 7229

J AM E S LI S ONBE E 4 3 5 - 7 24-2318 S T EV E O LDROYD 4 3 5 - 8 28-5011 R AN C E LONG 9 1 0 - 5 10-3464 LISON BEE STUD 70 4 • 2/3/17 • +18865814 CED +11, BW +.6, WW +72, YW +135, M +35 MB +.89, REA +.63, $W +81.13, $B +192.07 EXAR STUD 4658B X SITZ UPWARD 307R

OA R C H AL L EN G ER 587 • 2/24/17 • +18966473 CED +13, BW -.9, WW +80, YW +149, M +34 MB +1.43, REA +.67, $W +88.46, $B +173.80 VAR DISCOVERY 2240 X CONNEALY CONSENSUS 7229

Selling Sons of Basin Payweight 1682, VAR Discovery 2240, Quaker Hill Rampage 0A36, SAV Recharge 3436, EXAR Stud 4658B, and other proven AI Sires!

O L D ROY D A N G U S 1 2 2 0 S 2 5 0 0 W • Ve rn a l , U T 8 4 0 7 8 (h) 435.789.2975 • (c) 435.828.5011 sandse@ubtanet.com

L ISONBEE A NGUS www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

J L

2 1 2 S 1 9 3 0 W • Ro o s e ve l t , U T 8 4 0 6 6 (h) 435.722.0668 • (c) 435.724.2318 LisonbeeAngus@yahoo.com

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 5

FEBRUARY 2018


T HE H EREFORD

U TAH A SSOCIATION

4 7 TH A N N UA L BULL SALE 3 0 B ULLS • 15 F EMALES M ARCH 3 • 1

PM

• P RODUCER’ S L IVESTOCK • S ALINA, U T

Selling 45 Head from these Progressive Hereford Breeders P HILL A LLEN AND S ON, A NTIMONY • D ICK J ONES, O RANGEVILLE • D AN T AYLOR, G ENOLA O L I V E R B R O T H E R S , L E VA N • O J F I N L I N S O N , D E L T A • L A M O N D S M I T H , F E R R O N SIRED BY THESE BULLS

N JW 73S W 1 8 H O M ETO W N 1 0 Y E T

NJ W 7 3 S M 3 2 6 T R U ST 100W ET

CRR 719 CATA P U LT 109

TH 122 71I VICTOR 71 9 T

PLUS MORE BREED-LEADING SIRES!

Come enjoy a great afternoon hosted by the Utah Hereford Association! Call Shannon Allen at 435-624-3285

F OR M ORE I NFORMATION , C ONTACT :

U TAH H EREFORD A SSOCIATION

P RESIDENT • S HANNON A LLEN - 435-624-3285


Utilizing conventional embryo and in vitro technology to maximize genetic impact by Stevie Ipsen for the Utah Cattlemen’s Association

A

s cattle reproductive services mature, producers are working with animal health practitioners to find newer and better ways to quickly and more efficiently move the genetic improvement of cattle ahead. For more than 20 years, beef producers have been familiarizing themselves with the concept of embryo transfer (ET), which for many, has become an integral part of their breeding programs, especially on large scale seedstock operations. But now, cattlemen and women, whether purebred or commercial are using a range of reproductive sciences to multiply quality traits in their herds more quickly.

