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V OLUME 7

F EBRUARY 2020

U TA H C AT T L E M A N

S EEDSTOCK

EDITIO N

A special edition of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association official publication. www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Redd Ranches Annual

BULL SALE

APRIL 11TH 2020 ◆ PARADOX, COLORADO

Pedigree is one thing, Performance is EVERYTHING! GAR SURE FIRE

AAA 18024255

◆ The premier Calving Ease and carcass bull in the beef business today. ◆ SURE FIRE defines maternal like a good bull should. He’s high for DOC, HP, CEM, sires the right-size in terms of frame and he stamps his daughters with superb udders. With nearly 150 actual carcass records and top 1 percent Marbling, expect quality grade premiums!

KG SOLUTION 0018

AAA 16796888

◆ A breed leader for calving ease and performance, Solution is an obvious choice if you sell at weaning or retain ownership. ◆ A true customer satisfier, Solution continues to be a go-to sire for commercial cattlemen seeking fault-free progeny.

FRONT AND CENTER 1840 AAA 17029809 ◆ Big time curve bender spread, with a +16 CED and strong growth genetics ◆ The #1 Bull for Sire Alliance Maternal Index with reduced Feed Intake and top 1% Feed Efficiency ◆ Super sound, Foot Score research leader with +.42 Claw and +.46 Angle EPD

BROWN ORACLE B112

RAA 1703720

◆ Oracle is the #1 bull to combine marbling and rib-eye area. Predicted to be one of the highest profit producing Red Angus bulls. Top 25% of Red Angus Breed in 13 out of 16 traits. More than just a carcass bull, he exhibits amazing growth, combined with excellent calving ease and stayability.

PREMIER

RAA 1379610

W W W. R E D D R A N C H E S . C O M

RED ANGUS ◆ BLACK ANGUS ◆ SIMANGUS ◆ GELBVIEH

SELLING 200 BULLS

◆ Progeny are thick made, correct, well balanced ◆ Exceptional EPDs, packaging low birth weight and high growth with added carcass merit ◆ PREMIER offers calving ease with a notch of extra frame and a ton of extra performance, profit minded cattle with a great look

BROWN JYJ REDEMPTION Y1334 RAA 1441805

◆ Redemption is an iconic sire of recent times and continues to be a go-to sire for both calving-ease sons and productive daughters. ◆ Heifers bred to Redemption command a premium due to his name recognition as a sure-bet calving-ease sire. • DNA Profiled • PAP Scored • Herd PAP scored since 1978 • Free Delivery • Sight unseen buying guarantee • Live internet bidding

105 Years of High Altitude Genetics

2

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

WWW.REDDRANCHES.COM VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


L Y M A N L I V E S T O C K C AT T L E M E N T O C AT T L E M E N B U LL S A LE • S AT U R DAY • F E B RUA RY 2 9 • 1 P M • • P RO D U C E R ’ S L I V E S TO C K M A R K E T • S A L I NA , U T • • W ATCH AND B ID L IVE AT WWW .CATTLEUSA. COM •

75 Y E A R L I N G B U L L S

How do you want your bulls? PAP Tested? We PAP test all our bulls at 7,200 feet! Guaranteed? We 100% guarantee all our bulls! Fed for Free? We offer free wintering until April 15!

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Delivered? We offer delivery on all our bulls! Put through the ringer? Cattle raised at elevation and bred to perform in the harsh western climates!

Most of all, we offer our best! Call 801-310-1570

A

S IM

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W / C R APID F IRES 2 1 0 1 C C A LV I N G E ASE B L A Z E D - FAC E D BU L L W I T H A TO N O F M I D D L E !

O THER S IRES L R S T O P T E N • W / C L O C K D OW N • H O O K S B E AC O N • W / C U N I T E D T F S B L AC K I C E • J VC C A LVA RY • B ASI N P AY W E I G H T • S I T Z R E S O U RC E 6 8 7 C

ANGUS • SIMANGUS • SIMMENTAL • BALANCER

L YMAN L IVESTO C K

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

S A L EM , U T E RIC L YMAN • 8 0 1 . 310.1570 K EV IN L YMAN • 8 0 1 . 376.5774 MCIKE L YMAN • 8 0 1 . 404.0587 Utah attleman Seedstock Edition 3


UTAH CATTLEMEN’S ASSOCIATION

Serving Ranchers Since 1890 UCA PRESIDENT Tracy Hatch, Randolph 1ST VICE PRESIDENT Daniel Crozier, Roosevelt 2ND VICE PRESIDENTS Joseph Weston, Randolph Nils Myrin, Altamont Don Richards, Roosevelt IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT Mark Wintch, Milford EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT Brent Tanner UTAH BEEF COUNCIL Director of Marketing Jacob Schmidt, RDN The Utah Cattlemen’s Association works to represent cattlemen in the legislative arena, provide educational information and assist with networking opportunities. If you own cattle and are not a current member, checkout our member benefits by visiting www.utahcattlemen.org The Utah Cattleman newsletter is published monthly with this one-time annual publication published in February. This publication is sent to all UCA members and its affliates as part of their annual dues as well as prospective members of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association.

Table of Contents Working For You 20/20 vision at UCA............................................................8 Popular opinion: Beef is best..........................................18 Moving beyond trade wars...........................................24. Department of ag and food led by farmer................42. Who’s working for you in Washington..........................46.

Interest & Education New president takes reins at UCA................................. 14 Real Meat Act gets introduction................................... 26 Fighting respiratory disease in calves........................... 36 Hereford innovation......................................................... 38 Simmental: The details is in the data............................ 52 Angus built to last today and in the future.................. 62 Gelbvieh guide to genetic selection........................... 66 Utah’s beef industry at a glance.................................. 72 Beefmaster brings on board new tools........................ 76 Comprehending calving ease numbers........................ 78 Bringing back hybrid vigor.............................................. 82 Spring 2020 cattlemen’s calendar................................ 90 Index of Advertisers.......................................................... 92

For advertising inquiries in future issues of this publication or in upcoming newsletters, contact Brent Tanner at (801) 355-5748 or brent@utahcattlemen.org POSTMASTER: Send address changes to the Utah Cattlemen’s Association 150 S 600 E, #10-B Salt Lake City, Utah 84102 (ISSN #3933) mailed from USPS facility in Jefferson City, Mo.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


Low Birthweight • Performance • Carcass • Data McPherson Angus Bulls Have Everything the Commercial Man Needs!

Selling 7 0 A ngus bulls t h is spri n g!

We are offering bulls sired by these leaders

DL Dually

KCF Bennett Fortress

Werner Flat Top

Barstow Bankroll

Plus Genetics From Sitz Investment Rampage Ten X Basin Excitement SydGen Mandate

Cal l for m ore info rma ti o n ( 801) 3 62-7150

Look for our genetics at Angus in the Basin Bull Sale March 16 • Duchesne, UT Selling 1 Herd Bull Prospect!! Reg #19561013

ced +7 bw +1.7 ww +98 yw +170 m +28 marb +.75 rea +1.07 $w +101 $f +143 $b +209

McPherson Farms P AUL M C P HER SO N F A M ILY 885 W 200 S • N EPHI , UT 8 4 6 4 8 (80 1 ) 3 6 2 -7 1 5 0 M C P HER SO N F A R M S @ M SN . CO M

The 2nd Largest Angus Seedstock Herd in Utah www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Beef Improvement Association March 21 • Salina, UT Offering 18 Bulls Private Treaty At the Ranch BSE Tested PAP Tested Volume Discounts Available Delivery Options Available Guaranteed

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Over 40 Years

of performance breeding!

Sale bulls sired by these outstanding herd bulls are available! Walking herd sires in use

JH Advance 6101D

In

ing! troduc

HH Advance 6212D

HH Advance 5011C

CL 1 Domino 660D

CL 1 Domino 269Z

HH Advance 4344B

HH Advance 3033A

AI sires in use

CL1 Domino 215Z

Semen available on all of our herd sires.

Find us on our website at www.JohansenHerefords.com and on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube! Johansen Herefords

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Johansen Herefords

Call today for more information. Visitors always welcome! PO Box 199 • Castle Dale, UT Jonathan • (435) 650-8466 Craig • (435) 820-8490 johansenherefords@gmail.com www.johansenherefords.com


Feature Sale Bulls ld

ro a e y 2

1979-2020

JH Advance 8127F

JH L1 Domino 9102G

JH L1 Domino 9104G

JH L1 Domino 9106G

JH L1 Domino 9115G

JH L1 Domino 9123G

JH L1 Domino 9130G

JH L1 Domino 9133G

JH Advance 8150G

Over 30 yearlings and coming 2 year olds available by PRIVATE TREATY! Our herd consists of 140 registered Hereford females. Since the beginning, the base herd has been Line-One bred. It has been proven over time that these genetics are superior for our environment. Using our Line-One genetics will add an extra punch of heterosis to commercial breeders. Hereford genetics bring hybrid vigor, improved fertility, feed efficiency and easy handling docility to your program. Find out more on our website.

Our Cow Selection Criteria Fertility • Reproduction • Udder Quality • Pigment • Longevity And Conversion So They Can Produce Bulls That Are Powerful • Rugged • Eye Appealing • Sound • Guaranteed www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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TIME MARCHES ON

Embracing industry advancements while honoring tradition By Utah Cattlemen’s Association Executive Vice President Brent Tanner Congratulations, we made it to the year 2020. For some of us with silvering or thinning hair, the year 2020 was once only a time imagined in science fiction movies or a George Jetson Saturday morning cartoon. Now here we are living and using technology some of which seemed only a fantasy just years ago. The cattle industry is a unique business in that we are fortunate to carry on a lot of the old traditions and practices of our parents and grandparents, yet we also get to enjoy the modern conveniences that advanced technology provides. I smile every time I see a cowboy trailing cattle or roping calves at a spring branding who whips out a cell phone, takes a picture and sends that picture wirelessly throughout air to be seen by possibly millions of people around the world, almost instantly. As you study this 2020 edition of the Utah Cattleman seedstock magazine, pay close attention to the industry advancements and years of quality breeding programs. I hope we all recognize and appreciate the hard work generations have endured to bring a breeding program to where it is today. Many of these breeding programs have roots back to times before frozen embryos, genetic testing, internet marketing, and many other modern advancements.

While many of these breeding programs link back generations to simpler times, they are bringing us today the most advanced and cutting-edge genetics to be found anywhere in the world. Along with the breeding programs that have advanced through years of improvement, so has the feed industry, livestock pharmaceutical industry and equipment dealers. Look around at local ranches and you will see bone piles of what we now consider as outdated equipment. Those abandoned relics were what our parents thought were great inventions and cutting edge for their time. It should make us pause to think about what we are using today. Will it be replaced with something even better in the years to come? Will you find that idea or technology in this publication? Progressive ranchers should always be looking for better ways to conduct business or improved tools to produce a better product. To illustrate how the United States beef industry is progressive and advancing; a 2019 white paper, authored by Sara Place, Ph.D, highlights why and how the U.S. is the leader in sustainable beef production. “Compared ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 10

2020 8

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 7

•

FEBRUARY 2020


13TH ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE

PERFORMANCE TESTED ANGUS BULL AND FEMALE SALE Saturday

FEBRUARY 29, 2020 1 PM (MST) At the Ranch • 7673 Hwy 40 • Jensen, Utah

SELLING 50 ANGUS BULLS 2 SIM-ANGUS BULLS 5 HEREFORD BULLS 5 FEMALES

PROGENY FROM THESE SIRES SELL:

18170041 SYDGEN ENHANCE

Other sires in use: SS Objective • Mytty in Focus • AAR Ten X Quaker Hill Rampage • MGR Treasure • GAR Sure Fire • Sitz Sensation Jindra Acclaim • S Foundation 514 • Ellingson Homegrown 6035 Springfield Ramesses 6124 • HPF Optimizer A512 CCR Cowboy Cut • Next Level

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• Free delivery on five or more bulls within 150 miles. • Complimentary feed on bulls until June 1, 2020. • Video preview online at Liveauctions.tv.

18389838 BAR R JET BLACK 5063 Randy Vincent (435) 828-1111 I Randan Vincent (435) 828-1116 Jake Wilkins (435) 828-8391 rvranch@easilink.com I www.rvbarangus.com THE RV BAR HERD IS NOW IN ITS FOURTH GENERATION AND CONTINUES TO GROW AND EXPAND WITH SUPERIOR ANGUS SEEDSTOCK.

For more information go to: www.rvbarangus.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

18414912 TEX PLAYBOOK 5437 9 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8 to 1975, it takes 36 percent fewer cattle to produce the same amount of beef today. This dramatic improvement in efficiency has been driven by improvements in beef cattle genetics, nutrition, biotechnologies and husbandry practices that result in improved animal well-being. Research and extension and adoption of new knowledge is a continuous process that delivers on incremental improvements in reducing beef cattle production’s resource use and environmental impacts. Advancements in grazing land management, genomically-enhanced expected progeny differences (EPDs), methane-inhibitors, integrated crop-livestock systems, water recycling technology, and manure composting are just a few of the examples of new technologies being deployed and tested that will further enhance the sustainability of U.S. beef production. Ultimately, the U.S. beef industry is resilient and wellpositioned to continue to provide U.S. and international consumers a superior animal source food in a socially and environmentally responsible manner for decades to come.” The year 2020 marks the 150th anniversary of the first group of livestock producers in Utah who organized themselves to create the Utah Livestock Growers

Association, which eventually became the Utah Cattlemen’s Association. The association was organized to represent the livestock industry and work on industry issues. In the conference room of the UCA office hangs the portraits of every president that served from that early beginning in 1870. As I look at their faces, I can’t help but wonder how they would react to current livestock production practices, political climates and issues that we face today. Just this past week, the president of the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association was able to bridge past and future at an important industry event. The president of the United States of America signed a historic trade agreement with China. In the room seated near the NCBA president was a 96-year-old grey-haired gentleman, Henry Kissinger. Mr. Kissinger recalled his first trade visit to China in 1971. He marveled at the advancement of work to get this historic trade deal signed. Looking back, a lot of work went into that trade deal. Looking forward as cattle producers we see potential for a market for beef products that maybe we can’t even comprehend. As we stand in the year 2020 at the top of the bridge of time, we can look back one direction at the past accomplishments and great traditions. We then must look to the future only to imagine, or dream, of what is still ahead.

Trust in a program that stands behind their product!

True Quality from Robins Nest Angus ranch

mcconnell ALTITUDE 311 4 8.15.13 • 17877778 • 3114 (ced) +8 (bw) -0.8 (ww) +58 (yw) +102 (m) +19 (mb) +.58 (re) +.09 ($m) +77 ($b) +88

ff EZ MONEY d217 3.7.16 • 18526415 • D217

mgr TREASURE 1.17.15 • +18156972 • 5017

(ced) +10 (bw) -.1 (ww) +71 (yw) +131 (m) +22 (mb) +.21 (re) +.72 ($b) +142

(ced) +11 (bw) -1.0 (ww) +70 (yw) +133 (m) +13 (mb) +1.18 (re) +.51 ($m) +62 ($b) +153

OUR PROGRAM AI P ROGRAM S INCE 1990 • PAP T ESTING 100% OF O UR C ATTLE S INCE 2005 • S TRICT C ULLING C ATTLE ARE F ULLY G UARANTEED • F OCUS ON S TRUCTURE, P OWER, AND L ONGEVITY SELLING CATTLE AT Utah Angus Association Sale Ogden, UT • April 4 Rocky Mtn Angus Association Sale Ogden, UT • Nov 14

Private Treaty at the Ranch 10

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

Call us Today! Brent 435-529-0103 Hank 435-201-9679 Emmett 435-979-4154 Visitors Always Welcome!

ANGUS RANCH Brent and Lisa Robins Salina, UT h (435) 529-0103 f (435) 287-0483

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


WHY CHOOSE

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Chris (435) 231-2721 Chace (435) 231-2719

Located 10 miles south of Producers Livestock Auction! www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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FEBRUARY 2020


www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Family, Man.

For UCA’s new president, success starts at home

by Misty Russell for the Utah Cattlemen’s Association

I

n a community of range and farmland surrounded by the Crawford and Montecristo mountain ranges, the Hatch family runs a sizeable cattle operation. This is home to the newly-elected president of the Utah Cattlemen’s Association, Tracy Hatch. UCA members officially elected Hatch as their newest president at the culmination of the annual Utah Cattlemen’s Convention held in Salt Lake City in December 2019 after years of dedication to the association as a member and in leadership roles. Prior to his election to the help of the statewide ranching organiztion, Hatch had previously served The Hatch Family, Brandon, JD. Michelle, Debbie, Tracy and Nikki. as both the first vice president and second vice president making him as prepared for the title as been in the family for more than 100 years beginning any cattleman can be. with Joseph Hatch, Tracy’s great grandfather, who started Hatch has been very active in the UCA for the last the operation in 1891. 10 years and has been a part of the Utah Farm Bureau Both ranching and service to the agricultural for 30 years. He says that actively participating in the community are truly a family affair for the Hatches. Tracy Cattlemen’s Association is something he hopes every credits the support of family, the sacrifices of his parents, member of the cattle industry will want to do. In fact, when asked about his goals for his term as UCA President and especially his wife Debbie who joins him in his service and outreach, for the good in his life. he shared fervently his desire to grow and strengthen the “Support of family effects everything,” said Hatch. “I’ll voice of cattle producers, by helping them recognize the always be grateful for my wife, I wouldn’t be the person I great value they have when they band together. am today without Debbie.” “One goal would be to help all cattlemen feel Speaking of family brings both joy and humility to welcome. If you don’t come and get involved you just Hatch. He says that it’s the whole family that ensures the don’t realize what an impact you can have and how much success of the ranch. He also makes it clear that he would you can really do,” said Hatch. be unable to give time to his efforts within the UCA if He credits UCA with being a place where producers it weren’t for the dedication and sacrifice of not only his gain knowledge and a voice, and where learning and wife, but his children and grandchildren. networking result in growth, change and solutions. The Hatch family consists of Tracy, Debbie, a Hatch’s desire to participate and serve in daughter, Nikki, and son Brandon and his wife Michelle organizations like UCA seems to have come naturally, and their two children, JD and Hanna. Together the tightas both his father and grandfather did the same. He has knit family continues the legacy forged by generations followed their lead in more ways than one. The Hatch Ranch in the tiny Rich County town of Randolph has passed. VOLUME 7 • FEBRUARY 2020 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 14


“It is very humbling to know that I can travel if I need to. I can go meet with people who have concerns or are having a hard time. I can go to meetings or a convention and my family will be there to pick up the slack. Debbie, Brandon, Nikki, everybody spends extra time working so that I can do this and serve in this way. It means a lot to have that kind of support.” Brandon says he has known from a very young age that family was his father’s number one priority. “Dad always puts family first,” he shared. If I needed something, or Nikki needed something growing up it came first. If he needed something, it came last.” Sacrificing for the family is something Brandon loves most about his parents. He says they taught him a lot through the way they did things. They ran things “tight” and worked hard to run the ranch responsibly. To this day, Brandon’s favorite movie is “Hoosiers.” Not necessarily because of the movie itself, but because of the memory tied to it. He says that he can remember a time when his parents clipped little coupons off of frozen food boxes and mailed them away. The movie “Hoosiers” is what they got in return. “I’ll just never forget that. That my parents were serious enough about running things right that we ate all those frozen pizzas or whatever it was and didn’t splurge on things. And how excited they were when we got that movie in the mail at a time when we didn’t just go out and buy things like that.” Another memory Brandon holds dear is one rooted in tradition. He recalls a time at the age of 2 or 3 when his dad took him out on a “bull trip.” It is something they no longer do, but at the time it was a seasonal event. He remembers others on horses at 3 a.m. driving bulls, his uncle snoring, and getting to stay all night in the cab of the truck because he was too young to stay out. “That’s one thing about dad,” Brandon said with a smile in his voice. “I’ll always remember him letting me come along even though I was sure to be in the way. I was just so small, but he let me be a part of it anyway.” The experiences shared by his son offer a glimpse into the man who says his greatest strength is his ability

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 16

I want people to know that my door is open. If you’re from another state, or my hometown I want to talk with you and know what you’re concerned about and answer your questions and help bring solutions. www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

”—Tracy Hatch

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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...CONTINUED ROM PAGE 15 to bring people together. And that is what he says he hopes to continue to do as UCA President. Hatch says there is a lot of good things going on right now in the ranching community in the western states and in Utah in particular. He noted that the relationship between cattlemen and U.S. Department of Agriculture under the current administration is in a good place overall. In Utah, he says he also thinks cattlemen and the Bureau of Land Management are working well together right now to be good land managers. He recalled a time in the 90s when it was planned to remove grazing from public lands and compared it to where they are now. “It’s been a long road to get to where we are now, but we have been doing well and I hope people can see that grazing on public lands has not just benefitted cattlemen. It does benefit cattlemen and cattle greatly. But it also benefits the land itself, it has helped us manage our resources well. That benefits every person who uses those public lands,” Hatch explained. Hatch also recognizes needs to change and improve in his home state, and said the UCA never stops. The

need to continue learning and reaching out to those considering policy and legislation never goes away. He also hopes to work with others to improve information available to producers. With enthusiasm, Hatch shares that while UCA members reach out in a variety of different directions, a lot of times it is they who are invited to the table by others. And that means a lot to the new UCA President. “I want people to know that my door is open. If you’re from another state, or my home town I want to talk with you and know what you’re concerned about and answer your questions and help bring solutions.” Hatch said that when he was first elected, he felt a little overwhelmed and even intimidated in some regards. Being involved in any position means working together with individuals of varying backgrounds, ideas, opinions, and beliefs. But he seems to be taking it in stride and welcoming each opportunity that comes his way. He says he finds serving his fellow UCA members very satisfying, especially when he is able to be a part of bringing all those differences together and helping cattlemen join forces to create solutions. And that is exactly what he says he will work to accomplish.

P O L L E D H E R E F O R D B U L L S WI T H POWER • MATERNAL TRAIT S

PERFORMANCE

O UR B ULL S ALE C ALENDAR ! F ALLON A LL B REEDS B ULL S ALE FA LL O N LI V E S T O C K E XC H A N G E F E B R UA RY 1 5 • FA LL O N , N V

U TA H H E R E F O R D A S S O C I A T I O N B U L L S A L E PRODUCER’S LIVESTOCK MARKET MARCH 7 • SALINA, U T

B a s i n A l l - B r e e d s B ULL S ALE BASIN LIVESTOCK MARKET M A R C H 1 4 • R O O S E V E LT, U T

U TA H B E E F I M P R O V E M E N T A S S O C I A T I O N PRODUCER’S LIVESTOCK MARKET MARCH 21 • SALINA, U T

P R I VA T E T R E A T Y

AT T H E

A N T I M O N Y, U T

R ANCH

featuring the influence of these great sires!

NJW

O UR C OMMITMENT

TO

73S W18 HOMETOWN 10Y RST TIME’S A WASTIN’ 0124

Q UALIT Y

We a r e a f a m i l y o p e r a t i o n d e d i c a t e d t o r a i s i n g t o p t i e r Po l l e d H e r e f o r d c a t t l e . We s t r i c t l y c u l l a n d s e l e c t o n l y t o p c a t t l e t o u s e i n o u r p r o g r a m . W e a r e c o n fi d e n t t h e s e c a t t l e will work for you. Call us anytime, and we will do our best to help you.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

BOYD 31Z BLUEPRINT 6153

P HIL ALLEN POLLED

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P O B o x 1 2 0 0 7 4 | A n t i m o n y, U T 8 4 7 1 2 Shannon Allen 435-624-3285 s j a l l e n @ c o l o r - c o u n t r y. n e t

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


Utah Beef Improvement Association

Performance Bull Test Sale

UBIA

e l a S

Since 1972

March 21, 2020 - 1:00 p.m. Producers Livestock Market - Salina, UT Sale Preview at 10:00 a.m.

Charolais Black Angus Hereford Simmental Red Angus Gelbvieh Balancer Sim-Angus

Performance bulls for today’s cattleman.

View bull videos 2 weeks prior to sale at UBIABULLS.COM

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DV Auctions

ct Chris Beins e information conta

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Free Delivery up to 300 miles Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

17


PROOF IN THE NUMBERS Checkoff data shows positive beef opinion among consumers By Utah Beef Council Director of Marketing Jacob Schmidt, RDN

Through the Beef Checkoff, we are working to make sure that beef is the number one protein choice for consumers. By presenting the positive facts about beef to consumers, retailers, foodservice operators, the media and the scientific and influencer communities, consumers are choosing beef more often. To help consumers accurately compare plant-based proteins and beef, as well as to correct misinformation about beef production, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association (NCBA) is executing Checkoff-funded programs to position beef as the top protein. We help extend many of those same programs and information to those here in Utah. Checkoff funds cannot be used on regulatory issues. Organizations representing segments of the beef and meat industries, using non-Checkoff funds, are working to ensure that all protein sources are produced and marketed using the same standards as animal-based proteins. There has been a lot of media coverage on the new alternative protein products hitting the market. All products currently in the marketplace are plant-based. They are made from sources such as soy and peas and have been available for decades. There has also been

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

a lot of media coverage on “Lab Grown Meat” made from animal cell cultures. These products are not available to consumers and it is uncertain when they will be available. We should look beyond the headlines to put these next-generation meat substitutes in context with sales numbers and consumer perceptions. While some marketing of the companies behind these meat substitutes look to replace animal proteins, it’s important to note that beef was the most valuable protein at retail in 2018. Sales data reveals that last year consumers purchased 14 billion pounds of beef compared with 700,000 pounds of beef substitutes in both retail and foodservice. Beef substitutes comprised only half of a percent of the overall market in pounds. The 25 percent+ dollar growth rates of beef substitutes sound impressive when compared to beef ’s 5 percent. However, when the percentages are converted to dollars, that 5 percent increase in beef dollar sales amounts to over 22 times the growth of beef substitutes: $1.2 billion compared with $54 million. Research shows that consumers consider beef one ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 20

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


GILLESPIE ANGUS SE L L I N G 7 0 B U L L S A N N U A L LY P ER F O R MAN C E | Q U AL ITY | CA RCA SS | HIGH M ATE RNA L S T R UC TU R AL C O R R EC TNE SS | V IGOROUS | E FFICIE NT T ES TED FO R PER FO R M A NCE , SE M E N, TRICH, A ND PA P

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19


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 18 of the best sources of protein. In the same research, plant-based and lab-grown alternatives are not as good. While there is interest in these substitutes among some consumers, research shows that most meat alternative users still eat beef. Some of the companies market their meat substitutes by implying they improve human health or contain less saturated fat than beef. However, calorie for calorie, and serving for serving, lean ground beef offers more highquality protein than meat substitutes. It takes a long list of ingredients to attempt to imitate the taste and texture of beef, including added processing ingredients like sodium, saturated fat and starches. The Checkoff-funded Consumer Beef Tracker shows that when people are aware of the Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. brand, they’re more likely to feel positive about beef and more likely to eat beef more often. BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com was relaunched in October 2017 with a core focus on leveraging beef ’s greatest strengths. They include the complete protein benefit of beef, the amazing stories of the people who raise beef and the unforgettable pleasurable eating experience of beef. The U.S. Retail Beef Demand Index has increased by almost 15 percent since 2012. This increase in demand is being driven by consumer expenditures on beef, which reached an all-time high in 2018 of more than $105 billion in sales. Through a nearly $5 million consumer advertising budget, Beef.ItsWhatsForDinner.com is always-on (never dark) and is reaching more consumers today than ever before in the places where they spend their time – online. Using innovative marketing techniques, NCBA, on behalf of the Checkoff, targets consumers who are actively searching for information related to beef. It includes Google searches for whether or not beef is sustainable, one of the key ways that alternative proteins are marketing against beef. Consumers are then driven to the BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com website to get accurate information. The Utah Beef Council has targeted Utah consumers using these same marketing techniques also driving them to the BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com site for the beef information they are looking for. BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com has had more than 15 million site visits since October 2017. The total amount spent on paid Google Search this year nationally is $750,000 and is constantly shifting to ensure that it hits the highest Google queries, questions and keywords that consumers are asking about at any given moment. Utah has spent an additional $25,000 targeting Utah consumers. Since March 2018, more than 120,000 Google Search impressions were generated on beef production Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 20

related content, including sustainability, safety and the beef lifecycle. The Beef. It’s What’s For Dinner. brand has also created a series of social media ads that clearly position beef as the top protein and address meat alternative head on. These ads appear on popular websites and social media platforms and utilize tongue-in-cheek humor and beef ’s swagger to address alternative proteins head on. Every day, NCBA, a contractor to the Beef Checkoff, is using Checkoff dollars to monitor more than 40,000 media and social media sites to counter misinformation about beef in comparison to alternative proteins. For example, in the few weeks surrounding the launch of the EAT-Lancet report, which promoted a largely plantbased diet, there were more than 100 media touchpoints with national consumer media outlets providing correct messaging and the latest facts and data on beef ’s role in a healthy, sustainable diet. This outreach paid off in NCBA being included or quoted in six of the biggest national stories on the EAT-Lancet report, including stories in USA Today, AP, Reuters, New York Times, LA Times and Forbes. Beef ’s inclusion in these stories brought balance to the coverage and raised questions about the report’s findings. Outreach to media continues on a weekly, and sometimes daily basis to address misinformation and offer resources and interviews with industry experts. Consumers love the taste of beef and hold beef producers in high regard. When it comes to key nutrients, beef is an important source for today’s consumers. This is the message that we will continue to share and promote throughout the coming year. 1. 2.

3.

4. 5.

6. 7.

IRI Panel Data, All Outlets, 52 weeks ending 1/6/19, Market Basket Study, February 2019. IRI, Refrigerated/Frozen Meat Substitutes, 52 weeks ending 6/16/18; IRI/Freshlook, Total US MULO ending 5/28/18; Categorized by VMMeat System; Alternative Proteins at Foodservice Study, Technomic, October 2018; Usage and Volumetric Assessment of Beef in Foodservice, Technomic, December 2017 IRI, Refrigerated/Frozen Meat Substitutes, 52 weeks ending 6/16/18; IRI/Freshlook, Total US MULO ending 5/28/18; Categorized by VMMeat System; Alternative Proteins at Foodservice, Technomic, October 2018 Source 1: Toluna Protein Survey Results 2018, Source 2: Consumer Insights 2019 USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference for beef. NDB# 23472, USDA Ground Beef Calculator: https://ndb.nal.usda.gov/ndb/beef/ show, Beyond Burger, Impossible Burger Source: K-State; IRI/Freshlook, Total US MULO ending 11/26/18; Categorized by VMMeat System Consumer Beef Tracker, National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, Q1 2019 VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


C O R P O R A T I O N

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8 1 ANNUAL BULL SALE

K E L L E R C AT T L E

FRIDAY • MARCH 13, 2020

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

21


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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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23


TRADE DEALS DONE

NCBA members happy to see progress By NCBA Chief Executive Officer Colin Woodall NCBA has delivered some big wins for our industry this past year, but perhaps none are bigger than the trade deals we’ve delivered to close out 2019. We’re proud to work closely with the Trump Administration to deliver these major victories that will certainly boost our markets in the year ahead. International markets have been adding an additional $300 per head in value to fed cattle prices this year. That money flows back through our industry and helps support prices for every animal sold, at every level, whether you realize it or not. In just the past few weeks, we’ve managed to finalize a trade deal with Japan that places us on a level playing field with participants in the Trans-Pacific Partnership. Because of NCBA’s dedication to working with the Administration, America’s cattle producers will no longer be at a competitive disadvantage in our largest export market. That means our current market of $2 billion a year – nearly $100 per head sold – is likely to grow in the years to come, as the tariffs imposed on U.S. beef decline from the current 38.5 percent to 9 percent. Starting Jan. 1, U.S. beef will be sold at the same tariff level as production from Australia, Canada, Mexico and other countries. We also saw movement on the U.S.-MexicoCanada trade deal in December, with the announcement that the U.S. House of Representatives will soon vote on this crucial agreement that will maintain our duty-free access with two of our largest and most important markets. NCBA has been working closely with the office of U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) and the Administration to navigate the difficult complexities of a multilateral trade deal that impacts countless commodities and industries, and we’re extremely pleased with the outcome. If you haven’t already done so, it’s imperative that you reach out to your members of Congress and urge them to support swift passage of this critical trade deal. In addition to these two important trade deals, NCBA also worked to expand access to the market in the European Union. The deal negotiated by USTR established a duty-free quota for high-quality U.S. beef from nonhormone treated cattle. Once implemented, the annual quota will increase from 18,500 metric 24

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

tons in year one to 35,000 metric tons in year seven. The country-specific quota will benefit U.S. beef producers who participate in USDA’s non-hormone treated cattle program that was established in 1999; no longer will producers see quota consumed by competing nations in the future. In all, this deal will increase annual U.S. beef sales in Europe from $150 million to $420 million in year seven, a significant win. Finally, as we were preparing for the Christmas Holiday, we received word of major progress in a market that U.S. producers have long targeted for access. Negotiators announced Dec. 13 that they have reached a phase one deal with China. Although we’re currently awaiting details of the agreement, we’re optimistic that this is a positive step forward for our industry. In order to develop meaningful trade with the growing Chinese market, we must overcome the retaliatory tariffs China has placed on agricultural products for much of the past year. We must also ensure that China’s unjustifiable non-tariff barriers and restrictions on science-based production technologies are addressed in any eventual agreement. By doing so, we’ll ensure long-term access for U.S. beef that will allow Chinese consumers to enjoy the same high-quality, safe and sustainable U.S. beef that consumers around the globe have enjoyed for decades. To add China to the growing list of trade wins NCBA has notched in 2019, we’ll continue to work closely with the Administration to ensure the U.S. continues to benefit from these important overseas markets.