services in-center or on-site at a breeder’s ranch. Galen Lusk, DVM, a large animal practitioner and longtime embryologist, based in Sugar City, Idaho, works with beef producers throughout the Intermountain West. Lusk explains that conventional ET involves specific hormonal treatment of donor cows and heifers to cause multiple follicles to ovulate. He says donor cows are bred using artificial insemination (AI) following this superovulation regimen and estrus or standing heat. Then, approximately seven days after insemination, embryos are non-surgically collected or “flushed” from the donor’s uterus and transferred fresh into synchronous recipients who will serve as surrogate mothers who then carry the embryos to BACK TO BASICS: EMBRYO TRANSFER term and raise the calves as their own, though the DNA ET is an advanced reproductive technology and a is 100 percent that of the donor cow and a selected AI progressive tool that can help beef producers produce sire. more offspring from an elite cow and can extend the Over time, Lusk says the technology has rapidly impact of outstanding cattle genetics. Well-established evolved. Having worked in the field of embryonics since ET providers generally offer the option of performing 1977, he has seen literally every aspect of the science change drastically. “When ET technology first came about, there was no way to sync a cow’s heat cycle, so we had to work with their natural heat cycle,” Lusk said. “Donor cows had to be sent to a center to be flushed. All flushes were surgically invasive and all embryo work was done on fresh eggs. At that point in time, nothing was frozen. When those few things changed, it turned the industry upside down.” Today, embryos may also be cryopreserved or frozen to be transferred at a later point in time. Similar to AI semen, the frozen embryos are maintained in liquid nitrogen storage tanks until they are thawed and transferred to recipient cattle. Frozen embryos are washed and labeled according to the Through technology like embryo transfer or in vitro fertilization, an embryo with elite International Embryo Transfer genetics can be implanted into a surrogate “recipient” cow who raises the calf as her own. Societies protocol. This allows This practice has become widely used as a way to maximize the genetic impact of superior them to be shipped domestically or 100

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exported internationally. An ET collection can be performed on a donor female every 28 to 60 days. The average number of transferrable embryos per collection is 5 to 6, but a wide range of results are common. Some donor collections result in zero viable embryos, while other donor collections may yield more than 20 viable embryos. Just as science in any field gradually evolves, cattle producers and large animal veterinarians have taken ET work a step further in recent years. While embryo transfer is done “in vivo,” or inside of a living animal “in vitro” options – outside of the animal – also exist in beef production and are being more widely used. A GAME CHANGER: IN VITRO FERTILIZATION With in vitro fertilization, embryos are created from oocytes (unfertilized egg cells) by fertilizing them with semen in a Petri dish. Oocytes are first collected from the ovaries of donors by ultrasound-guided follicular aspiration. They are then matured in a Petri dish and fertilized 20 to 24 hours later. Through this method a variety of semen types can be used. Conventional, sexed, frozen or reverse-sorted semen (sexed before fertilization but after it has been previously frozen) may be used for fertilization. Oocytes are then developed in an incubator for seven days, at which point, Lusk explains, that the resulting viable embryos are transferred into recipient cows. To say IVF technology has taken off would be an understatement. Lusk said at the American Embryo Transfer Association meeting three or four years ago very few licensed embryologists were practicing IVF and at the meeting last year over 350 were utilizing the technology in the livestock industry. Similarly, Lusk said the proportion of breeders using ET and IVF has dramatically changed. “Initially, only the top premier programs were using AI and ET,” Lusk said. “Today, I’d say virtually all seedstock programs utilize AI, nearly all have

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“Initially, only the top premier programs were using AI and ET. Today, I’d say virtually all seedstock programs utilize AI, nearly all have implemented ET at some level .” —Galen Lusk, DVM

implemented ET at some level and more are using IVF. Year after year we see conception rates improving and learning more about how this technology can be implemented, not just in beef herds but in all cattle production sectors.” That is not to say there are not risks. While ET and IVF are not as invasive as they once were, Lusk warns that both can cause scar tissue and hinder a cow’s ability to breed or flush conventionally. “It’s also important to note that IVF embryos are not as likely to take as conventional embryos,” Lusk said. “With regular embryos we see a 60 percent success rate compared to a 45 percent success rate in IVF embryos. But it is improving every day and getting better and better.” He also says there is a slightly higher rate of abortion with IVF embryos compared to conventional embryos. But the fact that IVF can be preformed on donors while ...Continued on page 102