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

25


REAL MEAT REAL SOLUTION OFFERED TO COMBAT ARTIFICIAL PROTEIN MARKETING from the National Cattlemen's Beef Association To the delight of its members and livestock producers nationwide, in late 2019, the National Cattlemen's Beef Association's Center for Public Policy introduced The Real Marketing Edible Artificials Truthfully (MEAT) Act of 2019. It's also being called the Real MEAT Act. THE PROBLEM: In recent years, ultra-processed alternative protein products have begun to proliferate the marketplace. These products “bleed” like real meat, “sizzle” like real meat, and are being marketed to real meat eaters under the guise that these products are more than just an imitation, they are a superior replacement to real meat products. Rather than empower consumers to make informed purchasing decisions by way of accurate and truthful labeling, a growing number of imitation products are relying on clever marketing campaigns and flagrantly deceptive labeling practices as a means of growing their market share. Consumers have the right to expect that the information on food labels is truthful and not misleading, just as all food products should expect to compete on a fair, level playing field. The federal government understands this, too. That’s why the various laws governing food product oversight all include a universal standard that labels are truthful and not misleading. Unfortunately, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has failed to initiate meaningful enforcement action against a host of legally misbranded products for decades. FDA’s willful ignorance of the law has created a de facto loophole that is now being exploited by an entirely new, niche industry whose marketing tactics rely solely on deception. THE REAL MEAT ACT WILL: 1.Codify the Definition of Beef for Labeling Purposes a. Establish a federal definition of beef that applies to food labels b. Preserve the Congressional Intent of the Beef Promotion and Research Act 2. Reinforce Existing Misbranding Provisions to Eliminate Consumer Confusion a. FDA has misbranding provisions for false or misleading labels b. Prevent further consumer confusion with alternative protein products c. Clarify the imitation nature of these alternative protein products 3. Enhance the Federal Government’s Ability to Enforce the Law Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 26

a. FDA will have to notify USDA if an imitation meat product is determined to be misbranded b. If FDA fail to undertake enforcement within 30 days of notifying USDA, Secretary of Agriculture is granted authority to seek enforcement action THE SOLUTION PART 1: CODIFY THE DEFINITION OF BEEF FOR LABELING PURPOSES The Beef Promotion and Research Act of 1985 recognized the importance of U.S. beef production to the American economy and defined the terms “beef ” and “beef products” as part of an effort to strengthen the beef industry’s position in both domestic and foreign markets. While these definitions were codified in 1985, they are not applicable for labeling purposes. The United States Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety Inspection Service (USDA FSIS) regulates meat labeling under the statutory authority of the Federal Meat Inspection Act (FMIA). FSIS enforces the law’s misbranding provisions in two important ways: 1) a mandatory labeling preapproval process; and 2) the Agency’s Food Standards and Labeling Policy Book, which offers guidance to help manufacturers prepare product labels that are truthful and not misleading. The FSIS Labeling Policy Book defines certain terms and sets specific product ingredient parameters, but to date, the term “beef ” is what’s referred to as a “common or usual name.” The ‘‘Real Marketing Edible Artificials Truthfully Act of 2019’’ or “Real MEAT Act” will codify a definition of “beef,” preserving the integrity of the Beef Promotion and Research Act of ’85 and strengthening the federal government’s ability to enforce appropriate labeling standards. THE SOLUTION PART 2: REINFORCE EXISTING MISBRANDING PROVISIONS TO ELIMINATE CONSUMER CONFUSION Proper labeling to provide the consumer with useful, factual information was the rationale for the original FDCA misbranding provisions, and that motivation has not changed in more than half a century. Over the years, there has been a tremendous change in the types of food products available to the American consumer, as well as some significant changes in the way food products are packaged and marketed. As new iterations of imitation meat products enter the market, data indicates that there ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 28 VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


41st Annual

UDY CATTLE COMPANY BULL SALE

CATTLEM CHOICEEN’S

THE SOURCE FOR QUALITY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 2020

LUNCH AT 12 NOON

sale at 1 p.m. • Rockland, Idaho

EPDs —

EPDs —

BW -0.6 WW 82 YW 126 MM 26

BW 1.4 WW 54 YW 85 MM 31

LOT 1 – UCC HOMETOWN 849

LOT 35 – UCC ULTIMATUM 937U

124 BULLS AND 60 FEMALES Hereford, Red Angus, Black Angus 2-year-olds and yearling bulls.

HEREFORD SIRES

NJW 73S W18 HOMETOWN 10Y ET CHURCHILL KICKSTART 501C SHF ALL STAR 42X A191

RED ANGUS SIRES

EPDs —

5L DEFENDER 560-30Z LSF SAGA 1040Y HXC DECLARATION 5504C

BW 0.8 WW 72 YW 124 MM 24

BLACK ANGUS SIRES CASINO BOMBER N33 S A V RESOURCE 1441 S A V SENSATION 5615

George 208-226-7857 • Cell 208-221-2277 James 208-221-1909 • jamesudy@hotmail.com Fax 208-226-7671 Sale Broadcast on:

Information online at:

udycattle.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

LOT 81 – UCC BOMBER 907

Sale Location Nine miles south of Rockland, Idaho

Sale Day Phones 208-221-1909 208-548-2277

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

27


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 26 is considerable consumer confusion surrounding these products. When choosing between real meat and imitation meat, both of which are in the meat case, most consumer don’t realize that these products are regulated by two different government agencies and are held to an entirely different set of standards. In a recent nationwide survey conducted by the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association, 55 percent did not understand that “plant-based beef ” was an entirely vegan or vegetarian product. Further, when asked to compare plant-based meat to real beef, a majority of respondents believed plant-based meat products were healthier, more natural, less processed, lower in sodium, and better for the environment. A quick look at the ingredient labels indicate none of those beliefs could be further from the truth. THE SOLUTION PART 3: ENHANCED THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT’S ABILITY TO ENFORCE THE LAW Under FFDCA, a food is considered misbranded if it: has a false or misleading label; is offered for sale under the name of another food; if it is an imitation of another food unless prominently labeled “imitation”; or if its container is so made, formed or filled to be misleading. While the law requires FDA to enforce these provisions, the Agency takes a fundamentally different approach than USDA. For example, FDA does not pre-approve food product

28

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

labels. In order to properly fulfill its statutory mission, FDA must seek enforcement action after a product has already entered the market and the damage has already been done. FDA oversees roughly 80% of the grocery store and it has been well documented that FDA’s oversight and enforcement efforts have not kept pace with the everincreasing number of food products sold in the U.S. in part due to a lack of resources. The Real MEAT Act addresses this issue by closing the regulatory gap that exists between USDA and FDA. If enacted, FDA will be required to notify USDA immediately, in writing, whenever the Agency determines that an imitation meat food product is legally misbranded or if said product’s labeling or marketing is misleading to consumers. After 30 days of receipt of notification, should FDA fail to initiate formal or informal enforcement proceedings, the Secretary of Agriculture is granted the authority to seek enforcement action. CONCLUSION: The Real Meat Act will be a strong signal to the FDA that the labeling of food products must be honest and accurate. The enforcement of truthful labeling will encourage fair and honest competition in the marketplace and benefit consumers. Consumers will be assured that the labels they see in the grocery stores is a truthful representation of the product and allow individuals to make purchasing decisions that are best for them in terms of health and affordability.

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


Intriguing Next Steps PATRIARCH

29AN2093

FAMILY MATTERS ■ Record setting bull from the Tehama program and highlight of the Fall 2018 sales season ■ Admired for his sound structure, foot quality and massive appearance ■ Power phenotype bull with top 5% growth that also happens to have a +13 Calving Ease EPD ■ Maternal pedigree backed by a program that has relentlessly pursued and been focused on maternal output coupled with end product merit ■ His grandsires, HOOVER DAM and Connealy Thunder are both recognized as superior female sires that consistently transmit sound foot structure and excellent teat and udder quality

TEHAMA PATRIARCH F028 AAA 18981191 S S NIAGARA Z29X x CONNEALY THUNDER TRAIT EPD ACC %

CED BW +13 -1.5 .37 10

.52 10

WW Y W RADG DMI YH SC DOC Claw Angle HP CEM MILK +73 +137 +.29 +1.96 +0.5 +.85 +21 +.44 +.41 +16.2 +16 +31 .46 10

.41 3

.32 10

.32

.50

.47

.34 30

.31 20

.32 10

.25 5

.30 1

.31 15

Hd/Dts

0 0

MW MH CW MARB REA FAT +89 +0.3 +53 +.81 +.91 +.026 .38 10

.41

.41 20

.38 20

.38 10

.35

C/U Pg

0 0

$B

$C

$EN $M

$W

$F

$G

-35

+70

+84

+90

+64 +143 +268

15

3

35

15

20

15

EPDs as of 1/3/2020 TOP 35%

ACCOMPLISHMENT

29AN2113

A TRUE BREEDING ACCOMPLISHMENT ■ Cowboy favorite and 2019 Sitz Sale Topper ■ Combines the eye appealing calving ease and carcass merit of ACHIEVEMENT with the powerful muscle mass of Resource ■ Big bodied, powerfully constructed bull that excels for thickness and volume ■ Sound structured and good footed with a 35 PAP score

SITZ ACCOMPLISHMENT 720F AAA 19078208 POSS ACHIEVEMENT x S A V RESOURCE 1441 TRAIT EPD ACC %

CED BW WW Y W RADG DMI YH SC DOC Claw Angle HP CEM MILK +10 -0.3 +73 +125 +.24 +1.32 +0.3 +1.61 +20 +.51 +.45 +13.6 +13 +22 .38 20

.55 20

.48 10

.43 10

.32

.32

.45

.48 10

.32 35

.31

.32 25

.24 25

.27 10

.28

Hd/Dts

0 0

MW MH +71 -0.1 .36

.38

CW MARB REA FAT +55 +.93 +.48 +.053 .40 15

.34 15

.35

.31

C/U Pg

0 0

$B

$C

$EN $M

$W

$F

$G

-22

+68

+77

+93

+61 +154 +267

20

10

30

20

20

15

EPDs as of 1/3/2020 TOP 35%

Read more on these intriguiing sires and the rest of our Angus lineup in our new 2020 Beef Sire Directory! A B S G LO B A L . C O M | 1 . 8 0 0 . A B S . S T U D

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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NCBA: TRADE DEAL WITH CHINA A “GAME CHANGER” On Jan. 15, the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association applauded the signing of a Phase-One trade agreement with China, saying this agreement will lay the groundwork for American-produced beef to be highly competitive in the world’s most populous market. “The Phase-One Agreement with China will be a game changer for the U.S. beef industry,” said NCBA President Jennifer Houston, who joined President Trump at the White House for today’s event. “For many years, Chinese consumers have been denied access to high-quality U.S. beef—the same U.S. beef we feed to our families. Non-scientific trade barriers like the ban on production technologies, the extensive traceability requirements, and the 30-month BSE restriction have greatly limited our ability to tap into growing beef demand in China. The removal of these massive trade barriers gives Chinese consumers access to the U.S. beef they desire, and it gives America’s cattlemen and cattlewomen the opportunity to provide U.S. beef to a growing consumer-base that represents one-fifth of the global population and a middle-class that is greater than the entire U.S. population. “We cannot begin to express our thanks to President Trump for fighting for America’s cattle producers,” Houston continued. “Restoring U.S. beef access to China was the top agenda item resulting from the Mar-a-

Are you ready to Improve Your Genetics?

Lago summit in 2017, and our negotiators have never stopped working to reopen the Chinese market for U.S. beef. The Trump Administration did not allow the odds to dictate the outcome, and because of their hard work and dedication, America’s cattle producers and Chinese consumers will have a stronger relationship that will benefit both countries for generations. Today is a great day for the U.S. beef industry and the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.” When American-produced beef was banned from China for 14 years, NCBA worked with the U.S. government for more than a decade to reopen access to the market of nearly 1.4 billion consumers. American producers scored an initial victory in June 2017, when the Chinese market was reopened for the first time since 2003. NCBA joined U.S. Agriculture Secretary Sonny Perdue and American Ambassador to China Terry Branstad in Beijing to celebrate and mark the official reopening of the Chinese market. However, many non-science-based, non-tariff trade barriers remained in place, which limited the amount of American-produced beef that qualified for China. NCBA says that this Phase-One Agreement will begin knocking down those trade barriers and significantly improve access to what is potentially a top export market for U.S. beef producers.

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

DELAYED CASTRATION

Lightweight, no crimping required, Callicrate PRO Bander now comes with built-in cutter. Time-saving, convenient built-in cutter cuts the loop quickly and correctly with perfect results every time. No more reaching for the cutter and no more lost cutters!

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800-858-5974 VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


170 True High Altitude

SimAngus™ and Simmental Bulls

PAP 36 9206F

$API 131

PAP 42 9492G

SimAngus™ Brooks THR Mtn Top son. ASA# 3566317

$API 160

$API 150

SimAngus™ TJ Marlboro Man son. ASA# 3566109

9568G

SimAngus™ CLRS Dakota son. ASA# 3566278

PAP 44 9447G

PAP 34 $API 157

SimAngus™ GW Mountain Due son. ASA# 3592026

PAP 39 9465G

PAP 40

$API 150

9026G

SimAngus™ Hook’s Eagle son. ASA# 3566194

$API 144

SimAngus™ Hook’s Baltic son. ASA# 3584084

True High Altitude Cattle SIRE GROUPS INCLUDE: GW MOUNTAIN DUE 373C BROOKS THR MTN TOP C22 WS ALL ABOARD B80 KBHR HIGH ROAD E283

Our decades of data collection in PAP information have allowed us to uncover the most profit-oriented genetics that work best at high elevations. You can rest assured when you purchase T-Heart bulls you’re buying a product that will ultimately add value to your calves and excel in the High Country.

T-Heart Ranch will continually to strive to be your source of High Altitude Bulls for years to come. Shane & Beth Temple

T-HEART RANCH and L-CROSS RANCH Marty Ropp 406-581-7835 Corey Wilkins 256-590-2487 Clint Berry 417-844-1009 www.alliedgeneticresources.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Josh Staudt 970-227-0729 Justin Warren 970-367-0035 Clint Berry 417-844-1009

719-850-3082 • 719-850-3083 shane@t-heartranch.com

www.t-heartranch.com Follow us on Facebook

T-HEART

RANCH

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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JY FERRY & SON, INC. RECEIVES UTAH LEOPOLD CONSERVATION AWARD JY Ferry & Son, Inc. has been selected as the recipient of the 2019 Utah Leopold Conservation Award®. Given in honor of renowned conservationist Aldo Leopold, the award recognizes farmers, ranchers and foresters who inspire others with their dedication to land, water and wildlife habitat management on private, working land. In Utah the award is presented annually by Sand County Foundation, Utah Farm Bureau Federation, Western AgCredit and Utah Cattlemen’s Association. The Ferry family was presented with the $10,000 award and a crystal award November 22 at the Utah Farm Bureau Federation’s Annual Convention in Layton. “We congratulate the Ferry family for winning this award, and know of the great work they’ve done for generations to take care of the land,” said Ron Gibson, Utah Farm Bureau Federation President. “The Ferrys are great examples of the conservation ethic the Leopold name represents. We know there are many farmers and ranchers in our state committed to doing the right things for the land. We’re happy to partner with the Sand County Foundation and our great partners in Utah in presenting this outstanding award.” “Western AgCredit is proud to sponsor the Leopold Conservation Award in Utah. These families have worked for generations to improve the quality and production capacity of their ranches. Conservation is a way of life to these families and we appreciate their commitment to being exemplary stewards of the land,” said David Brown, Western AgCredit CEO. “The Utah Cattlemen’s Association congratulates

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

the landowners in our state who are demonstrating a commitment of conservation to the land and the natural resources in their stewardship,” said Brent Tanner, Utah Cattlemen’s Association Executive Vice President. Earlier this year, Utah landowners were encouraged to apply (or be nominated) for the award. Applications were reviewed by an independent panel of agricultural and conservation leaders. Among the many outstanding Utah landowners nominated for the award were finalists: Half Circle Cross Ranch of Coalville in Summit County, and Ferril and Dorothy Heaton Family LLC of Alton in Kane County. The first Utah Leopold Conservation Award recipient was Harold Selman Ranches of Tremonton in 2007. The 2018 recipient was Ercanbrack Livestock of Coalville. The Leopold Conservation Award in Utah is made possible thanks to the generous contributions from Western AgCredit, Utah Farm Bureau Federation, Utah Cattlemen’s Association, Utah Association of Conservation Districts, The Nature Conservancy, Utah Wool Growers Association, Producers Livestock Marketing Association, and the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food. In his influential 1949 book, A Sand County Almanac, Leopold called for an ethical relationship between people and the land they own and manage, which he called “an evolutionary possibility and an ecological necessity.” Sand County Foundation presents the Leopold Conservation Award to private landowners in 20 states for extraordinary achievement in voluntary conservation. To read the stories of other extraordinary landowners, visit www.leopoldconservationaward.org.

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


SITZ 18th Annual Spring Bull Sale March 11, 2020 | 12:30 PM (MDT) At the Ranch—Dillon, MT 325+ Yearling, PAP-Tested, Angus Bulls

Selling Sons of SITZ Stellar, SITZ Profile, SITZ Powerball 643D, Woodhill Blueprint, BUBS Southern Charm, Poss Achievement, Raven Powerball 53

Maternal Genetics Engineered for Fertility and Profitability

SITZ JLS Stellar 299G Reg# 19462625

Designed by AgTown

Sire: Sitz Stellar 726D MGS: Diamond in the Rough CED 12 BW -0.2 WW 75 YW 132 SC 0.97 HP 15.0 Milk 10 CW 46 Marb 0.64 RE 0.40 $M 67 $B 143

» Proven out-cross genetics in volume » HP EPD—82% of offering is breed average or higher » $M Index—80% of offering is breed average higher or higher » 130 heifer bulls (CED ≥10 and ≤ 1 BW) » 90 elite carcass-merit bulls (top 30% MARB) » 120 breed-leading fertility bulls (top 25% HP, ≥ .76 SC) » Sight-unseen guarantee » Free bull delivery or sale day pickup discount » First-year breeding guarantee » Repeat buyer discounts » SITZ-influenced calf marketing options

Sitz Profile 625G Reg# 19392868

Sire: Sitz Profile 1160 MGS: Raven Powerball 53 CED 11 BW -0.5 WW 68 YW 117 SC 0.86 HP 13.6 Milk 32 CW 43 Marb 0.65 RE 0.55 $M 81 $B 135

SITZ Achievement 732G Reg# 19392838 Sire: Poss Achievement MGS: S A V Resource 1441 CED 7 BW 0.8 WW 72 YW 133 SC 1.35 HP 13.9 Milk 11 CW 43 Marb 0.45 RE 0.76 $M 50 $B 124

SITZ Charm 281G Reg# 19392732

Sire: BUBS Southern Charm AA31 MGS: Sitz Tradition 9168 CED 2 BW 1.5 WW 66 YW 118 SC 1.98 HP 9.9 Milk 26 CW 52 Marb 0.79 RE 0.83 $M 52 $B 164

Text SITZ to (406) 960-4170 to receive updates by text! For additional details, please call SITZ Angus or visit SitzAngus.com.

Jim Sitz (406) 683-5277

SitzAngus@gmail.com

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Bob Sitz (406) 685-3360

SitzAngus@3Rivers.net

Joe Jones (208) 670-2364

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 33 JoeJones@SitzAngus.com


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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 7

•

FEBRUARY 2020


A r e yo ur b ul l s u sed t o 1 0,000 fe e t?

Ours were raised there We raise our cattle like commercial cattle! We expect them to survive the rigid conditions year-round with minimal inputs. As soon as our permit is ready, the pairs are taken to 10,000 feet to summer! If they can’t survive there, we don’t expect them to survive anywhere! Call today for more information or a sale catalog. Jeff 801-623-8308 Tamara 801-623-8309 www.LovelessGelbvieh.com

S i r ed b y

EGL Game Changer D136

PAP Score: 36 at 7,000 ft!

EGL Lifeline B101

CTR Elevation

Featuring sons of BGGR BLK Gold Payload! We will have some of the only progeny available anywhere! Plus Day Money, CTR Impressive 5767, MR Front Page, and Profit Agent.

PAP Tested at 7,280 ft. Sale Parnter in the

Jeff and Tamara Loveless Spanish Fork, UT 801-623-8308 • 801-623-8309 www.LovelessGelbvieh.com

Selling 50 Loveless Bulls!

March 13, 2020 6:00 pm Spanish Fork Fairgrounds Spanish Fork, UT


Tackling the Economics of Young Calf Respiratory Disease from Zoetis Protecting calves from respiratory disease can be a positive for animal well-being and bottom lines. Calving season is approaching in fall calving areas and getting those calves off to a healthy start is top of mind for cattle producers. Preventing respiratory disease is not only best for overall animal health and productivity, but recent studies demonstrate there can be an economic benefit for the cow/calf operation. The Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association (JAVMA) recently published a study based on a survey of cow/calf producers in multiple states. The study evaluated and compared the costs of vaccines and vaccine administration to calves for disease protection with the medication and labor costs of treating a calf with respiratory disease. The JAVMA study showed, in many cases, the costs associated with prevention — vaccine costs plus the labor cost to administer vaccines — were considerably less than the medication and labor costs to treat disease. Median vaccine cost per calf in the surveyed herds was $6.25, while labor costs were $5 for administering vaccine to calves. Medicine cost to treat a sick calf averaged $11, while treatment labor costs were $15 per calf.1 This study reveals that the cost per calf to treat respiratory disease is more than twice the cost of preventing respiratory disease. A proven approach to the young calf ’s immune system A young calf ’s immune system is unique in how it responds to viral and bacterial challenges. Calfhood vaccinations can complement what the dam provides through colostrum and help give a calf every chance to be healthy and perform to its potential. Timing and type of

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

vaccine administration play key roles in managing the young calf ’s immune response. A Montana study looked at the impact of timing and sequence of vaccination on the immune response in nursing calves. The study demonstrated that the intranasal vaccine works with the calf ’s immune system to prevent respiratory disease caused by bovine respiratory syncytial virus (BRSV) and helps prevent respiratory disease caused by infectious bovine rhinotracheitis (IBR) and parainfluenza 3 (PI3) virus. “The Montana study and research out of North Dakota demonstrated that vaccination at birth can improve future responses to vaccination, while helping provide protection against respiratory diseases from birth to weaning,” said Victor Cortese, DVM, PhD, director of immunology and biologicals with Zoetis. The Montana study helps support the Zoetis recommendation to use INFORCE 3® at birth followed by a second dose of INFORCE 3 and One Shot® BVD to protect against BRSV, IBR, PI3, bovine viral diarrhea (BVD) Types 1 and 2 and Mannheimia haemolytica, before heading to pasture. Cortese concluded with three things a cow/calf producer will see from implementing young calf respiratory vaccinations: · Lower pneumonia rates · Lower death loss · Greater weight gains To develop a vaccination protocol for your young nursing calves, visit with your local veterinarian, or visit CompleteCalfProtection.com to learn more about solutions from Zoetis.

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


www.ipsencattle.com Where busy cattlemen go to buy bulls! 7thAnnual

Internet BULL

SALE

march 3, 2020

S ELLING 20 A NGUS B ULLS • 7 H EREFORD B ULLS 3 B LACK H EREFORD B ULLS • 11 B RED H EIFERS

Hereford Bulls

7 PM CLOSE OUT Contact us for a sale catalog! 208-681-4794

Low birth Angus Bulls

Lot 1 Black Hereford Bulls

Lot 9

Angus Bulls with power

Lot 17 Angus Bred Heifers

Lot 22 Black Hereford Heifers

Lot 39

Lot 41

A U C T I O N D E TA I L S • Pictures and Videos will be available for viewing after Feb 15 • • Bulls are available to view at the ranch anytime • • Auction Format - open bidding from 7 am to 7 pm; followed by a horse-race style finish • • Bulls will be semen/trich tested, and evaluated for soundness • • All bulls selling have been PAP tested • 100% SATISFACTION GUARANTEED • go to www.IPSENC ATTLE.com for more details! angus • hereford

ICC

Ipsen Cattle Co.

Mark and Becky Ipsen | 4368 Dingle Rd | Dingle, ID | 83233 (208) 681-4794 | (208) 681-4793 | IPSENCAT TLECOMPANY @ YAHOO . COM | WWW . IPSENCAT TLE . COM

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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INNOVATION DRIVES

IMPROVEMENT from the American Hereford Association

The year 2019 was one of innovation for the Hereford breed. During its Annual Membership Meeting and Conference this fall in Kansas City, the American Hereford Association (AHA) shared how an emphasis on information — and its community of people – is paying off. “The U.S. cattle industry is the leader in cattle production. We produce more pounds of beef than any other country in the world. The second-closest to us is Brazil, and they do it with almost three times more cattle,” said Jack Ward, AHA executive vice president. “That message is important, and it continues to show us that we need to be focused here on how we make genetic improvement in cattle — and as a seedstock producer, I think that’s your role in the industry.” Hereford breeders have made significant genetic progress during the last decade — posting a 17 percent reduction in birth weights, a 20 percent increase in growth traits and an impressive 150 percent gain in marbling since 2008. “The Hereford breed right now is doing a great job of helping to provide tools to move us forward, to be forward-looking. For our operation, that’s been very important to us,” said Joe Ellis, longtime Hereford breeder from Chrisman, Ill. “The genetics we’re making today are for down the road. It’s wonderful to be able to come here and see things that are thought-provoking and able to help us make decisions for our commercial customer.” An investment in genetic improvement is coupled with an investment in people. During the Annual Meeting, several hundred Hereford breeders enjoyed educational workshops on sustainability, genomic Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 38

testing and marketing — while also celebrating industry contributors and awarding a record $180,000 in scholarships. “There are people here who feed cattle. There are people here who raise cow-calf, people that show cattle, and kids going to college in related industries like restaurant and hotel management,” said Ray Ramsay, Hereford breeder and president of the Hereford Youth Foundation of America. “I think it’s important for us to tell our story in a lot of different areas, and this is a place where we come together once a year as a group and vote on leadership. So, it’s important for us to analyze where we’ve been and where we want to go.” Ward says, “All of those things really interact well with our mission at the American Hereford Association, and our focus is to create the opportunity and the kind of genetics and the tools that our members need to have to support this kind of improvement in the industry.” Learn why ranchers are choosing to “come home to Hereford” by visiting Hereford.org.

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


P OWE RFU L B U LLS W I TH E LE G A NT F E MAL E S A L L C R EAT IN G A S O LI D F O UNDATI O N T HE 20 2 0 R EES C A LE NDA R S P R I N G A N G U S B UL L S A L E A P R I L 2 7 • AT T H E R A NC H S E LLI N G 3 0 Y EA R L ING ANGUS BULLS

Semen, Trich, Performance Tested • Ready to turn out!

A NNUA L F A L L P RO DUC TION S A L E N OV 1 3 • AT T H E R A NC H S ELL I N G 7 0 L O N G Y E A R L ING B U L L S A N G U S • HE RE F O R D 5 0 F EMALES ANGUS • HE R E F ORD • F 1 B A L DIE S

Cattle that work in all environments!

Bulls with these genetics sell! C HURCH I LL B ROADWAY 8 5 8 F

B A R S TOW B A NK ROLL B 7 3

R&R F I R E B A LL 5 0 8 6 7 0 7 0

C O NNE A LY C ONFI DENC E 0 1 0 0

R L E AD E R 69 6 4

B A L DR IDG E B RONC

O UR BULLS CARRY A F ULL GUARANT EE T H RO U G H T H E FI RST Y EAR AND STA ND BEH I ND O UR P ROD UC T 1 0 0 %.

Here at Rees Bros we operate a no nonsense performance oriented program. Our cows must calve every year in a 60 day breeding exposure and bring home a big calf. There is no forgiveness for low milk, poor udders, bad feet, cancer eye or poor temperament. They summer at 5000 to 8000 ft elevation on some 7000 acres of mountain forage. There is no creep feeding or hot rations. Our goal is to provide you with some of the freshest and most proven genetics that the industry has to offer; with bred in performance and an unconditional soundness guarantee. Come see for yourselves how Rees Bros can help your program. You'll be happy you did.

www.REESCATTLE.com Scott Rees (801) 949-8960 Jake Rees (801) 668-8613 Roger Rees, DVM (801) 913-5747 reescattle@gmail.com Take Exit 106 of I-84 Morgan, UT

OFFE RING ANG U S , HOR N E D A N D POLU L EC D HE R E FEOR D S!!39 S

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

tah

attleman

eedstock

dition


CLINTON BRIGHTWELL JOINS HEREFORD ASSOCIATION AS WESTERN REGION FIELD REPRESENTATIVE The American Hereford Association (AHA) welcomes its newest team member, Clinton Brightwell, Baker City, Ore., as the Western region field representative for the AHA and the Hereford World. Brightwell started his post Dec. 17, 2019. In this role, Brightwell will attend Hereford sales and events, as well as assist breeders with marketing and genetic selection. He also will contribute to educating members and commercial producers about AHA programs and other beef industry opportunities. “We are pleased to have Clinton Brightwell complete the AHA Fieldmen team,” says Joe Rickabaugh, AHA director of seedstock marketing. He brings to this position a well-rounded knowledge of the seedstock industry and a good knowledge of the northwest territory.” Brightwell, a Missouri native, previously was serving as the customer relations manager for Thomas Angus Ranch, Baker City, Ore. In this position, he worked directly with new and current customers to build relationships through various avenues. He managed

the breeding program, which is a 100% AI cow herd, the embryo transfer program and the sale cattle. The operation holds six sales throughout the year in Oregon, Wyoming, California and Idaho. Brightwell was also tasked with managing Thomas’ Trans Ova satellite center, which housed approximately 20 of their donor cows along with donors from other cattlemen. Brightwell graduated from Oklahoma State University (OSU) in 2016 and received a bachelor’s degree in animal science with an emphasis in production. While attending OSU, Brightwell was a herdsman for Pfeiffer Angus Farms and helped manage the seedstock and commercial cattle. He previously attended and graduated from Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College where he was a member of the livestock judging team. “I am extremely excited to have the opportunity to meet and build relationships with the members of region 1,” Brigthwell says. “I look forward to helping the breeders in any way that I can, along with assisting the cattlemen who rely heavily on Hereford genetics.”

HAYSTACK MOUNTAIN BRAND SEED AVAILABLE FROM YOUR LOCAL IFA, FARM DEALER, OR CO-OP. Visit www.haystackmtn.com to find a dealer near you. SEED

HIGH YIELD!

STATE OF THE ART CONDITIONING & CLEANING PLANT

40

SPRING GRAINS

FORAGE GRASS

PASTURE MIXES

Oats, barley, wheat, triticale, rye and sorghum sudangrass

For pasture, grazing, and hay crops.

Many species and varieties available.

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

GROWER & PRODUCER OPPORTUNITIES VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


p a p t e s t e d h i - a lt i t u d e Ru g g e d Ca lv i n g e as e 2020 Herd Sires

g a r fa i l s a f e

SS trump b236

Hoover Dam

exar all in one

bubs southern Charm

Diam ond p eak cat t le 2020 Bull Sales

La Junta, CO Fe bruary 21 st

Riverton,WY March 14th Loma, CO M arch 28th angus & simangus Yearlings & 2 Year-Olds

John Raftopoulos 970-326-8620 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

George Raftopoulos 970-326-8621

Angelo Raftopoulos 970-756-8600 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

www.diamondpeakcattle.c o m

Springcove crossbow

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LEADING THE WAY Utah’s face for agriculture is one of you from the Utah Department of Agriculture With both a passion for agriculture and a background in politics and public service, it is evident that Kerry Gibson would be an obvious choice to lead Utah’s Department of Agriculture and Food (UDAF) Kerry Gibson was appointed commissioner of the UDAF in the spring of 2019. Recognized for his vast experience in the dairy industry and business, he has served as a state legislator, county commissioner, and previously as a deputy director of Utah Department of Natural Resources (DNR). Kerry is fluent in agriculture production, business management and governance leadership. Born and raised in Weber County, where he owned and operated a fifth-generation dairy farm with his father and brother. Kerry has also successfully owned and operated several small businesses. He’s a big believer in the free enterprise system and feels government’s role is to support and help all citizens achieve life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. After two years of church missionary service in the Netherlands, Kerry married his sweetheart Katrina Creager Gibson and the two settled in Weber County with their six children, and now two grandchildren. He attended Utah State University where he earned his Dairy Herdsman Degree. Early on, Kerry took an active interest in community organizations that supported agriculture, including Farm Service Agency and Farm Bureau. He chaired the National Young Farmers and Ranchers committee, and in 2001 was chosen as the Top Young Farmer in the nation by the American Farm Bureau Federation. In 2003, he was awarded an Agriculture Eisenhower Fellowship and spent several months in Europe working on food safety and security issues with European Union officials. In these capacities he worked closely with officials in Washington, D.C., and developed a great love for country, sparking a desire to be more politically active. In 2004, he was elected as a State Representative for District 6. As a three-term State Representative, Kerry worked to preserve conservative and constitutional-based governing principles in the legislature. Kerry sponsored

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

and passed several pieces of important legislation that protect families, create government efficiencies, and preserve individual liberties. As the chair of the Natural Resources Appropriations Committee, Kerry oversaw the States’ budget for UDAF, as well as water rights, water resources, wildlife and SITLA, among others. He also served on the Utah International Trade Commission and State Water Development Commission. In 2010, Kerry won election to the Weber County Commission, where he served until his 2018 appointment as Deputy Commissioner of DNR. In Gov. Gary Herbert’s announcment that he had appointed Gibson to serve as commissioner of the state agency he touted Gibson’s experience and expressed why he was the man for the job. “His experience as a legislator, a county commissioner and especially as a dairy farmer himself will serve him well as he works with Utah’s farmers, ranchers and other important members of our agricultural community,” Herbert said in a statement. Gibson takes over the leadership post in the department of agriculture from LuAnn Adams, who announced her retirement in April 2019.

The Utah Department of Agriculture and Food oversees grazing and weed-mitigation programs meant to augment the health of Utah ag land and watersheds, among many other things. It also inspects retail stores and food-processing plants to maintain food quality and safety and assure correct pricing, according to the department website. Food grown and processed locally represents 15 percent of the Utah economy while the state’s livestock industry is worth some $1 billion.

Disclaimer: Breaking news at press time was that Gibson would be resigning his post at the department and will be throwing his hat in the ring as a rural advocate and conservative congressional candidate for the position currently held by Rep. Rob. Bishop

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


U N M AT C H E D P E R F O R M A N C E

Shandar Angus Ranch

Se l l i n g 2 5 B u l l s T h i s Y e a r ! M o s tl y a v a i l a b l e b y pr i v a t e t r e a t y ! F e b 8 G e m S t a t e C l a s s i c - Tw i n F a l l s , I D N o v 1 4 Ro c k y M t n A n gu s - O g d e n , U T D e c 2 U T C a tt l e m e n ’ s C l a s s i c - S a lt L a ke , U T PVF Insight 0129

C a l l T o d a y - 80 1 - 3 6 8 - 8 3 1 4 o r 80 1 - 5 92 - 7 2 7 9

r n ew I n tr o d u ci n g o u

es t h er d si r e!

2K

PAT R IOT 2019

Conley Express 7211

High Selling

Bull - NWSS, CO.

Res. Senior Bull N ILE, MT.

Thank You to Our Recent Buyers at the Utah Cattlemen’s Classic!

Colburn Primo 5153

S

Kunzler Ranch • Stu Wamsley • Jim Nelson • Della Ranches

R

Reserve Supreme Champion Bull!

ANGUS • SIMANGUS MR HOC Broker www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

3532 W 9600 S • Payson, UT 84651 Morgan 801.368.8314 • Landon 801.592.7279 landoman7v@hotmail.com

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Finding Balance With Beef’s High-Quality Protein Living Well Is All About Balance Balancing protein throughout the day supports overall health and wellness. Research shows that when coupled with physical activity, the high-quality protein in beef can help people meet nutritional recommendations, maintain a healthy weight and build lean muscle over time.1 It’s time to find more balance in our daily diets. With today’s leaner beef, it’s the perfect partner for fruits, vegetables and whole grains, making a healthful plate even more delicious.

BIG NUTRITION IN A SMALL PACKAGE

Meals That Nourish

Spaghetti Squash with Meat Sauce

Confetti Beef Taco Salad

1

Animal proteins, like beef, are complete proteins, and are naturally rich in many vital nutrients. While choosing a variety of protein sources is important; calorie for calorie, beef provides more and higher-quality protein than plant foods. Beef also provides more than 10 essential nutrients, including protein, zinc, iron and more, that help the body function at its best.2

TAKE CONTROL

2

Balancing protein intake at meals and snacks throughout the day may be helpful for people working towards improved appetite control and body weight management. Evidence shows that people who eat a higher-protein diet (about 30 percent of daily calories from protein) generally feel fuller longer between meals and are less likely to overeat.3 A 3-ounce portion of beef provides 25 to 30 grams of protein.2

LIVE A VIBRANT LIFE

3

Protein is a powerful nutrient that plays an essential role at any age. Beef provides essential amino acids that the body needs to grow, build and preserve muscle, which supports vibrant and independent living as we age.4 Eating enough protein-rich foods can help to protect lean body mass and prevent the loss of muscle and strength that comes with aging.5, 6 1 Layman DK, et al. A moderate-protein diet produces sustained weight loss and long-term changes in body composition and blood lipids in obese adults. J Nutr 2009;139:514-21. 2 US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Nutrient Data Laboratory. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 28 (Slightly revised). Version Current: May 2016. Internet: http://www.ars.usda.gov/ba/ bhnrc/ndl. (NDD13364. Beef, composite of retail cuts, lean, 0 inch trim, all grades, cooked. Per 100g: Protein 29.9g, Total fat 8.4g, Saturated fat 3.3g and Cholesterol 90 mg). 3 Paddon-Jones D, et al. Protein, weight management, and satiety. Am J Clin Nutr 2008;87:1558S-61S. 4 Wolfe, R. The underappreciated role of muscle in health and disease. Am J Clin Nutr 2006; 84:475-82. 5 Paddon-Jones D, et al. Role of dietary protein in the sarcopenia of aging. Am J Clin Nutr 2008;87:1562S-6S. 6 Paddon-Jones D, Rasmussen BB. Dietary protein recommendations and the prevention of sarcopenia: Protein, amino acid metabolism and therapy. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2009;12:86–90.