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...Continued from page 101 they are pregnant is an added advantage as well. “We can preform IVF on cows from 30 days after they calve until they are as far along as 120 in gestation,” Lusk said. IVF can be a great way to utilize an animal that because of injury or age can not be flushed in a normal fashion. Additionally, Lusk says IVF can work well in a case where the semen to be used is very rare, as one straw of semen can fertilize the ova from many cows. “When it comes to using a high-dollar donor cow, I advise livestock owners to consider using IVF sparingly as there can be risks that should be evaluated before using this or any new technology, for that matter,” Lusk advises. While large-scale, nationallyrecognized operations utilize ET and IVF technologies, even smaller breeders are now implementing ET and IVF as a way to more quickly emphasize the traits of a high-quality donor cow in their herd in a way that the cow can’t do on her own through conventional breeding. From small beef producers without a lot of space to raise their own calves, to club calf operators looking for a good mama cow to raise an exceptional show animal to a rodeo stock contractor who sells young bucking stock, there are a wide variety of folks who rely on reproductive technology to fill a void they might have somewhere on their operation. For someone, it may not make sense to purchase a high dollar cow for their small operation. ET and IVF make it possible for them to obtain genetics that will help progress their herd quality without breaking the bank. Though once used by only elite operations with high cattle numbers, the accuracy and availability of ET and IVF resources has made it more affordable for smaller producers. As reproductive sciences continue to evolve and are refined, it is likely that beef producers both small and large will have access to possibilities that the past generation of cattlemen may have never even dreamed of. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 102

COMMON QUESTIONS TransOva Genetics is a national and international firm specializing in embryo transfer and in vitro fertilization. Below are some common questions producers have that TransOva has addressed regarding IVF technology. Question: What results can be expected on each IVF cycle? Answer: Results vary with each donor, but we typically expect to collect ~18 oocytes per aspiration. On average, 30 percent of these oocytes will develop into a viable embryo. Thus, we expect about five transferrable (Grade 1 & 2) embryos per IVF cycle on average. Donors that produce greater numbers of oocytes and oocytes of higher quality may see larger numbers of embryos produced, whereas donors with compromised reproductive conditions may have lower results. Development rate will also vary greatly depending on the sire used. Question: What results can be expected with different semen types? Answer: On a given sire, the development rate between conventional and reverse-sorted semen is generally very similar. However, we do see a significant decrease in development rate with pre-sexed frozen semen compared to reverse-sorted semen with many bulls. Thus, our recommendation for clients wanting to produce sexed embryos is to use reverse-sorted semen. Question: What donor females are candidates for the IVF program? Answer: While reproductively sound donors are most likely to achieve success in IVF, we have worked with donors with a variety of reproductive conditions, including those unable to achieve success in conventional ET. Donors that tend to make unfertilized or degenerate embryos are a common type with which we have had success. Many clients also appreciate the ability to create embryos from pregnant donors and younger heifers with IVF. Question: Can a donor cow be flushed while pregnant? Is there added risk? Answer: One aspect of IVF that is surprising to many producers is that it can be performed while the donor cow is pregnant without taking her out of production. Between 40 and 100 days of pregnancy, oocytes can be aspirated from the donor and embryos can then be created, giving a donor a natural or AI calf and multiple IVF offspring at the same time. While the procedure is quite safe, clients should be aware that there is an increased risk of pregnancy loss and added risk to the recipient cow as the technology becomes more refined. Question: How often can oocytes be collected? Answer: Oocytes can be collected every other week as long as the attending veterinarian believes this is best for the donor. This fact makes it possible to create a significant number of pregnancies in a given period of time. Question: What are the pregnancy rates when IVF embryos are transferred fresh? Answer: On average, we expect fresh IVF embryos to achieve about a 45 to 50 percent pregnancy rate. This will vary somewhat depending on the time of year, type of recipient, and recipient management. Question: Can IVF embryos be frozen? Answer: Good-quality IVF embryos may be frozen with very acceptable results. Pregnancy rates from frozen IVF embryos in recipient cows have averaged 4550 percent. If clients would like to freeze IVF embryos, it is important to be very selective on the quality of embryos that are frozen. Embryos that do not qualify for freezing should be transferred fresh or discarded. IVF embryos will be frozen with one of two methods: 10 percent glycerol or direct-thaw. Data indicates that clients can expect very similar results with both freezing methods. VOLUME 5