Visit www.BeefItsWhatsForDinner.com for full recipes. #111816-03

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VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


ANNUAL PRODUCTION SALE / FRIDAY, MARCH 27, 2020 1:00 PM / AT THE RANCH IN BANCROFT, IDAHO OFFERING OVER 100 HEAD! / 50 REGISTERED BULLS - YEARLINGS AND COMING TWO-YEAR-OLDS [Negative BVD-PI Tested, Performance Tested, Fertility Tested and PAP Tested]

ANGUS & SIMANGUS FEMALES / 50 COMMERCIAL HEIFERS / 10 REGISTERED HEIFERS

PROFITABLE BALANCED BREEDING, SUPERIOR IN FUNCTION PAP TESTED & PROVEN ANGUS / SIMANGUS / FLECKVIEH

VE-EDP CUT RIGHT 362E / ASA# 3379416 / PAP 36 MFI Center Cut x Sim-Roc Stroller FleckAngus Sons Sell

JCS ABRAM Z121 / ASA #2756492 / PAP 38 Crossroad Tuxedo x Double Bar D Exodus Fullblood Fleckvieh Sons Sell

GOLDEN DAWN DECKER 584B / ASA# 3042281 / PAP 38 MFI Center Cut x HEMR Samurai FleckAngus Sons Sell

DREAM OF HAGUE 618 / AAA# 19076279 Resurgam Blu-Print x DDA Ally 69C Angus & FleckAngus Sons Sell

HAR PINEBANK 443 202 / AAA#17505028 Pinebank Waigroup 41/97 x DDA Ally 69C Angus Sons Sell

PAPA FORTE 1921 / AAA#11620690 Papa Optima x Papa Rito T Power Angus Sons Sell

Also selling sons and daughters of VE Euro Jiggs, MRL Discovery, VE JF Elation, Messmer Packer, OCC Mitchell, Big Hills Value Dirk & Marnie Johnson / Cell: 208-390-6619 / Home: 208-425-9169 2055 Ivins Road • Bancroft, ID 83217 / simroot57@yahoo.com

Call or email to join our mailing list. Stay tuned to website for pictures & videos.

www.verticaledgegenetics.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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Representing You in D.C. Eight Things to Know About the Public Lands Council’s New Executive Director from the Public Lands Council The Public Lands Council (PLC) announced Kaitlynn Glover as its new executive director late January. This comes after a months-long search for a leader who shared both a love for the West and a passion for the agricultural industry. In the end, the organization found what PLC President Bob Skinner calls “an outstanding fit”. Here are eight things to know about the newest face representing federal lands ranchers: 1. She’s not new to the industry While Glover joined the PLC team in January 2019, she has long been an advocate for federal land ranchers. In fact, her early professional experience included an internship for the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and the Public Lands Council. As her career trekked forward (literally – to Ireland), she eventually found her way back to Washington where she served as a policy advisor on agriculture, natural resources, and Tribal policy issues for U.S. Sen. John Barrasso (R-Wyo.). 2. She’s a native of the West. Glover grew up in Wyoming surrounded by sagebrush, forests, and range-fed cattle. In her early days, she worked on a cow-calf operation and has experience with smallscale feeder cattle operation. Even while living away from Wyoming, she remained connected to ranchers across the West. 3. Her education is diverse and well-rounded Glover is an alumna of the University of Wyoming College of Agriculture where she studied agricultural communications, international agricultural economics, and farm and ranch management. She also has a Masters of Agriscience in Innovation Support from University College Dublin in Dublin, Ireland. 4. She’s well-equipped for a smooth transition Change can be difficult. Often, steep learning curves require an on-boarding period for new hires, especially leaders who are the face of an organization. While some may come with the skills needed to perform a job, contextual nuances slow them down. For Glover, this is not the case. Many of PLC’s priority issues were in Glover’s portfolio during her time with Barrasso. Be ready – she is hitting the ground running.

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5. She knows the value of loyalty. While it may not always be easy, Glover knows the value of allegiances – especially when times are hard; you must look no further than her unwavering support for University of Wyoming sports to know that’s true. Go Pokes! 6. Leadership finds her an “outstanding fit” In a statement released by the PLC after Glover assumed the role as the PLC executive director, PLC President Bob Skinner said: “As we look at the future of federal lands ranching in Washington and anticipate the leadership needed to drive our priority issues forward, we need a strong voice. Kaitlynn is an outstanding fit as she comes well equipped to serve our organization with legislative knowledge, relationships, and a passion to drive PLC to higher ground. With her leadership, our organization will continue to be well represented in Washington.” 7. She has a track record of success. One of Glover’s greatest accomplishments while working in Congress includes her work on invasive species. While she is extraordinarily proud of the outcomes of forestry, grazing, and environmental successes in her portfolio, it is the work she did with her former boss on invasive species that continues to inspire her. She worked on the Federal Lands Invasive Species Control, Prevention, and Management Act for nearly a decade. The bill was signed into law in March 2019 as part of a larger natural resource management package, giving land managers better tools and more formal ways to control invasive species across jurisdictional boundaries. Glover knows that like so many issues in the West, cheatgrass and ventenata fail to respect fencelines. Control and prevention are key, but coordinated efforts are the only way to ensure success. 8. She comes with a vision for the future Glover is committed to a strong start to the next decade. She comes with a desire to work with PLC officers and affiliates to develop a strategic plan for identifying and achieving legislative priorities, building new relationships with key land user groups, and communicating the immense benefits grazing provides to public land health.

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


100

29TH Annual

Bulls Sell!

Bull Sale

Februar y 28, 2020 Montrose, Colorado

PAP tested for use at high elevations

100

Red & Black Gelbvieh and Balancer Bulls Sell!

“Providing dependable genetics to commercial and purebred cattlemen for over 29 years.� Mark Covington (970) 209-1956 Dave Bowman (970) 323-6833 www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

For online catalog and videos visit:

www.gelbviehbulls.net

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 7

•

FEBRUARY 2020


GENETIC EDGE BULL SALE Saturday, March 14, 2020 • 11 A.M. Idaho Falls, Idaho

www.riverbendranch.us

GENETIC EDGE BULL SALE

The Riverbend Ranch Advantage BACKED BY THE BEST GUARANTEE IN THE BUSINESS!

Your satisfaction is 100% guaranteed! If you’re not happy with your bull purchase at anytime for any reason, we’ll give you full credit.

WE INVEST IN OUR CUSTOMERS!

Put our customer investment program to work for you. Over the last 8 years Riverbend has been putting millions back in your pockets.

REPEAT CUSTOMER DISCOUNT!

Customers who purchased Riverbend Bulls in the 2019 Sale will receive 5% off of their bull purchase in this sale. In addition all customers can also qualify for the volume discount. www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Whatever your needs we have you covered! Growth Bulls, Maternal Bulls, Carcass Merit Bulls, Calving-Ease Bulls or Multi-trait Bulls. 18-Month-Old Bulls are ready for heavy service in the big country. All Semen tested and ready for turn out. 2880 N 55 W • IDAHO FALLS, IDAHO 83402 • 208-528-6635 Frank and Belinda VanderSloot | Owners Rhett Jacobs | General Manager | 208-681-9841 Dale Meek | Purebred Operations Manager | 208-681-9840 Chris Howell | Director of Customer Service | 208-681-9821 CALL 208-528-6635 OR E-MAIL BULLS@RIVERBENDRANCH.US TO BE PLACED ON OUR MAILING LIST

c

Sale Managed by:

OTTON & associates

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

49


UTAH GETS NEW STATE VETERINARIAN

Utah Department of Agriculture and Food (UDAF) Commissioner Kerry Gibson welcomed Dean Taylor, DVM, as the agency’s new state veterinarian in late 2019. “Dr. Taylor is a trusted and respected veterinarian in Utah’s agriculture and equine communities,” said Gibson. “His extensive background in veterinary medicine is evident in his clinical work, but I have also been impressed with his engagement in higher education – ensuring the next generation of veterinarians are prepared to carry on the work he is passionate about.” Taylor comes to UDAF after 25 years of running Aspen Grove Veterinary Clinic in West Haven. For many years his clinic cared for all large animals until the demand for his services led to specializing in horses alone. “I’m excited to be joining UDAF in safeguarding the health of Utah’s animal industry,” said Taylor. “I’ve worked many years in the industry and look forward to continuing that in a new capacity as the state veterinarian.” A 1991 graduate of Colorado State University, Taylor launched his career at a mixed practice in Evanston, Wyoming. Following that he married and moved to Utah to work for larger veterinarian practice before starting his

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

own. His work outside his clinic has also been noted, having served actively in several professional organizations. One of which is a national student relations committee that awards the Winner’s Circle Scholarships to the top students in their final year of veterinary school. Taylor’s practical experience as a vet is vital to his new position. The state veterinarian is responsible for directing the promotion of animal health; the diagnosis, surveillance and prevention of animal disease.. The incumbent coordinates, implements and organizes the veterinary medical aspects of the inspection of meat and poultry; and livestock brand registration and inspection programs; supervises veterinarian pathologists and livestock market veterinarians; identifies and initiates action to control communicable diseases to man; issues medical livestock quarantines; and makes final judgment of meat product and movement of meats for consumption in Utah and for toxic plants within Utah. He is ammember of the Comprehensive Emergency Management Team for the state and must be well versed in understanding an implementing policy.

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


- 313 LOTS SELL Females sell Sunday evening, February 23rd 36 Open Hereford Heifers | 21 Open Angus Heifers 8 Sexed Female Pregnancies

Bulls sell Monday, February 24th

AHA 44019175

AHA 44019093

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

5.7 75 114 36 0.75 0.05

LOT 19 - C BAR1 Candy Belle 9036 ET You can’t stack more phenotype and true power into one than this herd sire. He has already proven himself being recently named the Champion Horned bull in Reno 2019 as a calf. Top 1% WW, YW, Scrotal, Top 2% Milk, REA, Top 15% $CHB.

AHA 44019294

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

4.3 55 86 28 0.42 -0.02

LOT 94 - C SULL Who Maker 9262 ET Here is the 2019 Reno Champion Polled Bull that is a combination of power, look and structure. He is built so well from the ground and perfect structured. This one is built for the long haul. He has the pedigree and profile to back it up. Top 20% milk, $CHB.

AAA 19517428

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

0.7 70 121 22 0.61 0.56

LOT 168 - CCC 6020 Bomber 9021 ET This should be a real sale attraction and one of the top Angus bulls we have sold. He has the look of a herd bull with big time performance. His EPD profile is as balanced as they come ranking in the top 10% for numerous traits.

www.hereford.com www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

157 Hereford Bulls | 88 Angus Bulls

LOT 56 - C 3003 Valor 9126 ET

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

3.9 64 99 30 0.60 -0.04

This horned herd sire is huge hipped and wide pinned with extra look and neck extension. He is full of performance and power with a balanced set of numbers. He will be a Denver pen bull and a great herd sire. Top 10% WW, Milk, REA.

AHA 43966950

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

2.7 56 90 29 0.60 0.05

LOT 121 - C 2052 Diversified 8342 ET This is one of the lowest birth, calving ease options out of the popular sire Diversified that is available. His balanced EPD profile gives you so many options especially when you consider his tremendous donor dam “2052” on his bottom side. He is in the top 15% for six traits.

AAA 19517445

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

0.5 66 124 17 0.71 0.64

LOT 177 - CCC Developer 9045 Sired by Developer who is a half brother to Bomber. Great structure and balance to this bull. Not a hole is his numbers and great birth to weaning ratio.

AHA 44076981

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

3.0 59 95 31 0.68 0.06

LOT 84 - C 6018 Belle Air 9211 ET All factors considered this may be the best herd sire in the entire offering. He is a true performance sire with huge numbers. His mother is a full sister to Double Your Miles. She has an ideal udder and is perfect in her structure. He is in the Top 20% for 11 traits.

AHA 44020529

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

6.2 60 97 30 0.52 -0.10

LOT 266 - C Classy Lass 9136 We wanted to add a top show heifer prospect to the offering that is halter broke and ready to go. She is sired by the popular show heifer maker American Classic and goes back to Eye Candy’s mother. She has the pedigree and look to do some winning but also the maternal background to be a top cow.

AAA 19571629

BW WW YW MM REA MARB

0.7 68 108 26 0.83 0.61

LOT 231 - CCC 3013 Bomber 8307 ET We are proud to have some of the first sons of Bomber available for auction and what a herd sire he is making. This son is out of a great Brilliance daughter who has an ideal udder and pattern. He is the ideal balance of calving ease, performance and carcass.

Catalog available online www.hereford.com Guy, Sherry and Katie Colyer, 208.845.2313 Kyle and Bobby Jean, 208.845.2098 Sale Broadcast on GUY cell: 208.599.0340 • email: guy@hereford.com KYLE cell: 208.250.3924 • FAX: 208.845.2314 31058 Colyer Road, Bruneau, ID 83604

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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What to Google, Amazon, Facebook and IGS Have in Common?

Data is their lifeblood

by Jackie Atkins, Ph.D., Director of Sceince and Education, American Simmental Association International Genetic Solutions (IGS) partner organizations, representing 18.9 million beef cattle, gathered in Bozeman on October 22-24, 2019, for a meeting of the minds. Thirty guests including executive vice presidents, breed improvement staff and consultants, and the IGS Science Team, participated in meetings filled with bigpicture discussions of the power of the IGS collaborative, ideas on how to continue to improve data collection and integration into the genetic evaluation, new ways to benefit from economies of scale within this group, and technical updates on the genetic evaluation. Ample time for brainstorming during the meetings led to tangible action items for future developments. Topics included: • The “why” behind IGS by Dr. Wade Shafer • Advice to IGS and its partners for continued success by Dr. Matt Spangler • Updates to the Genetic Evaluation since the first launch of IGS Multi-breed Genetic Evaluation powered by BOLT by Dr. Lauren Hyde • New improvements and developments in genomics by Dr. Mahdi Saatchi • Updates to growth trait predictions by Dr. Bruce Golden • New bull lookup features by Ryan Boldt • Educational awareness efforts for foot/leg assessment by Ryan Boldt Wade Shafer gave a compelling presentation starting with a video of Simon Sinek’s TED talk entitled, “How Great Leaders Inspire Action.” Sinek is the author of the

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

book Start with Why about how successful companies build their business by starting with the “why” behind what they do instead of the “what”. Sinek talks about “the Golden Circle” with “why” as the bullseye, followed by “how” and the “what” is the outermost circle. Successful leaders and companies start in the center of the circle with “why”, then “how” and finally “what.”

Shafer extrapolated the golden circle principle for IGS.

The “why”=Better serve the beef industry by more effectively leveraging our resource for genetic improvement. The “how”=Leveraging data and technology through massive and unprecedented collaboration. The “what” =The largest and most powerful beef cattle genetic evaluation in the world. Shafer talked about an article in the May, 6, 2017, issue of The Economist about data being the world’s most valuable resource. Google, Amazon, Apple, Facebook and Microsoft all have something in common with IGS. Data is our lifeblood. The IGS collaboration now has 18.9 million animals and over 230,000 genotypes from 17 different organizations. Not only is it the largest beef cattle database, but it also has a large amount of connectivity among the different organizations. Shafer shared a table of sires (see table) with progeny from more than one data source. IGS has more than 30,000 sires represented in at least two different databases and nearly 6 million progeny records from these sires. Three of these

...CONTINUED ON PAGE 54

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


AMERICA’S

COW

The Simmental cow can handle any environment. She’s built to last in heat, fescue or high altitudes. And thanks to the breed’s built-in adaptability, you can match Simmental genetics to your environment – SimAngus™, SimAngus HT, Simbrah or proven Simmental genetics. Meet America’s all-purpose cow – gentle and consistent, with calves that give the heterosis boost commercial cattlemen need to stay profitable. www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

STAND STRONG

SIMMENTAL 406-587-4531 • simmental.org Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

53


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 52 sires show up in 12 databases. This perfectly illustrates the power in pooling this information into one genetic evaluation and gaining the benefit of all that information instead of each association only using their own records. Another way to illustrate the value of collaboration can be seen in this graphic. The total data in the IGS genetic evaluation is vastly more than any single

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association contributes. By pooling all the information into one genetic evaluation, all associations gain better genetic predictions than any could do alone. The IGS advisory meeting further developed the synergy of sharing and learning from our partners in beef cattle genetic improvement. Talks from the science team, brainstorming among the partners, and bonding over meals proved a valuable and productive time for all. We are excited about what the future holds for this group.

VOLUME 7

•

FEBRUARY 2020


Sons of These Bulls Sell!

10 T H A N N UA L

BULL AND HEIFER SALE Werner Flat Top

S AT U R DAY , M A RC H 21, 2 0 2 0 B OX E L D E R C O U N T Y F A I RG RO U N D S T REMONTON, U T • 1 : 0 0 PM 6 0 B ULLS • 2 0 H EIFERS S I M M E N TA L • A N G U S • S I M A N G U S ®

Bid Live Online at

Musgrave Big Sky

SEMEN AND TRICH TESTED F U L LY G UA R A N T E E D

FOR A CATALOG OF MORE INFORMATION, CALL OR EMAIL KASEY ROWSER 435-757-4093 • KASEYROWSER@YAHOO.COM

Come be a part of our family and enjoy a free lunch on us! Our sale is a highlight of our year and we’re excited to share it with you! HF Tiger 5T

W/C Bullseye 3046A

R&R Genetics consists of three families running cattle operations in Northern Utah. Our cattle run on US Forest permits where they range at elevations reaching 9,500+ feet. Water is scarce and trips of 2-3 miles are common from one watering hole to the next. This is why we have chosen to run Angus and Simmental cattle. Both breeds offer a strong maternal instinct, solid milk flow and reproductive efficiency. This is coupled with great dispositions, strong carcass traits and good feet and legs. Our high elevation cattle bred in the west offer top end genetics at affordable prices. We implement a strong ET program and vast AI protocol. If you are looking for strong Angus, Simmental, and SimAngus® genetics, be sure to look us up March 21 in Tremonton!

R & R

ROWSER & RINDERKNECHT

GENETICS TJ Main Event 503B www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Double JR Simmentals Rowser Angus & Simmental Rinderknecht Angus (435) 512-8455 (435) 757-4093 (435) 279-7372 Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

55


IN EVERY ANIMAL

The first step for every livestock manager is to correctly identify every animal. Allflex is the leader in visual and electronic identification, tissue sampling, and monitoring technology systems. We have more than 60 years of experience—all to help cattle producers manage their herds. Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 56

ALLFLEX.GLOBAL/US | 800.989.8247 VOLUME 7

•

FEBRUARY 2020


LISONBEE ANGUS& O L D ROY D A N G U S present the

Angus in the Basin Bull Sale

M ARC H 16, 2020

S A LE T I M E : 1 PM ( MT ) • D UC H E SN E C O U N T Y F AIRG RO U N DS • D U CH E S N E , UT 50 ANGUS BULLS • 3 HEREFORD BULLS • 10 REGISTERED ANGUS FEMALES P LU S 2 0 CO M M E RCIAL YE AR LIN G FEMAL ES - OPEN AND READY TO BR E E D

Feat u ring t h e i n fl ue nc e of t he s e s i r e s !

SAV RA I N DANCE 6848

W E RN E R F L AT TO P 4136

3F EPIC 4631

CO NNEALY L EGENDARY BOY D 31Z BLUEPRIN T 6 1 5 3

L ISONBEE A NGUS J L

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

BUBS SOUTHERN C HA R M

2 1 2 S 1 9 3 0 W • Ro o s e ve l t , U T 8 4 0 6 6 (c) 435.724.2318 LisonbeeAngus@yahoo.com

O L D ROY D A N G U S 1 2 2 0 S 2 5 0 0 W • Ve rn a l , U T 8 4 0 7 8 (h) 435.789.2975 • (c) 435.828.5011 sandse@ubtanet.com

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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UDAF TO INCREASE FOCUS ON AGRICULTURAL ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ACROSS STATE In keeping with the goals set by Commissioner Kerry Gibson’s for the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food (UDAF) to act as “a service organization with regulatory responsibilities,” Gibson announced in January an expanded focus to include economic development. “We are going to put a laser focus on the financial health and viability of farmers and ranchers across the state,” he said. “We’ll work with industry partners as well as state, federal and non-profit organizations to find opportunities for Utah’s farmers and ranchers to strengthen the financial viability of their businesses.” To lead out on this effort, UDAF is pleased to announce the recent addition of Linda Clark Gillmor, as the new director of “Marketing & Agricultural Economic Development.” Linda has a lifetime of experience in agriculture production, product marketing and economic development. She and her husband, Jamie Gillmor, raised sheep and four children on their farms and desert permits near Delta and their summer lands near Morgan. In 2001, the Gillmor’s founded Morgan Valley Lamb, LLC, a marketing company created to sell locally-grown lamb to grocery stores and high-end restaurants. Linda also served as the economic development director for Millard County in 2007 and was asked to be the director of the Office of Rural Development at the Governor’s Office of Economic 58

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

Development in 2015. “I am excited for this opportunity to work with the UDAF and our partners to create a strategy for strengthening our agricultural sector,” says Gillmor. “As parts of our state see record economic growth and skyrocketing land prices, now more than ever our farming and ranching families need to find ways to remain viable in order to provide fiber and food for Utah’s growing population.”

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


BARKER CATTLE COMPANY

BULL AND FEMALE PRODUCTION SALE

Tuesday, February 25, 2020 Burley Livestock Auction, Burley, Idaho • 1:00  () Complimentary lunch served at 11:00 AM.

He Sells.

GA207

He Sells.

He Sells.

G14P

GDP240

SimAngus™ • JC Mr BSR Kahuna N163C son

Angus • EXAR Epic 6549B son

He Sells.

He Sells.

GC8383

SimAngus™ • Yardley Man of War B475 son

He Sells.

G68W

SimAngus™ • SLN Michigan 334Z son

GD06

SimAngus™ • JC Mr BSR Kahuna N163C son

SimAngus™ • TJ Diplomat 294D son

We focus on the TRAITS that PROFIT Western Cattlemen: Calving Ease • BW • WW • YW • API

Ruel & Tyler Barker 801-792-1036 801-372-0996

SALE MANAGED BY:

Tom & Sally Ottley 208-312-3085

Marty Ropp 406-581-7835 Corey Wilkins 256-590-2487 www.alliedgeneticresources.com

Braden Ottley 208-650-6295

www.barkercattle.com

Bowdrie Ottley 208-340-4464 tosalott@atcnet.net

Selling 90 Simmental, Angus and SimAngus™ Bulls 50 Simmental, Angus and SimAngus™ Yearling Heifers www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

59


e v i l s u Joirnonline! o WE HOPE TO SEE YOU AT THESE UPCOMING EVENTS... SHASTA LIVESTOCK AUCTION YARD, COTTONWOOD, CA CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE FEBRUARY 27

WYNDHAM HOTEL, VISALIA

BROADCAST ON DISH 998 • CONSIGNMENT DEADLINE MARCH 30

Family-owned and operated since 1989. We invite you to become a part of our family legacy.

60

BID LIVE OR ONLINE AT WWW.WVMCATTLE.COM

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


SHAW CATTLE CO.

Annual Bull Sale Wednesday, February 19, 2020

450 Angus, Hereford & Red Angus Bulls • 12 noon

MST,

at the ranch, Caldwell, ID

HELP IN G CUS TO ME R S BU I LD C O W H ER DS FOR OVER 7 0 YE ARS!  Our cow herd is built on cow families. Many half, three-quarter and full siblings are included.  All bulls sell with genomic-enhanced EPDs.  Data driven performance—accuracy your cow herd can depend on.  Cattle that calve easy with gain and performance through finish.  Actual Birth, Weaning and Yearling Weight data, EPDs and genomic testing, but most importantly…Cow Sense!

Hereford

• AI sires include: Mandate, Boom Town, Integrity, Trust 167, Excede, Mighty and Revolution 66128

Angus

• AI sires include: Achievement, Payweight, Dually, Powerball, Broken Bow, Command and Acclaim

Also selling

Red Angus

75 Angus & Hereford cows with black baldy calves at side

• AI sires include: Fusion, Oscar X28 and Premier 45C

25 F1 black baldy replacement heifers REQUEST YOUR CATALOG NOW. VISITORS ALWAYS WELCOME!

SHAW CATTLE CO. Since 1946

22993 Howe Road, Caldwell, ID 83607 greg@shawcattle.com www.shawcattle.com HEREFORD | ANGUS | RED ANGUS

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Greg Shaw Sam Shaw Tucker Shaw Ron Shurtz

(208) 459-3029 (208) 880-9044 (208) 899-0455 (208) 431-3311

 First Breeding Season Guarantee  Sight-unseen Purchases Fully Guaranteed  Family Owned & Operated for over 70 Years Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

61


BUILT-IN AND BETTER TODAY’S ANGUS CHECKING ALL THE BOXES by Certified Angus Beef ’s Miranda Reiman They think of everything these days! Seeing new car advertisements, that thought runs through my mind. With an active family, I can’t count the number of times there’s been an immediate mess—think sandbox remnants dumped out of tennis shoes or cereal spread across the floor—and I wished a vacuum cleaner would appear out of thin air. About the day after I first had that thought, I saw the brand new minivan with an integrated vacuum. I used to carry a power inverter in my SUV, so as I made the most of our miles traveled, I could plug in my laptop. Today I can leave that inverter at home. I have a 120-volt AC plugin right there on the console. In the automotive industry, I’m sure there’s a fair amount of logging and correlating specific requests and responding to drivers as they file complaints, but car designers must think years ahead. They must anticipate. It’s not a question of "what does the customer want today," but rather what WILL they want. Designers have to imagine life in the future. From cars that communicate with each other and avoid crashes to driverless vehicles, it’s hard to picture what I’ll be driving, or just riding in 10 years from now. The cattle business is much the same. When breeders select genetics, they’re incorporating needs of commercial cattle customers, from growth and performance to structural soundness and maternal traits. They’re responding to consumer demand with more marbling. These are all traits and opportunities that cattlemen have the ability to affect today. The rapid pace of improvement has been astonishing, but when I think about the cattle of the future, that’s when I get really excited. Imagine a world where you could select for stock that almost never get sick. It may seem like an impossibility today, but there’s early Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 62

work being done to characterize the genetics of increased immunity. Someday it could be as routine as placing pressure on lower birthweight or higher weaning weight. Genomic technology puts this research within reach, but could also make that real-time information applicable. Cattle could be treated differently based on their inherent risk category. In a world where pen riders aren’t getting any easier to find, where consumers are ever more concerned about animal welfare, this is the kind of development that could be a game changer long-term. Heat, fescue, altitude—our environmental challenges across cattle country are as diverse as our zip codes, but associations are working to provide tools to help tap the animals that work best in those scenarios. More information will allow for more informed decisions. The cattle of tomorrow are being bred with more and more precision, and the rate of improvement can increase. They’ll fit the places they live and the places they’re headed more and more predictably than today. And because demand signals simply work to reward progress with profits, they’ll continue to align with consumer preference for higher quality beef. That’s the kind of built-in that will build the future.

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


Direc t or of H erd Improv em ent. With more Angus influenced cattle qualifying for the Certified Angus Beef ® brand than ever before, it’s clear that the Angus bull has become America’s bull. He sires calving ease, growth and superior marbling. He works well in any environment, and on any cow, regardless of breed. Make sure that America’s bull serves as your director of herd improvement. Angus. America’s breed. Go to www.Angus.org/businessbreed or call 816.383.5100 to learn more.

Jake Pickering

Regional Manager 530.415.5484 jpickering@angus.org

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

63


PUBLIC LANDS RANCHERS APPLAUD ANNOUNCEMENT OF LONG OVERDUE NEPA RULES Ranchers across the country hailed a Jan. 9, announcement by President Trump that his Administration will promulgate new regulations to implement the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). “Over time, NEPA has evolved into a complex web of onerous processes and bureaucratic red tape,” said fifthgeneration Oregon rancher and Public Lands Council President Bob Skinner. “These sensible updates proposed by Council on Environmental Quality (CEQ) are welcome news to ranching families whose businesses have been impacted by the overwhelming and growing costs of NEPA compliance.” “Cattle producers across the country are grateful to President Trump and his team at CEQ for listening to rural America and providing this commonsense regulatory relief,” added National Cattlemen’s Beef Association 2020 UTAH ANGUS.pdf 1 1/20/20 12:28 PM President Jennifer Houston. “Cattlemen and women

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should get their voice on the record by submitting comments in favor of this rulemaking.” NEPA was first enacted in 1970 to “create and maintain conditions under which man and nature can exist in productive harmony,” and has not undergone substantive regulatory revision since 1986. Ranchers must undergo NEPA reviews for many reasons, but common examples include renewal of a term grazing permit, construction of range improvements, or to become eligible for participation in USDA programs. However, due to litigation, outside pressure, an abundance of caution, and a variety of other reasons, oftentimes these costly processes are further delayed and create an uncertain business environment for livestock producers. When finalized, the draft rules, also announced on Jan. 9,, will relieve that pressure, clarify exemptions and eliminate redundancies.

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


15th Annual

Intermountain Genetic Alliance multi-breed production sale • angus, simangus, and simmental

March 7, 2020 • 1 pm (mt) Juab County Fairgrounds • Nephi, UT PAP Tested • i50K Tested www.IGABulls.net

Featuring sons of these AI Sires

Tex Playbook

Capitalist

Optimizer

HA Cowboy Up

Monticeto

CCR Cowboy Cut

Anderson Angus Mike and Vicki Anderson 801-368-4131

Banks Simmental Lynn and Kathyrn Banks 801-592-0851

Blackett Angus Justin 435-660-0630 Brady 385-329-3149

Daniels Livestock Ben and Angie Daniels 208-241-6686

Lynn Angus Mike and Rachelle Lynn 435-660-9013

Miles High Angus Lane and Jayne Miles 435-823-3277

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

65


AGE OF ADVANCEMENT Furthering herd genetics one decision at a time from the American Gelbvieh Association

1. Thought-out Bull Selection

The majority of the genetic improvement in a commercial herd is the direct result of sire selection. In fact, 87.5 percent of the contributions to an animal’s pedigree come from the last three sires. Such a blunt figure makes it very clear that genetic selection decisions are very important. The first steps in bull selection: utilize expected progeny differences (EPDs), EPD accuracy, percentile rank, and genomicenhanced EPDs (GE-EPDs). Unlike raw performance data, EPDs can be used to compare animals across different years in the same herd, and even across animals in various years in different herds. EPDs also include not only the animal’s own performance but that of all closely linked relatives, including parents and siblings. The additional information used to compute EPDs makes them a great genetic selection tool to help minimize risk. Accuracy is another valuable tool that bull buyers can use to help reduce risk in selecting animals for their bull battery. Accuracy is often published below its corresponding EPD and is defined as the strength of the relationship between an EPD and a sire’s true genetic value. In other words, accuracy is an indicator of the reliability of an EPD. Percentile ranks compare an animal’s EPDs to similar animals, such as all Gelbvieh or Balancer non-parents for

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yearling bulls. These rankings can be incredibly useful for a potential buyer to see how a sale animal ranks against other animals they might be considering. Rankings range from 1-100, with 1 being more desirable. Seedstock producers utilize genomic testing to add reliability to selection tools for their customers. The addition of genomic data to an EPD calculation is comparable to adding another source of information, like progeny or pedigree records. Specifically on young animals with very little information, genomic data has the potential to greatly increase the accuracy of an EPD prediction. Confidence in an animal’s EPDs earlier in life means that buyers can more reliably predict the performance outcomes of using unproven animals in their breeding herd. Increasing accuracy on animals used for breeding stock is a great way to speed the rate of genetic progress in any herd.

2. Implement a Crossbreeding Program

Now more than ever, producers are trying to maximize outputs and herd performance all while reducing costs. One tool that has been utilized in the beef industry for several years, and one that has evident value in beef production is crossbreeding. ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 68

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GELBVIEH & BALANCER

®

Smart. Reliable. Profitable.

Gelbvieh and Balancer® genetics offer more pounds of calf weaned, added fertility, and greater cow herd longevity.

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

gelbvieh.org

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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 66 Crossbreeding provides increased performance with minimal, if any additional costs to the producer. Through the practice of crossbreeding, heterosis (or hybrid vigor) is achieved. When valuing heterosis, you essentially gain a dual advantage: individual heterosis and maternal heterosis. Individual heterosis results in an increase of calf survival to weaning, along with increased growth. Through crossbreeding, calves have been seen to have a 3.9 percent increase in weaning weight and a 2.6 percent increase in average daily gain, all which translates to increased profits. Maternal heterosis provides improved fertility, increased calf survivability, greater cow longevity, and more pounds of calf produced. A crossbred cow has been shown to have a 16.2 percent increase in longevity and has proven to stay in the herd longer than a straight-bred cow. She also has a 30 percent improvement in lifetime productivity and annual income improvement from heterosis of 23 percent. Utilizing crossbreeding systems also allows for the opportunity to capitalize on breed complementarity. This is the assessment of strengths and weaknesses of each breed type and applying those that complement each other. Breed complementarity is one of the best ways to describe the benefits of Balancer® cattle. Balancer animals are 25 to 75 percent Gelbvieh with the balance of Angus or Red Angus. They combine the Gelbvieh growth, muscle, leanness, fertility, longevity and low yield grading ability with the carcass qualities of Angus to make an animal that meets today’s modern industry demands. Balancer hybrids offer a simple and powerful way to maintain hybrid vigor and the proper combination of British and Continental genetics in your cowherd in a straightforward and easy crossbreeding system. 68

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Gelbvieh are also an ideal fit for a crossbreeding program because of their superior maternal characteristics such as longevity and fertility. Gelbvieh females are known for reaching puberty at an earlier age and remaining in the herd longer.

3. Manage Herd Data Smart Select Service, a data management system from the AGA, is built primarily for the commercial producer to identify strengths and weaknesses in their cows to make breeding decisions for genetic improvement. Smart Select Service helps commercial herds become more efficient and successful. Efficiency is becoming more important and crucial to the success of any cattle operation. Inefficiencies are identified by taking measurements and then utilizing the data, and Smart Select Service identifies that. Managing data can sound intimidating at times, but that is where the AGA comes in to help. The program does the data management, and the AGA staff is there to discuss the data and understand it. Users of Smart Select Service can track the data of their cowherd to assist them in making selection decisions with the goal of retaining the best females possible. At just $1 annual fee per head with no breed restrictions, it’s a cost-effective way to better understand and track the performance of individual animals and on a herd basis.

VOLUME 7

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T HE H EREFORD

U TAH A SSOCIATION

4 9 TH A N N UA L BULL SALE 3 0 B ULLS • 15 F EMALES M ARCH 7 • 1

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Selling 45 Head from these Progressive Hereford Breeders

O LIVER

P HIL A LLEN AND S ON , A NTIMONY • D ICK J ONES , O RANGEVILLE • K ENT H ASKELL , E LK R IDGE B ROTHERS , L EVAN • R ON AND D ERRICK R EED , L AS V EGAS • C HRISTENSEN F AMILY C ATTLE , C ENTRAL V ALLEY SIRED BY THESE BREED-LEADING BULLS!