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ABS........................................................... 86 Adams Angus Acres............................... 25 Allflex, USA............................................. 34 All West-Select Sires............................. 105 American Angus Association............... 23 American Gelbvieh Association........... 85 American Hereford Associatino........... 37 American Simmental Association........ 55 Anderson Angus..................................... 80 Banks Simmental.................................... 80 Barker Cattle Company......................... 10 Beckman Angus...................................... 25 Beefmaster Breeders United.................. 91 Blackett Angus........................................ 80 Cannon Angus........................................ 83 Circle Four Simmentals......................... 39 Colyer Herefords and Angus................ 63 Conquest Insurance............................... 80 Daniels Hereford Ranch........................ 41 Daniels Livestock.................................... 80 DBC Angus............................................. 78 Diamond Peak Cattle Company......... 106 Double JR Simmentals........................... 71 Fullmer Crescent Moon........................... 5 Genex....................................................... 75 Giant Rubber Water Tanks.................... 78 Gillespie Angus....................................... 95 Hoffman A.I............................................ 28 Hot Shoe Red Angus.............................. 74

Hyline Angus Ranch.............................. 67 Intermountain Farmers................... 20, 21 Intermountain Genetic Alliance........... 80 Ipsen Cattle Company........................... 45 Johansen Herefords.............................. 6, 7 Keller Cattle Corp..................................... 9 Lazy JB Angus......................................... 40 Lisonbee Angus...................................... 97 Loveless Gelbvieh............................. 39, 49 Lund Ranch............................................. 82 Lyman Livestock....................................... 3 Lynn Angus............................................. 80 McPherson Farms.................................. 35 Memory Ranches.................................... 89 Miles High Angus................................... 80 Modern Litho.......................................... 38 Multimin, USA....................................... 46 Newport Laboratories............................ 93 Oldroyd Angus....................................... 97 Phil Allen & Sons................................... 50 Pot of Gold Bull Sale.............................. 87 Powder River........................................... 94 Quest of the West................................... 39 Redd Ranches............................................ 2 Rees Bros................................................. 30 Rigby Cattle Company........................... 88 Rigby Cattle Services ............................. 88 Rimrock Angus....................................... 25 R&R Genetics Sale.................................. 71

Riverbend Ranch.................................... 15 Robin’s Nest Angus................................. 14 Roche Cattle............................................ 81 RV Bar Angus......................................... 17 Scales Northwest................................... 107 Shandar Angus Ranch........................... 31 Shaw Cattle Co........................................ 47 Silveus Rangeland Insurance................ 98 Sitz Angus................................................ 27 Sorensen Angus................................ 29, 39 Spring Cove Ranch................................. 51 T-Heart Ranch........................................ 73 Thomas Angus Ranch............................ 43 Top Hat Simmentals............................... 44 Udy Cattle Company.............................. 53 Utah Angus Association...................... 103 Utah Beef Council.................................. 18 Utah Beef Improvement Association... 19 Utah Hereford Association................... 99 Vertical Edge Genetics........................... 61 Vitaferm................................................... 65 Ward Angus Ranch................................ 52 Western AgCredit................................... 79 Western Livestock Journal.................... 66 Western Video Market........................... 11 Wine Bar Ranch...................................... 44 Winnemucca Ranch Rodeo Weekend. 62 Zions Bank.............................................. 70 Zoetis.................................................. 56, 57

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Utah Cattlemen Seedstock Edition 2018  

The 5th Volume of the Seedstock Edition for the Utah Cattlemen's Association.

Utah Cattlemen Seedstock Edition 2018  

The 5th Volume of the Seedstock Edition for the Utah Cattlemen's Association.

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