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attleman

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UTAH’S TOP BEEF COUNTIES, THEIR SIMILARITIES AND DIFFERENCES •Utah’s No. 1 source of agriculture revenue • $400 million in cash reciepts annually at 21% of total ag market value. • State beef cow inventory of 810,000 • 11 million acres of farm ground • 16,000 farms and ranches • 6,458 of which raise cattle and calves. • Average size of 669 acres per operation.

• 33,000 head of beef cows • 10% of the state’s total beef herd. • With a population of almost 52,182 people, there could be one cow for every 1.58 people. • With 4.3 million acres in the county, every mother cow could have 130 acres to herself. • Main industries in Box Elder County are manufacturing, retail trade and health care and social assistance.

• 29,000 head of beef cows • 9% of the state’s total beef herd. • With a population of almost 2,400 people, the number of cows outnumbers people by 12 to 1 • With 695,000 acres in the county, that could equal 23 acres per cow. • While it seems most residents in Rich County are connected to agriculture, the main industries in Rich County are reported as retail trade, educational services and agriculture, forestry, fishing and hunting,

• 24,500 head of beef cows • 7.6% of the state’s total beef herd. • With a population of just over 20,000 people, the number of cows ot people is almost even 1.2 cows per person • With 2.08 million acres in the county, every mother cow could have 84 acres to herself. • Top industries in Duchesne County are mining, quarrying and oil and gas extraction, health care and social assistance and educational services. 72

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CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk Marb RE $M $W +13 +1.2 +68 +124 +1.56 +28 +36 +.51 +.59 +73 +89

$F $B +94 +138

CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk Marb RE $M $W $F $B +5 +1.8 +69 +132 +.48 +18 +21 +.92 +.81 +65 +61 +104 +179

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

CED BW WW YW SC Doc Milk Marb RE $M $W $F $B +16 -2.1 +84 +139 +.59 +20 +26 +.73 +.84 +71 +95 +108 +170

CED BW WW YW MA CEM SC DOC +12 +0.6 +74 +115 +12 +6 +0.4 +13

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USU EXTENSION RECEIVES GRANT FOR TRAINING NEXT GENERATION OF FARMERS a transition plan to keep their businesses operating,” Curtis said. “In Utah, the average specialty crop farmer is 60 years old – four years older than the national average. That’s why USU is providing programming and services to increase the number of new producers.” This project places a special focus on Native American and refugee beginning farmers as well as high school students involved in FFA and 4-H. A total of 65 new refugee farmers, 16 Native American farmers, and 250 agricultural students will be served by the project. USU Extension will partner with New Roots, an agriculture and food access program that already provides farmer training for refugees and immigrants. USU Extension will use this grant to further expand New Roots by providing additional land and the resources needed to make this program accessible to additional

refugee farmers in the Salt Lake area. Additionally, two incubator sites in rural areas will be focused on assisting Native American farmers with their operations. High school students involved with FFA and 4-H will receive instruction at farm demonstration sites and will receive training for and assistance with urban farming projects. “This project will lead to increased understanding of smallscale farming systems and provide important economic development and access to fresh produce in rural areas,” Curtis said. “Leveraging the agricultural expertise of USU Extension faculty and staff, and drawing on their statewide resources, this collaboration will have positive benefits for generations to come.” For more information about USU Extension programs, visit extension. usu.edu.

administration, especially the trade On Jan. 16, the U.S. Senate approved implementing legislation for experts within USTR and USDA, for their tireless efforts to ratify the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) just one day after President USMCA, which bolsters our position as a reliable supplier to two leading Trump and Chinese Vice Premier Liu markets that account for about onesigned the U.S. - China “Phase One” trade agreement. third of all U.S. red meat exports. U.S. Meat Export Federation Shipments to Mexico and Canada in 2019 totaled about 1.25 million metric (USMEF) President and CEO Dan tons valued at $3.8 billion, and the Halstrom issued a statement on the U.S. red meat industry looks forward Senate’s decision thanking all parties to many years of further growth.” for their swift actions on the matter. “The U.S. Senate moving quickly Regarding Phase One of the agreement with China, USMEF’s to approve USMCA reaffirms the Halstrom had this to say: United States’ commitment to two “For the U.S. pork and beef key trading partners, both of which are very important destinations industries to expand their business in China, the world’s largest and fastestfor U.S. pork, beef and lamb.” growing destination for imported Halmstrom said. “USMEF applauds Congressional leaders and the Trump red meat, it is critically important Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 74

that China follows international standards for pork and beef trade. The Phase One trade agreement lays important groundwork toward this goal, and USMEF thanks the Trump administration for addressing the barriers that have hampered U.S. pork and beef exports to China for many years.” Additionally Halmstrom said, “Last year China’s red meat imports exceeded $14 billion, a 65 percent increase from 2018. The U.S. industry looks forward to capturing a greater share of this rapidly growing market.” The office of the U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) has posted the agreement text and related fact sheets for the Chinese deal online for those interested in learning details.

Utah State University Extension recently received a grant worth $599,615 from the Beginning Farmer and Rancher Development Program to help increase the number of beginning farmers in the Mountain West. The grant, provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s National Institute of Food and Agriculture, will be used to establish three farm incubator sites across Utah that will include space for demonstration gardens. The grant will also cover workshops and training designed to increase understanding, knowledge and success for future and current farmers. According to Kynda Curtis, USU Extension food and agricultural marketing specialist, this grant comes at an important time for Utah agriculture. “Increasingly, farmers nationwide are reaching retirement without

USMEF PLEASED BY TRADE PROGRESS INVOLVING MEXICO, CANADA AND CHINA

VOLUME 7

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March 21, 2020 – 1 p.m. Anderson Livestock Auction Willard, UT

TEX PLAYBOOK 5437 KCF BENNETT FORTRESS 2-Year-Old Bulls – Yearling Bulls – Open Heifers – Bred Cows & Heifers

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NEW BEEFMASTER COMMERCIAL TOOL

IGENITY BEEFMASTER

by Beefmaster Breeders United Director of Breed Improvement Lance Bauer

A seedstock producer’s main goal is to produce animals that will help the commercial cattleman increase his profits and continually improve his cattle. Seedstock producers should be making choices to improve their cattle, so that the commercial cowman can use those cattle to improve his herd. Seedstock producers regularly select cattle for performance and they use expected progeny differences (EPDs) to help improve in areas that their herd is lacking. Commercial cattlemen can use EPDs to select bulls with the performance they need to work on their cow base. With Beefmaster bulls many of these cattlemen are retaining the heifers and using them as replacements. What if there was a way to offer the commercial cattle producer another selection tool for these replacement females? There is now a way! Beefmaster Breeders United (BBU) is releasing a commercial female chip that will be a tool for selecting commercial females, that are at least 50 percent Beefmaster. This new way is called Igenity Beefmaster and it is a product that will be offered by BBU as another selection tool for commercial producers. This product will calculate molecular breeding values (MBVs) on heifers that are at least 50 percent Beefmaster, for the traits that have EPDs. These MBVs will be in a format of a score from 1-10. There will also be a Maternal Advantage Index and Terminal Advantage Index. The Maternal Advantage will be based on $M and the Terminal Advantage based on $T. The Maternal and Terminal Advantage indexes will be on a dollar basis. These are added selection tools that can be used to help determine which heifers to keep back for replacements. It is also information that can be used to help sell commercial females, if they have the chip run on them. The MBVs are derived from the BBU genomic evaluation, that is run twice a year, and they provide another tool for selecting heifers that perform well, thus making the best replacements. Igenity Beefmaster can also be used as a tool when marketing commercial heifers. Producers can run the Igenity Beefmaster chip on their heifers and use the results to help add value to replacement females that are being marketed. Beefmaster breeders will be promoting this test to their commercial bull customers so that they can utilize this tool. Commercial producers should add this tool to their toolbox and use it Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 76

in selection decisions. Animals with scores higher than five are better for the trait that is being evaluated. T he Maternal and Terminal Advantages are in dollars, so the higher the dollar value the more valuable the heifer is for breeding. This tool can also be used to identify the sire of commercial females, which is great for the commercial cattleman. For example, if a cowman has five bulls with a group of cows and one of those bulls doesn’t sire any calves, he knows that he has an issue. He can also identify which of the bulls produces the most replacement heifers and continue to use that bull to build a cow base. The commercial cattleman will also have an idea of where his cows stand and what traits to select for in a bull to compliment his cows. The Igenity Beefmaster Commercial Heifer chip is a great new tool for the commercial producer and is also valuable in marketing commercial females that are at least one half Beefmaster. This product gives the producer a set of MBVs on a 1-10 scale that can be added to the toolbox as an addition selection tool. When the bulls being used have DNA on them the producer can also identify those higher performing bulls, as well as bulls that do not breed as many cows. This is a great product for all commercial bull customers to use and add more data to their cow herd. Igenity Beefmaster will be available to order from Beefmaster Breeders United for $25 per chip, for more information contact the BBU office at 210-732-3132 or contact directly Lance Bauer at lbauer@beefmasters.org or Dusty Pendergrass at dpendergrass@beefmasters.org.

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it’s called

adaptability. Beefmaster Calf, Oregon

Nothing is more adaptable than a Beefmaster.

Beefmaster Heifers Excel in Efficiency Beefmaster

Angus

Weaning weight

557

500

Residual Feed Intake

-0.41

+0.47

Beefmaster-sired heifers outpaced Angus-sired heifers, posting a superior weaning weight and RFI score of -0.41 on a GrowSafe System.

Developed in the 1930s to thrive in the South Texas brush country, the breed is an American original: Tough, productive, efficient. But the Beefmaster is also more relevant today than ever. Research shows the breed ranks above all others for feed efficiency, one of the most important production traits. So if your cow herd has lost its ability to adapt to changing times or challenging environmental conditions, turn out registered Beefmaster bulls.

Beefmaster: Built for Adaptability.

210.732.3132 • beefmasters.org www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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Understanding Calving Ease EPDs by Dan Moser for the Angus Journal

Since 2005, the American Angus Association has published EPDs for calving ease direct and calving ease maternal. Prior to that date, only birth weight EPDs were available to improve calving ease in Angus cattle. Compared with selection on birth weight (BW) expected progeny differences (EPDs), use of calving ease direct (CED) and calving ease maternal (CEM) EPDs offer several advantages. To make the most effective use of these tools, it’s helpful to understand a few relevant details. Calving ease is scored on a scale from 1 to 5. A score of 1 represents an unassisted calving, 2 is some assistance, 3 is mechanical assistance, 4 is a C-section, and 5 is an abnormal presentation. In the genetic evaluation, abnormal presentations are removed from the evaluation, because generally calves that come backwards or upside down are not the result of genetics, just random chance. Type of assistance provided may vary across operations. Accordingly, scores of 2, 3 and 4 are combined, so the data in the evaluation considers calves as assisted or unassisted. While the economically relevant trait to a commercial rancher is whether the calf required assistance or not, birth weight is a highly useful indicator trait. Birth weight is the most significant factor influencing calving ease. The genetic correlation between calving ease score and birth weight in the Angus genetic evaluation is fairly strong: 0.65. This indicates as birth weight increases, there is a strong tendency for greater calving difficulty, reflected in higher calving ease scores. For this reason, birth weight data is used in the CED and CEM EPD calculations as a correlated trait. Worth noting is that while breeders are encouraged to report calving ease scores on all calves, only the scores from calves born to first-calf heifers are used in the evaluation. The incidence of assisted calvings in older Angus females is so low, there would be no benefit to including that data in the evaluation. However, all birth weights are included in the CED and CEM calculations. Accordingly, if a bull is used initially only on mature cows, and the resulting calves are lighter than expected, his CED EPD will increase.

used the same as other EPDs. If Sire A has a CED EPD of 8 and Sire B has a CED EPD of 3, you would expect 5 percentage points less calving difficulty when similar heifers raised and calved in similar environments are bred to Sire A versus Sire B. In a herd with very little calving difficulty, if heifers bred to Sire A require assistance at calving 4 percent of the time, similar heifers bred to Sire B might require assistance at 9 percent of calvings. In a herd with more calving difficulty due to genetics, environment, or both, if heifers bred to Sire A require ....CONTINUED ON PAGE 80

USING CED AND CEM

It’s important to understand that while CED and CEM EPDs are expressed in percentage units, they are

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VOLUME 7

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The Brand That Covers the Nation Tuesday

March 3, 2020 Noon • Baker City, Oregon 200 BULLS & 75 FEMALES Thomas Niagara 91006

Thomas Complement T8273

CED I+1 BW I+.1 WW I+57 YW I+108

Milk I+27 MRB I+.83 RE I+.50 $B +165

Sire: Plattemere Weigh Up K360 • Dam’s Sire: Mytty In Focus

Thomas Discovery 8531

CED +9 BW -1.1 WW +72 YW +136

CED +4 BW +.9 WW +69 YW +131

Sire: SS Niagara Z29 • Dam’s Sire: WR Journey-1X74

Thomas South Side T8260

CED I+5 BW I+2.5 WW I+69 YW I+126

Milk +32 MRB +1.26 RE +.47 $B +178

Sire: VAR Discovery 2240 • Dam’s Sire: KCF Bennett Absolute

Milk +34 MRB +.80 RE +.69 $B +154

Milk I+29 MRB I+.63 RE I+.47 $B +149

Sire: KCF Benett Southside • Dam’s Sire: EXAR Upshot 0562B

Thomas Sure Fire 8626 42734 Old Trail Rd. • Baker City, OR 97814 Rob & Lori Thomas - Office: (541) 524-9322 Rob’s Cell: (541) 403-0562 • Lori’s Cell: (541) 403-0561 Cole Owens, Marketing Specialist & Cooperative Manager: (918) 418-7349 www.thomasangusranch.com • thomasangus@thomasangusranch.com

Sale Managed By:

also join us

Tuesday

March 24, 2020

Twin Falls, Idaho 100 BULLS

CED +8 BW +1.5 WW +64 YW +106

Milk +27 MRB +.82 RE +.75 $B +157

Sire: GAR Sure Fire • Dam’s Sire: Baldridge Waylon W34


...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 78 assistance 12 percent of the time, you’d expect assistance to be required 17 percent of the time when the heifers are bred to Sire B. In any case, differences are additive just like EPDs for growth traits expressed in pounds, not multiplicative. Most likely one of the most misunderstood values provided in the Angus genetic evaluation is the CEM EPD. Producers understand how important it is to maintain and improve the ability of females to calve, through increased pelvic area and other factors. CEM EPDs reflect the total difference in a sire’s daughters’ ability to calve unassisted. Those daughters’ assistance rate is due to both direct and maternal effects. Sires with greater CED transmit half that advantage to their daughters, and that in turn influences the size of the daughters’ calves. The CEM EPD combines the CED value with the maternal-only effect from the genetic evaluation, using the following equation, CEM EPD = CED EPD + MCE EPD, where MCE EPD is the maternal-only effect on calving ease. So CEM is not a maternal-only calving ease prediction, instead it combines direct and maternal effects to predict the rate of observed calving CHART 1. difficulty in a sire’s daughters. While the maternal-only value is not printed in beef genetic evaluation results, it can be determined with some simple algebra in a spreadsheet: MCE EPD = CEM EPD – CED EPD It might be interesting for Angus breeders who want to emphasize maternal calving ability to look at this value on their artificial insemination (AI) sires. A bull that is exceptionally high for CED can have an

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average or better CEM EPD, while the true maternal effect his daughters express is rather unfavorable. The graph shown below demonstrates documented Angus genetic trends for several calving-related traits over the last 15 years. On the left axis, average CED and CEM EPD are plotted by birth year, along with the MCE maternal-only effect on calving ease. Average BW EPD by birth year is plotted to the right axis. You can see through selection, Angus breeders have increased CED and decreased BW, but CEM and MCE are largely unchanged. The slight increase in CEM is mostly due to reduction in calf size (CED), not improved maternal ability to calve unassisted. Occasionally, members ask if selection for higher CED will ultimately result in reduced maternal ability to calve unassisted. In the Angus genetic evaluation, the genetic correlation between direct and maternal (only) calving ease is -0.06, very near zero. One wouldn’t expect selection on CED to have a significant effect on maternal calving ability. But the benefit of having a calving ease evaluation, as opposed to only birth weight, is that the maternal component of calving ease is part of the evaluation, and can be included in selection.

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Cow Sense & Science T H E W H O L E I S G R E AT E R T H A N T H E PA R T S

888.333.1783 // www.genex.coop www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org © 2020 Genex Cooperative. All rights reserved.

A-22216-20

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BACK TO THE BASICS Applying Principles of Crossbreeding to Maximize Hybrid Vigor by USU Extension Personnel Matthew Garcia, C. Kim Chapman, and Deric Despain One of the most powerful tools available to cattle producers to improve productivity and efficiency in a herd is the use of crossbreeding. Effective use of a crossbreeding system allows producers to take advantage of heterosis (hybrid vigor), breed complementarity, and biological breed type differences to match cattle to specific production resources. Failure to adequately implement a proper crossbreeding program can potentially decrease the level of hybrid vigor observed. Improper implementation with no regard to breed complementarity or breed background of the breeding herd can lead to a herd which lacks both uniformity and the ability to produce under a given set of available resources. HETEROSIS Heterosis is the superior performance of a crossbred or hybrid offspring over the average of the parental breeds. It can have a marked effect on profitability and productivity in a cattle operation. Heterosis, or hybrid vigor, is greatest when crossing two parent animals of completely different breed backgrounds. Hybrid vigor can be exhibited through a variety of traits such as increased survivability and growth of crossbred calves or higher reproduction rates of crossbred cows. The major factor that leads a producer to enter a crossbreeding system should be to optimize cattle performance and efficiency in a specific production environment. The amount of heterosis that is maintained in a herd depends on the type of crossbreeding system the producer implements and the number of breeds being incorporated into the crossbreeding system. BREED DIFFERENCES AND BREED COMPLEMENTARITY Generally speaking, the amount of variability between breeds for most traits is comparable to the amount of variability one would expect to find between individuals within a breed. All breeds manifest superiority in some of the economically important traits, but no breed can boast excellence in all traits. A crossbreeding program should be designed to capitalize on those traits that each of the parent breeds bring to the mix. This is known as breed Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 82

complementarity, or a mating that will generate a hybrid offspring that is overall superior in a specific production environment than the parents. Breed complementarity helps match the genetic potential for all the economically important traits such as growth rate and carcass composition with climate, feed resources, fertility, disease resistance and market preferences. Simply put, breed complementarity means that the strengths of one breed can complement or mask the weaknesses of another breed in the hybrid offspring. In poorly conceived crossbreeding programs, breed complementarity could have negative effects on productivity. For example, if a large, paternal sire breed with large milk potential were bred to small framed, heifers on a limited forage system, this could result in dystocia and replacement animals being incorporated that were not compatible with the producer’s resources. Cattle breeds can be separated into different biological types, with each type exhibiting differing levels of production for various production characteristics. One excellent crossbreeding example that maximizes breed complementarity of different biological types is very common in the Southeastern United States. A Hereford or Angus bull is bred to Brahman cows to produce a medium framed, moderate milking F1 female that will be breed back to a Bos Taurus type bull. These F1 females are ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 84

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Join Us the First Thursday in March

March 5: Preston, ID

lunch 11 a.m. Sale 12 p.m.

cache VaLLeY BULL saLe seLLIng a stoUt set of Late faLL anD earLY sPrIng YearLIng angUs BULLs

Outstanding Phenotype, Genetically Elite, Sound, Deep & Functional ThESE BullS anD MOrE SEll By BrEED-lEaDinG SirES ...

Preston, IDaho As 4th generation Preston, Idaho, cattle ranchers, we are building our family legacy as we take a systematic approach with sound judgement, balanced eye-appeal, and functional cattle that will thrive in our rigid conditions. Our cowherd is backed with performance, carcass and maternal traits so we can sell bulls that thrive in the commercial industry from conception to consumption. We take cattle ranching back to the basics of good-footed, hearty cows producing soggy calves every year!

Tattoo 504 by Bronc

Tattoo 544 by Playbook

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BW -.2 RE +.39

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SIRE: BALDRIDGE BRonC

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SIRE: BALDRIDGE BRonC CED +16 MARB +.47

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Tattoo 538 by Pay Raise

Tattoo 577 by Gold Rush

SIRE: EZAR GoLD RuSh 6001

saLe Manager Matt Macfarlane: 916-803-3113 m3cattlemarketing@gmail.com

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THD ©

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MILK +18 $B +193

SIRE: ICC PAY RAISE 4886 CED BW WW +6 +1.6 +62 MARB RE $W Utah C+.90 attleman +.70Seedstock +45

YW +121 $F Edition +90

AAA *17974692 SC +1.54 $G +26

MILK +19 $B +115

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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 82 more heat and parasite resistant than their Bos Taurus sire breed but are more early maturing sexually and will produce calves with better carcass quality than their Bos Indicus dam breed. CROSSBREEDING SYSTEMS Crossbreeding systems use heterosis, biological type breed differences, and breed complementarity with varying degrees of success. The main goal of any crossbreeding system is not only to maximize hybrid vigor but to retain high levels of hybrid vigor for multiple generations. Table 1 illustrates how multiple breed crossbreeding systems maximize retained hybrid vigor (RHV). Table 2 demonstrates how RHV works in a three-breed rotational crossbreeding system using Charolais as the base herd. ROTATIONAL CROSSBREEDING Rotational crossbreeding systems are the most common and easiest to implement systems. These include the two-breed rotation, three-breed rotation and two-breed rotation with mature cows being bred to a terminal sire breed. In the two-breed rotation, cows sired by breed A are bred to bulls from breed B, and cows sired by breed B are bred to bulls from breed A (Fig. 1). The three-breed rotation simply adds a third breed (breed C) into the rotation (Fig. 2). The two- and three-breed systems do require record keeping and additional breeding pastures to ensure the cows are bred by the correct bull breed. Another rotational cross that adds a slight variation accompanied by increased performance is the twobreed rotation crossed to a terminal sire breed (Fig.3). In this system, first-calf heifers and second- calf cows that meet the producers’ selection criteria are retained in the two-breed rotation while all mature cows are bred to sires of a terminal breed. All offspring from the mature cows are marketed and none are retained in the breeding herd. This system retains as high a percentage of heterosis as any rotational cross while taking greater advantage of complementarity. 84

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FIGURE 1. Two-Breed Rotation ROTATIONAL-IN-TIME CROSSBREEDING SYSTEMS A rotation-in-time crossbreeding system incorporates a new breed bull into the system every one or two years. For example, in year 1 an Angus bull would be mated to the herd, year 2 a Hereford bull, year 3 a Shorthorn bull, and year 4 a Simmental bull utilized. In this system bulls are introduced in yearly sequences in order FIGURE 2. Three-Breed Rotation maintain high levels of RHV and to minimize one specific breed becoming dominant in the herd. Although, this crossbreeding strategy is extremely effective at high levels of hybrid vigor, effective use of bulls may become an issue. With bulls being introduced in yearly sequences, a producer must obtain new breed bull types frequently and may be maintaining bulls of specific breeds that may not be in the breeding sequence for that FIGURE 2. Two-breed rotation with year. Thus, the cost to purchase mature cows bred to a terminal bull. or maintain bulls that are not being utilized in the system can become costly if many breeds are incorporated into the rotation in time crossbreeding system. SPATIAL CROSSBREEDING SYSTEMS A spatial crossbreeding strategy is very similar to a rotation-in-time strategy except all breed bulls are utilized at the same time but are separated by pasture. In this system where three different breed bulls are utilized, the initial cow herd would be separated and put into bull pastures based off of which bull breed they share the least amount of breed background with. Each year replacement females that are to be kept for breeding will move out of the pasture in which their mothers were bred and will be placed with a bull in which they share the lease amount of breed background. While this system also maintains a high level of RHV, and utilizes bulls simultaneously throughout the breeding season, it is not without its disadvantages. The

major disadvantage in this type of system is that a producer must have the land/pasture resources, and labor to separate and maintain multiple breeding herds throughout the breeding season. COMPOSITE POPULATIONS Composite breeds are designed to maintain high levels of RHV without further crossbreeding. Composite breeds, or American breeds as they ...CONTINUED ON PAGE 86 VOLUME 7

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...CONTINUED FROM PAGE 84 are commonly referred to, typically have a defined proportion of two or more breeds in their background (Beefmaster, Santa Gertrudis etc). Just as with traditional crossbreeding systems the more breeds in the background, the higher level of RHV that will be observed. An example of developing a four-breed composite is seen in Fig. 4. The development phase of this crossing scheme is quite complex. However, after development the herd can be managed as a purebred herd. Composite populations can maintain a relatively high amount of heterosis, providing there is an adequate population size to select replacements and new sires to avoid inbreeding. Additionally, you will note that composite populations also make effective use of additive breed effects and complementarity in addition to heterosis to achieve increased productivity. Although these populations have a high level of RHV without further crossbreeding there are some disadvantages to composite breeds. The first is that if the composite is not widely utilized replacements and bulls from outside the producers herd may be difficult to locate, thus leading to inbreeding. The second major disadvantage has to do with the defined breed proportions that make up composite breeds. If the breeder decides they would like to regenerate a new line of the composite it will take many generations to generate the composite with the specific breed proportions of

its ancestors.

SUMMARY Crossbreeding can be a powerful tool to improve the productivity and profitability of a beef cattle operation when it is used correctly. Conversely, it can reduce profitability if it is not contemplated fully before implementation. Regardless of what type of crossbreeding system is decided upon, the producer must plan ahead for several generations, and not just for a few years. Initial decisions made at the outset of a program will impact the operation for many years to come. No single crossbreeding system should be expected to fit every commercial cattle operation. When embarking FIGURE 4. Four-breed composite population on a crossbreeding program development 1/4A, 1/4B, 1/4C, 1/4D. each of the following facets must be either resolved, or at use of AI can be debated in terms least thoroughly considered of cost effectiveness. Furthermore, for the program to be implemented in any AI program clean up bulls successfully: still need to be utilized to achieve • Number of breeding pastures desirable conception rates, and the needed. level of hybrid vigor is not going • How replacement heifers will be to be measurably different between obtained or selected. live cover and AI calves • Optimum herd size. • Biological type and source of Perhaps the most important breeds to be used. question that must be answered after • Source of bulls. careful consideration of the above is • Feed resources required. whether the new system will fit the • Availability of labor. resources available to the operator. • Potential use and feasibility of If all of these can be resolved, artificial insemination? The use of the producer can move forward AI in crossbreeding systems would with confidence toward optimal need to be evaluated further as the production and profitability.

TABLE 1. Expected levels of heterosis, use of breed effect, and complementarity for various crossbreeding systems.

TABLE 2. Levels of retained hybrid vigor in a three-breed rotational crossbreeding system with a charolais based female herd in generation.

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FEBRUARY 2020


Clint Brightwell

Ariz., Calif., Idaho, Nev., Ore., Utah and Wash. 417-359-6893 • cbrightwell@hereford.org

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

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2020 CATTLEMEN’S CALENDAR Cattle Sale listed in this calendar are advertisers withtin this annual seedstock edition of the Utah Cattleman DATE

CATTLE OPERATION

Feb. 19 Shaw Cattle Co Feb. 21 Diamond Peak Cattle Co. Feb. 24 Colyer Herefords and Angus Feb. 25 Barker Cattle Co Feb. 28 Pot of Gold Bull Sale Feb. 29 Lyman Livestock Feb. 29 RV Bar Ranch Feb. 29 Winnemucca Ranch Horse Sale March 3 Ipsen Cattle Co March 3 Thomas Angus Ranch March 4 Adams Angus Connection March 5 Cannon Angus Ranch March 6 Western Video Market March 7 Lazy JB Angus March 7 Intermountain Genetic Alliance March 7 Utah Hereford Association March 11 Udy Cattle Co. March 11 Sitz Angus Ranch March 13 Keller Cattle Corp. March 13 Loveless Gelbvieh March 13 Quest of the West Sale March 14 Riverbend Ranch March 16 Angus in the Basin Sale March 21 Nelson Angus Ranch March 21 Utah Beef Improvement Association March 21 R and R Genetics

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

LOCATION

BREED(S)

SALE TYPE

Caldwell, ID Angus, Hereford, Red Angus Production Sale La Junta, CO Angus Production Sale Bruneau, ID Angus, Hereford Production Sale Burley, ID Angus, SimAngus Production Sale Montrose, CO Gelbvieh, Balancer Production Sale Salina, UT Angus, SimAngus, Simmental, Balancer Production Sale Vernal, UT Angus Production Sale Winnemucca, NV Horse Consignment Sale Dingle, ID Angus, Hereford Online Production Sale Baker City, OR Angus Production Sale Blackfoot, ID Angus, Limousin, LimFlex Production Sale Preston, ID Angus Production Sale Cottonwood, CA Commercial Online Consignment Sale Montrose, CO Angus Production Sale Nephi, UT Angus, SimAngus, Simmental Production Sale Salina, UT Hereford Consignment Sale Rockland, ID Angus, Hereford, Red Angus Production Sale Dillon, MT Angus Production Sale Tremonton, UT Angus Production Sale Spanish Fork, UT Gelbvieh, Balancer Production Sale Spanish Fork, UT Angus, Balancer, Gelbvieh, SimAngus Production Sale Idaho Falls, ID Angus Production Sale Duchesne, UT Angus, Hereford Production Sale Salmon, ID Angus Production Sale Salina, Utah Multi Breed Consignment Sale Tremonton, UT Angus, SimAngus Production Sale

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


DATE

March 21 March 27 March 28 April 3 April 11 April 18 April 27

CATTLE OPERATION Ward Angus Ranch Vertical Edge Cattl Co T-Heart Ranch Utah Angus Association Red Ranches Bar T Bar Ranches Rees Bros. McPherson Farms Johansen Herefords Robins Nest Angus Ranch Phil Allen and Son Gillespie Angus Fullmer Crescent Moon Shandar Angus Ranch ABN Ranch Ekker Herefords

LOCATION

BREED(S)

SALE TYPE

Willard, UT Angus Production Sale Bancroft, ID Angus, SimAngus, Fleckvieh Production Sale LaGarita, CO SimAngus, Simmental Production Sale Ogden, UT Angus Consignment Sale Paradox, CO Angus, Red Angus Production Sale Winslow, AZ Angus, Red Angus, Balancer, Gelbvieh Production Sale Morgan, UT Angus, Hereford Production Sale Nephi, UT Angus Private Treaty/Consignment Castle Dale, UT Horned Hereford Private Treaty/Consignment Salina, UT Angus Private Treaty/Consignment Anitmony, UT Polled Hereford Private Treaty/Consignment Mt Pleasant, UT Angus Private Treaty/Consignment Sigurd, UT Angus Private Treaty/Consignment Payson, UT Angus Private Treaty/Consignment Hatch, UT Wagyu Private Treaty/Consignment Vernon, UT Horned Hereford Private Treaty/Consignment

For additional information on any of the industy events below, contact the Utah Cattlemen’s Association. DATE

EVENT

Feb. 5-7 Cattle Industry Convention & NCBA Trade Show March 25 March 31 - April 2 July 27-30 September 2020 Dec. 2-4

www.UTAHCATTLEMEN.org

LOCATION San Antonio, Texas

Utah Beef Field Day NCBA Legislative Confernce NCBA Summer Meetings

Logan Washington, D.C. Denver, Colo.

Public Lands Council Annual Meeting Specific date and location to be determined Utah Cattlemen’s Association Annual Convention

Oregon Salt Lake City

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ABN Ranch Wagyu Cattle............................................................94 Advanced Breeding Systems (ABS)............................................29 All West/Select Sires......................................................................48 Allflex, USA....................................................................................56 Amereican Gelbvieh Association................................................67 American Angus Association......................................................63 American Hereford Association..................................................87 American Simmental Association...............................................53 Angus in the Basin Bull Sale........................................................57 Bar T Bar Ranches.........................................................................85 Barker Cattle Company................................................................59 Beefmaster Breeders United.........................................................77 Biozyme..........................................................................................70 Callicrate Banders.........................................................................30 Cannon Angus Ranch...................................................................83 Colyer Hereford & Angus............................................................51 Covington Gelbvieh......................................................................47 Diamond Peak Cattle....................................................................41 Ekker Herefords.............................................................................96 Fullmer Farms................................................................................11 Genex..............................................................................................81 Gillespie Livestock.........................................................................19 Hoffman AI....................................................................................58 Intermountain Embryonics..........................................................71 intermountain Farmer’s Association.................................... 22, 23 Intermountain Genetic Alliance..................................................65 Ipsen Cattle Company..................................................................37 Johansen Herefords.....................................................................6, 7 Keller Cattle Corporation.............................................................21 Lazy JB Angus................................................................................50 Lisonbee Angus.............................................................................57 Loveless Gelbvieh..........................................................................35 Lovell Semen Services...................................................................30

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Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

Lyman Livestock..............................................................................3 Maple Leaf Seed Company...........................................................40 McPherson Farms...........................................................................5 National Cattlemen’s Beef Association.......................................25 Nelson Angus Ranch.............................................................. 12, 13 Oldroyd Angus..............................................................................57 Phil Allen and Son.........................................................................16 Pot of Gold Sale.............................................................................47 Quest of the West Cattle Sale.......................................................93 R & R Genetics...............................................................................55 Redd Ranches...................................................................................2 Rees Bros........................................................................................39 Riverbend Ranch...........................................................................49 Robbin’s Next Angus Ranch.........................................................10 RV Bar Angus..................................................................................9 Scales Northwest............................................................................95 Shandar Angus Ranch..................................................................43 Shaw Cattle Co...............................................................................61 Sitz Angus.......................................................................................33 T Heart Simmentals......................................................................31 The Adams Connection................................................................73 Thomas Angus Ranch...................................................................79 Udy Cattle Company.....................................................................27 Utah Angus Association...............................................................64 Utah Beef Council.........................................................................44 Utah Beef Improvement Association..........................................17 Utah Hereford Association..........................................................69 Vertical Edge Genetics..................................................................45 Ward Angus Ranch.......................................................................75 Western Livestock Journal...........................................................89 Western Video Market..................................................................60 Winnemucca Ranch Rodeo Weekend........................................88 Zoetis...............................................................................................34

VOLUME 7

FEBRUARY 2020


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ABN RANCH WAGYU CATTLE PROFIT MARBLING CALVING EASE Bulls - Semen - Embryos

INCREASE CARCASS VALUE IN ONE GENERATION Why Wagyu?

Wagyu and Wagyu influenced beef improves meat quality across all grades. Half Wagyu progeny can bring a premium price at weaning.

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94

BIG AL

RUESHAW

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition

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Herd Bulls!

H5 161 Advance 586 • 43589508 (bw)+3.5 (ww)+64 (yw)+106 (m)+27 (mg)+59 (sc)+1.5 (re)+.59 586 was our selection out of Harrell Herefords’ sale in Oregon. He is a classy made, fully pigmented, correct bull backed by one of Harrell’s best cow families. EH Advance 757E • 43803478 (bw)+3.3 (ww)+58 (yw)+94 (m)+26 (mg)+55 (sc)+0.9 (re)+.44 757E is pictured below servicing heifers. He’s a very attractive son of 586 out of a really nice Yankee daughter. We are anxiously awaiting his first crop this spring and look to the future with this young sire!

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FEBRUARY 2020

Profile for Logan Ipsen

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 2020  

The 7th Volume of the Seedstock Edition for the Utah Cattlemen's Association.

Utah Cattleman Seedstock Edition 2020  

The 7th Volume of the Seedstock Edition for the Utah Cattlemen's Association.

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